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families today PENINSULA

A publication for families living on the North Olympic Peninsula, and a special supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette.

OUTDOOR FUN

Jefferson Community School students reflect on recent trip to Cuba — Page 4 Summer fun in the great outdoors — Page 8 Area organization encourages employers to have family-friendly workplace — Page 10 And much more inside

July 2016

volume 6, issue 3


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Peninsula Families Today is a family-focused publication and is inserted into both the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette. Please let us know what you’d like to see in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today. This publication welcomes input and new contributors. Educators, parents and professionals in their fields are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit it. Send articles, columns and photos (JPEGs at 200 dpi minimum) to section editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com. For details, phone 360-452-2345, ext. 4072.

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families today July 2016

PENINSULA

volume 6, issue 3

A publication for families living on the North Olympic Peninsula, and a special supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette.

Outdoor concerts underway across North Olympic Peninsula Front streets. Audience members are encouraged to bring blankets or chairs to the informal, family-friendly performances. No smoking is allowed on City Pier during the concerts. The series lineup for the rest of the summer, according to www. portangeles.org, is: v July 27 — Three Too Many; popular rock. v Aug. 3 — The Weavils; bluegrass and swing. v Aug. 10 — The Strait Shots; classic rock ‘n’ roll. v Aug. 17 — Ian McFeron Band; folksy rock ‘n’ roll. v Aug. 24 — Sweet T & Justice; Americana blues. v Aug. 31 — Joy in Mudville; Americana funk rock. v Sept. 7 — The Buck Ellard Band; country.

by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Attending an outdoor concert is fun for the entire family. A variety of free outdoor public concerts will be held in communities across the North Olympic Peninsula this summer including: OUTDOOR FUN

MUSIC IN THE PARK

Jefferson Community School students reflect on recent trip to Cuba — Page 4 Summer fun in the great outdoors — Page 8 Area organization encourages employers to have family-friendly workplace — Page 10 And much more inside

ON THE COVER Travis McClain and his son, Shaw, enjoy a sunny day of boating on Lake Crescent. Photo provided by Shauna Rogers McClain

The Sequim 2016 Music in the Park series runs from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. every Tuesday through Aug. 30 at Carrie Blake Community Park, 563 N. Rhodefer Road. Parking is available there or at 500 N. Blake Ave. Sequim city organizers encourage attendees to bring chairs or blankets and picnic baskets to the concerts. The lineup for the rest of the summer, according to www.sequimwa. gov, is: v Aug. 2 — Navy Band Northwest; variety. v Aug. 9 — Joy in Mudville; bluegrass, folk, rock, blues and funk. v Aug. 16 — Stardust Big Band; Big Band sound. v Aug. 23 — Fifth annual Sequim Karaoke Night; contest. v Aug. 30 — Farmstrong; bluegrass, country, folk and rock.

CONCERTS ON THE DOCK

Port Townsend Main Street’s Concerts on the Dock summer music series will run every Thursday through Sept. 1 at City Dock Civic Plaza in Pope Marine Park, 607 Water St. The free concerts will offer local vendors and a beer, wine and cider garden. Seating will open at 4:30 p.m. Shows will begin at 5 p.m. and wrap up by 7:30 p.m. The series lineup, according to www.ptmainstreet.org, is: v July 28 — Locust Street Taxi; variety band. v Aug. 4 — Toolshed Trio with Abakis; dance band. v Aug. 11 — Olympic Express Big Band; dance tunes from 1920s-2000s. v Aug. 18 — Cold Comfort with Kilcid; alternative, rock. v Aug. 25 — Joy in Mudville; bluegrass, folk, rock, blues and funk. v Sept. 1 — Lucky Brown and The Funk Revolution; jam-rock, reggae and funk.

CONCERTS ON THE PIER

Check out “Summertime Fun in Your Backyard” on Page 8 for suggestions about outdoor excursions to enjoy with the entire family.

The Concerts on the Pier series, organized by the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, runs every Wednesday evening throughout the summer through Sept. 7. Concerts will begin at 6 p.m. at City Pier, with parking at Lincoln Street and Railroad Avenue. Vendors will sell food, and organizers said they are working on the possibility of adding a beer and wine garden at the venue. If heavy wind or bad weather is expected, the performances might be moved to The Gateway pavilion located at the corner of Lincoln and 671638444

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Jefferson Community School students reflect

on scouting trip to Cuba by TRISTAN VAN LEUVEN AND JOCELYN YANG, Tristan is an incoming 11th-grader and Jocelyn is an incoming 10th-grader at Jefferson Community School in Port Townsend

Since U.S. President Barack Obama visited Cuba in March, people have been getting excited to rebuild the relationship between the U.S. and Cuba. With our curiosity to guide us, Jefferson Community School assembled a 10-day student leadership trip to Cuba last month in preparation for a whole-school expedition next year. Assistant Principal Craig Frick, and his fiancée, Celene Wendt, were chaperones for the trip. No parents or siblings went on the trip. The six student leaders were Rowan Gallagher, Erik Hansen, Junah King, Lena Valentine, Tristan Van Leuven and Jocelyn Yang (ages 14 to 17). The purpose for the scouting expedition was to find availability, costs and activities to do before the school’s 30 students make the trek. The pre-expedition was also intended to solve roadblocks and determine what places are important and safe for everyone to visit. PHOTO BY CELENE WENDT Cuba was chosen because of the recent availability for Jefferson Community School students Junah King, Jocelyn Yang, Lena Valentine, Rowan Gallagher, Erik Hansen and Tristan Van Leuven explore Americans and the amount of activities it has to offer. CUBA, continued on Page 5  >>

the Catedral de la Virgen María de la Concepción Inmaculada, which has been UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1982. This also happens to be a church U.S. President Barack Obama visited during his recent trip to Cuba.

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and rickshaws as well as foot traffic, all sharing the same narrow road. Among the many types of vehicles, classic cars were the most interesting to us. The bodies of the classic cars were made of basic iron in the 1950s, and we found that the car doors are very hot during the afternoon. The most unexpected part during this trip was the challenge to get on the internet in Cuba. We don’t know if the network restrictions are controlled by the government, but the truth is we only found Wi-Fi twice around Cuba and we were charged money to use it: about 3 to 5 CUC (1 CUC = $1.) You may not be able to imagine how life would be without the internet. However, it was not a bad experience. Everybody did feel a little bit upset about being unable to talk to their families and friends in the beginning, but we got used to it gradually. Instead of the internet, we enjoyed the lifestyle of PHOTO BY CELENE WENDT PHOTO BY CELENE WENDT Cuba — listening to salsa music, practicing Spanish with Jefferson Community School students Rowan Gallagher, Lena ValenJefferson Community School students, far left, walk alongside young the local people, jumping into waterfalls, scuba diving on tine and Jocelyn Yang look at some of Cuba’s classic cars. school children in Soroa, Cuba. a wall dive under 60 feet of water and even dancing on >> CUBA, continued from Page 4  The cities we visited were Havana, Cardenas, Trinidad, the roof in a restaurant. Playa Giron, Matanzas, Vinales and Soroa. We stayed During longer conversations with Cubans, they said Previous Jefferson Community School expeditions have one night in Cancun, Mexico on the way to Cuba and one they’re really looking forward to rebuilding new relations been to Guatemala, Belize, Vietnam and Cambodia. night when we left. with the United States and how honored they were to Before we went on the trip, each student was given a There are no direct flights from the U.S. to Cuba, have Obama visit their country. topic to research so we would know what to expect in though there is talk of that happening within the next in Although it’s difficult for most Cubans to go online and Cuba. Examples of topics were scuba diving, waterfalls, the near future. communicate with the outside world today, we observed hikes, nature reserves, museums and other educational The capital, Havana, is the largest and most populated that people were kind and lived simple lives. outlets. We also researched transportation, but that city in Cuba. When we traveled the streets of Havana we proved tricky. saw horse-drawn carriages, classic cars, buses, bicycles CUBA, continued on Page 6  >>

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>> CUBA, continued from Page 5 

There was one time that stood out when we were on the hunt to find a cave system in Matanzas. A bus driver that we asked had no idea where it was at first, but he still wanted to help us, so he let us onto the bus and took us to look for it. During this process, as soon as he saw a person on the road, he got off the bus and asked. It took him at least an hour to take us around the town and eventually find the caves he had never heard of before. We were so surprised that he found it at the end and he didn’t over charge us for the time it took him. He was happy to have accomplished the task and see everyone happy. His sincerity was very impressive to us. In a sense, individual people are the best representatives of the entire society of a country. After coming back from Cuba, each of us has a new understanding of the word “appreciation.” We are grateful not only to all of the Cubans who helped us along the way, but also we really appreciate all the opportunities and amenities we have in our lives: Nature, education, internet, hot water, cellphones and plentiful food. They seem common for us, but these are the things that are limited in most Cubans’ lives. We often say that “happiness lies in contentment.” The scouting expedition was a huge success. We were able to gather new information and figure out many of the unknowns to make the expedition next year feasible for the whole school. It was a big goal for the pre-expedition group to find accommodations for the whole school, as well as transportation. We knew it would be difficult, but now that we

PHOTO BY CELENE WENDT

Jocelyn Yang, far left, Junah King, Lena Valentine, Craig Frick, Erik Hansen, Tristan Van Leuven and Rowan Gallagher of Jefferson Community School enjoy a sunset at a beautiful beach in Varadero, Cuba.

went, we were able to make many alliances with Cubans and realized they are more than happy to help us out. Since we have begun our planning now, we can

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not only bring the whole student body to Cuba, but also visit a few other culturally significant sites we were not able to visit on the first trip.

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Summertime fun in your backyard by BRENDA HANRAHAN/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

For children summer is a magical time. School is out and endless days offer a chance for children and their families to explore the many natural wonders of the North Olympic Peninsula. With a little more than a month left before students return to classrooms it is time to venture into Olympic National Park for a family-friendly hike, camp at a local state park or simply spend an afternoon in the backyard to feel the grass under your feet and watch what adventures unfold. Add these family-friendly places to explore before the sun sets on summer:

THE NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA IS THE ULTIMATE PLACE FOR CHILDREN TO EXPLORE DURING THE LONG DAYS OF SUMMER. PLENTY OF HIKING TRAILS, LOADS OF PARKS A FORT, A LIGHTHOUSE, BEACHES AND MORE AND NATURAL WONDERS WILL KEEP LITTLE ONES ENTERTAINED AND ENGAGED. READY AND WAITING FOR YOU TO EXPLORE

Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center in Port Townsend allows visitors to be swept back a century by three dozen Victorian houses that were used as barracks during the fort’s early years. The scenic park features 12 miles of hiking and biking trails that are handicapped-accessible. Maintained baseball and softball fields and tennis courts encourage little ones to stretch their legs. Or maybe rent a rowboat, kayak or bike to explore the grounds for the afternoon. Alongside the beach-side road children will love the chance to explore the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Point Wilson Lighthouse, the Natural History Museum and the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum. Long stretches of sandy beaches on either side of the road provide easy access to look for shells, beach cobbles and sea glass. Children can enjoy writing their name in the sand with a piece of driftwood or trying their hand at building a sand castle. A highlight of visiting the fort is exploring Battery Kinzie to learn more about the history of Fort Worden. Children can wander through the fort stopping to learn more at informational signs and to enjoy views from the top of the fort where giant guns were once mounted for protection. A Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to the state park. For more information about passes, visit www.parks.wa.gov.

BIRDS GALORE AND A LIGHTHOUSE TO VIEW Dungeness Spit and Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge covers 261 acres and serves as a home to more than 250 species of birds, 41 species of land mammals and eight species of marine mammals. The Dungeness Spit is the world’s longest sand spit and offers a 5.5-mile sandy pathway to the New Dungeness Lighthouse. The walk to the lighthouse requires a little planning. Be sure to check tidal charts and leave plenty of daylight hours to complete the hike. Also pack water, sunscreen and a snack or light lunch. Picnic tables under the shadow of the lighthouse offer a great place to eat lunch on a sunny day. SUMMERTIME FUN, continued on Page 9  >>

PHOTO BY KATIE RUDD

Lucas Chance of Port Angeles uses a net to find treasures in a pond in the Black Diamond area.

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>> SUMMERTIME FUN, continued from Page 8 

Catie Chance of Port Angeles poses for a photo with a butterfly that landed on her hand during a family hike at Hurricane Ridge.

Inside the lighthouse children can view educational displays and talk to a knowledgable volunteer about the history of the light station and its surrounding waters. A drinking fountain and a clean public restroom are also inside for visitors. Volunteers are available to provide free guided tours of the museum and tower between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. seven days a week. A $3 refuge permit fee for a party of four adults can be paid at the informational kiosk near the main parking lot. Children younger than 16 receive free admission. There are no fees at the lighthouse, but donations to support the maintenance and restoration of the lighthouse are appreciated.

PHOTO BY KARI CHANCE

POPULAR PARK JUST OUTSIDE THE CITY Salt Creek Recreation Park is a 196-acre Clallam County park located near Joyce off state Highway 112. The park offers visitors rocky bluffs, tide pools, a sandy stretch of beach, forests and campsites. The adjacent Tongue Point Marine Life Sanctuary includes a rocky outcropping that, at low tide, reveals sea urchins, limpets, starfish and other forms of marine wildlife. Located on the National Audubon’s Olympic Loop of the Greater Washington State Birding Trail, the park is also a great place to bird watch. The area was once the location of Camp Hayden, a World War II harbor defense military base. The fort was decommissioned at the end of World War II, but remnants of two concrete bunkers can be viewed. For details, visit www.clallam.net/Parks/SaltCreek.html.

MOUNTAINS, SEA STACKS, RAIN FORESTS, WILDLIFE AND MORE Olympic National Park offers an array of family-friendly hikes and activities for children. Popular family hikes include the trek up Hurricane Hill; exploring the Hoh Rain Forest and Ruby Beach, both located south of Forks; spending a day boating in the clear blue waters of Lake Crescent; and so much more. Visit www.nps.gov/olym/ for more ideas about what to explore within the park.

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Family-friendly

“Too often we expect families to make it on their own. Yet, we know how challenging, complex and expensive that can be,” she said. “If we want to support parents and children in our community, then we need to take action in all our policies and procedures including in workplaces.” Moss said many local and national parent support organizations are encouraging family-friendly practices within workplaces. When employers adhere to practices and policies that take into account needs parents and caregivers may have, it has an impact. “It makes them a better employer with more committed, by BRENDA HANRAHAN, PENINSULA DAILY NEWS satisfied employees,” Moss said. “We always note that Prevention Works! Parent Education, Advocacy, every policy and procedure that is enacted, whether it Support and Services Task Force is encouraging North is an employer policy or a public/legislative policy is a Olympic Peninsula employers to establish family-friendly family policy because they all have family impacts.” policies and procedures. Moss said many employers may not understand their The nonprofit Clallam County-based organization has employees’ experiences outside of work. created a “Checklist for Creating a Family-Friendly Work “For example, what a single parent copes with just Place” and is challenging area employers to meet at least getting children to child care on public transportation 80 percent of items on the list. and then going to work also on public transportation, “We plan to list all employers on the Peninsula who or the sudden struggle to figure out what to do with a commit to eight or more items on the checklist and those sick child.” who have 80 percent or 13 items, will be highlighted on According to task force members, benefits to employers our website and ‘Family Friend Stars,’ with articles about who have family-friendly workplaces are significant their business practices,” said Jody Moss, chairwoman of and include: the Prevention Works! Parent Education, Advocacy, v Greater employee satisfaction and retention Support and Services Task Force. v Maximized employee productivity “This is an excellent way for employers to recruit and v Increased loyalty and morale retain great employees.” v Increased recruitment effectiveness Companies will be asked to submit written policies for v Improved work ethic review before task force members approve listing them Benefits of a family-friendly workplace also come to on the organization’s website www.preventionworkscc.org. employees including: The checklist will be shared with a variety of businessv Less stress oriented service organizations in the coming weeks. Or v Better balance in work and home life businesses can contact Moss at jodymoss@wavecable.com v More loyalty to employers or 360-460-4199 to obtain a list or for more information. v Greater job satisfaction Moss said creating a family-friendly workplace is So what are some family-friendly workplace policies needed to help families succeed. and procedures?

work environments encouraged by area nonprofit

SCHEDULING FLEXIBILITY

Flexible schedule workplaces can benefit employers for a variety of reasons. Flexible work environments attract, motivate and retain employees, increase employee satisfaction and maintain employee productivity, Moss said. Flexible work arrangements may include the following, although not all will be applicable in every situation: v Flextime: Modification in start and end times, often with required core hours for full-time employees. v Compressed workweek: Compression of full-time job responsibilities into fewer than five days per week (often referred to as a 4/10), or fewer than 10 days in two weeks (often referred to as a 9/80). FAMILY-FRIENDLY WORKPLACES, continued on Page 11  >>

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>> FAMILY-FRIENDLY WORKPLACES, continued from Page 10 

v Telework: Full-time work conducted up to several days a week at a site other than the primary work site. v Remote work: Full-time work conducted at home or another site with limited presence at a regular company facility. v Part time: Reduced hours or schedule, with a corresponding reduction in job responsibilities and pay, as well as an adjustment of benefits. v Job sharing: Two employees on reduced schedules and workload share overlapping responsibilities of a full-time position, with a corresponding reduction in pay and an adjustment of benefits for each. v Shift swapping v Occasional flexibility: Flexibility that is not regularly scheduled but is used from time to time (such as time off taken in small increments with the ability to make it up in the same pay period, shifting start and end times because of an appointment or event, working from home on occasion, etc.). v Paid time off (PTO) and emergency time off: PTO banks, use of sick and vacation time in part-day increments or ability to use PTO for sick children or emergency child care situations.

LACTATION-FRIENDLY WORKPLACE

Employers have a legal obligation to support breastfeeding, Moss said. Fulfilling these obligations can be an effective strategy to recruit, retain and engage mothers with infants — one of the largest and fastest growing segments in the U.S. workforce, especially in the retail, service and other lower-wage industries. And because studies show that breastfeeding helps protect infants from acute illnesses and infections and helps protect women from certain types of cancer, supporting nursing mothers helps lower health care costs, Moss said. According to the task force, businesses that support nursing mothers at work: v Enjoy a return of $3 for every $1 invested in breastfeeding support. v Increase employee recruitment, retention, productivity and engagement. v Reduce employee absenteeism and health care costs. v Enjoy a family-friendly image in the community. Employers may consider providing a comfortable place for new mothers to nurse their infants if at work with them or to use a breast pump; help employees gain access to a breast pump; and provide them extra breaks in order to accommodate their needs.

revenue comes back to state and local governments. These refunds are a foregone economic stimulus for Washington.” Employers who market this benefit to their employees around tax season can help not only their employees but the entire community.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Offering on-site training for employees not only provides a safe environment for employees to learn, but it also translates to improved employee morale, lower turnover and absenteeism as well as making it easier for employers to institute change and helps improve workplace communication and training. “Many nonprofit organizations in Clallam County would be happy to partner and offer their services to your employees periodically,” Moss said Consider brown bag luncheon sessions and allow these sessions to be employee driven. This will build leadership skills for employees as well as normalizing lifelong learning and parent education. Hanging educational posters in break rooms is another idea. Offer area agencies the opportunity to lead parent education programs in workplace conference rooms.

MORE ABOUT PREVENTION WORKS!

“Prevention Works! is a nonprofit organization that advocates, educates and invests in our children,” Moss said. “Through prevention and learning efforts, we nurture our children and thus strengthen our community.” The all-volunteer community-wide effort is not part of any other agency though Prevention Works! partners with nearly all social, educational and health service agencies in Clallam County. “Prevention efforts not only work, but they are the most cost-effective investment that a community can make to decrease its social problems,” Moss said. The mission of Prevention Works! is: A volunteer coalition that acts as a catalyst for community awareness of ways to nurture our children and thus strengthen our community. Visit www.preventionworkscc.org for more information.

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QUALITY CHILD CARE

Choosing child care is a stressful and very personal decision based on a family’s unique needs. The task of choosing the right high-quality child care can cause stress for the employee as they look for just the right place to leave their child during the day. “Offering support as an employee goes through this process can help ease the burden the employee is carrying as they return to work, and helps solidify for the employee that their employer understands that they are leaving their child to be in the workplace,” Moss said. Child Care Action Council — www.ccacwa.org — can be of assistance in helping parents locate child care and can come to the employer’s facilities and do a short workshop for staff on choosing child care. v Discuss particular concerns or questions of the family regarding child care and other resources (Mondays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.). v Offer a free customized list of licensed providers and/or child care centers/preschools which can be matched according to area, hours and the age of the child. v Provide information and application for subsidized child care/preschools. v Offer a Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account.

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The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is one of the federal government’s largest resources for working low-income Americans. It reduces the amount of income tax low-to-moderate income families are required to pay, and provides a wage supplement to some families. Hundreds of thousands of Washingtonians fail to claim EITC refunds, which range from a few hundred to several thousand dollars each, Moss said. “Families aren’t the only ones who suffer when refunds go unclaimed,” she said. “Local economies don’t benefit, since these dollars are never spent at local businesses. So fewer jobs are created, fewer wages are paid and eventually less tax

FREE

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  JULY 2016  11


Free programs offer summer meals for area children Boys & Girls Clubs offer free summer meals to Sequim, Port Angeles children

Jefferson County YMCA offering children meals during summer months

by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Free summer meals are available for children younger than 18 at locations in Port Angeles and Sequim thanks to an ongoing partnership between the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Peninsula and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program. The program will continue through Aug. 26. The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Peninsula has been sponsoring the program for three summers and has seen an increase in the number of children needing meals each year. In 2015, almost 18,000 meals were served during the summer to children who would otherwise have gone without, said Janet Gray, Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula’s resource development director. The idea for the program came from a simple question posed by club volunteers. “During the school year, more than half of elementary school-age children in the Sequim and Port Angeles school districts receive free or reduced lunches,” according to information provided by the Boys & Girls Clubs. “What are those children to do in the summer? That is a question a couple of Boys & Girls Club volunteers asked themselves in the fall of 2012.” This led to an investigation and an innovative program that serves children in both school districts. Volunteers learned the USDA has a Summer Food Service Program that can provide assistance with food costs. The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Peninsula prepares and serves supper, a four-component late afternoon snack funded by the USDA to members during the

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As summer gets underway, the Jefferson County YMCA is offering free meals and programs throughout the county. “We are excited to be able to offer this program at six sites in order to provide nutrition during the summer months,” said Erica Delma, the organization’s director of development and community engagement. “Without the free summer meals program, many children would go without adequate nutrition.” The sites are located in Brinnon, Quilcene, Chimacum and Port Townsend. There are three locations in Port Townsend: Mountain View Commons, Grant Street Elementary School and BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA Blue Heron Middle School. The meals are packed and prepared in the Chimacum Children receive free bagged lunches from volunteers at the School District kitchen by a team of volunteers then Dream Playground in Port Angeles. distributed to the respective sites. school year. “We appreciate our volunteers and donors,” Delma The challenge was to find a way to distribute summer said. “Without the donors, we would not have been able lunches to children who are not club members, as well as to offer the expanded programs.” those who are. The cost of the program is about $50,000, she said, Volunteers found the answer was to tap into a strength with funding provided through the U.S. Department of of the area — faith-based and service organizations. Agriculture’s Summer Meals program, a grant from “We knew that we have very generous people in our YMCA of the USA, community donations and partnercommunity, people who are willing to give their time to ships with local farms and the Food Co-op. help children,” said Jan Eadie, volunteer coordinator of This year, the Y is partnering with all four Jefferson the Sequim program. County school districts and the county and city libraries “Once the need was explained, people were enthusiasto provide comprehensive learning programs that are tically stepping forward.” aimed to close the achievement gap. BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS FREE LUNCHES, continued on Page 15  >> Each site includes a summer literacy program or “Feed Your Brain” activities designed to maintain active learning during the summer months. The sites, which will serve meals Mondays through Fridays, are: v Quilcene School, 294715 U.S. Highway 101, through Aug. 18 — Lunch served from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. and snacks from 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. v Chimacum Elementary School multipurpose building, 91 West Valley Road, through Aug. 19 — Snacks served from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and lunch from noon to 12:30 p.m. v Mountain View Commons, 1925 Blaine St., Port Townsend, through Aug. 19 — Lunch served from noon to 12:30 p.m. and snacks from 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. v Blue Heron Middle, 3939 San Juan Ave., Port Townsend, through July 29 — Snacks served from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. and lunch from 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. v Grant Street Elementary, 1637 Grant St., Port Townsend, through July 29 — Snacks served from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and lunch from noon to 12:30 p.m. v Brinnon School, 46 Schoolhouse Road, through Aug. 18 — Snacks served from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. For more information, phone 360-385-5811 or visit www.jeffersoncountyymca.org. SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO PENINSULA DAILY NEWS AND SEQUIM GAZETTE


Berries gone

WILD! by JEANETTE STEHR-GREEN, WSU-certified Clallam County Master Gardener

A walk at this time of year along the Olympic Discovery Trail or into Olympic National Park quickly reveals the abundance of wild berries available in the Pacific Northwest. Foraging for wild berries can be a fun family outing. Wild berries make a perfect snack eaten fresh or frozen, and many are delicious in jams, jellies, pies and other dishes. Keep the following tips in mind for the best berry-picking experience possible.

COLLECTING WILD BERRIES SAFELY Only some of the wild fruits that grow in our region are edible. Some are extremely poisonous. Just because a berry is eaten by wildlife, does not mean it is edible by humans. Do not experiment; the results could be life-threatening. Know what you are picking and eat only the berries that are known to be edible. Many references are available online and at the local library on berry identification. (See side bar) Flowers are the best way to identify most plants, but flowers rarely are present at the time berries are ready for picking. A positive identification at this time of year will include not only the berry itself, but likely the bush or vine on which it is growing, the shape of the leaf and the leaf arrangement.

Wear protective clothing when picking berries since many berry bushes (or the surrounding vegetation) have thorns or prickles. Protective clothing includes the following: ❖ Long jeans or thick pants ❖ Closed-toed sneakers or hiking boots ❖ Lightweight long-sleeved shirt ❖ Hat Because it is difficult to wash berries with much success, pick only clean, unadulterated berries. Avoid picking berries along roadsides because they will be covered with dust and spray from passing traffic. Avoid areas that have been sprayed recently with herbicide; indications of recent herbicide applications include dead vegetation and stunted vegetation that is leafing out unevenly along a roadside or under power lines. Watch out for wildlife. Make a lot of racket in the berry patch. Bears like berries, too, but will instinctively move away if they sense humans approaching. BERRIES GONE WILD, continued on Page 14 >>

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13


<< BERRIES GONE WILD, continued from Page 13

Wasps, hornets and yellow jackets are more commonly encountered wildlife on berry-picking forays because they are attracted to the fruity smell. Be careful, especially if you are allergic to certain insect stings. Even when collecting in a pristine area, it is a good idea to rinse wild berries under potable (drinkable) running water before eating them. An ideal cleaning method is to place the berries in a colander and wash them with the kitchen sink sprayer, turning the fruit as you spray. COLLECTING WILD BERRIES ON PUBLIC LANDS Berry collection generally is permitted on most public lands for personal consumption, although quantity restrictions may apply. (See “Collection of berries on public lands” story on this page.) Collection is prohibited where posted and in certain settings such as nature trails, conservation areas and wilderness areas. Finally, when you collect berries in the wild “leave no trace” and minimize your impact on the environment. Pick up litter and avoid damage to the berry plants and surrounding vegetation. Don’t over-harvest; leave ample fruit for reseeding and wildlife food. Take only what you can use and use what you take. Jeanette Stehr-Green is a WSU-certified Clallam County Master Gardener and a cultivated-berry enthusiast, growing strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries in her home garden. She also enjoys collecting wild berries, some of which have given rise to the berries we grow in our gardens.

n u F

Edible berry references

Collection of berries on public lands

For more information about the identification of wild berries, consult the following references: v “Wild Berries of the Northwest: Alaska, Western Canada and the Northwestern United States” by J. Duane Sept v “The Pacific Northwest Berry Book” by Bob Krumm and James Krumm v “Wild Berries of the Pacific Northwest: On the Bush, on the Table, in the Glass” by J.E. Underhill

Restrictions on collection of berries on public lands for personal use include: v Department of Natural Resources (DNR) — three gallons of single species per year not to exceed 9 gallons per year v State parks — total of two gallons of fruit, nuts or mushrooms (combined) per person per day v Olympic National Forest — no restrictions on collection for personal use v Olympic National Park — total of one quart fruit, nuts or mushrooms (combined) per person per day; no collection within 200 feet of nature trails; no restrictions on the collection of non-native blackberries

Edible wild berries of choice The following berries are edible and generally considered of choice flavor. *Non-native species v Trailing blackberry (Rubus ursinus) v Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor)* v Evergreen blackberry (Rubus laciniatus)* v Blackcap raspberry (Rubus leucodermis) v Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) v Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) v Black huckleberry (Vaccinium membranaceum) v Red huckleberry (Vaccinium parvifolium) v Oregon grape (Mahonia spp.) v Salal (Gaultheria shallon) v Wild strawberry (Fragaria spp.) v Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia) v Blue elderberry (Sambucus cerulea) Sample widely before harvesting in earnest, since flavor often varies from site to site. In general, plants in the sun that get sufficient water will provide the biggest and sweetest berries.

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>> BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS FREE LUNCHES, continued from Page 12 

The program launched in Sequim in the summer of 2013. Eadie set up a network of volunteers who would distribute lunches to locations around Sequim. Boys & Girls Club summer staff helped prepare sack lunches and acted as site supervisors. In accordance with USDA guidelines lunches were distributed to any child age 1 to 18. The following year, the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Peninsula began the summer lunch program in Port Angeles and continues to expand locations in both communities as the need arises. The program has twice won the Western Region Sunshine Award, given by the USDA to the best program

in the Western U.S. Meals, which meet the USDA’s nutrition standards, include milk, a meat/protein source, fruits/vegetables and bread/grain. Parents do not have to accompany their children for kids to receive free lunches. No paperwork or names are taken, and lunches are consumed on site. Lunches are offered in Port Angeles on Mondays through Fridays from noon to 1 p.m. at the following locations: v Boys & Girls Clubs Port Angeles Unit, 2620 S. Francis St. v Dream Playground on Race Street v Jefferson Elementary School, 218 E. 12th St.

v Evergreen Apartments, 2203 W. 18th St. v Shane Park on South G Street v North Olympics Skills Center, 905 W. Ninth St. Meals are offered in Sequim on Mondays through Fridays from noon to 1 p.m. at the following locations: v Boys & Girls Clubs Carroll C. Kendall Unit, 400 W. Fir St. v Carrie Blake Park, 202 N. Blake Ave. v Elk Creek Apartments, 90 S. Rhodefer Road v Mt. View Court Apartments, 303 S. Fifth Ave. For additional information about the local Summer Food Service Program, phone the Sequim Boys & Girls Club at 360-683-8095 or the Port Angeles Boys & Girls Club at 360-417-2831.

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Special Sections - Peninsula Family, July 2016  

i20160726173249928.pdf

Special Sections - Peninsula Family, July 2016  

i20160726173249928.pdf