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Breast Cancer Awareness

EDUCATION UNDERSTANDING EMPOWERMENT An advertising supplement produced by Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette


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October 2016

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

OCTOBER 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS & SEQUIM GAZETTE

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Breast Cancer Awareness is an advertising supplement published by the Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 147 W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 peninsuladailynews.com | 360-452-2345 sequimgazette.com | 360-683-3311

regional publisher | Terry R. Ward general manager | Steve Perry special sections editors | Pat Morrison Coate, Brenda Hanrahan and Laura Lofgren

Proud Supporter of Breast Cancer Awareness

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October 2016

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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prepare: Your next mammography visit METROCREATIVE

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OCTOBER IS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH Please join us in support of Operation Uplift, Port Angeles Cancer Support Group. Shop at Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co. and Hartnagel Building Supply on PINK SATURDAY, October 22nd 2016 and we’ll donate 5% of ALL RETAIL SALES to Operation Uplift!

may be optimal. Some facilities require you to wear a paper gown for the exam. •  Watch your grooming practices. You’ll be advised to abstain from wearing powder, perfume, deodorant, ointment and lotions on the chest or around the area. These substances may look like an abnormalities on the mammogram image, potentially resulting in false positive diagnoses. •  Take an over-thecounter pain medication. Mammograms are not necessarily painful, but they can put pressure on the breasts, which creates discomfort. Breasts are compressed between a plastic plate and the imaging machine. This spreads out the tissue and helps create a clearer picture.

If your breasts are tender, medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen taken an hour before the appointment may ease discomfort. •  Expect a short visit. Mammogram appointments typically last around 30 minutes. The technician will mark any moles or birthmarks around the breasts so they can be ignored on the imaging. You’ll be asked to hold your breath as the images are taken. If the images are acceptable, you are free to go. But new images may be needed in some instances. Mammograms are now a routine part of women’s preventative health care. The procedure is simple and appointments are quick and relatively painless.

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Annual mammograms are widely recommended for women beginning at age 40. Some estimates suggest that more than 48 million mammography screenings are performed in the United States every year. Whether it is a woman’s first mammography or her 20th, preparing for the appointment can ease anxiety and make the experience go more smoothly. The following are some guidelines to consider when preparing for a mammography visit. •  Choose a reputable and certified facility. Select a radiology center that is certified by the FDA, which means it meets current standards and is safe. Many women also prefer to select a facility that is covered by their health insurance. Plans usually allow for one mammogram screening per year. •  Time your visit. Schedule the mammogram to take place one week after your menstrual period if you have not reached menopause. Breasts are less likely to be tender at this time. Also, schedule your visit for a time when you are not likely to feel rushed or stressed. Early in the day works best for many. •  Dress for the occasion. Two-piece ensembles enable you to only remove your shirt and bra for the examination. A blouse that opens in the front

October 2016

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette

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October 2016

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

explained: The stages of breast cancer

But stage IB breast cancers also may refer to instances when there is both a tumor in the breast that is no larger than 2 centimeters and small groups of cancer cells in the lymph nodes that are larger than 0.2 millimeter but no larger than 2 millimeters. The ACS notes that the five-year survival rate for stage I breast cancers is roughly 100 percent.

METROCREATIVE

Upon receiving a breast cancer diagnosis, patients will soon receive a pathology report that informs them about the stage their cancer is in. The stage indicates how advanced the cancer is and whether it is limited to one area of the breast or has spread to other tissue or even other parts of the body. Understanding the stages of breast cancer can help patients cope with their diagnoses more effectively. Once the doctor has completed all the necessary testing, patients will then receive their pathology reports, which will include the stage of the cancer. The following rundown of the various stages of breast cancer can help breast cancer patients better understand their disease.

STAGE 0 Noninvasive breast cancers are considered to be in stage 0. When doctors have determined the cancer is in stage 0, that means they have not seen any indication that the cancer cells or the abnormal noncancerous cells have spread out of the part of the breast in which they started. Breast cancer patients may hear the term “five-year survival rate” when discussing their disease with their physicians. The five-year survival rate refers to the

percentage of people who live at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), the five-year survival rate for women with stage 0 breast cancer is nearly 100 percent.

STAGE I Stage I refers to invasive breast cancer and is broken down into two categories: stage IA and stage IB.

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Stage IA refers to invasive breast cancers in which the tumor is up to two centimeters and the cancer has not spread outside the breast. The lymph nodes are not involved in stage IA breast cancers. In some stage IB breast cancers, there is no tumor in the breast but there are small groups of cancer cells in the lymph nodes larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters.

STAGE II Stage II breast cancers are also divided into two subcategories: stage IIA and stage IIB. Both subcategories are invasive, but stage II breast cancers are more complex than stage 0 or stage I breast cancers. Stage IIA describes breast cancers in which no tumor can be found in the breast, but cancer that is larger than 2 millimeters is found in one to three axillary lymph nodes (the lymph nodes under the arm) or in the lymph nodes near the breast bone. But an invasive breast cancer can still be considered stage IIA if the tumor measures two centimeters or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or if the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters and has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes. >> STAGES, continued on 7

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<< STAGES, continued from 6 Stage IIB breast cancer describes breast cancers in which the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but no larger than 5 centimeters, and there are small groups of breast cancer cells in the lymph nodes. These small groups of cells are larger than 0.2 millimeters but no larger than 2 millimeters. Stage IIB may also be used to describe breast cancers in which the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but no larger than 5 centimeters and the cancer has spread to between one and three axillary lymph nodes or to lymph nodes near the breastbone. Tumors that are larger than 5 centimeters but have not spread to the axillary lymph nodes may also be referred to as stage IIB breast cancers. The five-year survival rate for stage II breast cancers is about 93 percent.

STAGE III Stage III cancers are invasive breast cancers broken down into three categories: IIIA, IIIB and IIIC. When patients are diagnosed with stage IIIA breast cancer, that means doctors may not have found a tumor in their breast or the tumor may be any size.

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette In stage IIIA, cancer may have been found in four to nine axillary lymph nodes or in the lymph nodes near the breastbone. Tumors larger than 5 centimeters that are accompanied by small groups of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but no larger than 2 millimeters) in the lymph nodes also indicate a breast cancer has advanced to stage IIIA. But stage IIIA also may be used to describe breast cancers in which the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters and the cancer has spread to one to three axillary lymph nodes or to the lymph nodes near the breastbone. A stage IIIB breast cancer diagnosis indicates the tumor may be any size and has spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast, causing swelling or an ulcer. The cancer may have spread to up to nine axillary lymph nodes or may have spread to the the axillary lymph nodes or lymph nodes lymph nodes near the breastbone. In stage IIIC breast cancer, doctors may near the breastbone. The ACS notes that women diagnosed not see any sign of cancer in the breast. If with stage III breast cancer are often sucthere is a tumor, it may be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or cessfully treated and that the five-year survival rate is 72 percent. the skin of the breast. To be categorized as stage IIIC, the canSTAGE IV cer must also have spread to 10 or more Invasive breast cancers that have axillary lymph nodes or to the lymph nodes above or below the collarbone or to spread beyond the breast and lymph

October 2016

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nodes to other areas of the body are referred to as stage IV. Stage IV breast cancer may be a recurrence of a previous breast cancer, though some women with no prior history of breast cancer receive stage IV diagnoses. The five-year survival rate for stage IV breast cancers is 22 percent. More information about breast cancer is available at www.breastcancer.org.

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October 2016

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

support: YMCA offers program Area cancer survivors have access to a free strength and wellness program designed specifically for them thanks to a partnership between the Olympic Peninsula YMCA and Olympic Medical Center. The 12-week program, Exercise and Thrive, is available to all adult cancer survivors, regardless of when their cancer occurred. The curriculum was developed by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle after what the center identified as gaps in support for cancer survivors after treatment. Fred Hutchinson reached out to YMCAs to deliver the program in communities across the country. Studies show that exercise can improve quality of life, lessen treatment side effects and help recovery. Participants in the YMCA’s program strengthen muscles, increase flexibility and improve endurance while receiving health-and-wellness coaching from YMCA personal trainers during biweekly sessions. They also are

introduced to mind/body activities like yoga and have the opportunity to learn about healthy eating. The ultimate goal of the program is to help survivors develop their own physical fitness regimen that they can continue on their own after the program ends. The next session of Exercise and Thrive in Port Angeles will begin this month. The 12-week session will be held on Mondays and Wednesdays from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning Monday, Oct. 10. Contact Karen Rushby, a physical therapist at Olympic Medical Center who specializes in cancer rehabilitation, for a consultation and to receive your medical screening/ permission form. She can be reached at 360-417-7116. Participants must be 21 years of age or older, 90 days out of treatment and have medical clearance to participate. For more information about Exercise and Thrive, contact Mikki Hughes, health and well-being coordinator at the YMCA, at 360-452-9244 or mikkireidelymca@gmail.com.

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According to the World Health Organization (WHO), breast cancer survival rates vary greatly worldwide. While survival rates range from 80 percent or better in North America and countries such as Sweden and Japan, those figures drop to roughly 60 percent in middle-income countries. Low-income countries fare the worst, with survival rates below 40 percent. The WHO attributes the low survival rates in low-income countries to inadequate diagnosis and treatment facilities and the lack of early detection programs. Early detection is often essential when battling breast cancer, as late-stage survival rates are low regardless of where a person lives.


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October 2016

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette “We bring in top tier Seattle entertainment, feature ‘pink drink’ specials, run raffles, giveaways and more. “It’s really about having a great time, wearing pink, and spreading awareness,” he said. Special musical guests Notorious 253 will perform favorite hits throughout the evening. “A great sense of community is important when battling The sixth annual Pink Party for Breast Cancer Aware- something that has affected so many people around us,” ness will take place at 7 Cedars Casino, 270756 U.S. Cathro said. “In hosting the Pink Party, we hope to further Highway 101, Blyn, on Saturday, Oct. 15. spread awareness in our community, as well as raise funds From 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., the casino and Club Seven pres- for the research and treatment of breast cancer.” ent the event, officially called Pink Party 6: Passionately The breast cancer awareness event also boasts VIP Pink for the Cure! bottle service sections, drink specials, party favors, Anyone ages 21 and older is encouraged to wear pink themed decor and more. and “party for a cure.” “If you have been or know somebody who has been Wear pink and $5 per person — for the first 200 affected by breast cancer, this is a great way to show attendees — will be donated to the Olympic Medical your support, spread awareness and party for a cure,” Cancer Center, courtesy of 7 Cedars Casino. Cathro said. There is no cover charge. For more information about VIP bottle service sec“The 7 Cedars Pink Party is an event we host every tions, email vip@7cedarsresort.com. For more informaOctober to raise awareness and funds for breast cancer tion on the Pink Party 6: Passionately Pink for the Cure! research,” said Tristan Cathro, marketing assistant at 7 event, contact Cathro at tcathro@7cedarsresort.com or Cedars Casino. 360-582-2489, or visit www.7cedarsresort.com.

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Three golden rules to remember:

Every October, the international community promotes Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In the United States, one woman in nine will be afflicted with this type of cancer during her lifetime. This is why it is so important to raise awareness of the ways to prevent this disease from developing. Of course, priority has to be placed on screening because the sooner a cancer is detected, the higher the chances of survival are. For women 50 years and older, the simple fact of having a mammogram as well as a breast examination every two years reduces the death rate in 50- to 69-year-olds by more than 25%! So it’s clear that breast cancer rates would be reduced significantly if all women had regular breast examinations.

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October 2016

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

story: Suzie’s full of thankfulness SUZIE BLIVEN BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR

My grandmother died of breast cancer in 1969 at the young age of 56. I was 12. While I have several warm memories of times spent with her as a child, my last memories were of her lying in bed and then a lot of adults crying at her funeral. From my childhood perspective, the outcome for a diagnosis of breast cancer was likely death. In the 60s, folks didn’t talk to children about death and dying and certainly not the “C” word. So when I got the results back from a biopsy in August 2003 stating the small lump that showed up in my mammogram was cancerous, I feared the worst. I didn’t know at the

time that my type of breast cancer was barely stage 1 and so small (neither I nor my doctor had felt anything during a manual exam), that it would be treatable with just surgery and some radiation for good measure. I learned later it was diagnosed as “ductal carcinoma in situ,” a more common type of breast cancer and probably affected by estrogen.

PRE-SURGERY

That September, I was sent to the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington for pre-surgery testing. On my 46th birthday, I remember lying face down with my left breast hanging through a hole in the table as someone took images from another room. I remember feeling nervous and afraid, still not

understanding at the time how lucky my outcome would be. They took out the small lump and one lymph node a week later. Other than a sleepless night in a cheap motel the night before and green pee from the injection to find the sentinel node, everything went very smoothly. We even were able to get in front of the ferry line on our way home due to “hospital patient” status.

HEALING & GUILT

After the surgery, I met with an oncologist who recommended five years of a drug called Tamoxifen that would inhibit estrogen production — the cancer culprit in my situation. I also did several weeks of radiation at the newly built cancer center in Sequim, finishing up by December.

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My body healed up just fine. There was no “lymphedema,” which sometimes can happen to cancer survivors when lymph nodes are removed. My emotions took a bit longer to heal, however. The fear of the cancer coming back stayed with me for a long time. I also have to admit I had a bit of “survivor’s guilt.” My breast cancer journey was not as rough an ordeal as one of my cousin’s or, later on, a few relatives’ and girlfriends’.

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B’s Organic Gardening. I figured some time in the sun and the dirt would be good for my soul. It was. I also got involved in Operation Uplift, a cancer support group, of very fun and nurturing women who had “been there, done that.” They offered a free yoga class that helped me realize my body was still very capable in spite of the cancer. I later went on to teach “Nia,” a fusion of dance, martial arts and healing arts. Besides staying active and eating healthier, “be here now” and “live life fully” became my mottos as I’m sure it has been for other cancer survivors.

I try to remind myself daily of all that I have to be thankful for. I eventually went back to my social work job for a while but then decided to pursue a massage therapy license with the intention of opening a small studio next door to my aging parents. My dad had a stroke and also is dealing with his own cancer journey now. He has lymphoma and leukemia. It’s not fun hanging out in doctors’ offices or at the hospital for blood transfusions, but I am so thankful for the time I have with them both and I’m doing my darndest to be here now.


Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October 2016

Peninsula Daily News & Sequim Gazette

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exercise: Working out after breast cancer METROCREATIVE

Routine exercise is an essential element of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise can help people maintain healthy weights, reduce stress and lower their risk for various diseases. After surviving breast cancer, many survivors wonder if it’s safe to return to the exercise regimens they followed prior to being diagnosed. Breast cancer survivors can benefit from exercise, but it’s important that they prioritize safety when working out. Survivors who have had breast cancer surgery may be at risk of lymphedema, a condition characterized by swelling of the soft tissues of the arm, hand, trunk or breast. That swelling is sometimes accompanied by discomfort and numbness, and some people dealing with lymphedema also experience infection. Breastcancer.org, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing up-to-date information about breast cancer, notes that some exercise may be especially risky for breast cancer survivors. These exercises include: •  swimming laps using strokes with arm movements •  activities that involve the usage of resistance bands •  pull-ups and push-ups •  certain yoga poses, including downward-facing dog and inversions, that put ample weight on the arms •  elliptical/cross-training machines •  cross-country skiing • tennis While breast cancer survivors might want to avoid certain types of exercise, it’s important to note that the American Cancer Society recommends exercise after breast cancer surgery. But exercise should be approached with safety in mind, and breast cancer survivors should heed the following tips to ensure their exercise regimens do not compromise their recovery. •  Discuss exercise with your physician and surgeon. Before making exercise a part of your post-recovery routine, speak with your physician and surgeon to determine if there any movements you should avoid. Your doctor and surgeon can tell you how you will be affected by medications you might be taking as part of your continued recovery. •  Take it slowly. If you were an exercise enthusiast prior to your diagnosis, you must recognize that returning to your pre-cancer regimen may not be possible, or that it’s likely to take a while before you feel like your old self again. Take a gradual approach, allowing yourself to build strength and not expecting results to appear overnight. •  Emphasize form. Place a great emphasis on form when exercising after surviving

DID YOU KNOW?

under the microscope. They can be in situ, meaning non-invasive or pre-invasive. They also may be invasive types that have

Saturday, October 15

spread to the ducts in the breast tissue. Breast cancer is about 100 times less common among men than among women.

Call Operation Uplift 457-5141 to schedule your appointment If you are a woman without health insurance, or your insurance does not cover breast exams or needed mammograms, call for an appointment. Sponsored by Operation Uplift and Soroptomist International of Port Angeles

(next to Sequim Sunnyside Mini-Storage) Open Tues.-Fri. 10-5 •Sat. 10-4 • Closed Sun. & Mon.

Soroptimist International of Port Angeles

Operation Uplift

The Breast Health Clinic will be held at Olympic Medical Imaging Center in Sequim located at 840 N. Fifth Ave. Sequim

6A1697481

360-683-1418 • 511 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA

521232356

Men have a small amount of breast tissue, and that means they can be affected by breast cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, men’s breast tissue has ducts, but only few, if any, lobules. That’s because men do not have enough female hormones to promote the growth of breast cells. Breast cancer can be separated into several types based on what the cancer cells look like

breast cancer. Many breast cancer survivors undergo surgery as part of their treatments, but even those who did not should still prioritize proper form when exercising, even if it means lifting substantially less weight than you might have prior to your diagnosis. •  Don’t persist through pain. If you feel any pain upon returning to exercising, stop immediately and speak with your physician and surgeon prior to exercising again. •  Rest between sessions. You likely won’t be able to exercise on successive days anytime soon, but build off days into your routine so you can rest and recover. Exercising after surviving breast cancer can promote recovery, but survivors must be extra careful as they work to get back on track.


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OCTOBER 2016

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS & SEQUIM GAZETTE

3D

MAMMOGRAPHY IS HERE .

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

6A1684569

Profile for Sound Publishing

Special Sections - Breast Cancer Awareness, 2016  

i20161004113017766.pdf

Special Sections - Breast Cancer Awareness, 2016  

i20161004113017766.pdf