Page 1

Campus overview: Our look at county colleges • 14-22

Inside Fortive Meet the brands behind Everett’s new Fortune 500-level company • 10-11

Real estate: Could median home prices break $400,000? • 5

Final frontier: Firm to bring recycling to space • 6-7 AUGUST 2016 | VOL. 19, NO. 5

Supplement to The Daily Herald

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AUGUST 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Fortive CEO and president Jim Lico, surrounded by other executives and guests, rang the opening bell mid-July for the New York Stock Exchange, Pages 10-11.

COVER STORY

engineering program . . . . . . . . . . 14

Fortive-owned companies may not be household names, but their products have a big impact on everyday life, 10-11

EvCC praised in study for transfer success. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BUSINESS NEWS

EvCC to open major AMTEC expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Peoples Bank opens financial center in Everett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Median home prices could break $400,000 for first time in county. . . . 5 Bothell firm builds recycling machine for International Space Station. . . 6-7 Marysville’s Northside footwear company grows with brand. . . . . . . . 8 Why Vertafore in Bothell sold for so much. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Phelps Tire in Everett acquired by Missouri company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

UW Bothell contributes to the community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

EdCC hopes to secure funding for long-delayed science building . . . . 22

BUSINESS BUILDERS Andrew Ballard: Use these tips to improve sales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Monika Kristofferson: Email etiquette for work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 BUSINESS LICENSES. . . . . . . 26-27 BRIEFS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

CAMPUS OUTLOOK

PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 31

WSU begins high-demand software

ECONOMIC DATA. . . . . . . . . 34-35

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

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Contributing Writers: Doug Parry, Jennifer Sasseen, Deanna Duff Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban. Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Fortive CEO and president Jim Lico stands at his desk at the Fluke campus in Everett. Andy Bronson / The Herald

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CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal. 1638146

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Peoples Bank opens Everett flagship Expansion in county includes $3.4 million financial center By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Peoples Bank has opened the doors on its biggest and splashiest location in Snohomish County. The Everett Financial Center — a $3.4 million, 13,000-square-foot building at the corner of Colby and Everett avenues — will serve as the flagship for the bank’s efforts in the community. “We wanted to be part of the business community of Everett,” said Tony Repanich, one of the bank’s executive vice presidents. “Colby Avenue represents the core and the heart of the business community. So it was important to find a location here.” The financial center at

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Peoples Bank branch manager Natalie Witney and senior vice president commercial team leader Steve Erickson oversee operations at the bank’s new flagship branch at 2702 Colby Ave., Everett.

2702 Colby Ave. replaces a smaller branch about a block away. Peoples Bank, headquartered in Bellingham, has had a presence in the

county for about a decade — with branches in Mill Creek and Snohomish. In the last three years, the bank has made a concerted effort to expand here. The loss of community banks like Frontier, Cascade and City Bank in the county created an opening in the market, Repanich said. “If you look at the change in the financial services landscape over the last few years here in Everett, that really provided an opportunity that didn’t previously exist, because this area was so well-served by community banks,” Repanich said. Now Peoples Bank has two branches in Everett, the financial center and a location at 6920 Evergreen

Way, the Mill Creek and Snohomish branches and an Edmonds branch that opened on June 20. Is the bank seeking to expand even more? “We’re continuing to look, but with adding so many branches over the past year, we really need to make these new investments work,” he said. “We’re a pretty patient, long-term-oriented organization. Slow and steady.” The loss of so many community banks also was an opportunity to attract talented bankers. “We’re a people-led bank, so, if we find the bankers, they have the relationships that bring the customers,” he said One of those bankers is Steve Erickson, senior

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vice president commercial team leader at the financial center. He worked for 34 years at Cascade Bank and lost his job after Irvine, California-headquartered Opus Bank took over. When he was looking at his options, Erickson said he wanted to land at Peoples Bank. “I’ve gone through one acquisition in my life and it was difficult for both me and the customers,” Erickson said. “I wanted to be with a bank that was in it for the long haul and not looking to be acquired by another bank.” Available talent led the bank to open in Edmonds. Peoples Bank branch manager in the city, Vern Woods, spent 20 years working at Cascade Bank and later Opus Bank. “When he was looking to change banks, he actually approached us,” Repanich said. “He made a case that he was a great fit for Peoples and we were great for Edmonds.” The bank is in a temporary location at 111 Main St., Suite 102, while Peoples looks for a permanent site. Everett branch manager and assistant vice president Natalie Witney said she was drawn to Peoples Bank in part because of its emphasis on community involvement. She had worked at Union Bank previously.

“What I’m experiencing is, the business community wants to give back,” Witney said. “They want to revitalize Everett, they want to stimulate the economy here. It’s a lot of fun to connect with those people and help them do that.” Erickson said that Peoples Bank is one of the top 10 community banks in the state in terms of size, with $1.5 billion in assets. “Our size, as far as from a community-bank standpoint, offers a lot to the businesses and consumers within the county,” Erickson said. “We’re large enough to meet many of the requests in the community. We’re extremely well capitalized.” Peoples Bank now has 40 employees working in the county. The Everett Financial Center has 13 employees and is housed in a renovated, two-story building. It will hold training offices for the bank’s county branches. Everett’s Dykeman Architects designed the building. Gaffney Construction was the contractor. “Dykeman architects have been a long-time partner of the bank,” Repanich said. “They have helped us on 20-some facilities around the state; it was really fun to be able to do something significant in their hometown.” Peoples Bank has been open since 1921 and has 26 branches throughout the state, in Snohomish, Island, Whatcom, Skagit, King, Chelan and Douglas counties. The bank survived the recession, in part, because of a risk-management program that focused on ensuring that it wasn’t concentrated on any one line of business. “If you look at the banks that didn’t fare so well, they were heavily concentrated in land acquisition and development,” Repanich said. “While we had some of those loans — and they performed equally as poorly as some of our competitors — we weren’t overweighted in that category. “That was a specific strategy. I don’t think we knew at the time how good of a strategy it was until we saw it in practice.”


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Could home prices surpass $400k? County single-family homes soar over pre-recession prices By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

The house on Rucker Avenue in Everett caught Barb Lamoureux by surprise. It was a century-old, American foursquare home, beautifully restored, said Lamoureux, who owns Lamoureux Real Estate in Everett. The owners hated to part with it, but their business moved south and it didn’t make sense to fight traffic anymore. So they put it on the market this spring priced at $610,000. Lamoureux thought it was a little high. “We staged it beautifully, put it on the market on a Thursday and on Saturday morning I had a call from Georgia and they wanted to buy it right now,” Lamoureux said. The sellers received

four offers and eventually accepted a bid from a Microsoft employee of $635,000. Real estate prices in Snohomish County have risen dramatically over the past year. The market has not only rebounded to surpass pre-recession levels, but the county could soon see the median price of a single-family home climb over $400,000 for the first time ever. “To get close to $400 and probably going to break $400 is higher than I expected it to be,” said Scott Comey, who owns Re/Max Elite, with four offices in Snohomish County and one office in Woodinville. Housing prices reached $395,000 last month for a single-family house, according to Northwest Multiple Listing Service. The highest that the median price for

a single-family house reached before the recession was $382,500 in March 2007. It’s quite the turnaround from five years ago — at the depths of the recession — when the median price for a single-family house was $243,000, Comey said. The numbers reflect only single-family houses, not condominiums. Combined the median prices

for houses and condos was $372,150, according to last month’s numbers. To be sure, the housing market in Snohomish County is heavily affected by location. Houses around Mill Creek, Mukilteo and the North Creek area near Bothell run much higher than homes in the northern part of the county. The median price for

homes in some parts of south county reached up to $550,000. The median prices on closed sales in the area around Arlington and Marysville was $306,500. Everett with its high rental rate — Census numbers peg the city at 55 percent rentals, one of the highest in the state — is still seeing housing prices much lower than the median. Real estate agents caution sellers to realize their home’s value. “What’s really difficult is overcoming this sense that they can put their house on the market and they’re going to get multiple offers and $50,000 over the asking price,” Comey said. While that’s happening, it’s occurring mostly further south. One of the reasons for the uptick in prices is the lack of inventory on the market. According to the numbers released last month, the county had only 1,746 active listings down from 2,310 the year before, or a

24 percent decrease year over year. Another reason for the booming housing market is the strength of the local economy. Boeing continues to thrive with contracts for orders well into the future. “We might have a slight correction at some point,” Comey said. “I don’t think it’s anytime in the near future.” He notes that foreclosures are down so much that Fannie Mae has canceled most of its contracts with listing agents in the county. And he doesn’t think that the current housing upswing is a bubble like during the recession. Neither does Lamoureux. She said people are moving into Everett and the rest of Snohomish County because it’s affordable. While the prices are escalating, jobs support it. “These kids work for Microsoft, Amazon and Zillow,” Lamoureux said. “They make a lot of money.”

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Firm to recycle ‘sporks in space’ By Patricia Guthrie

Tethers Unlimited, Inc.

For The Herald Business Journal

Can recycling be successfully launched in outer space? Tethers Unlimited, Inc., a Bothell-based aerospace technology company, plans to find out when its recycling/3D printing system is tested aboard the International Space Station. The company has been awarded a NASA contract to develop and deliver a Positrusion Recycler to sterilize and recycle plastic waste such as packaging materials, utensils, trays and food storage containers into high-quality 3D filament. Dirty plastic dinnerware will ultimately be turned into satellite components, replacement parts, and astronaut tools via a high-quality 3D printer, creating the first “closed-cycle” in-space manufacturing system. The recycler will be combined with a 3D

Private aerospace company in Bothell involved in research, development, manufacturing; contracts with the military and NASA. Founded in 1994 by Robert Hoyt and the late science fiction author, Robert L. Forward.

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Robert Hoyt holds a roll of 3D printer filament as he talks with Rachel Muhlbauer in the lab. They’ve been working on a recycler for the International Space Station that turns plastic waste into the filament.

printer in a payload for the Space Station dubbed the Refabricator, or as it’s known around the laboratory of Tethers Unlimited, “recycling sporks in space.” The process also helps minimize exposure of astronauts to harmful microbes because utensils

and food containers are not re-used but sterilized and recycled, said Robert Hoyt, CEO of Tethers and its division, Firmamentum. “We needed to make it as completely automated and completely safe as possible,” Hoyt explained. “Astronauts’ time is more

valuable than gold. They are extremely busy on missions.” The company has successfully run the device through a few manufacturing cycles in its sprawling laboratory. Performance in zero gravity is another matter. That could come in early 2017 when the

Refabricator makes a long-distance delivery to the International Space Station. Recycling would also benefit space travel of the future on trips that would last years. “On a manned mission to Mars, the astronauts must bring everything they need with them,” said Jesse Cushing, principal investigator for the Refabricator effort. “Due to the incredibly high cost of launching mass to Mars, carrying every tool or replacement part that they might possibly need simply isn’t affordable. The Refabricator will demonstrate the ability to recycle plastic parts and waste to make new parts and tools

on-demand.” What to do with intergalactic garbage has vexed space travelers since the first moon landing. Since it costs about $10,000 for every pound of weight launched into orbit, figuring out how to re-use what’s already on board saves money, Hoyt explains. Recycling also saves interior space, points out mechanical engineer Kristen Turner, who is leading the food-safe utensil recycling project. “Currently, astronauts use disposable wet wipes to clean their utensils and food containers after use,” Turner said. “These wet wipes then become trash that must be stowed, and

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they have to be resupplied on cargo launches. The logistics of supplying and disposing of those cleaners for a two-year manned Mars mission would be a real challenge.” Funding for the system is from NASA’s Small Business Innovation Research program and is one of numerous awards the space technology company has received from the government since its 1994 founding by Hoyt and Robert L. Forward. Forward, a physicist and science fiction writer, who died in 2002, is known for his research on gravitational radiation astronomy and advanced space propulsion. Hoyt met Forward as a University of Washington graduate student and became intrigued with Forward’s research on long cables used for propulsion and stabilization of satellites, known as space tethers. “I didn’t know what I was getting myself into,” Hoyt says, sitting at his office desk surrounded by three computer screens showing space-age diagrams and images. Fast forward 22 years. The company now has 33 employees and moved into its current location at 1711 N. Creek Parkway S, No. D113, in a Bothell industrial park 12 years ago. Advanced space propulsion systems and programmable radios for small satellites are among its technological inventions for space and defense missions. The company has also just been awarded three new contracts from the military totaling $1.25 million to develop radio and antenna signals for high-bandwidth data that would use a system of smaller, affordable satellites. Called SWIFT transceivers, the system would be used by the U.S. Army. “Currently Army tactical operations rely upon a few large, very high-cost satellite systems for communications services,” said Daniel Reuster, director of Product Integration for Tethers. But using a system of “nanosatellites” with multi-band capabilities would improve communications services for troops. Space travel was strictly a government gig when Hoyt and Forward started Tethers Unlimited Inc. NASA and the

“Due to the incredibly high cost of launching mass to Mars, carrying every tool or replacement part that they might possibly need simply isn’t affordable.” — Robert Hoyt federal government were the main research and development contractors back then. The two men worked first as consultants out of their homes, then formed the company as a partnership, then as a private corporation. Hoyt admits the trajectory of the company hasn’t exactly

“worked out as we originally planned.” The early years were “getting more and more depressing” when NASA’s future was ‘doom and gloom.’ But then came new satellite technology and the concept of commercializing space. Now, how to rocket ordinary people

(with gobs of money) into outer space has put a new spark — and definition — into the space race. The company also tries to find earthly applications for its far-out sounding devices. For example, the recycling system could be the solution to the piles of

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

packaging material that come with every item ordered online and delivered to your door. Maybe one day Amazon’s pesky packing material will be re-purposed into your next Starbucks to-go cup. And your future weather forecast might actually be accurate because of the nanosatellite/radio data system being developed by the Bothell company. These mini satellites, about the size of a loaf of bread, have evolved in 10 years from “toys that didn’t do too much” into the basis for the creation

of dozens of new start-up tech businesses. Mini-satellite systems would provide much better weather imaging and information for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hoyt explained. “Now, two or three huge (multi-billion-dollar) satellites collect weather data,” he said. “But a constellation of small satellites will be constantly updating weather data. It will dramatically improve weather forecasting.” Now, wouldn’t that be out of this world?

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Shoe company grows into bigger digs Marysville’s Northside expands with popularity of brand By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

MARYSVILLE ­— Outdoor footwear company Northside aims to appeal to people interested in “the other side of the outside.” Almost every outdoor company features hard-core adventurers in its marketing. Northside chases those people who want to go outside, but maybe not jump off a cliff. “It’s really about going to the beach with your kids, going camping, kind of the lighter side of recreation,” said Jack Wolfin, president of Triple T Trading, which owns Northside. “Not everyone wants to climb a mountain.” It’s a niche that seems to be working. Northside moved last month into a 110,000-square-foot office and warehouse building at 4025 152nd St. NE Marysville, constructed specifically for its business. The Northside logo appears in giant letters on the exterior. Northside, owned by Wolfin and brothers Jeff and Bob Thayer, had been doing business in relative anonymity at a 30,000-square-foot building near Quil Ceda Village. The company sells its hiking boots, snow boots and sandals through retailers in 50 states, including Fred Meyer, Amazon, Sportsman’s Warehouse, Nordstrom Rack and a host of independent retailers. Wolfin declined to disclose sales figures, but says the company has moved into the mid-tier of shoe brands. “We would just say we sell millions of pairs of shoes a year,” Wolfin said. The company employs 37 people in Marysville, including five in its shoe design department. The company also employs another 14 through an import business called Fortune Star International in China, where the shoes are made. The company works with another 25 independent sales representatives. Triple T Trading was started by the Thayers parents, Jim and Helen Thayer. They owned a couple of children’s retail stores in the Portland area in the 1980s called Whippersnappers. Jim Thayer was invited to start representing brands to other retailers. Eventually, that led him to buying and selling to other retailers wholesale products — shoes, sunglasses and almost anything. Jeff and Bob Thayer remember stacks of boxes on the family’s Ping-Pong table. That eventually morphed into an import business where Jim Thayer made contacts with factories in Taiwan and China. “In the beginning, he would go over and pick and choose some of the things that some of the factories had developed,” Bob Thayer said. “We started to focus on things that our customers were looking for.” As the company grew, Jim and Helen

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Purchasing manager Scott Carpenter picks out a shoe along a wall at Northside in Marysville. The outdoor footwear company recently opened the new 110,000-square-foot office-warehouse complex to consolidate operations.

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Jack Wolfin, president of Triple T Trading, which owns Northside, inside his company’s new warehouse in Marysville.

Thayer moved the business first to Tukwila and then later to Marysville. The parents still live in the Warm Beach area. Wolfin came onto the company in 2004 and along with the Jeff and Bob Thayer bought out the parents in 2005. The Northside brand was founded in 2000, but the Thayers and Wolfin changed the company from an import business to one that was creating and marketing its own brand of shoes. “As we looked forward, the whole plan was to find an opportunity in the marketpalace where that brand could fit,” Wolfin said. “It turns out to be everyday families who want to go out and enjoy the outdoors.” The Pacific Northwest is a great place to start an outdoor shoe company, Wolfin said. With Nike, Columbia and Keen

shoe companies based in Portland and Adidas running its North American headquarters out of the city, there’s a “very large contingent of footware-centric talent and experience” to draw upon, he said. With that being said, wouldn’t those large companies see the niche that Northside is carving and go after those customers? “I think with the big companies, a lot of them are like a big ship,” Bob Thayer said. “It takes a long time and a lot of effort to turn that thing.” Northside also works hard to build shoes at a lower cost than some of its larger rivals, Wolfin said. He said that it’s easier to design a $140 shoe, because there are lots of options that can be added. To try to keep the cost under $100 takes more effort.

The company also takes pride in helping its customers. Part of that is having an extensive network of relationships that their dad built in Asia, Jeff Thayer said. He points to Fred Meyer, one of the first major retailers to take on the Northside brand. “I think they’ve had great success selling our products over the years,” Jeff Thayer said. “I think one thing that attests to that is we’ve actually won Vendor of the Year twice with Fred Meyer and we’re pretty proud of that. ” When the company was looking to expand, Wolfin and the Thayers looked for existing buildings in Everett and also in Kent, which has easy access to the ports of Seattle and Tacoma. They chose to stay in Marysville to be close to where their employees live. “The majority of our employees are up here,” Wolfin said. “At the end of the day, the company is made of employees.” Jim Thayer actually found the property, had the offices and warehouse built and is leasing it to his sons and Wolfin. Gaffney Construction did the construction, which was in the $10 million to $12 million range. The wood-trimmed building is still spacious and bare. Spacious because the company expects to grow into the building. Bare, because the Department of Energy, a Seattle-based design firm, is coming to outfit it with an outdoorsy motif. The property is down a two-lane road. The building faces an empty field. “It’s kind of the middle of nowherish,” Wolfin said. “It’s nice when we have clear weather, we have a view of Mount Pilchuck down there. It’s just a nice area. We’re an outdoor company. We like being kind of out here.”


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COVER STORY

Under the Fortive umbrella By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

C

hances are you’ve used a Fortive product and you didn’t even know it. Stop at a convenience store, get a tire changed or drink a glass a milk. One of the companies owned by Fortive could very well have made the gas pumps at the store, the wheel balancer at the shop or the sensor that made sure your milk was safe to consume. Fortive is the new Fortune 500-level company that opened its corporate headquarters in Everett last month. Few of the companies owned by Fortive are household names, but they all make products that directly or indirectly have a big impact on modern life. Fortive, which is trading on the New York Stock exchange under the ticker symbol FTV, is a spin-off from industrial giant Danaher, a Washington, D.C.-based company that has grown into one of the world’s biggest businesses by acquiring smaller companies. Danaher made the decision to break into two companies last year after a $13.8 billion merger with the Pall Corp. Fortive — the name is derived from the Latin root ‘fort’ which means strong — kept the businesses involved in industrial technologies and test and measurements. Danaher retained companies focused on life sciences, health and dental. “The strategic rationale was that Danaher was going down the path of a different business model,” said Jim Lico, Fortive’s president and CEO, in an interview last month. “We often referred to it as razor-razor blades. You sell an instrument and then a set of consumables over time. If you look at all the businesses in Danaher, they all look like that.” Fortive’s businesses build products that are generally bought a single time. “The opportunity to create Fortive as this industrial growth company focused on instruments, components and equipment, we think was a unique opportunity.” Lico said. In the split, Fortive brought along 25 companies that employ 24,000 people worldwide and did $6.2 billion worth of business last year, enough revenue to rank the new company among the largest in the nation as well as one of the biggest in the state. Fortive’s companies include Everett’s Fluke Corp. Fortive established its corporate offices at Fluke’s campus at 6920 Seaway Blvd. Lico, along with one of Fortive’s senior vice presidents, Barbara Hulit, are former presidents at Fluke. The move is seen as a boon for Everett. Although the headquarters only brings a small number of jobs — just more than 50 — attracting a Fortune-500 level company brings a cachet to Snohomish County, said John Monroe, Economic Alliance Snohomish County’s chief operations officer.

COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Jim Lico, second from right, president and CEO of Fortive Corporation, with Stacey Cunningham, chief operating officer of the New York Stock Exchange. Fortive opened its corporate headquarters in Everett in July.

“It has to help us in the future recruit other Fortune 500 companies or get in the running for a Fortune 800 company,” Monroe said. “These guys know what they’re doing and they go through an evaluation and make a decision to establish a facility on a site. “They’ve done their business work. They’ve done their due diligence.” Fortive is also opening its in-house training and leadership courses — what it calls the Fortive Business System University — at the Fluke campus. Employees from around the world will travel to Everett to learn at the Fortive offices. Fortive will follow in Danaher’s footsteps in important ways. For one, Fortive won’t put its brand on any of the products under its umbrella. It will let its own businesses stand on the reputations they build in their fields. And Fortive, like Danaher, expects to grow. Fortive says in its report to investors that it has a bias toward mergers and acquisition. “One of the things that gets investors interested in Fortive is the fact that we have a strong dedication to growth both in an organic way and inorganic way through acquisitions,” Lico said. To that effect, Fortive brings a wealth of experience and expertise. Fortive’s senior managers, who are veterans of Danaher, have made more than 200 acquisitions, according to Bloomberg News. The spinoff has the power to make $3

billion of acquisitions over the next two or three years, Lico said. Still growing for growth’s sake is not the goal, Lico said. “I’m always focused on building a better company not a bigger company,” Lico said. “I think Danaher has gotten bigger from a dedication and commitment for being better.” Here are some of the bigger companies under the Fortive umbrella:

Headquarters: Fultonville, New York (European headquarters: Egg an der Günz, Germany) Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: www.anderson-negele.com/ Anderson-Negele is a global instrumentation company that provides hygienic instrumentation and services for food, beverage and life sciences processors. Founded in 1930, the Anderson Instrument Company repaired and then later made chart recorders for pasteurization of milk. In 2004, Anderson joined with Germany-based Negele Messtechnik GmbH. Anderson-Negele focuses on sanitary solutions that fulfills its role as a guardian of safe food, beverage and life sciences processing.

Headquarters: Everett Employees: 2,400 Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: www.fluke.com/ Fluke manufactures, distributes and services electronic test tools and software. Since its founding in 1948, Fluke has provided testing and troubleshooting in manufacturing and service industries. Typical customers and users include technicians, engineers, metrologists, medical-device manufacturers, and computer network professionals. Fluke has achieved the No. 1 or No. 2 position in every market in which it competes. Fluke Corporation has authorized distributor and manufacturer representatives in more than 100 countries.

Headquarters: Plainville Connecticut Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: www.gemssensors.com/ Gems founder Edward H. Moore


AUGUST 2016

developed a level indicator in his basement in 1955 and patented it in 1959. Gems designs and manufactures a broad portfolio of liquid level, flow switches and pressure switches, sensors and transducers, miniature solenoid valves and pre-assembled fluidic systems. Research and development teams simulate actual application environments. Each fluidic component and sub-assembly is individually designed and pre-tested for specific applications from liquid to pneumatic, cryogenic to high temperature or vacuum to high-pressure systems.

Largest companies in Washington Here are the largest publicly traded companies in Washington based on market capitalization as of July 22. Microsoft — $444.7 billion Amazon — $351.5 billion Starbucks — $84.8 billion Costco — $73.4 billion T-Mobile — $37.4 billion Weyerhaeuser — $24.2 billion Paccar — $19.3 billion manufacturing, aim to deliver products that are practical and marketable.

Headquarters: Greensboro, North Carolina Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.gilbarco.com/us/ Gilbarco Veeder-Root is producer of technology for retail petroleum and commercial fueling industries. The company works with 19 of the top 20 convenience store operators in the U.S., providing gas pumps, point of sale and operation management systems for convenience stores from the forecourt — where the pumps are located — to the store.

Headquarters: LaVergne, Tennessee Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.hennessyind.com/ Hennessy Industries produces aftermarket wheel-service equipment, including tire changers, balancer, weights and brakes lathes. Hennessy designs, builds and markets equipment, accessories and consumables under brand names: Ammco, Coats and Bada. Ammco has been manufacturing brake lathes since 1922. In 1947, Gil Coats first designed a wheel holder for changing tractor tires in his farm-implement business. For more than 50 years, Bada has provided selections of wheel weights, and is leading the transitioning from lead to environmentally friendly alternative, steel.

Headquarters: Mount Waverly, Australia Employees: 300 Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: www.invetech.com.au/ Invetech makes products and custom automation systems for a broad range of market sectors, including laboratory diagnostics, point-of-care diagnostics, cell therapy, life sciences, industrial and consumer products. Its staff of more than 300, with expertise in innovative design, engineering and

Headquarters: Bloomfield, Connecticut Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.jacobsvehiclesystems. com/ Jacobs Vehicle Systems has been in the engine braking industry in the United States for more than 50 years. Jacobs says it provides the high-quality, high-performance, reliable engine retarders — devices used to augment or replace some of the functions of primary friction-based brakes, usually on heavy vehicles, especially going downhill. Jacobs touts itself as the industry leader in new engine retarding and engine valve actuation developments.

Headquarters: Radford, Virginia Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.kollmorgen.com/en-us/ home/ Kollmorgen is a provider of motion systems and components for machine builders around the globe with more than 70 years of motion control design and application expertise. The companies motors, drives and controls can be found on Mars and in space; ships and submarines; oil and gas drilling; surgical robots and laser eye surgery; even inside of artificial hearts.

Headquarters: Stow, Ohio Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.matcotools.com/ Matco Tools manufactures and distributes automotive repair tools, diagnostic equipment and toolboxes. The company,

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

measurement, electronic transformer monitors and liquid level gauges.

Expedia — $17.4 billion Fortive — $17 billion Expeditors International of Washington — $9.1 billion F5 Networks — $8.3 billion Alaska Air — $8 billion Nordstrom — $7 billion Zillow — $6.9 billion Seattle Genetics — $6.2 billion Tableau Software — $4.3 billion Source: Nasdaq which started in 1946, has a product line that numbers more than 13,000 items. Matco distributors operate in all 50 states, Canada and Puerto Rico.

Headquarters: Chandler, Arizona Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: https://psemc.com/ Pacific Science EMC builds pyrotechnic and safety devices or electronic and laser ordnance firing systems for commercial and military aircraft. Established in 1975, the company’s products range from fire extinguishing to parachue deployment.

Headquarters: West Chester, Pennsylvania Segment: Indutrial technologies Website: www.portescap.com/ Portescap builds motors for a variety of industries including medical devices. The company has more than 70 years of experience “providing motion solutions to put precise power in the smallest places.” The company partners with customers across the globe in every phase of their product design — from selecting an optimal motion solution to customizing products to meet their customer’s application needs.

Headquarters: Fairport, New York Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: n/a Established in 1945, Qualitrol is a leading supplier of protection instruments used on transformers, an electrical device that transfers electricity between two or more circuits through electromagnetic induction. The company’s products include oil and winding thermometers, pressure relief and pressure monitors, fiber optic direct winding temperature

Headquarters:Boxborough, Massachusetts Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: www.setra.com/ Founded in 1967, Setra Systems is a leading designer and manufacturer of pressure, acceleration, and weight-sensing devices. Setra has devoted its engineering and research efforts to the development of transducers and systems based on the highly accurate variable capacitive transduction principle.

Headquarters: Beaverton, Oregon Segment: Professional instrumentation Website: www.tek.com/ Tektronix has been around for 65 years. The company supports scientists, engineers and technicians around the world by manufacturing test and measurement devices such as oscilloscopes, logic analyzers and video and mobile test protocol equipment. It’s equipment is used in health, communication, mobility and space.

Headquarters: Glenview, Illinois Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.teletracnavman.com/ Teletrac Navman equips businesses with advanced data tools for location tracking, fuel monitoring, reporting, safety and compliance — all via one platform. Teletrac Navman currently tracks more than 500,000 vehicles owned by over 40,000 organizations on six continents, making it one of the world’s largest fleet management providers. The company has offices in the U.S., Mexico, Europe, New Zealand and Australia.

Headquarters: Radford, Virginia Segment: Industrial technologies Website: www.thomsonlinear.com Thomson invented anti-friction linear technology more than 60 years ago. The company’s products range from linear bearings to actuators to clutches and brakes. The products are distributed by more than 2,000 businesses around the world. Source: Fortive


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Why Bothell’s Vertafore is so valuable Deal seen as one of largest ever for insurance technology

are looking to hire at many of our offices, including Bothell.

provider

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

BOTHELL — Insurance technology provider Vertafore, which is headquartered in Bothell, was purchased by two private equity firms in early July. Bain Capital Private Equity and Vista Equity Partners acquired Vertafore from TPG Capital. The terms of the deal weren’t disclosed, but Reuters previously reported that the deal values the insurance software provider at $2.7 billion, including debt. Vertafore provides software for more than 500,000 insurance professionals nationwide. The company has about 1,300 total employees, around 475 of which are based in Bothell. The company was founded in Texas in 1969 and moved its headquarters to Bothell in 2005. Vertafore’s Vice President of Marketing Guy Weismantel responded to questions through email about the deal and the future of Vertafore.

JIM DAVIS / THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Two private equity firms purchased Bothell’s Vertafore in July for a reported price that values the insurance technology provider at $2.7 billion.

What does the acquisition mean for Vertafore? Vertafore is operating business-as-usual. Although we have new ownership, we are still executing on our aggressive growth goals for the second half of 2016 and we’re moving forward with our plans to help our customers. Our customers rely on our technology and services to run their businesses, and we’re totally

committed to helping them — nothing has changed there. What will this allow the company to do in the future? This ownership group will help us zero-in on the technology that matters for insurance professionals today, including mobile, cloud-based solutions, and data aggregation and analytics software. They bring extensive

experience in the insurance technology space to Vertafore, as well as fantastic research and resources from across their portfolio companies that we’ll be able to leverage. Will this mean an expansion in Bothell? We haven’t discussed what this means for Bothell or any specific site, but we have aggressive growth aspirations and

What does Vertafore’s software do for insurance professionals? Vertafore’s technology is designed to help insurance professionals prepare their businesses for digital disruption and thrive in an increasingly competitive market. We currently offer dozens software solutions, from comprehensive agency management systems to content management workflow solutions to the first customer relationship management (CRM) platform designed for the insurance industry. We integrate our software products under a cloud-based platform that is flexible to meet the needs of any insurance professional looking to increase revenue, increase profitability, service the customer, and make more informed decisions during a time of industry disruption. Reuters is reporting that the deal was for $2.7 billion. Why is Vertafore considered so valuable? We’re not commenting on the acquisition price of the deal, but we do believe this is the largest investment ever in the insurance technology space. We have seen an

exponential increase in investment from venture capitalists, private equity firms, and even other technology companies in the insurance technology industry. As consumers continue to demand updated and modern services from every industry, insurance is seen as a market with the potential for extreme growth in technology adoption. How much revenue did the company earn last year? As a private company, we don’t disclose our revenue numbers. What type of market share does Vertafore hold? We hold a majority market share in our key markets: agency management software, benefits software, rating software, content management software for carriers, and compliance and regulation solutions. Those are all strengths of the company. What are Vertafore’s competitors? We have a wide range of competitors given the breadth of our product line. From small start-ups to legacy providers of insurance technology, there are over 40 companies that form our competitive set.

Everett’s Phelps Tire acquired by Missouri company Deal brings together two family-owned companies By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Phelps Tire, which is headquartered in Everett and has eight locations in Washington and Alaska, has been purchased by a Missouri tire company. The acquisition by Purcell Tire and Service Center brings together two family-owned companies which provide “excellent service and quality products,” said Bob Purcell, owner of Purcell

Tire and Service Center, in a statement. “We are excited about the prospects that the Phelps expansion provides and the markets that it opens to our retreading and commercial footprint,” he said. The sales price wasn’t disclosed. Phelps will operate as Phelps-Purcell Tire until the end of the year. In 2017, all locations will change to Purcell Tire. Phelps Tire was founded in 1947 by the grandfather of current company president, Jim Phelps.

JIM DAVIS / THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Phelps Tire, which is headquartered in Everett, is being sold to a Missouri tire company.

The company specializes in commercial, off the road and retread services. Phelps Tire is located at 3821 Railway Ave. in

Everett. The other Washington locations are in Seattle, Mount Vernon, Renton and Tacoma. There are three Phelps

locations in Alaska: Anchorage, Fairbanks and Wasilla. All Phelps locations are Tire Industry Association-certified dealerships and are part of the Michelin Commercial Services network. Jim Phelps will continue as a consultant until the merger is complete. The reason for selling was because he wanted to retire and there was no one in his family to take over. Purcell Tire was opened in 1936 by Robert M. Purcell in Washington, Missouri. His son and daughterin-law, Bob and Juanita Purcell, have expanded the company to nearly 80

locations, four retread plants and a fleet of trucks that provide pick-up and delivery service to 41 states. This acquisition gives Phelps its first presence in the Pacific Northwest. The company already has operations in Missouri, Arkansas, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Illinois, Texas, and Nevada. Purcell Tire said it is now ranked as the third-largest independent commercial tire dealership in North America, the nation’s largest retreader for offthe-road tires and one of the 10 largest independent tire store chains in the United States.


AUGUST 2016

EDMONDS COMM EDMONDS

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

UNITY UNITY

EDMONDS COMM COLLEGE COMM EDMONDS COMM COLLEGE COLLEGE COLLEGE

UNITY th UNITY th th th

anniversary anniversary

Est.1967 1967anniversary Est. Est. 1967 anniversary Est. 1967

Edmonds CC CC 50th Edmonds 50thAnniversary Anniversary Edmonds CC 50th Anniversary Kickoff Celebration Kickoff Edmonds CC Celebration 50th Anniversary

Kickoff Celebration Kickoff Celebration

Friday, September 16 | 4-9 p.m. | Triton Field Friday, September 16 | 4-9 p.m. | Triton Field Friday, 16 we | 4-9 | Triton Field EdmondsSeptember CC is turning 50 and wantp.m. to celebrate with you! Friday, CC September 4-9want p.m. | Tritonwith Field Edmonds is turning 5016 and| we to celebrate you! Edmonds CC is turning 50 and we want to celebrate with you! Listen to music through the decadeswith from Edmonds CC live is turning 50 and we want to celebrate you!The Listen music through thedecades decadesfrom from The Afrodisiacs, The Burg, and more Listentotolive live music through the The Listen to live music through the decades from The Afrodisiacs, The Burg, and more Afrodisiacs, The Burg, and more Enjoy food from local food trucks and drinks from Afrodisiacs, The Burg, and more our no hostfrom beer and Enjoy food food trucksand anddrinks drinks from Enjoy food fromlocal localwine foodgarden trucks from Enjoy food from local food trucks and drinks from our nonohost beer and garden our host beer and wine garden Celebrate 50 years of wine student success and being our no host beer and wine garden a part of your community Celebrate50 50years years of of student student success and being Celebrate success and being Celebrate 50 years of student success and being a partofofyour yourcommunity community a part a part of your community

For more information, visit edcc.edu/50 or on Facebook Forfacebook.com/edmondscc. more information, visit at more information, visit visit ForFor more information, edcc.edu/50 or on Facebook edcc.edu/50ororon onFacebook Facebook edcc.edu/50 at facebook.com/edmondscc. at facebook.com/edmondscc. at facebook.com/edmondscc. 1656437


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

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CAMPUS OUTLOOK

WSU adds in-demand software engineering Program to prepare students for jobs that pay six-figure salaries By Doug Parry

For The Herald Business Journal

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Bolong Zeng will serve as clinical assistant professor and program coordinator for the new software engineering program at Washington State University in Everett.

Dean Paul Pitre. “This program will help meet that demand from local businesses and give students more opportunities.” Deborah Squires, director of the Snohomish STEM Network, said that like WSU Everett’s other programs, software engineering will play an important role in adding to the local talent pool. “In our own county, we are quickly

approaching the point where 90 percent of unfilled jobs will be in STEM fields and health care,” she said, noting that WSU Everett “has made wise choices in degree programs that provide students with a quality education and align with high-demand careers.” Timing presents a challenge for Assistant Professor Bolong Zeng, coordinator of the new program. It earned its official accreditation in mid-July, giving the university a late start on advertising and recruiting students for classes that begin at the end of August. As a result, this year’s class likely will be in the single digits, but Zeng expects no trouble getting to 20-25 students by the 2017-18 academic year. He said he’s been encouraged by the amount of unsolicited interest in the program, especially after a WSU Everett team took second place in a recent Mars rover competition against universities from around the world. “About a dozen students have already emailed us without any formal advertising,” Zeng said. “They are looking at us as a local opportunity and they have heard the reputation of WSU North Puget Sound at Everett. Especially with the recent Mars

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EVERETT — It’s a matter of simple economics ­— supply and demand. The short supply of software engineers has put them in heavy demand among the aerospace and technology giants in the Puget Sound area. At a median salary that exceeds $100,000, such jobs pay more in Seattle than anywhere else in the United States after accounting for the cost of living, according to a July report from Glassdoor. Still, thousands of jobs sit unfilled every day. For Washington State University, this presents an opportunity at its Everett campus, which aligns its programs to meet the needs of the Puget Sound area’s aerospace and technology industries. It recently began accepting students to its new software engineering degree program, which is ramping up quickly to begin classes in late August. “Our state leads the nation in the creation of STEM jobs, but we aren’t producing those graduates,” said WSU Everett

rover competition, we have put ourselves on the map.” WSU Everett graduated 54 students in the spring in its mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, hospitality business management and integrated strategic communication programs. It expects that number to exceed 100 for the next academic year. Its programs are designed to be cost-effective for local students, with community colleges serving as a pipeline to WSU in Everett. Students take their initial two years of requirements at a lower cost, then transfer for their upper-level courses to complete their degrees. After their junior and senior years, they emerge with a WSU degree in a job market that’s eager to welcome them. WSU Everett is the first public university in Washington to offer a bachelor’s degree specifically in software engineering, which is a sister discipline to computer science with an emphasis on real-world problem solving. WSU Everett is searching for a second faculty member to join Zeng in software engineering. The program will also have teaching support from mechanical engineering and electrical engineering faculty in Everett and adjunct faculty who are professionals in the field. Students also have access to classes from the electrical engineering and computer science faculty in Pullman using video conferencing and online classes. Even when it reaches its initial goal of 20-25 students per cohort, the program will remain small enough to give students a more intimate educational experience than they might get in a large computer science program with hundreds of students. Working closely with students is one thing that attracted Zeng, who earned his Ph.D. last spring from WSU in Pullman. “I really love this area and these topics, and I love teaching students. I was informed about this opportunity on the Everett campus and I jumped on it,” he said. “There’s no doubt in me that this will be a huge success in the years to come.”

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

EvCC lauded for transfer success By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

Daniel Parrish’s path to college required more than SAT prep and personal essays. After high school graduation, he was responsible for himself financially — housing, food and any future tuition. His dream was to attend the University of Washington, but costs were overwhelming. “I know the value of a dollar. Going to Everett Community College and eventually transferring was the best bet,” Parrish says. “I worked at Fred Meyer and graduated without any debt from EvCC. Actually, I came out ahead.” Parish earned an Engineering Transfer Associate of Science Degree which is designed for students intending to transfer to four-year universities. It streamlines the process by ensuring students take the needed, applicable courses. A checklist is provided to track progress. “I had the same sheet for years and just kept checking off classes. Everything transferred without any problems,” says 23-year-old Parrish. He graduated from UW this summer and will continue his mechanical engineering studies as part of their master’s program. A 2016 report by the Apsen Institute and Columbia University’s Community College Research Center spotlighted EvCC for its long-term, successful efforts to help students navigate the transfer process. EvCC launched a campaign in 2006 to improve the process. At the time, data indicated that of 4,000 students with intent to transfer to a four-year school, fewer than 400 eventually did. After focused effort, EvCC’s student transfer rate increased 47 percent between 2007 and 2012. Additionally, the fouryear bachelor’s degree graduation rate increased 57 percent between 2007 and 2010. “One thing we did was move towards more mandatory advising,” says John Olson, EvCC’s vice president of College Advancement. “For new, degree-seeking students, they need to see an adviser in their first year. If they haven’t after their third quarter, there is a block on their registration. It’s a good incentive to pursue advising.” Advisers review the student’s records, ascertain fields of interest and begin discussing four-year schools. More faculty were trained in transfer advising and additional web-based resources were created. A degree audit checklist — such as the one Parrish used — were made more widely available. According to Olson, many programs — such as engineering, nursing and pre-med — already offered comprehensive transfer advising and had close working relationships with many four-year schools. EvCC’s goal was to implement similar efforts across all disciplines and with increased uniformity.

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Daniel Parrish stands in a lab at the University of Washington Mechanical Engineering Annex Building. Parrish, an Everett Community College graduate, transferred to the UW where he now is pursuing a master’s degree.

“I know the value of a dollar. Going to Everett Community College and eventually transferring was the best bet.” — Daniel Parrish More efforts are on the horizon. This summer, EvCC was one of five Washington state colleges to receive a a $500,000 Guided Pathways grant from College Spark Washington and the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. Guided Pathways is an evidence-based system that helps students determine their field of study and simplifies course choices. The result benefits students whether their goal is an associate’s degree, bachelor’s or entering the workforce. “We’re looking to limit the smorgasbord of options so there aren’t so many confusing choices. We want to work harder to guide students down the correct pathways. That includes not only course advising, but also student services and financial guidance,” Olson says. EvCC is also implementing the concept of a “meta major.” Even if a student only expresses an inclination toward broad categories — general sciences or arts — that will be used as a first step toward narrowing choices. EvCC does not want any student falling through cracks of being categorized as “completely undecided.” Olson foresees a five-year time frame for wider implementation of Guided Pathways.

Diane Brown, psychology instructor and head of EvCC’s Social Sciences department, began Guided Pathways data collection in April. She surveyed Washington’s five major public universities and 13 private state universities regarding their psychology department offerings. Information ranged from degree options to deadlines, specific class requirements and how transfer credits are applied. “I often found myself answering student questions that were questions I had myself,” Brown says. “As I was combing through university websites and navigating who to contact for answers, it was sometimes a challenge even for me. Imagine if you’re an undergrad student just starting out.” The result, Guided Pathways Start to Finish Psychology Majors, distills her findings into an easy reference guide that includes a school-by-school comparison chart. An abbreviated version for students will be available online by this fall. A more detailed version will be provided internally to advisers. Four-year universities appreciate close collaborations with community colleges such as EvCC. Western Washington University is a primary transfer school for EvCC. Approximately 33 percent of all new Western students are transfers.

“Especially for institutions like Western that are competitive (for acceptance), we’re more likely to admit students who are prepared to enter seamlessly,” says Jeanne Gaffney, Western’s associate director of Admissions and interim international admissions adviser. Western offers more than 160 majors, so advance planning is critical. “There is a tendency to think of twoand four-year degrees as sequential, but the planning really needs to overlap,” Gaffney says. “There are things students can do during community college that greatly helps navigate the four-year experience.” A reverse transfer program is another enticing option. Some students transfer from community to a four-year college before completing their associate’s degree. In those cases, students can complete the remaining courses at the four-year institution and transfer the needed credits to their previous community college to fulfill their associate’s degree. “Washington is a great state for students pursuing transfers. Two- and fouryear institutions are very cooperative,” Gaffney says. The end result is widening educational opportunities for as many students as possible. Parrish is the first in his family to graduate from college, but likely not the last. “My older brother is following in my footsteps. He’s at EvCC pursuing engineering on the same path,” Parrish says. “Community college is just so great for people who need that support and for a lower price.”


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

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Why EvCC?

“WITHOUT EVCC, I WOULDN'T BE THE PERSON I AM TODAY.” Everett Community College is working harder than ever to help students succeed in college. And, we’re receiving national recognition for it. EvCC is: Leading the way with helping students transfer to four-year schools.

One of the nation's top 150 community colleges.

Anthony Ansay EvCC Class of 2016 Bachelor's Degree in Business Class of 2018

A national leader in student success.

FIND OUT MORE EverettCC.edu/Leader Everett Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age.

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Everett Community College earns national recognition for student success

A

nthony Ansay knows succeeding in college isn’t always easy.

To earn his associate degree in business, he needed 18 required classes. He also had to decide early where he wanted to transfer because more classes were needed for certain colleges. He turned to EvCC Counselor Christine Sullivan, staff at the Student LIFE office and Running Start Director Bernita Bontrager. “Without all of them, I wouldn’t be able to navigate through my new environment and the educational system,” said Ansay, who graduated in June 2016 and plans to earn his bachelor’s degree in business. His success, and the success of thousands of students like him, is earning EvCC national recognition.

Everett Community College PROFILE INSTITUTION TYPE: TWO-YEAR, COMMUNITY COLLEGE

NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 19,610 IN 2015-16

student success leader in 2014 by Achieving the Dream for its commitment to student completion and closing achievement gaps.

The college has seen success with start-to-finish advising and the addition of a required college success class. The college has also increased tutoring, created a peer mentoring program and is “I am very happy doing more to help precollege students transition that I chose EvCC to college-level classes.

because without the help of this institution and the people I had the chance to meet and interact with, I wouldn’t be the person I am today.”

In the past two years, EvCC has earned attention for efforts to improve student success, raise graduation rates, and help students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. In January, The Aspen Institute College Excellence Program named EvCC one of the nation’s top 150 community colleges. Then in May, the Community College Research Center and the Aspen Institute identified EvCC as one of six colleges in the country leading the way in helping students like Ansay successfully transfer to four-year schools. The report also praises the University of Washington and Western Washington University as EvCC partners in transfer success. EvCC was also recognized as a national

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

LOCATIONS: NORTH EVERETT CAMPUS: 2000

TOWER ST. IN EVERETT; EAST COUNTY CAMPUS: 14090 FRYELANDS BLVD. SE, SUITE 283, IN MONROE; CORPORATE & CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTER: 2333 SEAWAY BLVD. IN EVERETT; AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY: 9711 32ND PLACE W., EVERETT; SCHOOL OF COSMETOLOGY, 9315 G STATE AVE., MARYSVILLE; OCEAN RESEARCH COLLEGE ACADEMY, 1205 CRAFTSMAN WAY, SUITE 203 IN EVERETT; EVERETT; ONLINE

CONTACT: EVERETTCC.EDU, 425-388-9100

Ansay, who was the student concerts and fine arts coordinator, urged new students to get involved in student leadership and campus activities. “I am very happy that I chose EvCC because without the help of this institution and the people I had the chance to meet and interact with, I wouldn’t be the person I am today,” Ansay said. Employee Training and Professional Development

EvCC also offers a wide variety of professional development and career training options. The college’s Corporate & Continuing Education Center provides training for more than 10,000 people each year. Courses can be customized and delivered on-site for employers throughout Snohomish County and the Northwest. Learn more at EverettCC.edu/CCEC About Everett Community College EvCC offers associate’s degrees in Arts and Sciences, Business, General Studies, Science, Fine Arts and Technical Arts; certificates in more than 30 technical and career fields. Students also come to the college to finish high school, learn basic reading, writing and math skills, learn English and earn a GED. 1637279

Everett Community College’s Gray Wolf Hall is one of 19 buildings on the college’s 40-acre main campus.


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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

UW Bothell reaches beyond classroom EvCC expands manufacturing center By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

LYNNWOOD — A resident of of YWCA’s Pathways for Women shelter, transitional housing for homeless women and families, voluntarily adopted the site’s communal garden. She weeds and waters with special attention paid to the lilies. After years of homelessness, she is cultivating roots, and her gardening education was partially inspired by University of Washington Bothell nursing students. The university is planting seeds of change in classrooms and the wider community. Many disciplines — such as nursing, education and environmental sciences — partner students with organizations for project-based learning. Outside collaborators represent nonprofits, industry, local governments and more. “The mission is to impact and enhance student learning through mutually beneficial relationships with community partners,” says Kara Adams, interim director, UW Bothell’s Office of Community-Based Learning and Research. Connections are often arranged by instructors, but organizations are increasingly approaching UW Bothell seeking opportunities. Often, alumni who benefited from similar experiences want to offer the same to current students. “For many of the mentors, it’s an opportunity to give back. They care about their professions and want to encourage others to consider their fields, too,” Adams says. “They often tell us that it’s energizing for them, too. It reminds them why they enjoy their work.” Nora Karena, YWCA’s director of Housing Services, graduated with a master’s degree in cultural studies from UW Bothell in 2014. Knowing firsthand the caliber of instruction, she is enthusiastic to work with UW Bothell’s School of Nursing. Nursing students focus time helping clients at Trinity Place and Pathways for Women, an emergency shelter and transitional housing site. “We rely on community partners to

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

At YWCA’s Trinity Place in Lynnwood, registered nurses Libby Church and Natalie Anderson, of UW Bothell’s School of Nursing and Health Studies, listen to resident Bonnie Geveshausen, right, talk about health concerns.

provide enriching, valuable life skills that we generally don’t have the resources to offer ourselves,” Karena says. “The nursing students do community training around public health issues from child safety to nutrition, reproductive health, stress management, nutrition, cooking and gardening.” The experience is part of the School of Nursing’s “Partners in Community Health” class that centers on nursing outreach to marginalized populations based on factors such as economics and cultural barriers. Mo West, part-time lecturer in UW Bothell’s School of Nursing and Health Studies, launched her class partnership with Karena and the YWCA in 2012. Her participating students are already registered nurses seeking further education via a bachelor’s degree. They all have experience in hospital settings, but the community aspect opens their eyes to new needs. “You have to deconstruct the ivory tower,” West says. “To make our commu-

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nities stronger and fully promote health and prevention, it’s crucial to immerse yourself in the community’s needs. We have to walk alongside one another and learn together.” Students gain hands-on experience, but hosting institutions also benefit. Adams cites organizations as being able to increase work capacity. Projects are pursued and completed that otherwise wouldn’t happen due to staffing or budget constraints. Students often bring to the table cutting-edge research, methods and analysis. It also creates an employment pipeline matching qualified, future graduates to potential jobs. Megan Dunn graduated from UW Bothell in 2013 with a master’s degree in policy studies. One of her classes partnered with Snohomish County PUD to analyze programming for low-income residents — how effective was it and were there more efficient approaches? Her group ultimately presented findings and recommendations to PUD leadership. “It allowed us to put our learning into

practice with real-world implications. I think that made us want to work even harder,” Dunn says. “I definitely gained experience with public speaking and time management.” PUD has partnered with two student cohorts. The other project analyzed a proposal of PUD internally switching to a biannual budget system. Students researched utility institutions, conducted interviews and analyzed costs and legal impacts. “It’s a win-win situation,” says Sarah Amos Bond, budget and financial planning manager, Snohomish County PUD. “The students learn about policy and we get the benefit of getting work done while taking some of the load off our staff.” For both projects, Bond was impressed by the high caliber of work. She is a 1997 UW Bothell graduate with a master’s degree from the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. She frequently encourages colleagues to consider hiring UW Bothell graduates based on both the positive collaborations as well as general reputation. Dunn now works as the program director at Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides and employs her learning on a daily basis. In additional to professional expertise, the experience also made a personal impression. “I live in Everett and read that PUD put some of our recommendations into practice, which was really exciting.” Dunn says. At this time, there is not a uniform, university-wide program, but Adams hopes for more classes to implement connected learning opportunities. It’s not only a success on paper, but inspiring real-world relationships. “I was formerly a homeless youth myself,” Karena says. “It’s an amazing thing anytime we can lift people’s sights towards education. The student themselves are role models because many of them have overcome obstacles, too. It’s always valuable to put people in touch so they get to know each other in real ways.”

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — It’s an innovative concept to teach students all aspects of manufacturing. Just two years ago, Everett Community College launched its Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center, a kind of simulated factory floor to teach students the skills for the jobs of tomorrow. Now, the college is about to open a major expansion of the center called AMTEC. The $2.5 million project will add 17,000 square feet to AMTEC at 909 N. Broadway in Everett. With the expansion, the center will grow to 54,000 square feet. The added space will provide a lab for the new mechatronics classes, which aim to teach students how to install, maintain and repair industrial equipment. Workers in the field are in high demand, said John Bonner, the college’s vice president of corporate and workforce training. “We’re trying to respond to that need,” Bonner said. “There are so many people out there doing that type of work that are nearing retirement.” The expansion will also provide more office and classroom space and a new industrial flex area so that the college can respond quickly to changing industry needs, Bonner said. The college opened AMTEC in fall 2014. Programs housed at AMTEC include precision machining, welding and fabrication, engineering technician, composites and pre-employment programs. In its first full year, the center trained 1,056 students for jobs in manufacturing and aerospace, an increase in enrollment of 15 percent for AMTEC programs. Based upon the first year’s results, EvCC President David Beyer and the Board of Trustees went ahead with the decision to expand. The center shares a former warehouse with Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, which stores medical records at the site. Providence gave up some space

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Precision machining instructor Jennifer Perrault, left, helps Rachel Howbert set up for making texture patterns for a vise handle at Everett Community College’s Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center.

for the expansion. EvCC trustee Bob Bolerjack said the skills that the center provide are in high demand. He pointed to Boeing’s forecast last month of demand for jetliners. The company expects airlines to need nearly 40,000 jetliners over the next 20 years, a $5.9 trillion market. Boeing and its suppliers need workers with skills that AMTEC can provide. “Advanced manufacturing is evoloving so rapidly,” Bolerjack said. “The community college has to provide the training that employers and employees need in a changing marketplace.” The college went ahead with the expansion without being fully funded for

launch, Bonner said. “If we were to wait for state funding, we might be waiting for quite a while,” Bonner said. Instead, they’ve sought out grants and donations to help fund the expansion and the added mechatronics classes. This summer, the college and the Center of Excellence for Aerospace and Advanced Manufacturing along with four other community colleges in the Puget Sound area received a $3.9 million grant from the federal Department of Labor to support mechatronics. Bonner said the mechatronics program and the facility will be ready when students arrive this fall. A new

instructor who spent six years at Boeing as a mechanical-propulsion design and analysis engineer has been hired to teach the mechatronics program. EvCC is still seeking more grants and donations, especially for equipment. “As the program grows, we don’t want students to be waiting too long to get on equipment,” he said. One of the strengths of the center has been the support from the business community, Bolerjack said. “A lot of the equipment is coming through grants and gifts from business,” Bolerjack said. “It’s really the community working together to ensure a stronger economic future.”

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CAMPUS OUTLOOK

EdCC looks to add science building — finally By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

In a perfect world, the newest building at Edmonds Community College would have been built five years ago. It wasn’t a perfect world five years ago. The recession was still causing problems with the state budget, delaying projects like EdCC’s Science, Engineering and Technology Building or SET Building. Even this year, college administrators had hoped the Legislature would give the greenlight to the $35 million, nearly 70,000-square-foot building. The SET Building was high on a prioritized list of projects by Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. It just missed the cut. Now, the SET Building stands atop the list. Barring any unforeseen hiccups, the project should get the go-ahead in the coming legislative session. If that happens, construction would start next year. “We should potentially see the doors open by 2018,” said Kevin McKay, the college’s vice president of Finance and Operations. It will be the first new construction on the campus at 20000 68th Ave. W, Lynnwood, since the college built Mukilteo Hall and the Black Box Theatre nearly a decade ago.

CONTRIBUTED RENDERING

The Science, Engineering and Technology Building was planned a decade ago, but state budget woes have pushed back construction.

While the college’s overall enrollment has declined in recent years, the number of students entering Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, or STEM, courses have increased. For instance, in 2014, more than 300 new students entered into the college’s engineering program, bringing the total enrollment to 800 students. During the recession, students flocked to STEM programs because those degrees could help them get jobs. “They wanted a job that was a viable

We Know Feet Inside and Out!

job at the end of their career,” said Pat Burnett, the college’s Engineering Department head. “Students realized that STEM degrees were valuable and that’s what they were going for.” The SET building across from Meadowdale Hall will stand three stories tall and provide office space as well as 11 new classrooms and nine laboratories for physics, chemistery, mathematics, engineering and nursing courses. “When this building got started, it was before the term STEM came into vogue,”

McKay said. “But, for all intents and purposes, it is a STEM building.” When you’re looking at jobs of the future, in most areas of the country, a good portion of the top-10 potential jobs are in STEM-related fields, said Carey Schroyer, the dean of EdCC’s STEM programs. The new classrooms and laboratories will feature technology that will make students better prepared whether they leave for a job or go onto a four-year institution. The new building is designed in innovative ways with inviting open spaces, she said. Even if students don’t want to pursue a career in STEM-related fields, the new building creates a space for people to come together to learn, she said. “One of my goals as the STEM dean is that STEM is for everyone,” Schroyer said. “Math or science is for everyone.” The project is also designed to the highest green building standards with drought-tolerant landscaping and lowflow fixtures. “My definition of what an engineer is is an artist who uses technology and math to make dot-dot-dot,” Burnett said. He said the new hall will help students pursue that. “Students need a place where they get to be creative,” he said. “They have to be able to explore and build things.”

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Port of EVERETT

Farmers’ Market Sunday’s @ new Boxcar Park

August 9 Port Commission Mtg

August 2016

REPORT

CALENDAR Jetty Island Days Open thru Labor Day

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

Creating Economic Opportunities

Historic Weyerhaeuser Building Moved 3rd Time

August 13 Scuttlebutt Rock the Boat Music Festival, Boxcar Park August 4, 11, 18 Port of Everett Free Harbor Tours August 5, 12, 19 Outdoor Movies; Boxcar Park August 20-21 Fresh Paint Festival; South Marina

Port of EVERETT

EXECUTIVE The Port of Everett Commission authorized a $20 million revenue bond to support its robust capital initiative program. The Port’s top two capital initiatives are modernizing our Seaport and developing Waterfront Place.

SEAPORT

The Port of Everett continues to move forward with its environmental permitting and engineering for its South Terminal Modernization Project II. This project is necessary to support the larger, heavier 777X airplane parts.

Pictured from left to right. Snohomish County Executive Dave Somers, Port Commissioner Troy McClelland, Nickel Bros' Nick Carpenter, Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson, Historical Commissioner Dale Good, Historic Everett's Andrea Tucker, Port Commissioner Tom Stiger, former Port CEO John Mohr and current Port CEO Les Reardanz.

O

n July 14, the Port of Everett’s iconic Weyerhaeuser Building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was successfully moved for the third time to Boxcar Park. This relocation is a major element of the Port’s new mixed-use Waterfront Place Central development. The building was moved prior to the commencement of the first phase of Waterfront Place’s Fisherman’s Harbor District this fall. After more than

a year in the planning, it took eleven (11) hours to move the building one-mile. The building, which has been moved three times, weighs approximately 350-tons, most of which is the concrete safe. In preparation for the tow, on June 21, the building was lifted 7.5 feet in the air using a unified jacking system, with 42 jacks. On July 13, the Port’s 98th birthday, Everettbased Nickels Bros spent nearly six hours getting the building into the right position to ensure a smooth move.

Port of Everett Honors The Boeing Company's Centennial

MARINA Come down and check out our new Sail In Cinema Movie Series on Friday nights through August 19! Beautiful views and great company.

REAL ESTATE Fisherman’s Harbor in-water and upland construction is set to begin in September.

Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3

Pictured from left to right. Port of Everett Chief Operating Officer Carl Wollebek, Port Commisioners Tom Stiger and Glen Bachman, Boeing's Rich White, Port CEO Les Reardanz and Port Commissioner Troy McClelland.

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

On July 14, the Port of Everett honored its partnership with The Boeing Company at the Economic Alliance Snohomish County Port Report. Port leadership presented a framed copy of a Port Commission Resolution in honor of Boeing's Centennial. The resolution recognizes Boeing's valued role in the regional, state and national economies. The Port looks forward to working with Boeing for the next 100 years!

Information you would like to see in next month’s update? Please e-mail lisam@portofeverett.com Stay Connected!

Visit www.portofeverett.com ‘Like’ us on Facebook; ‘Follow’ us on Twitter and Instagram

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PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from June 1-30. 16-13052-MLB: Chapter 7, Pillar Pet Products Inc.; attorney for debtor: Martin E. Snodgrass; filed: June 7; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-13213-MLB: Chapter 7, Donald Wayne Smith; attorney for debtor: Nicholas D. Fisher; filed: June 16; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-13353-MLB: Chapter 11, Western Industrial Inc.; attorneys for debtor: Jeffrey B. Wells and Emily A. Jarvis; filed: June 24; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-13356-TWD: Chapter 11, Cyrus Way Holdings; attorney for debtor: Larry B. Feinstein; filed: June 24; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: single-asset real estate; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: Corporation

Snohomish County Tax Liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between June 1 and June 30.

Federal Tax Lien 201606010508: June 1; LEC Contractors (+), 3927 Colby Ave., Everett 201606010509: June 1; Walker, Sean R., 20730 Woods Creek Road, Monroe 201606010510: June 1; Polzin, Julie A. (+), 10130 Edmonds Way, Edmonds 201606010616: June 1; Jorissen, Melanie, 14924 41st Ave. SE, Unit A102, Mill Creek 201606010617: June 1; Miller David T., 9326 51st Ave. NE, Marysville 201606010618: June 1; Villani, Joseph L., 3400 145th Place SE, Millcreek 201606010619: June 1; Calle (+), 2707 Bickford Ave., Suite F, Snohomish 201606010620: June 1; Charneski, Michael L., 16212 Bothell Everett Highway, Suite F246, Mill Creek 201606010621: June 1; Simmons, Laura I., 11030 Evergreen Way, Apt. D318, Everett 201606080175: June 8; Kozak, Jerry J. Jr., 11812 E Gibson Road, Apt. B212, Everett 201606080225: June 8; Willot (+), 221 SE Everett Mall Way, Suite M9, Everett 201606100263: June 10; Schwendtke, Brandon, 7704 176th St. SE, Snohomish 201606100264: June 10; Tiacharoenwat, Sudarat, 10426 13th Ave. W, Everett 201606100265: June 10; Rorison, Gregor, 5018 El Charlee St., Everett 201606100266: June 10; Grow, Wesley A., 4620 116 Ave. SE, Lake Stevens 201606100267: June 10; Ruiz & Associates Inc., 1120 112th St. SW, Everett 201606100268: June 10; Shipley, Carole A., 5528 153rd St. SW, Edmonds 201606100269: June 10; Fifth Wheel Place-RV Center (+), 12227 Highway 99, Everett 201606100270: June 10; Estate of Carol Paulson, (+), 23207 55th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201606100271: June 10; Hays, Harold S., 23207 55th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201606140082: June 14; Highland Glass,

4502 148th St. NE, Marysville 201606140083: June 14; SOS Bookkeeping Inc., 1031 SE, Everett Mall Way, Everett 201606140084: June 14; JTC Enterprises NW, 17910 37th Drive NE, Arlington 201606140085: June 14; David R. Downing and Associates (+), 4229 76th St. NE, Marysville 201606140086: June 14; Chin, Ronald F., 20016 Cedar Valley Road, Lynnwood 201606140087: June 14; Innovative Design Engineering and Analysis, 727 Second St., Suite A, Mukilteo 201606140088: June 14; Funderburke Autobody (+), 26905 87th Drive NW, Stanwood 201606140089: June 14; Saunders, Eric Stephen, 17420 62nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201606140090: June 14; Danahey, Lucena E. (+), 14533 46th Drive NE, Marysville 201606140091: June 14; Lacasse, Elizabeth K. (+), 3217 Grand Ave., Everett 201606140092: June 14; Potter, Susan R. (+), 26006 174th St. SE, Monroe 201606140093: June 14; Bradley, Kam C., 1242 State Ave., Suite I, Marysville 201606140094: June 14; Orca Electrical Contractors, PO Box 14693, Mill Creek 201606140095: June 14; Downtown Lodge, 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201606140096: June 14; Mill Creek Lodge, 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201606140097: June 14; Grube, Martine (+), 5110 Narbeck Ave., Everett 201606140107: June 14; Jal Holdings Inc. (+), 14512 167th Ave. SE, Monroe 201606140108: June 14; Bowen Recovery Center (+), 21818 66th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201606140109: June 14; Gluth, David M., 4428 115th St. SE, Everett 201606140110: June 14; Gluth, Lisa K., 4428 115th St. SE, Everett 201606140111: June 14; Wesweld Corp., PO Box 1145, Stanwood 201606140112: June 14; Michaux, Nikki, 1233 Admiralty Way, H105, Everett 201606140113: June 14; Doerier, Arthur J., 2026 Madison St., Apt. B, Everett 201606140114: June 14; Dubell, Cherie (+), 14936 182nd Ave. SE, Monroe 201606140115: June 14; Cassy’s Coffee Company (+), 36023 U.S. 2, Sultan 201606140116: June 14; Campbell, Lisa D. (+), 11324 26th Place SE, Lake Stevens 201606210498: June 21; Didok, Tatiana I (+), 7039 Morgan Road, Everett 201606210499: June 21; Hartvig, Raymond P., 12 W Casino Road, Apt. 11, Everett 201606210500: June 21; Schall, Robert S., 310 Willow Ave., Sultan 201606210501: June 21; Myers, Richard A., PO Box 786, Lake Stevens 201606210502: June 21; Pablo-Perez, Margarito, 8726 58th Drive NE, Marysville 201606210503: June 21; Cramer, Allen E., 6123 144th St. SE, Everett 201606210504: June 21; Blessing, Faye B. Ilano, 706 89th St. SE, Everett 201606210505: June 21; Peyanuvatchai, Kimberly S., PO Box 13414, Mill Creek 201606210506: June 21; Tjalas, Kirk (+), 7620 N Hartman Lane, Suite 180, Tucson, Arizona 201606210507: June 21; Petermeyer, Nicole R. (+), 4233 154th Place SE, Bothell 201606210508: June 21; Alder, Sandra J., 2813 Rockefeller Ave., Everett 201606210509: June 21; Ziskovsky, Joseph, 9307 15th St. SE, Lake Stevens 201606210510: June 21; Han, Sun A. (+), 6502 193rd St. SW, Lynnwood 201606280144: June 28; Hendrickson, Susann E., 8425 319th St. NW, Stanwood 201606280145: June 28; Ruiz & Associates Inc., 16430 6th Ave. W., Suite A,

SERVICES

Lynnwood 201606280146: June 28; Moe, Louisa B., 417 Ave. H, Snohomish 201606280147: June 28; Bradley, Jeffrey R., 1242 State Ave., Suite I, Marysville 201606280148: June 28; L&O Distributing Inc., 23591 28th Ave. W, Brier 201606280149: June 28; Flooring Solutions, PO Box 1586, Woodinville 201606280150: June 28; Amundson & Co. Inc., 1604 Hewitt Ave., Suite 610, Everett 201606280151: June 28; Puget Sound Investment Strategies Inc., 9405 101st Ave. NE, Arlington 201606280152: June 28; Cook, Peter and Carolyn Y., 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish 201606280153: June 28; SCP Enterprises Inc., 7120 35th Ave. NE, Tulalip 201606280154: June 28; Jenkins, Mathew D., 120 W Casino Road, Apt. 30D, Everett 201606280206: June 28; Gilmartin, Patricia J., 5701 10078 Place SW, Lynnwood 201606280207: June 28; Ward, Rose M. (+), 12005 207th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201606280208: June 28; Little, Lynda D. (+), 228 110th Place SE, Everett 201606280209: June 28; Harsaghy, Joseph K., 8307 First St. SE, Lake Stevens

Partial Release of Federal Tax Lien 201606010514: June 1; Vice, Jason, 13719 28th Drive SE, Mill Creek

Release of Federal Tax Lien 201606010511: June 1; Extremis Audio Partnership, 2006 196th St. SW, Suite 105, Lynnwood 201606010512: June 1; Linehan, Timothy, 954 W Smith Road, Bellingham 201606010513: June 1; Linehan, Timothy, 954 W Smith Road, Bellingham 201606010622: June 1; Knoth, Brady And Suanne M. (+), 316 176th Place SW, Bothell 201606010623: June 1; Morehead, Jason R., PO Box 783 Lake Stevens 201606010624: June 1; Williamson, R. P. (+), 16326 17th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201606010625: June 1; McClain III, Charles V., 18012a 31st Ave. NE, Arlington 201606010626: June 1; Williamson R. P. (+), 16326 17th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201606010627: June 1; Bruegeman, Karl E., PO Box 635, Everett 201606010628: June 1; Lipscomb, Jean (+), 4118 148th St. SW, Unit C-1, Lynnwood 201606010629: June 1; Ebel, Ulrich G., 603 116th St. SW, Everett 201606080176: June 8; Castle Painters (+), 7703 51st Ave. NE, Marysville 201606100272: June 10; LEC Contractors, 3927 Colby Ave., Everett 201606100273: June 10; Unitedgeneralcontractorsnet.net, 8825 34th Ave. NE, Suite L-384, Marysville 201606100274: June 10; Gaona-Montero J., 15001 35th Ave. W, Apt. 9-104, Lynnwood 201606100275: June 10; Pinfield, Nicholas J., 4432 176th St. SW, Apt. 3, Lynnwood 201606100276: June 10; Davison, Barbara A. (+), 4013 178th Place NE, Arlington 201606100277: June 10; Belk, Edwin B., 2424 Rucker Ave., Apt. 4, Everett 201606100278: June 10; Forbes, Dianna, 2404 236th St. SW, Brier 201606100279: June 10; Misquez, Diana L., 16223 Market St. Snohomish 201606140098: June 14; Greening America Landscape Inc., 19428 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish 201606140099: June 14; Secret Garden Restaurant (+), 21025 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201606140100: June 14; Hilden-Brand, Todd L. (+), 609 54th St. SW, Everett

201606140101: June 14; Brady, Joseph, PO Box 219 Monroe 201606140102: June 14; Nunes, Mark T., 905 150th Place SW, Lynnwood 201606140103: June 14; Neff, Benjamin L., 4329 180th St. SE, Bothell 201606140104: June 14; Martinson, Eileen C., 5132 108th Place NE, Marysville 201606140105: June 14; Nunez, Kennan L., 2010 Baker Ave. Everett 201606140106: June 14; Nunez, Kennan L. (+), 2010 Baker Ave. Everett 201606210511: June 21; Ferrin, Carl T., 12113 25th Ave. SE, Everett 201606210512: June 21; Corstone Flooring, PO Box 852 Stanwood 201606210513: June 21; Takagi, Brian K., 21600 Highway 99, Suite 230, Edmonds 201606210514: June 21; Lindberg, Malcolm, 15102 180th Ave. SE, Monroe 201606210515: June 21; Brawner, Jenifer (+), 18605 51st Ave. SE, Bothell 201606210516: June 21; Simpson, Dawn E. (+), 706 Marine Drive NE, Tulalip 201606210517: June 21; Grimes, David P., 19101 36th Ave. W, Suite 204, Lynnwood 201606210518: June 21; Ferrin, Carl T., 9830 30th Drive SE, Everett 201606210519: June 21; Salsa Mexican Grill 2009 (+), 2120 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201606210520: June 21; Care Controls Inc., PO Box 12014, Mill Creek 201606210521: June 21; Horton, Jane C. (+), 16814 29th Drive SE, Bothell 201606210522: June 21; Rants, Milton L., 17525 Valley Circle Drive, Bothell 201606210523: June 21; Lindberg, Malcolm J. Sr., 15102 180th Ave. SE, Monroe 201606210524: June 21; Lindberg, Malcolm J. Sr,, 15102 180th Ave. SE, Monroe 201606280155: June 28; Kim, Myungsoo, 16824 44th Ave. W, Suite 200, Lynnwood 201606280156: June 28; De-Rosa, Sheila, 12610 Beverly Park Road, Lynnwood 201606280157: June 28; Kuhlman, Jennifer A (+), 14431 27th Drive SE, Mill Creek 201606280158: June 28; Carpenter, Ana M. (+), 1730 112th St. SW, Apt. G104, Everett 201606280159: June 28; Berentsen, Lisa A., 15027 Forty Five Road, Arlington 201606280160: June 28; LEC Contractors, 3927 Colby Ave., Everett 201606280161: June 28; Mukilteo Sports Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, MSC 70580, Everett 201606280162: June 28; Kehn, Larry V., PO Box 780, Aberdeen 201606280163: June 28; Berentsen, Lisa A., 13831 52nd Ave. NE, Marysville 201606280164: June 28; Cordell, Marvin J., 16715 130th St. NE, Arlington 201606280165: June 28; Ammons, Philip J., 6 166th Place SE, Bothell 201606280166: June 28; Cable, Tammy L., PO Box 833 Mukilteo 201606280167: June 28; Rickman, Thomas E. (+), 9216 240th St. SW, Edmonds 201606280210: June 28; Obrecht, Penny J. (+), 515 112th St. SE, C7, Everett 201606290433: June 29; Roiss, Marguerite H. K. (+), 23617 36th Place W, Brier 201606270100: June 27; Wick, Michelle (+), 105 185th Place SW, Bothell

Withdrawal of Federal Tax Lien 201606210526: June 21; York Building Services (+), 16521 13th Ave. W, Suite 101, Lynnwood 201606210527: June 21; York Building Services (+), 16521 13th Ave. W, Suite 101, Lynnwood 201606210528: June 21; York Building Services (+), 16521 13th Ave. W, Suite 101, Lynnwood

List it or find it in The Daily Herald. 425-339-3100

www.heraldnet.com

classified@heraldnet.com • heraldnet.com/classified


26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2016

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington B&H Fire and Security: 16910 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-3725; 360-322-7634; Security Guard and Patrol Service Cad Ceramics: 210 E Third St., Arlington, WA 98223-1328; 360-435-6375; Ceramic Equipment and Supplies Heidi Bettinger LMP: 16404 Smokey Point Blvd., No. 307, Arlington, WA 98223-8417 JRV Acres: 10519 District Line Road, Arlington, WA 98223 Madric Real Estate: 13905 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9495; Real Estate Management Makeup By Mackenzie: 20721 Olympic Place NE, No. A206, Arlington, WA 982234862; Make-Up Studios Next-Gen Landcare: 20714 Lake Riley Road, Arlington, WA 98223-7012; Landscape Contractors No. 1 DUI Monitoring & Bail Inc.: PO Box 264, Arlington, WA 98223-0264; Bonds-Bail Norma’s Cleaning Services: 20227 80th Ave. NE, No. 36, Arlington, WA 98223-5906; Janitor Service Pathways To Healing: 16404 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8417; 360-658-1658 Sonic Elite Allstars: 3717 166th Place NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8453; 360-653-8685 Wade Stuart Woodturning: 2221 258th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7297 Wyatt Construction Services: 19306 Valley View Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-4032; Construction Companies

Everett A&M Restoration: 1714 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3561; 425-404-3169; Building Restoration and Preservation Ades Deli: 5317 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-3631; 425-353-1560; Delicatessens Adobo Express: 607 SE Everett Mall Way, No. Kl, Everett, WA 98208-3248; 425-5120504; Restaurants BABG International: 13610 Ninth Place W, Everett, WA 98204-7321 BHE Of Mill Creek: 12902 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208; 425-338-9620 Bikers and Babes: 2110 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-2379; 425-212-9136 Clear NRG: 2010 Madison St., Everett, WA 98203-5374; 425-374-7162 Denallis Mediterranean Fusion: 1325 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2808; 425-353-9325 D’s Painting and Maintenance: 4732 119th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-9666; Painters Dunamis Boutique: 824 W Casino Road, No. 18, Everett, WA 98204-1689; Boutique Items-Retail Enhance and Beyond: 11419 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5120 Fort Leslie: 4402 Federal Ave., Everett, WA 98203-2128 Freedom Systems Inc.: 12414 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5544; 425-353-9055 Fulltilt Arcade: 6010 145th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9357; Arcades GND Market: 1907 Hewitt Ave., No. B, Everett, WA 98201-3612; 425-610-4181; Grocers-Retail HMT Electric: 2310 112th St. SW, No. B, Everett, WA 98204-6115; 425-212-9664; Electric Contractors IM Body Art: 10121 Evergreen Way, No. 25-4, Everett, WA 98204-3885; Tattooing Jackson Lawn Care: 605 Center Road, Everett, WA 98204-7893; 425-512-0730; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Jones Global Consulting: 9911 First Place W, Everett, WA 98204-2751; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified K McConnell Vintage Antiques: 11000 16th Ave. SE, No. 215, Everett, WA 982084812; Antiques-Dealers

BUSINESS LICENSES

Kareem: 3006 W Marine View Drive, Everett, WA 98201-3972 Kate Sproul Counseling: 5030 118th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-8329; Counseling Kiernan’s Kuriosities: 1107 58th Place SW, Everett, WA 98203-5909 King Of Detail: 10121 Evergreen Way, No. 384-25, Everett, WA 98204-3885; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Lions Head Landscaping and Consulting: 6408 Lombard Ave., Everett, WA 98203-4814; Landscape Contractors Luxury Coach Lines: 11811 Second Drive SE, No. C, Everett, WA 98208-4901; Buses-Charter and Rental Maktoum Perfums and Googs: 1009 112th St. SE, No. A206, Everett, WA 98208-5018 Mattress Firm: 305 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3250; 425-353-8459 Mujeres De Accion: 13002 42nd Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5689 Necessity Designs: 2209 Madison St., Everett, WA 98203-5310 Next Dot: 1714 Baker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2108 North Sound Mind Body: 2230 Rucker Ave., No. 100, Everett, WA 98201-2772 Redfin: 808 134th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-2300; 425-582-0167 RMK Aircraft Production Test: 12320 12th Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-5926; Aircraft-Dealers SK Rixxo Digital: 1926 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204-1489 Skye Aero: 3125 100th St. SW, No. C75-5, Everett, WA 98204-9211 Sober Mode: 101 116th Place SE, No. B, Everett, WA 98208-4928 Sol Smiles: 1823 State St., Everett, WA 98201-2166 Sports Clips: 4809 132nd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6241; 425-948-6305; Beauty Salons Synergy Homecare Snohomish: 1812 Hewitt Ave., No. 207, Everett, WA 982015823; Home Health Service Tug Time: PO Box 811, Everett, WA 98206-0811 Vector Marketing: 3426 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-5095; 425-322-3203; Marketing Willful Little Sprite: 3315 Federal Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4118 Zebulon Swift Transporters: 11225 19th Ave. SE, No. K304, Everett, WA 98208-5189 Lake Stevens Allen’s Automotive Repair: 8806 12th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2419; Automobile Repairing and Service Bushman Financial: 16410 84th St. NE, No. D448, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9060; Financial Advisory Services CV Painting: 704 87th Ave. NE, No. 14, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2442; Painters Double Dub Farm: 12411 Machias Cutoff, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9797; Farms Greg’s Budget Floors: 1829 88th Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-6635; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing Junkasaurus: 2914 100th Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5756 Ken’s Flight Training: 1214 102nd Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8526; Aircraft Schools Land Pro Group Inc.: 10515 20th St. SE, No. 202, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4767 MB Ventures: 1620 77th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7404 Nails By Sesalee: 525 129th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5405; Manicuring One Way Masonry: 12404 26th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8125; Masonry Contractors Puffin Stuff: 3214 Lake Drive, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8770 Savannah’s Boutique: 12311 Williams Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5110; Boutique Items-Retail Scotty’s Gutters: 2506 Grade Road, No. 4, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9188; Gutters and Downspouts Trestle Station: 8011 20th St. SE, No. A-101, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4709; 425-335-3335 Vault Cannabis: 303 91st Ave. NE, No. E502, PMB 215, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2539

Vid Incorporation: 8321 Second St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3335 Lynnwood 1st Home-Happiness Adult: 20127 76th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5835 4 Little Apples: 16817 Larch Way, No. E103, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3366 Agate and Whale: 6020 172nd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-2921 Alex Janitorial: 19614 69th Place W, No. 4, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5829 Aman Cuisine Of India: 12926 Mukilteo Speedway, No. E1, Lynnwood, WA 980875114; 425-322-4379; Restaurants Amanda Holland LMP: 18600 52nd Ave. W, No. B106, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4563 Apples To Zebras Insurance: 14822 Meadow Road, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6410; Insurance Appliance Refinishing & Repair: 4300 Alderwood Mall Blvd., Lynnwood, WA 980366768; Appliances-Household-Major-Repairing AR Beauty Salon: 18500 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4777; 425-245-7116; Beauty Salons Aujla Trucking Inc.: 19311 36th Ave. W, No. 24, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5784; Trucking BG Hair Salon: 16715 52nd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3081; 425-361-7067; Beauty Salons BK Trimworks: Select 15729 Larch Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087 CB 4274: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; 425-697-2152 Chroma: 19620 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5565; 425-697-2086 Ciao Wagon: 15324 14th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8743 College Pro Painters JK 2016: 5525 190th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5213; Painters Edmonds Stump Grinding: 6707 196th St. SW, No. 102, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5943; Tree Service Emerald Earth: 426 Lakeview Road, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2140 Emily Keeney Art: 15631 Ash Way, No. E411, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5373; Art Galleries and Dealers Essentially Pure Cleaning Services: 6512 208th St. SW, No. F9, Lynnwood, WA 980368539; Janitor Service Evereve: 3000 184th St. SW, No. 988, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4704; 425-599-2088 Evergreen Home Loans: 3400 188th St. SW, No. 101, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4791; 425-245-8867; Real Estate Loans Frameworks Center: 18402 66th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4236; 425-361-7695 Fresh Cut Lawn Service: 3312 146th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3403; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance GH Gold: 17105 Sixth Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3324 Gladiator Weight Pull Club: 20426 54th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7619; Weight Control Services Hans Chicken Rice: 19717 26th Park W, No. B, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7875; Restaurants High Purity NW Inc.: 2027 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7073; 425-245-7948 KD Entertainment: 19701 Scriber Lake Road, No. 101, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6176; Entertainment Bureaus Lite Up Success: 6230 188th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7248 Mai Enterprise Inc.: 2204 133rd St. SW, No. 50, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6069 Matjac’s: 18625 42nd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3720 MGP XI Alderwood: 18530 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4775; 425-771-7294 NGK Investments: PO Box 480, Lynnwood, WA 98046-0480; Investments Northwest Church: 19820 Scriber Lake Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6121; 425-6972087; Churches Nrgize Lifestyle Cafe: 19800 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6042; 425-697-2752; Restaurants Olin Construction: 6030 173rd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-2923; Construction Companies On Site TV Services and Repair: 20610 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7701;

Television and Radio-Dealers Plastic Sales and Services: 5522 208th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7633; 425-2458272; Plastics-Products-Retail Prepcar: 16520 Larch Way, No. K2, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8124 Public Storage Co.: 13505 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1650; 425-7456031; Storage-Household and Commercial Pups Unleashed: 19410 Highway 99, No. 298-A, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5102; Pet Services RTI Services: 2006 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7089; 425-697-2061; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Russell Painting Services NW: 1929 144th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5947; Painters Shockem Apparel: 19701 Scriber Lake Road, No. 101, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6176; Apparel and Garments-Retail Sightglass Cellars: 4825 184th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-5408 Smart Learning Center: 15723 40th Ave. W, No. F307, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1469; Education Centers Spot On Evergreen II: 4425 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6804 Teriyaki Town: 4100 194th St. SW, No. 390, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613; Restaurants Unique Acquisitions: 731 191st Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4939; Mergers and Acquisitions United LC Capital Loveculture: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; 425-697-2127 Valhalla Armament: 14821 18th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6028 Zumiez Services Inc.: 4110 214th St. SW, No. C, Lynnwood, WA 98036; Services Not Elsewhere Classified

Marysville Byer Building Co.: 5020 100th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2357; Building Contractors C&T Entrepreneurs: 14212 31st Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8257 Dixie Moxie Hot Subs Group: 6124 101st Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2096 Eslwritinghelp.Com: 9705 52nd Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2389; Advertising-Computer Excellent Choice Auto Sales: 9302 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2204; 360-6530405; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars J&J Painting: 110 Alder Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-5129; Painters JDE Baker: 5421 107th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2015 K&J Nurse Delegation: 5722 65th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6129; Nurses and Nurses’ Registries Mason Electric: 1522 Third St., Marysville, WA 98270-5082; 360-548-3810; Electric Contractors Odyssey Certified Coaching: 1010 State Ave., No. 286, Marysville, WA 98270-6011; Amusement and Recreation Not Elsewhere Classified Pepelnjak Insurance and Financial Services: 1517 10th St., Marysville, WA 982704629; Insurance Precision Auto Works: 10504 39th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7221 Quilceda Creek Manor III: 1058 Alder Ave., No. A, Marysville, WA 98270-4318 Safety WEBB: 4430 128th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8730 Skagit Ballistics: 4431 107th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8339 Snohomish Wine Sales: 919 State Ave., No. 103, Marysville, WA 98270-4284; 206-9924420; Wines-Retail

Mill Creek DTG Enterprises: 16504 9th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6396; 425-361-2508 Expedia Cruise Ship Center: 15415 Main St., No. 104, Mill Creek, WA 98012-9001; 425318-3344; Cruises Holman Caldwell Investment Group: 914


BUSINESS LICENSES 164th St. SW, No. B12, No. 226, Mill Creek, WA 98012; Investments HR Business Partners: 13401 46th Ave. SE, No. 201, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4312; Business Services Not Elsewhere Classified Learning To Learn Aba: 2209 139th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5557; Education Centers Nouvelle Enterprises: 15224 Main St., No. 303, Mill Creek, WA 98012-7332 Olympic Veterinary Cardiology: PO Box 13076, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1076; 425-4091545; Physicians and Surgeons Platform Point: 3611 148th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4268 Rainaldo Chiropractic: PO Box 13287, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1287; Chiropractors Thunderbird Marina Inc.: 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., No. 201, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1286; Marinas Timaree: 14901 10th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-9007 Tracey Jardin Enterprises: 15111 Main St., No. 208, Mill Creek, WA 98012-9034 Tridentsearch Training: PO Box 14039, Mill Creek, WA 98082-2039; Training Consultants Trumark Properties: 15833 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1200; 425-615-6085; Real Estate Management Venture Management: 14615 Main St., No. U5, Mill Creek, WA 98012-2032; Management Services

Monroe Big Dog Builders: 24723 Old Owen Road, Monroe, WA 98272-7690; Building Contractors Burn The Breeze Ranch: 13515 259th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9698; Ranches David M Walker Construction: 134 N Kelsey St., Monroe, WA 98272-1806; Construction Companies Highlander NW: 14911 Chain Lake Road, No. M410, Monroe, WA 98272-8766 J&E Herbalife Distributors: 18904 208th

Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9491; Distribution Services Last Minute Green: 17376 W Main St., Monroe, WA 98272-1938 North Sound Dermatologist: 14090 Fryelands Blvd. SE, No. 21, Monroe, WA 982722693; 360-217-7176; Physicians and Surgeons On Site TV Service and Repair: 18950 U.S. 2, Monroe, WA 98272-1415; 360-217-4155; Television and Radio-Service/Repair Potent Component: 25104 146th Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8681 Racers Against Child Abuse: 13220 271st Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9024

Mukilteo Advance Academy: 12221 Village Center Place, No. 203, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6080 American Drywall: 12308 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5732; 425-405-3936; Dry Wall Contractors Equilibria Engineering: 9999 Harbour Place, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4260; 425-3747780; Engineers Game Time Steak Seasoning: 5500 Harbour Pointe Blvd., No. L10, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5158; Restaurants HD Consulting: 4773 Arbors Circle, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6087; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Historical Bias Couture: 9028 46th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3470 Home Theater Seattle Inc.: 11524 Mukilteo Speedway, No. 106, Mukilteo, WA 982755416; Home Theater Systems JB Alpha: 5927 St. Andrews Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4857 Michael’s Old World Produce: 8844 46th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3431; Fruits and Vegetables and Produce-Retail MM Brother Inc.: 8325 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2918; 425-353-9367 Nic’s Barbershop & Cafe: 4704 Pointes Drive, No. 105, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6074;

AUGUST 2016

425-330-2944; Barbers Studio Mark: 6024 Championship Circle, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5031

Quil Ceda Village Toys R Us: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8081; 360-651-7616; Toys-Retail

Snohomish Audiokraft NW: 2327 Russell Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-5627 Bad Pug Pet Waste Clean Up: 11630 59th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-6963; Waste Disposal Bamboo Paradise Garden: 18216 Broadway Ave., Snohomish, WA 98296-8021; Gardens Cross Fit Ironhide: 16720 24th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-4766; Health Clubs Studios and Gymnasiums Dirt Bangerz: 9217 210th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7112 DKS Workshop: 15519 OK Mill Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7719 Emergency Plumbers: 14030 Kenwanda Drive, Snohomish, WA 98296-8241; Plumbing Notary Public Service: 1412 185th Ave. NE, Snohomish, WA 98290-4463; Notaries-Public Flying Notary: 18019 105th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-2142; Notaries-Public Fox Cleaning: 19225 130th Place SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-8620; Janitor Service Harpe Clothing: 12727 66th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8991; Clothing-Retail Koz 216X SW Yamhill: 1208 10th St., No. 201, Snohomish, WA 98290-2099; Real Estate Low Cost Chiropractor Service: 14030 Kenwanda Drive, Snohomish, WA 98296-8241; Chiropractors Marzolf Properties: 8111 78th St. SE, Sno-

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

homish, WA 98290-5816; Real Estate Netovi Inc.: 1830 Bickford Ave., No. 108, Snohomish, WA 98290-1751 North Floor: 12326 219th Place SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5465; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing Outback Steakhouse: 2709 Bickford Ave., No. F, Snohomish, WA 98290-1766; 425-5577711; Restaurants Pacific Glo: 7721 Marsh Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-5901; 360-568-1274 Scrappy Punk Brewing: 707 Ave. A, No. A205, Snohomish, WA 98290-2475; Brewers Snohomish Landscape Design: PO Box 977, Snohomish, WA 98291-0977; Landscape Designers Substitute Substandards: PO Box 1693, Snohomish, WA 98291-1693 Sugar By Syd: 15913 61st Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-4643 Sweet Dreams Adult Family Home: 11531 197th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8167 Those Mcelhany Women: 21801 W Lost Lake Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-6182

Stanwood 7 Lakes Boat Rentals: PO Box 1812, Stanwood, WA 98292-1812; Boats-Rental and Charter Bigfood Lock Services: PO Box 962, Stanwood, WA 98292-0962; 360-424-1780; Locks and Locksmiths Eco Earth Yard and Garden: 8000 Lakewood Road, Stanwood, WA 98292-6736; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Gleason Law Office: PO Box 1515, Stanwood, WA 98292-1515; 360-389-3471; Attorneys National Food Corp.: 7906 Happy Hollow Road, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-652-9590; Food Products-Retail U-Haul Neighborhood Dealer: 26625 Old 99 N, Stanwood, WA 98292-9285; 360-6546586; Truck Renting and Leasing

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28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2016

EARN YOUR

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AUGUST 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 29

Education GUIDE HIGHER

Is an MBA Worth It? Top 10 Things From My MBA

T

By Courtney Rambo

5. Increased critical thinking skills A master’s program allows you to develop critical thinking skills in a much deeper way than an undergraduate degree. MBA’s often have a focus (in my case it was management) which allows you to better connect disparate departments and topics to see that everything is truly connected. There are two types of MBA 6. Increased programs: full-time and part-time. responsibility As you gain new skills and If you complete your undergrad and Courtney Rambo understanding, you will likely receive move to the master’s program right more responsibility. I noticed that my graduated away, you’re already in the mindset input was increasingly asked for the of a student and prepared for the from Western deeper I got into the program and long study sessions. However, if you the more I gave thoughtful feedback. Washington complete your undergrad and move That said, don’t expect to receive into the workforce before tackling University’s MBA more responsibility – you may have your masters, you gain real-world program in 2016 to ask for it. Don’t be afraid to ask if experience and may have a better that’s what you’re looking for. idea of whether or not a master’s and is the director 7. The Benjamins degree in that field of study is right With a higher degree, you’re more of Intellitonic, a for you. likely to receive a raise or capture digital marketing a larger salary at another firm. Additionally, if you take the partIf your plan is to move up within agency. time track and continue to work, you your organization, speak with your can apply the things you’re learning leaders to make your intentions in the classroom and potentially align known and see if upward mobility your projects for an added intellectual bonus. This is aligns with more responsibility and pay. the path I took and I’m glad I did. here are a multitude of reasons to get an MBA. I became interested in the idea after being in the workforce for a few years and found myself wanting more responsibility and opportunities.

Top 10 Highlights from my MBA 1. People are priority Organizations exist because of people. Select good people and create long-lasting relationships with those who fit in with your current crew and who are willing to learn. A happy team means a hard-working and dedicated team and your organization won’t do well without it. 2. Culture is king It is the leadership’s responsibility to create and maintain a strong company culture that is pervasive and easily followed. When done well, it will attract the people you’re looking for - and keep them there. 3. Play to people’s strengths Everyone has different skill sets. That said, let them stick to what they’re good at because otherwise, we all become average at everything. If someone is interested in learning a new skill, encourage it. 4. The cohort connection For two years you work with the same people through high-stress situations, awkward presentations and the constant onslaught of fast-approaching deadlines. All that time and energy creates an incredibly strong bond, despite differences. 1654115

8. The importance of a plan Making a plan is crucial. It will foster discussion, help determine goals and overall get your entire team on the same page. Include at least one representative from every department in the plan and make sure that they have spoken to their entire department. Creating a personal plan is just as important as leading one within your organization. 9. You will likely deviate from the plan A plan is just a plan. Even with all of the information, you cannot predict what will happen, but putting that plan together means you have a strong foundation to react to those changes more quickly. Be malleable and move as quickly as you can without collapsing. The true health of an organization is seeing how they react in times of change. 10. An MBA is universal You can apply your MBA education to pretty much anything. We all work for or with some kind of business, and the knowledge you gain during the program can be applied to your work. Western’s Everett Weekend MBA program is available to all learners. For more information, visit wwu.edu/MBAEverett.

Western Washington University ■

P R O F I L E

INSTITUTION TYPE - Four Year University EDUCATIONAL FOCUS - Offering a diverse array of quality educational programs designed to meet the changing needs of students in North Puget Sound. ESTABLISHED - 1899 (first classes attended) EVERETT LOCATION - Everett University Center On the Everett Community College Campus, 2000 tower Street WEBSITE - wwu.edu/Everett


30 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2016

EVERETT — Electric power engineering and design firm Commonwealth Associates has announced the relocation of its Pacific Northwest regional branch office from Mount Vernon to Everett. The newly opened office, located at 3501 Colby Avenue, Suite 101, has 15 employees and is led by vice president of Western Operations, John P. White. EVERETT — More public housing and HUD-assisted residents living in Comcast’s service area, including those in the Housing Choice Voucher and Multifamily programs, are now eligible to apply for Internet Essentials, the company’s high-speed Internet adoption program for low-income families. EVERETT — Evergreen Beauty College is once again Bringing Beauty Back to School. The event from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 17 takes place at both the Everett and Renton campuses. Staff and students at the schools will be providing haircuts at no charge for students grades K-12. For more information, go to www. evergreenbeauty.edu/. SNOHOMISH — Dream Dinners, based in Snohomish, has launched a new offering. Dream Dinners ShareCrate lets customers ship easy, homemade and affordable frozen meals to friends and family members experiencing a life moment such as celebrating the arrival of a baby or grieving the loss of loved one.

BUSINESS BRIEFS

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 42 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 35 Ship port calls 2015: 133 Barge port calls 2015: 61 Aug. 2: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Aug. 9: Westwood, Bardu Aug. 12: AAL, AAL Newcastle Aug. 15: Spliethoff, Donaugracht Aug. 16: Westwood, Westwood Victoria Aug. 18: ECL, Asian Naga Aug. 23: Westwood, Hammonia Berolina Aug. 30: Westwood, Westwood Columbia Source: Port of Everett STANWOOD — In July, the new Stanwood Grocery Outlet opened adjacent to Highway 532 at 26905 92nd Ave. Shayne and Mary Stoddard are the independent owners and operators of the new store. The retail project was constructed by Chad Fisher Construction and financed by Coastal Community Bank. OLYMPIA — The Office of Secretary

of State is accepting nominations for the 2016 Corporations for Communities Award. The award recognizes Washington businesses that demonstrate a commitment to giving in order to improve local or regional social and environmental conditions. The deadline to nominate a company is Aug. 31. Nomination forms can be found at www.sos.wa.gov/corps/ corpsforcommunities/ on the Secretary of State’s website. EVERETT — For the month of June, Snohomish County hotels were down over 2015 in two of the three measurements, occupancy and revenue per available room. Measurements were flat for average daily rate. Other figures from the recently released Smith Travel Report demonstrate that overall demand was down 4.8 percent and revenue saw a 4.3 percent decrease. King, Skagit and Whatcom counties also showed decreases. EDMONDS — The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center has awarded a $15 million contract to Edmonds-headquartered Sound & Sea Technology, Inc. to integrate and install an underwater cable system in support of the Seismo-Hydroacoustic Data Acquisition System. This is the largest task order from the Navy that the woman-owned small business has been awarded. WOODINVILLE — Elle Marie Hair Studio has announced plans for a new

hair salon located in Woodinville. The new location on NE 175th Street will be Elle Marie’s fourth hair salon. Other locations are in Mill Creek, Alderwood and Lake Stevens. The new salon build is planned for October with the first guests welcomed in November. SNOHOMISH — Housing Hope’s Fill the Sky with Hope event on June 25 raised more than $6,000 for the nonprofit. The event was hosted by Skydive Snohomish. A portion of each tandem skydive registration fee was donated to Housing Hope. Skydive Snohomish also donated skydives to seven Housing Hope residents during the event. EVERETT — PlasmaLab International of Everett is partnering with Everett AquaSox on their first-ever No Nuts Zone seating section at three games this season — one game in July and then games on Aug. 25 and 28. The No Nuts Zone section is an allergy-friendly, allages seating section for those with severe or life-threatening peanut allergies.

Corrections The Boeing Company started on July 15, 1916. A story on Page 8 of the July edition contained the wrong date. Teague 3D imagery designer Tyler Brunkhorst was misidentified in a cutline on Page 12 of the July edition.

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EVERETT — Snohomish County Executive Dave Somers has appointed Annie Cole as the Snohomish County director of Human Resources. Cole is an attorney who has worked Annie Cole as a human resources professional for large public sector agencies in Washington and California. She will replace Ricardo Cruz who has served as the interim Director since January. TULALIP — Seattle Premium Outlets has welcomed Ditas Pyle as the new director of marketing and business development. Pyle will lead overall marketing strategies such as event programming, social media, guest services, public relations and communications. Additionally, she will manage various business functions encompassing revenue generation, tourism, marketing budgets and tenant and partner relationships. Previously, Pyle was area director of sales at 360 Hotel Group. EVERETT — Edwin Petersen was sworn in as president of the Rotary Club of Everett on June 28. A club member since 1999, Petersen will lead the club’s 143 members as they provide community and international service and celebrate the club’s centennial year. He is a four-time Rotary Paul Harris Fellow and is employed by Housing Hope. Petersen takes over the presidency from Deborah Wright.

EVERETT — Jennifer Willows is the new vice president and chief development officer for the YMCA of Snohomish County. Willows started with the Everett YMCA in 2006 and moved to the Association Office in 2008. More recently, she played a key role in supporting the Association Annual Campaign and the capital development initiatives for Stanwood-Camano and Everett. SEATTLE — Seattle-based Moss Adams announced that Chris Schmidt has been re-elected to serve another term as chairman and chief executive officer. Dave Follett will take over for Dick Fohn as the new president and chief operating officer, while Fohn assumes leadership of the firm’s consulting practice. Rebecca Pomering will become chief practice officer. Changes are effective Aug. 10.

experience in geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering. SimpDaniel son holds Simpson a master’s degree in civil engineering from Oregon State University and a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. MILL CREEK — Peoples Bank named Melissa Siv as the new branch manager of the Mill Creek

MONROE — Everett

Community College has hired a new director for its East County Campus. Mostafa Ghous, Mostafa who now Ghous lives in Snohomish, is the former director of Campus Life and Student Activities at Berkeley City College where he managed the college’s Outreach and Retention services, student leadership initiatives, community relations, as well as

several other programs. LYNNWOOD — The Edmonds Community College Foundation awarded over $300,000 in scholarships and grants for the 2016-17 academic year. The Foundation awarded about $270,000 in scholarships to 192 students and provided $34,992 toward 15 innovation and program grants. Contributions came from individual donors, employee giving, local and regional foundations, and local companies, including Boeing.

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BOTHELL — Ed Buendia has been appointed dean of the School of Educational Studies at the University of Washington Bothell. He Ed Buendia takes over on Aug. 1, after current dean Bradley Portin goes on sabbatical. Most recently, Buendia served as chair of the Department of Education, Culture and Society at the University of Utah Salt Lake City. EDMONDS — Landau Associates has hired Daniel Simpson as a project geotechnical engineer in its Edmonds office. He has five years of

Office, located at 15506 Main St., Suite 105 in the Mill Creek Town Center. Siv has 10 years of retail banking experience, most recently as the operations manager at the Bank’s Ballard Financial Melissa Siv Center. As a Snohomish County native, she is familiar with the Mill Creek market and customers.

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 31

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MONROE — Monroe-based Canyon Creek Cabinet Company recently promoted Stephen Morton to be their Stephen mill plant Morton manager. He was hired last April as a process engineer and during that time has demonstrated his leadership and coaching skills, along with a commitment to continuous improvement in production.

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32 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Tips to aim for near-perfection sales B

ased on the results of a recent Qvidian’s annual sales execution survey, 94 percent of executive management view increasing win rates as the single-most important focus area for their sales activities. There are many moving parts when it comes to increasing “win rates.” If you want to increase your sales effectiveness, Six Sigma can be a formula for success. Six Sigma is data-driven approach for process improvement. The definition of Six Sigma (originally developed by Motorola in the mid ’80s) is a measure of quality that translates to a maximum of 3.4 defects (or errors) per million… which is near perfection. Near perfection may sound daunting; however, in terms of applying Six Sigma to sales, I’m referring to more of a method than a metric. A customary Six Sigma exercise, which translates very well to the function of sales, is process mapping. Michael J. Webb, president of Sales Performance Consulting, put it well (in an iSix Sigma Magazine article), “Effective sales process mapping focuses on the goals and problems of buyers and sellers. You don’t need to be a Six Sigma “Black Belt” to incorporate and beneLocally Owned & Operated

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include customer research, sales system development and promotion); 2) qualifying (determining prospect needs, capability and readiness to buy); 3) the third section is selling (which could include demonstration/proposal, handling obstacles and conversion); and 4) the map concludes with servicing (delivery, follow up, side-sell, retention, etc.). Process maps will differ by industry, business situation, objectives and resources. Don’t copy another company’s map, customize your own. Google “sales process map” for examples. Microsoft Excel has an adequate flow chart tool. Click on Help and type in “flow chart” in the search bar. Use this tool to map out your sales process, and then evaluate the results data for each section. The most commonly used flow chart symbols are Process (activity), Decision and Data. As you layout your sales process map, be mindful of where decisions occur.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 33

Know the no-nos of your work email E

mail, we may love it, hate it or feel it’s outdated, but we still have to deal with it in business. There are two major factors to consider when communicating through email — the legal side and the courtesy or etiquette side. Both have the potential to get you into trouble or make you look like the professional rock star you are. Let’s start with ethics and work our way to etiquette to make sure you stay on the rock star side. There’s an important little (actually big) thing you need to be very aware of called the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003, signed into law by President George Bush. Why is it so important to make sure you’re staying within the guidelines of this act? Because each separate email in violation of the CAN-SPAM Act

is subject to marketing, you’re penalties of still responsible up to $16,000 legally to comply — ouch, that with the law. hurts. Now let’s take You can a quick look at do your own privacy. Internet Well, when it research on comes to email, Monika the ins and it’s pretty much Kristofferson not private. outs of the CAN-SPAM Email is one of Office Act, but here the least secure are just a few methods of comEfficiency of the main munication you requirements: can use, accord■ Don’t use deceptive ing to www.FindLaw.com. subject lines. Something In comparison, phone calls like, “You won!” just to typically aren’t recorded get someone to open your and stored. email is a no go. If they were, your ■ Honor opt-out employer and law enforcerequests promptly. Once ment would have to get a people have told you they court order to get to them. don’t want to receive more Emails are considered to messages from you, you be company property if can’t sell or transfer their they are sent using the email addresses, even in company’s computer systhe form of a mailing list. tem. If you were to send ■ Monitor what others an email that you could are doing on your behalf. If you hire another company to handle your email

possibly come to regret, think twice because once it’s out there, it’s out there in many places. An email that is sent will be on the sender’s computer, the Internet Service Provider’s server and on the receiver’s computer. It’s common for employers to have their employees sign a computer and network usage policy. Typically, it’s going to mean that you’re only to use your business email for business and your employer has the right to monitor your email. You have to keep in mind, you’re sending communications from their equipment that could affect their business, which can provide them justifiable reasons to search your emails. Workplace harassment lawsuits are another big reason employers want to be able to check

emails and try to prevent lawsuits. Many employers run software searches for offensive words and have email systems that copy all email messages to check for productivity, illegal use and other issues. Can you imagine your emails coming back to haunt you in a court of law for employee misconduct? That’s some heavy stuff. Let’s round this out with a few etiquette reminders for good measure: Use a professional email address. Your business email should reflect your name and/or your company name. No room for cutesy names here. Use exclamation points sparingly — no need to shout. Although, I’ll admit, I tend to use them in my own writing for a little punch. Proofread every message by taking a few

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34 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,300

20,900

26,000

$10,816,389

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942 253.815


AUGUST 2016

Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

N/A

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

N/A

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

N/A

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

N/A

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

Prime Pacific

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ECONOMIC DATA

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 35

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36 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2016

Dan Ollis, Whidbey Coffee Family man Mud runner Coffee connoisseur

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Dan Ollis—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

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© 2016 Heritage Bank Member FDIC

Herald Business Journal - 08.01.2016  

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Herald Business Journal - 08.01.2016  

i2016080108013564.pdf