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Disaster plan Perteet CEO presses for preparing for catastrophe • 6-7 Ready made: Dream Dinners set to soar • 9 Shoplifting: Shocked by thefts • 18 SEPTEMBER 2016 | VOL. 19, NO. 6

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2 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

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SEPTEMBER 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Renee Quistorf, who opened Renee’s in downtown Everett 23 years ago, has decided to sell the business, Page 10.

COVER STORY Perteet CEO and president Crystal Donner wants her firm to help public agencies prepare for disaster, 6-7

BUSINESS NEWS Five-story hotel is part of new Marysville development . . . . . . . . . . 4 Gender pay gap persists in Snohomish County and state . . . . . . 5 Snohomish’s Dream Dinners stronger than ever. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Owner of downtown Everett fixture sells business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Snohomish farmers part of greenhorn food movement. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-12 Nation’s largest used car dealer CarMax building in Lynnwood . . . . 12 Dutch Bros. opening first northwest Washington location in Everett . . 12

Restaurants required to display calorie counts on menus. . . . . . . . . 14 Edmonds muralist helps personalize homes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BUSINESS BUILDERS Kylie Sabra: Shocked by rampant shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Monika Kristofferson: Connect with someone to hold you accountable.20 Tom Hoban: Snohomish County’s export to Brewster . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Andrew Ballard: You can learn marketing tips from Blue Angels. . . 22 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 17 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 BUSINESS LICENSES. . . . . . . 24-25 ECONOMIC DATA. . . . . . . . . 26-27

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Contributing Writers: Deanna Duff, Jennifer Sasseen, Meghan Brown, Janae Eason Contributing Columnists: Kylie Sabra, Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban. Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Perteet CEO and president Crystal Donner outside her office in Everett. Ian Terry / The Herald

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$17 million hotel coming to Marysville Home2 Suites and Sonic Drive-In part of two developments By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

MARYSVILLE — A $17 million, five-story hotel project and Sonic Drive-In — the first in Snohomish County — are part of two new developments sprouting up just east of I-5 in Marysville. Home2 Suites By Hilton will include 90-rooms along 116th Avenue NE at 41st Drive near the Burlington Northern Railroad tracks. “It’s not a big footprint, but it’s tall,” said Jim McPherson, the superintendent for Vandervert Construction, which is working on the project. The construction company has built the pad for the project on the 2

CONTRIBUTED RENDERING

A $17 million, five-story hotel project is planned in Marysville across I-5 from Tulalip Resort Casino. The hotel is expected to be the tallest building in Marysville.

1/2-acre site and is just waiting for a building permit and utility plan approval. The hotel should open by next fall, said Richard Heide, with construction management company Washington

Building Supplies. He said there’s been so much growth in the Smokey Point area and with the Seattle Premium Outlets that could use a new hotel. “The area is need of it,” Heide said. “The casino is

right next door, just across the freeway; it’s such a growing area.” The development is just south of Winco Foods and near Carl’s Jr. and Blazing Onion Burger restaurants. “We believe this fivestory Hilton property will

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be the tallest building in Marysville,” said Marysville spokeswoman Connie Mennie in an email. “Next highest is the four-story Holiday Inn Express.” Plans also call for a separate 10,000-squarefoot building on the site, Heide said. The bottom floor will house one or two restaurants. It hasn’t been determined which restaurant or restaurants will occupy the space. The second story will be office space. Next door to the Home2 Suites is a second project at 116th and 38th Drive NE. At that site, plans are under way to build a Sonic Drive-In and a medical office and another restaurant that is likely to be an Arby’s. Those buildings will be on 4 acres of a 9-acre site, said Rune Harkestad, the Kidder Mathews broker for the Sonic and the medical office. Sonic announced plans a couple of years ago to open at least 14 new driveins in the Puget Sound area. Three are already operating in Pierce County

and another has opened in Thurston County. A couple more are opening in Chehalis and Olympia this year. The Sonic in Marysville will be the first, but probably not the last, in the county. Harkestad last month was taking a Sonic representative to view other locations in Everett, Mill Creek and Burlington. He said a national medical firm is lined up to occupy a 3,900-squarefoot medical office at the site. He said he couldn’t identify the company at this point. Another broker is representing the Arby’s and Harkestad didn’t have details. He said this is the first phase of development on the site, which includes an extension of 38th Street south. Some ground work has been done, but most of the construction will begin after Labor Day. The medical offices and Arby’s are expected to open early 2017 while the Sonic is expected to open next summer, Harkestad said. In the future, another hotel or possibly apartments could be built on the remaining 5 acres of the site, Harkestad said. The land is owned by brothers who are longtime Marysville residents, he said. McPherson, the superintendent building the Home2 Suites, said that a long-time owner of the property is developing the hotel and received a franchise from Hilton. The project is just off the freeway and around the corner from the Tulalip Resort Casino so it’s located in a nice spot, McPherson said. The hotel, which includes a swimming pool, will be first-rate, McPherson said. ”It’s a Hilton so it’s going to be fairly nice,” he said.


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Gender pay gap persists in Washington Women make 76 cents on the dollar compared to men in state Washington has been progressive when it comes to issues that affect women. By Jim Davis The Herald Business Journal

More than a century ago, it was one of the first states to grant women the right to vote. The state also was among the first to elect a woman as governor: Dixy Lee Ray in 1977. And the state’s top federal officeholders are women, U.S. Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. So that’s why it’s surprising that Washington ranks low on the pay gap between men and women. Women in full-time jobs in Washington are paid 76 cents on the dollar compared with men, according to the American Community Survey by the Census Bureau in 2014, the most recent year available. That puts Washington at 38th in the nation, behind states like Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas. Nationally, women are paid 79 cents on the dollar. Washington lags almost every nearby Western state, including Oregon at 82 cents per dollar made by men, California at 84 cents, and Nevada at 85 cents. It’s worse in Snohomish County, where women in full-time jobs earn 74 cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts. The gap widens even further in the state and the county when all employees, full- and part-time, are added into the mix. Then, women statewide make about 66 cents on the dollar and 60 cents in the county when looking at all jobs. The majority of part-time jobs are filled by women. Fifty-six percent of minimum wage jobs are filled by women in Washington, according to the National Women’s Law Center. So why are women paid so low here and elsewhere? “My refrain — and this isn’t very media-friendly — is that it’s complicated,” said Kevin Miller, a senior

researcher with American Association of University Women in Washington, D.C. One of the first issues that can be looked at is the types of jobs that men do and women do and how those jobs are compensated, he said. “Truck drivers earn more than child-care workers,” Miller said. “Almost all truck drivers are male and almost all of child-care workers are women.” This could be an issue in Snohomish County where some of the best-paying jobs are in aerospace, yet women only hold one in four aerospace jobs. This “occupation segregation” is something that women should be aware of when choosing careers, said Julie Anderson, a research associate with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. “The days of sort of following your bliss is behind us,” Anderson said “We need to be arming people with information about their earnings potential.” That doesn’t tell the whole story. Women are paid less than men when doing like jobs in almost every category, Census data shows. And that’s the part where it’s complicated. Often times, women hold very different jobs in those categories, he said. And those roles with the company may be compensated differently. Men also tend to work for decades without taking a break from work, while women tend to take time off for child rearing. And that career interruptus can put women behind in chances to move up the professional ladder. And then there’s discrimination. “I think one reason is that employers are still in too many instances either consciously or unconsciously setting salaries based on who is perceived to be the most committed and the most competent on the job,” said Emily J. Martin, general counsel and vice president for Work Place Justice, part of the National Women’s Law

Snohomish County women’s wage gap Occupation Full-time, year-round employed civilians 16 years and over Management, business, science, and arts: Management Business and financial operations Computer, engineering, and science Education, legal, community service, arts and media: Community and social services Legal occupations Education, training and library Healthcare practitioner and technical Service: Healthcare support Fire fighting and prevention, other protective service inc. supervisors Law enforcement including supervisors Food preparation and serving-related Sales and office occupations: Sales and related Natural resources, construction, maintenance: Construction and extract.

Total workers

Median ($) male

Median ($) female

Percent of men’s earnings

262,914

$61,017

$45,143

73.98%

111,555 36,455

80,977 80,887

60,127 60,282

74.25%

14,034

65,004

60,928

93.73%

29,734

91,347

70,089

76.73%

19,519

60,035

51,585

85.92%

3,460 2,481

41,890 95,213

45,872 44,327

109.51% 46.56%

9,786

63,958

58,467

91.41%

11,813 33,858 5,254

100,262 33,941 36,856

61,152 30,133 33,873

60.99% 88.78% 91.91%

3,663

59,305

59,261

99.93%

2,563

85,513

51,214

59.89%

8,155

28,588

26,250

91.82%

55,118 24,588

47,436 51,343

40,603 40,352

85.60% 78.59%

29,762 14,484

60,648 60,938

41,667 42,587

68.70% 69.89%

$42,035 $39,054

75.90% 79.46%

74.53%

State and U.S. women’s wage gap Washington U.S.

2,238,913 102,196,022

$55,385 $49,149

Source: 2014 American Community Survey, Census

Gap by state Least

Biggest

1. New York: 87.75%

38. Washington: 75.9%

2. Nevada: 86.9%

46. North Dakota: 70.8%

3. Florida: 85%

47. West Virginia: 70%

4. Maryland: 84.8%

48. Wyoming: 68.7%

5. Vermont: 84.5%

49. Utah: 67.5% 50. Louisiana: 64.9%

Center. She points to a study published in Scientific American in 2012 in which scientists were given resumes for a student applying for a lab manager position. Half the scientists were given an application with a male name attached. The other half were given the identical resume with female name attached. The scientists, both men and women, rated the

female candidates lower in competence, hire-ability and whether the scientist would want to mentor the student. There’s also more conscious discrimination. Miller points to the Lilly Ledbetter case. She was a supervisor at the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. in Alabama who sued the company over discrimination after being paid less than all of her fellow supervisors.

Ledbetter became a symbol of the pay gap issue after the Supreme Court ruled that her equalpay lawsuit had been filed after the expiration of a statute of limitations. “It’s difficult to statistically isolate how much of the wage gap is because of discrimination,” Miller said. Progress in narrowing the wage gap has stalled in the past 10 to 15 years, Miller said. The way to change that would be to institute policy changes, such as creating laws that require mandatory sick leave, paid family leave or increasing the minimum wage, said Martin, with the the National Women’s Law Center. Washington companies have been at the forefront of attempting to fix the pay gap. Amazon and Expedia, two of the largest corporate giants in the state, have signed onto a White House

equal-pay pledge. Amazon says that women in the company are paid 99.9 percent of what men are paid. Microsoft says that women are paid 99.8 percent of their male counterparts. And Expedia this summer said men and women at its company are paid equally, but the company needs to do more work in promoting women to leadership positions. Martin said she is heartened that companies are stepping up and making equal pay an issue. She said that companies also need to work to attract women. “If a company like Boeing were to commit itself to not just paying men and women the same, but also ensuring that they’re creating pipelines into the field,” Martin said. “Closing the wage gap also requires bringing women into those equal-pay positions.”


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COVER STORY

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Perteet CEO and president Crystal Donner (right) started a new division in her company to help cities, counties and businesses prepare for the aftermath of disasters. She sees the division as providing a service that makes a difference for the communities her company serves.

In case of emergency

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

C

rystal Donner is thinking about the Big One. Or more precisely, what will happen about 72 hours after the Big One. The president and CEO of Everett’s Perteet Inc. wants the engineering firm to help communities and other businesses prepare for the aftermath of a massive earthquake. “Initially, it’s the blue lights, it’s the red lights, it’s the first responders,” Donner said. “When you think about a disaster, after the first three days, then it becomes a public works issue. “Who is going to clear out the debris? How are you going to rebuild? Many of our public agencies aren’t as prepared as they need to be for that.” And it’s not just the 9.0-magnitude earthquake. Plenty of smaller naturally occurring events cause problems that fall on the shoulders of overly strapped public works departments. “We live in a place where we’re prone to some pretty catastrophic disasters and something as simple as a snowstorm can be crippling here, too,” Donner said. The firm specializes in transportation and construction management, providing an outside engineering resource for cities and counties across the state. Its new Emergency Management Services Divi-

Everett engineering firm Perteet wants to help communities plan for aftermath of disaster sion will likely only be a small part of its business plan. Still, she sees it as a natural extension of Perteet’s work. “We’re invested here in the community,” Donner said. “We want to provide a service that can really make a difference. That’s what our calling is.” Perteet Inc. started with humble roots 28 years ago. Engineer Rich Perteet, who is now retired, began the company in the back room of a downtown Everett office. Perteet Inc. is now headquartered on the ninth floor of the Everett Mutual Tower at 2707 Colby Ave. The firm also has offices in Seattle and Snoqualmie, and opened an office in Ellensburg earlier this year. In the engineering world, Perteet, with 75 employees, is small compared to multinational corporations that employ tens of thousands. “We’re very much the David-and-Goliath situation,” Donner said. “After the downturn, there’s just a small handful of firms that even do this work. They were either bought out or didn’t make it through.” Perteet has worked on major projects across the region, including being the lead designer of the straightening of

Highway 522 and the multi-way boulevard of Highway 527 in Bothell. That’s an $80 million public project that has attracted $400 million worth of private development. The city of Everett has long used Perteet for transportation projects. Perteet’s engineers often understand the community better than some of the larger outside firms, said Dave Davis, the city’s public works director. “They live in it,” Davis said. “They touch it, they feel it daily and they have a better understanding of our needs than those who are unfamiliar with the pulse of the city.” Donner has been with Perteet for most of its existence. She grew up in Idaho and went to college at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma before graduating from Washington State University. At PLU, an adviser suggested she study engineering, because she was good at science and math. The first-year coursework was difficult and she almost gave it up. The father of a college friend at the time was the Snohomish County public works director. He encouraged her to apply for a summer internship with his department, an internship that she won. “I got to work on a construction site

and I fell in love with it,” she said. After she graduated in 1990, Donner applied at the county, but the nation was going through another recession and the county’s human resources department was turning away applicants with less than 10 years experience, even for entrylevel jobs. Instead, she was hired by one of those larger engineering firms, Jacobs. She later worked for another large firm, CH2M Hill. She spent five years working for those firms’ Bellevue offices. “I felt really isolated,” she said. “I had a five-digit employee number. The headquarters (for CH2M Hill) was in Denver. I really felt like I wanted to be somewhere smaller, more responsive, a part of the community. That’s when she met Rich Perteet, who offered her a job. “I think I was employee No. 22,” she said. “It was much more connected. Everybody pulled on an oar. You really understand the projects you’re working on.” At Perteet, Donner was immediately given more responsibility, taking over the management of a couple of projects. Perteet is a small enough firm that engineers get to see projects actually built in the field. “It’s one thing to draw a line on the paper and say this is a 60-inch pipe,” Donner said. “It’s another to see a 60-inch


SEPTEMBER 2016

pipe 10 feet down in the ground, see how big that hole is and see how hard that is for those guys to jack that pipe and move it around. Those are only experiences you get when you’re standing on grade.” She’s been around long enough to see projects that she designed be redesigned and rebuilt, including the first project she worked on as an intern for the county, Murphy’s Corner at Highway 527 in Mill Creek. “You know you’re old when they’re ripping up your projects,” she joked. “It’s happened a couple of times now.” She rose through the ranks and took on a couple of company-wide initiatives as Perteet grew. Eventually Donner became the head of the design team, the biggest division in the company. In 2009, she was offered the job of president and CEO. “The board appointed me at the end of 2009 as president,” Donner said. “They didn’t tell me that the economy was going to crash and it was going to be a hell of a ride. I should have read the fine print.” Davis, who has been with the city of Everett for 38 years, has watched Donner rise from a junior engineer to her role as the head of Perteet. “She is a very solid engineer, but maybe the best asset she has is her people skills,” Davis said. “Her ability to work with customers and, in particular, I’ve noticed her skill in working with her own staff, has been impressive.” As a woman who is an engineer, she’s found that people are surprised that’s she’s the CEO of the company, especially when she leaves the Northwest. “When I travel, I’ll end up being in a room and I think, ‘Oh my God, I’m the

“We live in a place where we’re prone to some pretty catastrophic disasters and something as simple as a snowstorm can be crippling here, too.” — Crystal Donner only woman in the room,’” Donner said. “That doesn’t happen a lot out here.” Inside Perteet, she’s led an expansion of the scope of work for the firm. She also convinced the former owners to convert Perteet into a 100-percent employee-owned company. Each employee has an Employee Owner placard next to their nameplate. (Donner’s nameplate in her office reads, ‘La Jefa,’ Spanish for the boss.) Even before becoming president and CEO of Perteet, Donner was involved in the community. She was one of the voices advocating for a four-year university in Everett, saying there is clearly a need with the number of advanced manufacturing businesses in the area. “All the while, I was trying not to get into the weeds of all of that,” she said. “I thought transportation politics is were crazy. Higher education politics? I thought I was prepared, because of what I understood about transportation, but I was nowhere prepared for that.” That led her to become involved with first the Everett Chamber of Commerce and its current iteration, Economic Alliance Snohomish County. She was elected president of Economic Alliance’s Board of Trustees this year. The effort has led to the growing pres-

ence of Washington State University in Everett. Donner and her husband, Richard, have a son, Alex, 16, and a daughter, Samantha, 15. She said their children might choose to go to WSU, but she saw that a college was needed to keep businesses in the community competitive. Economic Alliance president and CEO Patrick Pierce met Donner during her advocacy for bringing a university to Everett. He also said she’s been a strong leader in the community. “I always found her to be very thoughtful and she really cares about Everett and Snohomish County as a whole,” Pierce said. About a year and a half ago, Kirk Holmes, the public works director for Kittitas County in central Washington, approached her, concerned about emergency preparedness planning. His county had gone through 13 state disasters and three federal disasters. She said she started looking at the aftermath of a disaster from the perspective of an engineer. The state can experience wildfires, mudslides, flooding and earthquakes. A 9.0-magnitude earthquake would knock down almost every bridge in the county, she said. “The amount of structures alone that

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

couldn’t withstand a Big One is pretty shocking,” she said. Seattle is one of the better prepared cities in the region, she said. But she was at a presentation with the city’s emergency planning director who pointed out that city’s challenges. “He was even talking about 60 tower cranes in downtown Seattle,” Donner said. “They were talking about if those things go, all of the emergency routes they had planned that could be open, now you might have the tinker toys lying all over the place.” That led her to create the Emergency Management Services Division. She hired Holmes from Kittitas County to lead the division. Then, she held a meeting with her own staff and asked them took at their own homes and how they are prepared. Perteet made changes in house, adding emergency supplies in each of its offices and in each of its vehicles, and moving its computer servers to a different building than its headquarters. The division is still in its early stages of growth. Perteet plans another company-wide meeting on it later this fall. But Donner said she feels strongly that this is a direction her company should move. “Our core mission is to make the communities that we live in better,” she said. “Traditionally, we’ve done that through the infrastructure projects. We’ve worked on the roads, utilities and construction management. “When this presented itself, it seemed like a part of the business that was higher order, but it was the same clients. Not the first responders, but the public works people.”

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1675128


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

September 2016

REPORT RE Port of EVERETT

CALENDAR Farmers' Market Sunday's @ new Boxcar Park S E P T E M B E R 10: Wheels on the Waterfront Car Show S E P T E M B E R 13: Port Commission Meeting

Creating Economic Opportunities

Sen. Murray, Rep. Larsen Tour Port of Everett's Seaport After $10 million TIGER Grant Award

S E P T E M B E R 15: Port 2 Business Networking Event O C TO B E R 1: Walk to End Alzheimer's O C TO B E R 4/11: Port Commission Meeting NOVEMBER: Bayside/Coho Derby

Port of EVERETT

EXECUTIVE

The Port of Everett is gearing up for its 2017 budget cycle. The first budget presentation was on August 30, and there will be ongoing Commission meetings on the budget until its adoption in the November timeframe.

SEAPORT

The Port of Everett is seeing an increase in wind energy cargoes coming through the Port. Also, the Mill A interim cleanup action work has begun to remove 40,000 cubic yard of contaminated materials for the bay.

MARINA

The Port just wrapped up its first Sail-In Cinema series. Have ideas for next year? Email publicaffairs@ portofeverett.com by Oct. 31.

REAL ESTATE

The Port hopes to have a housing developer and hotel on board by the end of the year. 1675125

Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3

U.S. Senator Patty Murray and Representative Rick Larsen toured the Port of Everett’s South Terminal, which will directly benefit from a $10 million U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) competitive grant announced last month. The grant will help modernize the South Terminal through the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program, a program championed by Senator Murray in Congress. Earlier this year, both Senator Murray and Representative Larsen sent letters to DOT urging support for the Port of Everett’s grant application, citing the project’s importance to the local and regional economy. "With tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of exports, the Port of Everett is a critical part of our regional economy, which is why I am proud to stand with the Port today and why I'm so glad it received this important investment," Senator Murray said.

"I created the TIGER program because it's all about making our communities and our transportation systems safer, more efficient, and able to meet the demands of the 21st century economy. I will keep fighting in the other Washington to make sure the TIGER program has the resources it needs from the federal government to invest in infrastructure in Everett and around Washington state." “This is great news for the hundreds of businesses and the tens of thousands of jobs that depend on the Port of Everett to connect local goods and services with global markets,” said Larsen, a senior member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. “As an economic pillar of our region, an investment in the Port is an investment in the long-term economic growth that will create jobs in the Pacific Northwest – and I am proud to support the Port’s modernization efforts.”

Port of Everett awards contract for Fisherman's Harbor On August 9, the Port Commission awarded a $4.4 million contract to Bergerson Construction to complete the marine elements of the new Fisherman’s Harbor district in Waterfront Place and making way for vertical development to begin next year. The work includes the removal and reconstruction of the southern-most bulkhead in Fisherman’s Harbor, construction of a new overwater timber wharf to moor commercial fishing vessels, the platform for the new Pacific CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

Rim Splash Fountain Plaza, and an access pier that will eventually connect to a new guest moorage facility at the base of Fisherman’s Harbor. The marine work will begin in September, and is set to be complete in spring 2017. On parallel tracks, the Port is out to bid with the Fisherman’s Harbor upland bid package, which will include the roads, utilities, and public access features for the district. This work is expected to begin in October.

Information you would like to see in next month’s update? Please e-mail lisam@portofeverett.com Stay Connected!

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SEPTEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

Building an empire at the dinner table By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

Meals were a family affair during Stephanie Allen’s childhood. By age 11, Allen organized Tuesday night dinners and helped her kindergartner brother create menus of PB&J and mac and cheese. As a teenager, she had a burgeoning recipe collection and culinary dreams. “I wanted to raise my kids at the dinner table, too,” says Allen, a Snohomish County native. “It’s a time to sit down, eat and talk about everyone’s day. It’s where kids can learn and connect with their family.” That family focus translated into a business empire. Allen and her friend, Tina Kuna, co-founded Snohomish-based Dream Dinners in 2002. Clients create meals in bulk to freeze for easy, future use. Recipes are provided to ensure successful execution and clients use Dream Dinner’s fully-stocked kitchens for accessible, onestop preparation. Allen cooked up the idea in her own kitchen. In the 1980s, she owned a catering business which sometimes precluded making dinner for her own family. She began fixing and freezing meals in advance. Soon, friends and acquaintances were clamoring to participate and it became clear a larger need existed. “I didn’t think about it as a business until after 9/11. That was really the catalyst for Dream Dinners,” Allen says. Corporate catering clients declined that year, but interest in spending time with family surged. “People came out of the woodwork wanting a home-cooked dinner again. After that time of devastation for our country, I think people naturally felt like putting a higher importance on family,” Allen says. The Dream Dinners model launched a new industry and is still headquartered in Snohomish County. CEO Darin Leonard estimates 2016 revenues at $38 million. Approximately 600,000 dinners are produced monthly across 86 locations nationally. Washington is home to four sites. Systemwide, employees number 750 with more than 30 in Snohomish County. “We have employees who’ve been with us pretty much since Day One,” says Kuna. “Everyone works hard for the mission and vision of the company.” Allen and Kuna were previously coworkers and roommates. Kuna adopted Allen’s assemble-and-freeze method long before Dream Dinners formerly launched. Both shared entrepreneurial aspirations. As Allen’s culinary concept grew, she called upon Kuna to provide business acumen during the company’s early years. Leonard, former president/CEO of Maytag Stores, was hired as CEO of Dream Dinners in 2008. “My fundamental position is that we’re not a food company,” says Leonard, who grew up in Bothell. “Our mission is really and simply to help grow great kids. The financial performance and success comes from having that great purpose.” That sense of purpose helped Dream Dinners evolve through a changing

PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Dream Dinners co-founders Stephanie Allen (center) and Tina Kuna opened their first shop in Everett in 2002 and have since grown to more than 80 locations in 25 states.

Customers make about 600,000 meals each month at Dreamer Dinner locations like this one in Mill Creek.

business landscape. At its peak, there were more than 200 locations. However, Dream Dinners was hurt by the general economic downturn and what Leonard cites as a “litigious season” spanning 2008 to 2010. Franchisee lawsuits were settled out of court. According to Leonard, Dream Dinners did not pay any consideration, reduce any indebtedness, waive enforcement of any of their rights or take any actions adverse to their interests. The end result is a company that is stronger and on the rise. “This period of turmoil forced us to focus on improving processes and retention during a downturn in the economy. We made the unprecedented decision to shut down franchise sales while we focused on improving unit-level economics for our current franchisees,” Leonard says. Dream Dinners has enjoyed eight

consecutive years of sales growth and a 55.6 percent increase in average monthly sales per store since the tumultuous years following 2008. Other leaps forward include the launch this year of ShareCrate. A spinoff of Dream Dinners, clients can order pre-assembled meals to be sent as gifts. True to the DNA of the company, the idea grew organically from experience. Allen, Kuna and Leonard were all inspired by personal experiences of wanting to send loved ones food either in times of celebration or distress. “I’m a breast cancer survivor myself. When I was in chemo, people showed up on the doorstep with food for me and my family,” Kuna says. “I received so many blessings from people sharing food. It’s a great opportunity to show people you care and that’s the whole purpose of ShareCrate.” Company expectations for ShareCrate

are high, based on customer surveys. According to Leonard, even more growth is ahead. Dream Dinners is currently in the process of raising $35 million in equity for a new, yet-to-be-announced business venture. “If we come anywhere close to where our current plans take us, we would become one of the most significant employers in Snohomish County,” Leonard predicts. The company remains rooted in Snohomish County. Allen and Kuna both credit community support for Dream Dinners’ meteoric rise. Local banking institutions provided financing for the then-unproven concept. Most importantly, Allen and Kuna cite individual support as being the company’s essential backbone. Nearly 15 years later, 44 individuals remain loyal customers since signing up the very first month. ”Snohomish County is a connected community of moms and I watched it grow so naturally. We were all excited and wanted to participate. It became clear that it was going to be something really important,” says Peggy Sue Panko. Panko was involved from the start, even driving with Allen to haul supplies during the early days. Panko is a fourth-grade teacher at Snohomish’s Riverview Elementary School. Allen’s children were in her class. At its heart, the dream of Dream Dinners is connecting people through food. Allen’s company role remains centered on recipe development while Kuna focuses on Dream Dinners’ nonprofit endeavors. “The Snohomish area is pretty tight knit and a very active family center,” Allen says. “Everyone knows pretty much everybody in town or at least through a friend. We feel it’s important to be here because it’s our community and we always want to serve that first.”


10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

Everett shop owner to hang it up “It was almost like a dream come true, ‘I can own a women’s clothing store.’”

Renee’s owner sells store that has long been fixture in downtown Everett

— Renee Quistorf

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Renee Quistorf’s face brightened as a familiar customer walked through the door. “Hello, hello, hello,” Quistorf said. “There she is,” customer Renee Peterson said. The women greeted each other with a hug. For 23 years, Quistorf has run her women’s clothing store Renee’s Contemporary Clothing in downtown Everett. She was often on a first-name basis with her clientele, helping them find just the right clothing, accessory or shoes. Now, she’s selling the shop at 2820 Colby Ave. that’s long been a fixture in the downtown business community. “I love to help people look and feel their best,” Quistorf said. “I gave them honest opinions. I gave them a value for the dollar they spent. I did what I said I would do. I called the customers, ‘Something’s here you need to come in and see,’ or ‘Your favorite line is in.’” Part of the charm of the shop has been Quistorf, said Peterson, who visited at least once a month for years. “I have to stop by and see what’s here and, of course, say hi to Renee,” Peterson said. “It’s just so friendly and easy to come in. It’s not like you have to buy something, but you look around and usually you do find something.” When she decided to sell, Quistorf sought out new owners who she thought would put their heart and soul into the business. She chose identical twins Sue Nemo and Sharon Sanford, who live on Camano Island and own Laurie’s Boutique in Stanwood. Nemo and Quistorf went on a trip last year shopping for merchandise in Los Angeles. Nemo said she and her sister felt honored to be picked by Quistorf. “We’re excited to take on the challenge,” Nemo said. “We really admire Renee and we admire what she has done and accomplished with that store. We want to keep it as a great little shopping destination.” Nemo and Sanford are taking over the shop on Sept. 1. Quistorf will stay on to help with the transition as long as she’s needed. Nemo said they plan to keep the name Renee’s on the shop. “We’re not going to make Laurie’s into Renee’s and we’re not going to make Renee’s into Laurie’s,” Nemo said. When Quistorf opened the shop, she didn’t know the first thing about selling clothes. She and her husband Bill had moved to Everett in the early 1990s when he was stationed at Paine Field while serving

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

After 23 years running her store, Renee Quistorf is selling the fine clothing and shoe shop she calls simply Renee’s at 2820 Colby Ave. in Everett.

in the Army. They had talked about her opening a business and he suggested one that she could run without him in case he was deployed overseas. She had decided on opening a clothing store. “I think mainly because I liked nice, quality clothing,” Quistorf said. “It was almost like a dream come true, ‘I can own a women’s clothing store.’” The couple were waiting for their new home to close. That’s when Bill Quistorf said they should start planning the business. “I said, ‘Now? We’re in a hotel,’ and he said, ‘Yeah,’” Renee Quistorf said. “Back then, there was no Internet so we went to the library to make our business plan.” They planned expenses, profit-and-loss and cash flow for three years. The returns on the store came back better than expected from that very first year. “That speaks so highly of this community to embrace someone who’s not from here, to develop a loyal customer base,” Quistorf said. “They wanted something like this in their community to succeed.” The store was first located at Wetmore and Hewitt avenues. She later opened the store on Colby when she bought the building. She held fashion shows twice a year and invited customers to model clothing. She would travel to New York, Los Angeles, Portland and Seattle several times a year looking for new fashions. She’d take lists of customers’ names to match the clothing with her clients. She kept an air of whimsy in the store with her “Rack of Opportunity” clothes on sale at the front or displaying prominently clothing like the T-shirt with the words, “I Told My Therapist About You.” “Everything in here is unique and hand chosen,” Quistorf said. “People shouldn’t have to drive to Seattle to get nice things and when people invest in our community it brings up the whole community.” And Quistorf and her husband opened

the business, in part, because they want to make the city better. And the community responded, she said. “They want to shop in downtown and they want a thriving community and they want options,” Quistorf said. “They realize they need to support what’s here. And they’ve come through.” She praised her employees, past and

present, who helped run a successful store. She has two employees that will continue on after the ownership change. Even so, Quistorf found that running a small business was all-consuming, from marketing, advertising and accounting to washing the windows and vacuuming. After she helps with the transition, Quistorf plans to take some time to spend with her husband and to rest, to ride her bike and take up yoga. Eventually, Quistorf, who is 51, wants to go back to work. She doesn’t think she’ll start a new business even though she’s enjoyed the past 23 years. “I have had so much fun,” Quistorf said. “That’s the best part of it. “Wow, what an adventure it has been. Meeting the people. The relationships we’ve had. I’ve helped dress not only them, but their family members, too, over the years. I’ve lived vicariously through them, going on their vacations, telling me about events going on in their lives. It’s been fun. It’s been really fun.”

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SEPTEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

Making choices about what we eat Snohomish farmers part of movement concerned over what we consume By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

One week before Thanksgiving last year, Micha Ide lay awake in the predawn hours mourning the loss of around 50 heritage turkeys. “I didn’t sleep,” she said. “I pretty much cried the whole night.” Floodwaters inundated the small farm that Micha and her husband, Andrew Ide, run in Snohomish. The couple moved their 100 turkeys to high ground and kept the birds in a mobile hoop-house. They hoped roosting bars would keep the turkeys safe. It didn’t. The turkeys escaped their pen and flew straight into the floodwaters, Micha Ide said. “This was at night,” she said, “so we had to go out in the canoe and we were rescuing turkeys and we’re like, hypothermic, you know?” After a time, they couldn’t see any more turkeys and they were too cold anyway. After they crawled into bed, Micha pondered the “huge devastation” of losing half the flock they’d been raising just before Thanksgiving. And she cried. “But then, the next morning, I heard really hoarse-sounding turkeys, their voices were like gggghhhh,” she gurgled. “And I looked out the window and the floodwaters had receded and I saw them all walking up to the house from different parts of the farm. We only lost one turkey.” Such is life at Bright Ide Acres, a 10-acre parcel on the 132-acre Chinook Farms in the Snohomish River Valley. Had those turkeys been the broadbreasted bronze variety they’d grown their first two years on the farm, they would have all died, Micha said. “For sure. They would have just sunk to the bottom.” Broad-breasted bronze turkeys — and broad-breasted whites generally sold in grocery stores — grow exceptionally fast with very big breasts, to supply more of the white meat customers demand. But a downside to all that fast growth is that sometimes the turkeys’ legs give out and they need to be euthanized halfway through the season. And they can’t forage because they’re too heavy and tired so they end up sitting around a lot, Micha said. Neither can they reproduce without artificial insemination, which got the Ides thinking. “Do we really have business as a community, or as humanity,” Andrew said, “to propagate something that really can’t survive by itself, or naturally?” Researching the topic, they realized they wanted to raise a heritage breed. They chose a breed called standard bronze — as opposed to broad-breasted

PHOTOS BY DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Micha Ide of Bright Ide Acres in Snohomish, appears to have a way with the heritage turkeys she and her husband, Andrew, have been raising. The couple switched to heritage turkeys from an easier-to-raise, more commercial stock of turkey.

“Do we really have business as a community, or as humanity to propagate something that really can’t survive by itself, or naturally?” — Andrew Ide

Andrew and Micha Ide started raising heritage turkeys after becoming concerned that the previous turkey they raised could not survive on their own.

bronze — that was popular in the U.S. up until the 1960s. The standard bronze grow more slowly — the Ides raise them for seven months rather than the four to five months allotted the broad-breasted birds — and a lot more trouble. They can fly, for one thing. “They also learned that if they mob the fence they can just kind of walk over it, it’ll flatten down,” Micha said. “Like a zombie horde,” Andrew said. The Ides are college-educated urban professionals who are part of the “greenhorn” movement back to the land, a group of people who share a growing concern about knowing where the food we consume comes from. Turkeys are a supplemental “crop” for the Ides, their main focus being chicken and pork, but a measure of their success is that by early August this year, their tur-

keys were sold out. Their customers love the more complex flavor that accompanies slow growth and a diet rich in grass, bugs and fresh-milled non-GMO grains. The Ides might seem, at first, an unlikely choice for farming, but in some ways they’re uniquely suited. Growing up in the East Bay area north of San Francisco, Micha, 32, always had a passion for animals, volunteering at animal sanctuaries and working at a private zoo. Her college degree was in anthropology with an emphasis in archaeology, but she went to work for a biotech company in San Diego. “They taught me, really, everything I know about sales and marketing, which is very helpful,” she said, “because you can farm all you want, but if can’t sell your product, you might as well not farm.” Andrew, 30, graduated from a pri-

vate college in Southern California with a degree in philosophy and theology, because “that’s what spoke to me.” He and Micha met in 2010, on a fundraising trip for a San Diego nonprofit called Outdoor Outreach, which takes troubled inner-city kids rock climbing and backpacking. Two years later, he and Micha were married where they met, in Joshua Tree National Park. That same weekend, Micha got the layoff notice she’d been expecting since the biotech company she worked at was sold to a bigger firm. Soon the adventurous couple was on the road. “We sold everything that we owned, pretty much,” Micha said, “and bought a little teardrop trailer and traveled the U.S. and parts of Canada and Mexico for three months and we just spent most of our time outside, staying in campsites, national parks and whatever.” “Our road trip kind of had an extended-honeymoon feel to it,” Andrew said. “It was kind of a good foot to start our Continued on Page 12


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

CarMax dealer to open in Lynnwood By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

LYNNWOOD — Construction is under way on a CarMax dealership along Highway 99. The publicly traded company bills itself as the nation’s largest used-auto dealership. It’s big enough to rank on the Fortune 500 list of wealthiest U.S. companies. Work started in July on the 9-acre site of the former Detroit Autoworks property along Highway 99 at 212th Street SW. The project is expected to be fin-

ished in March. Sierra Construction of Woodinville is the general contractor. Plans call for a 19,277-square-foot, single-story building and a 926-square-foot car wash. The lot will include 580 parking stalls, 402 for sales and 178 for customers and employees. The dealership will employ between 50 to 100 people, said Jonathan McNamara, a CarMax spokesman, in an email. He said the chain spends between $10 million to $25 million per store. This and another dealership being built

in Puyallup are the company’s first foray into the Puget Sound area. The only other CarMax dealership in the state opened two years ago in the Spokane Valley. “As far as additional stores in the area, I have no information to share at this time,” McNamara said. “It can often take two to three years to get all necessary approvals, complete construction and open for business once we decide to move forward on any location.” CarMax, based in Richmond, Virginia, has about 50,000 vehicles at its more than

150 stores nationwide. It’s growing by about 13 to 16 stores a year. CarMax was started in the early 1990s by Circuit City executives who were looking to create a national retail chain without a national competitor, according to the CarMax website. Circuit City, which went out of business in 2009, invested $50 million into the CarMax concept. The company sold its first car, a 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee in 1993. CarMax became its own company in 1997 and is traded under the ticker symbol KMX.

Dutch Bros. Coffee to begin pouring in Everett By Jim Davis

grab-and-go snacks. The company was founded in 1992 by dairy-farmer brothers Dane and Travis Boersma, who started with a single espresso push-cart.

Now the company operates 265 locations in Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Colorado and Arizona. Almost all of its sites are drive-throughs although the company has added some

sit-down destinations. The Everett site will be a drive-through with a walk-up window. Wheatley said she expects the site to employ about 30 people when it opens. It’s on a large lot that will include several parking spaces and a small water-retention pond. Everett’s Arm & Hammer Construction is the general contractor. A subcontractor is A Clean Chimney & Contracting. Matt Utley, the owner of Arm & Hammer, said he’s been impressed with Dutch Bros. and its approach, saying the stand and its equipment are high-end. “I do know they’re expecting to do some pretty good growth in Washington state,” Utley said. The chain only franchises new locations to existing employees, people who understand the company and its values, Wheatley said. She said there’s been interest from baristas and other employees to open a franchise in the Puget Sound area for quite some time. The franchisee who was awarded the Everett location is Teal Anderson, who has worked at Dutch Bros. in Portland, Oregon. “We’re excited about joining the Everett community,” Wheatley said.

It was in the fall of 2012 that the Ides started looking for a farming opportunity. In spring 2013, they arrived at Chinook Farms. That first year, they said, they had 300 meat chickens, 30 laying hens, five pigs, 25 turkeys and about 10 goats. They also managed a 30-member vegetable community-supported agriculture program, in which customers pay a set fee for a weekly box of farm wares. Chinook Farms is owned by Eric Fritch, who lives less than two miles away and raises 80 grass-fed beef cattle. Fritch, 55, has an engineering degree and once worked at Boeing, but now owns Chinook Lumber stores and bought the Chinook Farms acreage in 2008, when it grew nothing but old poplar trees. Fritch cleared most of the poplar trees from his 132 acres and set up Chinook Farms as an organic farm. He feels very strongly about keeping production agriculture thriving in Snohomish County,

Fritch said, because he remembers when the Kent Valley was developed in the 1970s and ‘80s. “That used to be the produce department for Seattle, was the Kent Valley,” he said. The Ides dropped raising vegetables two years ago to concentrate on ethically raised meat, which they feel is more difficult to come by than good organic vegetables. This year they’re raising 1,400 meat chickens, 100 laying hens, 40 pigs and 100 turkeys. Andrew said he’ll probably breed 20 ewes this year, so they’ll have 40 sheep, which they started raising two years ago, and around 40 goats. It’s not an easy lifestyle. Besides hawking their wares at farmers markets in Edmonds, Carnation and Snohomish throughout the summer, and trading their meat at the markets for foods like fresh berries and halibut, Micha works on a friend’s food truck and Andrew pours

concrete to supplement their income. While they’re not losing money on the farm, they’re still not making much. “Last year our net for the entire farm, for us, our whole net was 20 grand,” Micha said. “So that means we each took in 10 grand income, which is really not much of a living wage.” Still, they have no plans to quit. Their dream is to find land above the floodplain that could act as their home base, with a store and freezer space for customers, and a barn to keep their animals out of the weather. But even if their farming business doesn’t work out, even if their dream doesn’t come true, they will always raise their own food. “Always,” Micha said. “Because gosh, I don’t know, once you go down that rabbit hole, you can’t go back… We eat like kings. Poor as paupers, but we eat like kings.” “It’s the truth,” Andrew said.

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Dutch Bros. Coffee, with its distinctive blue-and-white windmill logo, is opening its first coffee stand in the Puget Sound area in Everett. The country’s largest, privately held drive-through coffee chain expects the stand at 2202 Broadway to begin serving coffee in late fall or early winter. The chain, which has locations in Eastern Washington and towns from Olympia south, is planning a second site in Renton. “Our projected growth is pretty organic,” said Jennifer Wheatley, director of public relations and foundation. “We try to grow out from existing stands. How that will occur will depend on how these stands go.” That part of Everett already offers spots for those in need of a caffeine fix, including two Starbucks on opposite ends of Broadway north of 41st Street and several independent coffee stands. “Our approach to that is we think there’s room for all kinds of different of coffee companies,” Wheatley said. The Grants Pass, Oregon-based company features specialty coffee drinks, smoothies, freezes, teas and a private-label Blue Rebel energy drink. It also sells Continued from Page 11

marriage out on because we kind of confined ourselves; I mean, two people in a truck for three months…” “It was good prep for living in a tiny house,” said Micha, finishing his sentence. They talked about wanting to work outside, perhaps as park rangers or farmers, though the only experience they had with farming was a backyard garden and a few chickens. Then a friend gave them a copy of the book, “You Can Farm” by Joel Salatin, a farmer featured in the New York Times bestseller “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” and the award-winning documentary “Food Inc.” They were hooked. (The road trip also inspired, indirectly, the name of their future farm. In a pun on their family name, Micha started a blog, Bright Ide and Bushy Tailed. It still exists. She still writes in it about life on Bright Ide Acres.)

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Grants Pass, Oregon,-based coffee chain plans to open its first northwest Washington stand in Everett.


SEPTEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

Calorie counts required on menus Chains with 20 or more locations must display nutrition information soon By Janae Eason

The Bellingham Business Journal

The menus at some of your favorite food joints will be getting a fresh look. Restaurants with 20 or more locations will be required to display calorie counts and nutritional facts beginning later this year. The rule is a result from provisions of the Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. Americans eat and drink an average of one-third of their calories outside of the home, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The rule is designed to give the consumers accurate information about what they eat when they go out. Menus need to be changed by Dec. 1, but the FDA won’t enforce the rule until May 5, 2017. While the rule will affect major chain restaurants around the country — the McDonalds, Burger Kings and Olive Gardens of the world — it will also impact homegrown restaurants in Washington state, including Lynden-based Woods Coffee. One Washington-based chain won’t be making any major changes — Ivar’s Seafood Bars. The chain started putting calorie counts next to menu items when King County implemented a similar requirement in 2008. At that point, Ivar’s displayed calorie information on all of its restaurants even outside King County, said Jim Werth, marketing director of Ivar’s Seafood. “It just made good sense to carry it system-wide beyond the King County since we expected it to become national in the near future, but also because our customers requested it,” Werth said. King County was one of the first counties in the nation to make a requirement that chain restaurants to display calorie counts. But it’s caught on: Now several states require menu labeling. Those are Oregon, California, Massachusetts and Maine. The federal requirement will supersede local and state statutes. The FDA developed the calorie labeling rule after several hearings. The agency also received more than 400 comments from consumers. Under the new rule, chains with 20 or more locations that do business under the same name and have a main menu must label calories and nutritional information, said FDA spokeswoman Lauren Kotwicki in an email. Any food or drink on the menu for more than 90 days out of a year must have calories listed. Market test items on a menu less than 90 days, temporary/seasonal items on

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Lauren Prater serves customers at the Woods Coffee in Boulevard Park in Bellingham. The coffee shops will be affected by a new rule that requires calorie counts to be displayed on menus.

While the rule will affect major chain restaurants around the country — the McDonalds, Burger Kings and Olive Gardens of the world — it will also impact homegrown restaurants in Washington. a menu less than 60 days and alcoholic beverages do not have to follow the regulations. Kotwicki declined to speculate about how the federal agency would enforce the rule or what would happen if a chain refused to comply with posting calorie counts and nutritional information. Now, many restaurants and food retailers are beginning to change over their menus. Woods Coffee, based in Lynden, Washington, is opening an 18th location in Bellevue Square in Bellevue. Woods CEO Wes Herman said he expects to have more than 20 locations in the coming year, meaning his company will have to comply with the FDA regulations Herman anticipated the need for nutritional information of Wood’s menu, he said.

“It is not that abnormal of a request,” Herman said. “We are prepared to do that, and the benefit is we have the information readily available.” Food and drinks sold at Woods all ready have been tested for nutritional values, he said. Still, redesigning all of his location’s menus will be a significant cost, Herman said. The coffee shop company re-branded and changed all of its menus just last March. Now, Herman has to do it all over again. Companies likes Ivar’s are using resources like EHSA Research, Elizabeth Stewart Hands and Associates, to evaluate staple food items for nutritional values. Established in 1981, EHSA released its The Food Processor Nutrition Analysis

software. The software provides companies with an overall evaluation of nutritional values for products. The EHSA provides quotes on the costs of the software on its website at http://tinyurl.com/CalorieCounts.In addition, EHSA has a database that is ever changing with new dietary information, according to the EHSA website. To help businesses ease into the changes, the FDA released a guide called “Labeling Guide for Restaurants and Retail Establishments Selling AwayFrom-Home Foods – Part II.” Anthony Anton, president and CEO of the Washington Restaurant Association based in Olympia, said federal requirements for menu labeling is a good opportunity for standardization of products within the restaurant industry. “Restaurants are made for people and by people,” he said. “With this comes variance in ingredients behind the scenes.” Implementing federal rules, Anton said, brings predictability in nutritional values of dishes sold. The Washington Restaurant Association has information on menu labeling on their website like the FDA. “What we were focused on is how to get prepared,” Anton said. “Time until compliance allows for restaurants to do that.” In his opinion, the best way for businesses preparing for the change is to learn where they are at and make small steps. The bumps along the way from switching menu boards started with the font size of the calorie counts, said Ivar Seafood Bar’s director of recruiting and training Patrick Yearout. “It was challenging at first because menus only have so much space to be distinctive from the prices for guests to see,” he said. Ivars Seafood’s complied with the calorie and nutritional requirements in 2007 in order to make information available for guests. “First thing we noticed is sometimes the calories would be confused with the prices,” Yearout said. An entree could be 650 calories and a guest would think it was $6.50, he said. For companies looking to redesign menus and provide nutritional brochures, he suggests planning it with other re-branding or price increases for products to cut the costs. “It turns out, when we added the required information, we had to change the menu boards anyway with new products,” he said. “To make the changes is a cost we would have had to pay anyway.” Ivar’s customers seemed to have made a collective shrug about the calorie count information. The Seattle-based chain uses Customerville, a survey website for companies to gauge its customers impressions on its services. Out of the thousands of comments in Ivar’s most recent survey, three comments asked about calorie counts overall. “A lot of customer’s concerns about calories can be solved in the store,” Yearout said. “Most comments about nutrition do not get to the corporate level.”


SEPTEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

Muralist adds personal touch to homes More businesses also adding murals, Edmonds artist says By Megan Brown

For The Herald Business Journal

Jennifer and Donald Kaumps’ historic north Seattle house seemed to have it all. Charming, spacious and well-maintained, the 1914 home they bought last summer was surrounded by a pristine garden and landscaping. It even had a peek-a-boo view of the water. “This house captures every decade,” Jennifer said of its overlapping styles. “We love that about it.” But the Kaumps felt something was missing: their own history. To give their home that personal touch, they decided to have a mural painted. Researching local artists for the job, they came across Edmonds-based artist Andy Eccleshall. His work with murals and on canvas proved a grasp of a wide range of forms and scenes. They contacted Eccleshall and started brainstorming together, as a team. In the beginning, the couple were worlds apart in their ideas. “I wanted it to be something Pacific Northwest, but my husband wanted a jungle,” Jennifer said. Though the scenes seemed irreconcilable, Eccleshall drew up designs and matched colors, and soon pitched them a draft that they loved. After he got to work, the paint was drying within a week. Today their dining room is enveloped by jade-green trees, illuminated by an amber sunset. Clouds hang from the ceiling. Wild branches flow throughout the room, gently curving around an antique fireplace and French doors. “We get lots of compliments,” Jennifer said. “People love to be in here. It’s so warm and cozy. It feels magical.” The Kaumps were added to a long list of Eccleshall’s satisfied clients throughout the country. Businesses are increasingly interested in giving their venues a personal touch. “In the past, it was a split between 90-percent residential, 10-percent commercial. This year, it’s more like 60-percent residential, 40-percent commercial.” Nearby commercial murals include one at Bothell’s McMenamins, the lobby of Edmonds Theater and several other buildings downtown. The City of Shoreline commissioned a mural of Echo Lake on Ballinger Way in 2013. Eccleshall’s diverse portfolio showcases his willingness to honor that every homeowner and business is unique. “What I do is make sure that the mural has meaning to them,” said Eccleshall. Some prefer local landscapes, like a majestic portrait of Mount Rainier or a ferry gliding across the Sound. But his repertoire also includes city skylines, foreign landscapes, lush gardens, underwater

PHOTOS BY DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Artist Andy Eccleshall paints unique including this one extending all the way around the large formal dining room in the home of Jennifer and Donald Kaump. Below, a service cart stands near a corner of the dining room, which has a one-of-a-kind mural, painted by Eccleshall.

sea turtles and windows to other worlds. “This is the client’s home, so it’s what they like to see,” said Eccleshall. The possibilities go on as far as your imagination can reach. And if you don’t have one, he’s got plenty to tap into. “It can start with a time, or place, or even an idea,” he said. One of Eccleshall’s favorite painting styles is “trompe l’oiel,” the French term translates to “fool the eye.” These murals are meant to be so lifelike that they can be mistaken for an extension of the home. Examples include wine cellars, a cozy fireplace or a window overlooking a garden. ”It gives you that real sense of illusion, that there’s actually something there,” Eccleshall explained. The biggest compliment is if somebody walks by and doesn’t notice that it isn’t real, he said. It’s a challenge, but a fun one. “It’s always a constant series of adjustments,” Eccleshall said. “All of it is. I say painting is a lot like sculpture. You start

off with an enormous blob, and you chip away at it.” That description doesn’t give justice to Eccleshall’s finished results: elegant, colorful and rich in texture. Eccleshall, 48, is originally from England. He moved to Seattle in 2000 with his wife, Ingrid, an occupational therapist. Her craft comes in handy after long days painting ceilings. “That’s hard on the neck,” said Eccleshall. The couple live in Edmonds with their 16-year-old son, Jack, who will be helping him complete a few larger projects this summer. “Although, I think he’d rather be playing X-Box,” admitted Eccleshall. When he was around that same age, Eccleshall was settling into his professional painting career. Aside from a shortlived gig as a bus driver, he’s always been an artist. “It’s all I’ve ever done,” he said. He attended art school in England, majoring in illustration.

“The year after I graduated was the year that they brought in all of the computers. The day I graduated, I was obsolete,” joked Eccleshall. But he traces his skill and patience as an artist back to his training. “I had an illustration teacher, who always wore black and carried a stick. You’d be drawing away, you’re feeling pretty proud of yourself … and whack! She’d hit you right in the back of the head. Your charcoal would go flying.” That wealth of concentrated practice explains his steady hand. Eccleshall never traces out any designs before getting to work on a mural. “I just want to dive straight in,” he said. And he’s not afraid to dive in anywhere. “I work in 1950s ramblers, and I work in construction places,” he said. “Every mural has its own challenges and its own requirements, but you always want it to feel like it’s part of the setting.” A mural can add warmth and character to any home, at every price point. “Prices are based on time. I figure out how long it’s going to take and I set a price based on that. If it takes me longer, that’s my problem,” he explained. “Designs are approved before I start, and everyone just relaxes. I just turn up.” Depending on the size, he can complete a mural in a few days. A typical work day is 10 hours. It sounds grueling, but it’s anything but. “It certainly doesn’t feel like that. It flies by,” Eccleshall said. “It’s like therapy.” Eccleshall also does paintings and commissioned portraits. His work is featured in magazines, galleries and on studio tours. He conducts painting workshops at the Cole Gallery. Eccleshall’s mural gallery and fine art can be viewed at www.themuralworks. com or on Facebook at The Mural Works, Inc.


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

BUSINESS BRIEFS

EVERETT — Leadership Snohomish County and its partners plan to hold the first Leadership Day in Snohomish County on Oct. 14. The organization seeks to shine a light on the work being done — and yet to be done — by engaged and dedicated leaders across the county. The event will include two Leadership Snohomish County awards and a celebratory community breakfast. Tickets for the event, taking place at Everett Station’s Weyerhaeuser Room, are available at no charge. Visit www.leadershipsc.org to reserve a seat before Oct. 7.

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SULTAN — Sultan Mayor Carolyn Eslick, in partnership with Grow Washington, the Washington Small Business Development Center and the Sky Valley Chamber of Commerce, will host a free business workshop on Marketing Concepts for Your Business. The workshop is from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 20 at 927 U.S. 2. Call 360-793-0983 or email debbie@skyvalleyvic.net to reserve a seat.

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EVERETT — Chipotle Mexican Grill plans to open its first restaurant in Everett at 505 SE Everett Mall Way near the end of October. Chipotle restaurants typically employ 25 to 30 f full- and parttime employees. Interested applicants can visit www.careers.chipotle.com for more information about job opportunities. EVERETT — Bluewater Distilling has announced the pre-sale of Wizard Akvavit, a special barrel of spirits that

formal release of eBid-O-Gram, a benefit auction electronic bidding application. Designed for use with the Android and iOS device platforms, it aims to provide a simple to use, safe and secure user experience for bidders of all ages.

Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 52 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 38 Ship port calls 2015: 133

EDMONDS — Edmonds Center for the Arts 10th Anniversary Gala & Auction will be held at 5 p.m. on Sept. 24 at 410 Fourth Ave. N, Edmonds. This annual fundraising event features food, wine and auctions. Tickets may be purchased online at www.ec4arts. org or email angela@ec4arts.org or call 425-275-9492.

Barge port calls 2015: 61 Sept. 6: Westwood, Westwood Pacific Sept. 13: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Sept. 20: Westwood, Bardu Sept. 22: ECL, ISS Spirit Sept. 27: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Source: Port of Everett went to the Bering Sea aboard the Wizard, the vessel helmed by “Deadliest Catch” television show’s Capt. Keith Colburn. Only 250 bottles are expected to be drawn from the Wizard Barrel. For more information about this collector’s item, go to https://squareup.com/market/ bluewater-distilling. EVERETT — Northwest Software Technologies, Inc., a pioneering and leading developer of event fundraising management software designed for nonprofit organizations, announced the

MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — Join the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance for Oktoberfest featuring beer, bratwurst and aerospace networking from 4 to7:30 p.m. on Oct. 13 at Diamond Knot Brewery in Mountlake Terrace. Cost is $35 for PNAA members and $50 for non-members. Early registration is recommended but lederhosen is not required. For details, click here. EVERETT — Café Zippy in Everett is offering free bike deliveries, within a six block radius of its shop at 2811 Wetmore Ave., with a $20 minimum order. Call 425-303-0474 for details. MUKILTEO — Senior Services of America has announced that it will soon start construction on a state-of-the-art memory care communityat the corner of

Harbour Pointe Boulevard and Harbour Reach Drive in Mukilteo. The new Mukilteo Memory Care Community complex will be two stories high and approximately 44,000 square feet. At an estimated cost of $14 million, it will feature 51units. ARLINGTON — Smokey Point Distributing, a Daseke company, has received the Safety Fleet of the Year award in the common carrier category from the Washington Trucking Associations. The company also recently received its fifth straight Platinum Safety Award from its insurance provider and was recognized by the Truckload Carriers Association as the top fleet in safety. EVERETT — Electric Mirror unveiled the next generation of its patented and energy-savings Keen Technology, which offers improved functionality and is now available at a lower cost. Keen allows hotels to individualize lighted mirror experience by choosing from eight different lighting levels. BOTHELL — The 2016 Built Green Conference is scheduled for Sept. 13 at Cascadia College, 18345 Campus Way NE, Bothell. Built Green is a non-profit designed to set standards of excellence for environmentally-friendly building. The schedule includes a number of unique beak-out sessions. For details or to register, http://tinyurl.com/ BuiltGreenBothell.

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PEOPLE WATCHING

EVERETT — Dan Krause, owner and climbing arborist at Everett’s Champion Tree Care and former World Tree Climbing Champion, helped to organize a tree climbing competition that took place on Aug. 27 at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle. MONROE — The president and CEO of Canyon Creek Cabinet Company is stepping down at the end of the year. Bill Weaver has led the company for Bill Weaver more than 20 years. His successor, Bob Foote, was promoted earlier this Bob Foote month to president. Foote joined Canyon Creek as an executive vice president in January 2015. EDMONDS — Carole Williams has joined Camp Fire of Snohomish County as the club administrator serving the south Snohomish County area. She will be coordinating the startup of new Camp Fire Clubs in the Edmonds and Northshore school district neighborhoods. LAKE STEVENS — Gov. Jay Inslee has announced the appointment of Brett Blankenship to the Washington State University Board of Regents.Blankenship, who resides in Lake Stevens and Washtucna, is an owner and partner in Blankenship Brothers, a family farm wheat producer. Blankenship

has served as president of the National Association of Wheat Growers and as president of Washington Agriculture and Forestry Leadership Foundation. SEATTLE — The Washington State Hospital Association announced that Cassie Sauer, the association’s current executive vice president,will become the organization’s new Cassie chief execSauer utive officer in January. Sauer replaces outgoing CEO Scott Bond, who is retiring. Sauer has worked for the hospital association for 16 years.

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Rob Muszkiewicz are new board members.

LYNNWOOD — Edmonds Community College has hired a 24-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force to serve as Dennis the college’s Curran associate vice president of Human Resources. Retired Col. Dennis Curran started on July 18. Curran formerly served as the United States Air Force human resources

BOTHELL — Ed Buendia has been appointed dean of the School of Educational Studies at the University of Washington Bothell. He took over Aug. 1, after current dean Bradley Portin went on sabbatical. Buendia Ed Buendia served as chair of the Department of Education, Culture and Society at the

EVERETT — The American Red Cross Serving Snohomish County has announced new board members and officers. Darren Redick is board chairman after serving as second vice chairman in 2015. Daren Kloes is now first vice chairman after four years as a board member. Keely Reinhard will assume the role of second vice chairwoman following three years of service as a board member. Charles Crawford, Michael Stenchever,

SNOHOMISH — Coastal Community Bank announced that Melissa Hemrich has joined the bank as vice president-busiMelissa ness develHemrich opment officer for its Snohomish location. She worked most recently as manager and vice president at Opus Bank both the Lake Stevens and Marysville branches.

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EVERETT — Todd Cudaback, owner and president of Everett Hydraulic Inc. in downtown Everett, has been elected as the new District 2director at Toastmasters International. Cudaback will lead an executive team that will manage the success of over 3,600Toastmasters members in 175 clubs in District 2 that spans from Kent north to the Canadian border. LYNNWOOD — Pacific Crest Savings Bank has appointed Scott Gibson as senior vice president and lending manager. Gibson joined Scott Pacific Gibson Crest in 2012 and previously served as vice president of commercial lending. He will oversee Pacific Crest’s entire lending operation. STANWOOD — In April, the membership of Josephine Caring Community in Stanwood elected Jan Barnes, Connie DiGregorio, and Don Schultzto its board of directors. They join current Board members Kimberly Geariety, Tom Lucas, Steve Hoag, Irene Nelson, Chris Gustafson, Ernie Fosse, Tom Curtis, Russ Wells and Janet Waterworth. Donn Hollenbeck was also recently appointed to

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

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18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Boutique owner shocked by shoplifting I My brain would flood with questions without answers. ‘Why would they steal food from my family’s table? ... This is just small-town America after all, right?

JIM DAVIS / HBJ

Everett’s reFresh Boutique owner Kylie Sabra instituted a tag system to identify how many items customers take into dressing rooms.

shopkeepers face. I sat down and took a look at the problem sans emotion — not easy to do. Here’s what I learned from The National Association for Shoplifting Prevention: ■ There are approximately 27 million shoplifters (or one in 11 people) in our nation today. ■ Men and women shoplift about equally as often. ■ Approximately 25 percent of shoplifters are kids. ■ Many shoplifters buy and steal merchandise in the same visit. Shoplifters commonly steal from $2 to $200 per incident depending upon the type of store and item(s) chosen. ■ Shoplifting is often not a premeditated crime. 73 percent of adult and 72 percent of juvenile shoplifters don’t plan to steal in advance. ■ Approximately 3 percent of shoplifters are “professionals” who steal solely for resale or profit as a business. These include drug addicts who steal to feed their habit, hardened professionals who steal as a lifestyle and international shoplifting gangs who steal for profit as a business. ■ The vast majority of shoplifters are “non-professionals” who steal, not out of criminal intent, financial need or greed but as a response to social and personal pressures in their life. ■ Most non-professional shoplifters don’t commit other types of

crimes. They’ll never steal an ashtray from your house and will return to you a $20 bill you may have dropped. As you can see from the statistics above, the problem is monumental and it has no face. I’ve seen secretaries walk out with items. I’ve seen senior citizens do the same. In

fact, as the statistics above bear out, the “average” gal is more likely to be a shoplifter than the “fringe” lady. Honestly, I have no desire to babysit bags of any size. However, I had to come to terms with the fact that I needed to protect my inventory — my livelihood. There is no particular demographic for a shoplifter, and I simply will not use profiling as a tool for loss prevention. Instead, I had to find a solution that works to protect both me and my customers. I’ve settled on a lowtech loss-prevention plan that makes sense. Every-

one — no exception — takes a numbered tag into the dressing room that matches the number of items and then return the items and the tag to the front desk. I sincerely hope customers understand that I am not accusing them of being a shoplifter; but, statistically, neither can I take the chance that they aren’t. Who knows, maybe one day those pesky shoplifters will wear those darn name tags. Kylie Sabra opened the women’s resale clothing store, ReFresh Boutique, at 2829 Wetmore Ave. in Everett earlier this year. She can be reached at 425-303-3311.

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have never shoplifted ration. They are stealing in my life — not even from me, an arthritic-ridas a child. den, near-60-year-old just It simply never occurred trying to make a living to me to take something that will support me into that was not mine. retirement. I am new to retail and There is no insurance I absolutely love my new coverage for the daily life. Running ReFresh grind of petty theft. The Boutique allows me to burden falls squarely on engage my artsy tendenthe small business owner cies as well as my planning struggling to make ends and logistical skills. I’ve meet. lived a protected life I I began a progression of suppose. My professional loss prevention ideas — career was most of which in corporate were met with marketing and resistance or communicaeven outright tions where anger from I dealt with customers. a microcosm I remember of humanity. feeling those I now find watchful eyes myself exposed myself as a Kylie to a far wider shopper and Sabra range of I took a look personalities, back at my own Guest and most of actions. them I enjoy Now that Column immensely. I’m on the Then, there other side are the issues. of the counter, I realize I remember how heartthat my carrying a huge sick I felt the first time purse or backpack into a someone stole from me. shop was not creating an It was an all-to-common ideal experience for the occurrence. shopkeeper. I’ve been able to reduce At one point, I posted a much of the theft probnotice at the front door; lem by adjusting security which drew some laughs, cameras and rearranging some frowns and a wee bit the store to remove blind of compliance, but in the spots and closely observend I removed it. ing people with large bags, The sign showed a coats, purses and the like. name tag that read, “Hello It is an exhausting prop- My Name is Amy. I am osition and sadly reduces shoplifter. Until shopmy ability to relax and lifters wear name tags; enjoy my customers. please leave large purses, I worked hard to create shopping bags, large coats an experience that should … at the register.” be fun for both of us. While the sign was The dressing rooms amusing, I came to realize, pose another probafter much research, that lem altogether. Once a it was far more accurate customer enters, there than even I imagined. is no control over what Later I put a sign in happens. I’ve seen it all the dressing room stating too often. A customer that no bags were allowed. leaves quickly, and by my That too proved to be count has absconded with useless as shoppers would one, two or even more just ignore it. Occasionally pieces of clothing. The I get the rare shopper frustration is, again, heart who will approach me rending. and say, “Kylie, can you My brain would flood hold on to my bag while with questions without I shop?” Or, “I have four answers. “Why would they items I’m taking into the steal food from my famdressing room,” being very ily’s table? What have I careful to show them to done to deserve this? This me. I swear I just want to is just small-town Amergo to the floor and kiss ica after all, right?” They their feet, and I do thank aren’t stealing from “the them profoundly for man” or some big corpobeing aware of the issues


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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Partner to help with accountability

R

ecently, I took on a new role next week in a Google Doc so we can see in my business as a goal coach the other person’s goals. for a local business The document is also set up empowerment group for for us to type our “intentional women. action steps.” Along with coaching each This part alone has been Monday during a scheduled huge for me. Every week I have group call, I also helped the to think about what I want to director create an accountaccomplish, verbalize it and put ability program. it in black and white. Fun stuff. Writing down my action Now, I already know firststeps has been so beneficial Monika hand how important it is to because I can break big projset structured, written and Kristofferson ects down into very specific, manageable goals. small tasks that are easy to And, in helping clients get knock out. Office organized for my business, Suddenly, a big project is Efficiency I know just how important now a bunch of very small accountability is. parts and pieces. As you accomWhen clients are organizplish each small part of the ing with me, the accountability of having bigger project, it’s exciting to see progress an appointment scheduled with someone and the end in sight. is the catalyst for progress. Knowing I have to answer to someone So, I’m not just helping with the other than myself really pushes me to accountability program, I’m also in it. work on my tasks so I have progress to And, wow, having an accountability report. partner to answer to weekly is really It can be very easy to get busy and put helping me move forward in my own projects on the back burner and before business. you know it, a week has passed with no Here are some of the ways it’s helping progress. me: The extra accountability is helping me Every Friday after our accountability make sure I keep working on these goals phone call, we type up our goals for the throughout the week and it keeps them

Knowing I have to answer to someone other than myself really pushes me to work on my tasks so I have progress to report. on my mind. It’s helping me pull out “dream” projects and start making headway. Each New Year, we come up with big “to do” items, projects or changes in our businesses that we’d like to implement. But then the day-to-day work happens and it’s common for those big, dreamy projects to sit on hold. Working on my goals with an accountability partner has helped me bring out those goals, dust them off and start making progress. Encouraging someone else to reach their goals is good for me, too. It’s a good feeling to know that advice and encouragement that I’m giving is having a positive impact on another business professional. I also hope that being a good example is another way I’m encouraging my accountability partner. Sharing my advice as a goal coach each week forces me to review the importance of goals, time management

and focus management so I can share it with others. We often have to hear the same information over and over to keep ourselves on track and it helps me too, even if it is my own advice. I like checking off a ‘to do’ list, so typing in the word “done” next to each of my tasks is motivating for me. There’s so much to be said about receiving support from someone else to help you reach your goals. Having an accountability partner also applies positive pressure on yourself to complete the tasks you committed yourself to. If you’re struggling to meet your goals, I’d recommend connecting with someone you trust to help you put your feet to the fire, give you feedback and share words of encouragement. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in LakeStevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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Making connections across the state A

t the confluence of the Okanogan and Columbia rivers about 25 miles north of Lake Chelan in north-central Washington sits Brewster, one of the most important little towns you’ve never heard of. Golfers began taking notice last year when members of the Gebbers family, who own many of the orchards in the area, built a links-style golf course, Gamble Sands (www.gamblesands.com ). It’s now drawing regional attention. A new hotel is opening on grounds this summer offering spectacular views of the Columbia River valley and adjacent mountains. Fishermen, hunters and outdoor enthusiasts might know it for its famous summer salmon runs and productive fall hunting seasons.But what you likely didn’t know is that it’s one of the most productive tree fruit, cherry, beef cattle, lumber and power-producing regions in the state. A unique arrangement with Costco almost guarantees that the cherries you buy there are from Brewster. Products from this region, though, are shipped around the world as well leveraging these unique packaging techniques that hold flavor and keep fruit fresh longer. Snohomish County is now exporting an important product to Brewster of its own. Two years ago, Snohomish County Boys & Girls executive director Bill Tsoukalas (zoo-cal-us) led an effort to open a new club there, chartered through his organization since there wasn’t an existing neighboring Boys & Girls Club in the Wenatchee Valley. It is taking off quickly. Brewster is part of Snohomish County’s broader strategy to bring clubs to under served or rural communities like some of the smaller communities they have brought clubs to locally, such as Sultan and Granite Falls. The organization used a grant that allowed it to help open clubs outside of the county. In the past 20 years

the number of clubs has quadrupled, including Snohomish County’s partnership with the Tulalip Tribes that is a model for these rural clubs opening outside of the county. “In addition to Brewster, we’ve opened new clubs in the past year in partnership with the Colville and Spokane tribes” explains Tsoukalas. “We’ve been able to do this without detracting from our core geographic

footprint in Snohomish County.” “In rural places like Brewster, we’re introducing our story to people who may have heard of us but needed an existing organization to guide their start. “It takes a year or two for them to understand how important the club is to their community. Once they see the value and adopt it as their own, things really take

off. That’s what we see happening there already. Eventually they will spin off and become an independent Boys & Girls Club organization. That’s the ultimate goal. We’re the venture capital that gives them their start.” Tsoukalas has a sweet spot for Brewster, in particular. “It’s a two way street and shows how dependent we are on each other. The Brewsters of the world

grow the products we consume and we help nurture the kids from the families who grow and harvest it. “It’s really rewarding to be part of that and create that connection to Snohomish County.” Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

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BUSINESS BUILDERS

Marketing tips from the Blue Angels I

was among many that enjoyed the mission and coordinated duty. Blue Angels’ performance this sumThis is a good company model. Your mer during Seafair. entire team (not just sales and While listening to the marketing) should be aware of television narrator, I realized the marketing program and their the discipline and preparespective roles. ration that goes into their Every successful organizashow has many similarities tion, I believe, is a marketing to what is necessary for organization. a successful marketing From the person who answers program. the phone to the person who Since 1946, the Blue delivers the product, they are all Andrew Angels (named after a part of the marketing team. This Ballard famous New York nightclub) is as much about culture as it is have been wowing audiences communications. Growth around the world — they’ve It is management’s job to flown over nearly a half a ensure everyone in the orgaStrategies billion people. nization is up to speed on the Their primary mission is marketing mission. to showcase the pride and Conditioning: Blue Angels professionalism of the U.S. Navy and pilots fly a $28 million F/A-18 Hornet at Marine Corps Flight Demonstration nearly Mach-1, often executing maneuSquadron as a means of recruiting for the vers that pull over seven G’s. Navy, clearly a marketing function. Their pilots do not wear G-suits As Marine Corps Capt. Corrie Mays, (pressurized garments to keep the blood who is the events coordinator for the from pooling in the legs during strenuous Blues Angels, explained the rigors of their maneuvers.) program during the television broadcast, You need to be in excellent condiI took away four parallels that are central tion to withstand that kind of stress to effective marketing. and keep from “blacking out” during a Teamwork: The Blue Angels have performance. 126 team members; most are behind the The same is true for your marketing scenes, and each one carries out a critical program. Your people and systems must

Every successful organization, I believe, is a marketing organization. From the person who answers the phone to the person who delivers the product, they are all part of the marketing team. be able to manage the stress generated by your marketing program. Map the entire “customer experience” — from point-of-entry to purchase and service to retention. Identify areas in bad shape and begin conditioning. Preflight: The Blue Angels always go through many preflight planning sessions before they hit the tarmac. Followed by a highly choreographed “walk down” preflight routine as the Blue Angel pilots climb into their F-18 Hornets, start them up, and taxi out for takeoff. Your company can go through a similar process before launching a marketing initiative. Go through a “preflight” checklist to make sure your systems are up and everyone involved knows what to do. Just as the Blue Angels have a “low-altitude show” they perform on cloudy days, you, too, may need to have a contingency ready. Debrief: After every show, the Blue Angels debrief. They go over video and

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discuss each maneuver. They resolve communications, coordination and areas needing improvement. Do you and your team debrief after each marketing venture? Do you know what went right and wrong, and, most importantly, why? Think of the added preparation you’d go though if failure meant endangering lives. Thankfully, most of us aren’t held to that standard — but could you imagine how much your marketing program would improve if you were? If you and your entire organization focus on teamwork, conditioning, preflight and debriefing, even to a lesser extent than the Blue Angels do, you’ll experience far better results, and your marketing program won’t likely “black out.” Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

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PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from July 1-31. 16-13574-MLB: Chapter 11, Mikey and Sunshine Inc.; attorneys for debtor: Emily A. Jarvis and Jeffrey B. Wells; attorneys for special request: Martha J. Simon and Zachary Mosner Barreca; filed: July 7; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-13972-MLB: Chapter 7, DJ Drywall Inc.; attorney for debtor: Thomas D. Neeleman; filed: July 29; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation

Snohomish County Tax Liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between July 1 and July 31.

Federal Tax Lien 201607050244: July 5; Shoreline Sign & Awning (+), 12101 Huckleberry Lane, Arlington 201607050245: July 5; Daves, Kevin J., 15225 23rd Place W, Lynnwood 201607050246: July 5; Hendrickson, Susann E. (+), 8425 319th St. NW, Stanwood 201607050247: July 5; Greenwood Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201607050248: July 5; Wesweld Corp., PO Box 1145, Stanwood 201607050249: July 5; Legacy SMO, 5503 128th Place SE, Everett 201607050250: July 5; Jantz, Lafon M. (+), PO Box 700, Edmonds 201607050251: July 5; Jantz Lafon M (+), PO Box 700, Edmonds 201607050252: July 5; Larsen, Carolyn M., 1212 Maple Ave., Snohomish 201607050253: July 5; Bio Management Northwest, PO Box 564, Mountlake Terrace 201607050254: July 5; Small, Stephanie, 4509 132nd Place SE, Apt. 305 Mill Creek 201607060462: July 6; Castoriano, Marc S., 6306 61st Ave. SE, Snohomish 201607060463: July 6; First Class Concrete Inc., 20721 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish 201607060464: July 6; Mozes-Allen, Kathy (+), 14522 54th Ave. SE, Everett 201607060465: July 6; Helfenberger, Dan E., 532 Hawthorne St., No. B, Everett 201607060466: July 6; Williams, Jay R., 3327 Rucker Ave., Apt. 105, Everett 201607060467: July 6; MCCI (+), 8126 66th Drive NE, Marysville 201607060468: July 6; Slendebroek, Frances, 23205 SE Black Nugget Road, Apt. J2, Issaquah 201607060469: July 6; Slendebroek Frances A (+), 23205 SE Black Nugget Road, Apt. J2, Issaquah 201607060470: July 6; Parke, Joshua A., 12639 Eagles Nest Drive, Mukilteo 201607060471: July 6; Pasha, Kauser, 2726 163rd Place SE, Mill Creek 201607060472: July 6; Imperial Casket Inc, 18933 59th Ave. NE, Space 111, Arlington 201607060473: July 6; Parks, George A., 5222 150th Place SW, Edmonds 201607060474: July 6; Gorham, William G. Sr., 23721 Old Owen Road, No. B, Monroe 201607060475: July 6; Zab Thai Restaurant (+), 11108 Evergreen Way, Suite A, Everett 201607060476: July 6; Castoriano, Marl S., 6306 61st Ave. SE, Snohomish 201607060477: July 6; Castoriano, Christiana, 6306 61st Ave. SE, Snohomish 201607060478: July 6; Koering Western Inc., 15916 77th Ave. NE, Arlington 201607120388: July 12; Poteet, David D., 1701 121st St. SE, Apt. N301, Everett 201607120389: July 12; Maldonado, Ramon, 9021 49th Drive NE, Marysville 201607120390: July 12; LW Lacrosse, 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett

201607120391: July 12; Fossum, Sharon M. (+), PO Box 2477, Snohomish 201607120392: July 12; Bear, Christopher, 5409 Broadway, Everett 201607120393: July 12; Rosenberger, Joan (+), 14028 61st Place W, Apt. B, Edmonds 201607120394: July 12; Maldonado, Icela (+), 9021 49th Drive NE, Marysville 201607120395: July 12; Herzog, Steve P., 3216 124th St. SE, Everett 201607120396: July 12; Bartelheimer, Kurt (+), PO Box 878 Snohomish 201607120397: July 12; Tiacharoenwat, Sudarat, 10426 13th Ave. W, Everett 201607120398: July 12; Hutton, Laura B., 4518 113th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201607120399: July 12; Buck, Brent A., 1225 183rd St. SE, Apt. M-306, Bothell 201607120400: July 12; Ohman, Joseph, 3333 164th St. SW, Space 1214, Lynnwood 201607120401: July 12; Ohman, Joseph (+), 3333 164th St. SW, Apt. 1214, Lynnwood 201607120402: July 12; Crenshaw, Kelvin N., 6608 49th Place NE, Marysville 201607120403: July 12; Evolve Inc., 12201 Cyrus Way, Suite 101, Mukilteo 201607140106: July 14; Wilson, Darren J., 4420 Grand Ave., Everett 201607140107: July 14; Sarkhosh, Shohreh, 13625 57th Drive SE, Everett 201607140108: July 14; Ruiz, Luis N., 15721 67th Ave. NE, Arlington 201607140109: July 14; Scroggins, Ronald M., 1605 128th St. SW, Everett 201607140110: July 14; Scroggins, Ronald M, 1605 128th St. SW, Everett 201607200131: July 20; Northwest Professional Residential & Commercial Construction Inc., PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201607200132: July 20; White, Susan K., 11231 First Ave. W, Everett 201607200133: July 20; Bond, Donald R., 17501 54th Place W, Lynnwood 201607200134: July 20; Crawford, Jeremy, 17910 37th Drive NE, Arlington 201607200137: July 20; Riveras MDH Inc., 17267 149th Place SE, Monroe 201607200138: July 20; Espinoza, Gloria N. (+), 19930 Ninth Ave. W, Lynnwood 201607200139: July 20; Gross, Nathanial S., 6713 45th Place NE, Marysville 201607200140: July 20; Olacio, Robert A., 7829 59th Ave. NE, Marysville 201607200141: July 20; Adams, Lucinda M. (+), 7829 59th Ave. NE, Marysville 201607200142: July 20; Dotson, Daniel J., 10318 Fourth Ave. W, Everett 201607200143: July 20; McLaughlin, Sean P., 8206 184th St. SW, Edmonds 201607200144: July 20; Burns, Michelle L., 10702 Holly Drive A, Everett 201607200145: July 20; Lehman, Douglas B., 8107 B 214th SW, Edmonds 201607200146: July 20; Leake, Craig G., 3825 Shelby Road, Lynnwood 201607260444: July 26; M&D Quality Painting (+), 18501 66th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201607260445: July 26; Tacomas Siding, 140 Woods St. Monroe 201607260446: July 26; Salatelis, Linda (+), 10402 59th Drive NE, Marysville 201607260447: July 26; Floe, Warren, 12118 54th Drive NE, Marysville 201607260448: July 26; Hundley, Ted (+), 11924 51st Ave. NE, Apt. B, Marysville 201607260449: July 26; Hundley, Ted, 11924 51st Ave. NE, Apt. B, Marysville 201607260456: July 26; Dolph, Billy T. Jr., Estate Of, 15925 91st Ave. SE, Snohomish 201607260457: July 26; Ntere Inc., 5807 244th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201607260458: July 26; Ntere Inc, 5807 244th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201607260459: July 26; Ntere Inc, 5807 244th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201607260460: July 26; Williams, Iris R., 2308 Taylor Drive, Everett 201607260461: July 26; Robison, Karen (+), 211 W Hill St., Monroe 201607260462: July 26; Myung, Jang (+), 19031 33rd Ave. W, Suite 211, Lynnwood 201607260463: July 26; Drexler, Terry J., 21010 120th Drive SE, Snohomish

SEPTEMBER 2016

201607260464: July 26; Cook, Carolyn Y. (+), 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish

Partial Release of Federal Tax Lien 201607050255: July 5; Carpenter, Christopher L., 1730 112th St. SW, Apt. G104, Everett 201607060479: July 6; Nesbit, Michael, 18463 Blueberry Lane SE, Apt. M304, Monroe 201607140111: July 14; Vice, Jason, 13719 28th St. SE, Mill Creek

Release of Federal Tax Lien 201607060480: July 6; Mercado, Joseph Homer, 7909 212th St. SW, Unit 1, Edmonds 201607060481: July 6; Pedersen, Eric C., 7744 18th Ave. NW, Seattle 201607060482: July 6; Brand, Todd L. Hilden, 609 54th St. SW, Everett 201607060483: July 6; Nesbii, Michael W, PO Box 1565, Sultan 201607060484: July 6; Cook, Julie L., 6116 84th Place NE, Marysville 201607060485: July 6; Knoth, Brandon C., 3909 205th Place SW, Lynnwood 201607060486: July 6; Miyata, Patricia M., 4401 216th St. SW, Apt. B, Mountlake Terrace 201607060487: July 6; Krause, Ervin K, 19628 Bing Road, Lynnwood 201607060488: July 6; Adair, George P, 5714 Halls Lake Way, Lynnwood 201607060489: July 6; Knoth, Alicia (+), 16120 Second Place W, Lynnwood 201607060490: July 6; Lovins, Robert L., 15530 Highway 9, Arlington 201607060491: July 6; Walker, Orville W., 5802 70th St. NE, Marysville 201607060492: July 6; Parrish, John B., 19620 80th Ave. W, No. D, Edmonds 201607060493: July 6; Clark, Stephen E., 4320 196th St. SW, Suite B, PMB 535, Lynnwood 201607060494: July 6; Creasey, Janien M. (+), PO Box 476, Monroe 201607060495: July 6; Jones, Luanne (+), 1122 Viewland Way, Edmonds 201607080082: July 8; Cuff, Reese A. (+), 6515 118th Drive SE, Snohomish 201607080083: July 8; Cuff, Reese A. (+), 6515 118th Drive SE, Snohomish 201607120404: July 12; Wetzel, Andrea L. (+), 7209 193rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201607120405: July 12; Mahlman, Michael J. (+), 319 118th Drive NE, Lake Stevens 201607120406: July 12; Sleister, Cassandra (+), PMB 273 23632 Highway 99, Apt. F, Edmonds 201607120407: July 12; Dumm, Yvonne J. (+), 8928 180th St. NW, Stanwood 201607120408: July 12; Bailey, Horace Jr, PO Box 434, Mukilteo 201607120409: July 12; Dumm, Yvonne J. (+), 14018 34th Drive SE, Mill Creek 201607120410: July 12; Williams, Marvin, 13000 Admiralty Way, Apt. D-303, Everett 201607140112: July 14; Nunley, Derrick B., PO Box 771, Lynnwood

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

201607140113: July 14; Mcalorum, Kieran, 12150 Greenhaven, Mukilteo 201607140114: July 14; Sewell, Josh, 19218 26th Ave. SE, Bothell 201607200135: July 20; Fortin, Randy M., 11602 92nd St. SE, No. B, Snohomish 201607200136: July 20; Fortin, Randy, 11602 92nd St. SE, No. B, Snohomish 201607200147: July 20; Brand, Todd L. Hilden, 609 54th St. SW, Everett 201607200148: July 20; Kehn, Louise (+), PO Box 780, Aberdeen 201607200149: July 20; Kehn Dental Lab (+), PO Box 780, Aberdeen 201607200150: July 20; McKenney, Ryan M., 9224 176th St. SE, Snohomish 201607200151: July 20; Mahil, Dilbar S., 5932 101st Place NE, Marysville 201607200152: July 20; Kehn, Louise (+), PO Box 780, Aberdeen 201607200153: July 20; R Ellersick Brewing Co. (+), 5030 208th St. SW, Suite A, Lynnwood 201607200154: July 20; Korzynek, Mirjana M. (+), 3116 104th Place SE, Everett 201607200155: July 20; Franklin, Jason A., 13328 56th Drive NE, Marysville 201607200156: July 20; Time Out Sports Bar Snohomish (+), 921 First St., Snohomish 201607200157: July 20; Senick, Meridee L. (+), 15224 Main St., Suite 303, Mill Creek 201607200158: July 20; Shangri-La Massage Therapy (+), 212th St. SW, Suite 101, Edmonds 201607200159: July 20; Shangri-La Massage Therapy (+), 7500 212th St. SW, Suite 101, Edmonds 201607200160: July 20; Baba, Caryl L. (+), 6921 191st St. SE, Snohomish 201607260450: July 26; Ergler, Chalene P., 9709 Holly Drive, Everett 201607260451: July 26; Osemene, Justin C., 13824 N Creek Drive, Unit 2301, Mill Creek 201607260452: July 26; Ergler, Chalene P., 9709 Holly Drive, Everett 201607260465: July 26; Commercial Aircraft Interiors, 5916 195th St. NE, Arlington 201607260466: July 26; Chong, Bong C., 5017 176th St. SW, Apt. E, Lynnwood 201607260467: July 26; Corns, Rachel P. (+), PO Box 104, Lynnwood 201607260468: July 26; Corner Coffee Bar & Cafe Inc., 18401 76th Ave. W, Suite 103, Edmonds 201607260469: July 26; Carlson, Nickolas J., 20019 8th Drive SE, Bothell 201607260470: July 26; Exterior Stucco Inc., 7030 193rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201607260472: July 26; Langdon, Jennifer (+), 5416 93rd Place SW, Mukilteo

Withdrawal of Federal Tax Lien 201607050256: July 5; Walkley, Fran (+), PO Box 1085, Everett 201607200161: July 20; Dotson, Daniel J., 10318 Fourth Ave. W, Everett 201607260471: July 26; Rendorio, Ronald B., 19506 Bing Road, Lynnwood

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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington Diesel Drive: 19010 66th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-4701; 360-435-5195; Diesel Fuel (Wholesale) Fabtek Industries: 6011 199th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6381; 360-322-7536; Manufacturers Loft Coffee Bar: 15915 Fourth Ave. NW, Arlington, WA 98223-5439; Coffee Shops Loomis Armored: 16910 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-3725; 360-435-3283; Nonclassified Mary Jayne Parties Inc.: 4032 167th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8447; Party Planning Service North Sound Pest Control: 22602 121st Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9594; Pest Control Prestige Construction Specialist: 31525 365th Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9207; Construction Companies Repairs By Dan: 1026 Park Hill Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-1134; Repair Shops and Related Services Not Elsewhere Classified

SEPTEMBER 2016

Revolution Pole Fitness: 17216 Ironwood St., Arlington, WA 98223-5982; Entertainers-Adult Selective Gardener: 4023 168th St. NE, No. B, Arlington, WA 98223-8429; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Skye Aero: 18928 59th Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7834; 360-322-7761; Nonclassified Starke Digital Graphics Inc.: 604 E Gilman Ave., No. 10, Arlington, WA 98223-1132 Tractor Supply Co.: 17020 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8426; 360-653-2123; Farm Supplies (Wholesale)

Edmonds No. 1! AAA Ascending Adult: 9307 220th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98020-4551; Home Builders Always Fresh: 22315 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8003; 425-697-2250 Creative Concepts Construction Co.: 100 Second Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-8443; Construction Companies Edmonds Garage Door: 502 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3148; 425-880-2527; Doors-Garage Lularoe Dana Lowe: 22409 93rd Place W, Edmonds, WA 98020-4514; Clothing-Retail On Site TV Service and Repair: 22201 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8043;

BUSINESS LICENSES Television and Radio-Dealers Quantum Resources: 9333 244th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98020-7513; 206-629-5587; Energy Conservation and Management Consultants Sparks R Fly N Metalworks: 19910 88th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-6309; Sheet Metal Work Contractors TFS Advisors: 100 Second Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 980208443; 425-670-9162; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified WHAN Young: 16010 60th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-4625; 425-361-1341; Nonclassified Zizo: 610 Main St., No. E, Edmonds, WA 98020-3099; 425-582-8036

Everett ABC Commercial Cleaning: 13507 Highway 99, No. 27, Everett, WA 98204-5442; Janitor Service Appfactory: 120 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 982041704; Nonclassified B&C Thriftique: 607 SE Everett Mall Way, No. B, Everett, WA 98208-3264; 425322-4381; Nonclassified Chinemarelie: 12907 E Gibson Road, No. E105, Everett, WA 98204-9380; Cookies By Caity: 2929 130th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-6702; Cookies and Crackers DWK Services: 11611 Airport Road, No. 206, Everett, WA 98204-3782; 425-512-

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8853; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Dream Tech: 11802 Evergreen Way, No. 106, Everett, WA 98204-4620; Nonclassified Elevate Web Solutions: 12415 4th Ave. W, No. 4105, Everett, WA 98204-6421; Internet Home Page Dev Consulting Estelle’s Custodial Services: 1708 Puget Drive, Everett, WA 98203-6615; Janitor Service European Denture Center: 1111 Pacific Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4200; 425-374-8470; Dentists Everett Garage Door Repair: 2942 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4011; 425-880-2838; Garage Doors-Repairing GH Construction Co.: 723 94th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3721; Construction Companies Global Spirits & Wine: 3809 McDougall Ave., Everett, WA 98201-5106; 425258-9916; Wines-Retail Goodyear Auto Services Center: 1621 Riverside Ave., Everett, WA 98201; 360-4282711; Automobile Repairing and Service Gravity Thief: 2916 State St., Everett, WA 98201-3842; 425-258-9906; Nonclassified J William Finley MD: 540 Alverson Blvd., Everett, WA 98201-1010; Physicians and Surgeons Jersey Mike’s Subs: 1130 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2800; 425-2670101; Restaurants Just Left Pub & Grill: 611 60th St. SE, Everett, WA 98203-3734; Restaurants Katrina Iiams-Hauser, Naturopathic Physician: 1902 120th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-8400; 425-357-0856; Holistic Practitioners Kondelis Development Strategies: 6309 Second Drive SE, No. 1, Everett, WA 98203-3453; Nonclassified Lucuna Counseling and Consulting: 1721 Hewitt Ave., No. 401, Everett, WA 982013570; Counseling Services Luks Construction: 10115 Holly Drive, No. E210, Everett, WA 98204-8752; Construction Companies Maple & Sage Pastry Shoppe: 8600 18th Ave. W, No. B110, Everett, WA 982044902; Bakers-Retail Michael A. Morrisey Photography: 11401 3rd Ave. SE, No. J2, Everett, WA 982085514; Photography NW Auto Dr Inc.: 11014 19th Ave. SE, No. 8, Everett, WA 98208-5121 Paradise Construction: 3631 Tulalip Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4656; 425-595-5704; Construction Companies Resin Rescue: 26 113th Place SE, Everett, WA 982085045; Rescue Squads Rev One: PO Box 4549, Everett, WA 98204-0051 SK Rixxo Digital: N 201 1926 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204; Nonclassified Sandy’s Hair Extensions and Beauty Supplies: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, No. 2, Everett, WA 98208-2857; 425374-7214; Beauty Salons

Seatac Auto and Truck Appraisal: 11012 Paine Field Way, Everett, WA 982043712; Automobile Appraisers Senny Grace Adult Family Home: 2410 104th Place SE, No. 1982, Everett, WA 982084474; Homes-Adult Sirens Market: 3021 Rucker Ave., No. B, Everett, WA 98201-3931; Markets Smart Stop Evergreen Way: 10919 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-3840; 425348-4955; Nonclassified Sparkle and Shine Images: 120 69th Place SE, No. A, Everett, WA 98203-4976; Tercrisca Salon and Spa: 7425 Hardeson Road, Everett, WA 98203-7131; 425-3223947; Beauty Salons Warforge Entertainment Inc.: 3827 108th St. SE, No. 1995, Everett, WA 982085437; Entertainment Bureaus Zambrano Roofing: 12601 8th Ave. W, No. A303, Everett, WA 98204-1813; Roofing Contractors Zenergy: 5915 Fleming St., Everett, WA 98203-3708

Lake Stevens Catering By Tara: 1221 81st Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3193; Caterers Cod’s Restaurant: 12405 20th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9270; 425-2129817; Restaurants Computer Doc: 9818 Second St. SE, No. 31, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1989; Computers-Service and Repair Deane’s Facility Maintenance: 9301 16th Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 982588588; Building Maintenance Destination Taklo: 2210 Grade Road, No. 4, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8127; 425-512-0042; Nonclassified JM Business Consulting: 2820 S Lake Stevens Road, Lake Stevens, WA 982585631; Business Management Consultants Northwest Canine Safety: 2125 107th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5791; Safety Consultants Us Licensing Group: 8911 Vernon Road, No. M115, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2430; License Services Via Vitae: 10216 10th Place SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9498; Nonclassified

Lynnwood 12th Driver Inc.: 212th St., Lynnwood, WA 98036; 509663-7433; Nonclassified AE Construction: 18601 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4576; 425-361-1588; Construction Companies Aman 28 Limo Inc.: 1715 180th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4931; Limousine Service Andgyn: 3322 148th St. SW, No. A2, Lynnwood, WA 98087-4891; Nonclassified Avastyle: 21117 30th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 980368949; Nonclassified BC Rious: 15319 Ash Way, No. A1, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8797; Nonclassified BZ Locks: PO Box 658, Lynnwood, WA 98046-0658;

Locks and Locksmiths Clementine Vintage: 7126 196th St. SW, No. 9, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5057 Enhance and Beyond: 2610 143rd St. SW, No. A, Lynnwood, WA 98087-4876 Gangnam Korean Restaurant: 19505 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5658; 425-678-0337; Restaurants Gateway Consultancy Services: 214 206th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 980367217; Business Management Consultants Home Expressions: 715 212th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8606; 425-3611076; Nonclassified Integrative Mental Health Services: 1813 151st St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8801; Mental Health Services Interface Technologies Northwest: 6825 216th St. SW, No. E, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7379; Nonclassified Jenderuss Forensic Acct: 19031 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731; 425921-6984; Nonclassified Just Something Light: 15631 Ash Way, No. D204, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5337 Kathleen Dowd Yoga: 21816 Cypress Way, Lynnwood, WA 98036-9012; Yoga Instruction Kelsey Knits: 16520 Larch Way, No. Aa310, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8109; Knit Goods-Retail Kris Coppedge: 16825 48th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6401; 425-582-2763 Kuro Neko Services: 4318 Serene Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5210; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Lularoe The Obriens: 1707 196th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7012; Clothing-Retail Milestone Information: 15614 Meadow Road, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6520; 425-361-2386; Information and Referral Services New Heights: 14630 33rd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3407; Nonclassified Noahs Ark Christian Preschool: 3408 132nd St. SW, No. B2, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5135; Schools-Nursery and Kindergarten Academic Onigiri Robot: 15330 14th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8769; Robots (Wholesale) PIQ Photobooth Co.: 3116 164th St. SW, No. 1901, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3252; Photo Booths Painting By Number: 15511 35th Ave. W, No. G, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8486; Painters Passionate Wordplay: 3705 165th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7019 Pedroso Tile: 16626 6th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8834; Tile-Ceramic-Contractors and Dealers Peter Hong Insurance Group Inc.: 18514 Highway 99, No. E, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4549; Insurance Phaeton: 17230 33rd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 980377719; Nonclassified Pluckidon Co.: 521a Logan Road, Lynnwood, WA 980367241; Nonclassified


SEPTEMBER 2016

BUSINESS LICENSES Q Cellphones: 18904 Highway 99, No. L, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5219; Cellular Telephones (Services) Rila Bakery and Cafe: 7600 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5097; 425967-6094; Bakers-Retail Sebastian Place: 1925 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7003; 425-582-8756 Sopheakdey and Khut: 7600 196th St. SW, No. 850, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4421 Streamline Motors: 16825 48th Ave. W, No. 245, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6406; Automobile Dealers T&J Trading: 19505 Highline Plaza, Suite D, Lynnwood, WA 98036; Nonclassified Upper Advantage Painting: 20516 Damson Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7221; Painters Z&I: 632 142nd St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6442

Marysville Agroitalia USA: 5900 57th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9032; Nonclassified Brookdale Fax: 9802 48th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8100; 360-653-3285; Facsimile Transmission Service Bustard Custom Construction Inc.: PO Box 1243, Marysville, WA 98270-1243; 425-876-6551; Construction Companies Butokukan Of North Puget Sound: 6811 54th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8924; Nonclassified Classic Garage Door Services: 11721 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98271-8430; 360-657-5772; Doors-Garage DC Window Tinting: 14608 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville, WA 98271-8946; 360-322-7645; Glass Coating and Tinting Gi’s Hair Salon: 1339 State Ave., Marysville, WA 982703604; 360-386-9451; Beauty Salons Gorillabilly: 9017 46th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2561; Nonclassified Julie Ann Kerber Agency: 302 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270; Nonclassified Kraftwerk European: 15008 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville, WA 98271-8912 MB’s Fantastic Kettlecorn: 11219 State Ave., No. 3, Marysville, WA 98271-

7231; Popcorn and Popcorn Supplies Macintosh Protective Services: 4901 104th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7259; Not Elsewhere Classified Marysville Clean CrawlWet: 9129 62nd Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2845; Marysville Garage Door Repair: 922 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4239; 360-637-0111; Garage Doors-Repairing Miller TV: 4210 126th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8762; 360-386-8090; Television and Radio-Dealers Natalie’s Bookkeeping: 2506 169th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4721; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Svc NW Maids Inc.: 7930 87th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270; Maid-Butler Service Pilchuck Home Inspections: 5317 85th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-3161; Real Estate Inspection Private Client Fiduciary Corp: 7719 81st Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8012; Fiduciaries R&W Firearms: 6008 77th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8942; Guns and Gunsmiths Red Maple Senior Care Adult: 4331 129th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8709 Sport Motive Auto Sales: 15005 45th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8965; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Stanwood Grocery Outlet: PO Box 791, Marysville, WA 98270-0791; Grocers-Retail White Cobra Construction: 9520 50th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2328; Construction Companies

(Wholesale) My Mill Creek Garage Door Repair: 15500 Country Club Drive, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1201; 425-880-2541; Garage Doors-Repairing Teriyaki and Pho: 16017 24th Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-7837; Restaurants Yuke Investment: 1127 141st St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1360; Investments

Mountlake Terrace

Monroe

Mukilteo

Transmissions of Marysville

....

PUBLICATION: HERALD RETAIL

Bluejay Interpreting Services: 20929 Meadow Lake Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7277; Translators and Interpreters CAV Glass and Window: 5427 99th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-5707; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc. Chaplin Inc.: 1422 Ridge Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-1349; 360-863-3551; Nonclassified Dubchino Custom Designs: 20403 64th Ave. SE, Stanwood Snohomish, WA 98296-5174 Elite Holdings Group: E Cook Virtual Assis16006 73rd Drive SE, No. tance: 7028 281st Place NW, B, Snohomish, WA 98296Stanwood, WA 98292-4506; 8671; Holding Companies Computers-Virtual Reality (Non-Bank) Flying Monkey Distillery: Elite Remax: 1800 Bickford 27122 102nd Drive NW, Ave., No. B206, Snohomish, Stanwood, WA 98292-8039; WA 98290-1769; 360-863Distillers (Manufacturers) 3940; Real Estate Grocery Outlet: 26905 Grover Trucking: 1300 92nd Ave. NW, Stanwood, 30th St., Snohomish, WA WA 98292; 360-572-3300; 98290-5712; Trucking 1231656 Grocers-Retail NEXT DATE: 01/24/15 LevelRUN 10 Fitness: 12704 Perfectbee: 7412 150th 58th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA Place NW, Stanwood, WA PUBLICATION: HERALD RETAIL

SIZE: 2 col X 2 in

AUTO GLASS • GLASS REPLACEMENT • TINTING • VINYL WINDOWS

Rock Chip Repair…

Serving Snohomish County Since 1980

$

TRANSMISSION SERVICE

3495

TRANSMISSIONS Our Speciality, Not a Sideline

Quality Transmission Service & Repair

CLEAR-VIEW GLASS COMPANY

• Remanufactured • Automatic • Standards • Differentials • CV Axles Drivelines • Repairs and/or Replace

4317 Rucker • Everett 425-258-9399

1811 Everett Ave. Everett (425) 252-2161

Serving the NW Since 1952

www.edstransmission.com

www.clearviewglass.com

How to

1674729

ADVERTISE in the…

One Day Service/Rebuilds in Stock 36 mo. Unlimited Mileage. Warranty Available

1674301

98296-8976; Nonclassified Lularoe Alexa Ayers: 2113 Lake Crest Drive, Snohomish, WA 98290-1309; Clothing-Retail SME Professional Development: 231 N Lake Roesiger Road, Snohomish, WA 982907546; Nonclassified Small Business Media: 1121 22nd St., Snohomish, WA 98290-1346; Not Elsewhere Classified Snohomish Shell and Food Mart: 1105 Second St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2921; Service Stations-Gasoline and Oil Trainer USA: 6515 134th Place SE, No. F8, Snohomish, WA 98296-8674; Training Programs and Services Volo Bistro: 801 First St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2975; 425-595-7550; Restaurants

MARKETPLACE

European • Japanese • Domestic

Free Local Towing w/Major Repair www.edstransmissions.com (360) 653-1835 10226 State Ave. Marysville

Pearl Valley Designs: 902 18th St., Mukilteo, WA 98275-2215; Robinson Brothers Construction Inc.: 13102 Beverly Park Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275; 425-745-8533; General Contractors

Snohomish

A Gurukul: 6013 122nd Bahn Brenner Motorsport Place SW, Mukilteo, WA Inc.: 17239 Tye St. SE, No. D, 98275-5578; Nonclassified Monroe, WA 98272-1089 Bright Star Athletic Dosbros Landscaping: Scholarshps: 4840 Sterling 13819 Chain Lake Road, Way, No. 109, Mukilteo, WA Monroe, WA 98272-7700; 98275-6058; Scholarship Landscape Contractors Programs EOP Distributing: 16913 Galaxsea Freight ForChinook Lane SE, Monroe, warding: 8423 Mukilteo WA 98272-2911; Distribution Speedway, Mukilteo, WA Services 98275-3237; 425-512-8097; G House Inspections: Freight-Forwarding 23701 150th St. SE, Monroe, Jenna Marie Salon: 12199 WA 98272-9609; Real Estate Village Center Place, Inspection Mukilteo, WA 98275-5313; On Site Hydraulic Recla425-374-7905; Beauty mation: 334 Orr St., Monroe, Salons WA 98272-1424; Hydraulic Kelly Kleaners: 997 Goat Equipment and Supplies Trail Loop Road, Mukilteo, (Wholesale) WA 98275-2212; Cleaners Russell Iron Works: 27930 Kymberlee Taylor: 4812 176th Place SE, Monroe, WA Pointes Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98272-8963; Ornamental 98275-6081; Nonclassified Metal Work (Manufacturers) ADVERTISER: PENNY10821 LEE TRUCKING Manna: 47th Ave. Zeke’s Painting: 28609 SALES 1902 WA 98275-5001; W, Mukilteo, 107th Place SE, Monroe, WA PERSON: 98272-9515; Painters CREATED425-263-9084; BY: SHOPPE Nonclassified

Mill Creek Byzantine Works: 16107 24th Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-7874; Nonclassified Camas Fuel Inc.: 2623 Seattle Hill Road, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4802; Oils-Fuel (Wholesale) FSK Enterprises: 4417 137th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8909; Nonclassified Green Light Auto Sales: PO Box 13332, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1332; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Lash Lounge: PO Box 13332, Mill Creek, WA 980821332; Artificial Eyelashes

American Cancer-Cigarette: 22603 56th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-3917; Cancer Information Seatown Soaps: 5905 238th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5134; Soaps and Detergents-Manufacturers

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

1674731

EAST VALLEY

SAND & GRAVEL CO. DBA Penny Lee Trucking, Inc.

OVER 35 PRODUCTS Celebrating

30 Years!

Same Day

CRUSHED & WASHED ROCKS LANDSCAPE MATERIAL RECYCLED ASPHALT & CONCRETE PIT RUN & SCREENED BARROW ORGANIC TOPSOIL • GRAVEL CHIPS DISPOSAL SITE FOR CLEAN DIRT/ASPHALT/CONCRETE

eaSTvalleySaNdaNdGravel.COm Deliveries ROAD CONSTRUCTION

Recyled Concrete or Asphalt Site Work, Grading, Excavating Crushed Rock 5/8 - 4” Washed Rock 3/8 - 2” River Rock & Chips 360-403-7520 Mulch - Perk Dirt 29 YEARS

Call 425.339.3445 of Outstanding Reputation for Quality Products and Service 5802 Cemetery Rd • Arlington, WA 98223 Email mbozlinksi@soundpublishing.com QUiCKwww.eastvalleysandandgravel.com QUOTe Same day delivery 1231656 www.TheHeraldBusinessJournal.com 360.403.7520 1674728

1611476

To have your business or service showcased here, please call 425-339-3445 today!

1674726


26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

234.81

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942 253.815

256.098


SEPTEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

Here to Help Snohomish County Businesses Grow & Thrive Responding to your business opportunities with Local SBA Expertise, Quick Decisions & Streamlined Processing Prime Pacific Bank, now a division of Bank of the Cascades, is proud to continue our tradition of providing Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help local business succeed. We provide SBA loans for: • Business Expansion • Business Buyouts • Working Capital • Equipment

• Franchise Financing • Self Storage • Manufacturers • Wholesale

Please call or stop by any of our local branches to discuss how we might help your business today. Main Branch 2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036 425.774.5643

Kenmore Branch 6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028 425.415.6564

Mill Creek Branch 2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012 425.357.1516

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

N/A

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

N/A

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

N/A

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

N/A

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

a division of

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

Bank of the Cascades

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

Member FDIC 1674295


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2016

Matt Smith Trident Marine Enthusiastic dad Geoduck farmer Aspiring guitarist

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Matt Smith—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

HeritageBankNW.com | 800.455.6126

1517291

© 2016 Heritage Bank Member FDIC

Herald Business Journal - 09.01.2016  

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Herald Business Journal - 09.01.2016  

i20160902071527800.pdf