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families today PENINSULA

A special supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette

CELEBRATE AUTUMN Find out why leaves turn red, yellow and orange during the fall — Page 8 A listing of autumn and Halloween-themed events across the Olympic Peninsula — Page 12 Cold-weather superfoods the entire family will enjoy — Page 15

October 2016 volume 6, issue 4


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Peninsula Families Today is a family-focused publication and is inserted into both the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette. Please let us know what you’d like to see in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today. This publication welcomes input and new contributors. Educators, parents and professionals in their fields are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit it. Send articles, columns and photos (JPEGs at 200 dpi minimum) to section editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com. For details, phone 360-452-2345.

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Fire safety reminders for your home, family by BRANDPOINT

National Fire Prevention Week took place in early October. In case you missed it, now is a great time to evaluate your home for fire safety. According to the National Fire Protection Association’s September 2015 Structure Fires Report, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 357,000 home fires per year between 2009-2013, causing $6.9 billion in damage and 2,470 deaths. The National Fire Protection Association cites cooking equipment, heating equipment and electrical distribution systems as the three leading causes of accidental home fires, but there are steps homeowners can take to help prevent them. To help protect your family in the event of a home fire, there are several safety tips and steps that you can take. The association recommends testing your smoke alarms regularly and replacing them every 10 years to best help protect your family and home, but there are several safety tips and steps you can take to further help prevent a fire before it happens. Here are three to consider:

CLEAR YOUR COOKING SPACE

With hot ovens and stovetops, some of which even contain open flames, it’s not surprising that cooking equipment is the leading cause of accidental home fires.

It’s important to be aware of your cooking area before, during and after food preparation. Make sure that anything flammable, such as dish towels, pot holders or food containers are moved away from hot surfaces or flames, and that all cooking utensils, like pots, pans, spoons or ladles, are removed from ovens before preheating. Also, take special care and read cooking directions carefully when using flammable ingredients or equipment, such as oils or deep fryers.

UNDERSTAND YOUR ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Although there are several ways to recognize potential risks of an electrical fire in your home, most homeowners are not aware of the signs or what to look for. For example, keep an eye out for discolored or warm outlets, which are signs of an electrical failure or malfunction and a potential electrical fire. Other signs of electrical issues are flickering or dimming of lights, frequent issues with blowing fuses, or smelling a burning or rubbery odor from appliances. Other often overlooked electrical fire safety tips include using extension cords for temporary needs only, never running cords under rugs or pinched beneath furniture, and to not overload electrical outlets. Though convenient, these common mistakes can result in serious fire hazards. Hire a professional to inspect areas of major concern.

PURCHASE AND INSTALL SAFETY PRODUCTS

In the chance a fire does occur in your home, safety equipment such as smoke detectors and fire extinguishers can mean the difference between life and death, but homeowners should also install devices that can help to prevent fires. Given that 50 percent of the electrical fires that occur each year could be prevented with Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) outlets, it seems logical that homeowners should install them. These outlets, detect a wide range of arcing electrical faults, which are dangerous and could lead to electrical fires. Once an AFCI outlet detects an arcing fault, it immediately shuts off power to help prevent potential ignition of a fire. These are important to have in living areas like bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens to protect homeowners from unexpected electrical hazards. For more information, visit the National Fire Protection Association’s website at www.nfpa.org. 6A1718762

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Help for those suffering from compassion fatigue by EMILY LANDIS, adult outpatient services supervisor at Peninsula Behavioral Health in Port Angeles

Anyone can experience burn-out, but compassion fatigue is a specific type of burn-out sometimes experienced by those of us who are taking care of a loved one, or who are employed in the “helping professions” (nurses, caregivers or counselors, for example). Many of us may be suffering compassion fatigue and not even know it, although we can sometimes identify the symptoms in others, such as: • Isolating from others • Using substances such as drugs or alcohol • Paying less attention to personal hygiene • Blaming others • Having nightmares, bad dreams or poor sleep • Feeling distracted • Mental exhaustion • Physical symptoms (somatic complaints such as stomachache, headache, etc.) • Feelings of sadness, depression or hopelessness • Physical exhaustion • Frequent complaining • Missing days of work, missing deadlines Compassion fatigue can impact anyone who is caring for the needs of others on an on-going basis, either personally or professionally or both. When a caregiving situation feels overwhelming or hopeless, the risk of compassion fatigue increases. Other factors that increase the risk, especially in the work setting, include: Lack of

support from peers and management, high mortality rate of patients, client or patient suicide and intense crisis work. Additionally, focusing on others without taking care of yourself can contribute to the problem. If you are a caregiver for a loved one, you are at a higher risk for compassion fatigue if you set unrealistic expectations for yourself and others. You may be taking on responsibility for things that are beyond your control, for example: not being able to relieve your loved one’s pain, not having enough resources, and not having enough time. Perhaps you are trying to do everything yourself and not reaching out for support from others. Social isolation is a major contributing factor to compassion fatigue. If any of the symptoms or risk factors apply to you, there are many strategies to help you recover. Even if you are not experiencing compassion fatigue, you will still benefit from good self-care. You may be able to prevent exhaustion in yourself or others by taking some of these steps:

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<< COMPASSION FATIGUE continued from Page 4

ACCEPT WHERE YOU ARE IN YOUR JOURNEY

In counseling we call this “radical acceptance.” Radical acceptance is a state of completely accepting something with your heart and mind, ending your fight against your reality. When you stop fighting your current reality, your suffering and stress will be reduced. Plus, you will be saving your energy for other endeavors.

LEAN ON OTHERS

Do not try to walk this journey alone. Reach out to others and accept the help they offer. This may mean that you have to allow others to take care of you at times, or to relieve you from your caregiving role for a time. When you are used to taking care of everyone else, it can be hard to accept help from others.

TAKE CARE OF YOUR BODY

Exercise regularly, even if it’s just a walk around the block. Eat healthy foods, avoiding processed, sugary or salty foods. Make sure you are drinking enough water. Limit your caffeine intake.

STAY AWAY FROM ALCOHOL AS A COPING STRATEGY

You might feel temporary relief, but using alcohol to cope with stress carries a lot of risk.

ORGANIZE YOUR LIFE

This puts you in charge of your own life so you are proactive rather than constantly reacting to the chaos in your life. Refer to www.flylady.com for more information on how to organize your life.

REINFORCE YOUR OWN BOUNDARIES

RESERVE ENERGY FOR THINGS THAT MATTER

EXPRESS YOUR NEEDS

LIVE A BALANCED LIFE

In other words, learn how to say “no.” Limit your contact with negative people. Don’t feel guilty for setting limits.

When people ask “How can I help?” be prepared with an answer. If you need help cleaning the house, picking up the dry cleaning or preparing dinner, say so. People will be delighted to be able to actually do something for you.

This is a difficult one, but an important one. Don’t let things that don’t really matter take up your precious time. Make sure that you have interests outside of work or caregiving.

OTHER WAYS TO DE-STRESS

Massage, yoga and meditation are all helpful ways to cope with stress.

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SEEK PROFESSIONAL HELP

If the strategies listed above do not resolve your symptoms, it is time to seek the help of a professional counselor. He or she can help you explore any underlying issues that might be bothering you. The best news about compassion fatigue is that it’s preventable and treatable! You do not have to suffer alone. If you are a caregiver or employed in a helping profession, please remember to address your own needs as well. You will be of better service to others if you are healthy and well yourself. Emily Landis supervises adult outpatient services for Peninsula Behavioral Health. Before moving to the Peninsula from Northern Illinois, Landis served as the vice president of program services at Home of the Sparrow in McHenry, Ill. She has experience working with children and has supervised children’s services for a community mental health center. She also has worked in the field of domestic violence, trauma recovery and clinical supervision. Landis earned a master’s degree in social work from Aurora University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Help for kids with allergies, asthma by BRANDPOINT

If you’re a parent of one of the 28 million children who suffer from allergies, or one of the 7.1 million children who have asthma, sending children to school can cause anxious moments. “For parents of children with allergies or asthma, school raises questions about conditions that can’t be controlled or monitored,” said allergist Janna Tuck, spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “They want to make sure their child is safe, has adequate resources and that systems are in place if they have an asthma or allergy attack.” By following these suggestions from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology you can help ensure your child has a safe, fun school year.

KNOW THEIR TRIGGERS

Students with pets at home can bring pet dander into school. Other common allergens such as pollen and dust will definitely find their way into the classroom. If your child suddenly develops a runny nose, has difficulty breathing or comes home with a rash, it may

be related to classroom triggers. Check with your allergist if previously unseen symptoms occur or if existing symptoms worsen.

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH AN ALLERGIST

If you think your child might have allergies or asthma, making an appointment with a board-certified allergist is the first step to accurately developing a game plan. An allergist can determine what’s causing your child’s symptoms, as well as provide guidance to help both of you cope with allergies and asthma. Through prescribing medication and creating treatIf your child is old enough, teach them how to use their ment plans, your allergist can provide the care that leads epinephrine auto injector or rescue inhaler. to fewer school absences. Make sure they understand warning signs and symptoms, what precautions to take and who to talk to if a TALK TO YOUR CHILD ABOUT LUNCH TIME reaction develops. Younger children especially might be excited to share food with friends or try new things on the lunch menu. TALK WITH YOUR CHILD’S FRIENDS, PARENTS If your child has a food allergy, it’s important they Communication is always a good policy when it comes know why they cannot eat certain things or share food. If your child is prescribed an epinephrine auto injector, to managing your child’s allergies and asthma. Talking to your child’s friends, or asking their parents make sure the staff is trained in how to use it and knows to talk to their children about asthma and allergies, adds where your child’s is located. another layer of support. This is important for social reasons, as the more your MEET WITH THE SCHOOL child’s friends and classmates understand allergies and This is one of the biggest steps in preparing for the asthma, the less chance your child will feel isolated. new school year. It can be a challenge to keep your children free from Your child’s teachers, coaches, school nurse and principal should all be informed about your child’s asthma and/ allergy and asthma triggers. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immuor allergies, and what medications they carry with them. All 50 states have laws allowing children to carry their nology website ­— www.acaai.org — has resources to ensure your child has a safe and enjoyable school year. needed medication.

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l autumn fun

A fanciful fall farewell

by JEANETTE STEHR-GREEN, WSU-certified Clallam County Master Gardener

As days grow shorter, and nights grow cooler, a colorful farewell to the growing season can be viewed around the North Olympic Peninsula and even in your own back yard.

NATURE’S AUTUMN PALETTE

Leaf color, in general, is due to three types of pigments: chlorophyll, carotenoids and anthocyanins. Chlorophyll is responsible for the green seen in most (but not all) plants. Chlorophyll allows plants to absorb energy from light and convert it into a form that can be stored and used by plants. Carotenoids are responsible for the yellows, oranges and browns seen in leaves; these pigments are present in some plants throughout the growing season but are masked by chlorophyll. Carotenoids absorb light in wavelengths at which chlorophyll is inefficient and also can protect chlorophyll molecules from excess energy. Anthocyanins are responsible for the deep purple and red hues. Anthocyanins are powerful antioxidants that prevent and repair environmental damage to plant cells; they also bind sugars in leaves and transport them to the woody, overwintering parts of the plant before the leaves fall. Anthocyanins occur naturally in some plants, but their presence can be masked by chlorophyll and affected by weather conditions. >> FALL LEAVES continued on Page 9

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native plants make for an interesting fall landscape. Color changes start in September and continue through October; areas at higher elevations turn color before lower elevations. So be on the lookout!

COLOR IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD

If you want to add fall color to your own back yard, now is a great time to plant. With cooler temperatures and the return of rain, plants can become better established before the stresses of the next growing season. You might even realize some savings in the purchase, as many nurseries try to reduce inventory before winter, selling their stock at reduced prices. Choose plants that do well in our climate (See “Adding color to your yard” on Page 10) and plant them in a sunny spot. Sunlight is often needed to trigger anthocyanin production; so more sun means redder leaves when colors change. Follow recommended practices for planting to reduce transplant shock and improve plant health. (See “How to plant a tree or shrub” on Page 11.) Whether viewing fall foliage in the grandeur of the National Park or the comfort of your own backyard, don’t miss this pre-winter party and fanciful farewell to fall. Jeanette Stehr-Green is a WSU-certified Clallam County Master Gardener. She and her husband, Paul, moved to Port Angeles in 1998 and enjoy the North PHOTO BY PAT BREEN, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Olympic Peninsula in all seasons. Big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) leaves are very large (6 to 15 inches wide) leading to the species name; most have three to five lobes (points). Green summer foliage turns bright yellow to golden in fall.

>> FALL LEAVES continued on Page 10

<< FALL LEAVES continued from Page 8

WHAT CAUSES FALL COLOR?

During the growing season, chlorophyll is continually produced and broken down causing leaves to appear green. As day length shortens in the fall, however, chlorophyll production slows and eventually stops; due to continued breakdown, the chlorophyll ultimately disappears, allowing the color from other pigments to shine through. As nights cool and leaves prepare to fall, anthocyanins are produced to scavenge the sugars from the leaves. If days are bright and sunny, favoring the development of more sugars, more anthocyanins are produced for a more brilliant color display.

COLOR OF CONCERN

Leaf reddening occurs naturally in some species in the fall and can also be seen in young leaves and leaves exposed to bright light or cold. The buildup of anthocyanins, however, can be a sign of plant stress including nutrient deficiencies, chronic drought, poor drainage, pests and diseases. If you see “out of season” red foliage, consider the reasons that your plant might be stressed. It could be natural pigmentation for the plant, but it could signal something that needs attention.

WHERE TO LOOK FOR FALL COLOR

Olympic National Park ranks among the best national parks for viewing fall color. Although evergreens predominate, splashes of color from vine and big leaf maples, huckleberry and other

PHOTO BY PAT BREEN, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Red chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia) is known for its glossy red berries and scarlet fall foliage. Its leaves are elliptical in shape and about 3 inches long.

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<< FALL LEAVES continued from Page 9

ADDING COLOR TO YOUR YARD

Want to add some autumn color to your landscape? Many trees and shrubs can brighten your surroundings when summer’s over. Staff from local nurseries can guide you in selecting trees and shrubs that thrive in our climate zone and promise colorful fall foliage. Here are just a few: l Blueberries (Vaccinium) (orange, yellow and burgundy) l Burning bush (Euonymus alatus) (vibrant scarlet) l Cranberry bush (Viburnum) (yellow to red-purple leaves with red or orange fruit) l Chokeberry (Aronia) (raspberry to crimson leaves, with purplish highlights; can have yellow mixed in, especially in shady sites) l Ornamental fruit trees (pear, plum, cherry and crabapple) l Sourwood (Oxydendrum) (brilliant scarlet) l Maple (Acer) (yellow, gold, orange and red) l Smoke tree (Cotinus) (yellow, red and purple) l Pacific dogwood (Cornus nuttallii) (pinkish red) l Serviceberry (Amelanchier) (yellow to orange to dusty red) l Mountain ash (Sorbus) (yellow to golden orange leaves with orange-red berries) >> FALL LEAVES continued on Page 11 PHOTO BY PAT BREEN, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Vine maple (Acer circinatum) leaves are circular in shape with 7 to 9 lobes (points). They range from 2 ½ to 4 ½ inches in width, and have toothed margins. In autumn leaves turn gold (in the shade) and bright red (in the sun) before falling.

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<< FALL LEAVES continued from Page 10

HOW TO PLANT A TREE OR SHRUB

Plant trees and shrubs through mid-December as roots will grow over winter and plants will be better-established by spring. 1 Dig a hole that is two to three times the diameter of the plant’s root ball but no deeper than its height. 2 Roughen up the sides of the hole and save all the soil you remove, breaking it up if necessary. Water the soil in the hole well. 3 Unwrap the plant or take it from its pot and loosen the outer roots from the pot shape. Untangle or cut encircling roots and place the plant in the hole. 4 Backfill around the plant with the pulverized original soil you saved. Do not add anything to this soil. Fill the hole halfway, then firm to eliminate air pockets, but do not tamp it down. Water well. 5 Finish filling the hole with the original soil, firm again and water thoroughly. 6 Mulch with two to four inches of rich compost to nourish and protect the roots. Do not fertilize new plantings.

Fun

Toddler storytimes at the library by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Toddler storytimes for children between the ages of 18 months and 3 years are offered at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. The free program will take place at 10:15 a.m. every Friday through Nov. 18, and from Jan. 6 to May 12. There will be no programs on April 28 or Nov. 11. After each session, parents and caregivers will have an opportunity to visit and swap information about parenting resources in the community. Storytimes feature picture books, fingerplays, music and plenty of movement and wiggles. Studies show that children who are read to before the age of 5 develop essential pre-reading skills, supporting later success in school. Activities such as talking, reading, playing and singing all play an important role in early childhood development and encourage children to interact with their caregivers and peers in a fun, literacy-rich environment. For more information about storytimes and other programs for youth, visit the library’s website at www.nols.org, phone 360-417-8500 ext. 7705 or send an email to youth@nols.org. Storytimes are supported by Port Angeles Friends of the Library.

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Fall fun, Halloween activities for children Find out what there is to see and do across the North Olympic Peninsula to celebrate autumn and Halloween by PATRICIA MORRISON COATE, Sequim Gazette

Autumn on the North Olympic Peninsula offers plenty of family-friendly carnivals, group trick-or-treat opportunities and other activities. Here’s just a taste of fall carnivals, parties and Halloween events for area youngsters:

JEFFERSON COUNTY

A fall carnival will be held at Chimacum Elementary School, 91 W. Valley Road, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. The family friendly event will feature fun activities, prizes at a variety of booths, a cake walk, a bouncy house and arts and crafts activities. Games cost 25 cents to 50 cents each. Food will be available for purchase. The Port Townsend Public Library, 1220 Lawrence St., Port Townsend, in the Charles Pink House, will host a “Cute — Not Scary Halloween Party” from 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. Come in costume (not too scary, please!) and join library staff for stories, songs, snacks and crafts. For children up to age 12 and their caregivers. The Quilcene ninth annual Spooktakular Halloween Party will be held at the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, from 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. >> FALL FUN continued on Page 13

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<< FALL FUN continued from Page 12

The free family friendly event will feature “monster” food, photos, a costume contest, a scavenger hunt, games and more. The Port Townsend Main Street Downtown Trick-or-Treat and Costume Parade will begin in downtown Port Townsend at 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. The free event is open to costumed youngsters, preschool through sixth grade, and their parents or caregivers. Participants are to meet at 3:45 p.m. under the Bank of America clock at Water and Adams streets. Participating merchants — designated by signs in their windows — will offer trick-or-treating opportunities after the parade. Water Street will be closed to traffic 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. from Madison to Polk streets. Flashlights and visible clothing are recommended. Haunt Town, the Port Townsend Kiwanis Club’s second annual haunted house, will return this year for three weekends in October — Fridays and Saturdays through Oct. 29. The theme for the 2016 Haunt is “Your Worst Nightmare” and is built in the basement of the Elks Lodge at 555 Otto St. in Port Townsend. The fundraiser again benefits the Kiwanis club’s children’s projects and all the local high school ASB programs whose students attend. The event is from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Haunt Town is totally revamped for 2016 with the new theme, 11 haunted rooms and an all new cast and crew to entertain you. Haunt Town is not for the faint of heart; it’s basically considered a teen/adult scare, working mainly on a psychological basis, rather than using obvious scary items; in other words, what really makes a person very fearful and nervous — creating nightmares.

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While there is no minimum age limit, organizers suggest children under 10 may not be up to this type of entertainment. Parents are asked to consider whether their child can handle it before bringing them. Spencer and the Kiwanis Club are very grateful to the Elks Club House Committee for the use of the facility. Questions should be directed to Steve Spencer at 360-

CLALLAM COUNTY

Olympic Theatre Arts will be hosting a Spooktacular Haunted House attraction open to the public from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at Olympic Theatre Arts Center, 414 N. Sequim Ave. >> FALL FUN continued on Page 14

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Kendall Unit Boys & Girls Club in Sequim, 400 W. Fir St., from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. The event is open to the public. Presented by the theater’s Children’s Theatre Troupe, Children must be accompanied by an adult. teams of little “ghost hosts” will be conducting guided Admission costs $1 per person and includes 10 game tours of the “haunted” theater building which will boast a tickets. This fee does not include concessions. series of frightful special effects designed by the stageAdditional game tickets can be purchased at the rate craft team of spooks. Trick or treating, games and ghoulish concessions will of $1 for 10 tickets. “finish off” the Halloween festivities. A trip to the Pumpkin Patch, located on the corner of Admission will be $5 at the door with proceeds to benKitchen-Dick Road and U.S. Highway 101, is a must for efit the Children’s Theatre program that offers classes many area residents. and workshops throughout the year. Although no general admission is charged to the annual Pumpkin Patch, which is open daily from noon to A fall festival known as The Bash, will be held at Kings Way Four Square Church, 1023 Kitchen-Dick Road 6 p.m. through Halloween, fees are charged for activities. U-pick pumpkins cost 50 cents per pound. in Sequim, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. Admission to the patch’s children’s straw maze costs A donation of nonperishable food will be collected at $5 per child. Adults can accompany their children the door and will donated to Sequim Food Bank. through the maze for free. The family-friendly, all-ages event will include a rock Snacks and drinks are available for purchase. climbing wall, pony rides, a Ferris wheel and indoor For $5, visitors can launch two small, hard pumpkins games. Prizes and candy will be given to attendees. — called ironsides — from a catapult, aiming for a barrel Family friendly costumes are encouraged. in a field. If a pumpkin lands in the barrel, the shooter Food and drink will be available for purchase. gets $100. For more information, visit www.thekingsway.net. People can view chickens, bunnies and pigs. Draft The annual Sequim Merchants Trick-or-Treat will horse rides are available some weekends. Group field trips are available upon request. be held at a variety of Sequim businesses between 3 p.m. For details, phone Teresa Lassila at 360-461-0940. and 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. The free event, sponsored by the Sequim-Dungeness The Port Angeles Downtown Association TrickValley Chamber of Commerce and Sequim Merchants, or-Treat will occur from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, will feature business owners who post a picture of a pumpkin in their window handing out treats to children. Oct. 31. The free event is open to costumed youngsters accompanied by parents or caregivers. Haunted Hallways will take place in Sequim High Stores bearing a “trick-or-treat” sign on doors or winSchool’s H Building, 601 N. Sequim Ave., between 1 p.m. dows will offer treats to costumed children. and 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. Downtown streets will remain open to traffic so care The family-friendly event will feature an array of activities. Attendees are asked to bring nonperishable goods to should be exercised when crossing streets. be donated to Sequim Food Bank following the event. A Truck or Treat will be held at the Assembly of God Church, 81 Huckleberry Lane in Forks, from 6 p.m. A Halloween Bash will be held at the Carroll C. << FALL FUN continued from Page 13

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An all-ages pumpkin decorating and carving contest will be held at Clallam Bay Library, 16990 Highway 112, beginning at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26. Decorators and carvers are invited to submit creations during the library’s hours of operation until judging commences at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. All entries must be received no later than 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. Prizes for Best in Show will be awarded in four age divisions: youth (6 and under); kids (7-12); young adult (ages 13-17); and adult (18 and older). Only real pumpkins, vegetables and fruit may be used. Artificial craft pumpkins are not eligible. Only real pumpkins, vegetables and fruit may be used. Artificial craft pumpkins are not eligible. For details about additional upcoming events on the North Olympic Peninsula, visit www.peninsuladailynews. com or www.sequimgazette.com.

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The Forks Forum will sponsor the second annual Halloween Pet costume contest for dogs from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at Forks Outfitters “Pumpkin Patch” outside the store. Participation entry fee is $5 or a bag of pet food, photos are $5; all proceeds to benefit Friends of Forks Animals. Prizes awarded for first, second and third place.

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A pumpkin carving contest will be held at Forks Community Hospital’s Spoon’s Cafe, 530 Bogachiel Way. Children ages 2 to 16 years can bring their carved pumpkins to the hospital’s cafe by 1:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 30, for the chance to win cash prizes. The first place winner will receive $15 and a second place winner will be awarded $10.

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Cold-weather superfoods now at Peninsula farmers markets by PATTY MCMANUS, CO-OWNER OF NASH’S ORGANIC PRODUCE IN SEQUIM

As the seasons change and we get out our coats and turn up the heater, our bodies also experience changes in energy levels, metabolism and even food preferences. We feel the need for “comfort foods” — meals that make us feel warm all over and fortify us against the cold. But if you are just serving up mac ‘n cheese and calling it good, you might not be getting what you need to stay healthy all winter long. Foods that truly warm us are foods that take longer to grow. These vegetables have had more time to accumulate the vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (natural plant chemicals that help fight diseases) our bodies need for a strong immune system, and they include most root vegetables (carrots, beets, turnips, parsnips and potatoes) and cruciferous vegetables (kales, cabbages, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts). Compared with lighter, leafy veggies we associate with summer (like lettuces) that tend to grow much more quickly, these roots and crucifers provide the human body with the nutrition and flavors that make winter a season to enjoy. Local farmers markets have great produce well into the fall and winter months. Some of these locally-produced vegetables really pack a healthy punch for you and your family.

CARROTS

Fall and winter are the best times to enjoy carrots. Rich in vitamins A and C, potassium and insoluble fiber, carrots also contains magnesium, which relaxes you and aids in muscle recovery. Carrots are much easier to digest when cooked, and very warming to the body this way as well. Slice into bite-sized pieces and toss ‘em into soups and stews. The bright orange color comes from beta-carotene, an important precursor to vitamin A, and it protects against macular degeneration and senile cataracts. Carrots have also been shown to protect against some cancers and cardiovascular disease. You can steam, mash, sauté, roast and even grill carrots. They can be candied, grated into salads, added to cookies, soups, stews and quiches. Carrots are one of the most versatile of vegetables.

BEETS

Beets get a lot of attention for being a unique source of betalains, phytonutrients that are known for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and detoxification supportive properties. Beets are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium and copper. They also are rich in dietary fiber, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin C, iron and vitamin B6. Steaming beets helps maximize their nutrition and flavor. Fill the bottom of the steamer with an inch of water and bring to a rapid boil. Add beets, cover and steam for 15 minutes. Beets are fully cooked when you can easily pierce with a fork. Serve on top of salads or sprinkle with balsamic vinegar and serve as a vegetable side dish. Save those greens! Beet greens are lovely sautéed and offer you the same nutrient density as the root. It’s a two-for-one deal. Prepare them like you would Swiss chard.

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WINTER SQUASHES

There are many varieties of winter squash — including pumpkin, butternut, acorn, delicata and spaghetti squash — and they are all excellent choices for winter nutrition. One cup of cooked winter squash has around 80 calories, but is high in both vitamin A (214 percent of the recommended daily value) and vitamin C (33 percent), as well as being a good source of vitamins B6 and K, potassium and folate. Squash’s high fiber makes it especially filling, yet it’s one of the easiest veggies to digest since it has a high water content. Winter squashes are easy to enjoy. Punch a couple of vents into the skins and place on a baking sheet. Bake in a moderate oven for an hour, allow to cool a little and cut open. Season the insides with garlic salt, pepper, even cumin or turmeric. You can also bake the seeds for a healthy snack.

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Dark leafy greens, such as beet greens, kale, chard and collards, thrive in the chill of winter when the rest of the produce section looks bleak. In fact, a frost can sweeten them up, because the plant uses sugar as an “antifreeze.” Winter greens are particularly rich in vitamins A, C and K. Collards and mustard greens are also excellent sources of folate, important for women of childbearing age. The phytochemicals found in winter greens help liver cells excrete toxins. One cup of chopped greens has 100 percent of the average daily vitamin A requirement and ¾ of the daily vitamin C requirement. Dark winter greens lend themselves particularly well to soups and stews because

they hold up well in the cooking process. But don’t overcook them. Add them toward the end of the cooking time, so that they maintain their nutritional benefits.

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  OCTOBER 2016  15


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Special Sections - Peninsula Family, October 2016  

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