Page 1

HEALTHY LIVING

| AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PRODUCED BY PENINSULA DAILY NEWS & SEQUIM GAZETTE |

RETURNING

TO PORT ANGELES AFTER 11 YEARS

PAGE 8

PLUS

HOW TO PREVENT SPORTS INJURIES AUTUMN 2015

volume 11, issue 3

GROWING FOOD, CANNING CLASSES


HEALTHY LIVING

| AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PRODUCED BY PENINSULA DAILY NEWS & SEQUIM GAZETTE |

RETURNING

TO PORT ANGELES AFTER 11 YEARS

PAGE 8

on the cover THE BIG HURT RETURNS

PLUS

HOW TO PREVENT SPORTS INJURIES

Healthy Living Volume 11, Issue 3

AUTUMN 2015

volume 11, issue 3

GROWING FOOD, CANNING CLASSES

After an 11-year hiatus, the Big Hurt, a race featuring mountain biking, kayaking, road biking and running segments, returns to Port Angeles. Page 8 Photos provided by BIG HURT ORGANIZERS

Articles and submissions

AUTUMN 2015

We’re always on the lookout for article ideas to include in our quarterly Healthy Living publication. If you have an idea for a story, please let us know. Professionals in their field are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration in Healthy Living. Send articles, columns and photos (jpegs at 200 dpi minimum) to special sections editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit submissions. Submitted articles are the opinions and beliefs of the contributing writer and in no way represent an endorsement by Healthy Living, Peninsula Daily News or Sequim Gazette.

Published by the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS/SEQUIM GAZETTE Advertising Department Offices: 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 360-452-2345 ■ peninsuladailynews.com 147 W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311 ■ sequimgazette.com

Terry R. Ward, publisher and editor Steve Perry, advertising director

Patricia Morrison Coate, Brenda Hanrahan and Laura Lofgren, editors

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Take the first step to putting an end to your joint pain.

Registration open for Crab Fest 5K Fun Run in Port Angeles STORY BY PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Early registration is open for the Crab Fest 5K Fun Run at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 10. The run is one of many activities planned during the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival, set from Oct. 9-11 at City Pier in downtown Port Angeles. The run is sponsored by Peninsula College Athletics. Event proceeds will support student athlete scholarships. Registration is $30 before Oct. 1 and $35 thereafter. Runners also can register on the day of the race beginning at 9:30 a.m. The annual Crab Fest, now in its 14th year, will offer a community crab feed; arts and crafts; food from eight local restaurants; cooking demonstrations including master chef Graham Kerr, who is known as “The Galloping Gourmet;” the Captain Joseph House Chowder Cook-off; a grab-a-crab tank derby; Olympic Peninsula Rowing Association rowing

exhibitions; and live music. Registrants in the fun run will receive a gift bag with a T-shirt, a $5 coupon toward a crab dinner, a free run at the Crab Derby and a drink ticket good for one beer, wine or soft drink. To ensure they get the right size T-shirt, runners are urged to register in advance. The 5K is open to all ages and running styles and will be an out-and-back along the waterfront trail starting at City Pier. Prizes will be awarded in four divisions: Under 40/Over 40 women and Under 40/ Over 40 men. The winning runner in each category will receive two free crab dinners and season passes for the men’s and women’s Peninsula College basketball 2015-16 season. To register for the run in advance, see http://tinyurl.com/PDN-crabfestfunrun. For more information about the Crab Fest 5K Fun Run, send an email to Alison Crumb at acrumb@pencol.edu or phone 360-417-5697.

Make this year a time for a new you. Attend our free Orthopedic Health Seminar. If you’ve been living with joint pain because treatment seemed to complicated, this seminar is for you. Join Jefferson Healthcare’s Dr. David King for a discus-

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SEPTEMBER 2015

3


Preventing fall sports injuries STORY BY BETH SANDOVAL, DIRECTOR OF THERAPEUTIC ASSOCIATES PHYSICAL THERAPY PORT ANGELES

Fall brings the excitement of a new school year, new backpacks and for many youths, the start of fall sports. In the United States, about 30 million children and teens participate in some form of organized sports. Each year, participants experience more than 3.5 million injuries, causing lost playing time. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly half of youth sports injuries are preventable. As your athletes take the field, here are some ideas to avoid injury: 1) Wear appropriate footwear Children’s feet grow, so make sure shoes are the correct size. Also make sure your child has the correct type of cleat for the surface on which they will be playing. If you are uncertain regarding what type of footwear your child should be wearing, talk to your coach. 2) Wear appropriate safety equipment This is particularly important with contact sports. Safety equipment includes things like helmets, shin guards and mouth guards. Make sure they correctly fit your child and all components function properly. Make sure your child knows how to take them on and off themselves. 3) Warm up Make sure your child arrives in time to participate

in warm up. Dynamic warm-up drills are an excellent way to prepare the body for an athletic activity. Note that 62 percent of sports-related injuries occur during practice, so warming up is important on both practice and game day. For a link to dynamic warm ups, check out: www. tinyurl.com/qcxecmr. 4) Stay fueled and hydrated All athletes need adequate energy to perform their best. For morning events, make sure your athletes wake up early enough to get a solid breakfast. For afternoon or evening events, have adequate snacks to bridge the gap between lunch and when they play. Children 9-12 years old should drink 1.5 liters or seven glasses of water per day. Teens 13 and older, should drink 2 liters or eight to 10 glasses of water each day. These numbers should increase on hot days and as exercise intensity increases. 5) Pay attention to first signs of injury Bumps and bruises are typical for children playing sports. Persistent pain is not normal. PREVENTING FALL SPORTS INJURIES CONTINUED ON PAGE 5 >>

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HEALTHY LIVING

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<< PREVENTING FALL SPORTS INJURIES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4

treat the area using PRICE, which stands for Protect, Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevate. Protect the area, by covering any open wound or bracing the joint. Rest can mean either sitting out completely or modifying participation to rest the injured area. Ice for 15 to 20 minutes. Compress using an ace wrap. Elevate the area to reduce swelling. If self-care has not improved symptoms in 24 to 48 hours, it is recommended to consult your medical doctor or physical therapist.

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Beth Sandoval is a board-certified orthopaedic clinical specialist and the director of Therapeutic Associates Physical Therapy Port Angeles, 1108 E. First St.. Phone 360-452-6216. Sandoval received a bachelor’s of science in biology from Washington State University and a doctorate of physical therapy from the University of Colorado. She treats patients with conditions including sports injuries, musculoskeletal pain, surgical rehabilitation and spinal dysfunction.

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Overuse injuries account for nearly half of all injuries. These can present gradually over time. Listen and talk to your athlete. If appropriate, discuss the situation with the coach and determine if the player should take a break, do an alternate form of conditioning, or apply PRICE (see No. 7 below). 6) Notice signs of concussion A concussion is a brain injury caused by a blow to the head or a force causing quick motion of the head. It is important to notice signs or symptoms of a concussion. If a concussion is suspected, the player must stop playing and be evaluated. Continuing to play puts the player at risk of Second Impact Syndrome. Second Impact Syndrome is when an athlete sustains a second concussion while still having symptoms from the first concussion. It can cause severe impairment and in rare cases death. To learn more about concussions, check out: www.sportsconcussion.com. 7) PRICE For acute injuries, including things like ankle sprains or pulled muscles,

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HEALTHY LIVING

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SEPTEMBER 2015

5


Music for Baby & Me, Toddler Storytimes resume STORY BY PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The North Olympic Library System recently resumed offering Music for Baby & Me and Toddler Storytimes at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Both library programs are free and open to the public. Music for Baby & Me storytimes will occur every Friday at 11:15 a.m. from Sept. 11 until Nov. 20, and from Jan. 8 to May 13. The program features songs, fingerplays and rhymes for babies up to 24 months old and their parents or caregivers. Toddler Storytimes for children between the ages of 18 months and 3 years will occur at 10:15 a.m. every Friday from Sept. 11 to Nov. 20, and from Jan. 8 to May 13. Toddler storytimes feature picture books, fingerplays, music and plenty of movement and wiggles.

talking with your baby,” Youth Services Librarian Jennifer Knight said. “Babies absorb the world around them and learn at an amazing rate. Research has shown that the first few years of a child’s life are critical to their development and later success in school. “Programs like baby storytime help parents and caregivers by teaching tools and techniques that support early literacy. “Music is an important part of language development, which is why baby storytimes at the Port Angeles Main Library are 85 percent rhyme and song. “Storytime programs also help build a stronger community of parents and caregivers who can swap ideas, share stories and learn from each other.”

TODDLER STORYTIMES

After each Toddler Storytimes session, parents and caregivers will have an opportunity to visit and swap information about parenting resources in the MUSIC FOR BABY & ME community. After each Music for Baby & Me session, parents Studies show that children who are read to before and caregivers are welcome to linger, visit and the age of five develop essential pre-reading skills, swap information. supporting later success in school. Those who attend three sessions will receive a free Activities such as talking, reading, playing and board book or audio CD to take home. singing all play an important role in early childhood “It’s never too early to start reading, singing and development, which is why they are included in

Toddler Storytimes at the library. These activities support skill development and encourage children to interact with their caregivers and peers in a fun, literacy-rich environment. For more information about North Olympic Library storytimes and other programs for youth, visit www.nols.org, phone 360-417-8500, ext. 7705, or send an email to youth@nols.org. Storytime programs are supported by the Port Angeles Friends of the Library.

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SEPTEMBER 2015

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HEALTHY LIVING

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette


Beating the stress of back to school STORY BY BRANDPOINT

Do you or your child have the back-to-school blues? If so, you’re not the only ones. Saying goodbye to slower summer days can be difficult. For almost three months, you felt free from the structure of the classroom and the accompanying homework. When school starts, it’s common to feel some sadness. For children who suffer from anxiety, this stress may be harder to handle, and it may stem from more than just pop quizzes and earlier bedtimes. These children need extra attention when the school bell rings. The best thing you can do to prepare your child is to give the gift of your time and attention. Instead of dwelling on things like tests and homework, talk about how to make the transition into the exciting new school year the best it can be. These tips can help to reduce the stress and tension felt by you and your child, not only for the first weeks of school (the hardest time to adjust) but throughout the year as well. 1. Connected communication Engage in a conversation with your child and ask what he or she is excited and concerned about for the school year. Give your child the freedom to speak openly and

avoid asking too many questions at once. You’ll know you are connecting when he or she starts volunteering information. When you listen to your child, and he or she can see the genuine interest and attention in your eyes and through your body language, they will feel more comfortable discussing the upcoming year. 2. Creative calendars Planning ahead makes adults feel prepared, which is a huge de-stressor. The same goes for your child. Younger children only need a day or two to look forward to a big change. Older children may benefit from discussing the big changes weeks before, especially if those conversations include working on things like organization, planning, prioritizing and sequencing (those important executive functions of the brain). 3. Visualize the goal Get specific and help your child visualize going to school. Have your child tell you or draw out the sequence of the day, from waking up in the morning, to dressing in an outfit chosen the night before, to what he’ll or she’ll be enjoying as her brain-boosting energy breakfast. The more your child can visualize his or her routine, the more he or she will be at ease when actually doing the routine.

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The Port Angeles Pranic Healing Clinic, located at the Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., is offering free clinics to the community. Clinics take place on the first and third Mondays of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Pranic healing is an effective and powerful notouch healing modality developed by Grand Master Choa Kok Sui that uses “life force,” or prana, to heal physical and emotional ailments, according to a news release. This type of healing is based on two principles: the body has the ability to heal itself and the principle of “Life Force Energy.” Pranic healing work with ailments ranging from stress, back pain, asthma and arthritis to traumas, phobias and addictions. To make the most of a session, do not wear leather, silk or crystals; do not wash a treated area or shower at least 12 hours after the session (this ensures assimilation of energy for the purpose of healing instead of being washed away); and after the session, rest or follow your normal routine but no excessive exercise or activities. Pranic healing is meant to enhance and complement your medical treatment, not meant to replace it. For additional information about the clinics, visit www.portangelespranichealing.com or www. facebook.com/portangelespranichealing.com.

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SEPTEMBER 2015

7


REGISTRATION DETAILS

<< THE BIG HURT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

AFTER 11 YEARS, THE

The chip is like a baton, being passed from one team member to the next during the event. There will be a “Transition Zone” established for the start and finish of each of the event legs (except mountain bike, which will have a remote start line but will finish in the Transition Zone). During the race, a team member that is finishing their leg will touch his or her chip to the timing “Bulls Eye,” then go to the Transition Zone to hand off the chip to the next team member, who will complete their event and again touch the chip to the timing Bulls Eye. All individuals and team members must be off the course by 5 p.m.

Open to ages 15 and older, teams of two to four racers can be formed for $220, or individuals can race in the Iron Division for $85. Registration closes at 11:59 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25. Packet pick up will take place Friday, Sept. 25, between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m, and Saturday, Sept. 26, between 7 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. at the Red Lion Hotel in Port Angeles. Each team must bring a completed team roster when they pick up their packets, and all team members must be present together at packet pick up to sign their liability waivers. The race starts at 10 a.m. All racers must be off the course by 5 p.m. MP3, iPods or similar music/audio systems are not allowed to be used by racers while competing. To register, visit www.bighurtpa.com.

RACE LEGS

There are four legs to the Big Hurt: a 16.5 miles mountain bike ride, a 3-mile kayak row, a 30-mile road bike route and a 10-kilometer (6.21-mile) run.

LEG 1: MOUNTAIN BIKING

returns to Port Angeles

story by LAURA LOFGREN Peninsula Daily News photos provided by THE BIG HURT

8

SEPTEMBER 2015

|

HEALTHY LIVING

AFTER A LITTLE OVER A DECADE, Port Angeles is reviving the Big Hurt, a grueling four-leg race that will take place downtown starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 26. Back in 1997, the city asked the North Olympic Peninsula Visitor and Convention Bureau to put together an event that would bring people to town. After a brainstorming session with the Port Angeles Parks & Recreation Department, the Big Hurt was born. The event started out with only 65 participants, but it grew to more than 300 racers in the next two years. At the peak of the event, there were nearly 600 participants. The Visitor Bureau coordinated the event until 2002, after which it transferred to the Hurricane Ridge Public Development Authority. Consisting of four race legs — mountain bike, kayak, road bike and run‚ — the event has had a number of distance and location configurations over the years. The last year of the original event was 2004. The event is now being resurrected this year by codirectors Scott Tucker, Tim Tucker and Lorrie Mittmann, plus Title Sponsor Family Medicine of Port Angeles. “We feel that we live in a place with incredible outdoor recreation opportunities and wanted to bring back the Big Hurt to showcase our beautiful place and our amazing activities for the benefit of the community,” Mittmann said. “Over the years, whenever the Big Hurt was mentioned, the common sentiment was ‘someone should bring it back,’” Scott Tucker said. “It is a major undertaking . . . even more so than we thought. It’s like putting on four races in one day,” he said. This year, the team is starting small in order to ensure

they have everything figured out. Participants ages 15 and older can race solo in the Iron Division or as a relay team made up of two to four racers. There are 50 spots open in each category. Awards will be given for overall top three men and women in the Iron Division and top three overall teams. A portion of event proceeds is donated to the Peninsula Trails Coalition, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the construction, maintenance and promotion of the Olympic Discovery Trail and Olympic Adventure Trail.

THE HUB

The Big Hurt event central, or Hub, is located between the Red Lion Hotel and the Port Angeles Pier on Lincoln Street and Railroad Drive. Red Lion Hotel will host a beer garden and food concession at the Hub, which is open to the public and for race participants. Community members are encouraged to hang out near the Hub to cheer on race participants. Each participant will be treated to one free beer compliments of the Big Hurt and Olympic Distributing. A food table with free snacks will be available for racers. Additional food will be for sale by Red Lion. There also will be some live music in the late afternoon at the Hub.

THE BIG HURT SPONSORS Family Medicine Olympic Distributing Gregory Voyles of Farmers Insurance Peninsula Bottling Red Lion Hotels City of Port Angeles

LEG 2: KAYAKING

Kayaking is an out and back east of Hollywood Beach in Port Angeles Harbor. Kayakers will head east from the beach to pass a buoy and continue straight until they reach another buoy. At this point, they will turn right toward the shore and in a short distance turn right again around the final buoy.

Additional sponsor and volunteer support from: Port Angeles Yacht Club Coast Guard Auxiliary Scuttlebutt Brewing Company Finnriver Farm Cidery Pike Brewing Olympic Peninsula Paddlers Peninsula College Captain T’s

THE BIG HURT CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 >>

TEAMS

PHOTO INFORMATION

Each team will be assigned one timing chip that will be included in and picked up with their race packet. This chip is associated with their team bib number and cannot be switched with any other chip.

ABOVE: A Big Hurt participant completes the road bike leg of the four-part race. LEFT: A kayaker makes her way through the smooth waters of Port Angeles Harbor off Hollywood Beach.

THE BIG HURT CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 >>

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS/SEQUIM GAZETTE

The mountain bike portion takes place in the Foothills above Port Angeles on a combination of dirt logging road, single-track trail and paced road. The course will start on a gated dirt road on the North side of Little River Road. Riders will go through the gate uphill to the start a little less than ½ mile up the logging road. The Foothills trail is a multi-use trail, including motorized use. Some off-road riding experience is strongly recommended. The bike racer must be capable of racing/riding on public roads that are open to motor vehicles. The racer is responsible for knowing the course. There are minimal signs and no mileage markers on the course. Assistance along the course is not allowed. There will be a mechanic available at the start line for any lastminute emergencies. Cyclists competing on a team are required to be dropped off at the gate on Little River Road. There is very limited parking at the gate, so cyclists must be dropped off by their team; however, team members and spectators can park temporarily along the road and walk to the start line if they wish to watch the race start. Cyclists competing solo in the Iron Division will be shuttled from the Hub to the gate at 9 a.m.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS/SEQUIM GAZETTE

HEALTHY LIVING

|

SEPTEMBER 2015

9


REGISTRATION DETAILS

<< THE BIG HURT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

AFTER 11 YEARS, THE

The chip is like a baton, being passed from one team member to the next during the event. There will be a “Transition Zone” established for the start and finish of each of the event legs (except mountain bike, which will have a remote start line but will finish in the Transition Zone). During the race, a team member that is finishing their leg will touch his or her chip to the timing “Bulls Eye,” then go to the Transition Zone to hand off the chip to the next team member, who will complete their event and again touch the chip to the timing Bulls Eye. All individuals and team members must be off the course by 5 p.m.

Open to ages 15 and older, teams of two to four racers can be formed for $220, or individuals can race in the Iron Division for $85. Registration closes at 11:59 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25. Packet pick up will take place Friday, Sept. 25, between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m, and Saturday, Sept. 26, between 7 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. at the Red Lion Hotel in Port Angeles. Each team must bring a completed team roster when they pick up their packets, and all team members must be present together at packet pick up to sign their liability waivers. The race starts at 10 a.m. All racers must be off the course by 5 p.m. MP3, iPods or similar music/audio systems are not allowed to be used by racers while competing. To register, visit www.bighurtpa.com.

RACE LEGS

There are four legs to the Big Hurt: a 16.5 miles mountain bike ride, a 3-mile kayak row, a 30-mile road bike route and a 10-kilometer (6.21-mile) run.

LEG 1: MOUNTAIN BIKING

returns to Port Angeles

story by LAURA LOFGREN Peninsula Daily News photos provided by THE BIG HURT

8

SEPTEMBER 2015

|

HEALTHY LIVING

AFTER A LITTLE OVER A DECADE, Port Angeles is reviving the Big Hurt, a grueling four-leg race that will take place downtown starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 26. Back in 1997, the city asked the North Olympic Peninsula Visitor and Convention Bureau to put together an event that would bring people to town. After a brainstorming session with the Port Angeles Parks & Recreation Department, the Big Hurt was born. The event started out with only 65 participants, but it grew to more than 300 racers in the next two years. At the peak of the event, there were nearly 600 participants. The Visitor Bureau coordinated the event until 2002, after which it transferred to the Hurricane Ridge Public Development Authority. Consisting of four race legs — mountain bike, kayak, road bike and run‚ — the event has had a number of distance and location configurations over the years. The last year of the original event was 2004. The event is now being resurrected this year by codirectors Scott Tucker, Tim Tucker and Lorrie Mittmann, plus Title Sponsor Family Medicine of Port Angeles. “We feel that we live in a place with incredible outdoor recreation opportunities and wanted to bring back the Big Hurt to showcase our beautiful place and our amazing activities for the benefit of the community,” Mittmann said. “Over the years, whenever the Big Hurt was mentioned, the common sentiment was ‘someone should bring it back,’” Scott Tucker said. “It is a major undertaking . . . even more so than we thought. It’s like putting on four races in one day,” he said. This year, the team is starting small in order to ensure

they have everything figured out. Participants ages 15 and older can race solo in the Iron Division or as a relay team made up of two to four racers. There are 50 spots open in each category. Awards will be given for overall top three men and women in the Iron Division and top three overall teams. A portion of event proceeds is donated to the Peninsula Trails Coalition, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the construction, maintenance and promotion of the Olympic Discovery Trail and Olympic Adventure Trail.

THE HUB

The Big Hurt event central, or Hub, is located between the Red Lion Hotel and the Port Angeles Pier on Lincoln Street and Railroad Drive. Red Lion Hotel will host a beer garden and food concession at the Hub, which is open to the public and for race participants. Community members are encouraged to hang out near the Hub to cheer on race participants. Each participant will be treated to one free beer compliments of the Big Hurt and Olympic Distributing. A food table with free snacks will be available for racers. Additional food will be for sale by Red Lion. There also will be some live music in the late afternoon at the Hub.

THE BIG HURT SPONSORS Family Medicine Olympic Distributing Gregory Voyles of Farmers Insurance Peninsula Bottling Red Lion Hotels City of Port Angeles

LEG 2: KAYAKING

Kayaking is an out and back east of Hollywood Beach in Port Angeles Harbor. Kayakers will head east from the beach to pass a buoy and continue straight until they reach another buoy. At this point, they will turn right toward the shore and in a short distance turn right again around the final buoy.

Additional sponsor and volunteer support from: Port Angeles Yacht Club Coast Guard Auxiliary Scuttlebutt Brewing Company Finnriver Farm Cidery Pike Brewing Olympic Peninsula Paddlers Peninsula College Captain T’s

THE BIG HURT CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 >>

TEAMS

PHOTO INFORMATION

Each team will be assigned one timing chip that will be included in and picked up with their race packet. This chip is associated with their team bib number and cannot be switched with any other chip.

ABOVE: A Big Hurt participant completes the road bike leg of the four-part race. LEFT: A kayaker makes her way through the smooth waters of Port Angeles Harbor off Hollywood Beach.

THE BIG HURT CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 >>

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS/SEQUIM GAZETTE

The mountain bike portion takes place in the Foothills above Port Angeles on a combination of dirt logging road, single-track trail and paced road. The course will start on a gated dirt road on the North side of Little River Road. Riders will go through the gate uphill to the start a little less than ½ mile up the logging road. The Foothills trail is a multi-use trail, including motorized use. Some off-road riding experience is strongly recommended. The bike racer must be capable of racing/riding on public roads that are open to motor vehicles. The racer is responsible for knowing the course. There are minimal signs and no mileage markers on the course. Assistance along the course is not allowed. There will be a mechanic available at the start line for any lastminute emergencies. Cyclists competing on a team are required to be dropped off at the gate on Little River Road. There is very limited parking at the gate, so cyclists must be dropped off by their team; however, team members and spectators can park temporarily along the road and walk to the start line if they wish to watch the race start. Cyclists competing solo in the Iron Division will be shuttled from the Hub to the gate at 9 a.m.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS/SEQUIM GAZETTE

HEALTHY LIVING

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SEPTEMBER 2015

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gain of 2,100 feet. After leaving the Transition Zone, bikers head west on Railroad Avenue. The bike racer must be capable of racing/riding on public roads that are open to motor vehicles. Road cyclists can drop off their bicycles at Hollywood Beach between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. the day of the race. Helmets are mandatory. Bikes must be in good condition. Recumbent bicycles are not allowed except for handicapped racers (request approval prior to registration). Motorized bikes of any nature are not allowed.

Racers then head back to Hollywood Beach. To ensure fairness and safety in the kayak leg, all boats must be dropped off and inspected between 4 p.m. and 10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25. All kayakers are required to wear a life jacket and have a whistle. The kayak leg is conducted only in acceptable wind and water conditions. Be aware this leg may be canceled in case of seriously challenging weather. In the event of extreme wind conditions (18 to 20 knots or more), this entire leg of the race may canceled at any time. LEG 4: RUNNING There will be safety boats patrolling the race course, plus The last leg of the Big Hurt is a 10K out-and-back some boats anchored at various locations along the course. starts and finishes at Hollywood Beach and continues along the Olympic Discovery Trail. LEG 3: ROAD BIKING The course is flat and on a paved surface. During the The 30-mile road bike heads west out of Port Angeles race, the trail will remain open to the public. and crosses the Elwha River and visits Freshwater Bay, For details about participating, sponsoring or volunas well as the lower parts of Kelly Ridge on Dan Kelly teering in the Big Hurt, email olympicadventuretrail@ and Eden Valley roads. It has a cumulative elevation gmail.com or visit www.bighurtpa.com.

Kayaks wait for the Big Hurt participants to finish the mountain biking leg of the race.

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Port Angeles Arts & Draughts festival follows the Big Hurt STORY BY LAURA LOFGREN

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and those who don’t drink. Cellars, Camaraderie Cellars and more will boast their beverages. Swing by that Saturday between Tickets are $20 in advance for the 21+ beer and wine gardens, which includes 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. for vendors and stick tastings, and are $25 at the gate. around from noon to 8 p.m. for the beer/ Please bring IDs, no matter how old. wine garden and live music. Stop downtown for artisan booths, a street fair, local eateries and hometown Art vendors return Sunday from 10 harvest fun. a.m. to 4 p.m., and the beer/wine garden and live music goes from noon to 4 p.m. Arts & Draughts features live music by Robbie Walden Band, Whiskey Syndicate, Joy in Mudville, Black Lodge, The Pine Hearts, Guardian Elephant, The Abide and CHIROPRACTICGreat • YOGA • REIKI more. Barhop Brewing, Deschutes Also offering a variety of yoga classes each week with Brewery,ofFreServing the families the Olympic Peninsula with Kat Parks, RYT200 and other certified yoga instructors mont Brewing, CHIROPRACTIC Silver City Brewsafe, gentle, and effective chiropractic applied & WELLNESS ery, 7 Seas Brewing, Propolis kinesiology with Dr. Ryan Iskenderian, DC. CHIROPRACTIC • YOGA • REIKI Brewing, Wind Rose

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Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette


Light-based skin treatment offers people a way to look younger STORY BY BUNNY CORNWALL, LICENSED MASTER AESTHETICIAN AND BOARD-CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST

As baby boomers age, the demand for younger looking and younger acting skin has grown. Many treatments and products designed for this are making their way into the mainstream, and one of those is intense pulsed light (IPL). First introduced in the 1990s, IPL represents a useful tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions such as pigmented disorders, age spots, flushing, rosacea and dilated blood vessels. Intense pulsed light also is used for collagen stimulation and hair removal. IPL is different from laser in that it is polychromatic, non-coherent and broad spectrum. Light from a laser beam is very narrow, only covering a small spot at a time, while IPL coverage is several times the area and therefore treatments are much quicker. An IPL photo facial is a gentle, state-of-the-art approach to making your skin look younger and smoother. The process treats the full face, neck, chest or hands, rather than simply one isolated area or imperfection. A series of IPL photo facial treatments can rejuvenate your complexion without downtime or a

prolonged recovery process. IPL treatment is based on light absorption in melanin and hemoglobin. Treatments are most efficient in patients with light skin who are not tanned at the time of treatment. Pre treatment protocols include the cessation of the use of alpha hydroxy acid and retinols for one week prior to treatment. In addition, no UV (ultraviolet radiation/rays) exposure for two weeks prior to treatment and no use of medicines that would make one photosensitive. Pain tolerance is very individual from person to person. Expect some discomfort and a warming snaplike sensation on the skin during treatment. This is what you can expect from treatment; for freckles and age spots, the dark spots generally look darker for three to 21 days as the pigmentation comes to the surface of skin and is shed naturally. For veins, generally the skin looks slightly redder after treatment for two to five days. The vascular lesions dissipate into the lymphatic system for excretion. LIGHT-BASED SKIN TREATMENT CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 >>

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Classes set on growing own groceries STORY BY PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Jefferson County WSU Master Gardeners will prevent a second round of “Growing Groceries” classes to the community this autumn. Classes will take place on six Friday nights from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and three Saturday afternoons from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 25 through Nov. 6 in the

Marina Room of Port Hudson, 103 Hudson St. in Port Townsend. This course is for anyone who wants to learn how to grow fresh, nutritious groceries for healthier food and to extend the budget. Class participants will learn what vegetables grow best in North Olympic Peninsula gardens, garden planning and record-keeping, soil management,

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<< LIGHT-BASED SKIN TREATMENT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Collagen growth will happen because the light bypasses the outer layer of the skin and gently heats the cells in the deeper layer of skin. These cells called fibroblasts start to produce more collagen which improves skin texture. Fine lines and wrinkles are reduced, enlarged pores, minor pitting and scarring diminish and fade. You will need between one and three treatments for successful reduction of pigmented lesions. If you want to maintain collagen stimulation,

treatment is recommended every six to 12 months. Hair growth becomes sparser with each session and all treated hair should shed within about two weeks. A note about hair — hair grows in constant cycles. Firstly, hairs are actively growing then they become dormant, and finally they loosen and shed, only to be replaced by more new actively growing hairs. Only hair follicles in the active growth stage are disabled by IPL treatments. Hairs in the dormant stage of the growth cycle normally remain anchored in the follicles for weeks or months, depending on their location, but their follicles

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Special Sections - Healthy Living, September 2015  

i20160727114655810.pdf

Special Sections - Healthy Living, September 2015  

i20160727114655810.pdf