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Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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C E L E B R AT I N G

Celebrating 75 years of rich history. Come discover the changes planned that will shape EvCC’s future.


Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

y College 75 Year Anniversary

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C E L E B R AT I N G C E L E B R AT I N G

The Early Days m Everett the ashes Junior College opening

ade sparks Hall destroyed by fire Feb. 16, 1987 controvers

By KATHERINE SCHIFFNER SCHIFFNER and THOMAS GASKIN nity CollegeEverett Community College

in June 1916. However, the next year with the entry Drewel would go on to serve three terms of the United States into World War I, only eight as Snohomish County executive and is students graduated. By 1923, when there were no now the interim chancellor of Washington graduates, the college program closed. being told 12 days after your first colState University’s North Puget Sound munity CollegeImagine president In 1941, students were determined not to let that happen again. EJC’s 134 students campaigned for Everett location. hone rang atlege 3:16class a.m.that the fate of your school is in doubt. That’s exactly what happened to the first class of their school, handing out pamphlets explaining the Drewel credits the work of EvCC’s Fire at the college. Everett Junior College students. advantages of the college. Department, the college’s students, faculty the fire comingClasses down started I-5 Sept. 8, 1941. Parents unhappy “Everett has long awaited a junior college. Now and staff, fire investigators, city of Everett he said. about the Everett School District’s decision to use that this goal has been achieved, the student body leadership, governor, the community and to EvCC, he saw flames Lincoln Elementary School as the first home for EJC is behind it with a great enthusiasm and will work technical college system and others. he roof of the library andelementary school students – peti– displacing hard in an endeavor to make it a college that future “It was one of the saddest times of my a three-alarm blaze tioned thethat County Superintendent of Schools. They generations will be able to point to with pride,” EJC supported life, but one of the times I’m proudest of ade Hall. The fire, lateradding a junior college, just not at student Delbert Brydges, chairman of the junior colLincoln, elementary school constructed just two lege’s student council, wrote in a letter published in too,” he said in a July 2016 interview. e arson, claimed theanlife years earlier. “Everyone came together to get us back on hter Gary Parks. The Herald Sept. 18, 1941. Theinvoters The students and the Everett School District our feet as quickly as possible. We knew l destroyed pales com-of Everett were asked to decide the future of the college. If they voted no, EJC would board were backed by the Junior Chamber of we had to give our best because Gary ther tragedy here this close. Commerce, Lions Club, Rotary Club, University of Parks had given his last.” ld The Herald.EJC had already shut its doors once before. The Washington and some influential community leadcollege was first established in 1915, the second ers. NOT FORGOTTEN LOSS such institution west of Chicago. Tuition was free, On Sept. 20, 1941, voters endorsed the board’s The Washington State Legislature quickyear fire department vet-were presented an opportunity to and students actions by a strong majority – 2,609 to 875. EJC ly approved money to clean up the charred running outattempt of air while college work without taking a traditional would stay open. Everett Junior College’s first home was at Lincoln Elementary exam or leaving home, requirements for remains Hall, then more to He and sixentrance other fire“After a doubtful start, the college ended strongSchoolofatCascade 25th Street and Oakes Avenue. studywhen at a university. rebuild the college’s library and student ide the building a EvCC President ly, having the largest freshman enrollment of a school graduates attended that Drewel (second d the way out.Forty-two highBob junior college in the state,” according to the col- union. first year with thirteen completing the year’s work from right) leads lege’s first yearbook. In June 1987, EvCC’s Board of Trustees voted ames filled the room. the groundbreaking to name the new building after Gary Parks. In wled to safety, using their ceremony for the Gary October 1988, the Gary Parks Memorial Student de them out, but Parks, Parks Memorial StuUnion and a library/media center named after the them. He’d lost his way. dent Union and John executive director of the community college sysound him an hour later. Terrey Library Media tem, John Terrey, opened. d to resuscitate him, but to Center Media Center on Aug. 17, 1987. A permanent memorial to Parks stands north of who was married with OPERATING BUDGET the building that carries his name. A bronze firewas pronounced dead fighter’s helmet and jacket sit on a bench, just a.m. around the corner from another metal sculpture, the st line-of-duty death of an Feather Star. r since the early 1920s. The 1941-42 The sculpture was once located in the atrium of 2016-17 cafeteria. The Everett Junior Everett Community Cascade Hall. It was one of the few things to survive THE COLLEGE DESTROYED Northlight Gallery. Student governCollege College the fire, unscathed except for one bent tip. ed more than $8 million in damage and ment offices. The La Salle d’Ecole restaurant. The Feather Star, which became a symbol of renewal stimated 48,000 books and 19,000 periFour days later, they learned the fire had been intenand rebirth for the college, was the inspiration for the g EvCC yearbooks and historical records. tionally set. The case remains unsolved. ENROLLMENT three spires in EvCC’s logo. m burning books and newspapers rained “It’s a reminder that when we are knocked down, we rrounding neighborhood. PROJECT PHOENIX come back stronger,” said EvCC President David Beyer. f the college is gone,” said German The rubble of Cascade Hall was still smoldering “Our college and our students e Bjorn, who watched as the walls colwhen Drewel started getting offers of help. 1941 can overcome adversity 2015-16 and succeed.” The college formed Project Phoenix to coordinate Freshman Class students educated er instructors had gathered at the college community donations, which ultimately totaled more Everett Junior Everett Community h a bus to Olympia to meet with legislathan $300,000 and 70,000 books. College College ey joined stunned students and colAfter being closed for a week, EvCC reopened Feb. g firefighters continue to hose down the ANYONE WITH INFORMATION that could 23, 1987. When 6,000 students returned, Drewel, then Everett Junior College students gather on the college’s first day, Sept. 8, 1941. At EJC’s opening day lead to an arrest in the arson that claimed the 40, encouraged them to stay positive about the college’s CONTINUED ONlife PAGE 4 assembly, College President George Porter told students that they played the most important role in amily. I feel like my own house burned of Everett Firefighter Gary Parks and destroyed future. shaping the college’s future. udent Sandy Dudley told reporters. EvCC’s student union is encouraged to call “It was a knockdown, not a knockout,” said Drewel. ed the college’s student services offices. detectives at 425-257-8450. Widely praised for his leadership during the crisis,

Then and Now...

$17,599

134

$58.2 million

19,610


Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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C E L E B R AT I N G CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

WARTIME

The calm didn’t last long. Three months after the college opened, the student body listened to the radio as President Franklin Roosevelt spoke about the attack on Pearl Harbor and called on Congress to declare war against Japan. As Everett men and women went off to war, enrollment at the college plummeted. There was a real possibility that the number of students would drop below the 100 required to keep the college open. With the student body becoming almost entirely female, two programs steadied the perilous situation: nursing and officer training. The nursing program was a joint effort with Everett General and Providence hospitals. The officer training program sped high school males through the high school and junior college to positions of command in the military. Although fall 1942 enrollment was only 118, EJC had 175 students spring quarter. In fall 1943, enrollment was a healthy figure of 207. The Postwar Planning Committee of the Everett Chamber of Commerce in 1943 was impressed: “We feel that this college is properly located and recommend that the county give its continuous and unanimous support in order that it may fully serve those who find such an institution best for their educational growth.” At the First Presbyterian Church on June 7, 1943, Everett Junior College graduated its inaugural class: 22 students.

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Three members of the 1941 Board of Trustees – Arthur Wilson, George Culmback and Artie Whitely – join Everett Junior College President George Porter, Everett School Superintendent J.A. Reeves, Everett Mayor Frank Spencer, members of the Chamber of Commerce, and faculty members on the college’s opening day, Sept. 8, 1941. Other founding trustees include Charles Jordan and W.C. Browning.

We feel that this college is properly located and recommend that the county give its continuous and unanimous support in order that it may fully serve those who find such an institution best for their educational growth. — 1943 Everett Chamber of Commerce Postwar Planning Committee


Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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C E L E B R AT I N G

A new home

EJC outgrows first home By KATHERINE SCHIFFNER and THOMAS GASKIN Everett Community College Everett Junior College planners knew in 1941 that the college would need more space. But they had no idea how quickly EJC would outgrow its first home as a converted elementary school – or that it would take 17 years to create a new campus. In the postwar boom, students enrolling on the GI Bill packed EJC. By the 1946-47 academic year, 876 full-time students were enrolled. With enrollment continuing to grow, EJC added Memorial Hall and portables from the Air Force Base at Paine Field. “Now it is a recognizable fact that more space is needed,” student Beverly Ernlund wrote in a 1950 front-page article in the student newspaper, The Clipper. “Maybe the new college won’t be forthcoming for years, but now is the time to look to the future and plan.”

PLANS FOR A NEW CAMPUS

J.A. Reeves, the Everett superintendent of schools, started laying the groundwork for an EJC campus in 1943. In 1947, Reeves recommended the acquisition of more property. In 1949, the 30-member Citizens Advisory Committee to the college formed to look for a site. The committee ultimately decided on the south end of the Legion Park Municipal Golf Course, to the consternation of some golfers. Everett voters backed the site choice in 1953

and approved funding for the college in 1955.

OVERCROWDED ON DAY ONE

EJC president Fred Giles led the groundbreaking for the new campus on Feb. 19, 1957. The seven buildings were constructed for just under $2 million, with the state paying for 55 percent of the cost and local financing covering the rest. The campus was designed by Harold Hall and Associates of Everett. The campus was designed for 1,200 students. When classes started Sept. 10, 1958, EJC had 1,510 day students – a 34 percent increase from the previous fall. The evening program also surged in enrollment with 1,114 students. The new campus “was filled with students and overcrowded on day one,” recalled former EJC faculty member Marie Cowley-Ross. A key reason for the enrollment growth was the legislative ban on building a junior college in any county where there was a private or public four-year school. Through a good part of the 1960s, students from King County to the south frequently enrolled at EJC. The early buildings on EJC’s campus all were numbered, but in 1966 sophomore Tom Haviland came up with the idea of naming campus buildings after the Cascade and Olympic Range mountains they faced. With the help of fellow students Toby Elwood and Sharon Bruce, that idea became the practice on the campus and continues to this day.

Everett Junior College president Fred Giles reviews the plans for Monte Cristo Hall during construction of the college’s main campus.

Everett Junior College’s new campus under construction in 1958. The campus was originally made up of seven buildings facing Wetmore Avenue.


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C E L E B R AT I N G

From the ashes

Cascade Hall destroyed by fire Feb. 16, 1987 By KATHERINE SCHIFFNER Everett Community College Everett Community College president Bob Drewel’s phone rang at 3:16 a.m. There was a fire at the college. “I could see the fire coming down I-5 from Arlington,” he said. When he got to EvCC, he saw flames shooting from the roof of the library and student union – a three-alarm blaze that destroyed Cascade Hall. The fire, later determined to be arson, claimed the life of Everett firefighter Gary Parks. “Any material destroyed pales in comparison to the other tragedy here this morning,” he told The Herald.

Drewel would go on to serve three terms as Snohomish County executive and is now the interim chancellor of Washington State University’s North Puget Sound Everett location. Drewel credits the work of EvCC’s Fire Department, the college’s students, faculty and staff, fire investigators, city of Everett leadership, governor, the community and technical college system and others. “It was one of the saddest times of my life, but one of the times I’m proudest of too,” he said in a July 2016 interview. “Everyone came together to get us back on our feet as quickly as possible. We knew we had to give our best because Gary Parks had given his last.”

A TERRIBLE LOSS

NOT FORGOTTEN

Parks, an 18-year fire department veteran, died after running out of air while fighting the fire. He and six other firefighters were inside the building when a flashover blocked the way out. Smoke and flames filled the room. Firefighters crawled to safety, using their hose lines to guide them out, but Parks, 48, wasn’t with them. He’d lost his way. Firefighters found him an hour later. Paramedics tried to resuscitate him, but to no avail. Parks, who was married with two daughters, was pronounced dead shortly before 5 a.m. It was the first line-of-duty death of an Everett firefighter since the early 1920s.

EvCC President Bob Drewel (second from right) leads the groundbreaking ceremony for the Gary Parks Memorial Student Union and John Terrey Library Media Center Media Center on Aug. 17, 1987.

HEART OF THE COLLEGE DESTROYED

The fire caused more than $8 million in damage and consumed an estimated 48,000 books and 19,000 periodicals, including EvCC yearbooks and historical records. Hot ash from burning books and newspapers rained down on the surrounding neighborhood. “The heart of the college is gone,” said German instructor Brigitte Bjorn, who watched as the walls collapsed. She and other instructors had gathered at the college at 6 a.m. to catch a bus to Olympia to meet with legislators. Instead, they joined stunned students and colleagues watching firefighters continue to hose down the building. “This is our family. I feel like my own house burned down,” EvCC student Sandy Dudley told reporters. The fire leveled the college’s student services offices.

The cafeteria. The Northlight Gallery. Student government offices. The La Salle d’Ecole restaurant. Four days later, they learned the fire had been intentionally set. The case remains unsolved.

PROJECT PHOENIX

The rubble of Cascade Hall was still smoldering when Drewel started getting offers of help. The college formed Project Phoenix to coordinate community donations, which ultimately totaled more than $300,000 and 70,000 books. After being closed for a week, EvCC reopened Feb. 23, 1987. When 6,000 students returned, Drewel, then 40, encouraged them to stay positive about the college’s future. “It was a knockdown, not a knockout,” said Drewel. Widely praised for his leadership during the crisis,

The Washington State Legislature quickly approved money to clean up the charred remains of Cascade Hall, then more to rebuild the college’s library and student union. In June 1987, EvCC’s Board of Trustees voted to name the new building after Gary Parks. In October 1988, the Gary Parks Memorial Student Union and a library/media center named after the executive director of the community college system, John Terrey, opened. A permanent memorial to Parks stands north of the building that carries his name. A bronze firefighter’s helmet and jacket sit on a bench, just around the corner from another metal sculpture, the Feather Star. The sculpture was once located in the atrium of Cascade Hall. It was one of the few things to survive the fire, unscathed except for one bent tip. The Feather Star, which became a symbol of renewal and rebirth for the college, was the inspiration for the three spires in EvCC’s logo. “It’s a reminder that when we are knocked down, we come back stronger,” said EvCC President David Beyer. “Our college and our students can overcome adversity and succeed.”

ANYONE WITH INFORMATION that could

lead to an arrest in the arson that claimed the life of Everett Firefighter Gary Parks and destroyed EvCC’s student union is encouraged to call detectives at 425-257-8450.


Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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The Herald

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The Times of Everett Community College  1941

Sept. 8: Everett Junior College’s first day at the former Lincoln Elementary School at 25th Street and Oakes Avenue. George Porter was the college’s first leader. Oct. 23: First issue of the college’s student newspaper, The Clipper, is published. The Clipper continued throughout the college’s history and is still published today. Nov. 8: EJC admitted to the Junior College League for athletics. Students select the Trojan as the college’s mascot. Other mascot options: Pioneers, Lumberjacks and Seahawks.

 1943

June 7: 22 students graduate at the first EJC commencement ceremony. June 28: J.F. Marvin Buechel named president of EJC.

 1962

Feb. 16: Dedication of Baker Hall, new physical education expansion, new swimming pool and the inauguration of EJC president Rodney Berg.

 1966

May 16: Everett Board of Education names EJC’s buildings. They previously had been known by numbers. Oct. 24: Sen. Robert Kennedy and Sen. Henry “Scoop” Jackson speak to hundreds of EJC students at the college’s student union.

 1967

Feb. 3: Paul McCurley inaugurated as president. June 28: The Board of Trustees of Community College District 5 (Everett) changes the official name of the college from Everett Junior College to Everett Community College to conform with the Community College Act of 1967. July 1: Trustees establish Edmonds Community College as part of the Everett community college district.

nts ks to EJC stude rt Kennedy spea be Ro n. Se : . 66 19 student union at the college's

 1968

 1986

Sept. 23: East and west sides of Index Quad open for classes; Trojan Bookstore Conference Room (now the Henry M. Jackson Conference Center) opens.

Oct. 14: Applied Technology Training Center satellite program added at 2333 Seaway Blvd. The site is now the home of EvCC’s Corporate & Continuing Education headquarters.

 1969

 1987

March 26: Jeanette Poore becomes acting president. She was appointed permanently as president in April 1970. April 1969: EvCC’s Black Student Union student organization forms.

 1973  1945

1945: First EvCC GIs.

Sept. 5: First veterans attend Everett Junior College on the GI Bill.

 1947

Dec. 6: EJC’s football team plays Santa Rosa Junior College. With a crowd of 10,000 watching, Trojans defeated the nationally ranked Santa Rosa team in an 18-6 upset. It was the first game played at Everett Memorial Stadium.

 1948

Jan. 2: Rainier Hall opens. The building was formerly called the Learning Resource Center.

 1975

July 30: Norm Clark named president of EvCC

 1978

March 21: Nina Haynes appointed interim president of EvCC. She became a permanent president in 1979.

Oct. 5: Enrollment drops to 477 primarily due to the Korean War, according to The Clipper.

 1953

 1984

 1951

Jan. 19: Construction beings on new Everett Junior College campus in north Everett. The campus was originally made up of seven buildings facing Wetmore Avenue.

Sept. 24: The Everett Community College Foundation is established. The first foundation director is Bill Deller, EvCC’s former dean of students. Dec. 13: Bob Drewel becomes president of EvCC.

 1958

 1985

May 4: Fred Giles named president of EJC.

 1957

Feb. 21: Physical Education building at 13th Street and Rockefeller Avenue opens. Sept. 22: New campus opens for fall classes. Fall enrollment is 2,614 students, the highest of any junior college in the state.

 1988

Oct. 15: Grand opening for the Gary Parks Student Union building and John Terrey Library Media Center, which replaced Cascade Hall.

 1981

July 1: Edmonds Community College separates from the Everett community college district, establishing its own independent college. Oct. 13: Paul Walker becomes president of EvCC.

Nov. 25: The Football Team went untied and undefeated for the season to beat Santa Rosa, California in the Evergreen Bowl Game

Feb. 16: Arson destroys Cascade Hall, the college’s library student union. Everett firefighter Gary Parks dies while fighting the blaze. Feb. 19: Community support pours in for Project Phoenix to help the college replace books and materials destroyed by the fire. More than $300,000 is donated to the EvCC Foundation to fund a new college library. Sept. 28: Nippon Business Institute Japanese Culture and Resource Center begins offering classes for students, businesses and executives.

Sept 23: Aviation Maintenance Technician School training facility opens for classes at Paine Field, 9711 32nd Place W Building C-80. The program started in 1968.

1984: Bill Deller, first Everett Community College Foundation director and former dean of students.


C E L E B R AT I N G  2004

 1989

Feb. 16: Memorial sculpture at EvCC honoring Gary Parks dedicated. May 15: Bookstore Conference Room renamed the Henry M. Jackson Center.

 1990

May 29: Early Learning Center grand opening. The center provides childcare for kids ages 1-5.

 1991

Sept. 20: EvCC’s Ocean Research College Academy opens with a class of 30 students. ORCA is an early college academy for high school students who can earn up to two years of college credit while completing their high school education.

The faces of

EvCC

Dec. 11: Bob Barringer becomes interim president of EvCC.

 1992

ciences health s home to rams. – ll a H erty prog 2013: Lib d public safety an

July 1: Susan Carroll becomes president of EvCC.

 1995

February: Tulalip College Center opens.

 1996

 2013

Feb. 15: EvCC’s School of Cosmetology program moves from Everett to Marysville.

 1997

Aug. 9: More than 300 alumni gather for the college’s grand reunion, the first major gathering of college alumni since EvCC opened.

April 1: Liberty Hall opens. The building is home to the college’s health sciences and public safety programs. 1989: Memorial for fallen firefigh ter Gary Parks wh while fighting th o died e Cascade Hall fire in 1987

 2005

May 4: Washington State Legislature transfers management and leadership of the University Center of North Puget Sound to Everett Community College. The Center offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Everett from seven partner colleges and universities.

 2014

July 1: Washington State University becomes the new manager of the University Center of North Puget Sound, which offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in Everett from seven colleges and universities. Sept. 22: Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center (AMTEC) opens at 909 N. Broadway.

 2006

Feb. 1: Michael Kerns becomes interim president of EvCC. July 24: David Beyer becomes president of EvCC.

 2007 1999: Shuksan Hall.

 1999

Jan. 4: Shuksan Hall, home to the college’s natural sciences and computer information technology programs, opens for classes. July 1: Charlie Earl becomes president of EvCC. Oct. 21-22: Nippon Business Institute Japanese Culture and Resource Center building and garden grand opening celebration with representatives from Everett’s Japanese sister city, port and college.

 2002

March 1: Baseball returns to EvCC after a 20-year hiatus. Since 2004, 17 EvCC players have been drafted in the Major League Baseball draft.

 2003

Jan. 25: EvCC’s first Students of Color Career Conference, an event for high school and middle school students to learn about career options from professionals of color.

Jan. 3: Whitehorse Hall opens. The building is the home of the college’s visual arts and physical sciences programs.

 2009

Aug. 4: The EvCC gym located at 1815 13th St. is demolished. The gym and the surrounding land was purchased by Providence Everett Medical Center as part of a land swap agreement that provides EvCC with property across the street from its Broadway Street campus at the College Plaza Shopping Center. March 30: Gray Wolf Hall opens. The building has EvCC’s humanities, social sciences, and communications programs. It is also the current location of the University Center of North Puget Sound offices until WSU moves into its new building in 2017.

 2010

Jan. 8: Student Fitness Center opens

 2012

May 31: The remodeled Henry M. Jackson Conference Center opens.

2014: Photo by Max Phipps. EvCC welding student Brittani Foster (center) joined Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee, Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson, EvCC president David Beyer, Economic Alliance Snohomish County president Troy McClelland and EvCC Corporate & Continuing Education Director John Bonner in cutting the ribbon at the grand opening of EvCC's Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center Oct. 1, 2014.

 2016

Sept. 11: New student housing building opens with private rooms for 120 students. Sept. 19: The Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center’s 17,000-square-foot expansion opens. The extra room is for the college’s new mechatronics program.

throughout the years...


Everett Community College 75 Year Anniversary

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C E L E B R AT I N G CHUCK CLOSE

I chose EvCC.

People influenced by Everett Community College and Everett Junior College remember notable moments. Read more memories of EvCC alumni at EverettCC.edu/Alumni

PAUL MATTHAEUS

Emmy winner and founder of Digital Kitchen. Best known for creating the main titles for TV shows “Six Feet Under,” “Nip/Tuck,” “House,” “Rescue Me,” "True Blood" and “Dexter.”

“Within the first 15 minutes of my time at EvCC, I learned all I needed to start a company 20 years later that eventually changed the paradigm of TV main title design and commercial production. That company grew to 150 creative digital filmmakers across three offices in Seattle, Chicago and Los Angeles. “I walked into the photo department, and there was this traveling fine art photography exhibit that (EvCC photography instructor) Lloyd Weller put together. The photographer was Jerry Uelsmann – an early pioneer in image manipulation. That showed me that photography could be both literal and figurative; real and surreal. “Then (Weller) stuck his head out of a doorway. Lloyd Weller (is) a very approachable but disciplined thinker, and the guy in charge of the photography program. I enrolled in EvCC’s associate program, and took Lloyd's evening workshop classes, which taught me the power of the ‘collaborative auteur’ (auteur theory is the French film theory that looks for the author in filmmaking). “Lloyd’s workshop showed me the value of a collaborative studio environment in the pursuit of both personal and collective creative pursuits. Those two ingredients are the basis for Digital Kitchen, period. “My studies at the University of Washington were valuable, but Lloyd and Jerry are essence of my career.

Artist

Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni

As a 16-year old high school student struggling with learning disabilities, Close was advised to pursue automotive repair rather than academics. But a chance meeting with EvCC instructors Russell and Marjorie Day changed his course. Through their encouragement and advice, Close instead pur-

sued his passion for art. “They were so supportive and welcoming and encouraged me that I could have a life in art without academic skills,” he said. “They said all that mattered was passion, hard work and a modest amount of talent; I was off and running.” Chuck's two years at Everett Junior College with art instructors Day, Don Tompkins and Larry Bakke were a life-changing experience. “I owe everything I have accomplished and who I have become to that encounter with Russ and Marjorie Day,” he said. Close’s work has been shown in the world’s finest galleries, and he is widely considered one of America’s best contemporary artists.

KIM WILLIAMS

Providence Health & Services chief operating officer

As an EvCC nursing student, Kim Williams didn’t envision that one day she’d become the chief nursing officer for one of America's top 100 hospitals. The 1974 Snohomish High School graduate attended EvCC classes during her senior year of high school and simply set her sights on getting

an AA degree in nursing. “I wanted to be a nurse and take care of patients,” Kim said. “I loved doing that.” Because of her experiences at EvCC, Kim has a thorough respect for the nursing students who graduate from the college. “As a person who employs a lot of nurses, I can say that EvCC produces really exceptional nurses,” she said. “They always have.” She also thinks of EvCC as a great place to start a nursing career. “EvCC has good instructors, they pay attention to the curriculum, and the nursing students get great clinical experience,” she stated emphatically. “The college has a culture of high expectations and high quality of their students and I think that shows.”

DALE CHIHULY Glass Artist

Internationally-known glass artist Dale Chihuly also calls EvCC art instructor Russell Day a mentor. Day founded the arts program at Everett Junior College. He worked at the college from 1947 to 1976, and is best known for his pioneering work with silver and glass. Former Everett Commu“When I was a student nity College art instructor and I was working with Russell Day (center) talks glass, there wasn't anyone with glass artist Dale Chielse who knew anything huly (right) and retired art about glass other than instructor Lowell Hanson (left), May 27, about Day’s Russell,” Chihuly said, recalluntitled 238-pound Blenko ing how Day made him redo glass and concrete sculphis portfolio four times when ture permanently installed Chihuly applied to grad in EvCC's Whitehorse Hall. school. Chihuly said that in 1966 he melted some glass in a ceramic kiln and used a house pipe to blow a glass bubble. “I was so excited that I called Russell on the phone and he drove down in his orange Corvette to see my bubble,” he said. Chihuly visited EvCC in May for the installation of one of Day’s sculptures in Whitehorse Hall. “It's great to see him at 103,” Chihuly said.

KARENA HOOKS

Hooks earned an associate degree at EvCC, bachelor’s at New York University and master’s at the University of Washington. Formerly the director of EvCC’s Diversity & Equity Center, she is now the Edmonds School District Diversity, Equity, and Outreach Manager.

“I didn’t know if college would be something that was for me, if it was something that I would consider doing when I got out of high school. My impression after spending the summer at Everett (though an Everett High School program) really did change because I realized that people who worked at Everett Community College were invested into really providing and instilling hope and giving you the motivation and the platform to be able to pursue your dreams. … I then started to wonder what I would look like as a college student.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


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Serving the Everett, Washington Area Since 1907

“Congratulations to Everett Community College on 75 years! Thank you for fostering the future of our community.” 1677126

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KATIE GWYN, JULIE FRAUENHOLTZ, AND LAUREN FRAUENHOLTZ Family of EvCC alumni

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For sisters Katie Gwyn and Lauren Frauenholtz, EvCC provided a way to attend college while still in high school. Gwyn attends the University of Washington. Frauenholtz, who graduated in June from Everett High School, is at Western Washington University. Both earned college credits at EvCC. The girls point to their mom, Julie, as their role model. Her attendance at EvCC eventually led to obtaining a bachelor's degree in human services and her current position as coordinator of the City of Everett Community Streets Initiative. “EvCC offers a great opportunity for a wonderful education and meaningful career right here in Everett,” Julie Frauenholtz said. “The college is also a bond we share that helped us increase our opportunities for success.” Gwyn agreed: “EvCC's College in the High School program is a great option and gave me an edge when starting my college classes. Everyone should take advantage of this!”

C E L E B R AT I N G

I chose EvCC. HOWARD BEHAR

Former president of Starbucks Coffee Company North America and Starbucks Coffee International

“I didn't have the grades to go to the University of Washington, so I attended EvCC, along with several of my friends. At that time, it was more an extension of high school. I think I needed the community college; it matured me by exposing me to things I would have never been exposed to. At some level, I was directionless; at other levels, I wasn't. For example, I grew up in a really entrepreneurial family. I had direction to that and that's why I did well in accounting and business; anything that had to do with that. Anything that didn't, I didn't.”

LARRY HANSON

Former president and publisher of The Herald. He met his wife, EJC nursing student Raili Kuivikko, during a photo shoot for the EJC annual. Raili became a nurse and worked at Everett General Hospital for 40 years.

“I was impressed with the quality of instruction I received in all of my classes. Faculty had high expectations but what was really helpful is that they wanted to work closely with their students – that was obvious – to help us succeed. “I soon realized that I was getting an excellent education that would serve me well as I transferred to the University of Washington for my junior and senior years Not only was the quality of the education important, I was learning some valuable leadership skills as the editor-inchief of the school annual. Those skills helped me advance more quickly at The Herald. I gained more responsibility and more income at a career that became my passion.”

“Congratulations

glass & glazing

Congratulations on 75 years in our community!

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Everett Community College”

Opening windows of opportunity in the local community for 75 years!

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C E L E B R AT I N G

Athletics

By JOHN OLSON Everett Community College

Pat Brady is famous for making a football disappear, but it wasn’t a magic act. Brady was the punter on the 1947 Everett Junior College conference championship football team. During several of the games at Everett Memorial Stadium, the fog would roll in and form a cloud over the field. If opponents were skilled enough to stop the powerful Trojan offense, Brady would come in and boot the ball so high it would get lost in the fog, making it impossible for the fans (and opposing players) to see. Teams in the late 1940s set the bar high for the college’s athletic program, which began intercollegiate competition in 1946. Championships in each major sport (football, basketball, track, tennis, golf and baseball) followed in 1948 for the men. Dolly Holland was years ahead of her time in establishing an athletic program for women, scheduling intercollegiate scrimmages in field hockey, tennis, basketball and volleyball as early as 1949. Lacking robust two-year college competition, the women would often compete against neighboring four-year schools, including the University of Puget Sound, Pacific Lutheran University and the University of Washington. Athletes have also competed in gymnastics, sail-

ing, crew, swimming, track and field, cross country, volleyball, softball and field hockey. The most successful program was men’s golf, which dominated the league from 1947 to 1970 and won over a dozen state championships. Many of the athletes went on to compete at the university and professional levels. National Football League players included Pat Brady, Steve Okoniewski, Randy Montgomery and Terry Metcalf. Earl Averill Jr. played one year at EJC before his seven-year major league baseball career, and since baseball was brought back after a hiatus, nearly 20 players have moved on to the professional ranks. Even more impressive is the number of athletes who went on to success in fields other than athletics. This list includes businessman Dwayne Lane (football), developer Al Clise (basketball, track), author William Prochnau (baseball), Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Archie Van Winkle (football), advocate Joan Elvin-McAree (cross country) and dozens of educators at the elementary and high school levels. The college now fields teams in basketball, baseball, softball, track and field, cross-country, volleyball and soccer.

A distinguished past shaping bright futures… Congratulations, Everett Community College, on educating our community for 75 years.

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www.bgcsc.org

Walt Price Dolly Holland

Walt Price and Dolly Holland Two pioneers in the history of Everett Junior College athletics, Walt Price and Dolly Holland, will long be remembered for their accomplishments. The college’s fitness center is named after Price, a long-time coach and athletics director, and Holland was instrumental in establishing the foundation for women’s athletics. Both Price and Holland are members of the school’s athletic Hall of Fame. They are remembered by former athletes as competitive, forward thinking, and compassionate individuals who inspired students to be better students, athletes, and community members.


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C E L E B R AT I N G

What’s next?

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changes that will shape years ahead, these are EvCC’s future Infivethechanges to watch for. By KATHERINE SCHIFFNER Everett Community College

1 STUDENT HOUSING

EvCC’s new student housing building, Mountain View, opened to students Sept. 11, and a second residence hall is under construction. “For 75 years, EvCC was primarily a commuter college. Now, students living on campus can roll out of bed and walk to class in five minutes,” said EvCC Housing Director Lea Wasson. “It’s a different kind of college experience.” Mountain View, constructed by Snohomish-based real estate developer Koz Development, Inc., is home to 120 students renting private rooms. Before Mountain View, the college ran the 36-bed Lona Vista apartments, located at 10th and Broadway. The college demolished those apartments in July to make way for the college’s second student housing building, which will open in September 2017. EvCC also knocked down a building at College Plaza to create additional parking spaces to replace spots that will be used for student housing.

2 GUIDED PATHWAYS

College students are more likely to finish a degree if they choose a program, develop an academic plan early and get help following the plan. That’s the idea behind guided pathways, an approach to higher education many community colleges are embracing. Changes include mapping out specific steps students need to take to reach their goals. “It was super clear what classes I needed to take in order to transfer. It helps to have an adviser who is willing to work with you to get to the next point in your education,” said 2016 EvCC journalism grad Samantha Chapman, who transferred to WSU’s North Puget Sound’s Integrated Strategic Communication program. EvCC students already meet with an advisor before their first and third quarters, but the college will take more steps to help students complete their programs faster. In July, the College Spark Foundation gave EvCC a $500,000 Guided Pathways grant.

3 NEW PROGRAMS

EvCC’s newest associate degree program, Mechatronics, starts classes in the expanded Advanced Manufacturing Training and Education Center (AMTEC) this week. The 17,000 square foot expansion includes a $217,000 mechatronics simula-

tor. The program prepares students for jobs as electro-mechanical technicians working in robotics operations, testing, and equipment maintenance.

4 NORTH AND EAST COUNTY

New EvCC student housing building, Mountain View.

EvCC offered its first advanced manufacturing class in Arlington at Weston High School in June, and there’s more to come. The goal is ultimately to offer classes in the Arlington area similar to those at EvCC’s Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center (AMTEC) at the college’s main campus, said John Bonner, EvCC vice president of Corporate and Workforce EvCC grad Training. uate Saman tha Chapm EvCC also plans to expand an, who tran sferred to WSU. offerings at its East County Campus in Monroe. This fall, EvCC’s East County Campus expects to educate 600 students.

5 GROWTH

EvCC has requested state funding to construct a new Learning Resource Center to replace the college’s Library/Media Center. The college hopes to receive state funding to begin the project in 2019-20. EvCC’s Board of Trustees selected the site of EvCC’s former Index Hall as the location for the new LRC in November 2014. The college is also exploring the possibility of building the LRC on the east side of Broadway. EvCC’s current Library/Media Center was opened 1988 after a fire destroyed the college’s former library and student union, Cascade Hall, on Feb. 16, 1987. The Library/Media Center is now located in the college’s Parks Student Union. The Parks building was named after firefighter Gary Parks, who died while fighting the Cascade Hall blaze. The proposed Learning Resource Center would be home to the library, as well as EvCC’s Writing Center, Tutoring Center and eLearning offices.

Mechatronics advanced manufacturing training program.


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1904 Wetmore Ave, Everett - www.LamoureuxRealEstate.com

PSKC staff and EvCC alumni: Gayla C., Dialysis RN, Maria F., Dialysis RN, Jenni T., Director, Nursing Services, Amanda C., Chief Operating Officer

Congratulations on 75 years in the community! From our family to yours.

“Congratulations on 75 years of excellence. We are proud to be part of the EvCC community!� 1681767

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Erickson Furniture ~ A Family Tradition since 1912


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Why EvCC?

CELEBRATING 75 YEARS OF HIGHER EDUCATION In 1941, 134 students gathered in a converted elementary

school for the ďŹ rst classes at Everett Junior College. Today, Everett Community College serves more than 19,000 students. CELEBRATE

75 YEARS WITH US!

EverettCC.edu/75Years 1682402

Everett Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age.

Special Sections - Everett Comm College Sept. 18  

i20160919101114893.pdf

Special Sections - Everett Comm College Sept. 18  

i20160919101114893.pdf