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families today April 2016

PENINSULA

volume 6, issue 2

A publication for families living on the North Olympic Peninsula, and an advertising supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette.

PLAN AHEAD FOR A FUN-FILLED SUMMER Variety of summer camps offered — Page 8 Museums the family will love — Page 12 Great Outdoors Photo Contest winners announced; see the photos — Page 14 And much more inside


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families today PENINSULA

Published by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette advertising department Sequim Gazette 147 W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311

W’ Y

Terry R. Ward, publisher

Next Big Project?

Steve Perry, advertising director Patricia Morrison Coate, Brenda Hanrahan and Laura Lofgren, special sections editors Peninsula Families Today is a family-focused publication and is inserted into both the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette. Please let us know what you’d like to see in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today. This publication welcomes input and new contributors. Educators, parents and professionals in their fields are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit it. Send articles, columns and photos (JPEGs at 200 dpi minimum) to section editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com. For details, phone 360-452-2345, ext. 4072.

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Children’s mental health: What to do when you suspect your child needs help by ANNE KOOMEN, advanced registered nurse practitioner certified in psychiatry and mental health at Peninsula Behavioral Health

Most parents, in the course of raising their children, have asked themselves, “Is this behavior normal?” Luckily, it is usually easy to use friends, family and teachers as resources to answer this question. One often comes away with the idea that the spectrum of expected behavior is quite wide, making room for the qualities that make all children both unique and still quite “normal.” Still, there are other times when it is less clear whether what is happening for a child requires further assessment or support. All children need help learning new skills, navigating unfamiliar social situations, managing academic expectations and practicing healthy decision-making. Parents are often on the front lines for meeting these needs, but sometimes a child requires something additional. When this happens, parents can harbor significant feelings of guilt that they may have done something wrong, or fear that their child may develop a chronic or debilitating mental illness. Additionally, they may have concerns about how to access help and what treatment will be offered. These fears and feelings of guilt are quite normal. To guide you along in your process, it is generally helpful to start with the following questions: • Is my child’s behavior within the range of normal for her age? Ask your child’s primary care provider and teachers whether what your child is going through is “developmentally appropriate,” or in line with what other children of the same age also go through. CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH, continued on Page 5  >>

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if the behavior is present in more than one setting, this is a great time to bring your child to a mental health For example, it is perfectly normal for a 2-or-3-year old provider to occasionally get so angry that they hit, kick or bite, but • Is the behavior or emotional change severe? for a 10-year-old to do the same signifies that additional How a child’s emotional experiences are perceived is help is needed. If it looks like your child’s emotional, highly dependent on your family values, cultural backsocial or behavioral experiences are significantly out of ground and personal experiences with mental illness. sync with his or her peers, you should bring him or her to An important component of your exploration into a mental health provider for further assessment. whether your child needs help is the level of distress • How long has this been going on? their experiences have brought to your family. Children are strongly affected by the same stresses as Additionally, any sudden or drastic change such as adults. If your family has recently gone through a total social withdrawal, refusal to go to school for a prodivorce, financial strain, loss of a loved one, addition of longed period, or the appearance of self-destructive another child or any other major change, it can be quite behaviors such as suicidal statements or self-harm normal to see a child become more emotional, act should be addressed quickly. younger than his or her age or even become angry. In these cases, you should contact your child’s school Additionally, it is common for children’s development to counselor, primary care provider, the Peninsula Behavprogress in a “two steps forward, one step back” fashion. ioral Health Crisis Line at 360-457-0431 or dial 9-1-1 for The development of a new pattern of behavior should immediate help. not immediately be met with alarm. Instead, talk to your If a problem is identified and you enroll your child in child about how they are doing, track this behavior and mental health services, the first-line treatment is usually wait to see if it goes away naturally. a combination of therapy, parenting training and coordiIf it doesn’t go away, or if it leads to further disruptions nation with the child’s school. in their social or emotional health, seek a mental health This does not imply that you or your child’s school has assessment. “failed” in caring for your child. • Is this behavior present in more than one Instead, these treatments are meant to enhance and location? build upon the important work you have already been If a problem is only present in one setting (such as doing. school, friend’s houses, sports, church, etc.) you can often In many cases, children find relief with these intervenimplement simple changes in that environment to alter tions alone. However, if treatments are not effective after the pattern. a period of regular attendance, a child may be referred If you find yourself running out of changes to try, or for an assessment with a psychiatric medication specialist << CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH, continued from Page 4

who can make a recommendation on whether medication could be helpful in addition to ongoing therapy. If you would like to speak with a mental health specialist to determine whether your child would benefit from additional support, phone Peninsula Behavioral Health at 360-457-0431 and access specialists will assist you. Anne Koomen is an advanced registered nurse practitioner certified in psychiatry and mental health at Peninsula Behavioral Health in Port Angeles where she sees children and adults of all ages. She received her Master of Science degree from the University of California, San Francisco and her ANNE KOOMEN Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Vermont. She is the current president for the Association of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses, and she was granted this organization’s award for Nurse of the Year in 2014. From 2005 until 2007 she was awarded a clinical research training fellowship at the National Institutes of Health, where she studied child development. She also has a background in international nonprofit work focused on children and families.

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Fun family programs at your library by NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

CELEBRATE DÍA!

As the nation’s population continues to become more diverse, the North Olympic Library System will join hundreds of libraries in celebration of the 20th anniversary of El día de los niños (Day of the Child/Day of the Book) on Saturday, April 30. Bilingual musician Eli Rosenblatt and friends will lead the celebrations with music to move and groove to in English and Spanish. Rosenblatt will appear at 10:30 a.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave.; 1 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St.; and 4 p.m. at the Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave. All children in attendance will receive a free book.

POETRY WALKS

The North Olympic Library System is teaming up with Olympic National Park to offer a third season of Poetry Walks. This year’s program began April 1 and continues until May 31, and features inspiring poetry along five dazzling trails

in Olympic National Park. The library and national park hope the playful combination of nature and art will encourage local residents and visitors to get out and be active, and remind them of two great, local resources that are always available to explore. During Poetry Walks, poems will be placed on signs along the following trails in Olympic National Park: the Hall of Mosses Trail, the Living Forest Trail, the Madison Creek Falls Trails, the Peabody Creek Trail and Spruce Railroad Trail. With the exception of the Hall of Mosses Trail, access to the trails is free.

FRANCES ENGLAND

On Friday, May 13, families are invited to have fun singing and swaying along to the delightful tunes of children’s musician Frances England as she makes her first appearances at the library. There will be two opportunities to catch England’s fun and heartfelt music: A matinee performance will take place at 10:30 a.m. at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St. in Sequim, followed by an evening performance at 6:30 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library.

Enjoy the beauty of Olympic National Park’s Hoh Rain Forest and other scenic locations during the North Olympic Library System’s Poetry Walks series this spring.

ENDANGERED SPECIES DAY

To celebrate Endangered Species Day, the Port Angeles Library’s youth services staff will stage a free puppet show at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road in Port Angeles. The whimsical show, created for 3-to5-year-old children, will take place at 10:30 a.m. Friday, May 20.

CREATIVE SCIENCE!

On Saturday, May 21, the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture will present a special family program for children ages 3 to 5 that is all about nature, art and science. Families can drop by the Port Angeles Library anytime between 10 a.m. and noon to participate in this fun and educa-

tional program focusing on patterns, design and technology in nature.

EXPLORE! BACKYARD BIRDS

Discover the birds dwelling in your own backyard at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25, at the Sequim Library. Birds aren’t just a lot of fun to follow, they are central players in what goes on in many familiar ecosystems. This free class will expand your understanding of these feathered wonders of nature, with the Dungeness River Audubon Center on-hand to identify the special characteristics of species you can expect to encounter in your own backyard. For more information about these and other upcoming family programs at your library, visit www.nols.org or send an email to Discover@nols.org.

Learn About Your Port Angeles Schools Visit Facilities Committee 2016 online to view its report, www.portangelesschools.org. Go to Community > Capital Facilities Planning. Questions and comments can be sent to info@portangelesschools.org. Visit www.portangelesschools.org for calendar of events, student and staff success ar�cles, and more!

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The power of choice Every April 22, people all around the world gather to celebrate Earth Day and to raise awareness about the need to work together to protect our environment. The Earth Day Network is the sponsor of this event, and their goal is to show Americans that the choices we make each and every day determine the way our children will grow up and live on this planet. AN EXAMPLE According to the United Nations’ Environment Statistics Country Snapshot, only 9 per cent of the energy used in this country in 2009 was renewable. That means the vast majority of us are using fossil fuels that can’t be regenerated once they’re gone. However, it’s important not to give in to a sense of powerlessness. Earth Day is a chance for all of us to join together in identifying all the small — and big — ways we can make a difference to the environment. WHAT YOU CAN DO • Become a volunteer with a national or local organization that works to preserve the environment. • Reduce your carbon footprint every day by learning about green commuting, eating local whole foods and sustainable consumerism.

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Summer camps offer fun, educational opportunities for area youth by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The arrival of spring means many things — warmer weather, longer daylight hours and a chance to find a summer camp that children will look forward to attending once the last school bell rings. Camps across the North Olympic Peninsula offer area youth a chance to stretch their legs and imaginations with an array of nature-based activities. Some camps offer a glimpse at what happens under the sea, or a chance to learn or improve sewing or acting skills. Camp organizers say children will learn new skills, build friendships, develop character and confidence, and uncover new interests and talents.

JEFFERSON COUNTY PORT TOWNSEND MARINE SCIENCE CENTER The Port Townsend Marine Science Center, 532 Battery Way, will offer summer science camps filled with exploring area beaches, uncovering treasures in its exhibits, making crafts, playing games and nature walks through Fort Worden State Park. Camps offered include: • Seal Pups Day Camp is for preschoolers ages 3 to 4 and runs from 9:30 a.m. to noon June 27-July 1 and Aug. 8-Aug. 12. Cost is $90. • Junior Explorers Day Camp is for youngsters ages 5 to 7. Morning sessions from 9 a.m. to noon will be offered Aug. 15-19. Afternoon sessions will be held between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. June 27-July 1, Aug. 8-12 and Aug. 15-19. Cost is $150. • Coastal Explorers Day Camp is for children ages 8 to 10 and runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 11-15. Cost is $275. • Marine Biology Day Camp will be offered from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 18-22 for children ages 9 to 13. Cost is $275. Early registration is recommended; visit www.ptmsc. org/programs/learn/camps for more information. A limited number of scholarships are available. EAST JEFFERSON CUB SCOUT CAMP Crazy Cub Science — A fun-filled camp will be held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2098 Anderson Lake Road in Chimacum. The camp is open to all area Cub Scouts and friends of Cub Scouts when registered through their pack. Space is limited. Activities will include science experiments, archery, games, crafts, cooking and working with BB guns safely. Cost is $80 if registered by May 31, or $100 if registered between June 1 and July 1. No registration will be accepted after July 1. For more information and to register, contact Kim Barry at eastjeffcubscoutcamp@gmail.com.

CLALLAM COUNTY DUNGENESS RIVER AUDUBON CENTER SUMMER CAMPS The Dungeness River Audubon Center, 2151 W. 8

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY April 2016

photo courtesy of MUSICAL THEATRE INTENSIVE FOR TEENS

Participants from the 2015 Musical Theatre Intensive for Teens take to the stage to learn dance basics, improvisation, audition coaching and more during the annual camp held in Sequim.

Hendrickson Road in Sequim, will offer its popular summer camp programs to entice children to learn and have fun while exploring the great outdoors. Camps offered include: • Two sessions of Nature Ninjas! will be offered for youth ages 8 to 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 27-28 and Aug. 11-12. Cost is $90. Participants will learn how to become a “nature ninja” in this two-day camp by practicing techniques of “blending into” the woods by mastering camouflage and sneaking skills. Fun games and activities will have your child exploring the ins and outs of Railroad Bridge Park, getting dirty and having a blast. • Builder’s Camp for children ages 8 to 12 will be held June 30-July 1. Cost is $90. For students who love to build and create, this is the camp. Campers will build bridges, towers, airplanes, boats and more. Fun games, activities and competitions revolving around creating and building will have your child exploring the ins and outs of Railroad Bridge Park, getting dirty and making new friends. • Girls in Science for children ages 7 to 13 will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 11-13. Cost is $120. This camp will immerse young girls into the fantastic world of science. Through fun and interactive experiments and activities, grade-level appropriate topics in biology, chemistry and physics will be explored while introducing women in scientific careers within the community. In addition, the camp will focus on collaboration and confidence-building through teamwork exercises. • Bike Camp for children ages 8 to 14 will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon July 18-21. Cost is $90. Participants must be able to ride 10 miles a day. Last year children rode a total of 61 miles during the camp. Campers will learn the basics of bicycle maintenance

and ride the trails around Sequim during this four-day adventure. Campers will travel to various places along the Olympic Discovery Trail and beyond. Bicycle and helmet are required. Let camp organizers know if a camper needs a bicycle during the registration process. • Survival Camp, for children ages 8 to 12, will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 8-9. Cost is $90. Survival Camp is a unique opportunity for boys and girls to experience some of the living and survival skills practiced by our distant ancestors.  Participants will spend each day out in the woods getting dirty and learning how to find food, water, warmth and shelter through a variety of fun games and craft activities. • Summer Nature Camp is for children ages 8 to 12 and will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 15-18. Cost is $150. Summer Nature Camp is an exciting opportunity for boys and girls to experience and explore the outdoors.  Campers will survey Railroad Bridge Park and investigate the Dungeness River’s wide variety of plants, animals and insects, and learn about floodplains, ecology, geology, river dynamics and the Railroad Bridge.  The goal is to help children understand and enjoy the natural world through a variety of hands-on activities that include science investigations, games, arts, crafts, hikes, water play and a bicycle journey.  Enrollment of only 20 campers guarantees a warm, personal learning experience.   Camps are led by dedicated environmental educators and naturalists who have strong backgrounds working with elementary and middle-school youth. For more information about summer camps, phone the Dungeness River Audubon Center at 360-681-4076 or visit www.dungenessrivercenter.org. SUMMER CAMPS, continued on Page 9 >>

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<< SUMMER CAMPS, continued from Page 8

MUSICAL THEATRE INTENSIVE FOR TEENS Now in its fifth year, the Musical Theatre Intensive for Teens is shifting its location to Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. The camp runs from 9:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays July 5-Aug. 5 and is for teens ages 12 to 19. The camp focuses on “finding your voice,” “acting a song,” “dance basics,” “improvisation” and “audition coaching” in the mornings. Afternoons are spent on creating original musical numbers. In addition to group activities, attendees will receive individual coaching and will benefit from discussions of confidence building, discovering and fine-tuning their talents and communicating their own stories. A professional musical director, Broadway singer, actress and modern dancer are among the instructors. After two weeks of training as a company, campers and staff will present informal performances to invited audiences. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. The cost of $475 includes all materials for the twoweek session plus lunch, catered by Sequim’s Pacific Pantry. To register, contact the Olympic Theatre Arts office Mondays through Fridays between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. at 360-683-7326. OLYMPIC NATURE EXPERIENCE CAMPS • The Dungeness Adventure Club Camp is for children ages 3 to 6. The camp will take place between 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. July 11-14 at the Dungeness River Audubon Center in Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road in Sequim. Cost is $80 During the camp, children will adventure, play and learn along the woods and side channels of the Dungeness River. Through instructor-led storytelling, games and crafts, children will learn about the plants and animals in the region. Through adventures, play and personal challenges, children will strengthen their self confidence, self awareness and team building skills. This class is led by a forest kindergarten-certified teacher and naturalist. • Wild Coyotes Camp is geared toward children ages 5 to 8. The camp will be held between 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. June 20-24 at the Dungeness Recreation Area, 554 Voice of America Road in Sequim. Cost is $130. Children will adventure through forests and fields looking for animal tracks, wild edibles and learning forest skills such as silent travel, camouflage and shelter building. Through games, adventures and storytelling, children will become familiar with the compass directions and how to identify dangers in the forest. Through stories, games and crafts, children will learn much about themselves and their love of nature. Arts, crafts and games are child-led so that each child is allowed to create their own unique experience

during camp. • Way of the Woods is for children ages 7 to 12. The camp will be held between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. July 25-29 at the Dungeness Recreation Area. Cost is $165 Through play and adventure, children will learn quiet movement and camouflage skills and will begin to learn about primitive hunting and fire-making techniques. Through games and awareness tools, they will learn the four compass directions and how to navigate safely in the forest. Children will be allowed to challenge their skills at their own pace and will practice lots of team work and problem solving, gaining increased self awareness and confidence. • Tribe Camp will be offered to youth ages 3 to 12 between 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Aug. 2-4 at Robin Hill County Park on Pinnell Road in Sequim. Cost is $80. Children must have completed a previous Olympic Nature Experience drop-off program to register for this camp experience. Through multi-age play and adventure, children will build on the skills and knowledge they previously developed. Younger students will have the advantage of older role models while older children will be able to practice leadership and mentoring with younger students. For more camp information or to register online, visit www.olympicnatureexperience.org. BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula will offer summer programming for area youth throughout the summer. Weekly day camp sessions will begin June 20 at the Carroll C. Kendall Unit, 400 W. Fir St. in Sequim, and Port Angeles Unit, 2620 S. Francis St. Camps run from 7:45 a.m. to noon each weekday. Cost per child is $65 for the week or $15 a day. Participants must be Boys & Girls Club members, and membership dues are $30 per child through December.  Each week the camp’s crafts and activities are centered around a different theme and most are paired with field trips. Parents can sign up children for as many camp weeks as they want — from one day, one week to the entire summer.  All participants receive a free lunch and morning and afternoon snacks as part of the program. After the morning camp wraps up at noon, the clubs are open for general membership from noon to 6 p.m. The afternoon is packed with programs to keep youth busy and their minds sharp over the summer.  Each summer, 43 million kids (three out of four) in the U.S. do not participate in summer learning programs.  “The average American student loses approximately one month’s worth of learning during the summer; for most students from low-income families, the learning loss is far greater — two to three months behind,” said Janet Gray, resource development director for the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula. “To combat summer learning loss, we are offering “Brain Gain,” Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s enrichment program aimed to prevent summer learning loss.”  

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This program will run Mondays through Thursdays engaging youth in project-based learning through discovery, creative expression and working toward a common goal. Further academic opportunities include weekly science activities, reading time, writing time and computer access to “Stride Academy.”  The club is equipped to offer families an opportunity to enhance academics using this educational software to reinforce learning by rewarding success with entertainment and connecting members to their peers as they compete in an exciting virtual world. Health and fitness is infused into daily physical activity instilling teamwork and knowledge of sports. Members will be given gym time, outdoor access and coaching in several different sports increasing their agility and hand eye-coordination, encouraging 60 minutes of physical activity each day.  Also available to members are the Garden Club, Running Club and “What’s Cookin’” — a culinary class. Boys and girls will have lots of opportunities to explore outside the clubhouse this summer, too.  Back by popular demand is the “Jr. Rangers” program where members explore Olympic National Park with ranger facilitators leading hikes, canoeing, rafting, swimming and introducing members to everything available on the Peninsula.    Each week there will be a field trip taking children out on adventures normally not available to them, like sport events, zoo trips and museum tours, and the Teen Club travels to Lake Crescent weekly. For more information on summer programming and camps or to register, stop by either club, phone 360-6838095 in Sequim or 360-417-2831 in Port Angeles, or visit www.bgc-op.org. CLALLAM COUNTY YMCA Summer day camps at the Clallam County YMCA, 302 S. Francis St. in Port Angeles, are offered each week from June through August. • Day camps are offered for children in grades kindergarten through six, with a variety of fun and engaging sport, hobby and art themes alternating each week. Some of the most popular camps are geocaching, archery, hiking club, beach explorers and Lego Madness. New offerings for 2016 include Shark Tank and Amazing Race, which allow children to pitch their own inventions and participate in a scavenger hunt across Port Angeles. The YMCA’s summer day camps are designed to encourage creativity and exploration, build confidence and character, and introduce and develop skills. Through summer camp, children build friendships with peers and relationships with positive adult role models, all while staying active and having fun. Registration for day camps begins May 1. Early registration is recommended. Classes run Mondays through Fridays, with morning offerings (9 a.m. to noon) and afternoon offerings (1 p.m. to 4 p.m.). Full-day enrollment options, with morning and afternoon camps, also are available. Week-long classes cost $75 for YMCA facility members or $95 for community members. SUMMER CAMPS, continued on Page 10  >>

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  April 2016  9


<< SUMMER CAMPS, continued from Page 9

Specialty camps are available at an additional cost. • The YMCA will be once again offering its specialty drama camp. Drama camp will be offered for three weeks beginning July 11 and culminating with a performance the weekend of July 30 camp. This popular camp allows children to learn the techniques actors use on stage, rehearse and perform a play. Drama camp is available to children ages 8 to 16. For more information about camps or to register, stop by the Clallam County YMCA, phone 360-452-9244 or visit www.clallamcountyymca.org. WSU EXTENSION CLALLAM COUNTY 4-H CTA SEWING DAY CAMP Clallam County 4-H and WSU Clothing Textile Advisors will present Beginners and Continuing Sewing Camp for youth ages 8 to 18. The day camp will be held the mornings of July 26-29 at Viking Sew and Vac, 707 E. First St. in Port Angeles. At the camp, youth will learn to navigate their sewing machine, use basic sewing tools and be provided with several projects, each designed to improve sewing skills.    All class materials will be provided along with a basic sewing kit.  Please have your child bring a sewing machine.  A limited number of machines are available for use and can be reserved at registration.    Cost is $45 per youth.  Scholarships are available.  Space is limited. The deadline to register is June 1.  To register, contact Jenny Schmidt, 4-H program coordinator at 360-417-2398 or email jenny.schmidt@ wsu.edu. FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER Port Angeles’ Feiro Marine Life Center and Olympic

photo courtesy of FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER

Children watch a video of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary scientists with a submersible during a Feiro Marine Life Center Junior Oceanographer Camp in Port Angeles.

Coast National Marine Sanctuary team up to engage youths to investigate, explore and get inspired by what is found in the ocean during Junior Oceanographer and Marine Tech summer camps. • Junior Oceanographer Camp sessions for youth ages 7 to 9 is scheduled for June 27-30, for ages 10 to 12 July 18-21 (underwater robotics theme) and July 25-28 (marine biology theme), and half-day sessions for children ages 5 to 7 will be held June 20-23 and Aug. 15-18. • Older youth, ages 13 to 15, can sign up for Marine Tech Camp July 11-14. This summer camp will focus on different technologies used for ocean exploration, including activities such as building underwater harbor cameras, designing remotely operated vehicles and creating videos using digital

cameras and editing software. Get early-bird rates until April 30: The cost for full day camps — 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. — is $110 for Feiro members or $130 full price. Half-day camp — 9 a.m. to noon — is $75 for Feiro members or $90 full price. Beginning May 1, prices for full day camps rise to $130 for Feiro members or $150 full price. Half-day camp prices will rise to $85 for members or $100 full price. Scholarships are available on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, phone Feiro Marine Life Center at 360-417-6254 or visit www.feiromarinelifecenter.org/ youth-programs.

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Free packets of pollinator seeds available

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Campaign encourages public to plant non-invasive flowers

by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Packets of non-invasive flowering seed mixes that attract bees, butterflies and other pollinators are now available free to the community while supplies last. The Clallam County Noxious Weed Board offered these seed packets last year as a way to increase backyard pollinator plants within the county. Wildly successful, these packets are again being offered as a way to ensure that local homeowners’ and gardeners’ commitment to controlling noxious weeds doesn’t have to come at the expense of providing a pollinator-friendly environment. Clallam County Weeds Coordinator Cathy Lucero said the seed packets are part of a campaign to promote noninvasive forage for a broad array of pollinators who face many obstacles, coupled with an awareness that some beautiful plants have become bullies in the bigger scheme of things. Certain beautiful but noxious weeds can provide pollen and nectar sources for honeybees but are capable of spreading far beyond their intended area, ruining pastures, displacing native plants, disrupting riverbed habitat for fish and damaging infrastructure.

“As always, our ultimate goal is to protect people, land and natural resources from the degrading impact of noxious weeds,” Lucero said. Seed packets contain seed for lupine, sunflower, coreopsis, purple coneflower, crimson clover, lemon mint, bee balm, butterfly milkweed and other species. The seed packets are available at a variety of locations around the county including: In Port Angeles: • Port Angeles City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. • Department of Community Development, 223 E. Fourth St. • Washington State Extension in the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St. • Port Angeles Farmers Market, on the corner of Front and Lincoln streets on Saturdays throughout the year • KONP, 721 E. First St. • Peninsula Daily News, 305 W. First St. • Clallam County Conservation District, 228 W. First St., Suite H In Sequim: • KSQM, 577 W. Washington St. • Sequim City Hall, 152 W. Cedar St. In addition, Forks City Hall, 500 E. Division St., and Olympic Natural Resources Center, 1455 S. Forks Ave., also will have the packets available beginning in May. For additional information, contact Lucero at 360-417-2442.

Get Ready for Summer . . . with some SPRING CLEANING!

The Clallam County YMCA has partnered with the NFL for another season of flag football on the North Olympic Peninsula. The program will be offered from June 4 through Aug. 18. Program offerings include: • 5-to-6-year-old co-ed academy • 7-to-8-year-old co-ed league • 9-to-10-year-old co-ed league • 11-to-12-year-old co-ed league Cost per person is $55 for YMCA members and $65 for community members. Registration closes when all spots are filled, or on May 29 at the latest. Practices will be held at Erickson Park’s playfield, located off Race Street in Port Angeles, three times a week on weeknights. Games will be held at Albert Haller Playfields on North Rhodefer Road in Sequim on Saturdays. The 5-to-6-year-old academy will meet twice a week on weeknights only. Space is limited. Each participant receives a replica of a reversible NFL jersey. For more details or to register, phone the YMCA at 360-452-9244, or visit www.clallamcountyymca.org.

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Peninsula’s museums offer fun, educational opportunities by PATRICIA MORRISON COATE, Sequim Gazette

From ancient Native American artifacts to restored airplanes, from mastodon bones to a stately home built and furnished nearly 150 years ago, the North Olympic Peninsula has nearly a dozen museums for families to explore. Get a real sense of the heritage of Clallam and Jefferson counties by browsing through these familyfriendly museums.

JEFFERSON MUSEUM OF ART & HISTORY

The Jefferson Museum of Art & History is in the restored 1892 Port Townsend City Hall building. Housed in the former municipal courtroom, fire hall and jail spaces, the museum’s exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. The exhibit also features historical examples of extravagant Victorian regalia. The Fire Hall Gallery features exhibits on Jefferson County’s maritime history and the Port Townsend Fire Department, as well as a Victorian hearse and Gurney cab. The former courtroom has been transformed into an art gallery with rotating exhibits. Museum hours are daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors 65 and older, and $1 for children 3 to 12. Admission is free on the first Saturday of every month for Jefferson County residents. A passport to the museum includes admission to the Rothschild House. The museum is at 540 Water St., Port Townsend. For more information, phone 360-385-1003.

Sequim Museum & Arts in downtown Sequim

Jefferson Museum of Art & History in downtown Port Townsend

Joyce Depot Museum in the heart of Joyce

ROTHSCHILD HOUSE STATE PARK MUSEUM

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors 65 and older, and $1 for children 3 to 12. A passport to the Rothschild House includes admission to the Jefferson Museum of Art & History. Phone 360-379-8076 or see www.jchsmuseum.org for more information.

The Rothschild House is at Taylor and Franklin streets in uptown Port Townsend. It was built in 1868 by a prominent Port Townsend merchant and occupied by the Rothschild family for almost a century. The two-story house retains its Greek Revival architecture, decor and 19th-century original furnishings, plus a traditional herb and rose garden with a superb view overlooking downtown and the bay. The smallest state park in Washington, it is managed by the Jefferson County Historical Society. The museum is open May 1 to Sept. 30 daily from

PUGET SOUND COAST ARTILLERY MUSEUM

The Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum is in Building 201, one of the original barracks built in 1904, at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend.

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MUSEUMS, continued on Page 13  >>

BE IN THE KNOW! Find out more about family-friendly events on the North Olympic Peninsula by visiting the Peninsula Daily News’ and Sequim Gazette’s websites www.peninsuladailynews.com www.sequimgazette.com.

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<< MUSEUMS, continued from Page 12

The museum is dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of coast artillery history with special emphasis on the harbor defenses of Puget Sound. The museum also has exhibits showing the history of Fort Worden from its beginnings in 1897. It is open 365 days per year from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with extended hours from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Admission is $4 for adults, $2 for ages 6 to 12 with a $10 family value package covering two generations. Admission is free for children 5 and younger and active-duty service members with ID. Partners and dependents of active-duty military service members pay half-price. Group rates are available for students, Scouts and similar organizations by prior arrangement. Contact the museum at 360-385-0373.

PORT TOWNSEND AERO MUSEUM

If antique airplane aficionados are anything like their car-worshiping counterparts, they’ll hit every museum within a hundred miles. One not to miss on the Olympic Peninsula is the 18,000-square-foot Port Townsend Aero Museum at the Jefferson County International Airport, 4 miles south of the junction of highways 19 and 20 from Port Townsend. About 25 antique or classic airplanes have been donated to the nonprofit and, after meticulous restoration, are displayed on three levels.

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The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors and active military, $6 for youth 7 to 12 and free for children 6 and younger. Most of the planes fly at least once every two weeks. Stay long enough and you might see some in flight. Discounts are available for groups and special events. For more information, phone 360-437-0863 or go to www.ptaeromuseum.com.

QUILCENE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

The nonprofit museum is at 151 E. Columbia St. in Quilcene and features artifacts, documents and photos of the Quilcene area, many of which were donated by local residents. Exhibits feature Quilcene life, businesses and events, including logging, agriculture, hearth and home, Native Americans and schools. A gift shop and research library are available. Hours are from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays through Mondays April through October. Tours are available by appointment. Phone 360-765-3192 or 360-765-0688.

SEQUIM MUSEUM & ARTS

Sequim Museum & Arts is dedicated to presenting the history and culture of the families that settled the Sequim Prairie, Dungeness and areas of eastern Clallam County. The exhibit center, 175 W. Cedar St., is home to the Manis mastodon bones that are the oldest in

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North America. Carbon testing and DNA testing have earned Emanuel Manis and his discovery a place in the Smithsonian Institution and multiple scientific magazines for decades. On permanent exhibit is a rowing shell built by George Popcock, the man who built the boat that the University of Washington crew won the gold medal in the 1936 Olympics against Hitler’s team in Germany. Follow local athlete Joe Rantz’s road to the Olympics shown on the poster wall. Regional displays, including farming, marine and air travel, Native American baskets and taxidermy, are complemented by local art displays that change every two months. The museum bookstore carries a collection of local history books, postcards and gifts. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and on First Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. For extended hours on special occasions, phone 360-683-8110 or visit www.SequimMuseum.com. The Sequim Museum & Arts Center also oversees the Dungeness Schoolhouse at 2781 Towne Road which hosts weddings, musicals, classes, family reunions and tours that keep the 125-year-old National Historic site busy. Visit the Veteran’s Memorial at 544 N. Sequim Ave., also the site of the new exhibit center. This museum building houses the administration building, research library and artifact collection, and currently has a classroom for students to see and learn about the mastodon tusks.

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Great Outdoors Photo Contest winners In the winter edition of Peninsula Families Today, we asked young readers to send their best shots for our Great Outdoors Photo Contest, which is proudly sponsored by Brown’s Outdoor, 112 W. Front St. in Port Angeles. After sorting through all of the contest entries, we selected a first-place photographer and a runnerup photographer. But we also chose to select a couple of honorable mentions because they were just too good not to share. We hope you enjoy these photos of beautiful scenes on the North Olympic Peninsula taken by some of the area’s youngest shutterbugs. A huge thank-you to everyone who entered the contest.

RUNNER-UP PHOTOGRAPHER —Gideon Oravetz, 3, of Port Angeles snapped this photo in March during a family hike along the Peabody Creek Trail.

FIRST-PLACE PHOTOGRAPHER — Jack Walsh, 12, of Port Angeles took this photo of Olympic National Park’s Madison Falls in late October/early November 2015. HONORABLE MENTION — Brayden Yingling, 13, of Port Hadlock took this photo of Lake Cushman.

HONORABLE MENTION — Leighton Flores, 4, of Port Angeles took this photo of the first day of spring in his backyard.

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<< MUSEUMS, continued from Page 13

Veterans ceremonies are held throughout the year. Check the website for event dates.

JOYCE DEPOT MUSEUM

The Joyce Depot Museum is a railroad and logging history museum housed in an authentic and restored railroad depot built in 1914 at the Joyce site, about 15 miles west of Port Angeles. It showcases area history and memorabilia through photos of the Joyce-Lake Crescent area and old logging and railroad equipment. Some of its history includes the Spruce Railroad to Lake Crescent, built to ship spruce for World War I-era airplanes. Summer hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays through Mondays. The depot is at 50883 state Highway 112. Phone 360-928-3568 for more information. Admission is by donation.

FORKS TIMBER MUSEUM

The Forks Timber Museum offers a look into the rich history of homesteading, farming and logging on the Olympic Peninsula, presented in a log cabin “home” built by talented local volunteers and the high school carpentry class of 1989. There are interactive displays of pioneer living, farm life, a logging camp bunkhouse and cook area, chain saw exhibit, Native American art, fire lookout tower and many pictures of early life in the area.

A $3 entrance fee is charged for people older than 12, with military and younger children free. A Museum Hunt engages children to really look at the displays by asking them to find certain objects — with a reward of color pages and a packet of “goodies” given to them at the end. Homemade local wood and denim crafts are offered for sale, along with Timber Museum caps, in the small gift area. The museum, at 1421 S. Forks Ave., Forks, is open year-round from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Phone 360-374-9663 for more information.

MAKAH MUSEUM

The Makah Cultural and Research Center includes the world-renowned Makah Museum, home to the largest collection of pre-contact Northwest Coast Native artifacts, including a complete gray whale skeleton. This high-quality Makah museum offers visitors a fullscale replica of a longhouse, dioramas and artifact replicas from one of five traditional villages of the Makah tribe, buried by a mudslide near Lake Ozette about 500 years ago. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day; it may be closed in harsh weather. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors 62 and older and military in uniform, and children 5 and younger are free. The museum is at 1880 Bayview Ave. in Neah Bay. For more information, phone 360-645-2711.

BLOCK Fest event planned by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Young children ages 8 months to 8 years can learn math and science through block play during an upcoming BLOCK Fest event. BLOCK Fest organizers, in partnership with the Port Angeles School District, will host events at two locations in Port Angeles: Saturday, April 23, at Jefferson Elementary, 18 E. 12th St.) and Saturday, May 7, at Dry Creek Elementary, 25 Rife Road. Sessions are at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Registration is requested in advance as there are only five different block stations and families rotate through them over the course of one hour. To register, phone Parenting Matters Foundation at 360-681-2250 or email nicole@firstteacher.org. For more information, phone Parenting Matters Foundation at 360-681-2250. These events are sponsored by Parenting Matters Foundation and the First Teacher Program, A United Way Partner Agency, through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Ben R. Curran, M.D. Ned J. Hammar, M.D. Lindsey Dickens Hay, M.D. Lissa K. Lubinski, M.D. Jessica M. Colwell, M.D. Karen J. Lacy, LCSW The NORTH OLYMPIC HEALTHCARE NETWORK, a federally qualified community health center, provides high-quality, full-spectrum Primary Care, Behavioral Health, and Oral Health services to meet the needs of North Olympic Peninsula. NOHN provides safe, effective, patient-centered, continuously measured and improved health care to every patient regardless of age, gender, race, creed, national origin, insurance status or ability to pay.

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Special Sections - Peninsula Families Today April 2016  

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