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Bed rest: Providence partners with Gospel Mission • 4 Affordable homes: How to achieve it • 18

Patient perspective New CEO takes over during time of change at Everett Clinic • 6-7 OCTOBER 2016 | VOL. 19, NO. 7

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OCTOBER 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

A handblown glass bulb sits atop artist Sean Carletons’s “Light in the Dark” sculpture. Notecard-size solar panels will power the lights attached to the piece, Page 14.

COVER STORY Everett Clinic CEO Chris Knapp takes over in a time of great change, 6-7

BUSINESS NEWS Providence, Gospel Mission work to give homeless a place to heal . . . . . 4 Western Washington Medical Group opens Imaging Center . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Meet the new Western Washington Medical Group CEO. . . . . . . . . 10-11 Marysville’s Northside Shoes starts selling in China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Leadership Day to be celebrated in county. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Iconic Marysville hardware store to close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

BUSINESS BUILDERS Tom Hoban: Time to think seriously about new north-south corridor. . . 18 Monika Kristofferson: Getting a grip on your overwhelming to-do list. . . 18 Andrew Ballard: Grow your business by fueling its engine of growth. . . . 19 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Everett’s Fluke purchases New Jersey software provider . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 21

Smokey Point’s Central Welding Supply expands rapidly . . . . . . . . 13

BUSINESS LICENSES. . . . . . . 24-25

Bothell artist creates unique furniture with metal, wood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

TAX LIENS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

ECONOMIC DATA. . . . . . . . . 26-27

NEWSROOM

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Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

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Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Patricia Guthrie Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban. Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO New Everett Clinic CEO Chris Knapp outside the Founders Building at 3901 Hoyt Ave. Knapp is just the third CEO for the clinic. He replaces Rick Cooper. Kevin Clark / The Herald

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4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

HEALTH CARE

Partnership helps those in need heal Providence, Gospel Mission work together to provide bed rest for people without homes By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Her options looked bleak at her lowest moment. A divorce. Financial trouble. An eviction. Stacy Mooney and her five children couch-hopped around Snohomish County last winter when life upended itself. The 45-year-old would stay with friends with a couple of her younger children. Her older ones would stay with their own friends. Then Mooney said she was beaten by her girlfriend while staying at the woman’s home. Her hair was pulled, her neck wrenched and her knee swelled up after she was knocked to the ground. Mooney headed to a walk-in clinic, but the clinic sent her to Providence Regional Medical Center Everett’s emergency room. She was treated, but was deemed too healthy to be admitted to the hospital. “I literally limped out of that hospital and gathered my kids up and had to figure out where I was going to stay,” Mooney said. “We were literally looking at staying in my truck in a Walmart parking lot. I was completely desperate at that point.” Hospital staff realized that Mooney and her children had no place to go. They intervened and sent Mooney to the Everett Gospel Mission to a bed set aside for the hospital for patients who need doctor-prescribed rest and have no other place to stay. “I thought it was amazing,” Mooney said. “They wanted to know if it would be safe when I returned home and I told them that I didn’t have a home to go to. It was a miracle for us. I don’t have any other way to explain it.” Mooney is just one of the people helped by a partnership between Providence and the Gospel Mission with assistance from the Providence General Foundation. As state and federal rules have tightened in recent years on who can be admitted to hospitals, Providence staff saw a need to find a place for people too healthy for a hospital bed, but who need a place to recover. “They don’t really need to be in the hospital, but they would normally go home and rest and recuperate,” said Ruth Collins, a nursing transition coordinator and case manager at Providence. “If they were homeless, they didn’t have any place to go, they’d have to go back to the streets and into the rain.” She had never worked in an emergency room until she came to work at

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Stacy Mooney visits the kitchen and dining room in the Women’s Shelter of the Everett Gospel Mission where she stayed with her children during a recent time of extreme difficulty.

“I literally limped out of that hospital and gathered my kids up and had to figure out where I was going to stay. We were literally looking at staying in my truck in a Walmart parking lot.” — Stacy Mooney Providence in 2012. She saw too many people coming into the emergency room with ailments who needed to recuperate, but didn’t have a place to really recover. That included people with bronchitis who might develop pneumonia in the winter, wounds that wouldn’t heal without dry dressing and even rape victims who needed a few days to rest and recover. Collins asked her medical director if there was anything that could be done. “I didn’t have the idea,” Collins said. “I had an obvious need, that’s part of my job here is to find needs, glaring needs.” The medical director, Julie Zorn, suggested a program through the Providence General Foundation where employees could apply for grants to meet community needs. The foundation put up some money and Providence reached out to the Gospel Mission. An arrangement was made where the Gospel mission would set aside eight beds for medical recovery — four in the men’s shelter and four in the women’s shelter.

Everett Gospel Mission CEO Sylvia Anderson said she thought it was a great idea . “Their staff, because they were compassionate were having a hard time saying, ‘Yes, you need to leave the waiting room and no, we don’t know where you can go,’” Anderson said. The Gospel Mission would always take people, but beds are not always available. With this arrangement, Providence knows just how many beds are available and how long the beds will be occupied. And the beds are in quiet areas at the shelters, Anderson said. “Hospitals do not want to turn sick people out onto the streets,” Anderson said. “Someone who is suffering from the flu is not going to do as well sleeping on a bench or out in a tent.” She said other communities have medical-rest housing available and some even have nurses who visit people who are recovering. But Snohomish County hasn’t had this type of arrangement for years, she said. The effort started as a pilot program in

April 2014. The foundation is paying the cost for four beds, which come out to be $12.50 a night for linen and food. The Gospel Mission is paying for the other four. Anderson said she hopes the program can expand. Since the program started, 114 homeless patients discharged from Providence have been prescribed 637 days of medical rest at the Gospel Mission. Many of those people have stayed on at the mission for a total of 2,442 days. Several of the people who have recuperated and then stayed on worked through community programs to find stable homes. That’s what happened with Mooney. She stayed for four days to recuperate with her two youngest daughters. The Gospel Mission then found beds for her and her five children to continue to stay until she could get back onto her feet. Last month, Mooney got the keys to a three-bedroom apartment in Arlington through Housing Hope. She moved in with her five children and a sixth who had been staying with her father. Her children — who range in age from 6 to 15 — were so excited about moving out of the Gospel Mission to a place where they could get into school, start sports and get back to a normal life. “We’re so thankful to all be together and have our own space,” Mooney said. “The kitchen table is all set up so we can have a place to eat meals and they have a place to do homework together.”


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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

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6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

COVER STORY

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Chris Knapp was promoted to chief executive of The Everett Clinic in late August, just the third CEO in the history of the clinic. He replaces CEO Rick Cooper, who spent 31 years in the role.

Passionate about caring for patients New Everett Clinic CEO seeks to learn customer, employee perspective of the business By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

H

e sees it as a bit of a barrier, but also an opportunity. Chris Knapp, the new CEO of The Everett Clinic, is a lawyer by training, not a doctor. Does that make it difficult to lead one of the largest medical groups in the state? Yes, he says, he has much to learn. Even though he has worked for the clinic for nearly 20 years, Knapp has undertaken a listening tour on his first 90 days on the job, visiting all the clinical and non-clinical departments to get out of his “bubble in administration.” But he’s also committed to spending at least a half-day a week shadowing frontline staff, meeting patients and, if they’re agreeable, joining them on medical exams and even procedures. “I think that’s an opportunity for me to learn about our business from the patient perspective,” Knapp said. “So I understand how our customers are experiencing The Everett Clinic, and it’s an opportunity for me to walk in the moccasins of our care providers and under-

stand the complexity of their daily work lives, the challenges they face and see how they partner and team together to solve problems. “But I can do it with fresh eyes.” Knapp replaces Rick Cooper, who served in the same role for more than 30 years. Cooper is continuing as the Pacific Northwest market president for DaVita HealthCare Partners, the new parent company of The Everett Clinic. Cooper calls himself a big fan of Knapp. “I think he’s the right person for the job,” Cooper said. “He’s very passionate about evolving our care model to be even more focused on the patient. I really think under his steady hand we will do a much, much better job for our patients.” Knapp takes over as CEO at a time change for the clinic, one of the county’s largest employers with 467 medical providers, more than 2,000 employees and 320,000 patients in Snohomish, Island and, now, north King counties. Perhaps the biggest change is in ownership. The Everett Clinic was a privately held medical group — owned mostly by doctor shareholders — but was sold to Denver-based DaVita earlier this year.

“I think it’s significant that DaVita has made this commitment to continuing local leadership,” Knapp said. “They could have brought in somebody from outside the organization or from another market.” Cooper echoes the sentiment. “I am just delighted that he has now, past-tense, moved into the CEO role for me,” Cooper said. “It was a real demonstration of commitment on the part of DaVita in the local leadership team.”

Best business thinkers Knapp becomes just the third CEO in the more than 90-year history of the clinic. He’s worked for the clinic since 1997 — as a lawyer at Everett’s Anderson Hunter Law Firm and then, in 2012, as in-house counsel. Knapp, 51, lives in Everett with his wife, Holly. Their two sons, Cal, 22, and Spencer, 19, attend the University of Washington. Knapp is originally from Minnesota, where he grew up in the small town of Detroit Lakes, about 40 miles east of Fargo. When looking to go to college, he knew he didn’t want to stay in the Midwest. His sister was attending Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. On a trip to see her, Knapp toured the University of Washington campus.

“It was on a weekend in November around Thanksgiving, when the sun happened to be shining,” Knapp said. “When you’re out on the University of Washington campus and the sun is shining and Mount Rainier is out and Drumheller Fountain is going, it’s the most beautiful campus in the world. “I knew that’s where I wanted to be.” After getting his undergrad degree at UW, Knapp returned to Minnesota for law school. Between his second and third year of law school, Knapp landed a clerkship with Anderson Hunter. After the clerkship, the firm offered him a job. He started practicing law in Everett in 1990. His time as a lawyer for Anderson Hunter, first as an associate and later as a partner, gave him a chance to meet influential people in the region. “I just had the great good fortune of being exposed to Snohomish County’s very best business leaders,” Knapp said. “Whether it was in the timber industry or municipal law or banking and real estate and, ultimately, health care, working with people like Rick Cooper, it really gave me exposure to some of the best business thinkers that the north Puget Sound had to offer. “It was a really fortunate education for me, not just in legal issues, but in how Continued on Page 7


OCTOBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

Everett Clinic expanding outside county By Sharon Salyer The Herald

SHORELINE — The Everett Clinic opened its doors on a $17 million clinic in Shoreline in September, the first time it has expanded outside of Snohomish County. It’s part of planned growth that will see the organization double in size over the next five years. The clinic currently has 320,000 patients. Two more facilities are scheduled to open in the next four months. A $3 million community clinic in the Thomas Lake neighborhood near Mill Creek is to open in December. A $10 million outpatient surgery center is expected to open in Edmonds in mid-January. It will have three outpatient operating rooms, physical therapy, imaging machines and a walk-in clinic, said Chris Knapp, the clinic’s chief executive. The Everett Clinic merged with DaVita earlier this year in a $405 million deal specifically with the goal of getting capital to grow. The 40,000-square-foot Shoreline clinic, at 1201 N. 175th St., is in a neighborhood shopping center that’s also home Continued from Page 6

people run a good business and, beyond running a good business, how you give back to your community.”

Bit of good in the world He spent his first years in Everett working as a litigator, learning about strategy, human nature and the art of negotiation. “You’re also dealing with people always in very difficult circumstance,” he said. “Litigation is time-consuming, it’s costly, it’s emotionally draining and you don’t always see people on their best behavior, so I started looking for opportunities outside of litigation to look for clients who I enjoyed working with who maybe were doing a little bit of good in the world.” That led him to taking more work with The Everett Clinic, where he said he found smart, hardworking, dedicated clinicians and business people who were always seeking to do things better. Knapp earned the confidence of The Everett Clinic board, said Doug Ferguson, senior counsel at Anderson Hunter. He said Knapp is intelligent, has high integrity and is one of the most organized lawyers he’s ever met. Ferguson thinks those traits will serve Knapp well in the new role. “I think he was a natural choice and it’s an excellent fit for him,” Ferguson said. “I think he’ll do very well — obviously his role has expanded significantly. In my judgment, he has big shoes to fill in following Rick Cooper. I’ve worked with a lot of business leaders and Rick Cooper is right at the top of the list. “But he’s worked with Rick Cooper for quite some time, and he’ll have the benefit of continuing to work with Rick.” Knapp’s time at The Everett Clinic has come while the clinic was growing rapidly and while the regulatory environment of

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Everett Clinic Shoreline Family Medicine physician Stephen Campbell talks with staff at the front desk of the new Shoreline Clinic at the open house in late September.

to a Trader Joe’s grocery store. It is modeled on, but is slightly smaller than the 60,000-square-foot Smokey Point clinic that opened in 2012. The services being offered at the King County clinic include family and

internal medicine, pediatrics and a walk-in clinic. Specialty services include optometry, allergy and asthma services, dermatology, obstetrics and gynecology, sleep medicine, podiatry and physical therapy.

Adult behavioral health services are available. The closest Everett Clinic offices to its Shoreline clinic are in Mill Creek and Harbour Pointe. Like the Shoreline clinic, the Thomas Lake clinic, at 3916 148th St. in Mill Creek, also will be located in a retail center. The Everett Clinic’s outpatient surgery center at 21401 72nd Ave. W. will open just two blocks away from Edmonds Family Medicine. In addition to the new Shoreline, Edmonds and Mill Creek-area offices, The Everett Clinic is looking at further expansion in Kirkland and Bellevue; 164th St. SW in Lynnwood; and the possibility of opening up to three more neighborhood clinics in Snohomish County. The Shoreline clinic is part of the organization’s continued growth into the more densely populated areas near I-405 and I-5. That will include expanding more into King County, probably on both sides of Lake Washington, as well as more offices in south Snohomish County, Knapp said.

“I am just delighted that he has now, past-tense, moved into the CEO role for me. It was a real demonstration of commitment on the part of DaVita in the local leadership team.” — Rick Cooper health care was becoming more and more complicated. Since he became in-house lawyer, Knapp has worked on more business issues. “I had the opportunity to move into some areas that were not really traditional legal work, but were fascinating to me, around business development, strategy and developing our long-range business plans and, ultimately, the work that led to our partnering process and the decision to align with DaVita,” Knapp said.

Eyes on the merger The ability to grow was one of the key factors in the decision to merge with DaVita, Knapp and Cooper said. The clinic in late September opened a 40,000-square-foot clinic in Shoreline, its first clinic in King County. The clinic is also in the next few months planning to open an ambulatory surgical center in Edmonds and a smaller office near Mill Creek. Part of Cooper’s role will be to help guide growth, either by opening new clinics or partnering with existing medical groups. “Our business plan calls for us to double in size over five years,” Cooper said. That will include growing more in King County and expanding elsewhere, Knapp said. “In the near term, I think we’re kind of focused on King and Pierce counties,” Knapp said. “In the long term, we really

view the Northwest as a region where we can grow, and that extends from the greater Portland area to the Canadian border.” For now, Knapp’s new role with the company will be joining the cultures of The Everett Clinic with the new corporate ownership. “We do know that a lot of folks are watching this transaction, wondering if The Everett Clinic is going to change,” Knapp said. “I would say the only thing that’s constant in life is change. We’re always looking to evolve and improve and, in the classic words of a former board president, how can we do this better?”

Challenges to face During DaVita’s first earnings conference call after the acquisition, company officials, responding to an analyst’s question about disappointing fee-for-service revenue growth, pointed to The Everett Clinic as the single biggest source. The officials said it was an uncharacteristic stumble. “Well, first it’s kind of unusual to get market-specific in an earnings call, but that did come up,” Knapp said. “We have known for a long time that in fee-for-service medicine there is a significant business challenge.” Fee-for-service is a payment model where services are paid for separately. There’s a concern that it gives an incentive for doctors to provide more treat-

ments because payment is dependent on the quantity of care, rather than quality. Knapp said the clinic has known over the past six or seven years that the cost of paying for medical treatments has been rising faster than revenue growth, which has stayed relatively flat. He said that is another of the reasons the clinic has aligned with DaVita, which has been able to grow revenues year over year. Knapp said that doesn’t necessarily mean the clinic will raise prices. There may be ways to perform more efficiently. That’s something that needs to be explored, he said, pointing out that health care costs have risen to a little more than 18 percent of the gross domestic product of the country. One of Knapp’s jobs will be to help his staff — doctors, nurses and others — keep up with increasing demands, from electronic records to administrative burdens. Burnout is a concern among health care providers. With an aging population, many people don’t come in with a single problem but a “constellation of issues that are all interrelated in very complex ways.” “The ability to meet the patient where they are, provide the empathy and communication that the patient needs and then partner with them in improving their own health care is a very challenging thing to do,” Knapp said. “I think it’s one of the most complicated things that humans do is the practice of medicine.”


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

Medical group opens Imaging Center By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Chris Sloan peers at the screen in front of him, going over minute details of the insides of the test patient in the adjoining room. “Small bowel here. You’ve got your large bowel out here. There’s the stomach. There’s the pancreas. Here’s the gall bladder, there’s no stones or sludge,” said Sloan, a technologist with Western Washington Medical Group. “Abdomen work has come such a long way on the MRI.” The MRI machine is one of the featured pieces of equipment at Western Washington Medical Group’s new Imaging Center at 3822 Colby Ave. in Everett. The center, which opened in September, also includes a CT scan machine, ultrasound equipment and an X-ray machine. All of the equipment is high end, state of the art,

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Rita Mangum, 21-year CT technologist, at her station at the new Western Washington Medical Group imaging center in Everett.

said Dr. David Russian, Western Washington Medical Group’s CEO. “You might ask why they’re such expensive studies, but if they prevent an exploratory surgery or they tell you everything is fine then it’s all a good thing for you,” Russian said.

The Imaging Center is the next step for the growing Western Washington Medical Group. The group used to contract with outside groups for these scans, but made the decision to open its own imaging center. The medical group expects about 3,000 to

6,000 patients to be seen at the center each year. The equipment and remodeling of the 3,000-square-foot office space cost about $3 million, Russian said. The group was fortunate to move into the building, which was the former Everett Radia Imaging

Center, Russian said. The layout of the building was already suited for much of the equipment. Even a copper shielding in one of the rooms needed only minor repairs. Western Washington Medical Group has grown from about 45 to 50 medical providers to more than 90 in just the past few years. Demands from electronic medical record keeping to payment systems are spurring further growth and consolidation in the medical community, Russian said. The requirements are both from the government and outside groups. Western Washington Medical Group expects to continue to grow. “We’re still in a part of the country where we make stuff that people want. So we want to grow to meet the increase of population,” Russian said. For now, the medical group is adjusting to owning its own imaging center.

In early September, the center went through several test patients on the MRI machine, getting a handle of the new equipment. Russian was one of the test patients, listening to the Rolling Stones during the noisy half-hour of the testing. With the Imaging Center in house, it will make it easier for Western Washington Medical Group providers to have access to the information. “Your patient can go wherever they want,” Russian said. “If an 88-year-old lady up in Arlington wants to go to the hospital in Arlington for her CT, of course, that’s something we can do for her. “It’s better for the group and, probably ultimately better for the patient, if everything is in one site for the physician and all of the physicians seeing her within the group to have the best access (to her medical scans). “Hopefully the majority of our patients will come down here.”

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10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

HEALTH CARE

Times are a changin’ for health care Western Washington Medical CEO sees evolving medical landscape By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

Dr. David Russian, CEO of Everett-based Western Washington Medical Group, seems younger than his 54 years. There’s excitement in his voice when he talks about challenges facing his profession and the group of doctors he’s been leading for not quite a year. He quotes a favorite line from the Bob Dylan song, “My Back Pages,” and it seems to suit him: “I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now.” Russian became the CEO of the growing medical group earlier this year. He takes over at a time of changing demands for his profession. Russian grew up on the other side of the country, in Cranston, Rhode Island — a suburb of Providence — but a University of Washington medical fellowship many years ago brought him and wife Mari Vicens, a freelance journalist, to the

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OCTOBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

HEALTH CARE “If you’re talking about medicine — I think this is something that folks don’t appreciate out here — we’re pretty progressive in the Northwest and the West Coast, particularly in the Northwest.” — Dr. David Russian guide Castle Connelly to websites like www.vitals.com/doctors, Russian also specializes in sleep medicine, which he said was unheard of 30 years ago, but has become a hot topic in the past 10 to 15 years. “Now it’s been a huge growth field and trying to help folks with their sleep is amazingly rewarding,” he said. Russian moved here permanently in 1998 and joined Western Washington Washington Medical Group, serving as a board member at one point and later, as president of the group for five years. Selected by the 18-member board last November to replace Jerry Tillinger as CEO, Russian is the group’s fourth CEO and the first doctor named to the position. Following a six-month trial period, his title became official last May. Despite his demanding job as CEO of a 95-member-and-growing medical group, he still manages to see patients the equivalent of one day a week. He said it helps him understand what doctors are up against in a medical world where one of the big challenges is that health care costs too much. The advent of the Affordable Care Act and a government mandate for electronic medical record-keeping — which Russian said he agrees with in principle — has been difficult for all medical groups because the technology is still rapidly evolving. “Those products, I think it’s universally understood,” he said, “were not quite ready for Prime Time.” A second big challenge, he said, is that payment models are changing, moving away from the traditional “piecework” method of charging by the X-ray or by the size of the stitched laceration, to charging by the episode. So if a patient has a heart attack, he or she might get charged for the whole episode, Russian said, rather than “for every

time the doctor saw you or every time the nurse gave you a water pill and every time you had an X-ray done.” A third and constant challenge is to provide the best possible medical care in the evolving medical landscape, he said. New data shows independent medical groups better able to manage this because their doctors can choose hospitals that best meet their patients’ medical and insurance needs. From a business perspective, that’s a winning strategy. “And the payers know this, by the way, the insurance companies — they get it,” he said. “Which is probably another competitive advantage we have; they understand that independent medical groups are very important in the landscape going forward.” Western Washington Medical Group is 100-percent doctor-owned, Russian said, which means it’s not beholden to any hospital or corporation. It is, however, Everett-centered; more than 90 percent of the group’s hospital work is at Providence Everett and 90 percent of its doctors live within a 15-mile radius. “And we really feel like our model is super important,” he said, “in terms of providing the best care to the citizens, the folks that we’re in the community with.” The group has doubled in size in the past 5-7 years and will likely continue to grow. By just how much is a question the group’s 18-member board is grappling with at the moment, hoping for an answer by early next year. “We’re provider-centered, we’re independent, we’re growing,” Russian said. “But we don’t want to ever be just a cookie-cutter, Kaiser kind of a thing. “We want people, when they come to see us, that they feel they’re getting personalized service. That’s really important to our group.”

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12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

Marysville’s Northside sells footwear in China

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Jack Wolfin, president of Triple T Trading, sees a market for his company’s footwear products in China where more people are spending time outdoors recreationally. The Herald Business Journal

MARYSVILLE — Northside is proving that trade can be a two-way street. The outdoor footwear company based in Marysville has long designed shoes that were made in China and sold mainly in the U.S. and Canada. Now the company is ramping up efforts to sell the shoes to Chinese consumers. “People everywhere are looking for a dependable, approachable outdoor brand,” said Jack Wolfin, president of Triple T Trading, which owns Northside, in a statement. “We are thrilled at the opportunity to make our footwear available throughout mainland China. The company is working with its import business, Fortune Star International, to distribute its footwear and other products in China. “We feel like there will be a growing demand for outdoor footwear as more people in China want to get out and explore,” said Nam Lui, the president of Fortune Star International, in a statement.

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“We’re excited to make Northside footwear more readily available as people of all ages continue to show an enthusiasm for the outdoors.” Fortune Star presented the Northside brand at tradeshows in both Beijing and Shanghai over the past year. The company has partnered with Sanfo, the largest outdoor products retailer in China, as well as other retailers to sell Northside shoes in stores and online throughout the country. China is an appealing market, because Chinese consumers are becoming more and more interested in outdoor activities, according to Triple T Trading. The company points to a report from the China Outdoor Association that expects 12 percent to 20 percent growth in sales of outdoor shoes and apparel each year through the end of this decade. If that were to occur, Chinese consumers would spend nearly $5 billion a year by 2020. In July, Northside opened a 110,000-square-foot office and warehouse building at 4025 152nd St. NE Marysville, constructed specifically for its business.

EVERETT — Fluke Corp. has acquired software provider eMaint Enterprises, a company that was named to Inc. magazine’s list of fastest-growing companies earlier this year. eMaint Enterprises, which has 100 employees, is headquartered in New Jersey and has operations in Florida and Ireland. It makes computerized maintenance management software. The product is used by 50,000 maintenance professionals in food processing, health care, fleet and transportation services and manufacturing and other industries. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Fluke, based in Everett and owned by Fortive, makes handheld test tools and portable sensors used by service and

maintenance technicians, electricians and plant engineers around the world. eMaint’s maintenance management software combined with Fluke’s “brand strength and expertise will deliver new generations of connected technologies,” said Fluke’s President Wes Pringle in a statement. “eMaint brings not only world-class software development but the sales and customer support to help maintenance professionals succeed,” Pringle said. “I couldn’t be more excited to welcome the eMaint team to the Fluke family.” Bringing the companies together “unlocks tremendous potential,” said eMaint CEO and President Brian Samelson. eMaint was founded by Samelson in 1986. The company has been recognized by Inc. Magazine for the past four years as one of the 5,000 fastest-growing


OCTOBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

Central Welding expands to Oregon By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

SMOKEY POINT — Central Welding Supply has expanded into Oregon for the first time, acquiring United Welding Supply Inc. in Portland. The business will be the 21st retail location for Smokey Point-based Central Welding Supply, which has supplied products to the Portland business for years. “It’s not completely out of the blue,” said Dale Wilton, CEO of Central Welding Supply. “We’ve had a relationship with the ownership of that company for quite a long time.” He said the owner of United Welding, Bruce Thompson, was retiring The new store at 2313 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. in Portland re-opened as the Portland branch of Central Welding Supply on Sept. 6. All 11 employees were retained. The store does $4.5 million in revenues a year, Wilton said. Central Welding Supply has grown greatly over the past 20 years. It was started by Wilton’s father, Mickey, in 1975 as a single store in Lynnwood. The company added an Everett location in 1980 and a Burlington location in 1983. Since then, the company added 18 retail locations either by opening new stores or buying existing businesses. “It’s been very steady growth,” Wilton said. “It’s has happened in little bursts

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Central Welding Supply’s fleet of trucks distributes gases, welding equipment and industrial supplies throughout Western Washington. The company stores gas in bulk in these white towers in Smokey Point.

every few years but most of the growth has happened since 1994.” He said Central Welding did about $6 million worth of business a year in 1994, but the company expects to do $82 million to $83 million in revenue this year. Central Welding Supply has 16 locations throughout Western Washington

and now Portland and also owns Pacific Welding Supplies, which has five locations also around the state. The company also owns a Rental Center in Auburn and a Cylinder Distribution Center in Tacoma. Central Welding also has an online presence, weldersdirect.com. Wilton’s company employs 280 with 70

employees on its 6-acre headquarter site in Smokey Point. While welding supplies has always been a big part of its business, the name of the company is a bit of a misnomer, Wilton said. Filling and leasing canisters of gas has become a main thrust for the business. And Central Welding provides canisters for all sorts of businesses throughout Western Washington. Just in the Puget Sound region alone, Central Welding Supply serves 15,000 customers. The list of businesses that need canisters of gas includes welding shops, but also includes dental and medical offices, oil refineries, breweries and even restaurants for pop machines. “Helium, I don’t care whether you get it at a florist or a grocery store, it’s probably coming from us,” Wilton said. “We touch a lot of different kind of businesses. We are in the top 100 privately owned companies in the state of Washington.” Filling and leasing canisters of gas is very much a service business. Wilton said his employees roll out every day making deliveries and picking up canisters. He said that insulates the company from online competition. “There is some pressure that’s been put on us and some business that has leaked away, but there’s a big part of our business that can’t be purchased that way and can’t be delivered that way,” Wilton said. “That’s what really makes us a very diverse business and we get to avoid kind of the cyclical nature of a lot of business.”

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

Crafting marvels of metal and wood By Patricia Guthrie

For The Herald Business Journal

Wood, metal and a meandering mind. These three main components fill Sean Carleton’s Bothell work studio, his sketch pad and his ever-growing list of commissioned orders. His distinct tables, chairs, desks, shelves and other designs sold under the name Carleton Fine Work are created from local steel and wood. Much of his white oak, maple, alder, madrone, fir and cedar comes from Coyote Woodworks on Bainbridge Island while his metal (he uses either mild steel or stainless steel) is recycled from Everett Steel. Only three years after making the decision to give up his varied day jobs and devote all this time, talent and tools toward his own business, Carleton, 31, has enough orders to keep him busy for the next five months. His one-of-a-kind pieces cost an average $3,000. Finished pieces range from small magazine racks and side shelves ($500 to $750) to a huge $9,000 slat white oak and padauk wood “piano dining table” that extends with a hand-cranked chain. With a background in shipyard welding and floor and wood finish work, Carleton’s home pieces are works of art that serve a purpose. He calls them “sculptural furniture.” It’s apparent that Carleton’s quirky imagination and innovative touches are breaking new ground in the wood and metal art market of the Pacific Northwest. The young artist’s work is getting noticed by regional galleries and juried shows. A month ago, Carleton spoke about his work to the Northwest Eco Builders Guild where he also displayed one of his first solar pieces, an 8-foot tall geometric tower called Light in the Dark. Carleton envisions patios and walkways as the perfect spot for his next challenge — designing large metal sculptures featuring glowing glass and small solar lights. This summer, one of Carleton’s sleek, smooth yet rustic tables was featured on the poster advertising the “Cocktail Culture” show at Northwest Woodworkers Gallery in downtown Seattle. Among his 2015 awards: Carol Duke Award of Excellence/BAM ARTSFair in Bellevue and Honor of Distinction First Place at the Rising Star Furniture Show of Northwest Woodworkers Gallery. Many of Carleton’s fans have two or more of his pieces in their homes, offices or businesses. “I’m a big fan of nature with a metal twist,” says Tyner Guillot. “To me, Sean is able to create a unique modern blend of metal and wood. He’s made one really unique mirror for me so far and re-done a coffee table cypress stump that my family has had for decades. I currently have five pieces commissioned with him for my entry way that I can’t wait to get.” Alex Shor, a prosthodonist-dentist in private practice, commissioned Carleton to design a bench for his Mercer Island home after seeing Carleton Fine Work featured at the Bellevue Arts Fair.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Standing at about 9-feet tall, Sean Carleton’s “Light in the Dark” outdoor night light is the Bothell artist’s first foray into making solar-powered sculpture. Below is one of the pieces of “sculptural furniture” built by Carleton.

Built solid Carleton Fine Work owner Sean Carleton builds what he calls sculptural furniture at his Bothell studio. To learn more, visit his webpage at www.carletonfw.com or www.facebook.com/carletonfinework or www.instagram.com/carletonfinework.

“Sean listened to my vision for the piece and analyzed our space and environment,” Shor said. “The bench for us is a real highlight and conversation piece in our house.”

Art inspired by industry The industry of the Pacific Northwest — shipyards, fishing vessels, woodworking — are part of Carleton’s work history and his finished pieces. Each piece is cut, de-burred and welded, sanded, assembled and finished by hand. Carleton is a fan of keeping the natural patina that’s a result

of the welding process. He also uses an environmentally friendly process to protect and reveal wood’s natural beauty and texture. A 2004 graduate of Woodinville High School, Carleton admits he struggled in classes, mainly because he couldn’t sit still. Home schooled for awhile, he then let loose his creative energy at Seattle Waldorf School. Soon, he jokes, “I was your typical private school kid, playing violin, learning Japanese, knitting, making candles and doing drawing and charcoal painting. … Growing up, I was always seeking what it was that made me tick.” At age 23, he found it — and kept with it — making the Dean’s List at Lake Washington Technical Institute after taking 20 credits of evening welding classes. At the time, he worked full-time and was in demand as a journeyman sander, fine-tuning expansive wood floors inside the homes of some of the region’s wealthiest residents. He also worked in shipyards, welding and designing systems for police boats and fishing vessels. Along the way were stints in Alaska and Korea, working on dry-docked boats. “This is the dance I did for about 10 years, between wood and welding, but I always knew I wanted to do something really meaningful. I always felt the things I was doing weren’t fulfilling,” Carleton recalled. “Then one day, I was crossing

the 520 bridge at four in the morning, the moon was out and it just hit me, ‘I could do it. I could do something with wood and metal.’”

Happiness is in his hands Welding metal and sanding and shaping wood is when Carleton says he’s happiest. In the studio behind his Bothell house, he says he finds freedom. It’s where he goes to challenge himself, his art form and to leave and make his mark. Inspirational quotes are scattered throughout Carleton’s studio and home. So are to-do lists to remind him not to forget to feed, water and walk his Siberian Huskies, Donatello and Burton. He spends lots of time alone, alone with wood and metal and tools. All that time alone has allowed him to reflect on why he took a risk that so many with similar dreams never do. “Objects are cheap, quality is low and people are tired,” he says. “My work signifies lasting quality and integrity. I want my work to be a symbol that people can rely on in times of despair and remember that a dreamer existed and fought until the end for what they believed in.” Then he cracks a wide smile, asking, “Did that sound too serious? I’m just happiest when I’m building with my hands. That’s what my work is all about.”


OCTOBER 2016

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

Shining light on leadership in county By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

It will be a day to rally around leadership. On Oct. 14, elected officials as well as business and nonprofit representatives will gather to celebrate the first Leadership Day in Snohomish County. “Leadership is a pretty nonpartisan issue,” said

Kathy Coffey, Leadership Snohomish County’s executive director. “We have Republican leaders, Democratic leaders and leaders who are somewhere in between. “It’s really about trying to make a difference in your region and aligning that with your values.” The day will be used to shine a light on the work being done — and yet to be done — by engaged and

dedicated people across the county. “I don’t think there could be a more perfect time for Snohomish County,” said Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Sno-Island Libraries executive director and Leadership Snohomish County’s board president. “We’re really in a spot where a lot of things are happening and there’s a lot of potential now that we’ve moved

on from the recession.” So far, Snohomish County, a majority of cities in the county as well as the Port of Everett, the Tulalip and Stillaguamish tribes, Sno-Isle Libraries, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and others have signed proclamations to recognize the day. A celebratory community breakfast is scheduled from 7:15 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the Everett Station’s

Weyerhaeuser Room, 3201 Smith Ave., Everett. Leadership Snohomish County expects to give two awards for the event, a Distinguished Alumni Award to new Everett Clinic CEO Chris Knapp, who went through the program in 1998, and a Community Partner award for Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. For 19 years, Leadership Snohomish County has been trying

to foster community and civic involvement. The group holds a signature class for people to get a deep-dive lesson on the inner workings of the county. Participants spend one day a month for nine months on the class. Those people also take on a community project. This year, Leadership Snohomish County is holding two of these classes with more than 50 attendees. In one class, partipants are helping the City of Arlington create a maker’s space to help entrepreneurs and inventors. In the second class, people are helping HopeWorks create a TechWorks job program. Leadership Snohomish County also holds a class for young professionals for people 35 and younger. The class also runs nine months, but the classes last two hours as opposed to a full day. Coffey was looking to raise the profile of Leadership Snohomish County when she came up with the idea for a Leadership Day. “It really came from I was just trying to find a way to heighten our visibility in the community, and I thought, ‘Is there a national Leadership Day?’ Huh, there isn’t. Then it became, ‘Why don’t we just create a Leadership Day?’” For several years, SnoIsle Libraries has been sending a couple of its employees to participate in Leadership Snohomish County’s program, WoolfIvory said. It’s important to grow the next generation of leadership in the county with so many baby boomers nearing retirement age. She said this an opportunity for people to not only learn about Leadership Snohomish County, but also get involved in civic affairs. “If you’re a new person to the area, it’s sometimes hard to know how to begin and how to engage in community activies,” Woolf-Ivory said. “This is a really good way to broaden that scope for people.” Visit www.leadershipsc. org to reserve a seat before Oct. 7.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

End of era for Carr’s hardware store Fixture in downtown Marysville to close after nearly 93 years By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

MARYSVILLE — Carr’s Hardware looks like something from a bygone era. The classic old storefront sign. The oiled wood-plank flooring. The vintage National cash register clacking away in the middle of the store. For nearly 93 years, the business was a one-stop shop for all of your needs and for what you probably didn’t need but would buy anyway. Now the store at 1514 Third St. is shutting down; the family that has owned it over the years is stepping away. “It’s just the right time to bow out gracefully,” said Gail Libbing, the third generation of the family to own the store. “Business is still good. The big box stores didn’t push us out. The timing is just right for our family.” Businesses open and close everyday. But Carr’s Hardware is something different, a scene from a Norman Rockwell painting, a piece of nostalgia that just continued. Take the morning crew. For years, a handful of people who live in Marysville have stopped by the backroom of the hardware store to drink coffee — they hang their own cups near the refrigerator — and talk about the news of the day. “It’s kind of like the pot-bellied stove,” Gail Libbing said. “There’s just no pot-bellied stove anymore. It happens pretty much every morning, six days a week. We’ll be cramping their style.” A judge used to be part of the klatch. Another member of the group worked for the city of Marysville. For the most part, it was people in town coming to talk informally. They mainly had no link to the shop, although one of the frequent ringleaders, Clarence Dosie, worked at the store until 1985. At coffee last week, Dosie, 91, and the others joked about where they would go after Carr’s closes. “I don’t know yet, we haven’t made up our minds,” Dosie said. “Maybe we’ll meet out in the parking lot.” Still, Carr’s was very much a working store, serving the needs of the community. Wheelbarrows, garbage cans and rakes and shovels line the sidewalk for sale. Inside, fan belts of all sizes hang from one wall. Along the other wall are shelves with Pyrex measuring cups, muffin tins and cookie sheets. Packs of chalk. Bags of rubber bands. Ball canning jars. Paint supplies in the back. A lone Daisy Red Ryder BB gun sits just out of arm’s reach of children. What wasn’t on hand, the store could order through co-op partner Ace Hardware. In 1923, Milford Carr opened the

PHOTOS BY ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Dale Smith gives Carr’s Hardware owner Darlene Scott a hug as they talk about the history of the store in Marysville. Carr’s Hardware is closing after nearly 93 years in business.

In the back office, Barry Galde and owner Maurice Libbing (right) play with Indy, the shop dog, at Carr’s Hardware on Friday in Marysville.

store at its current location. He had been a blacksmith in town, shoeing horses and working at a forge on First Street, which was then Front Street. In 1921, he decided to put up a building on Third Street as an investment. When the building didn’t attract any tenants, Carr heard about a general store in Mount Vernon going out of business and selling its stock. Carr negotiated a price for the store’s remaining inventory. He brought it down to Marysville and opened Carr’s Hardware. Carr and his two stepsons, Bruce and Howard Scott, were the key workers. In 1948, Carr hired 16-year-old Darlene Campbell, who had been taking bookkeeping classes in high school.

Campbell’s aunt had been in the store and learned they needed some help and sent her to apply. Campbell got the job. That’s where she met Bruce Scott. They married in 1951. She’s spent 68 years as a part of Carr’s Hardware. “When I say it out loud, it sounds ridiculous, but that’s what the timing is,” Darlene Scott said. “It’s been wonderful.” Bruce Scott convinced his stepdad to double the size of the building. (Half of the floor is the oiled wooden planks; the newer half is concrete.) Eventually, Bruce and Darlene Scott took over the store from Milford Carr. Carr died in 1978. His stepson, Bruce Scott, passed away in 1997, leaving Darlene Scott to run the business with the

help of daughter Gail Libbing. About three years ago, Libbing’s husband, Maurice, joined the business. Gail Libbing remembers growing up in the store. She and her brother would ride displayed bicycles around the aisles, and her brother once knocked over a gumball machine, which shattered, spilling gumballs everywhere. The Libbings’ own children, Jessi and Nicholas, had their own misadventures in the store, including one time when 18-month-old Nicholas climbed to the third-rung from the top of the bolt-bin ladder. Now, with the children grown, their dog Indy, short for Indiana, has the run of the store. The Libbings and Scott will keep the store open until all of the stock and fixtures are sold. They’ll lease out the building to another business. They plan to travel and take Darlene Scott to see family. Eventually, the Libbings will find something else to do. The family sent out a letter to customers and neighbors about the closure last week and shut the store down for three days to prepare. When they re-opened, there was a a line out the door in the morning, and hundreds of people came to get hugs and to pick up a little something for the home. “It was mind-boggling, it was wonderful, and the nice thing about it was there were maybe a lot of people that I didn’t know but there were so many of our regular customers who came in and purchased as well,” Gail Libbing said. “I didn’t know if the regular people would be mad.”


18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

The roadmap for affordable homes S

trong rental-rate growth for two straight years has allowed landlords to recover finally from when the market took a tumble in 2008-09. Renter’s personal income, though, has not kept pace, putting the squeeze on them at nearly every end of the market. At the bottom of the incometo-rent ratio, the squeeze can lead to homelessness. At the top, it squeezes lifestyle and can lead to job creators looking for other more affordable places to start or expand their businesses. Boards and commissions across the state are calling meetings to address what is being described as an affordability crisis. The fundamental problem is indisputable, though: We simply are land-constrained in the Puget Sound region. Competition for that limited land inventory is fierce, so prices rise. The solution to improving supply of developable land is not that simple, though.

With a maxed out transportation system and geographic realities on either side of I-5, the Puget Sound region presents challenges to opening up more Tom buildable land inventory inside of Hoban reasonable commute times to the Realty major employment Markets centers. Uncertain processes to securing a permit to build, the level of impact fees for fire, schools, roads, design restrictions that affect the number of units that can be built on a site, and other realities come into play as well, leading to higher costs to deliver product. At a recent emergency conference hosted by the governor’s office on affordable housing, discussion ran deep and wide on solutions.

A developer from the Seattle area summed up the entire conference with a simple statement, “We just need more land.” He’s right. A developer from the Seattle area summed up the entire conference with a simple statement at the end of the day with a very straightforward one of his own, “We just need more land.” He’s right. How to create more land inventory is the challenge. But with an already constrained transportation system laid upon environmental realities, geographic constraints, and a culture of government overspending that has made long term projects like building more roads almost politically impossible today, the Puget Sound region is in a bind. Public transportation is part of the equation with light rail and opening Paine Field airport to commercial passenger service as examples of ways to

relieve pressure on I-5 in the north Puget Sound region and opening up more land inventory by offering solutions that aren’t available today. Eventually, though, the region has to face the cold truth that we need another north-south corridor east of I-5 to create land inventory up to the slopes of the Cascade Range. Building roads isn’t something people talk about in environmentally-sensitive polite company, but it’s the elephant in the room. Without a plan to accelerate expansion of our road grid, housing affordability will likely remain a crisis. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visitwww. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

Jot down your tasks to get organized H

ave you ever felt overwhelmed by too much to do and you didn’t know where to get

started? Or maybe you were working on something and ideas or other tasks started popping into your head. Maybe you just shut down altogether and started posting on social media or watching TV instead of starting on the tasks rolling around in your head. Don’t worry, you’re not alone, this happens to a lot of people. Under stress and without a plan, it’s common for people to power down instead of getting things done. But I want you to feel on top of things so you can use your energy to power up, get tasks crossed off your to do list and improve your life balance. When I’ve felt overwhelmed, I’ve found that getting everything out of my head and onto paper reduced my stress tremendously. Here’s why — when it’s on paper it helps relieve your brain from the responsibility of trying to hold onto everything. That’s a lot of responsibility because we usually have a lot rattling around in there. When it’s in front of you in black and white, you can start evaluating your tasks by their priority levels. When they’re all just bouncing around in your head, it’s difficult to distinguish which tasks are more important than others. Picking up milk from the grocery store is floating around right next to writing a blog post and calling new clients. I’m

confident two out of three of these tasks come as a higher priority. But here’s the key-how are you writing your list? Are you using scraps of paper, sticky notes and the back of envelopes? Getting your tasks and ideas out of your head and onto paper is a fantastic first step, but how you do it holds a lot of importance as well. I want you to use a system that you are naturally comfortable using. Are you a digital person or do you prefer paper and pen? There’s no wrong answer. The right answer is the one that works for you because you will be able to adopt it easily and stick with it. If you have to create all new habits right out of the gate, the chances are good you’ll return to the back of envelopes in no time. Let’s look at a few of the possibilities at your fingertips. But be sure to think outside of my ideas if you can come up with a solution that works better for you. These suggestions can get you thinking in the right direction.

Sticky Notes When I’m working with clients, it’s common for me to see these colorful gems lining the edge of computers, filling bulletin boards or even sticking to walls. This may seem like a good idea as an eye catcher for reminders, but these little squares quickly become visual clutter. And when you have too many sticky notes vying for your attention, the

importance of tasks from one sticky note to another gets lost. Now, if you just have one or two sticky notes in front of you, it’s probably not a problem. Monika But if you have Kristofferson too many and it’s time for a change, you can experiment Office with these ideas. Efficiency Toss sticky notes after you complete your task. Don’t let them keep hanging around in your work space. Streamline your system by keeping notes in just one place-ideas are coming up next. Recently, I created a notebook with a client for her sticky notes. We used dividers and labeled them with a label maker. She was then able to place her sticky notes in the correct section. This allowed her to use the sticky notes she so loved but keep them in an organized system that made sense. Examples for categories could be: To Do, Errands, Shopping List and Ideas.

Legal Pads Instead of having little notes all over the place that can easily get lost, keep all of your notes in one place and one place only. Not three legal pads, just one. Now

I don’t like to turn right around and contradict myself, but, if you are involved with different meetings, events, committees, etc., you may want one legal pad for each one so the notes you have coincide with the meeting you’re in. Be sure to cross things off as you get them done and you can even tear out the pages when they are complete.

Digital This is a great option if you want to have your lists and notes with you on your computer and synced with your phone. A great option is Evernote so your lists and notes will be with you wherever you go and they can be shared right from your phone. Evernote is great, but there are so many apps out there to choose from. The concept really isn’t about a specific app as much as it is about finding one that works for you, using it consistently and having confidence in your system. Don’t let yourself end up with productivity paralysis due to ideas, tasks and to do’s floating around in your head. Get them out of your brain and into an organized paper system or a digital system so you can be assured that things won’t slip through the cracks, you can prioritize your lists, cross off completed tasks and feel accomplished. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in LakeStevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.


OCTOBER 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

You need to fuel your engine of growth I

hear all too often from business owners and managers, “I’m not happy with my rate of growth.” My first question when I hear that complaint is, “What is your engine of growth?” Which is usually followed by a crinkled up forehead or blank stare. Even though the economy is chugging along, albeit at a slow rate, most business owners are not satisfied with their flat or single digit gains. If you want to outpace the economy, you’ll need to add more fuel to your engine of growth. Most business owners can quickly tell you what their sales were for their last reporting period, but few understand the engine or measure the metrics that drive those results. There are two primary engines of growth categories: paid and organic. You can certainly fuel both engines, but knowing

and tracking the faster you will track word-of-mouth and the right grow. networking referrals by metrics are Organic Engines sourcing new customers. critical to include growth Viral growth, on the accelerating from word-ofother hand, happens as your rate of mouth and viral a side-effect of using the growth. (not to be confused product. It usually involves Paid with a viral maran embedded or autoEngines keting campaign, matic system to spread the Andrew require an which falls in the word, and doesn’t require Ballard investment paid growth engine evangelists to transmit in traditional category). To the message like word Growth or digital generate a bankable of mouth does. A good promotion. organic effect, how- example is social media Strategies The most ever, you need to networks that automatiimportant deliver a truly outcally email you when you metric is standing customer have a new post, request, the margin between the experience… I mean you photo, connection or Lifetime Market Value have to really WOW your tweet. (LMV) of a customer and customers and sustain The way to measure the Cost Per Acquisition that WOW factor. The a viral growth engine (CPA) of that customer. difference between wordis through what Eric Divide your CPA by your of-mouth and viral growth Ries — author of “Lean LMV to determine your is that word-of-mouth Startup” — calls the “viral .... margin. As long as the (getting people to share coefficient.” In essence, margin is greater than their experience with fam- you measure how many one, you will grow. For ily, friends and colleagues) new customers will use the example, if you spent is less controllable and product as LEE a result of each ADVERTISER: PENNY TRUCKING $1,000 on an advertisemore difficult to measure; new customer you acquire. SALES PERSON: 1902 ment that generated although, you can still Example, if each new CREATED BY: SHOPPE $2,500 in lifetime sales, PUBLICATION: HERALD RETAIL your margin would be 2.5. The higher your margin,

customer generated one but people will never additional customer (on forget how you made average), the coefficient them feel. If you make would be 1.0 and the com- your customers feel special pany would grow. With a — like they are your only coefficient of less than 1, customer — your Cost the growth wouldn’t be Per Acquisition will go sustainable. down and your Lifetime The higher your viral Market Value will go up. coefficient the faster your Lastly, if you’re a small product will spread. The business owner interest in same engines (and math) discovering new engines work for service and of growth, be sure to nonprofit organizations attend the North Puget as well. Sound Small Business It doesn’t matter Summit on Nov. 2 at the whether your engine of Lynnwood Convention growth is paid, organic Center. It’s a free event, or both, as long as your and one I believe you margin and coefficient will find informative and are greater than one, your inspiring. You can register business will grow. And, at www.EconomicAlliancthe best way to ensure a eSC.org. sustainable growth rate is Andrew Ballard is presito deliver a stellar cusdent of Marketing Solutions, tomer experience. an agency specializing in To paraphrase Maya growth strategies. For more Angelou, people will forinformation, call 425- 1231656 get what you said, people 337-1100 or go to www. NEXT RUN DATE: 01/24/15 will forget what you did, PUBLICATION: HERALD RETAIL mktg-solutions.com. SIZE: 2 col X 2 in

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

EVERETT — Iditarod Musher and Edmonds native Jan Steves is the keynote speaker at the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County’s 11th annual Hope Within Luncheon. The program begins at noon on Oct. 5 at Xfinity Events Center in Everett. Contact Stephanie Civey at 425-259-2827, ext. 1013 or stephanie@dvs-snoco.org for reservations. EVERETT — The Madrona Group, a specialized real estate team working in the greater Puget Sound area, has announced that it has partnered with Keller Williams’ Everett office. This makes it part of an 11 office regional network. The Madrona Group is led by founders and brokers Joe Kiser and Jason Fox as partners with Patrick Flynn operating as the managing broker. LYNNWOOD — Stantec has unveiled plans for its new regional creative headquarters in Seattle’s downtown South Lake Union neighborhood. The new 16,993-square-foot office and its staff will help comprise a greater Seattle-area network of Stantec offices with 257 total team members between the South Lake Union neighborhood location, the Lynnwood office and two offices in Bellevue. EVERETT — Electrical Construction and Maintenance magazine has honored the Fluke TiX560 Infrared Camera with

BUSINESS BRIEFS

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 61 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 46 Ship port calls 2015: 133 Barge port calls 2015: 61 Oct. 4: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Oct. 5: Swire, Siangtan Oct. 8: SASCO, SASCO Avacha Oct. 11: Westwood, Westwood Victoria Oct. 18: ECL, Asian Naga Oct. 18: Westwood, Westwood Pacific Source: Port of Everett the overall Silver Award in its 2016 Product of the Year awards. Fluke Networks has announced that three of its recent products were judged by the Cabling Installation & Maintenance 2016 Innovators Awards program to be industry-leading developments. MUKILTEO — Members representing Guild 1 of the Providence General Children’s Association have presented a check for $4,400 to Board President Mary Lou Finley. The funds represent

the proceeds from the Guild’s summer Garden Party that was held at the home of Pat Dennis in Old Town Mukilteo. Providence General Children’s Association is a non-profit organization. EVERETT — Workforce Snohomish has received a $314,000 grant to allow it to partner with Everett Community College to develop a career pathway and Retail Management Certificate program that culminates in an industry recognized credential. The grant also funds a Retail Employment Navigator position at Workforce Snohomish. The grant was made possible through a $10.9 million overall grant from the Walmart Foundation. ARLINGTON — On Aug. 31, Sound Physicians began providing hospitalist services for patients at Cascade Valley Hospital in Arlington, part of Skagit Regional Health. Hospitalists are physicians who specialize in the care of hospitalized patients, offer around-theclock services for adult patients and work in conjunction with the patient’s primary care physician. EVERETT — JPMorgan Chase Foundation has awarded a $300,000 grant to HopeWorks Station, a transit-oriented development and workforce development center accessible to residents of affordable housing throughout Snohomish County. In general, the grant will support community, transit-oriented

and social enterprise development in the community. HopeWorks Social Enterprises is an affiliate of non-profit Housing Hope. MARYSVILLE — A pet sitter service, Paws R Us, has opened to serve Marysville, Tulalip and Arlington. Owner Kelly Carroll previously operated pet sitting services in Illinois. Services offered by Paws R Us include basic obedience training for puppies, mid-day dog walks, pet transport, and vacation care. For more information, go online at www.pawsrus.biz. EVERETT — Driving Hope, a partnership between BECU, Housing Hope and 13 local car dealerships, raised more than $27,000 during its recent campaign in Snohomish County. The funds will support the Generations of Hope Campaign, a Housing Hope fundraising campaign aimed at building more than 175 units of affordable housing, expanding job programs and services for children and families experiencing homelessness. EVERETT — Everett’s Port Gardner Rotary Club presented two checks, each worth $5,000, to the Rotary Club of Everett to celebrate the older club’s 100th birthday. The funds will help support two service projects — a program to help people in the Dominican Republic build commercial gardens and a facility to train Everett residents for jobs in the food service industry.

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PEOPLE WATCHING EVERETT — Snohomish County nonprofit Housing Hope welcomed two new members to its board of directors, Sue Ambler and Robert Walker, and has elected a new board chair, Todd Morrow. Ambler is principal of contracting firm Triple R Solutions, and previously served Workforce Snohomish as a president and CEO. Walker is a Boeing engineering manager. Morrow is a founding board member of Housing Hope. EVERETT — Zach Anderson has joined People’s Bank as real estate loan officer at the Everett Real Estate Loan Center located at 2702 Colby Ave., Everett. Bellingham-headquartered People’s Bank has 26 full-service branches and three loan production offices located throughout Washington. MOUNT VERNON — What’s Your Avocado? Marketing & Public Relations, based in downtown Mount Vernon, has welcomed Sabrina J. Russo to its team as a social media specialist and copywriter. EDMONDS — Real estate agent Rhonda Snyder has joined RE/MAX Direct Realty’s Edmonds office as the managing broker and director of operations. She brings more than 25 years’ of local real estate experience to the office as a realtor, broker-owner and title/escrow account manager.

Ronald Quam

Catherine Yee

Todd Morrow

Robert Walker Zach Anderson

Joshua Hernandez Buck

Erin Duvall

Sue Ambler

Todd M. Hull

EVERETT — John Melson has been hired to lead Everett Community College’s eLearning department. As the director of educational technology, he will work with EvCC faculty and students on a variety of digital tools and technologies including the college’s eLearning system, Canvas. LYNNWOOD — Todd M. Hull has joined Pacific Crest Savings Bank’s Lynnwood branch as a lending officer. Hull brings over 20 years of banking experience to his new role, including 17 years in the commercial, income property and construction real estate sectors.

Rhonda Snyder

OCTOBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

Rhonda Matthes

Don Barclay

Lia Andrews

Peg Balachowski

John Melson

Sabrina J. Russo

EVERETT —Western Washington Medical Group added four new providers to its growing network. The providers are: Dr. Ronald Quam, an orthopedic total joint surgeon; Dr. Catherine Yee, an interventional pain/physiatry specialist; Dr. Joshua Hernandez Buck, a neurologist; and Erin Duvall, primary care, integrative and complementary medicine. LYNNWOOD — The Edmonds Community College Board of Trustees has selected its fourth student trustee. Student Lia Andrews, 23, was appointed by Gov. Jay Inslee to serve from July through June 2017.

EVERETT — Everett Community College Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning Peg Balachowski has received a grant from the IDEA Foundation to test a way to provide faculty feedback. EVERETT — Rhonda Matthes has joined Coastal Community Bank as a vice president and business development officer at the bank’s branch at 5415 Evergreen Way in Everett. EVERETT — Reid Middleton recently named engineer Don Barclay as the Airport Group director. Barclay will be responsible for leading the group and growing the practice.

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22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

October 2016

REPORT RE Port of EVERETT

CALENDAR Farmers' Market Season ends Sunday October 16 O C TO B E R 4/11: Port Commission Meeting; budget O C TO B E R 1: Walk to End Alzheimer's

Creating Economic Opportunities

Port Commission Awards $7.6 million contract to build roads, public spaces for Fisherman's Harbor

O C TO B E R 15: Making Strides Against Breast Cancer N O V E M B E R 1/8: Port Commission Meeting; budget

December 3:

Holiday on the Bay

Port of EVERETT

EXECUTIVE

Interested in following the Port's budget process? Find more details at www.portofeverett.com

SEAPORT

The Mill A Interim cleanup action is on schedule to be complete in the November/ December timeframe. This project removes 40,000 cubic yards of contaminated and clean sediment from Pacific Terminal.

MARINA

The Port just wrapped up its first Sail-In Cinema series. Have ideas for next year? Email publicaffairs@portofeverett.com by Oct. 31.

REAL ESTATE

The Port is actively recruiting tenants for Fisherman's Harbor. The district is expected to include 11,000 square feet of retail and 19,000 square feet of restaurant space. Interested? Contact Taylor Nuccitelli at 425.388.0661.

On September 13, 2016, the Port Commission awarded a $7.6 million contract to Burlington-based Interwest Construction to construct the roads, utilities and public access features to the new Fisherman’s Harbor district in Waterfront Place. The contract award includes building the new Seiner Drive and 14th Street roadways, the Esplanade trail system in Fisherman’s Harbor, the Pacific Rim Plaza, provide landscaping for all the public spaces and install a new pipeline in the City of Everett’s Puget Sound stormwater infrastructure within the site. In August, the Port awarded a $4.4 million contract to Bergerson Construction for the marine elements of Fisherman’s Harbor. The work, which will begin October 3, includes the removal and reconstruction of the southernmost bulkhead in Fisherman’s Harbor, construction of a new overwater timber wharf to moor commercial fishing vessels, the platform for the new Pacific Rim Splash Fountain Plaza, and an access pier that will eventually connect to a new guest moorage facility at the base of Fisherman’s Harbor. Fisherman’s Harbor, the first phase of the 65-acre Waterfront Place Central mixed use development, is located on 12 acres adjacent

to West Marine View Drive. This district will be a year-round hub of activity that includes up to 265 apartment units, a 135 room hotel, five commercial buildings and numerous retail and waterfront restaurant spaces. The key public features of this area include: a continuous public trail, a dock walk for visitors to get down to touch the water, a small boat course and Pacific Rim Plaza that will pay tribute to our international seaport. The Port has completed the recruitment for the housing developer and hotelier for Fisherman’s Harbor and is actively recruiting the retail components of the district. Staff expects to have developers on board by the end of the year, with vertical construction to begin in 2017. The Waterfront Place Central project will create a new community where people can live, work, shop, relax and find entertainment. Overall, it includes 15 new public gathering spaces, up to 660 housing units, two waterfront hotels, at least 10 fine and casual dining restaurants, and 662,000 sq. ft. of commercial, retail and marine sales and services. At full build out, the project will support more than 2,000 jobs and $8.6 million in new tax revenue for the city.

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Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

Information you would like to see in next month’s update? Please e-mail lisam@portofeverett.com Stay Connected!

Visit www.portofeverett.com ‘Like’ us on Facebook; ‘Follow’ us on Twitter and Instagram


PUBLIC RECORDS Snohomish County Tax Liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Aug. 1-31.

Federal tax liens 201608020410: Aug. 2; Dahl Construction Services Inc., 4502 92nd St. NE, Apt. A, Marysville 201608020411: Aug. 2; Kolash, Paul, 9216 Woods Creek Road, Monroe 201608020412: Aug. 2; O’Finnigans Pub (+), 13601 Highway 99, Everett 201608020413: Aug. 2; Bracamontes, Vicente (+), PO Box 1091, Lynnwood 201608020415: Aug. 2; Hanke, Mary Lou Kelley (+), 415 Legion Drive, Everett 201608020416: Aug. 2; York, Sharron R., 2325 Cleveland Ave., Everett 201608020417: Aug. 2; Nicholson, Karin A. (+), 18423 North Road, Bothell 201608020418: Aug. 2; Millcreek AFH Inc., 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201608020419: Aug. 2; Ohman, Joseph (+), 3333 164th St. SW, Apt. 1214, Lynnwood 201608020420: Aug. 2; Danas, Mary, 4118 76th Drive NE, Marysville 201608020421: Aug. 2; Connelly, Debra S., 7127 Skipley Road, Snohomish 201608020422: Aug. 2; Cold Tech NW, 14617 E Lake Goodwin Road, Stanwood 201608020423: Aug. 2; Ross, Ione L. (+), 23328 84th Ave. W. Edmonds 201608100553: Aug. 10; MTN Inc., PO Box 12670, Mill Creek 201608100554: Aug. 10; Pineda, Leyla (+), 9112 46th Place W, Mukilteo 201608100555: Aug. 10; Petersen, Brad, 2321 123rd St. SE, Everett 201608100556: Aug. 10; Dumm, Keith E., 14018 34th Drive SE, Mill Creek 201608100557: Aug. 10; Highland Glass, 4502 148th St. NE, Marysville 201608100558: Aug. 10; Wilhelmsen, Terry A., 9102 Ninth Ave. SE, Everett 201608100559: Aug. 10; Wilhelmsen, Victoria A. (+), 9102 Ninth Ave. SE, Everett 201608100562: Aug. 10; Rowe, Jennifer S., 2209 Lakewood Road, Arlington 201608100563: Aug. 10; Ferrara, Louis, 2220 Grand Ave., Everett 201608100564: Aug. 10; Solumntech Inc., 8505 45th Drive NE, Marysville 201608100565: Aug. 10; Montgomery, Raymond W Jr., PO Box 3105, Lynnwood 201608100566: Aug. 10; Ruiz, Jimmy G., 7513 15th Place SE, Lake Stevens 201608100567: Aug. 10; Lobaugh, Lisa, 6816 86th Ave. NE, Marysville 201608100568: Aug. 10; Andersen-Ross Photography , 16119 73rd Place W, Edmonds 201608100569: Aug. 10; First Class Concrete Inc., 20721 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish 201608100570: Aug. 10; Sound Storage Management, 15722 OK Mill Road, Snohomish 201608100571: Aug. 10; Nesseth, Kay C. (+), PO Box 999, Snohomish 201608100572: Aug. 10; Kimball, Richard, 10232 Idaho Ave., Everett 201608100573: Aug. 10; Bransford, Sheryl (+), PO Box 2649, Lynnwood 201608100574: Aug. 10; Hedeen, Nicole (+), 11414 W Ibberson Drive, Everett 201608100575: Aug. 10; Hovde, Robert L., 20501 86th Place W, Edmonds 201608100576: Aug. 10; Hovde, Mary J. (+), 20501 86th Place W, Edmonds 201608100577: Aug. 10; GALA-FC (+), 1010 State Ave., Unit 1915, Marysville 201608100578: Aug. 10; ALA-WA Inc. (+), 1227 147th Place SW, Lynnwood 201608100579: Aug. 10; Kim, Kyusuk, 3013 177th Place SW, Lynnwood 201608100580: Aug. 10; Crank, Alicia J., 8121 236th St. SW, Apt. 103, Edmonds 201608100581: Aug. 10; Speed, Katherine A. (+), 20902 67th Ave. NE, No. 345, Arlington 201608160368: Aug. 16; Jones, Tirzah E.,

11121 17th Court W, Everett 201608160369: Aug. 16; Funderburke Autobody (+), 26905 87th Drive NW, Stanwood 201608160370: Aug. 16; Bartelheimer, Kurt (+), PO Box 878, Snohomish 201608160371: Aug. 16; Kolash, Paul, 9216 Woods Creek Road, Monroe 201608160372: Aug. 16; Kyle, Cheryl L. (+), 15214 116th St. NE, Arlington 201608160373: Aug. 16; RC Pfaff Quality Carbide Tooling (+), 17700 147th St. SE, Suite B, Monroe 201608160374: Aug. 16; Mill Creek Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201608160375: Aug. 16; Stewart, Elizabeth A., 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201608160377: Aug. 16; Perales, Henry P., 12712 Admiralty Way, Apt. D101, Everett 201608160378: Aug. 16; Parke, Joshua A., 11324 31st St. SE, Lake Stevens 201608160379: Aug. 16; Goings, Stephanie, 3607 W Mukilteo Blvd., Everett 201608160398: Aug. 16; Allen Creek Coffee, 4711 64th St. NE, Unit 101, Marysville 201608160399: Aug. 16; Crees Underground Construction (+), 10910 100th St. NE, Suite D202, Lake Stevens 201608160400: Aug. 16; Hawk, Brenda L., 1025 Marine Drive NE, Tulalip 201608160401: Aug. 16; Flatten, Marilyn S., 18463 Blueberry Lane, Apt. U104, Monroe 201608160402: Aug. 16; Garcia, Domingo (+), 4306 228th St. SW, Suite 8, No. 9, Mountlake Terrace 201608230335: Aug. 23; Valdez, Susan P., 2728 144th St. SW, Lynnwood 201608230336: Aug. 23; Novak, Michael T., 14719 Main St., F-102, Mill Creek 201608230337: Aug. 23; Nobach, Ryan P. (+), PO Box 3369, Arlington 201608230338: Aug. 23; White, Lori A., 11807 Tulare Way W, Tulalip 201608230339: Aug. 23; Stewart, Rick D., 9812 215th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201608230340: Aug. 23; Scoringe, Sarah L. (+), 317 Glen Ave., Snohomish 201608230341: Aug. 23; Erickson, Leah J., 2302 11th St., Snohomish 201608230342: Aug. 23; Lopez Bros. Construction, 33307 138th St. SE, Sultan 201608230343: Aug. 23; Matthies, William J., 608 Warren Ave., Everett 201608230372: Aug. 23; Evolve Inc., 12201 Cyrus Way, Suite 101, Mukilteo 201608230373: Aug. 23; Knight, Jacqueline J., 6414 66th Place NE, Marysville 201608230374: Aug. 23; Davalos Farriers Inc., PO Box 1722, Sultan 201608230377: Aug. 23; Eggleston, Georgie B., 2515 Colby Ave., Apt. 409, Everett 201608230378: Aug. 23; Heichel, Patricia A. (+), 1418 Sunday Lake Road, Stanwood 201608230379: Aug. 23; LEC Contractors (+), 3927 Colby Ave., Everett 201608230380: Aug. 23; Frederickson, Cindy M. (+), 14031 Highway 9, Snohomish 201608230381: Aug. 23; Crain, Corey M., 7620 197th St. SE, Snohomish 201608230382: Aug. 23; Traina, Eric P., 22221 Meridian Ave. S, Bothell 201608230383: Aug. 23; Ray, Renee C. (+), 13330 Harbour Heights Drive, Mukilteo 201608300078: Aug. 30; Venturo, Zakary, 820 Cady Road, Apt. A303, Everett 201608300079: Aug. 30; Valdez, Susan P., 2728 144th St. SW, Lynnwood 201608300084: Aug. 30; Hutchinson, Robert G., 5011 60th Ave. NE, Marysville 201608300085: Aug. 30; Berlin, Japhet P., 19925 Maplewood Drive, Edmonds 201608300086: Aug. 30; La Hacienda Inc., 620 Everett Mall Way, Suite 200, Everett 201608300087: Aug. 30; AA Diversify Group, 15620 Highway 99, Suite 1, Lynnwood 201608300088: Aug. 30; Davis, Richard M., 6825 22nd Drive NE, Tulalip 201608300089: Aug. 30; DiVito, Dustin, 14022 Aspen Way, Snohomish 201608300090: Aug. 30; Rippee, Michael P., 620 Waverly Ave., Everett 201608300092: Aug. 30; Rose, Cory, 417 Maple Ave., Snohomish 201608300093: Aug. 30; Roofing Technical

OCTOBER 2016

Services (+), 18416 40th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201608300095: Aug. 30; Fifth 5 Wheel Place-RV Center (+), 12603 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood 201608020414: Aug. 2; Ponton, Gerald E., 7505 212th SW, C202, Edmonds

Partial Release of Federal Tax Lien 201608160381: Aug. 16; Collins, Lynne A., 21101 Welch Road, Snohomish

Release of Federal Tax Lien 201608020424: Aug. 2; DiMaggio, Tracie (+), 17426 Mountain View Road SE, Monroe 201608020425: Aug. 2; Schueller, Victor H. (+), 19610 Soundview Drive NW, Stanwood 201608020426: Aug. 2; G-2 Contracting, 3405 172nd St. NE, Suite 5, No. 245, Arlington 201608020427: Aug. 2; Mitchell, Richard T., 15320 35th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201608020428: Aug. 2; Deiner, Laura R. (+), 15211 75th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201608020429: Aug. 2; Mosbacker, Shelly A. (+), 10965 36th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201608020430: Aug. 2; Salvador, Hollie A. (+), 17809 65th Place W, Lynnwood 201608020431: Aug. 2; Torngren, Susan (+), 20833 67th Ave. W, Suite 201-203, Lynnwood 201608020432: Aug. 2; Corner Coffee Bar And Cafe Inc., 18401 76th Ave. W, Suite 103, Edmonds 201608100561: Aug. 10; Clark Dental Clinic (+), 7825 47th Ave. NE, Marysville 201608100582: Aug. 10; Mukilteo Sports Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201608100583: Aug. 10; Frohning Dairy Inc., 17506 190th St. SE, Monroe 201608100584: Aug. 10; Champion, Su L. (+), 3802 Colby Ave., Everett 201608100585: Aug. 10; Sno-King Dispatch Service Inc., 16409 20th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201608100586: Aug. 10; Sawyer, Edith (+), 14014 68th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201608100588: Aug. 10; Gosney, Verlyn R. Jr. (+), 2527 Baker Ave., Everett 201608100589: Aug. 10; Holt, Victoria (+), 424 Ave. D, Snohomish 201608100590: Aug. 10; Rule, Kristy M. (+), 15001 52nd Ave. SE, Everett 201608100591: Aug. 10; Horman, Gordon L., 17526 76th Ave. W, Edmonds 201608100592: Aug. 10; Mize, Jermaine I., 3711 164th St. SW, Apt. Z-403, Lynnwood 201608100593: Aug. 10; Champion, Robert W., 601 Olympic Blvd., Everett 201608100594: Aug. 10; Champion, Su L. (+), 601 Olympic Blvd., Everett 201608160384: Aug. 16; Dumm, Keith E., 8928 180th St. NW. Stanwood 201608160385: Aug. 16; Abdellahi, Abdellhaye, 519 NE 165th St., Apt. 4, Shoreline 201608160386: Aug. 16; Kyobe, Mohammed, 5503 152nd St. SW, Edmonds 201608160387: Aug. 16; Exterior Stucco Inc., 7030 193rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201608160403: Aug. 16; Gray, Douglas J., 3414 177th Place NE, Arlington 201608230344: Aug. 23; Zorich, Matthew, 3807 Lincoln Way, Apt. A, Lynnwood 201608230345: Aug. 23; Supply Company, 17404 147th St. SE, Suite No. I, Monroe 201608230346: Aug. 23; Tharp, Sarah P. (+), 21945 Oak Way, Brier 201608230348: Aug. 23; Lizotte, Loretta, 14816 239th Place SE, Snohomish 201608230349: Aug. 23; Luna, Maria R. (+), 5325 242nd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201608230350: Aug. 23; Powell, Marilee A, 10424 56th Drive NE, Marysville 201608230351: Aug. 23; Led Electric & Steamers Espresso (+), 3519 104th Place SE, Everett 201608230352: Aug. 23; Goines, Michael A., 500 75th St. SE, Everett 201608230354: Aug. 23; Tharp, Sarah P. (+), 21945 Oak Way, Brier 201608230355: Aug. 23; Dickerson, Holley

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

Anne, 17400 43rd Drive NW, Stanwood 201608230384: Aug. 23; Hatten, Amy N. (+), 19831 30th Drive SE, Bothell 201608230385: Aug. 23; Al-Aboudy, Arkan J., 707 93rd St. SE, Everett 201608230386: Aug. 23; Hatten, Jack T III, 19831 30th Drive SE, Bothell 201608300096: Aug. 30; Ame, Kelly D., 3321 188th St. SW, Apt. 3, Lynnwood 201608300097: Aug. 30; Moser, Louise S., 15713 Old Snohomish Road, Snohomish 201608300099: Aug. 30; Robertson, Dale, PO Box 2095, Everett 201608300101: Aug. 30; Moser, Bruce M., 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201608300102: Aug. 30; Pacific Security Engineering Partnership (+), PO Box 5156, Lynnwood 201608300104: Aug. 30; Northern Star Real Estate Inc., L1223 48th Drive NE, Marysville 201608300106: Aug. 30; Cook, Carolyn Y., 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish 201608300107: Aug. 30; Swinburnson, Tyler F., 828 103rd Drive SE, Lake Stevens 201608300108: Aug. 30; Bryson, Gail (+), 33331 St. Road 530 NE, Arlington 201608300109: Aug. 30; Redmon, Linda M. (+), 316 Maple Ave. B, Snohomish 201608300110: Aug. 30; Prather, Catherine H. (+), 19730 86th Place W, Edmonds 201608300112: Aug. 30; Enchanted Little Forest Child Care Center, 2720 W Marine View Drive, Everett 201608300115: Aug. 30; Olcese, Shannon J., 19111 30th Drive SE, Bothell 201608300116: Aug. 30; Fisher, David W., 21604 60th Ave. W, Apt. G108, Mountlake Terrace 201608150583: Aug. 15; Dahlstrom, Timothy, 654 5th Ave. S, Unit 404, Edmonds

Satisfaction of Employment Security Lien 201608020038: Aug. 2; Roberts Garage, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of Federal Tax Lien 201608100595: Aug. 10; DiMaggio, Tracie, 17426 Mountain View Road SE, Monroe 201608100596: Aug. 10; Floor Guys, 14525 254th Ave. SE, Monroe 201608230387: Aug. 23; Booher, Leman W, 4758 Park Drive, Apt. 104, Mukilteo

Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Aug. 1-31. 16-13994-MLB: Chapter 7, Jimmy Dung Nguyen and Tiffany Luu; attorney for join debtors: Ty Ho; filed: Aug. 1; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-14037-MLB: Chapter 7, Imtiaz Ali S. Modak and Shaba Modak; joint debtors: Pro se; filed: Aug. 4; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-14193-MLB: Chapter 7, Scott Park; attorney for debtor: Lawrence M. Blue; attorney for special request: Annette Cook; filed: Aug. 15; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-14208-MLB: Chapter 7, Atsuki Toritani; attorney for debtor: Kenneth J. Schneider; filed: Aug. 16; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-14335-MLB: Chapter 7, Marvin Eugene Hancock; attorney for debtor: Martin E. Snodgrass; special request: Pro se; filed: Aug. 23; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington Amerigas Propane: 4014 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8429; 360-322-6153; Propane (Lp) Gas Armata Construction: 16910 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-3725; 360322-7478; Construction Firstsource Builders: 20815 67th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8232; 360-403-8797; Building Contractors North Sound Motorsports: 19010 61st Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6346; 360-386-8855; Nonclassified Octane Toy Box: 19010 61st Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6346; 360-322-7659; Nonclassified Establishments White Security Systems Inc.: 12617 108th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7574; 425-402-0366; Security Control Equip and Systems-Wholesale

OCTOBER 2016

Budget Blinds: 22833 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98021-9385; 425-892-9173; Venetian Blinds-Retail DLM Appraisal Services: 16520 North Road, No. B205, Bothell, WA 98012-4909; Appraisers Decibel Brewing Co.: 18204 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-6869; 425-408-1624; Brewers (Manufacturers) Downtown Design Shop: 16016 39th Ave. SE, No. 1993, Bothell, WA 980125421; Nonclassified Emerald Didi Motorsports: 18724 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-6838; 425-949-5373; Nonclassified James West Design: 21317 39th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-7908 J&S Development: 100 228th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-8762; 425-482-2884; Nonclassified Knotted Wood: 19300 24th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6900; Wood Products Mana Kai 701: 21919 20th Ave. SE, No. 100, Bothell, WA 98021-4446; Nonclassified Mosa Museum Of Special Arts: 720 238th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-4308; 425-4820353; Museums Mrs Systems Inc.: 19000 W 33 Ave. W, Bothell, WA 98021; 425-563-1700 Northshore School District 417: 3613 SE 191 Place, Bothell, WA 98021; 425-424-

BUSINESS LICENSES 9418; Schools Northwest Solutions: 21621 Fourth Ave. W, Bothell, WA 98021-8126; Nonclassified Petco: 22621 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98021-8401; Pet Supplies and Foods-Retail PCC Natural Markets: 22621 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98021-8401; 425-492-8635; Food Markets Pit Stop: 3933 152nd Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6104; Nonclassified Rathbun Consulting: 20008 27th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98012-3604; Consultants Royal Banquet-Conference Hall: 21121 35th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98021-7092; Banquet Rooms Ruag Space USA Inc: 4408 216th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98021-7980; Nonclassified Sweat Cycle: 17606 North Road, Bothell, WA 980129134; Nonclassified Thought Concepts: 15424 39th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-9500; Nonclassified Truckrecord: 18405 Bellflower Road, Bothell, WA 98012-6234; Nonclassified Village Street Cafe: 23732 Bothell Everett Highway, No. A, Bothell, WA 98021-9383; 206-407-6821; Restaurants Waffles & Stuff: 17625 48th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6792; Restaurants Wilder Two Corp: 1223 187th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-7923; 425332-2283; Nonclassified

Join us for the 2016

PUBLIC OFFICIALS’ Reception PUBLIC OFFICIALS’ Join us for the 2016

Bothell

After The Plug: 19212 22nd Ave. SE, No. A, Bothell, WA 98012-6940; Nonclassified

Reception Join us for the 2016

PUBLIC OFFICIALS’

Reception

Darrington

Glacier Peak Institute: 1405 Emens Ave. N, Darrington, WA 98241-9502; Associations

Edmonds Edmonds 2020: 130 Second Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3512; 425-697-2343; Nonclassified Louvre Cafe: 210 Fifth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3625; 425-640-8188; Restaurants Toll Brothers: 15482 NE, Edmonds, WA 98026; 425836-6831; Nonclassified West Slauson Avenue Real Estate: 145 Third Ave. S, No. 200, Edmonds, WA 980203593; Real Estate Woodway Garage Door Repair Pro: 9633 Firdale Ave., Edmonds, WA 980206519; 425-880-2848; Garage Doors-Repairing

Everett Alraze M P4: 500 SE Everett Mall Way, No. 20, Everett, WA 98208-8110; 425-2639132; Nonclassified Chop Express: 7405 Hardeson Road, Everett, WA 98203-7129; 425-212-9295; Restaurants Choux Choux Bakery: 2900 Grand Ave., No. 113, Everett, WA 98201-4488; 425322-5805; Bakers-Retail CMIT Of Everett: 909 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3746; 425-512-8920;

Nonclassified Elite Autocare Inc.: 10630 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-3868; 425-374-3040; Automobile Repairing and Service Fixnthings: 1719 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 982013520; 425-512-0655; Repair Shops and Related Services Not Elsewhere Classified Fortive Aviation: 9724 32nd Drive W, Everett, WA 98204-1903; 425-353-9937; Aircraft-Dealers GCA Services: 3827 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4831; 425-404-3043; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Grow For Vets: 2804 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3430; 425-789-1297; Veterinarians Howard Lamp Co.: 2609 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2926; 425-405-3452; Nonclassified Megan Buechel Insurance Agency: 2529 116th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6004; 425225-5251; Insurance Northwest Ambulance: 8620 Holly Drive, Everett, WA 98208-1825; 425-263-9645; Ambulance Service Northwest Ambulance: 1316 Wall St., Everett, WA 98201-3942; 425-374-2526; Ambulance Service Northwest Motorsport: 12227 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5514; 425-7891549; Nonclassified Polygon Homes-Silver Lake Community: 2016

113th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-7415; 425-225-6997; Nonclassified Establishments Pro Fit Rx: 7425 Hardeson Road, Everett, WA 98203-7131; 425-328-4831; Pharmacies Rage Industries: 8616 Eighth Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204-1641; 425-263-9719; Nonclassified Smittys Auto Repair: 4205 S Third Ave., Everett, WA 98203-2519; 425-374-2410; Automobile Repairing and Service

Granite Falls Wetlands Creation Inc.: 26709 Mountain Loop Highway, Granite Falls, WA 98252; 360-691-6104; Nonclassified

Lake Stevens Jobsite Stud Welding: 3302 Old Hartford Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8699; 425-322-5808; Welding Lake View Custom Homes: 15408 84th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 982588822; 360-691-9253; Home Builders Metro Pcs: 25 95th Drive NE, No. 108, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7976; 425-3747245; Cellular Telephones (Services) Sunrise Services: 1602 Mitchell Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8102; 425-2129278; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Wise Choice Movers: 8316

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investors | in $40 non-investors Reception. There is$30 nobusiness better time to chat with your elected officials Join leaders from every business sector the Snohomish County region to network Join leaders from every sector in the Snohomish County region and make our annual Public Offi cials’ Reception. There is no on better Joinconnections leadersissues from at every business sector in fellow the Snohomish County region about business and connect with business leaders the to network and make connections at our annual Public Officials’ time to state chat to with your elected offi cials about business issues and connect with fellow network and make connections at our annual Public Officials’ ofThere affairsisinnothe region, the State, and your Washington D.C. Reception. better time tochat chatwith with elected officials business leaders on There the state ofbetter affairs in the region, the State, and Washington D.C. Reception. is no time to your elected officials about business issues and connect with fellow business leaders about business issues and connect with fellow business leaders on the on the Morein information available at: D.C. state of affairs region, the the State, and Washington state of affairs in thetheregion, State, and Washington D.C. www.economicalliancesc.org/events/2016-officials More information available at:

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The PUD helped El Paraiso turn to more efficient lighting and HVAC systems for its Snohomish County restaurants. It’s now saving more than $7,600 annually on energy bills. Call or go online today to learn how PUD energy-efficiency programs can help you save energy and money.

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1681514

More information available at:

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Enrique Guererro General Manager, El Paraiso


BUSINESS LICENSES 14th Place SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-6648; 425-2639573; Movers

Lynnwood Abigail Salon: 19725 40th Ave. W No. E, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6732; 425-673-7777; Beauty Salons American Patrol & Surveillance: 16825 48th Ave. W No. 347, Lynnwood, WA 980376408; 425-678-0069; Security Guard and Patrol Service Cove Restaurant Lounge: 406 164th St. SW, No. 106, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8114; 425-350-3881; Restaurants Custom Defense Systems: 16824 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3111; 425-245-7603; Nonclassified Digital Hearts Collective: 19031 33rd Ave. W, No. 207, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731; Nonclassified JEM Homecare Services: 16825 48th Ave. W No. 225, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6404; 425-361-1261; Home Health Service Lake Stickney Elementary School: 1625 Madison Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6024; 425-741-9843; Schools Mom’s House Of Pain: 1120 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8190; 425-245-8285; Tattooing Natural Stone Interiors: 13020 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5109; 425-258-5770; Interior Decorators Design and Consultants No. 1 Fan Club: 18421 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4457; 425-678-6915; Clubs Pacific Living Properties: 16028 44th Ave. W No. 24, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6100; 425-361-1185; Real Estate Red Safety: 18601 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4576; 425-582-7423; Safety Consultants Rhettrovation: 16627 60th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8312; 425-361-2455; Nonclassified Seattle Tires: 17510 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3146; 425-361-1693; Tire-Dealers-Retail Smart Learning Center: 17410 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3632; 425745-8414; Education Centers Smithwright Services-Voice: 2626 204th St.

SW, Lynnwood, WA 980366946; Services Not Elsewhere Classified SRS: 19020 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5206; 425-640-7569; Nonclassified Stellar Event Rentals: 6116 211th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7526; 425-697-2145; Party Supplies-Renting Stevenson Advertising: 19231 36th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5763; 425-245-7979; Advertising Not Elsewhere Classified United Commercial Inc.: 16504 6th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8102; 425-9675436; Nonclassified Victoria’s General Remodel: 19212 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5231; 425-697-2400; Remodeling and Repairing Bldg Contractors Washington Korean Golf Association: 17424 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-9241; 425-361-2792; Associations

4824; 360-652-0702; Cosmetics and Perfumes-Retail

Mill Creek Auto & Car Show Events: 914 164th St. SE, No. 220B12, Mill Creek, WA 980126385; Events-Special Constant Comics: 914 164th St. SE, No. 220-B12, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6385; Comic Books

Monroe Lovitt Motors: 17461 147th St. SE, No. 8, Monroe, WA 98272-1070; 360-2178093; Nonclassified

Mountlake Terrace Crema De LA Crema: 21709 66th Ave. W,

Exclusive Salon Products: 3616 South Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275-1540; 425-356-2727; Cosmetics and Perfumes-Retail Forecast Roofing: 4463 Russell Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5445; 425-512-8041; Roofing Contractors Mukilteo Power Coating Inc.: 4215 Russell Road,

Mukilteo, WA 98275-5447; 425-595-5313; Nonclassified Veca Co: 9800 Harbour Place, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4747; 425-374-2951; Nonclassified

Snohomish Amped Electric: 1313 Bonneville Ave., No. 101, Snohomish, WA 982902092; 360-217-7053; Electric Contractors Cathcart Chevron: 16315 Highway 9 SE, No. A, Snohomish, WA 982968792; 360-668-1353; Service Stations-Gasoline and Oil Mark Bauer Consulting: 2031 157th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-4746; 425-622-9260; Consultants Oscar New Consulting: 23112 155th Ave. SE,

Snohomish, WA 98296-7875; 360-799-9390; Consultants Snohomish Garage Door Repair: 222 Maple Ave., Snohomish, WA 982902524; 360-637-0033; Garage Doors-Repairing Veteran Awards Inc.: 2801 Bickford Ave., No. 103, Snohomish, WA 98290-1734; Trophies Awards and Medals Woodland Medow Farms: 12125 Treosti Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-6918; Farms Xetri: 2802 165th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9782; 425-622-9264; Nonclassified

Woodway Engle Survivors: 11002 Kulshan Road, Woodway, WA 98020-6129; 425-776-8838; Nonclassified

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AD Trampolines: 6610 64th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-4834; 360-454-0099; Trampoline Equipment and Supplies Brian Van Laar Trucking: 11721 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98271-8430; 360-6570835; Trucking Calvin Klein: 15311 39th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8902; 360-925-6581; Fashion Designers Car Link Autosales: 1115 Fifth St., Marysville, WA 98270-4502; 360-322-7374; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Everson Marysville: 12204 54th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98271-6200; 360-651-2511; Nonclassified Jasmine Spa: 9501 State Ave., Marysville, WA 982702235; 360-657-5085; Health Spas Purple Haze Detailing: 1403 Grove St., Marysville, WA 98270; 360-386-9346; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Trinity Massage Clinic: 1059 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4269; 360-3869428; Massage Therapists Ulta Beauty: 2551 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

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Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2103; 425-967-5310; Nonclassified Cube Corp: 6100 219th St. SW No. 480, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2222; Nonclassified Global Peace: 6912 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2169; 425-5827901; Nonclassified

OCTOBER 2016

EVERETT | 1611 SE Everett Mall Way Everett, WA 98208 | 425-290-8308

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26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1,873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815 256.098


OCTOBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

325

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

a division of

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

Bank of the Cascades

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

Here to Help Snohomish County Businesses Grow & Thrive Responding to your business opportunities with Local SBA Expertise, Quick Decisions & Streamlined Processing Prime Pacific Bank, now a division of Bank of the Cascades, is proud to continue our tradition of providing Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help local business succeed. We provide SBA loans for: • Business Expansion • Business Buyouts • Working Capital • Equipment

• Franchise Financing • Self Storage • Manufacturers • Wholesale

Please call or stop by any of our local branches to discuss how we might help your business today. Main Branch 2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036 425.774.5643

Member FDIC 1681469

Kenmore Branch 6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028 425.415.6564

Mill Creek Branch 2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012 425.357.1516


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 2016

Mike Morse, Morse Steel 4th generation owner Runner Sports dad

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Mike Morse—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

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© 2016 Heritage Bank Member FDIC

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