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VOTER

GUIDE

2016 VOTER GUIDE

for the general election ending Nov. 8 FEDERAL President Vice president U.S. senator U.S. representative WASHINGTON STATE State senator State representative, Positions 1 and 2 Other state races CLALLAM COUNTY County commissioner Superior Court judge Ballot measures JEFFERSON COUNTY County commissioner Public utility district commissioner, Position 1 Ballot measure

Published as a public service by the

Peninsula Daily News

INITIATIVES, ADVISORIES, CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

VOTER TAB 2016

Introduction

Be sure to vote by 8 p.m. Nov. 8 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

This special section of the Peninsula Daily News and the Sequim Gazette, also available online at www.peninsuladaily news.com and www.sequim gazette.com, provides voters with information about the Nov. 8 general election. It includes candidate questionnaires and biographical profiles for all contested races in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Races in which candidates are unopposed are not profiled in this section. Neither are write-in candidates. It also includes information on positions up for election in “About the Job” features and on local ballot measures. It includes summaries of state initiatives, advisory votes and presidential and state candidates. Ballots will be mailed by auditor’s offices in Clallam and Jefferson counties to registered voters Oct. 19. Voting continues until 8 p.m. Nov. 8. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb coordinated compilation of candidate questionnaires, profiles and position descriptions. Copy Editor Allison McGee and Managing Editor Michael Foster designed this section. Staff photojournalist Keith Thorpe processed photos. Candidates’ answers were limited to 75 words per question and were edited for length, grammar and spelling. For disabled voters, during the voting period, a voting terminal is available at the Clallam County Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Suite 1, Port Angeles, and at the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. Ballots must be postmarked no later than Nov. 8 or dropped off by no later than 8 p.m. Nov. 8 at the following locations:

• Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Drive-up drop boxes are provided on the circular drive and directly across from disabled parking. • Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, Suite 1, open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. • Sequim Village Shopping Center, near the J.C. Penney store, 651 W. Washington St. • Forks District Court lobby, 502 E. Division St.

Jefferson County • Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. A drive-up drop box is provided in the parking lot to the rear of the courthouse off Franklin Street. • Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 8. • Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock. An outside drop box is mounted in the parking lot.

Election calendar Here are some significant dates relating to the Nov. 8 election: • Oct. 16: The North Olympic Peninsula Voter Guide for the general election is published in the Peninsula Daily News and posted online at www.peninsula dailynews.com. • Oct. 19: The North Olympic Peninsula Voter Guide for the general election is published in the Sequim Gazette and posted online at www.sequimgazette. com. • Oct. 19: Ballots are mailed out to registered voters for the Nov. 8 election. • Oct. 26: Voter registration

Secretary of state mails out Voters’ Pamphlet PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Washington Secretary of State 2016 General Election Voters’ Pamphlet is being mailed to Washington residents for the Nov. 8 general election. The pamphlet provides information on state candidates, six statewide initiatives on the ballot, a proposed amendment to the state constitution and two nonbinding advisory votes on revenue-related bills passed by the state Legislature this year. It was being mailed to 3.3 million households throughout the state. Accessible audio and text formats are available for voters who are blind or have limited vision. Additional copies of the printed Voters’ Pamphlet are available in county auditor offices, libraries, post offices, long-term care centers and disability service centers. The state office does not fact-check or correct statements or arguments by candidates or ballot measure committees. They are printed as submitted. Those who do not receive a pamphlet by Oct. 17 are urged to call the voter hotline at 800-448-4881 or email the Elections Division at elections@sos.wa.gov for assistance. Ballots will be mailed to registered voters Oct. 19. For more information, see www.sos.wa.gov. deadline for people not registered to vote who want to vote in the Nov. 8 election. Registration must be done in person at the courthouse of the county of residence by Oct. 31. • Nov. 8: General election ends at 8 p.m.

Have questions? Questions about Clallam County elections can be phoned to the county Auditor’s Office elections center at 360-417-2217 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, emailed to khugoniot@co.clallam. wa.us or asked at the elections office at the county courthouse. The office will be open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 7. Voter registration information is also available by phoning 360-

417-2221. The website is www.clallam. net/elections. Questions about Jefferson County elections can be phoned to the county Auditor’s Office elections division at 360-3859117 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Voter registration information is available by phoning 360-3859119. Questions also can be emailed to elections@co.jefferson.wa.us. The website is http://tinyurl. com/PDN-Jeffcoelections. Both Clallam and Jefferson County elections offices will be open at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8. The Secretary of State’s Office in Olympia maintains a website with general voting information at www.vote.wa.gov.

Uncontested races in Clallam, Jefferson PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Five races are uncontested on the North Olympic Peninsula. Unless facing write-in candidates (who must file to declare their write-in candidacy by Oct. 21), these candidates are automatically elected. They are: • Clallam Superior Court judge, Position 1 — Erik Rohrer • Clallam Superior Court judge, Position 3 — Christopher Melly • Clallam Public Utility District commissioner, District 1 — Will Purser • Jefferson County commissioner, District 2 — David W. Sullivan • Jefferson County Superior Court judge, Position 1 — Keith C. Harper

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VOTER TAB 2016

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

U.S. House of Representatives

Member of Congress, 6th District Do you support or oppose the Navy’s proposed expansion of electronic warfare training in and over the North Olympic Peninsula? Bloom: Support. This modest increase will enhance critical war-fighting skills of our Navy aviators, which is important to our national defense. The Navy uses systems within IEEE [Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers] safety standards and has a history of safely employing these systems. The expansion does not involve low-altitude flights, and the incremental number of sorties should go unnoticed by the public. Our all-volunteer military, which sacrifices so much to protect and defend us, deserves the best training and equipment. Kilmer: A well-trained naval presence and a healthy Olympic National Park have been critical elements to this region’s past and will be important to its future. I’ve used my voice to make sure that the Navy actively engages with the Park Service, Forest Service and local communities to ensure that any training activities, existing or proposed, are carried out in a way that respects the soundscape and sensitive environments that make this region so special. Do you support or oppose the Wild Olympics Plan to permanently protect more than 126,000 acres in Olympic National Forest? Bloom: Oppose. Supposedly improved from 2012, the current plan was introduced by Sen. [Patty] Murray and Rep. [Derek] Kilmer. The plan’s language, however, in naming the additional lands subject to wilderness designation (and the acreage of each tract),

About the job 6TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Election boundaries: Clallam, Jefferson, Grays Harbor and Kitsap counties, and portions of Mason and Pierce counties Voters: 433,093 as of Sept. 30 Term: Two years

Todd A. Bloom

Compensation: $174,000 annual salary; same health and retirements benefits as federal employees; eligibility for the Civil Service Retirement System or the Federal Employees’ Retirement System

tracks word-for-word the bill from 2012 introduced by Sen. Murray and [former] Rep. Norm Dicks. When introduced in 2012, this ran into fierce opposition from constituents and continues to be unpopular. It restricts use and will not benefit the economy. Kilmer: As a co-sponsor of this bill, I worked to incorporate feedback from local communities and produced an updated, consensus Wild Olympics proposal that protects our most sensitive watersheds, respects private property rights and has no negative impact on the timber industry. At the same time, we must do more to responsibly increase harvests in our federal forests, which is why I brought industry and

environmental leaders together to form the Olympic Peninsula Forest Collaborative. Who are you supporting for president? Bloom: Republican nominee Donald J. Trump. I believe his positions more closely align with mine on how to stimulate economic growth and job creation in America. Although I may disapprove of some of his public statements, I believe he is a strong leader who will work with Congress to improve our economy, who will work with our military leadership and who will ultimately enhance America’s prestige and standing as a world leader. PLEASE

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Residence: Gig Harbor

Residence: Tacoma

Duties: Initiate all spending bills, pass legislation in concert with the Senate, elect the president in Electoral College deadlocks, conduct impeachment inquiries. Approve a 2016 federal budget: In 2016, the approved spending plan was $3.34 trillion with total expected outlays of $3.95 trillion, according to www.insidegov.com, a government research site. The budget covers 2.79 million employees, according to the federal Office of Personnel Management.

Derek Kilmer

Phone: 253-213-1982 Email: electtoddbloom@ gmail.com Campaign website: www. electtoddbloom.com 54

Age as of Election Day:

Education: Bachelor’s degree, economics, Simpson College, Iowa; Master of Laws, University of Washington School of Law; master’s degree, national security and strategic studies, U.S. Naval War College; law degree, master’s in business administration, Tulane University

Phone: 253-572-4355 Email: info@derekkilmer. com Campaign website: www. derekkilmer.com 42

Age as of Election Day:

Education: High school diploma, Port Angeles High School; bachelor’s degree, public policy, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, certificate in American Studies, both Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.; Ph.D., social policy, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? U.S. representative, 6th District: 2013-present, Washington state senator, 26th District, 2007-12; Washington state representative, 26th District, 2005-06

Party preference: Republican Party

Party preference: Democratic Party

Occupation: Certified public accountant, currently taking leave of absence from Deloitte LLP; Navy Reserve

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER TAB 2016

Washington Legislature

State senator, 24th District How would you provide the $3 billion to $3.5 billion required for basic education under the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Turissini: The logical first step is to determine how the state is spending in other areas. Spending that isn’t constitutionally required or necessary for the public welfare should be on the table for consideration to be cut. I’m confident we can make progress in the give-and-take of the legislative session if all parties are willing to lay aside personal differences, agendas and special interests. I expect the solution will be a tough one regardless. Van De Wege: First, we need to look at streamlining costs in education, such as high-stakes testing, then in other parts of state government to make it as efficient as possible and save taxpayer money to be used for education. Next, close tax loopholes and exemptions that are not working any longer and put that money toward McCleary. Lastly, consider new revenue

such as a capital-gains tax on nonretirement profits from the sale of stocks. What would you do to foster economic development in rural communities such as Clallam and Jefferson counties? Turissini: Small business is the backbone of our rural economy and the lifeblood of our Peninsula communities. I will foster economic development in our region by supporting business-friendly policies that reward success, not exploit it. Government doesn’t create jobs; entrepreneurs do. Our economic development depends on small businesses’ ability to thrive. That’s why I’ll support tax incentives over tax burdens and work to restructure the regulatory mandates that get in the way of job growth. Van De Wege: Top priority is keeping existing jobs we already have, particularly in the manufacturing sector, and then trying to grow those jobs through infrastructure and incentives to business.

Danille Turissini Kevin Van De Wege Candidates’ biographies appear on next page. Also, putting an emphasis on service-related jobs, such as tourism and elderly care, has proven to be effective. Growing new jobs, such as the composite recycling technology industry that the Port of Port Angeles is working toward, will elicit development but also requires the highest capital investment. How would you fund social services under tight budget constraints? Turissini: The state needs to routinely assess publicly funded programs and services, weed out those that are no longer needed and maximize that funding elsewhere. PLEASE

About the job 24TH LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT STATE SENATE Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Election boundaries: Clallam and Jefferson counties, and the northern half of Grays Harbor County Voters: 49,999 in Clallam County, 24,065 in Jefferson County, 21,038 in Grays Harbor County, for a total of 95,102, as of Sept. 30 Term: Four years Meetings: The legislative session is 60 days in even-numbered years, 105 days in odd-numbered years. Compensation: $46,839 not including benefits, and can claim $120 a day for expenses while the Legislature in is session Duties: Draft bills, vote on state laws, address constituents’ complaints and concerns, participate on legislative and regional committees. Approve a two-year general fund budget: The spending plan for July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2017, is $38 billion for about 110,000 employees.

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Member of Congress, 6th District/continued Kilmer: I support Hillary Clinton for president because she has the experience to keep our nation safe, she’ll work to grow an economy that works for everyone and she is running a campaign based on optimism and inclusion rather than fear. As the dad of two daughters, I am motivated by the chance to finally elect our country’s first female president and someone who has dedicated her life to public service.

Bloom: I believe that, on balance, this was an acceptable decision. There were some good reasons why the dams were candidates for demolition (e.g., poorly constructed, lack of salmon ladder, etc.). However, as a rule, I am doubtful of the wisdom of discarding our hydroelectric-power-generation capabilities and infrastructure, and will work to ensure future decisions on the matter carefully weigh all of the considerations. Kilmer: The demolition of the Was the federally funded two dams and accompanying resdemolition of the two Elwha River dams a good idea or not? toration efforts on the Elwha

River rightfully restored tribal treaty rights and will revive this river’s ecosystem and historic salmon runs. While we still have work to do to complete this project and ensure that local water systems are sustainable, our community should be proud of this effort and will benefit from its cultural and scientific significance into the future. What would make you a more effective congressman than your opponent? Bloom: My military leader-

ship and War College education distinguish me from the incumbent, who has no military background. My leadership in business — managing revenue, expenses and employees, as well as working with clients — is also a distinct difference. My education — economics, business, law and taxation — also contrasts with that of the incumbent, who studied politics and social welfare. I believe my superior knowledge, experience and judgment will make me a more effective congressman than my opponent.

Kilmer: While middle-class families are getting squeezed, Congress is often focused on partisan bickering rather than progress. I’ve led by example — giving up my own pay during the government shutdown and helping lead a coalition of Democrats and Republicans working together toward common-sense solutions. That’s why a Washington Post article named me as one of the five most effective Democrats in Congress. I’m working to get this economy and this Congress back on track.


VOTER TAB 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

State senator, 24th District/continued

Danille Turissini

Kevin Van De wege

Residence: Port Ludlow

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-301-4134

Phone: 360-477-0548

Email: Danille@danille forsenate.com

Email: kevinvandewege@ hotmail.com

Campaign website: www. danilleforsenate.com

Campaign website: www. kevinvandewege.com

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Age as of Election Day:

Education: GED certificate; Pennsylvania State University Rural Leadership Program, 1999-2001; University of Phoenix Online, 2000-03 Occupation: Former grass-roots director, Family Policy Institute of Washington Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. Party affiliation: Prefers Independent GOP Party

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Age as of Election Day:

Education: Associate degree, fire investigation, Edmonds Community College, 1995; associate degree, fire administration, Edmonds Community College, 1996; bachelor’s degree, social science, Washington State University, 2002; master’s degree, public administration, Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kan., 2016 Occupation: Lieutenant, Clallam County Fire District 3; state representative Have you ever run for or held elective public office? State representative, 2007-present, elected to five terms. Party affiliation: Democratic Party.

Empowering citizens to serve in their own communities would take some of the burden off the state. I would seek to mitigate laws that create a barrier (liabilities) between critical human services and treatments and the people who need them, such as faithbased ministries, Good Samaritans, general acts of kindness and benevolence. Van De Wege: We have faced this challenge since the McCleary decision came down in 2011. Success is found through innovation and looking at new ways of administering the same services. For instance, combining mental health and chemical dependency both saves the state money and also provides a better service. Fortunately, many nonprofits have stepped up to this challenge, and the state needs to continue to incentivize their work. Do you support or oppose Initiative 1433, which would increase the statewide minimum wage to $13.50 by 2020? Turissini: I oppose I-1433 because it’s a one-size-fits-all solution that could create more problems than it solves. I empathize with those who want to earn more, but $13.50 will barely support a single person, let alone a family. Paid sick-and-safe leave is reasonable, but not if an employer is mandated to pay for something they can’t afford. Many business owners will have to let people go or, worse, be forced to close their doors. Van De Wege: Support.

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

The increase in minimum wage is reasonable and goes toward allowing families’ success and decreases dependency on local and state government and also nonprofits. At the same time, business cannot be forgotten, for it is they who pay this higher wage. The state needs to ensure this increase proves successful for both the workers and employers. How would you be a more effective state legislator than your opponent? Turissini: I will be an independent voice for our entire district. As a state senator, my priority will be to empower our communities, not myself, a political party, party bosses or special interests. I will not take sides. I’ll build bridges. All constituent input will be valued, including from those with diverse backgrounds and perspectives different from my own. I will sincerely listen and learn from the people who will be impacted by policy decisions. Van De Wege: I have a record of success from my 10 years in the House, including helping our mills, maritime industry and small businesses. At the same time, I have built strong relationships in the Legislature and with state agencies that have proven effective in solving constituent issues as they arise. I have shown the ability to listen in the district and work in Olympia, and look forward to continuing this service in the state Senate.

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Pick from the Money Tree! EVERY TUESDAY! Every week’s Money Tree is ripe with exclusive discounts — 35 percent off! — from North Olympic Peninsula businesses. It’s easy and fun. ✔ Check the Money Tree page on Tuesdays for the bargain you want. ✔ Phone the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 360-417-7684 and use your credit card to claim your purchase. We’ll mail the certificate to be redeemed to you . . . at no extra cost. ✔ Or if you’re in the neighborhood, drop by the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 305 W. First St. to pick up your certificate. (It’s not available at our Port Townsend or Sequim offices.)

Peninsula Daily News

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

VOTER TAB 2016

Washington Legislature

State representative, 24th District, Position 1 How would you provide the $3 billion to $3.5 billion required for basic education under the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Chapman: The court has told the Legislature to fully fund basic education, but it did not say how that should be accomplished. The final solution must be bipartisan, and all options should be considered. I look forward to working with other legislators in a collaborative approach that meets the court’s mandate. We must not harm our economy or unnecessarily raise taxes, especially on low-middle income families, retirees and small businesses throughout 24th Legislative District. Vrable: More aggressive equalization of the state K-12 levy of property taxes. A flatter K-12 levy statewide should generate enough additional funds. What would you do to foster economic development in rural communities such as Clallam and Jefferson counties? Chapman: We need an economy that works for everyone. I will work to fully fund basic education and support construction of new schools. I will make sure that tax dollars are allocated wisely to invest in local infrastructure and environmental restoration projects. I support small-business B&O [business and occupation] tax reform to tax net profit as opposed to gross income. This reform alone would encourage small businesses to hire more people, pay better wages and provide better benefits. Vrable: We need to ensure that the maximum sustainable harvesting is being allowed in our forest and make the state

About the job 24TH LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES POSITIONS 1 AND 2 Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Election boundaries: Clallam and Jefferson counties, and the northern half of Grays Harbor County Voters: 49,999 in Clallam County, 24,065 in Jefferson County, 21,038 in Grays Harbor County, for a total of 95,102, as of Sept. 30 Term: Two years Meetings: The legislative session is 60 days in even-numbered years, 105 days in odd-numbered years. Compensation: $46,839 not including benefits and can claim $120 a day for expenses while the Legislature is in session Duties: Draft bills, vote on state laws, address constituents complaints and concerns, serve on legislative and regional committees. Approve a two-year general fund budget: The spending plan for July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2017, is $38 billion for about 110,000 employees. tax our local business more fairly. Business should be taxed on net profit, not gross income. How would you fund social services under tight budget constraints? Chapman: We must reform our regressive tax code that overtaxes low-middle-class workers, retirees and small businesses while undertaxing large corporations and the very wealthy. This tax structure has our poorest families paying about seven times more of their income in taxes than the top 5 percent. The answer will not come in higher taxes but in a fairer tax system.

The Legislature should ask the top 5 percent to pay its fair share. Vrable: We need to do the best we can within our budget constraints. Do you support or oppose Initiative 1433, which would increase the statewide minimum wage to $13.50 by 2020? Chapman: I personally support I-1433, but I would have preferred that the Legislature enact a bipartisan minimum wage law, with the support of small businesses, that included a tiered approach for teenage workers. PLEASE

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Mike chapman

George vrable

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Ludlow.

Phone: 360-477-1131

Phone: 360-301-4626.

Email: chapman@olypen. com

Email: votegeorgev@gmail. com.

Campaign website: www. votemikechapman.com

Campaign website: None.

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Age as of Election Day:

Education: Associate of Arts and Sciences, Shoreline Community College, 1993; bachelor’s degree, organizational management, Northwest College, Kirkland, 1998; master’s degree, leadership and liberal studies, Duquesne University, 2001 Occupation: Clallam County commissioner Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Elected Clallam County commissioner in 2000, 2004, 2008 and 2012. Party affiliation: Democratic Party

Age as of Election Day: 72. Education: U.S. Air Force GED certificate. Occupation: Retired battalion chief, Navy Region Northwest Fire Department. Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. Party affiliation: Republican Party


VOTER TAB 2016

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Washington Legislature

State representative 24th District, Position 2 How would you provide the $3 billion to $3.5 billion required for basic education under the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Alger: Zero-base the state budget. Justify every expenditure. The Legislature’s chronic failure to fund education is not license to raise taxes. According to our state constitution, making ample provision for education is ”paramount.” Thus, funding education should have been first, then other programs and services considered; however, over recent years, the Legislature created and funded programs at the expense of education. Now, the hard task of prioritizing to identify reductions falls to the upcoming session. Tharinger: The Legislature has addressed the basic-education funding challenge, putting over $4 billion toward schools. The remaining piece of the puzzle, ensuring equity and adequacy for K-12 funding, will be solved this year. The policy changes could include standardized contracts

for teachers and support staff with regional adjustments and state benefit packages, lowering of local levies with an increase in state property taxes and additional revenue through a capital gains tax and B&O tax reform.

robust community college to address employer needs is fundamental for economic success on the Peninsula. As capital budget chair, I can direct investments toward crosslaminated timber, strengthening the forest products sector, and What would you do to foster work with the ports, ensuring we economic development in rural have the industrial land base to communities such as Clallam site industry. and Jefferson counties? We can also use capital investments in our parks and trails to Alger: I’d listen to local busienhance our tourist/recreation ness owners, not those at the sector. capital. Obviously, the answers to our How would you fund social long-standing economic problems services under tight budget are not in Olympia, or they constraints? would have been solved already. The ones who know specific Alger: Remembering education needs of the community are comes first (according to the state those who are personally constitution). invested. All other programs and serI’d partner with local business vices must vie for a finite set of associations, economic developresources. ment councils, chambers of comThe Legislature increased merce and small-business-devel- spending by $18.9 billion since the opment associations. 2009-11 budget. They know the problems and State debt increased from they know the solutions, not $2,226 per person in January Olympia. 2011 to over $11,460 per person Tharinger: Making sure we today. have strong K-12 schools to attract professionals and a PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE

State representative, 24th District, Position 1/continued I have supported local control for counties and cities on a host of issues like land use, public health and law and justice. Therefore, I also support giving cities and counties the authority to enact local minimum wage laws. Vrable: No. How would you be a more effective state legislator than your opponent?

Chapman: As a lifelong Washington resident, I have been in public service since 1991 as a police officer and sergeant, U.S. Customs inspector and a fourterm Clallam County commissioner. I will use my experience to fund our local schools, support tax code reform to make it fairer for all, invest in public infrastructure to create jobs and ensure our environment

is protected. I have one promise — work hard to improve the quality of life we enjoy. Vrable: I respect my opponent. We do disagree on issues, and I am running an issue-oriented campaign, not a personal campaign. I believe in a strict adherence to the Constitution, and I believe our state spends too much money.

John d. alger

Steven tharinger

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim.

Phone: 360-775-1327

Phone: 360-460-3079

Email: johndalger@wave cable.com

Email: stharinger@gmail. com

Campaign website: www. electjohndalger.com

Campaign website: None.

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Age as of Election Day:

Education: Bachelor’s degree (cum laude), management, Golden Gate University, San Francisco, Calif., 1983; graduate certificate, New Testament background, Jerusalem University College, Jerusalem, Israel, 1998; master’s degree, theology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, Calif., 2001 Occupation: Retired Air Force officer (22 years) Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. Party affiliation: Prefers GOP/Independent Party

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Age as of Election Day:

Education: Bachelor’s degree, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. Have you ever run for or held elective public office? I am in my third term representing the 24th District in the state House of Representatives. I was a three-term Clallam County commissioner (2000-12). Party affiliation: Democratic Party

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

VOTER TAB 2016

Clallam County

County commissioner, District 2 If elected Nov. 8, what will be your budget priorities if you follow outgoing Commissioner Mike Chapman’s suggestion and participate in forming the 2017 spending plan? Johnson: I certainly plan to participate. I have the preliminary 2017 budget, and I’ve been studying it. I’ve overseen multimillion-dollar budgets in business for many years. However, the 90-plus sub-budgets and the county’s 20 departments have yet to be presented to the three commissioners, administrator and budget director. I’m looking forward to evaluating these departmental budgets in light of adequate county reserves and an overall balanced 2017 spending plan. Richards: The current county commissioners must adopt the 2017 budget. I will participate in that process to the extent any member of the public can. I will suggest that the 2017 budget focus county programs on

economic development, address mental health and substance abuse issues, coordinate health and human services efforts to promote workforce development and enhance our ability to respond to changing conditions in order to develop and maintain a vibrant economy.

Randy Johnson ron richards Candidates’ biographies appear on next page.

other expenditures. From 2014 through 2016, overall expenditures will have increased 13.66 percent. Law and Justice expenditures will have increased 10.99 percent. Johnson: Public safety and law and justice expenditures comWhether these trends should prise the highest priority for be continued or altered should be county government. determined through the budget The actual cost for this — process, in which I will particithanks to merging of Sequim and pate as stated above. Port Angeles jail revenues — has made everyone more efficient and To what extent should the appears close to revenue growth. county limit building sizes in But the cost for indigent rural-residential zones? defense as mandated by the courts continues to escalate far Johnson: In all building decifaster than revenues and must be sions, there are many factors — reviewed with a thorough review soil capacity for septic systems, of the alternatives. safety, environmental conditions Richards: The 2017 prelimiand, of course, zoning. nary budget shows the Law and PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE Justice budget has not outpaced Should the growth of public safety and other law-andjustice costs continue to outpace other expenditures?

About the job CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONER PORT ANGELES-AREA DISTRICT 2 Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Election boundaries: Port Angeles-area District 2 Voters: 16,302 as of Oct. 5. Term: Four years Meetings: Work session Monday, regular meeting Tuesday Compensation: $69,864 annual salary, not including benefits. Commissioners are eligible for a $60 monthly car allowance and a $40 monthly cellphone stipend. Duties: Approve a general fund budget — the 2016 spending plan is $36.8 million and covers 392 full-time-equivalent positions. Decide on an annual tax levy, set land-use policy, approve ordinances, hire a county administrator, serve on regional and statewide boards, serve on the county Board of Health, which meets monthly.

State representative, 24th District, Position 2/continued This biennium, we are spending $5.1 billion on state debt. Those monies will be available to fund social services if the Legislature exercises debt reduction. Tharinger: We must maintain our social services network while meeting our K-12 obligations. Kids who are homeless, underfed and dealing with dysfunction and trauma at home will not be able to learn, making it more difficult to break the cycle of poverty and need. Our aging population is going to have an increased need for longterm care services. So it is important we look at revenue options such as a capital

gains tax and B&O tax reform. Do you support or oppose Initiative 1433, which would increase the statewide minimum wage to $13.50 by 2020? Alger: I oppose I-1433 because the reality is, no one in the Seattle metropolitan area can survive on $13.50, so the worker is harmed. Conversely, in smaller, rural communities, some employers cannot afford $13.50, so the job is never offered. Instead, I propose allowing the minimum-wage question to be answered at the lowest level,

where all information is available. Counties, cities or towns know better than the state what their economies/businesses can bear. Let them decide. Tharinger: I support the minimum-wage increase, realizing the challenges for rural districts. $15 an hour is too high for the Peninsula, but ramping up to $13.50 over four years is acceptable. One thing to remember about the minimum wage is, these employees put their money back into the economy supporting local businesses and additional economic activity. It also helps students reduce their debt.

How would you be a more effective legislator than your opponent? Alger: I’d be accessible. Going door-to-door introducing myself, I’ve asked folks when they last saw/spoke to Steve Tharinger. Their answer: “Never.” Effective representation comes through frequent interaction with those who best know the issues and solutions. To represent someone — anyone — you have to have an ongoing conversation with him/her. To that end, I propose quarterly town hall meetings. For example, on the first Mon-

day in Hoquiam, the second in Port Townsend, the third in Forks, etc. Tharinger: As in any human activity, to be effective in the Legislature, you need to build relationships, which I have done over the last six years. As capital budget chair and being on the appropriations and health care committee, I can work on issues important to the Peninsula, such as hospital and mental health funding, infrastructure for ports and cities and the Olympic Discovery Trail. I would appreciate your vote to keep working for you.


VOTER TAB 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Commissioner, District 2/continued

The county Department of Community Development has specialists who include these factors in their decisions. I would like a building to fit the character of its neighborhood, but this standard is far too subjective and, therefore, the reason for zoning and building codes. Size is one of the factors in making these decisions. Richards: Building size should be considered in conjunction with its intended use, occupancy level, water and energy needs, waste disposal requirements, traffic impacts, lot size, setbacks, screening, compatibility with existing uses and other relevant considerations. An inflexible maximum would not be wise, might not be in the Department of Community Development’s recommended permanent ordinance and could be subject to variances or conditional use permits. How committed are you to funding the county Economic Development Corp. in 2017? Johnson: Totally committed — provided the EDC meets the metrics required by the three commissioners on recruitment of new businesses, job growth and employment. Other important goals for the EDC include business retention and expansion. Recent examples of the EDC’s help include the Lincoln industrial acquisition and the expansion of the Kokopelli Grill restaurant. It is also important that the EDC continue to expand its membership beyond the current 120-plus businesses; they also fund the EDC. Richards: EDC funding should depend on how well the EDC advances the strategic objectives, goals and outcomes, and additional metrics in its agreement with the county. I am concerned that the EDC (1) spends tax dollars promoting itself and the politicians who support the EDC; (2) pays for expensive newspaper ads promoting private companies; (3) claims credit for economic gains unrelated to its activities; and (4) promises new employers that don’t materialize.

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

9

CLALLAM COUNTY

Superior Court judge, Position 2 What qualifies you to be a Superior Court judge?

randy johnson

ron richards Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-460-7648 Email: randy4county commissioner@wavecable.com Campaign website: elect Randycountycommissioner.com 73

Age as of Election Day:

Education: Bachelor’s degree, economics and forestry, University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn.; master’s degree, business administration, Harvard Business School, Boston Occupation: Chairman and board member, Green Crow Corp. of Port Angeles, a timberland and wood products company

Phone: 360-457-1787 Email: ronrichardsfor clallamcounty@gmail.com Campaign website: www. ronrichardsforclallamcounty. com 71

Age as of Election Day:

Education: Graduated from Columbia High School, Richland, 1963; bachelor’s degree, chemical engineering, Washington State University, 1967; law degree, University of Denver, 1973 Occupation: Commercial fisherman, retired lawyer and chemical engineer

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? I served as a Clallam County commissioner, Port Angeles-area District 2 (197781).

Party affiliation: No party preference

Party affiliation: Democratic Party

How would you be a more effective county commissioner than your opponent? Johnson: I have worked continuously and successfully since 1985 with many local groups toward community goals.

Across business and volunteer work with many nonprofits, I have been far more active than my opponent. He doesn’t seem to grasp the priorities that we face at this time. PLEASE

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Coughenour: I’ve been judge part time in Superior Court for 15 years and full time since May 2015. I have presided in Port Angeles and Forks district courts, Drug Court, Juvenile Court, Family Court and was Lower Elwha Klallam chief tribal judge for 15 years. I have 500 hours of judicial training at the National Judicial College and Washington State Judicial College combined. I’ve argued cases in the Court of Appeals and Washington state Supreme Court. Neupert: Twenty-five years of experience in Clallam County. Executive Director of Clallam-Jefferson Public Defender’s Office, and represented clients in civil cases regarding family law, vulnerable adults, personal injury, probate, guardianship, real estate, employment, land use, administrative law, municipalities, landlord-tenant, small business, partnership, contracts, shareholder rights, public disclosure, labor and appeals. I have decided cases as a pro tem (substitute) judge for 20 years and am admitted to practice in Lower Elwha Klallam and Quileute tribal courts. What is your position on establishing a Veterans Court?

Brian coughenour dave neupert Candidates’ biographies, About the Job outline appear on next page. families already cover the critical areas where veterans who commit felonies appear. We don’t have the numbers to justify a separate court since we already divert the few veterans who commit major crimes into these programs if the prosecution, which has the discretion in this area, allows. Neupert: I am an advocate for Veterans Court. Clallam County has one of the highest numbers of veterans per capita in Washington state. Many service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan have experienced problems due to PTSD [posttraumatic stress disorder]. Eligible veterans who find themselves in the criminal justice system should have the opportunity to participate in a treatment-based alternative to prosecution. Veterans Court also will strengthen families and save taxpayer dollars in the long run.

What U.S. Supreme Court jurist who has served in the Coughenour: With only three Superior Court judge posi- past 20 years do you admire the most? tions, Clallam County already has four specialty courts. Coughenour: I admire John Adult and juvenile Drug Paul Stevens. Courts, Mental Health Court and LIFT Court for struggling PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE


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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

Judge/continued

He replaced another favorite, William O. Douglas, and he is the only justice I’ve met personally. He was appointed by President [Gerald] Ford and was one of the longest-serving justices. He didn’t let politics influence his decisions and maintained his judicial independence. As a baseball fan, I really admire him since at 12 years old, he actually witnessed Babe Ruth call his home run in the 1932 World Series. Neupert: Justice John Paul Stevens, who served on the United States Supreme Court for 35 years until his retirement in 2010. During his tenure on the court, Justice Stevens wrote opinions that protected individual rights under the Constitution, most importantly the right of free speech and protection against unlawful search and seizure. Justice Stevens was a principled person who did not allow the politics of the times to influence his decisions. How literal an interpretation should be given to the Constitution? Coughenour: The Constitution written by our Founders was intended to be a living document. Otherwise, we’d still have slavery and women couldn’t vote. It must be interpreted considering the freedom and democratic principals of our origins but with an eye toward the future of our nation and a changing world. The amendments of our Constitution are the rights most frequently quoted and the blueprints for a just and free society. Neupert: The United States

Constitution and the Washington state constitution establish principles that protect individual rights. The job of the judge is to apply the law under the state and federal constitutions, and not to make new law. I will not be concerned if my decisions make new friends or enemies. I will apply existing constitutional law and case law precedent to make rulings that are fair, consistent and reliable. How would you be a more effective Superior Court judge than your opponent? Coughenour: My 40-year career as an attorney in Clallam County makes me uniquely suited to be the Superior Court judge, which is why I was appointed by Gov. Inslee to serve. Since family law and criminal cases represent three-quarters of our workload, I am effective since those were my primary areas of practice, and I was able to hit the ground running when I was appointed a year and a half ago. Neupert: I will provide needed leadership to bring our Superior Court into the 21st century. The court is not serving the people in the most efficient manner possible. There are needless delays in resolving cases, outdated technology and lack of interest in moving the needle forward. These conditions cost the taxpayers money. I will always respect and hear the individuals who appear in court, understanding that every case is critical to the people involved.

Commissioner / continued My long-term, consistent commitment to our county and my proven expertise in finance and management make me the superior candidate. Richards: I have extensive business, engineering, legal and governmental experience. My opponent has only business experience. These extra skills are impor-

tant for Clallam County to attract new technological companies, complete the Carlsborg sewer on time and within budget, and understand continuing legal issues. In my businesses, people have worked for me as their boss. As a former county commissioner, the people have been my boss. This allows me to understand and appreciate the difference.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER TAB 2016

About the job CLALLAM COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE POSITION 2 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Election boundaries: Countywide

brian coughenour

dave neupert

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-457-4167 Email: sunriseranch@ olypen.com Campaign website: None. 65

Phone: 360-808-4489 Email: electdaveneupert@ gmail.com Campaign website: www. electdaveneupert.com

Age as of Election Day: 61

Education: Bachelor’s degree, political science, Thiel College, Greenville, Pa.; law degree, University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1975; Washington State Judicial College program, state Superior Court Judges’ Association; National Judicial College, Reno, Nev. Occupation: Clallam County Superior Court judge Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Yes. Appointed Clallam County Superior Court judge by Gov. Jay Inslee on May 14, 2015.

Age as of Election Day:

Education: Bachelor’s degree, University of Washington, including two years at The Evergreen State College; law degree, University of Puget Sound School of Law; Certified Mediator-Dispute Resolution Center of King County. Occupation: Attorney at law; serves as a judge pro tem in Clallam County District Court; retired from Platt Irwin Law Firm, Port Angeles, December 2015 Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Voters: 50,157 as of Oct. 5 Term: Four years, short and full term. Winner takes office Nov. 30, the day after the election is certified. Compensation: $165,870 salary, paid half by the state and half by Clallam County, not including benefits, which are fully covered by the state. Judges are eligible for a $324 Clallam Transit pass paid by the county. Duties: Preside over civil, felony-criminal, family, juvenile offender and truancy cases; preside over bench and jury trials; preside over probate, guardianship, paternity and adoption matters; hear appeals from lower courts and small-claims court; impose sentences; hear mental illness and juvenile dependency filing. Submit a general fund budget for county commissioners’ approval: The 2016 spending plan is $1.36 million and covers 8.5 fulltime-equivalent positions, not including four pro tem court commissioners and two pro tem judges.

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VOTER TAB 2016

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

11

City of Sequim

Advisory Proposition 1: Banning fireworks pass, they could opt to leave the code the same or consider reducSEQUIM — The Sequim City ing sales, days and hours in the Council wants to know if resifuture under a new amendment. dents want to ban the discharge By state law, a ban cannot be of consumer fireworks within city effective until one year after its limits. adoption. The advisory vote on the The advisory vote deals only Nov. 8 general election ballot will with the discharge of consumer not be binding — meaning that it fireworks. It does not ask about does not have the power of law prohibiting sales, which currently — but it would give the council are done within city limits by direction on the issue, direction four groups, usually local the council has said it will follow. churches/service groups, in tents The council had discussed in an allotted time from June 28 whether or not to ban the disto July 5. charge of fireworks within city The Port Angeles City Council limits year-round — excluding voted in March 2015 to ban dispermitted public displays — but charging personal fireworks had not come to a consensus. On within the city limits. July 25, council members unaniThe law went into effect this mously approved sending an summer. advisory vote to registered voters The city of Port Townsend within the Sequim city limits. banned consumer fireworks in 2003. Consumer fireworks are Three possibilities allowed for the Fourth of July in Clallam County from June 29 to City Attorney Kristina Nelson-Gross said three things could July 5 and in Sequim. A “yes” vote for the measure happen following the vote. If it on the November ballot supports passes, City Council members banning the discharge of all would vote to change the city’s code for July 4, 2018. If it doesn’t fireworks in Sequim, except for

OLYMPIC PENINSULA NEWS GROUP

Advisory Proposition No. 1 The Sequim City Council has called for an advisory vote on banning the discharge of fireworks. Shall the discharge of fireworks be prohibited within the City of Sequim at all times of the year with the exception of properly licensed and permitted public displays? Should this ban be enacted?  Yes  No public displays. A “no” vote supports leaving the law as it is. Under state law, it is legal to discharge consumer fireworks in conjunction with the Fourth of July and New Year’s holidays. State law also allows persons licensed by the state and city to sell fireworks during those times. The argument in favor of the measure published on the Clallam County auditor’s website says that fireworks can be risky in densely populated areas such

as a city, and that the noise can disturb sensitive individuals and pets. However, when used correctly, fireworks can be relatively safe in rural areas, the argument says, and so the measure does not ask about sales. “Persons living in Sequim only need to visit a friend outside the city to use them,” said the argument prepared by Larry and Stella Allen and John Butler. City Councilwoman Candace Pratt has said that allowing the sales of fireworks while banning

discharging them seemed “dysfunctional.” “It’s a grand assumption that everyone who is buying fireworks lives outside of town,” she said. Pastor Dave Westman, a fireworks retailer for the Royal Rangers, testified before the council advocating for discharging/sales to continue. Nelson-Gross said if the ban does pass, city staff recommended the City Council investigate financing a public fireworks display.

Early estimates She said early cost estimates set a show in Sequim between $11,000 and $30,000 depending on the size of the mortars, length of the display and if the fireworks are discharged from a barge. Nelson-Gross said if the city did host a public fireworks show, it likely would be on land at a park. She said for security, signage and other costs, the city would need to budget about $25,000 for a 20-minute show.

Clallam County Public Hospital District 1

Proposition 1: Increasing number of commissioners BY PAUL GOTTLIEB

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Voters From Neah Bay to the west end of Lake Crescent will decide in the Nov. 8 general election if Forks Hospital District 1 — the state’s first such district — should increase its three-person board of commissioners to five members.

Formed in 1947 after passage of the state hospital district law that same year, the district now serves 11,500 Clallam County residents. The district — which opened a hospital in 1952 at the present location of Forks Community Hospital, named in 1959, at 530 Bogachiel Way — has been

guided by three commissioners for 69 years. Of 57 hospital districts in the state with hospitals, Forks is one of three districts with three commissioners, District 1 Commissioner Don Lawley of Beaver said, adding that most have five. “With all the changing dynamics of medicine, we feel a

greater number of board members would help provide greater representation, a greater knowledge base and would help with decisions,” Lawley said. “It’s making sure our district is fully represented.” Forks Community Hospital is a 45-bed facility — 25 for acutecare patients and 20 for long-

term patients. The district also operates Bogachiel and Clallam Bay outpatient family practice clinics and West End Outreach Services for mental health and chemical dependency treatment and includes an adult day treatment program and family support services. PLEASE

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

VOTER TAB 2016

Number of hospital commissioners/continued

The financial impact on the district if two commissioner positions are added would be “very minimal,” Lawley said. Commissioners don’t receive the compensation for engaging in hospital district activities that they are eligible for under state law. They meet the fourth Tuesday of the month and also attend other districtrelated meetings. They receive $70 a month for serving on the board, though under state law, they are eligible for $90 a meeting. “It’s just what we’ve chosen to do,” said Lawley, 64, who retired as a quality assurance manager from Angeles Composite Technologies in Port Angeles. “Most of us look at it as a service we are providing, and obviously we are not in it for the money because we could be doing a lot of other stuff,” he added. “We take the 70 [dollars] because the lawyers once said we’ve got to take something.”

Eligible for insurance Commissioners also are eligible for health insurance, which Lawley said he receives. Board positions are sixyear at-large posts. Lawley said if voters approve the board increase, the board will select the two new commissioners. The two new commissioners would be expected to run for election in 2017, Lawley said. The top vote-getter in that election would serve six years. Lawley said the second new commissioner would serve for four years before running for re-election to ensure the new commissioners’ terms would be staggered.

CLALLAM COUNTY CHARTER

Proposed amendments

Proposition No. 1 The Board of Commissioners for the Clallam County Public Hospital District No. 1 (doing business as Forks Community Hospital) adopted Resolution No. 2016-502, concerning a proposition to increase the number of commissioners. If approved, this proposition would increase the number of commissioners serving on the board of commissioners for Clallam County Public Hospital District No. 1 from three (3) to five (5) as allowed by state law. Should this proposition be approved?  Yes  No

A

bout 600 residents of western Jefferson County who are in West Jefferson County Hospital District 1, which does have a board but does not have a hospital, also have access to the hospital services but will not take part in the election.

The current board is composed of Lawley and board President Daisy Anderson. Board member Gerry Lane recently resigned because he moved out of the district. Lawley said the board was soliciting letters of interest for Lane’s position, with hopes of replacing him by Oct. 31. Lane’s term ends Dec. 31, 2017. As of Oct. 6, there were 4,429 voters in the district. A similar process of seeking letters of interest would be employed for selecting the two new commissioners, Lawley said.

About 600 residents of western Jefferson County who are in West Jefferson County Hospital District 1, which does have a board but does not have a hospital, also have access to the hospital services but will not take part in the election. They are not district taxpayers but would have to travel to Aberdeen for hospital services, Lawley said. “They do contribute, and contribute greatly, if we are in need,” he said.

Helping hand The West Jefferson district helped the Forks district purchase digital mammography equipment and helped fund start-up costs of the hospital’s physical rehabilitation department, Lawley said. “We are in essence an extended community,” Lawley said. “When we have needs, they say, ‘Let’s help pay for that.’ “It’s a great relationship we have.”

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 55650, or at paul.gottlieb@ peninsuladailynews.com.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Two proposed amendments to the Clallam County charter are on the Nov. 8 general election ballot. One is a housekeeping measure to update charter language concerning vacancies in public offices to conform to state law. The other is a move to streamline the appeal process for county employees who have been suspended or dismissed. Clallam County is one of seven of the 39 counties in the state that operate under a home-rule charter, unlike most where procedures are dictated by the Legislature. A Charter Review Commission is elected every eight years. Fifteen members were elected to the commission during the Nov. 4, 2014, general election, five from each of the three county commissioner districts, to review the charter and recommend amendments. A variety of proposed amendments were on the November 2015 ballot. The proposal concerning public vacancies requires the charter to use the same language as state law. Specifically, the amendment would replace references to an “independent candidate” with a candidate who “states no party preference” or holds “nonpartisan office.”

Charter Amendment No. 1 The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter concerning vacancies in public offices. This amendment would require the charter to use the same language as state law when referencing vacant offices that are nonpartisan or previously held by an official that did not state a preference for a political party. Should this amendment be:  Approved  Rejected

Charter Amendment No. 2 The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter, concerning a county employee’s right to a public disciplinary hearing. This amendment would require an employee contesting a suspension or dismissal from county employment to choose (1) a hearing prescribed by county policies, or (2) a public hearing before the Board of County Commissioners as allowed by charter; thereby, eliminating the ability to pursue both. Should this amendment be:  Approved  Rejected The proposal concerning a county employee’s right to a public disciplinary hearing would require an employee contesting a suspension or dismissal from county employment to choose either a hearing

prescribed by county policies or a public hearing before the board of county commissioners as allowed by the charter. It would eliminate the present ability to pursue both.

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VOTER TAB 2016

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

13

Jefferson County

County commissioner, District 1 How should the county pay for infrastructure such as a sewer system in Port Hadlock? Dean: There is no “silver bullet” funding source. Instead, the county needs to dedicate staff time to leveraging multiple funding sources, working with residents to create a fair fee structure and financing important infrastructure projects responsibly. The funding package will, of necessity, be a patchwork of sources: federal and state grants and loans, some debt via bonding and a taxing district for those who will use and benefit most from the new services in the county. Thomas: The current $23 million plan is a huge financial burden on local citizens. I would divide the project into two phases: Phase 1: A business district sewer funded by a combination of federal and state grants, with contributions from local business partners. Phase 2: A residential section (enabling high-density housing in District 2), funded by tax receipts from newer employers. This can scale over time as funding is available. How possible is it to guarantee the financial stability of county government without increasing property or sales taxes? Dean: Growing the tax base in Jefferson County will rely most heavily on increasing the retail activity and growth in real estate, especially new construction. While both of these require careful land use planning, they are less regressive than increases in sales and property taxes, making them more fair for low- and fixedincome residents. Without an income tax, Washington’s counties struggle to fund basic services and mandates, many of which come from the state. Thomas: “Smart growth” is a buzzword you’ll hear frequently in this election, and it involves fostering economic vitality to pay for the

About the job JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Election boundaries: Countywide Voters: 24,134 as of Oct. 5 Term: Four years Meetings: First four Mondays of the month Compensation: $77,959 not including benefits, mileage reimbursement and a cellphone Duties: Decide on an annual tax levy, set land-use policy, approve ordinances, hire a county administrator, serve on regional and statewide boards, serve on the county Board of Health, which meets monthly. Approve a general fund budget: The 2016 spending plan is $18.1 million and covers 270.5 full-time-equivalent positions. Thomas: Water and sewer access are the sorts of basic things local governments were designed to provide, and we do the people a disservice by treating this as a mystery. A handful of unnecessarily restrictive land use policies, combined with a general apathy about the economic health of Districts 2 and 3, is actively preventing the tax base from growing, and this How would you keep up with causes tension with District 1 as the public demand for county its tax burdens increase. services? What can the county do to Dean: Providing services such increase access to affordable as roads, public health, safety, housing? courts and permitting is the counDean: The county needs to ty’s No. 1 job, but most of these services struggle to pay for themselves. evaluate the land and assets that it owns to assess whether it could The county must continue to be used for affordable housing. identify fair user fees for services County staff must also collaborate and create savings and efficiencies with stakeholders who are already through process improvements working on this critical issue. and technology investments. Lastly, lack of infrastructure Encouraging economic activity outside city limits makes developthrough infrastructure investments will grow the tax base and ment costs prohibitively high for allow for delivery of services such multi-family housing. as wastewater management and Developing the sewer in the drinking water throughout the Tri-Area is an essential first step county. to allow for the density and cost infrastructure demands of a growing population. Our county hasn’t seen economic growth in nearly a decade. If we don’t increase the tax base through local business revenues, then we will continue to rely on ever-higher property and sales taxes while denying basic services to two-thirds of the county.

kate dean

tim thomas

Residence: Port Townsend

Residence: Port Townsend

Phone: 360-207-4749

Phone: 360-301-0444

Email: kateforcommissioner@ gmail.com

Email: timforcommissioner@ gmail.com

Campaign website: www. kateforcommissioner.com

Campaign website: www. timforcommissioner.com

Age as of Election Day: 42 Education: Bachelor’s degree, sustainable agriculture, Western Washington University, 1996; master’s degree, public administration, Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Washington, 2015

46

Age as of Election Day:

Education: High school graduate, 1988 Occupation: President, Bernt Ericsen Excavating Inc., Port Townsend

Occupation: Regional director, North Olympic Peninsula Resource Conservation & Development Council, Port Townsend

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? I ran unsuccessfully for Port Hadlock-area District 2 Jefferson County commissioner in 2012.

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Party affiliation: Democratic Party

Party preference: Democratic Party savings necessary for affordability. Thomas: We need to bring the city of Port Townsend and Jefferson County together to grant permits to private developers for the construction of higher-density

housing options both within and next to Port Townsend, since it is currently the only place with the sewer access that high-density PLEASE

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

Jefferson County

Public utility district, Position 1 What steps should be taken to improve the functioning of the PUD? Burke: • Implement all of the state auditor’s recommendations and maximize proficiency in our financial controls and procedures. • Continue optimizing our outage procedures, including more effective coordination with JeffCom, installation of more equipment to remotely monitor and operate the grid, etc. • Better communication with customers (we just hired an employee whose job includes public outreach). • A more robust emergency response plan with greater emphasis on water, the most critical utility in a disaster. Randall: The PUD has successfully kept the power on, but the rapid growth from a small water utility to an electric utility serving all of East Jefferson County has come with significant growing pains. The PUD will not function well until its financial and budget problems are addressed. My focus would be to make the PUD financially responsible, keep the rates fair and improve the functionality of the board, which needs to make more timely decisions. How would you hold the line on increases in electricity bills for increased staffing and such services as power-line-related tree trimming? Burke: • Replace old, failing mechanical meters, which are operated by a vendor. Buying and operating our own meter system is cheaper. • Tree-trimming is one of our most cost-effective activities because it reduces outages. • Conservation, using a low base rate plus tiered consumption rates, is the most cost-effective way to meet load growth and cut carbon (Google “Seventh Power Plan” to learn more). • Time-of-use rates and demandresponse programs can reduce peak

barney burke Jeff randall Candidates’ biographies appear on next page. demand costs. Randall: The PUD now admits it lost $1 million from 2015 to 2016 and is scheduled to lose more than $3 million next year if rates aren’t increased. To keep rates fair, I would spread the rate increase evenly among all rate classes, so the rate increase would be as small as possible while providing reduced rates for low-income customers who have taken a big hit with the switch from Puget Sound Energy to the PUD. What is your position on carbon-emission-tax Initiative 732? Burke: I’m supporting it, now that the PUD cost estimate is much lower, about $144,866 in 2018 and $376,000 in 2030. Previously, the cost estimate for JPUD was $320,383 to $1,067,943 in 2018 and as much as $2,454,210 by 2025. And I agree with climatologist James Hansen, who says a carbon tax is better than cap and trade. Randall: I support I-732, not because it is perfect but because it puts a price on carbon pollution. Carbon pollution is invisible, but we know it’s harmful and is the primary contributor to climate change. Until we regulate and put a price on carbon pollution, it is unlikely we will make significant progress on reducing our carbon emissions. I don’t view I-732 as the final step to address carbon pollution but rather a good first step. How should the PUD address the need for high-speed broadband in Chimacum and other areas? Burke: If private utilities are

unwilling to extend fiber, JPUD can extend fiber funded with a local utility district approved by property owners, and ISPs [Internet service providers] can connect from there. We are looking at this option for Marrowstone and other areas. PUDs are not allowed to offer retail broadband. Nevertheless, we must continue extending our fiber network to monitor and operate the power grid, and we should make excess fiber available, wholesale, for broadband wherever it’s needed. Randall: The PUD cannot provide retail broadband service (service directly to customers) under current Washington state law, but it can provide wholesale broadband service to Internet service providers (ISPs), who provide retail service to the public. I would work to identify areas in Jefferson County that lack adequate internet service and use the PUD to work collaboratively with other parties, including ISPs, to find solutions to improve that service. How would you be a more effective PUD commissioner than your opponent? Burke: I have nearly seven years of experience overseeing local and regional public power utilities; he has none. I’m a strategic thinker who recognizes utilities need to evolve their business models to remain viable. I’m not accepting campaign contributions because I try to represent all ratepayers. I have a track record of asking the right questions and standing up for the public interest. I have the 20 to 30 hours a week required for the job. Randall: I have been following our PUD actively for four years and been working with others for positive change in the organization. PLEASE

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VOTER TAB 2016

About the job JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT COMMISSIONER POSITION 1 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Election boundaries: Countywide Voters: 24,134 as of Oct. 5 Term: Six years Meetings: First and third Tuesdays Compensation: Salary is $2,285 a month, or $27,420 a year. Per diem is $114 a day with a maximum of $15,960 a year. Health and life insurance totalling $7,445 a year. Total maximum compensation is $50,825. Duties: Decide on a tax levy, set utility rates, hire a general manager. Approve a general fund budget: The 2016 spending plan is $35.7 million to operate the district’s electricity, water and sewer services and covers 39 full-time-equivalent position.

County commissioner, District 1/continued Later, as we build infrastructure elsewhere in the county (and work with Olympia on septic requirements), more affordable housing options will become available throughout the county. How would you be a more effective county commissioner than your opponent? Dean: I have a solid track record of delivering results that benefit our communities. As the director of a local council of governments, I work every day on issues including economic development, housing and land use, and have built working relationships with local governments across the Peninsula and in Olympia.

I bring unparalleled experience to this position. I am committed to making government more effective through collaboration with business, nonprofits and engaged citizens. Thomas: The same party leadership that has neglected the needs of Districts 2 and 3 while placing an unfair tax burden on District 1 has hand-picked yet another candidate to continue the status quo. We deserve better. As a longstanding member of the local business community, I have spent decades shaping and preserving our land and water while navigating the complicated bureaucracy that oversees it. We need doers with technical expertise, not career politicians.


VOTER TAB 2016

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

15

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Brinnon levy proposition BY CYDNEY MCFARLAND AND PAUL GOTTLIEB

Proposition No. 1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

barney burke

jeff randall

Residence: Port Townsend

Residence: Port Townsend

Phone: 360-379-4081

Phone: 360-385-2575

Email: Barney@Olympus. net

Email: Jeff4PUD@gmail. com

Campaign website: www. BarneyPUD2016.org

Campaign website: www. jeff4pud.org/p/meet-jeff.html

61

Age as of Election Day:

Education: Bachelor’s degree, urban social psychology, University of California, Berkeley, 1977; master’s degree, urban planning, University of Michigan, 1979; certificate in government management, San Jose State University, 1989 Occupation: Retired city planner, economic development manager and journalist. Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Appointed to PUD in January 2010. Elected to current term in November 2010.

50

Age as of Election Day:

Education: Law degree, University of Washington School of Law, 1992; bachelor’s degree, political science, Central Washington University, 1989; Coulee-Hartline High School, Coulee City, class of 1985 Occupation: Solar designer and sales agent, Power Trip Energy, Port Townsend, and licensed attorney Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Jefferson PUD/continued I am an attorney, a trained mediator and a renewable energy professional. I have worked in both the public and private sectors and have management experience.

I have a track record of success, including serving as the volunteer campaign manager for two local bond measures that each passed with over 70 percent voter approval.

BRINNON — Brinnon-area residents will cast ballots on a five-year levy measure in the Nov. 8 general election that would fund Jefferson County Parks and Recreation District 2 with a tax levy for the first time since voters created it in 2012. The six-year property tax levy of 5 cents for every $1,000 of valuation — being proposed by the district’s five-person board — would cost the owner of a $200,000 home $10 a year from 2017-2022. It would generate an estimated $13,000 annually toward the $15,000 needed to fund district operations, said parks board Chairwoman Nichole Brakeman. “That’s what we wish we had, but we don’t,” Brakeman said. Voters created the district in 2012 with 62 percent approving the move. Current operations are covered through fundraising and donations, and pay mostly for insurance. “We have to spend a lot of time fundraising rather than creating programs and activities,” Brakeman said. “To take on any activities, we have to [pay] out of pocket and get reimbursed, which just isn’t a good system.” Levy revenue also would fund rental of an office in the Coyle Community Center and basic office needs such as paper. “We’re hoping to be more involved with the community center since we have no workspace,” Brakeman added. “We have all these great out-

The board of commissioners for Jefferson County Parks & Recreation District No. 2 adopted Resolution No. 2016-5, which, if approved, would impose property tax levies during six consecutive years beginning in 2016, with collection beginning in 2017. Will the Jefferson County Parks & Recreation District No. 2 be authorized to impose regular property tax levies of 5 cents ($0.05) or less per thousand dollars of assessed property valuation for each of six consecutive years for the district’s program operating expense? Should this levy for the program operating expenses of Jefferson County Parks and Recreation District No. 2 be approved?  Yes  No door activities but nowhere to centralize and distribute all that information. “They have been open to having us, but we would need to pay rent and our share of expenses, which is money we don’t have.” Brakeman said it also would allow for more staff training. “We’re all volunteers, so we’ve had to do training along the way, which we’ve had to pay for out of our own pockets,” she said. “Hopefully, we can also have the funds to hire a grant writer so we can start applying for grants that will benefit the community.” “It’s just hard when we have to pay out of pocket for these things,” she added. “People don’t expect that, and some can’t afford it.” A minimum 60 percent supermajority must vote in favor of the levy for it to be implemented. Any future levies would require only a 50 percent-plusone-vote majority for passage.

For the results to be valid, voting participation must equal at least 40 percent of the total of 512 voters who participated in the November 2015 general election, county Elections Supervisor Betty Johnson said. That means at least 205 voters must cast ballots to validate the election results. There were 951 registered voters as of Oct. 5. Brakeman said the community has been supportive of the proposed levy so far. However, district personnel are reaching out in the weeks before the election to address any questions or concerns community members may have, she added.

________ Jefferson County Editor/Reporter Cydney McFarland can be reached at 360385-2335, ext. 55052, or at cmcfarland@ peninsuladailynews.com. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 55650, or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.

Get it 24/7. North Olympic Peninsula news, shopping values, classified and more from

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

VOTER TAB 2016

Washington state

Advisory votes, initiatives and constitutional amendment Advisory Vote No. 14: House Bill 2768 The legislature extended, without a vote of the people, the insurance premium tax to some insurance for stand-alone family dental plans, costing an indeterminate amount in the first 10 years, for government spending.

Advisory Vote No. 15: Second Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2778 The legislature imposed, without a vote of the people, certain limitations on the retail sales and use tax exemptions for clean alternative-fuel vehicles, costing $2 million in the first 10 years, for government spending.

Initiative Measure No. 732: Concerns Taxes This measure would impose a carbon emission tax on certain fossil fuels and fossil-fuel-generated electricity, reduce the sales tax by one percentage point and increase a low-income exemption, and reduce certain manufacturing taxes.

This tax increase should be:

This tax increase should be:

Should this measure be enacted into law?

 Repealed

 Repealed

 Yes

 Maintained

 Maintained

 No

Initiative Measure No. 735: Concerns a Proposed Amendment to the Federal Constitution This measure would urge the Washington state congressional delegation to propose a federal constitutional amendment that constitutional rights belong only to individuals, not corporations, and constitutionally-protected free speech excludes the spending of money.

Initiative Measure No. 1433: Concerns Labor Standards This measure would increase the state minimum wage to $11.00 in 2017, $11.50 in 2018, $12.00 in 2019, and $13.50 in 2020, require employers to provide paid sick leave, and adopt related laws. Should this measure be enacted into law?

Should this measure be enacted into law?

 Yes

 Yes

 No

 No

Initiative Measure No. 1491: Extreme-Risk Protection Orders

Initiative Measure No. 1501: Concerns Seniors and Vulnerable Individuals

This measure would allow police, family, or household members to obtain court orders temporarily preventing firearms access by persons exhibiting mental illness, violent or other behavior indicating they may harm themselves or others.

This measure would increase the penalties for criminal identity theft and civil consumer fraud targeted at seniors or vulnerable individuals; and exempt certain information of vulnerable individuals and in-home caregivers from public disclosure.

Initiative Measure No. 1464: Concerns Campaign Finance Laws and Lobbyists This measure would create a campaign-finance system; allow residents to direct state funds to candidates; repeal the non-resident sales-tax exemption; restrict lobbying employment by certain former public employees; and add enforcement requirements. Should this measure be enacted into law?  Yes  No

Senate Joint Resolution No. 8210: Concerns the Deadline for Completing State Legislative and Congressional Redistricting This amendment would require the state redistricting commission to complete redistricting for state legislative and congressional districts by Nov. 15 of each year ending in a one, 46 days earlier than currently required.

Should this measure be enacted into law?

Should this measure be enacted into law?

Should this constitutional amendment be:

 Yes

 Yes

 Approved

 No

 No

 Rejected


VOTER TAB 2016

Federal

(president, Democrat) Elected experience: U.S. senator, New York. Other professional experience: U.S.. secretary of state; first lady of the united states; first lady of Arkansas; attorney; assistant professor, University of Arkansas school of law; director, University of Arkansas legal aid clinic; Children’s Defense Fund Education: Wellesley College; Yale Law School Community service: Chair, American Bar Association Commission on Women in the Profession; cofounder, Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families; chair, Legal Services Corporation; co-author, “Handbook on Legal Rights for Arkansas Women” Contact: 646-8541432; info@hillary clinton.com

Tim Kaine (vice president, Democrat)

Elected experience: U.S. senator, Virginia; governor of Virginia; lieutenant governor of Virginia; mayor of Richmond; city councilman, Richmond Other professional experience: Democratic National Committee Chairman; civil rights attorney; part-time professor, University of Richmond Law School Education: University of Missouri; Harvard Law School Community service: Board member, Housing Opportunities Made Equal (HOME); board member, Myotonic Dystrophy Foundation; honorary member, Virginia Foundation for Community College Education; honorary chair, United States Spain Council

Donald j. trump (president, republican)

Elected experience: None. Other professional experience: Donald J. Trump is the very definition of the American success story, continually setting the standards of excellence while expanding his interests in real estate, sports and entertainment. He is a graduate of the Wharton School of Finance. An accomplished author, Mr. Trump has authored over 15 best-sellers, and his first book, “The Art of the Deal,” is considered a business classic and one of the most successful business books of all time. Education: Wharton School of Finance Community service: Mr. Trump has long been a devoted supporter of veteran causes, raising millions of dollars for veterans. Contact: 646-7361779; info@donald trump.com

17

source of information

President/VP

Hillary Clinton

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Information on state initiatives and advisory votes, as well as federal and state candidates, is from the Washington secretary of state website at http://tinyurl.com/PDN-state voterguide. The secretary of state is not responsible for the content of statements or arguments. The state office does not fact-check or correct statements or arguments by candidates or ballot measure committees. They are printed as submitted.

Mike pence (vice president, republican)

Elected experience: Governor, state of Indiana, 2012-present; member, United States House of Representatives, 2000-12 Other professional experience: Talk show host, Network Indiana, 1994-2000; television host, 1995-99; president, Indiana Policy Review Foundation, 1991-94; attorney, private practice, 1986-90; admissions counselor, Hanover College, 198183 Education: Hanover College, Indiana University School of Law Community service: A strong supporter of the military, Pence has made a priority of reducing veteran unemployment and, while in Congress, he visited Hoosier soldiers in Iraq and/or Afghanistan every year since hostilities began.

Alyson Kennedy

osborne hart

(president, socialist workers party)

(vice president, socialist workers party)

Elected experience: Kennedy is an elected member of the Socialist Workers Party National Committee.

Elected experience: Hart, 63, ran for mayor of Philadelphia in 2015. He fought for black rights for many decades and participates in Black Lives Matter protests against police killings.

Other professional experience: Kennedy was a leader in a United Mine Workers organizing drive of mostly Mexican immigrant miners in Utah. The workers fought to unify workers regardless of where they came from. Education: As a coal miner, Kennedy was part of the Coal Employment Project to champion women’s fights to get hired in the mines. Community service: Kennedy walked picket lines with machinists on strike at Triumph Composites in Spokane. She has also physically defended clinics from those who oppose a woman’s right to choose abortion. Contact: 646922-8186; swp2016 campaign@gmail.com

Other professional experience: Hart actively protested the U.S. war in Vietnam. Education: He has joined protests in Philadelphia against the slashing of funds for public schools and assaults on the union’s wages and benefits. Community service: He joined United Steelworker members at refineries and steel plants where the union has been fighting concessions, speed-up and job cuts. He demands an end to the U.S. embargo against Cuba and return of the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo.


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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER TAB 2016

President/vice president/continued

Gloria estela la riva (president, socialism & liberation party) Elected experience: Candidate for mayor of San Francisco, 1983 and 1991; candidate for governor of California, 1994, 1998; candidate for U.S. president, 2008 Other professional experience: Elected vice president, Pacific Media Guild, CWA; graphic artist; awardwinning video producer, “Genocide by Sanctions” (Iraq 1998),“NATO Targets” (Yugoslavia 1999) Education: Attended Brandeis University Community service: Founder, Farmworkers Emergency Relief; founder and coordinator, National Committee to Free the Cuban Five; organizer, ANSWER Coalition-Act Now to Stop War & End Racism; organizer of numerous protests against war and occupation in Central America, Middle East; activist in movements against racism and police abuse and in support of women’s and LGBTQ rights.

Eugene puryear (vice president, socialism & liberation party) Elected experience: Candidate of Statehood-Green Party for District Council, Washington, D.C., 2014; Party for Socialism and Liberation candidate for vice president, 2008. Other professional experience: Author, “Shackled and Chained: Mass Incarceration in Capitalist America”; radio talk show host; blogger for Liberation News Education: Graduate, Howard University. Community service: A founder of the Jobs Not Jails Coalition and co-founder of the DCFerguson Movement, a Black Lives Matter organization in Washington, D.C.; key organizer of many marches and rallies against wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and in solidarity with Palestinian rights; frequent lecturer at colleges and universities on issues of racism, police brutality and mass incarceration. Contact: 206-3673820; seattle@pslweb. org

jill stein (president, green party) Elected experience: Lexington town meeting Other professional experience: Physician. Education: M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1979; B.A., psychology-sociologyanthropology, Harvard University, 1973 Community service: Dr. Jill Stein is a mother, housewife, physician, longtime teacher of internal medicine, and pioneering environmental-health advocate. She served in elected leadership roles with the Coalition for Healthy Communities, Citizens for Voter Choice and the national Physicians for Social Responsibility. She won several awards including Clean Water Action’s Not in Anyone’s Backyard Award, the Children’s Health Hero Award, and the Toxic Action Center’s Citizen Award. In 2002, she ran for governor against Mitt Romney. In 2012, she was the Green Party’s candidate for president. Contact: 801-3037922; hq@jill2016.com

ajamu baraka

darrell l. castle

(vice president, green party)

Scott n. bradley

(president, constitution party)

(vice president, constitution party)

Elected experience: NA. Other professional experience: Founding director, U.S. Human Rights Network (200411) with 300 organization and 1,500 individual members working on the full spectrum of U.S. human rights issues; taught political science at Clark Atlanta University, Spelman College and others; guest lecturer at academic institutions throughout the U.S.; authored several articles on international human rights Education: University of South Florida, Clark Atlanta University Community service: Served on boards of Amnesty International (USA), National Center for Human Rights Education, Center for Constitutional Rights, Africa Action, Latin American Caribbean Community Center, Diaspora Afrique, and Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights. Currently on boards of Praxis Project and Cooperation Jackson.

Elected experience: None. Other professional experience: Darrell Castle and Associates Law Firm, based in Memphis, Tenn., 1984-present; works with poor and injured people Education: Graduate of Ketron High School in Kingsport, Tenn.; B.A. in political science and B.A. in history, East Tennessee State University, 1970. Juris Doctor, Memphis State University, 1979 Community service: ROTC at East Tennessee State University; USMC combat officer, Vietnam, 197173; founder of Mia’s Children Foundation, which provides services to homeless gypsy children in Bucharest, Romania; local church leader Contact: 901-4815441; info@castle2016. com

Elected experience: U.S. Senate candidate, 2006 and 2010 Other professional experience: Currently a business owner, author and lecturer on American’s founding principles; previously fulfilled positions in corporate management and university administration Education: Bachelor of Science; Master of Public Administration; Ph.D. in constitutional law Community service: Founder and chairman of the Constitution Commemoration Foundation, an organization seeking to foster increased understanding and application of the original intent of the Founders of our Constitution; formerly executive director of Trapper Trails Council of Boy Scouts of America; author of book and lecture series titled “To Preserve the Nation,” a work intended to illuminate the principles of sound government and liberty.


VOTER TAB 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

U.S. senator 6-year term

gary johnson (president, libertarian party) Elected experience: Governor of New Mexico, 1995-2003 Other professional experience: Despite his two terms as governor, Gary Johnson still prefers to call himself an entrepreneur. To pay for college, he started a doorto-door handyman business. Twenty years later, the one-man-shop had grown into one of the largest construction companies in New Mexico, with more than 1,000 employees. Education: B.S., University of New Mexico Community service: Gov. Johnson has been and remains involved in a range of volunteer activities and organizations both in his home state of New Mexico and nationally. Areas of particular interest involve drug policy reform and environmental stewardship. Contact: 801-3037922

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

19

Governor 4-year term

bill weld (vice president, libertarian party) Elected experience: Governor of Massachusetts, 1991-97 Other professional experience: Assistant U.S. attorney general in charge of the Criminal Division of the Justice Department; U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, 1981-86; staff member in both houses of Congress Education: Harvard Law School (J.D., cum laude); Harvard College (B.A., summa cum laude); Oxford University (DegreeEP, with distinction) Community service: Throughout his career, Gov. Weld has been involved in many civic and national organizations.

Patty Murray

Chris Vance

(prefers Democratic Party)

(prefers republican Party)

Elected experience: Shoreline School Board, state senator, U.S. senator Other professional experience: Shoreline Community College Cooperative Preschool teacher Education: Graduate, Washington State University Community service: No information submitted Contact: 206-6594915; campmail@patty murray.com

Elected experience: Elected twice to the Washington state House of Representatives and twice to the Metropolitan King County Council. Other professional experience: Currently adjunct professor, University of Washington; public affairs consultant and small-business owner; special assistant, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction Education: Bachelor of Arts, political science, Western Washington University Community service: Chris and Ann Vance are regular volunteers with Reach Out Federal Way, a program to serve the homeless in South King County. Chris coached youth sports for many years and is the past president of the Auburn Youth Soccer Association. Contact: 253-3260816; info@chrisvance forsenate.com.

jay inslee

bill bryant

(prefers Democratic Party)

(prefers republican Party)

Elected experience: Washington state House of Representatives 198992 representing Yakima Valley; U.S. House of Representatives 1993-94 representing Eastern Washington; U.S. House of Representatives 19992012 representing Kitsap, King and Snohomish Counties; Washington state governor 2013-present Other professional experience: Attorney; author, “Apollo’s Fire: Igniting America’s Clean Energy Economy” Education: Ingraham High School, Seattle; University of Washington, B.A. in economics, 1972; graduated magna cum laude from Willamette University Law School, 1976 Community service: Charter member of Hoopaholics to raise money for Childhaven; coached youth sports; served as honorary board member of the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition Contact: 206-5330575; Jay@JayInslee.com

Elected experience: Commissioner, Port of Seattle Other professional experience: Founder, Bryant Christie Inc., a company that helps farmers export (1992-present); vice president, Northwest Horticultural Council (Yakima, 1985-92); director, Governor’s Council on International Trade (1984-85) Education: Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service (B.S.F.S., trade/diplomacy, Asia/Latin America) Community service: Volunteer night manager, St. James shelter for homeless men (2004-06); founding board member, Nisqually River Foundation; former board member of Stewardship Partners, Washington Council on International Trade, Spokane International Trade Alliance; member, Gov. Gregoire’s transportation task force; Rotary (Olympia, Yakima, Seattle); 2010 Maritime Public Official of the Year Contact: 253-2205051; info@billbryantfor governor.com


20

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER TAB 2016

State

Lieutenant governor 6-year term

Secretary of state

Treasurer 4-year term

4-year term

Cyrus habib

marty mcclendon

kim wyman

tina podlodowski

duane davidson

michael waite

(prefers Democratic Party)

(prefers republican Party)

(prefers republican Party)

(prefers democratic Party)

(prefers republican Party)

(prefers republican Party)

Elected experience: State senator, 48th Legislative District; member of the Senate Democratic Leadership Team; Democratic whip; former state representative, 48th Legislative District; former vice chairman of the Economic Development Committee Other professional experience: Attorney at Perkins Coie representing entrepreneurs and small businesses; professor at Seattle University Law School Education: Public school graduate; additional coursework at the Washington State School for the Blind; bachelor’s from Columbia; master’s from Oxford (Rhodes Scholar); law degree from Yale Community service: Advisory board, University of Washington Eye Institute; board of directors, 5th Avenue Theatre; board of directors, Bellevue College Foundation; former King County civil rights commissioner; parishioner, St. James Cathedral Contact: 425-6799103; cyrus@cyrushabib. com

Elected experience: Precinct committee officer 26-335, 26th LDRC president, 2012-14. Other professional experience: Anesthesia technician, 19872000; small-business owner/entrepreneur, pastor, 2002-present; real estate managing broker, 1999-present; radio talk show host, 2015-present Education: Attended University of Washington pre-medicine, anesthesia technician training and certification, biblical and polity training, and certificate for pastoring; mortgage brokers training and license, life insurance license, real estate managing broker’s training and license, and thousands of hours of continuing education; sales training with negotiation and presentation Community service: Boys & Girls Club; Make-A-Wish Foundation; Rotary; Leukemia Foundation; Little League; World Vision Contact: 206-8184308; info@electmarty. com

Elected experience: Washington secretary of state, 2013-present; Thurston County auditor, 2001-13 Other professional experience: Served 10 years as Thurston County elections manager, assistant records manager; 18 months as a U.S. Army civilian training specialist Education: Bachelor of Arts, California State University, Long Beach, 1985; Master of Public Administration, Troy State University, 1990; Certified Elections Registration Administrator (CERA), Auburn University/Election Center, 2004-present; Washington state certified election administrator, 1995-present Community service: Jennifer Dunn Leadership Institute Board chair, honorary cochair NTPS Levy Committee, Washington Historical Society Board of Directors; YMCA Youth and Government Advisory Board; TVW Board of Directors; Lacey Rotary Club Contact: 360-7466668; Kim@kimwyman. com

Elected experience: Seattle City Council member Other professional experience: Director and senior manager at Microsoft; senior vice president at Porter Novelli; Puget Sound Business Journal “Woman of Excellence” Education: University of Hartford, Bachelor of Science, computer engineering Community service: Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Puget Sound; co-founder of Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility; Washington Citizens for Fairness; CITIES Technology and Leadership Project, Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle “Spirit Award”; Human Rights Campaign Contact: 206-4191364; Tina@votersfor tina.com

Elected experience: Benton County treasurer, 2003-present Other professional experience: Certified Public Accountant (CPA); former chief finance officer for Benton County Auditor’s Office; former assistant state auditor; loan officer for a consumer finance company Education: Tolt High School, Carnation; associate degree from Bellevue Community College, Bellevue; bachelor degree in accounting from Central Washington University Community service: Current president, Washington State Association of County Treasurers; past president, Atomic City Kiwanis; past president, Tri-City Industry Kiwanis; current treasurer for TriCity Kiwanis Foundation; past church treasurer and member of Gideon’s International; precinct committee officer and past treasurer for the Benton County Republican Party Contact: 509-3663646; Duane@elect DuaneDavidson.org

Elected experience: You deserve a finance professional — not a professional politician — as your state treasurer. While this is my first run for office, I’m the only candidate with 15-plus years of private sector finance, investment and accounting experience. Other professional experience: Senior VP of operations, Bentall Kennedy, managing $11.1 billion of assets; head of accounting, Cascade Investment (Bill & Melinda Gates’s investment firm), managed $70 billion of assets Education: Master of Business Administration, Emory University; Bachelor of Business Administration, accounting and management, Columbus State University Community service: United Way of King County board member (2012-15); Finance and Audit Committees (2008-15); Early Learning Impact Council (2012-present) Contact: 425-2338176; info@HireMichael Waite.com


VOTER TAB 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

21

State

Auditor 4-year term

Attorney general 4-year term

Commissioner of public lands 4-year term

mark miloscia

pat (patrice) McCarthy

bob ferguson

Joshua B. Trumbull

steve mclaughlin

hilary franz

(prefers republican Party)

(prefers democratic Party)

(prefers democratic Party)

(prefers libertarian Party)

(prefers republican Party)

(prefers democratic Party)

Elected experience: State senator, 2015-present; state representative, 19992013; chair, House Audit Review Committee; chair, Senate Accountability Committee; commissioner, Lakehaven Utility District, 1996-99 Other professional experience: Air Force B-52 pilot, contract manager for Boeing’s B-1 program, quality examiner for the Baldrige National Performance Program; Tacoma Goodwill director managing three businesses serving individuals with disabilities; substitute teacher, Auburn School District Education: B.S., engineering, USAF Academy; MBA, University of North Dakota; M.S., clinical psychology, Chapman University Community service: Federal Way Boys & Girls Club board; Lake Dolloff PTA VP; FW Community Caregiving Network Board president serving meals to the needy and housing homeless women with children Contact: 253-8397087; miloscia@comcast. net

Elected experience: Pierce County executive, currently serving her second term. Pat leads a county government with 3,000 employees. Previously elected as Pierce County auditor (2005 County Auditor of the Year) and 12 years as a Tacoma School Board member. Other professional experience: Sound Transit, recent chair; 2015 U.S. Open Championship, chair; board member, Alliance for a Healthy South Sound, Tacoma-Pierce County Economic Development Board, South Sound Military & Communities Partnership Education: B.A., University of Washington, Tacoma Community service: Sexual Assault Center of Pierce County, emeritus; United Way of Pierce County; received awards for land conservation, open government and access to justice Contact: 253-6938147 pat@patmccarthy. org

Elected experience: Washington’s 18th attorney general Other professional experience: Law clerk in Spokane for Chief Judge Nielsen of the Federal District Court of Eastern Washington; law clerk for Judge Bright of the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals; attorney at Preston, Gates & Ellis (now K&L Gates), one of Washington’s leading law firms Education: Blanchet High School; B.A.; University of Washington; J.D., New York University School of Law Community service: Bob and his family are active in St. Catherine’s Church; Bob joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps after college and directed an emergency services office. Contact: 206-4862621; info@electbob ferguson.com

Elected experience: Absolutely no political experience. Other professional experience: I grew up working at my dad’s auto body shop and my grandma’s autoparts store in Snohomish. During college, I worked in house painting, banking and real estate. Importantly, I have had the privilege of helping people in my law practice. Education: Snohomish High School, Snohomish, 2000; University of Washington, B.A. in business administration and management, 2004; Seattle University, Albers School of Business and Economics, MBA, 2005; Gonzaga University School of Law, 2008 Community service: Lake Stevens Youth Soccer. I provide a significant amount of reduced-fee legal work to community members. Contact: 425-3097700; josh@joshua trumbull.com

Elected experience: None. Other professional experience: Commander, U.S. Navy (retired), I honorably served 25 years; Incident Command System instructor (10 years), I’ve trained nearly 1,000 firefighters and public safety personnel in incident management; security systems program manager (10 years) Education: B.S., University of Oregon, health and biology; PSC Royal Naval College; M.A. (with distinction), U.S. Naval War College Community service: Rotary Club of Wenatchee; Liberty Disaster Relief Services (executive director); Navy League of the United States; American Alpine Club (10 years); relief and reconstruction drives for victims of Oso landslide and Eastern Washington fires; chairman, Operation Steadfast Veteran’s Suicide Prevention Contact: 509-8854541; Steve@mac4lands. org

Elected experience: Bainbridge Island City Council; served on Puget Sound Transportation Futures Taskforce; Puget Sound Regional Council Growth Management and Economic Development boards; Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Council; Kitsap Regional Coordinating Council; appointed to Gov. Gregoire’s Climate Action Team Other professional experience: Executive director, Futurewise, 2011-present, crafting solutions to complex land use and natural resource issues statewide; attorney, representing communities, local government and nonprofits on critical cases involving agriculture, forest, fish and wildlife, and waterways Education: J.D., Northeastern University; B.A., Smith College Community service: Former board member of Washington Environmental Council and Conservation Northwest; active in the education of three teenage sons Contact: 206-7349729; hilary@hilaryfranz. com


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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER TAB 2016

State

Superintendent Supreme Court Insurance of public justice, instruction commissioner Position 1 4-year term

erin jones

chris reykdal

Elected experience: Erin Jones is a state and national award-winning teacher and district/state administrator. She has never sought elected office. Other professional experience: AVID district director, Tacoma Public Schools; director of equity, Federal Way Public Schools; assistant superintendent of Student Achievement and director, OSPI; instructional coach, Spokane Public Schools; substitute and classroom teacher, Tacoma; teacher, South Bend, Ind. Education: B.A., Bryn Mawr College; teaching certificate, PLU Community service: Youth ministry leader, 1993-2006; YoungLife leader, 2006-08; board member: Girl Scouts of Western Washington, College Spark, Recruiting Washington Teachers, Center for the Strengthening of Teaching Profession, Washington Alliance of Black School Educators Contact: 360-9183498; Erinjonesin2016@ gmail.com

Elected experience: Tumwater School Board; Washington State House of Representatives, vice chair of the House Education Committee; Higher Education Committee; Finance Committee; formerly served on the Education Appropriations Committee Other professional experience: Classroom teacher (James Madison Teaching Fellowship finalist); education budget and finance executive, state Board for Community and Technical Colleges Education: Baccalaureate degree in social studies and a Washington state teaching certificate, Washington State University; master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis on budget, finance and performance management, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Community service: Parent volunteer in schools, coach, former planning commissioner and nonprofit fundraiser Contact: 360-7903151; chris4wakids@ gmail.com

4-year term

mike kreidler

richard shrock

(prefers democratic Party)

(prefers republican Party)

Elected experience: Served as insurance commissioner since 2001. Also served as a North Thurston School Board member, state representative and senator for the 22nd Legislative District and U.S. representative for the 9th Congressional District. Other professional experience: Worked as an optometrist for 20 years; small-business owner; served as director, Region 10, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Education: Bachelor’s degree and Doctor of Optometry from Pacific University; master’s degree in public health from UCLA Community service: Retired U.S. Army Reserve lieutenant colonel with 20 years of service; active member of a number of community service organizations Contact: 360-8196956; mike@mike kreidler.com

Elected experience: Richard Schrock is serving his second term as commissioner of Snohomish County Fire District No. 1, one of state’s largest regional fire departments. Other professional experience: Richard Schrock served four years as director, Washington State Department of Commerce (under Gov. John Spellman). He successfully led state efforts to grow international trade, promote tourism and attract new businesses to Washington, creating thousands of new jobs. Professional communications consultant who advises businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. Education: St. Martins College, political science Community service: Board member, Snohomish County Emergency Radio System (SERS); founding board member of the Lake Stickney Conservancy and Sno-King Watershed Council Contact: 425-7459380; Richard@ commissionerschrock. com

6-year term

mary yu

david dewolf

Legal/ judicial experience: Supreme Court justice; 14 years as trial judge; instructor and distinguished jurist in residence, Seattle University School of Law; seven years, King County Prosecutor’s Office Other professional experience: Co-chair, Minority and Justice Commission; advisory board, UW Gates Law Scholars Program; director, Peace and Justice Office, Archdiocese of Chicago Education: J.D., University of Notre Dame Law School; M.A., Theology, Mundelein of Loyola University; B.A., Dominican University Community service: Co-chair, WSBAUW Leadership Institute; board member, FareStart; distinguished speaker on civility in the legal profession, access to justice and reducing court financial barriers; mentor to minority and disadvantaged students statewide Contact: 206-6827328; mary@justice maryyu.com

Legal/ judicial experience: Professor David DeWolf taught at Gonzaga Law School for 28 years. Previously, he was an attorney at Lukins & Annis and clerked for the Idaho Supreme Court. The author of five volumes of “The Washington Practice,” he is an expert in the Constitution, contracts and torts. Other professional experience: Washington Pattern Instruction Committee Education: B.A., Stanford University (Phi Beta Kappa); teaching credential, University of California at Santa Barbara; J.D., Yale Law School Community service: Member of the Spokane Public Schools Human Growth & Development Committee; lector, Mary Queen Parish; president of Artisan’s Ark, helping the developmentally disabled find employment Contact: 509-3152224; David@DeWolf ForJustice.org


VOTER TAB 2016

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

State

Supreme Court Supreme Court justice, justice, Position 5 Position 6 6-year term

6-year term

barbara madsen

greg zempel

Legal/ judicial experience: Justice, Supreme Court (1992-present); chief justice, (2009-present); judge, Seattle Municipal Court (1988-92); presiding judge (1990-92); commissioner, Seattle Municipal Court (1986-88); special prosecutor, Seattle City Attorney (1981-86); attorney, Snohomish Public Defender (197981); attorney, Associated Counsel for the Accused (1977-79); intern, Spokane County Legal Services (1975-76); University Legal Assistance (1976-77) Other professional experience: Production staff, Northwest Catholic Newspaper Education: B.A., University of Washington; J.D., Gonzaga University Community service: Barbara and Don raised four children in Pierce County. She has volunteered with Judges in the Classroom, U.S. Navy Sea Cadets, Tacoma Rescue Mission and YMCA Youth in Government. Contact: 253-9053272; JusticeBarbara Madsen@gmail.com

Legal/ judicial experience: Greg Zempel is in his sixth term as Kittitas County prosecutor. Greg has handled nearly every type of criminal prosecution, from shoplifting to murder. He serves as the head of the county’s civil division, advising the county on complex legal issues. Other professional experience: Past president, Washington Association of County Officials Education: B.A., University of Washington; J.D., University of Puget Sound; proud graduate of Roosevelt High School in Seattle Community service: Greg helped create the Sexual Assault Interagency Coalition and Protecting Our Children, a group that educates parents on the risks of sexual predators. He has coached youth soccer and baseball. Contact: 509-4367819; Greg.Zempel@ ZempelForJustice.org

charles (charlie) wiggins Legal/ judicial experience: State Supreme Court, 2010-present Other professional experience: Justice Wiggins has served on the state Court of Appeals, as a pro-tem Superior Court judge and in private practice for over 30 years. Education: Justice Wiggins graduated from Princeton University with honors. He served four years in the Army, earning an MBA and rising to captain. The G.I. Bill helped Wiggins attend Duke Law School. Community service: Justice Wiggins is an active volunteer, traveling to Albania to assist judges transitioning from communism to democracy, performing award-winning work with Habitat for Humanity and his church, and assisting poor clients without payment. Contact: 253-2274954; info@justice charliewiggins.com

dave larson Legal/ judicial experience: Judge Larson is the presiding judge of the Federal Way Municipal Court. Larson has 23 years of legal experience in both state and federal courts. He has handled complex civil litigation. Other professional experience: Former president, Federal Way School Board Education: B.A., public administration, University of Puget Sound; J.D., Seattle University School of Law Community service: Judge Larson remains very active in the Federal Way Schools. He is a member of the Council on Public Legal Education and Kiwanis. He founded Aktion Club of Federal Way, a service club for people with developmental disabilities. Contact: 206-2572075; JudgeLarson@ LarsonForJustice.org

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 8, 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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