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JUNE 2016 | VOL. 19, NO. 3

The Good Fight Seattle Genetics in Bothell expands after success of cancer-fighting drug • 6-7

Exploring Mars: WSU students build rover • 16 Supplement to The Daily Herald

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JUNE 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Seattle Genetics in Bothell is working on 12 new lines of drugs after its initial success with the FDA-approved Adcetris. Pages 6-7

COVER STORY Seattle Genetics in Bothell expands after success of drug Adcetris, 6-7

Everett artist delves into pop culture, fantasy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Sound Transit prepares for light rail in county . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BUSINESS NEWS

WSU students in Everett compete in Mars rover contest . . . . . . . . . 16

What new Composite Wing Center means for Boeing, community . . . . 4

PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Why artists are so concerned about closure of Spectrum Glass . . . . . . . . 5

BANKRUPTCIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Slingshot aims to help start-ups get off ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-9

PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . 23

Architects honored for work in Snohomish County, region . . . . . . . 9

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 26-27

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 24-25

Ecuadoran immigrants hit success with Panama hat business . . . . . . 11

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Mukilteo man publishes monthly biotech investor guide . . . . . .12-13

Tom Hoban: Readers share what they want to know about . . . . . . . 17

Marysville Kmart, last of chain’s stores in county, to close . . . . . . . . 13

Monika Kristofferson: Being efficient isn’t always being effective . . . . . . 19

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Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Patricia Guthrie, Deanna Duff Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Seattle Genetics founder Clay Siegall leads a company in Bothell that is growing in size and breadth of vision. Dan Bates / The Herald

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CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal. 1591187

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4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

What 777X plant means for Boeing Why is this important to the 777X?

The Herald Business Journal Staff

Boeing will celebrate its past in grand fashion at its centennial in July, but its future was on full display last month at the Everett plant. That’s where the aerospace manufacturer unveiled its new Composite Wing Center, a $1 billion, 1.3 million-squarefoot facility to build carbon-fiber wings for the 777X jetliner. The Composite Wing Center is seen as key to the 777X program, because it will be where the jetliner’s innovative carbon-fiber composite materials wings will be manufactured. The building will initially house one autoclave, essentially a giant pressure oven used to cook and harden the carbon-fiber wings. It is designed to eventually hold three autoclaves. Portland, Oregon-based Hoffman Construction started work on the building in October 2014. At its peak, an estimated 1,200 workers put in time on the building; a total of 4.2 million hours went into the construction. The center is huge. It’s 27 acres of space under one roof or the equivalent of 24 football fields, according to Boeing. To get a sense of the size, just look at the construction materials: 31,000 tons of steel, 340.2 million pounds of concrete and 486 miles of electrical cable. The autoclave is one of the world’s largest by volume: It can hold more than 200,000 14-inch pizzas.

The 777X will use even more carbon-fiber composites than the 787. With the composite material wings, the 777X is expected to boast lower fuel consumption and operating costs than the competition. That’s appealing to customers who above all else want an aircraft that is efficient to operate. With this giant new conclave, Boeing will be able to build wings that have fewer pieces.

Has work started in the center?

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The gantry system is tested at the new 777X Composite Wing Center at Paine Field in Everett.

Here are some questions and answers on the Composite Wing Center and what it means for the future of the company:

Why is this such a big deal? Carbon-fiber composites are being used more and more in manufacturing, from cars like BMWs to planes. Boeing’s 787, used more composite material than any other commercial airplane when it was launched in 2004.

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Carbon-fiber composites are prized for a high strength-to-weight ratio. They don’t easily fatigue or corrode like metal. They’re easy to mold and shape; bonded structures are smoother and more aerodynamic than those that are riveted. Carbon-fiber composites require special storage and handling and expensive equipment to create. They require a skilled work force to create and repair. And composites are expensive.

Boeing opened the Composite Wing Center on schedule in May. But the company doesn’t expect to begin actual production until 2017. The first delivery of the 777X is targeted for 2020. So far, Boeing has received 320 orders for 777X planes and commitments from six customers worldwide.

How many people will it employ? Boeing’s not saying, at least not right now. However, according to site selection documents sent by Boeing to various states in late 2013, the 777X line is expected to have about 3,250 workers in 2018, peak at 8,500 in 2024 and scale down to about 7,250 by 2026. The wing production center will have more than 2,000 workers, according to those documents.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

Glassmaker’s closure shocks artists By Patricia Guthrie For The Herald Business Journal

Spectrum Glass Company’s unexpected announcement that it’s closing, combined with Oregon’s crackdown on Portland glass manufacturers because of public health concerns, has sent specialty glass prices soaring and shaken the glass art community. Glass distributors, artists and teachers are rushing to stock up on raw material while wondering if the glass industry can withstand increasingly stricter air emission regulations. “There’s tens of thousands of artists who depend on Spectrum through retail shops and distributors,” said David Scott of Northwest Art Glass in Redmond, a wholesale supplier of glass. “Spectrum is close to 60 percent of our warehouse stock. We’ll adjust, we’ll survive but lots of people, I’m sure, won’t.” Spectrum, which has a Woodinville address, but is in south Snohomish County, is the largest manufacturer of specialty art glass in the world, producing hundreds of colors of sheet glass used by artists and architects to create art and household objects that are fused, blown, kiln-formed, or made into stained glass. Spectrum cited nearly a decade of declining sales, rising operating costs and the expense of responding to new emission control regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its decision. The company’s 124

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Colleen Price and her husband, Stan, show examples of popular Spectrum Glass work that’s been a staple of their own business, Covenant Art Glass, in Everett. Spectrum Glass, a south county business, plans to close in July.

employees will receive severance packages. The plant will continue operations for the next 60 to 75 days while selling off its inventory. “It’s sort of like Kodak announcing it’s no longer going to make film anymore,” said Maria Ruano, owner of Bedrock Industries in Seattle, a combination studio and retail store that’s depended on Spectrum glass for 22 years. Spectrum produces more than 300 colors and textures of glass, and its product list exceeds 450 items. Architects also incorporate Spectrum products into glass tiles, entryway windows, lamps and cabinets. Creations made from Spectrum’s can be found around the globe; a domed

glass studio in India; a high-end gallery in London, novelty gift stores in Australia and, closer to home, in a waiting room of Cascade Skagit Health Alliance in Arlington in a mural made by local artist Anita Black. Concern over toxic metal emissions has forced two manufacturers in Portland, Bullseye Glass and Uroboros Glass Studios, to halt production of colored glass while they install new furnace filters designed to nearly eliminate emissions of cadmium and arsenic. Spectrum’s plant has had the pollution control system, called baghouse technology, in place since the 1990s, and inspections are made daily, according to its website.

Spectrum CEO Craig Barker called the decision to close after 40 years “extraordinarily difficult” but inevitable because it was no longer financially feasible to continue operations. “Our facility was built to support product demand at the height of art glass movement, but our sales never fully recovered following the Great Recession,” Barker said in a statement posted on the company’s Facebook page. The national Speciality Glass Artists Association said local and federal governments are rushing to judgment and unduly harming glass factories and the entire industry. The group said in a statement: “While the SGAA does not support

excessive emissions we do feel that these companies are being put under excessive duress and should be given more time and money to comply.” Spectrum’s processing of its sheet glass is unique, trademarked and not used by any other glass manufacturer in the world. Spectrum’s original founders perfected a continuous melt “ribbon” system where thin sheets roll through a series of furnaces, cool and get cut into 4-foot sections. Artists say Spectrum’s glass is uniform, consistent, has fewer bubbles and is easier to work with than sheets produced by other manufacturers that hand roll their glass sheets. Ruano of Bedrock Industries worries how

she’ll stock the dozens of tin boxes filled with the leftover trimmed edge of Spectrum sheet glass, known as mosaic cullet. “Since 1994, I’ve been buying Spectrum’s mosaic cullet and used it in mosaic art and in the glass tiles and garden art we produce,” she said, standing among dangling dragonflies, koi fish platters and rows of gleaming tile lining her store near Ballard. At the height of the glass art craze 10 years ago, Ruano said she purchased eight to 10 tons of mosaic cullet a year from Spectrum; now she’s going through about 3 tons annually. “I don’t think the consumer realizes how good they’ve had it here,” she said. “The affordable glass art available in Seattle is because of Spectrum. Maybe this is the beginning of the end of Seattle’s glass reputation.” Many glass artists say they’re taking a wait-andsee approach. Colleen Price, owner of Covenant Art Glass in Everett, carries sheets of Spectrum colorful glass. Some with heavy wavy patterns, some translucent and dazzling, line the shelves of her Broadway Avenue shop. She estimates 80 to 90 percent of her sales are for Spectrum products. Her praise runs high for the company she called a leader in the glass arts community. “Spectrum glass is predictable, available and the price was affordable,” Price said. “For many reasons it’s been the go-to glass.”

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6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

COVER STORY

Passion drives Bothell biotech firm Seattle Genetics expands, adding hundreds after approval of first drug By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

I

magine walking into your office every day and seeing someone whose life you saved. That’s what it’s like to work at Seattle Genetics. In the Bothell company’s lobby, a video featuring people in remission from Hodgkin’s lymphoma plays, patients treated with Seattle Genetic’s signature drug Adcetris. Those patients also come to company-wide meetings to share their stories. “One of the first patients who came was signed up for the Peace Corps, he was in the pink of health,” said Dennis Benjamin, the company’s vice president of translational research. “To go into the Peace Corps, you need a physical. So he’s sold all of his stuff, got his plane ticket but then they called him back in. “And he’s in chemotherapy and when chemotherapy didn’t work his whole life just changed. It was two years of a downward spiral. And then he got Adcetris and he got better.” More than 26,000 patients have been treated with Adcetris since it was first approved for use in the U.S. in 2011. Many of those survived where other front-line drugs for lymphoma have failed. This has energized the people who work in the labs at Seattle Genetics at 21823 30th Drive SE, Bothell, tucked in the Canyon Creek Business Park. “You can probably sense the passion that’s around research in the whole company,” said Travis Biechele, one of Seattle Genetic’s scientists. “People really believe in what we’re doing. I believe in what we’re doing. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t be here. It’s exciting to come in every day here. I ride my bike here and I get more and more excited as I get here. It’s really fun doing this.” It’s also profitable. Seattle Genetics made $450 million in sales last year on Adcetris and the company reported at its most recent quarterly reports that it has $691.7 million in cash without any debt. Seattle Genetics is the largest biotech company in the Northwest based on market capitalization — the value of a company factoring price of its shares compared with the total number of stocks — as well as revenues and number of employees. And Seattle Genetics is growing both in terms of size and breadth of vision. In addition to Adcetris, the company is developing 12 new lines of cancer-fighting drugs. To do the research, the com-

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Seattle Genetics founder Clay Siegall lost his father while in college, prompting him to switch from studying for an MD to studying for a Ph.D. with the goal to treat cancer patients. His efforts are paying off in lives saved.

“My goal in the world is to treat cancer patients and do better than what we’re doing today with targeted drugs, and I love that I wake up every day and I’m excited about it.” — Clay Siegall pany has added hundreds of employees over the past several years. Seattle Genetics grew from just more than 100 employees 10 years ago to 800 employees this spring. The company expects to add another 100 this year. To house that many workers, Seattle Genetics is expanding from four buildings at the Canyon Creek Business Park to six, occupying about 350,000 square feet of space. The company also is adding another 20 workers at a new Switzerland office that will work with the European Medicines Agency, which approves drugs for countries in the European Union. Adcetris, which comes in vials that patients take in a 30-minute

drip into the arm on an outpatient basis, is only approved to be used on Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients who have failed other treatments. The company is now seeking to get the drug approved as a front-line treatment. “To get a drug approved for patients who have failed other therapies, that’s great but why let them go through really hard therapy and they fail and they have a tough time in life?” company founder Clay Siegall said. “Why don’t you give the best right away?” If it’s successful, that could cause Adcetris’ sales to explode. “I expect Seattle Genetics sales to go over $1 billion in sales by 2020,” Sie-

gall said. “That’s what we’ve guided Wall Street to say pending these trials, pending data and there’s a lot of work left to do.” It’s quite the rise for Siegall, who started off with one other person when he founded Seattle Genetics in 1998. Siegall, who grew up in the Washington, D.C. area, was in college studying to become a doctor when his father died of brain cancer. He saw the treatment his father received and felt that there needed to be better medicine. He switched from an “MD to pursuing a PhD.” “My goal in the world is to treat cancer patients and do better than what we’re doing today with targeted drugs, and


JUNE 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

COVER STORY I love that I wake up every day and I’m excited about it,” Siegall said. “I’m not just saying that. It’s what I do. I’ve been doing it for 30 years.” He graduated with his doctoral degree in molecular genetics from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He then went on to do a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Institute of Health in Maryland. Afterward, he was hired by biopharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb in Connecticut. In 1992, the company asked Siegall to move his entire team to Seattle where it had purchased a biotech research firm. Eventually, Bristol-Myers Squibb decided to move out of the Puget Sound area. Siegall stayed: “I moved to Seattle and I fell in love with the area, this is home for my kids.” He continues to live in Woodway. In 1997, Siegall started Seattle Genetics in Bothell. He praised Bristol-Myers Squibb, which helped him get started. Siegall’s company grew slowly in its first years. The company made its initial public offering in 2001 and is traded on the Nasdaq Stock Market under the symbol SGEN. One of the first drugs that the company worked on was Adcetris, which targets lymphoma cells and delivers a payload to kill the cancer. The key is the drug is attracted to a protein called CD30. “We did not discover CD30,” Siegall said. “It was discovered in Germany. It was discovered and described and that’s it. We noticed it was on lymphoma cells in high density. So we decided we would make a drug that would find CD30, find the target and kill the cell.” The company went through years of research on Adcetris and then even more time on trials. And there was no guarantee that it would succeed. “Cancer drugs fail a lot,” Siegall said. “Even with the best research and with the best scientists in the world and then you go into humans and we’re complicated. Sometimes the drugs don’t work as well as you think they would or predict.” When the blind testing was completed on Adcetris, the scientists at Seattle Genetics were stunned at how successful it was in treating lymphoma patients. The drug was approved for use in the U.S. in 2011. To celebrate, Seattle Genetics held had a company party at the Showbox Theater in Seattle. Benjamin, the company’s VP of translational research, has kept the rubber wristband they gave for people to enter the party. “Most of what happens in the discovery of research fails,” Benjamin said. “The drugs don’t deliver specifically. They’re not active. They’re not selective. There’s an awful lot of hard work that people put in and some people in this industry can literally go 20 years in their career and not have a drug approved. So it really was a really a special moment. It was fantastic.” The drug has been approved for use in 64 countries around the world, most recently in Russia and Egypt. And Seattle Genetics is seeking approval in China. With the success of Adcetris, Seattle Genetics has been able to expand its

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Dennis Benjamin, Seattle Genetic’s vice president of translational research, places a sample slide in a microscope at one of the laboratories on the company’s Bothell campus.

“There’s an awful lot of hard work that people put in and some people in this industry can literally go 20 years in their career and not have a drug approved. So it really was a really a special moment. It was fantastic.” — Dennis Benjamin on FDA approval of Adcetris

Seattle Genetics worker growth (anticipated)

2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999

EMPLOYEES 0

100

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SOURCE: SEATTLE GENETICS

operations, buy new and better equipment and conduct more research. While none of its new drugs are for brain cancer, Siegall said his company is licensing its research to an outside firm doing study in that area. As Seattle Genetics grows, the company is helping spur economic development in the south part of the county. Siegall said he’s happy with being an engine for the local economy although he notes that the true value of the company

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is in the research, not the manufacture of the drugs. “I get questioned from lawmakers, senators, Congress people and they ask, ‘Are you going to build manufacturing here?’” Siegall said. “That’s a very Boeing-centric question. We have our headquarters here. We have hundreds and hundreds of people. We’ll hire a company that has a big manufacturing center and 20 people and they’ll make our drug in a month, enough for a year, it won’t move the needle.”

Other biotech companies have come and gone in the Puget Sound region. Immunex was the heavyweight drugmaker of its day in the Seattle area, but it was purchased by Amgen and then the company slowly moved operations from the area. Amgen shut down the last offices in Seattle and Bothell last year. Icos — the developer of Cialis, the erectile-dysfunction drug featuring the bathtub-sitting couples — was the largest drugmaker in the county until it was bought by pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly in 2007. Eli Lilly then shut down most of the Bothell operations and sold what was left to a Danish company. Siegall doesn’t see that happening with Seattle Genetics. Most of the time companies that are bought are looking to be purchased, he said. He and the board of directors believe that Seattle Genetics is on a trajectory where “we think we can build something that the shareholders will be proud of and will be worth their while from an investment standpoint.” “Our goal is to be an independent, self-sustaining company that’s making the difference in the lives of cancer patients with innovative targeted therapies,” Siegall said. “We’re trying to build as strong a company as we can.”


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

Slingshot to give velocity to businesses By Jim Davis

To contact

The Herald Business Journal

It’s a start-up to help start-ups. The nonprofit NW Innovation Resource Center is creating a new venture called Slingshot-NW to help inventors and entrepreneurs market whatever they dream up. Inventors are often “garage geeky guys and girls” who want to make things, but don’t have the desire or experience to sell it, said Diane Kamionka, the executive director of the NW Innovation Resource Center, which helps entrepreneurs throughout northwest Washington. “Inventors are just not very good marketers,” Kamionka said. “They know their product, but, with rare exception, it’s not what they do to go and sell it.” So Slingshot is being created as a marketing tool to help these businesses get off the ground. Bryan Brown, who has been a mentor with the NW Innovation Resource Center for more than a year, has been hired to serve as the executive director for Slingshot. “If all goes well, their time with Slingshot will be short,” Brown said. “We’ll take them in, find the right market for their product and move them into that bigger marketplace.” Brown learned about both start-ups and e-commerce while working with software companies in the Seattle and East Side area.

Learn more about Slingshot-NW or the NW Innovation Resource Center by calling 360-255-7870 or visiting www.nwirc.com.

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Bryan Brown takes over as the first CEO of Slingshot-NW to help market products and inventions by northwest Washington inventors and entrepreneurs. Slingshot is an offshoot of the NW Innovation Resource Center.

“I’ve been through the trenches of start-ups and understand how to get from idea to start-up to full blown execution in the marketplace,” said Brown, who now lives in Bellingham. Slingshot will help inventors and entrepreneurs get their products to the consumers in several ways, Kamionka and Brown said. First, Slingshot could work with other companies to sub-license a product. For instance, if an inventor comes up with a better paintbrush, maybe Slingshot works

with that person to sub-license the brush to existing painting companies that could manufacture and sell the item. Another way, Slingshot could help the inventors present the product to as-seen-on TV marketing companies, which have a proven process of getting products into the marketplace not only on television but also in retail stores. Some budding entrepreneurs may need to demonstrate there’s a demand for their products. Slingshot will also create an e-commerce website.

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Slingshot will pay a royalty to the inventors or entrepreneurs for each product sold. Slingshot will get revenue from sales of the products or sub-licensing fees. Kamionkas see Slingshot as a natural extension of the NW Innovation Resource Center, which started three years ago to help entrepreneurs in Snohomish, Island, Skagit, Whatcom and San Juan counties. Those five counties are beginning to form a regional identity, Kamionka said. There was concern from business people in those counties that entrepreneurial folks were leaving the area. “You’re kind of boxed in between Vancouver (B.C.) and Seattle,” Kamionka said. “You’ve got high-tech businesses — huge entrepreneurial success stories in both of those cities and people in the middle who are very innovative. You don’t want to lose those people to the two ends.” So the NW Innovation Resource Center was born to help mentor entrepreneurs and foster their ideas in the area. The NW Innovation Center has received grants and donations, including from


JUNE 2016

entrepreneurs it has helped, Kamionka said. So far, the NW Innovation Resource Center has been working with about 40 inventors and entrepreneurs intensively. And some of those people have experienced success. One inventor has created a lighted, electric screwdriver that gets into tight spaces. It’s being sold on the shelves of Lowes, Kamionka said. Another has made a travel bag that has a fold-out mat that can serve as a sleeping space for babies or toddlers. Another inventor has come up with a better way to breed geoducks and clams. The NW Innovation Resource Center is doing important work for this region, said Lanie McMullin, the city of Everett’s economic development executive director. “When we talk about growing jobs, we’ll always have more success through expansion of business that are already here and growing our own businesses,” McMullin said. She praised Kamionka for her creativity and expertise at helping entrepreneurs. “There are so many people out there who have an idea or a product in mind that just needs some help and some structure for their progression and that’s what she offers,” McMullin said. The NW Innovation Resource Center also helps entrepreneurs and inventors connect them with potential investors. The group has about 50 people in the region who are willing to consider putting money toward projects. “They may look at a dozen of them or more before they find one that they like,” Kamionka said.

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

Local architects honored for work

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Designs Northwest Architects and Stig Carlson Architecture won an award for their work on remodeling Camano Island Library, a former restaurant.

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Several local architectural firms won recognition last month for their work in the 2016 Northwest Washington American Institute of Architects Design Awards. The awards celebrate the best architectural designs available from architects in Island, Skagit, San Juan and Whatcom counties, according to the institute. The projects were judged on sustainability, innovation, building performance and overall integration

with the client and surrounding community. The awards were presented at the institute’s annual dinner on May 5 in Bellingham. Stanwood architectural firm Designs Northwest Architects and Stig Carlson Architecture in Coupeville on Whidbey Island won a merit award for the remodel of the City of Everett’s Cope-Gillette Theatre at 2730 Wetmore Ave. The building was a former bank turned into a children’s theater. Architects on record were Dan Nelson and John Jones. The builder was Newland Construction of Everett.

Designs Northwest Architects and Stig Carlson Architecture also won a citation award for their work on Sno-Isle Library’s Camano Island Library at 848 N Sunrise Blvd. The firms helped turn a former restaurant into the library. Work began in 2014 on the then-empty Islanders Restaurant, at Terry’s Corner in Camano Commons, and the new library opened in August. Kirtley Cole Construction of Everett was the builder. Designs Northwest won a citation award for a building owned by Kirtley Cole, which did the construction. Dan Nelson was the architect on record. Designs Northwest and Mount Vernon’s HKP won a citation award for a Housing Hope project in the unbuilt category. Architect of record is Julie Blazek. Blazek of HKP also won awards for the Henry M. Jackson Park construction at 1700 State St., Everett, and the reconstruction of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Building reconstruction in Skagit County. Stanwood architect David Pelletier of Pelletier + Schaar won a citation award for the Bomgardner residence in the residential category. Holbeck Construction & Desgn on Camano Island was the builder. For a full list of winners and projects, go to http://tinyurl.com/NWAIADAwards.

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Everett Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age.


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Stylish hats help couple find success Ecuadoran immigrants struggled in U.S. until launching Panama hat import business By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

The founder of a Lynnwood company that imports Panama hats directly from 10 women weavers in Ecuador said he’s dreamed of helping others his whole life. Since he was a small boy exploring mountainous terrain with his dog in his native Ecuador, he’s felt a responsibility to do some good, said Yuri Parreno, of Ultrafino Panama Hats in Lynnwood. “I saw the world in a different way,” he said. “I loved nature and the mountains.” The lush beauty of the landscape in Ecuador, which straddles the equator, opened his eyes to the poverty and homelessness co-existing around him. “When you live in a third-world country,” said Parreno, 46, “you can see many things that can change your life.” His parents cautioned him against giving money that could be used to buy drugs, he said, but the desire to help the poor never left. Forty years later, Parreno’s dreams are coming true through Ultrafino Panama Hats, a company Parreno founded and co-owns with his wife, Ivonne Jurado, also 46. Aside from a few male master weavers of Panama hats — which originated in Ecuador despite the name — most of the weavers are women, many of whom have five or more children, Parreno said. Buying directly from the weavers cuts out the middleman — Ecuadoran companies that buy the weaving, then finish the brims and machine-press the hats to ready them for sale — and enables Ultrafino to pay more to the weavers, Parreno said. “These women are helping their families,” he said. “So they are making the difference, not the men.” For Parreno and Jurado, being able to help make a difference began with immigration to the United States 16 years ago. “Ecuador is a beautiful country with beautiful people,” Parreno said. “But unfortunately, you don’t have too much opportunity.” He didn’t give this too much thought until their first son was born, he said. He and Jurado were working in marketing and administration, respectively, but Ecuador’s economy was poor and their son’s future looked bleak. Jurado had been an exchange student in Kansas and some members of her family were living in Seattle, so the choice to immigrate seemed easy. Adapting was not so simple. Their degrees didn’t count for much and rent was expensive. Jurado found a secretarial-receptionist job at a community center, but Parreno’s English was not as good. He ended up working as a driver, a waiter and in fastfood restaurants like Arby’s, where he did everything including mopping the floors. He worked as many as three jobs at a time, he said, and was so tired sometimes

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Ultrafino’s owners, Yuri Parreno (right) and his wife, Ivonne Jurado, model Panama hats they import from their native Ecuador. The couple struggled finding work, even though both had college degrees, so they started their own business.

“It’s fun, it’s stylish, you can wear it for all occasions — summer, or if you’re going to concerts. Hats make you feel good.” — Ivonne Jurado he would fall asleep on the bus and miss his stop. One cold night he had to walk a mile in the snow without the proper footwear. “Sometimes my eyes start trying to cry because sometimes you start losing your power,” he said. “And you say, ‘What am I doing here?’ “ His family still lives in Ecuador and calls him “the crazy one” for leaving, he said. “But I feel very proud that we keep moving forward,” he said. He and Jurado started importing various arts and crafts from Ecuador, selling them at street fairs and on e-Bay to find what customers wanted. When Panama hats proved the most popular, they formed Ultrafino Panama Hats in 2003. At first they worked out of a 750-squarefoot space in their garage and basement and sold strictly online. Not only did they have to educate themselves about the hats, including how to finish the brims, press the hats into various shapes and trim them with ribbons etc., they had to educate the Ecuadoran weavers on what they wanted, Parreno said. They still receive incorrect orders sometimes, he said, and have to figure out how to fix them. The more they learned about the Panama hat, though, the more they grew to love it, Jurado said.

“It’s fun, it’s stylish, you can wear it for all occasions — summer, or if you’re going to concerts,” she said. “Hats make you feel good.” Something happens when a customer dons the right Panama hat and looks in the mirror, Parreno said. The smile tells the story. “Your self-esteem is going up because you feel great,” Parreno said. Handwoven from straw made from the toquillo palm plant that grows on Ecuador’s Pacific coast, the iconic hats can be traced back to the Incas and have been worn by such famous people as Gary Cooper, Winston Churchill, Sean Connery and Anthony Hopkins. Prices average $100 to $200 a hat, but can go as high as $5,000 for collectors’ hats, which have a very fine weave. Depending on the fineness of the weave, Panama hats can take anywhere from one week to one year to make, Perrano said. Theories abound as to why they came to be called Panama hats, but several websites attribute the start of their widespread popularity to the California Gold Rush in the mid-1850s, when American travelers bought them while passing through Panama. Ultrafino Panama Hats has been growing in popularity. With the help of a $50,000 loan from Business Impact NW,

a nonprofit dedicated to helping underserved entrepreneurs including women, minorities and veterans, Perrano and Jurado moved their business out of their garage last year and into a 6,000-squarefoot space in Lynnwood. They learned about Business Impact NW while taking a business class at the UW Consulting and Business Development Center. They had tried borrowing from banks, Perrano said, but didn’t have the amount of collateral the banks wanted, so were shocked when Business Impact NW took only a month to approve their loan. Joe Skye-Tucker, co-executive director of Business Impact NW, called Perrano and Jurado “incredibly persistent” with a strong business sense and the kind of steady growth that gives him confidence. Located at 6333 212th St. SW, Suite C, Ultrafino’s new space includes a warehouse, offices and a Panama hat showroom to help customers find the right hat. The showroom is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Ultrafino’s Panama hats can also be found at a number of summer festivals, including in Fremont and Bellevue and at Folklife in downtown Seattle. The company now has six employees and “many, many” Panama hats in stock, Perrano said, as well as a selection of American-made winter hats and newsboy-type hats like those worn in the movie, “Newsies,” or seen on the golf course. “Right now our main goal is to keep working hard, having fun and finding ways to make history, to help to make a difference,” Perrano said. “Not only in Ecuador, but here, too.”


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

Biotech investor sheet plans online relaunch By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

For Alan Leong, stock values extend beyond the bottom line. He co-founded BioWatch News, a soon-to-relaunch website that offers biotech investors commentary, interviews and global market analysis. Readers appreciate the knowledge of how to better invest in the future — both financially and philosophically. “I have a passion for biotech because you see amazing things happening,” Leong says. “When there is a previously incurable disease and a child is saved by new advancements, there is no other feeling in the world like that. We get to have a front-row seat.” The first incarnation of BioWatch News launched in 2000 with a newsletter-focused format. In 2013, it was re-envisioned as a magazine publication. It is relaunching this year

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

BioWatch News founder Alan Leong, together with Samson Ramirez (right) and Corinne Jordan (left). Leong founded the now online service that tracks biotech news.

as a web-based offering in order to minimize overhead and expand the freedom to publish faster. The initial rollout is planned

for this summer with a formal launch in the subsequent 12 to 18 months. BioWatch News readers have long been a mix

of individuals, institutions, funds and more. In addition to the site’s free content, an eventual subscriber section will offer

more comprehensive, high-end services. “Our stock and trade is to get better and better at communicating each

biotech company’s story,” Leong says. “We have a definable edge in knowing what I call the important parts of the science. My job is to explain the relevant parts as well as I can to investors.” BioWatch News maintains a global outlook, but is headquartered in Bothell where it is part of the area’s growing biotech community. Both Seattle Genetics and Alder BioPharmaceuticals are also based in Bothell. Juno Therapeutics and Cocrystal Pharma maintain local presences as well. “Biotech has come in waves in the greater Puget Sound region. We have a ways to go, but there are wonderful things happening,” says Leong, who lives in Bothell. “We’re probably going to need to cross a couple more bridges to ascend to the first tier, but people still see the area as significant.” Leong describes his own background as having been the type of kid who

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“read Popular Science magazine in his room.” His academic background includes undergraduate work in math, business and social sciences, graduate work in engineering and a Ph.D. in social sciences. He has taught management and entrepreneurship for the past 18 years including at University of Washington’s Bothell and Seattle campuses, and specifically via UW’s Arthur W. Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship. “Alan is 100 percent dedicated to his students. He sometimes stays up until two or three in the morning helping them. He takes them to another level they didn’t even know they had,” says Samson Ramirez, Leong’s former student who is serving as co-founder of BioWatch New’s current relaunch. Ramirez, 26, originally envisioned a possible career in corporate banking. Four university classes with Leong and a few special projects convinced him to pursue a path where investing was about

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

Marysville Kmart to close in July The Herald Business Journal

CONTRIBUTED GRAPHICS

Covers of BioWatch News when it was being published as a print magazine.

more than just dollars and cents. “We want our readers to understand that you’re not just investing money, but investing in the medicine of tomorrow — your kids’ futures,” Ramirez says. “You’re providing resources for a company to bring products to fruition that help humanity.” BioWatch News has repeatedly featured Corcept Therapeutics, a California-based company studying the cortisol hormone. Their research can be applied to the treatment of diseases ranging from cancer to diabetes. “A major thing that may sound simple — but it’s

CHRIS ADAMS CHRIS ADAMS CHRIS ADAMS

not — is that BioWatch News is providing topshelf analysis for essentially individual investors who would otherwise have difficulty finding equivalent info,” says Joe Belanoff, co-founder and CEO of Corcept Therapeutics. “It’s important to me that people really understand what we’re doing. They’ll make their individual investment decisions, but I’m always pleased when they can explain the reasons why and the science,” Belanoff says. For now, Leong and Ramirez are the driving forces. The hope is to eventually add a third, full-time person and a few

support staff or interns assisting with ground-level work. Leong believes the new site will benefit from the experience of past endeavors. He hopes to increase the focus on offering differing viewpoints albeit under the same umbrella of values. “Actually, we don’t want to be our client’s only source because we shouldn’t be. People should be getting information from a wide range of sources,” Leong says. “What we want is to be their favorite source with well-thought, irresistible information they can’t find anywhere else.”

MARYSVILLE — The last Kmart in Snohomish County is shutting down. Store closing signs went up in May at the store at 9623 State Ave. After the announcement, the store was packed with people looking for bargains. The store plans to shut down in mid-July. The store employs 47 people who are mostly part-time or hourly, said Howard Riefs, director of corporate communications for the Sears Holdings Corp., which operates both Kmart and Sears. Those employees will be eligible to receive severance and can apply for open positions at other Sears or Kmart stores. Sears Holdings announced in April that it planned to close 68

Kmarts and 10 Sears stores this summer to offset losses. At the time, the Marysville store wasn’t on the list of closures. But rumors surfaced on social media that the Marysville Kmart was targeted for closure. Riefs said at the time that wasn’t the case. “No, that’s a bad rumor,” Riefs said in an email on May 2. “The store will remain open.” Riefs said that he was in error in that email. “Store closures are part of a series of actions we’re taking to reduce on-going expenses, adjust our asset base, and accelerate the transformation of our business model,” a spokesman said. Two years ago, Sears Holdings shut down the Kmart at 8102 Evergreen Way in Everett. That store had been open for 48 years. The location remains vacant.

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

Artist chooses her own adventure With move to county, Brandi York focuses on art that she loves By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

To be sure, it’s only a small amount of Brandi York’s work. The Everett artist has sold 30 to 40 portraits of online characters, avatars for games like “World of Warcraft,” “Everquest” or “Star Wars: The Old Republic.” For York, it’s satisfying to bring to life characters that gamers have come to love and to flesh out details that may not show up on the computer screen. “I’m a fan girl at heart,” York said. “Pardon the pun, I’m kind of drawn to drawing what reflects that fan-girl aspect.” Click through her website, brandiyork. com, or look at her page on etsy.com and you’ll find what York describes as fine art and random geekery. She’s done landscapes and historical murals, but the art tends toward popular culture. There are the pictures of online avatars, portraits of famous fictional characters (think Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes) and an assortment of quotes written in stylized typography. (One from the popular fantasy-mystery series, the Dresden Files, reads, “Paranoid? Probably. But just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean there isn’t an invisible demon about to eat your face.”) One of her current projects is doing the cover and rulebook art for new game by Phoenix, Arizona-based company Magic Meeples. She met the owners of the company at a comic-book convention. “One of the owners saw my art at my table and she really, really liked one of my art pieces and she bought it,” York said. “A couple of days later, they emailed me and asked me if I would be interested in doing this project.” This is the type of art she wanted to do when she gave up working as a commercial artist and moved to Snohomish County two years ago. York, 36, has drawn all of her life, but it wasn’t until she saw the Disney movie, “Beauty and the Beast” at age 12 that it became a can’t-put-it-down passion. She drew the movie’s soundtrack cover 50 times. “Instead of finding me in a corner with a book you’d find me in a corner with a sketchbook,” York said. At Santiago High School in Garden Grove, Calif., York found a mentor in art teacher Diane Acosta, who taught her how to use watercolors, pastels, oils and other materials. Another passion of hers helped lead to her selling her first art. York lived down the road from Disneyland where she spent countless hours. “Some people turn to drugs, I turned to Disneyland,” York joked. She watched artists working on Main Street at the park and met one who drew Disney-themed books. He hired her to draw some background elements, giving

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Brandi York has spent a career doing portraits in Disneyland and working as a Trader Joe’s in-store artist. Now, she’s parlayed that into a business making pop-culture, fan-girl art that she sells online. To the right are fantasy portraits of woman done in a nonsexual manner.

some work to help out a young artist. After high school, York spent three years at California State University, Long Beach, learning techniques and styles of art. What was not taught was the “business side of things, the real, honest, truthful, this-is-what’s-going-on side of things,” York said. “There are times you’re going to have more work than you know what to do with and there are times when you’ll be scraping by, hoping that you can make your bills next month,” York said. “That’s not what they necessarily tell you in college.” While in college, York worked at Disneyland, first at parking and later as costumed characters Pluto and Eeyore. Then she was hired as a contract artist doing portraits in the New Orleans Square part of the park. It was great training to do as many as 20 portraits a day, even though, like any job, it had its drawbacks. “The parents who really just don’t get it, they’d ask their child, ‘Honey, can you sit still for 30,’” York said. “I’m like, ‘Do you even know your kid? I can tell you the answer to that right now.’”

It was at this time she met her husband, Jim York, at a party where they played Nintendo games and croquet in the back yard. When they got married, York sought out work that would pay more and landed a job as an in-store artist at a Trader Joe’s, creating signs, displays and hand-written prices on the merchandise. It was steady work, but she would come home and draw fantasy and pop culture art. “For a lot of artists, it’s like breathing,” York said. “You go do the art you are told to do and then you go home and do the art you want to do.” She worked for Trader Joe’s for 10 years and transferred to a store in Eugene, Oregon, where her husband pursued a master’s degree in counseling. Brandi York would sell her art at anime and comic-book conventions although she took a hiatus during the height of the recession when people just didn’t have spare money. She would draw fantasy characters as she imagined them in fantasy books and other characters. She drew her interpretation of the characters of “Critical Role,” a

group of voice actors in Los Angeles who weekly stream their Dungeons & Dragons gaming sessions. At one of conventions, York was set up next to a Copic Marker vendor. The vendor enjoyed York’s work enough that they agreed to hire her to demonstrate art techniques with their markers. It supplemented her income enough that when she and her husband moved to the county for his practice, York was able to take the plunge into art of her own choosing. (Jim York now works in Everett as a family and couples therapist at Spectrum Psychological Associates.) One of her current projects is an art nouveau-inspired series of women in the classic roleplaying characters — clerics, wizards and fighters — drawn in a non-sexualized way. Fantasy portrayals of women have often shown the characters wearing little to no armor. She said there are a lot of female gamers who are trying to become part of the culture. “If I’m playing a fighter in this game, she’s going to wear real plate mail,” York said. “She’s not going to wear this bikini chain mail.”


JUNE 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

Getting ready for Lynnwood light rail By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

It’s still up in the air when light rail will reach Everett. When it will reach Snohomish County is another matter. Sound Transit is busy doing behind-the-scenes work to bring light rail to Lynnwood including looking to acquire several businesses and homes in south county. Construction is expected to start in 2018 — in just two years. The project is expected to open by 2023, allowing people to get on the train in Lynnwood and get to downtown Seattle in 28 minutes. The extension is expected to carry up to 74,000 riders each weekday by 2035. One of the biggest steps to make that happen occurred in February when President Barack Obama’s budget allocated $125 million of a potential $1.1 billion sought for the Northgate to Lynnwood extension. Sound Transit always had counted on federal dollars to make the numbers work on the project, said Bruce Gray, a Sound Transit spokesman. The Federal Transit Administration also gave the Lynnwood project its second-highest possible rating under its competitive grant process. In March, the transit agency awarded a $73.7 million contract for the final design of the 8.5-mile light rail extension from Northgate to Lynnwood. Bellevue firm, HNTB Jacobs Trusted Design

JIM DAVIS / HBJ

Sound Transit is looking to acquire several businesses and properties in south Snohomish County for the new light-rail extension.

Partners, won the job. And Sound Transit is starting the process of selecting the general contractor-construction manager to build the 3.7 miles of track from Shoreline to Lynnwood. A contractor should be in place by this fall. The real estate division for Sound Transit is beginning to talk with 10 businesses and homeowners in the county to purchase the property needed for this extension. The businesses are all in Lynnwood near the existing Lynnwood Transit Center Park-and-Ride. Those businesses include: the Chevron Station at 20000 44th Ave. W — which was remodeled just a few years ago; McDonald’s Fine Furniture at 20111 46th Ave. W; the Black Angus Steakhouse at 20102 44th Ave. W.; and a strip mall at 20007 44th Ave. W. Sound Transit is also

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months of testing before the scheduled opening in 2023. Cost estimates for the entire 8.5-mile-long extension from Northgate to Lynnwood range from $1.5 billion to $1.7 billion, including adding 1,500 park-and-ride spaces along the route. The project will also pay for 34 new light rail vehicles and fund a portion of a new light rail maintenance facility, bringing the total project cost to approximately $2.3 billion. Two stations are planned in Snohomish County with this extension, one at the Mountlake Terrace Transit Center at 236th Street Southwest and a second at the Lynnwood Transit Center. A parking garage with 500 stalls will be added at the Lynnwood Park-and-Ride, bringing the total number of spaces there to 1,650. The Snohomish County portion of the project calls

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JUNE 2016

Building the future, building their future WSU students in Everett enter Mars rover competition By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Even on a college campus, a Mars rover draws attention. The go-kart-sized rover darts over a large rock, claws at the sidewalk with a robotic arm and rests on a lawn on a sunny day in May at Everett Community College. Students, administrators and even a couple of campus visitors wander over to see what’s going on. The 100-pound, remote-controlled rover is the work of the Engineering Club for Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett. More than a dozen mechanical engineering majors spent what precious little spare time they had during the school year building the rover to compete in an international contest featuring 30 university teams from seven countries. “We get no academic credit for this, whatsoever, this is all extracurricular,” said Blaine Liukko, the Engineering Club president. “This is the Engineering Club that we built to further ourselves. We learn so much in the classroom and in the labs, but this gives us the ability to design and be creative. It allows us to be engineers.” The WSU Engineering Club in Everett started in the last school year and entered the University Rover Competition, but the club didn’t make it through the preliminary phases. This year, the club made the cut to be invited to the competition to be held June 2-4 at the Mars Desert Research Station in Hanksville, Utah. Liukko and Robert Blosser graduated in early May from the WSU mechanical engineering program but held off on their job search. They and other students continued coming to campus, working 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. days to complete the last details. “For us, we wanted to finish out the rover,” Blosser said. “Some of the other seniors in the club, they already have jobs and they’re going straight to work and they were unable to continue to work on this. We decided we wanted to finish out the project.” The rover, named simply Rover 2 — since this is the second one that the club worked on — will need to undergo a series of tests at the competition including showing how well it traverses rough terrain as well as how it can help an astronaut by delivering tools and flipping switches and opening up valves. The rover will also need to make soil analyses while in the competition. The Engineering Club students will control the rover during each of these tasks at times from as far as a half mile away. With the exception of the tires, bolts and battery and a few other pieces, the Engineering Club designed and manufactured every piece of the rover.

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The prototype Mars rover built by the Engineering Club at Washington State University in Everett are finalists in a competition that features 30 teams from across the world.

Some of the Engineering Club students at WSU Everett who manufactured the Mars rover: Stewart Kerns (from left), Austin Sundseth, Blaine Liukko, Robert Blosser, Mitch Elder and Phil Engel.

The students went to companies around the area asking for parts and material to build Rover 2. Janicki Industries in Sedro-Wooley and Boeing gave the students carbon fiber for some of the rover’s body. Pacific Power Batteries in Everett donated a 5-pound lithium iron phosphate battery for the power source. The students also needed help with money for travel expenses. WSU alumni as well as other businesses including

Mukilteo’s Electroimpact donated nearly $4,000. Many of the clubs competing in the contest include students with biology and computer science majors who could help with coding as well as figuring out how to test soil samples. The still-new WSU in Everett doesn’t have the luxury of a large number of programs yet so the Engineering Club students needed to learn those skills themselves.

“I had to contact a lot of geo-technical engineers around the country to find out about digging into soil and doing some tests and how can these tools can actually measure the soil,” junior Phil Engel said. The contest requires all of the rovers to be built for under $15,000 in costs; even donated materials need to be priced in that equation. Rover 2 comes in about $12,000, Liukko said. While the WSU students worked on this rover, eight EvCC students worked this school year on a project called Aerospace Partners for the Advancement of Collaborative Engineering, helping build drones that could explore the Mars landscape. They helped students from three other universities build drones that could fly from a rover and explore Mars. This type of innovation — and what the students will do after they graduate — is why civic leaders have sought so long to expand higher education opportunities in Snohomish County. It’s been good for students like Liukko and Blosser who went to community colleges in the county before transferring to WSU for their junior and senior years. “That was my goal with going to college,” Blosser said. “I wanted to be able to pay for all of it and leave school with no debt and I’ve been able to do that. That’s a big testament to this program.”


JUNE 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

BUSINESS BUILDERS

You want to know about minks, parking, more

R

eaders of this column consistently contribute good ideas to me. I’m glad you do, too, because this month is just a slow real estate news month, friends, and I needed your help. Housing prices are steady, sales velocity is solid, interest rates are unchanged, investors are still chasing yield, supply remains constrained and rents are probably going to increase a little bit this year. Nothing very interesting there to lift up. So I dug through some recent emails to see what you want me to write about. This first group might be dubbed suggestions from out-of-left field: A reader from Darrington asked, “Can you write about the growing mink farming problem? It’s just getting completely out of hand!” One from Everett writes, “Why isn’t anyone talking about drones?” A Lake Stevens reader asks, “Can you do some research on algae in our lake and write about it? I think if you write about it it’ll get fixed.” Here are a couple from the mad-as-hell-and-we’re not-going-to-take-it-anymore crowd: A Shoreline reader asks, “When are you going to write about us being forced into a cashless economy?” A Mill Creek writer says, “My neighbor keeps parking in front of my house. Can you write about that and make him stop?” And a couple more from people reacting to something I wrote who I believe just need to take a chill pill: One from Granite Falls says, “You 1 percenters are all the same. I’ll bet you drive a fancy German car and light cigars with $20 bills! You make me sick!” A Marysville reader makes this suggestion: “I wish you would just leave and go hang out with your liberal friends in Seattle.” They are all such great

suggestions that I thought I could write about all of them. Here goes: On politics, I’m a middle-right guy who prefers balance in government to create the best policy. And I live in Everett. I drive a Chevy and I haven’t smoked a cigar in years. As for the others, I’m

afraid drones are here to stay and we can just get used to cameras taking our pictures everywhere we go now. While I’m impressed that a reader thinks I have enough pull to make changes to Lake Stevens, I will simply acknowledge that algae in Lake Stevens is a bit of a problem but it also helps keep that

lake warm in the summer, which I sort of think is a redeeming quality. And yes, we are going cashless as a society so just get used to it. I can’t help you with your neighborhood-parking spat. Maybe go ask your neighbor nicely to park somewhere else and see if that works? I didn’t know there

was a big mink farming problem, but I’m going to research that and maybe write about it in a future column. Thank you all. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

BUSINESS BUILDERS

The struggle between efficient, effective A re you striving to work efficiently or effectively in your business each day? On the surface, efficient sounds great, right? Heck, I named my business Efficient Organization almost a decade ago. Over the years, I’ve learned a thing or two about what it means to work effectively and why it’s important. On a side note — I still love my business name. When we work efficiently, we’re performing tasks without wasting time or effort. That doesn’t sound so bad. Here’s the thing, we can do pretty much anything efficiently without wasting time or effort. We can post comments on Facebook efficiently, we can read jokes efficiently and we can drink a cup of coffee just as easy as can be. When we choose to work effectively (yes, it’s a choice), we get important stuff done. When we work effectively, we’re moving our businesses forward and getting the results we want. I think it’s safe to say if you’re working effectively, you’re going to leave your business or home office at the end of the day feeling accomplished. Let’s look at two examples of what could happen for a business owner who needs to make money through appointments with clients. Example 1: Working Efficiently You sit down at your desk with a hot

cup of coffee, ready to write out your ‘to do’ list and hit it hard on a Wednesday. You pull out a pad and pen and write out your list: ■ Research stats for a business Monika article for local Kristofferson newspaper; ■ Write 900 Office word business article for local Efficiency newspaper, due in one week; ■ Call five contacts who showed earlier interest; ■ Call five past clients to see if they would like to schedule a future appointment; ■ Update LinkedIn profile ■ Go to networking lunch meeting 12-1 p.m. It’s now 9:10 a.m., you take a sip of your coffee, look over your list and fire up your computer. First stop, email. Forty-five minutes later, you decide you should create a Facebook post for your business. Once you’re on Facebook, you stay for “just a minute” to read a few posts. A half an hour later, after reading posts and watch-

ing a few videos, it’s time to get a refill on that coffee. You really need to get some steps on your tracker since you’ll be sitting so much, so why not walk to the corner coffee stand. You get back to your desk, ready to get serious. A quick look at the clock and you see it’s almost 11 a.m. You have 45 minutes until you need to leave for the networking meeting. You call one of the five contacts on your list and leave a voicemail and then respond to texts that have come in. Well, you better wrap things up and head to the meeting because you really need to drop off your dry cleaning on the way. Things are getting done, but not the tasks that are critical, have a deadline or could produce income. Example 2: Working Effectively You sit down at your desk with a hot cup of coffee, ready to write out your ‘to do’ list and hit it hard on a Wednesday. You write the same to-do list. : It’s now 9:10 a.m., you take a sip of your coffee, look over your list and fire up your computer and turn your phone volume off. You set a timer for 30 minutes to research stats for the article you have to write. As you read, you jot down the information you need. When the timer goes off, you get out a piece of scratch

paper to create a mind map for your article. You set the timer for another 30 minutes and map out the sequence of your article. It’s about 10:15 and you’re ready for another cup of coffee so you turn on the coffee pot in your office and a cup of java is ready in five minutes. Now it’s time to get busy making those 10 phone calls to your contacts and past clients. You have well over an hour to make the calls before leaving for the lunch meeting. You go down the list of calls to make, leaving voicemails as well as engaging in a few conversations. You check your email before heading to your lunch. You can see the pattern that’s happening here. Tasks are getting crossed off your list and you’re scheduling paying clients. There’s a big difference isn’t there? Keep this adage in mind from now on: “There’s no correlation between how long you sit at your desk and what you accomplish.” It’s the truth. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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JUNE 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from April 1-30. 16-11875-MLB: Chapter 13, Hackey Masao Choi; attorney for debtor: Lance L. Lee; attorney for special request: Douglas R. Cameron; filed: April 7; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; type of debtor: individual 16-11952-MLB: Chaper 7, J and R Exterior Construction; attorney for debtor: Thomas D. Neeleman; filed: April 13; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; type of debtor: corporation 16-11977-MLB: Chapter 7, Lee Ann Crawford; attorneys for debtor: Gloria Z. Nagler and Michael M. Sperry; attorney for special request: Cara Richter; filed: April 14; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; type of debtor: individual 16-12124-MLB: Chapter 7, Mike Chung Woo and Kyung Sook Woo; attorney for joint debtors: Young Oh; filed: April 21; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between April 1-30.

Tax liens 201604050209: April 5; Funderburke Autobody (+), 26905 87th Drive NW, Stanwood 201604050210: April 5; Funderburke Autobody (+), 26905 87th Drive NW, Stanwood 201604050211: April 5; Messmer, Uryah D., 2720 Hoyt Ave., Apt 15, Everett 201604050212: April 5; Brand, Todd L. Hilden, 609 54th St. SW, Everett 201604050213: April 5; Artistic Eco Design (+), 818 175th Ave. NE, Snohomish 201604050214: April 5; Grift, Sidney W., PO Box 1227, Bothell 201604050215: April 5; Tarvin, Shana K. (+), 15913 61st Ave. SE, Snohomish 201604050216: April 5; Sherris, Melodee A. (+), 10634 210th St. SE, Snohomish 201604050221: April 5; SOS Bookkeeping (+), 6101 200th St. SW, Suite 205, Lynnwood 201604050222: April 5; Glaefke, Patricia J, 15703 70th Ave. W, Edmonds 201604050223: April 5; Trostle, Byron, 23629 45th Ave. SE, Bothell 201604050224: April 5; Lee Carol A., PO Box 98, Lake Stevens 201604050225: April 5; Jeffress, Phillip R., 20509 Filbert Drive, Unit B, Bothell 201604050226: April 5; Ruiz & Associates Inc., 1120 112th St. SW, Everett 201604050227: April 5; Schnell, Lindsey E., 29902 49th Drive NW, Stanwood 201604050228: April 5; Morehead, Jason R., PO Box 783, Lake Stevens 201604050229: April 5; Ruiz, Jimmy G. (+), 15408 84th St. NE, Suite 1, Lake Stevens 201604050230: April 5; ADK Construction Inc., 17720 Larch Way, Lynnwood 201604050231: April 5; Jakusz, Noelle E., 24395 33rd Court W, Brier 201604050232: April 5; Deo, Shaneel, 4777 Arbors Circle, Mukilteo 201604050233: April 5; Brown, Jesse, PO Box 751, Monroe 201604050234: April 5; Nieto-Ruiz, Miguel, PO Box 4392, Everett 201604050235: April 5; Willis, Artegus D., 1117 Loves Hill Drive, Sultan 201604050236: April 5; Rowe, Jennifer S., 2209 Lakewood Road, Arlington 201604050237: April 5; Jakes Development Corp, 19414 Eighth Place W, Lynnwood 201604120624: April 12; Seton, Fredrick J., 4602 113rd Place NE, Marysville 201604120139: April 12; Sno-King Dispatch Service, 16409 20th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201604120140: April 12; Unitedgener-

alcontractors.net, 8825 34th Ave. NE, Suite L-384, Marysville 201604120141: April 12; Top Hat Painting (+), 17720 Jim Creek Road, Arlington 201604120142: April 12; Falls, Daward L. Jr., 11030 Evergreen Way, Apt A-110, Everett 201604120143: April 12; Eidson, Fredrick, PO Box 353, Lynnwood 201604120144: April 12; Oswald, Stephen M., 21520 Ninth Place W, Lynnwood 201604120145: April 12; Nygreen, Greg H., 21533 36th Ave. W, Brier 201604120146: April 12; Dela-Cruz, Trinidad T., 923 196th Place SW, Lynnwood 201604120147: April 12; Duenas, Carlos A., 1521 Eighth St., Marysville 201604120148: April 12; Sawyer, Edith (+), 14014 68th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201604120149: April 12; Park, Eun S., 4525 164th St. SW, Apt AA-201, Lynnwood 201604120150: April 12; Rice, Douglas, 4412 179th St. SW, Lynnwood 201604120151: April 12; Winckler, Arthur C., 2302 97th Drive SE, Lake Stevens 201604120152: April 12; Thomsen, Brad A., PO Box 203, Edmonds 201604120153: April 12; Nielsen, Eleanor M. (+), 14th Ave. NE, Tulalip 201604120154: April 12; Pacific Logging, PO Box 1439, Marysville 201604120155: April 12; Megyery, Ezzsebet (+), 4924 192nd St. NW, Stanwood 201604120156: April 12; Megyery, Sandor A., 4924 192nd St. NW, Stanwood 201604120157: April 12; Flatten, Marilyn S., 18463 Blueberry Lane, Apt U104, Monroe 201604120158: April 12; Hyatt, Lauren (+), 6711 126th St. SE, Snohomish 201604120159: April 12; Larsen, Debra J. (+), 17808 39th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201604120160: April 12; Morrison, Carlene A., 18232 36th Ave. W, Apt G-4, Lynnwood 201604120161: April 12; Cook, Peter G., 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish 201604120351: April 12; Foster, Kelsey M., 20903 80th Place W, Edmonds 201604120352: April 12; Montgomery, Jeffrey L., 5631 Broadway, Everett 201604120353: April 12; Coronado, Saira (+), 11108 131st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201604120354: April 12; Atkinson, Mark, 10118 169th Drive NE, Granite Falls 201604190054: April 19; Hess, Michael C., PO Box 2051, Granite Falls 201604190055: April 19; Fallon, Wess J., 430 50th St. SW, Everett 201604190056: April 19; Johnson, Owen K., 27126 55th Ave. NE, Arlington 201604190057: April 19; Lindquist, Kay C. (+), 4333 105th Place NE, Marysville 201604190058: April 19; Martinez, David R., 622 Lincoln Ave., Snohomish 201604190059: April 19; Chang, Ho K. (+), 2510 164th St. SW, Apt F-207, Lynnwood 201604190060: April 19; Elbadri, Nagla (+), 12522 Eighth Ave. W, Apt C-105, Everett 201604190061: April 19; White Paint (+), 15806 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201604190062: April 19; Davis, Jody L., 4319 151st Place NE, Marysville 201604190063: April 19; Clark, Kenneth A., 16528 78th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201604190064: April 19; Clark, Sharon L., 16528 78th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201604190065: April 19; Clark, Sharon L., 16528 78th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201604190066: April 19; Grant, Karen S., 12623 133rd Place SE, Snohomish 201604190067: April 19; Hollmann, Raul W., 12204 11th Place W Everett 201604190418: April 19; O’Finnigans Pub (+), 13601 Highway 99, Everett 201604190419: April 19; Amundson & Co. Inc, , 1604 Hewitt Ave., Suite 610, Everett 201604190420: April 19; Sprague, Stephen R., PO Box 456, Arlington 201604190421: April 19; Boyd, Catherine Ann, 20427 Poplar Way, Lynnwood 201604190422: April 19; Routen, Michael F., 3019 164th Place SE, Bothell 201604190423: April 19; Bloch, Robert A. Jr., 7303 224th St. SW, Apt G8, Edmonds 201604190424: April 19; Sparling, William

H., 127 Stone Ridge Drive, Snohomish 201604250318: April 25; Buckardt, Elmer J. (+), PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201604250319: April 25; Buckardt, Elmer J. (+), PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201604250320: April 25; Buckardt, Elmer J. (+), PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201604250321: April 25; Buckardt, Elmer J. (+), PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201604260355: April 26; Jansen, Diane M. (+), 40614 169th St. SE, Gold Bar 201604260356: April 26; Gudmundson, Kris, 17809 79th Drive NE, Arlington 201604260357: April 26; Dettrich, J. William Jr. (+), 9015 Vernon Road, Suite 3, Lake Stevens 201604260358: April 26; Lindberg, Malcolm, 15102 180th Ave. SE, Monroe 201604260359: April 26; Delvechio, Luigi J., 2211 101st Place SE, Everett 201604260360: April 26; Lasnier, Jeffrey, 6911 Olive Ave., Stanwood 201604260361: April 26; Alexander, James B., 1030 Ttereve Drive, Apt. 110, Everett 201604260362: April 26; Parise, Dominic E., 4808 Belvedere Ave., Everett 201604260363: April 26; Smith, Norma (+), 13619 23rd Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201604260364: April 26; Miller, David T., 9326 51st Ave. NE, Marysville 201604260365: April 26; Wysocki, Jeremiah L., 320 Maple Ave., Apt B, Snohomish 201604260366: April 26; Schneiderman, Donald, 23715 84th Ave. W, Unit 102, Edmonds 201604260367: April 26; Schneiderman, Donald, 23715 84th Ave. W, Unit 102, Edmonds 201604260368: April 26; Huang, Denise (+), 1709 164th St. SE, Mill Creek 201604260369: April 26; Northwest Professional Residential & Commercial Construction Inc., PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201604260370: April 26; Chang, Yun Fong, 19506 Richmond Beach Drive NW, Shoreline 201604260371: April 26; Patty’s Eggnest Mukilteo (+), 20016 Cedar Valley Road, Suite 204, Lynnwood

Employment Securities Lien 201604110284: April 11; Compass Employee Services Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201604120706: April 12; Northwest Cartage Co., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201604120707: April 12; Davis, S. (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Partial Release of Federal Tax Lien 201604190425: April 19; Berry, Douglas A., 3427 Norton Ave., Everett

Release of Federal Tax Lien 201604050217: April 5; Janssen, Bryan F., PO Box 544, Edmonds 201604050238: April 5; Gseaa, Abdurraouf (+), 4731 200th St. SW, Apt 117, Lynnwood 201604050239: April 5; Coronado-Perez, Christian, 11611 Airport Road, Ste 206, Everett 201604050240: April 5; Coronado-Perez, Christian, 11611 Airport Road, Ste 206, Everett 201604050241: April 5; Eaton, Patsy M., 23802 141st Drive SE, Snohomish 201604050242: April 5; Commercial Construction Specialty Inc., 19410 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201604050243: April 5; Eaton, Patsy M., 23802 141st Drive SE, Snohomish 201604120162: April 12; Anderson, Warren (+), 8722 147th Ave. NE, Granite Falls 201604120163: April 12; Anderson, Warren (+), 8722 147th Ave. NE, Granite Falls 201604120164: April 12; Mooney, David, 16410 84th St. NE, Apt D-439, Lake Stevens 201604120165: April 12; Nesbit, Michael, PO Box 1911, Sultan 201604120166: April 12; Gerwick-Brodeur, Madeline, PO Box 160, Arlington 201604120167: April 12; Mosbacker, Mar-

tin D., 10965 36th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201604120168: April 12; Gerwick-Brodeur, Madeline, PO Box 160, Arlington 201604120169: April 12; Carey, William E., 9907 49th Drive NE, Unit B, Marysville 201604120170: April 12; Nesbit, Karen (+), 18463 Blueberry Lane SE, Apt P-103, Monroe 201604120171: April 12; Badr, Jamileh (+), 13412 48th Drive SE, Snohomish 201604120172: April 12; Mayo, Michelle R., 14 154th Drive SE, Snohomish 201604120173: April 12; Darren Greenhalgh, PLLC (+), 15130 Main St., Suite 210, Mill Creek 201604120174: April 12; Darren Greenhalgh PLLC, 15130 Main St., Suite 210, Mill Creek 201604120175: April 12; Darren Greenhalgh PLLC (+), 15130 Main St., Suite 210, Mill Creek 201604120176: April 12; Darren Greenhalgh PLLC (+), 15130 Main St., Suite 210, Mill Creek 201604120177: April 12; Shill, Warren R., 24222 54th Ave. W, No. 16, Mountlake Terrace 201604120178: April 12; Greenhalgh, Cynthia C. (+), 6516 177th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201604120179: April 12; Greenhalgh, Darren S., 6516 177th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201604120355: April 12; Kinkead, D. Lorraine (+), 6621 40th St. NE, Marysville 201604180089: April 18; Couldry, Lisa G. (+), 16007 Connelly Road, Snohomish 201604190068: April 19; Ivanyuk, Valentin, 13431 33rd Drive SE, Mill Creek 201604190069: April 19; Monro Law Firm Inc., 1830 Bickford Ave., Suite 204, Snohomish 201604190070: April 19; Vaja, Joshna J., 14917 39th Place W, Lynnwood 201604190071: April 19; Monro Law Firm Inc., 1830 Bickford Ave., Suite 204, Snohomish 201604190072: April 19; Flores, Sonia (+), 1233 167th Place SW, Lynnwood 201604190073: April 19; Malysheff, Karin L. (+), 9822 Holly Drive, Everett 201604190074: April 19; French, Robert G., PO Box 666, Sultan 201604190075: April 19; Pecina, Zennia Cruz, 12433 Admiralty Way, Apt. C101, Everett 201604190076: April 19; Lundquist, Todd (+), PO Box 1329, Lake Stevens 201604190077: April 19; Sylvester, William (+), 8210 83rd St. NE, Marysville 201604190078: April 19; Smith, Somin, 18310 36th Ave. W, Apt E-10, Lynnwood 201604190079: April 19; French, Robert G., PO Box 666 Sultan 201604190080: April 19; Rorke, Danielle L. (+), 23430 97th Place W, Edmonds 201604190081: April 19; Wilson-Rogers & Associates Inc., 2006 196th St. SW, Lynnwood 201604190082: April 19; Monro Law Firm Inc., 9623 32nd St. SE, Building C-101, Everet 201604220673: April 22; Waldal, Skyler A., PO Box 25, Arlington 201604220674: April 22; Brunhaver, Stacey L. (+), 6702 124th Place SE, Snohomish 201604260372: April 26; Axiom Concrete Corp, PO Box 1309, Issaquah 201604260373: April 26; Monro, Robin J. (+), 10431 Trombley Road, Snohomish 201604260374: April 26; A-One Medical Services Inc, 3114 Oakes Ave., Everett 201604260375: April 26; Reissland, Eman A., 3816 132nd St. SW, Apt A, Lynnwood 201604260376: April 26; Gemmer, Jodi L. (+), 9889 Central Valley Road NW, Bremerton 201604260377: April 26; Legg, William H., 7103 230th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201604260378: April 26; West, Darrel W, 11427 159th St. NE, Granite Falls 201604260379: April 26; Lapole, Holly A. (+), 22809 121st St. SE, Monroe

Withdrawal of Federal Tax Lien 201604050218: April 5; Geor, Danielle Fawaz (+), 5522 190th St. SW, Lynnwood 201604260380: April 26; Brewer, George H. Jr, 23532 82nd Ave. SE, Woodinville 201604260381: April 26; Brewer, Linda L. (+), 23532 82nd Ave. SE, Woodinville


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BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — Bethany of the Northwest Foundation is the recipient of a $40,000 grant from the Employees Community Fund of Boeing to benefit low-income, disabled seniors in Everett. The funds will go toward purchasing a new six-wheelchair, handicapped-accessible vehicle with a rear 1,000-pound hydraulic lift and large windows.

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Long-term includes regularly scheduled vessels only. Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 29 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 25 Ship port calls 2015: 133

LYNNWOOD — The opening of the newest Snohomish County WorkSource Center, WorkSource Lynnwood, is scheduled for 1:30 to 4 p.m. June 6 at 18009 Highway 99, Lynnwood. WorkSource is a partnership of organizations across the state that are dedicated to addressing the state’s employment needs at no cost to the job seeker.

Barge port calls 2015: 61

EVERETT — The Valley-Organic Deli has opened at 2805 Colby Ave. in downtown Everett. The shop, owned by Luis Elviro, is focused on healthy organic meals and snacks such as coffee, sandwiches, salads, paninis, and smoothies. It is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. For more info, visit http://valleyorganicdeli.com/.

Source: Port of Everett

MARYSVILLE — Ideal Wellness celebrated its grand opening in Smokey Point-Marysville on May 11. The weight loss and wellness center, owned by Emily Countryman, is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and from

June 7: Westwood, Westwood Rainier June 14: Westwood, Westwood Pacific June 18: Swire, Shengking June 21: Westwood, Westwood Victoria

8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. It is located at 2639 172nd St NE, Marysville. EVERETT — The GroWashington Store located at 3013 Colby Ave., Everett, has added coworking space. Coworking is when independent contractors and entrepreneurs share office space together but do not work for the same company. Sharing space in this manner tends to be more sustainable and cost-efficient, allowing for greater networking and the sharing of office resources.

TULALIP — Seattle Premium Outlets has opened three new stores; Citizen Watch, The Limited Outlet and Anime World. A fourth new store, Hanna Andersson, is coming this June. Additionally, Hugo Boss launched two exclusive new lines. For more info, visit the website www.premiumoutlets.com/outlet/seattle. EVERETT — Since the Snohomish County PUD launched its lighting promotion in 2000, it has sold more than 10 million energy-saving bulbs. This adds up to more than 30 bulbs for every home in Snohomish County and Camano Island. The utility started the program at a smaller stores. Now, the discounts are offered at more than 150 retailers. EVERETT — Real estate website Estately has listed the median percentage of household income that homeowners in Washington’s 25 largest cities spend on housing. The results place Everett fourth highest in these spending percentages at more than 40 percent. The general rule of homeownership is that you shouldn’t spend more than 28 percent of your income on housing. EVERETT — U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker has presented three Washington firms with the President’s E Award. One of those firms was Electric Mirror of Everett. The President’s E Award recognizes persons, firms, and organizations that significantly

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1610147

contribute to increasing U.S. exports. Electric Mirror is a leading U.S. manufacturer of lighted mirrors and mirror TVs. CAMANO ISLAND — Camano Island Coffee Roasters has opened a new building at Terry’s Corner, the intersection of Highway 532, Sunrise Boulevard and North Camano Drive. The building houses an art gallery, a French bakery, a chiropractic clinic and the coffee roasters offices. The building also includes a made-in-Washington solar system to help power the offices. EVERETT — Boeing has named its 2015 Supplier of the Year award winners, recognizing 12 companies for the high quality of their product or service and the value they create for Boeing and its global airline and U.S. and allied government customers. Snohomish County awardees are Teague for design, JAMCO America for interiors and Labinal Power Systems for electrical. SNOHOMISH — Skip Rock Distillers has been awarded seven medals, including one Gold Medal from the American Distillers Institute for its Belle Rose Double Barrel Rum. In addition to being awarded the Gold Medal, the Belle Rose Double Barrel Rum was also recognized as the Best of Category. The company was co-founded by Julie and Ryan Hembree in 2009.


JUNE 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

PEOPLE WATCHING EVERETT — Peoples Bank has announced a new real estate lending team in Everett. Barbara Galusha joined the bank as vice Barbara president Galusha and real estate loan manager and Tamara Fiorentini joined the bank as senior real Tamara estate loan Fiorentini officer. Galusha and Fiorentini are currently located at the branch at 6920 Evergreen Way, and will transfer to the bank’s new flagship office in downtown Everett when it opens in July. EDMONDS — The Washington State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has selected Adam Pazder as Washington State’s Management Award for Excellence recipient for 2016. Pazder

works as a manager of nutrition services for Swedish Medical Center in Edmonds. He also works as a consultant dietitian for Nutrition Authority and has worked as the chef manager for Federal Way Public Schools. EDMONDS — Edmonds pet groomer Zoe Zimmer won second place in the Poodles Intermediate Division at the Northwest Grooming Show dog grooming contest in Tacoma. Zimmer took home cash, a trophy and featured coverage in the grooming industry’s most prestigious magazine, Groomer to Groomer. Zimmer owns of mobile service Zoe’s Canine Design. Her winning work was on a standard poodle named Zora, owned by herself and Zach Lantow.

mer Alaska office director Ken Andersen is now a principal engineer in its Everett office. Andersen’s Ken engineering Andersen practice is focused on providing the structural design of buildings and waterfront projects. EVERETT — Washington School Public Relations Association has honored Everett Public

Schools communications director Mary Waggoner with its first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award. The association also honored Waggoner in 1997 with a Learning and Liberty Award for her contributions to the profession. Waggoner has served as Everett Public Schools’ director of communications since the spring of 2006. Waggoner is retiring at the end of the school year. Communications director Leanna Albrecht will transition from Northshore School

District to Everett Public Schools in July. LYNNWOOD — Stantec’s Adam Bettcher has earned his professional architectural license from the State of Washington Adam and has Bettcher become a full member of the American Institute of Architects. A resident of Edmonds, Bettcher is employed at Stantec’s

Lynnwood location. Previous experience includes the Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. and the Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. EVERETT — Skagit Bank announced that Jim Calderon has joined the company as a new vice president and commercial loan officer at its Everett Loan Production office. Calderon has lived in Snohomish County for 20 years and has 38 years of experience in the banking industry.

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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington A Mother’s Heart: 17400 Redhawk Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-5954; Nonclassified Bean Here: 26804 Highway 9 NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9102; 360-572-4901; Nonclassified Briteway NW: 18516 Woodbine Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-7438; Nonclassified Hard Industries HL: 7226 Eaglefield Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-5984; Nonclassified Jeff & Rebecca Photography: 20721 Olympic Place NE, No. A212, Arlington, WA 98223-4870; Photography Laminar Development: 25718 46th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5740; Nonclassified Mirage Manufacturing: 14 288th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9108; Manufacturers Rest Easy Hair Clinic: 3710 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8461; 360-322-7540; Beauty Salons Sweat Shop: 3405 172nd St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7717; 360-386-9743; Nonclassified Viking Mart: 140 S Olympic Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1547; Miscellaneous Retail Stores Ace Commercial Tire Service: 19326 Bothell Everett Highway, No. 48, Bothell, WA 98012-7151; Tire Service

Everett Akos Food Co.: 5821 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-3741; 425-353-8297; Food Products-Retail American Security: 2013 Walnut St., Everett, WA 98201-2609; Security Control Equip and Systems-Wholesale

Black Lab Online Gallery: 2935 Federal Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3903; Online Services Bud Emporium: 3101 Oakes Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4405; Marijuana Dispensary Budezzz: 305 109th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7018; Nonclassified Cricket Wireless: 10121 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-3885; 425-374-3334; Cellular Telephones (Services) El Sinaloense: 9610 Evergreen Way, No. A, Everett, WA 98204-7102; Nonclassified Eva Jane Fashion: 1010 110th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-4032; Clothing-Retail Everett Mobil: 1515 132nd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7263; Service Stations Everett Union Gospel Mission: 2717 Harrison Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3876; Churches First Globalnex-FGC: 4818 Evergreen Way, No. 100, Everett, WA 98203-2879 Five Star Farms: 11530 53rd Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9227; Farms Gismervig Mart: 520 112th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-4828; 425-265-1283; Retail JW Consulting Inc.: 3121 Tulalip Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4153; Consultants-Business Jordan R Dobson Construction: 1215 NE 78th Ave., Everett, WA 98213; Construction King Wireless: 2625 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2971; 425-349-0726; Cellular Telephones (Services) Madrona Financial Service: 2911 Bond St., No. 200, Everett, WA 98201-3943; Financial Advisory Services Maidpro: 824 66th Place SE, No. B, Everett, WA 98203-4524; Maid and Butler Service Netscout Systems: 728 134th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-5322; Nonclassified Northwest Preferred Funeral: 5017 Claremont Way, Everett, WA 98203-3321; 425-2129283; Funeral Directors Rae N Elizabeth Designs: 11812 E Gibson Road, No. A102, Everett, WA 98204-8633 Scrappy Sweet Creations: 11609 25th Ave.

SE, Everett, WA 98208-6083; Nonclassified Sleep Smart: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2857; 425-610-3453 Sugared Violets Bakery: 2443 Columbia Ave., Everett, WA 98203-5435; Bakers-Retail Uplifted Co.: 10302 First Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-3964; Nonclassified Valley Organic Deli: 2805 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3512; 425-512-8577 Wamsley & Co.: 5505 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-3638; Nonclassified Words to Life: 7402 Olympic Drive, Everett, WA 98203-5742; Nonclassified Yires General Construction: 2221 Everett Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3775; 425-374-2545; Construction Companies

Granite Falls Mountain Loop General Store: 32005 Mountain Loop Highway, No. 10, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8577; General Merchandise-Retail Next Generation Yoga: 704 Leola Lane, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8438; Yoga

Lake Stevens Almgren Construction: 2822 Old Hartford Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9760; 425-3771774; Construction Companies Baked With Love: 3230 92nd Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8776; Bakers-Retail Cascade Northwest Siding-Windows: 621 Highway 9 NE, No. B-17, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8525; Siding Contractors Cleaning Fairy: 9727 5th St. NE, No. A, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1605; Janitor Service Cottage Nursery: 406 91st Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3774; Nonclassified Farris & Furlan: 12424 20th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258; 425-367-4418 Fav Blend: 12904 74th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9656; Nonclassified Fixing To Go Fishing: 2611 S Lake Stevens Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5629; Guide

Service Herb Virtue: 8328 Fourth St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3323; Herbs Kettle Korner: 1010 99th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1964; Nonclassified Raise a Glass Wedding-Event: 3610 101st Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5712; Wedding Supplies and Services Reno Paint Inc.: 1028 73rd Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4548; Paint-Retail That’s So Creative!: 11903 29th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9173; Nonclassified

Lynnwood Accettolas Estate Sales: 2100 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7001; 206-552-4379 Alimac Cleaning Service: 14322 Admiralty Way, No. 86, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1743; Janitor Service Altruistic Nursing: 5302 172nd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3028; Nurses’ Registries Amy Hall Music: 17023 57th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-2808; Nonclassified Brodie Apparel: 2413 202nd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6954; Apparel-Garments Comfort Inn-Bellingham: 4100 194th St. SW, No. 390, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613 CVS/Pharmacy: 19507 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036; 425-640-0646; Pharmacies Delightful Adult Family Home: 17316 18th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4050 Family Plumbing: 1724 202nd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7026; Plumbing French Nail: 20901 Cypress Way, No. 14, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7984; Manicuring Grass Hopper: 1409 Madison Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6031; Nonclassified Highland Quick Stop & Gas: 19312 60th Ave. W, No. D, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5103 Jet City Pizza: 20925 Cypress Way, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7989; 425-967-3690; Pizza Kaanji’s Kloset: 19410 Highway 99, No. A266, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5102 Ken-Dall Solutions: 3728 204th St. SW, No.

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JUNE 2016 D204, Lynnwood, WA 98036-9314 Marwan Smokeshop: 18503 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4596; 425-673-9856 Michael P Sheehey Law Office: 19000 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4751; 425-6739615; Attorneys Reliance Bar Code Solutions: 14926 35th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2412; 425-7456165; Bar Code Scanning Equip and Supplies Ruiz Associates: 14702 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087; 425-787-7777 Sugarette City: 17621 66th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7113; Nonclassified Sunnycrest Rentals: 2215 143rd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5920; Nonclassified Supreme Green Delivery: G 207 3816 156th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087; Delivery Service ZT Automations: 807 215th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8688; Automation Systems

Marysville, WA 98271-8427; Food Markets Treeline Contracting: 8405 61st Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8525; Contractors Whipped Raw: 13618 45th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7876; Nonclassified Willow Tree Realty: 3217 82nd Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7004; Real Estate

Mill Creek Bubble Bilingual English: 3109 133rd Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5649; Schools RNR House: 14023 34th Drive SE, No. D, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4675; Nonclassified Squatch Supply: PO Box 13334, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1334; General Merchandise-Retail Sugary Fare Bakery: 1506 142nd Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1388; Bakers-Retail White Rock Hills Management: 914 164th St SE No. B12, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6339

Marysville

Monroe

A Doll’s House Tiny Stuff 4 Me: 2203 172nd St. NE, No. 226, Marysville, WA 982714819; Dolls-Retail Abbey Carpet of Marysville: PO Box 1541, Marysville, WA 98270-1541; Carpet-Rugs Bella Home: 8901 58th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2786; Nonclassified Carrie: 7122 63rd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8938; Nonclassified D&D Concrete Pumping: 1242 State Ave., No. I, PMB 249, Marysville, WA 98270-3672; Concrete Pumping Service Golden Lily Massage Spa: 9501 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2235; Massage Marysville Pilots: 5802 132nd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7710; Pilots Norwest Business Solutions: 10928 47th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8349 On Site Glass Solutions & More: 4101 78th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-3748; 360657-0775; Glass-Auto Plate and Window Spot On Evergreen: 14303 55th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-6615; Nonclassified State Market: 11605 State Ave., No. 104,

Herbs Joint: 22510 161st Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-7303; Herbs MCK Brothership: 145 Hayes Lane, Monroe, WA 98272-2340; Nonclassified Marlen House Cleaning: 23412 142th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272; House Cleaning Nailcessity: 17521 Stanton St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2738; Beauty Salons Obsidian Brewing Co. Joint Venture: 14575 Ravenwood Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8323; Brewers (Manufacturers) Organically Inspired: 21006 223rd St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9383; Nonclassified Pine Ridge Outdoors: 19940 Old Owen Road, Monroe, WA 98272-9778; 360-7947649; Nonclassified REM Tractor Service: 23131 U.S. 2, Monroe, WA 98272-9303; Tractor-Repairing Service Suzabelle’s Sweets & Treats: 203 N Lewis St., Monroe, WA 98272; Candy-Confectionery Trusted Nursing: 20411 Corbridge Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9693; Nurses registry VSW: 17631 160th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1903; Nonclassified

RATS!

Mukilteo Carpenter Properties and Construction: 407 Fourth St., Mukilteo, WA 98275-1541Diamond Auto Source: 4220 Russell Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5418; Nonclassified Iris Nails: 4411 133rd St. SW, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5913; Manicuring Kiahuna Vacation Condo: PO Box 703, Mukilteo, WA 98275-0703; Condominiums PR Wood Group: 12303 Harbour Pointe Blvd., No. M3, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5202; Wood Products Sushi Me: 12445 61st Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275; Restaurants

Quil Ceda Village Armani Exchange: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8081; 360-6531031; Nonclassified

Snohomish 76 Station: 202 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290-2745; 503-484-3161; Service Stations 1st Rate Gifts & More: 2020 Bickford Ave., No. M21, Snohomish, WA 98290; Gift Shops Ally Portfolio Investments: 23410 124th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-4907 Bob The Fixer: 14819 63rd Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5276; Fix-It Shops CHAWC: 15102 61st Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-4208; Nonclassified Clover Strength & Performance: 19921 Mero Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7325 Haywire Brewing Co.: 12125 Treosti Road, No. G, Snohomish, WA 98290-6918; Brewers Hudson Property Management: 8529 52nd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9282; 425-2639972; Real Estate Management Josh’s Taps & Caps: 1800 Bickford Ave., No. 210, Snohomish, WA 98290-1769; 360348-3406; Bars Prison Break Brewing: 920 First St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2907; 360-568-1061; Brewers (Manufacturers) Protouch Decor: 16711 87th Ave. SE, Sno-

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

homish, WA 98296-8019; Home Furnishings Simply Enchanting: 7310 142nd Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9003; Nonclassified TGS Enterprise: 7831 Riverview Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-5885; Nonclassified

Stanwood Accounting Bookkeeping: 7156 288th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8402; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services Bonhoeffer Botanical Gardens: 2420 300th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9661; 360-6299704; Botanical Gardens Community Thrift: 1401 Pioneer Highway, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-652-9241 Cricket Wireless: 9322 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-1902; 360-629-9493; Cellular Telephones (Services) Dysake: 2424 Pioneer Highway, Stanwood, WA 98292-9223; Nonclassified Frozen Fiber Inc.: 7717 319th Place NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9770; Fiber and Fiber Products Happy Hollow Dog Ranch: 4629 212th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5782; Ranches Island Floral: 8701 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5995; 360-631-5688; FloristsRetail North Sound Landscape: 9412 176th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9153; Landscaping Pacific Crest Weight Loss: PO Box 1023, Stanwood, WA 98292-1023; Weight Controlw Toke of the Town: 10101 270th St. NW No. 250, Stanwood, WA 98292-8090; Nonclassified WVS: 18826 Marine Drive, Stanwood, WA 98292-5351; Nonclassified Wesweld Corp: 27210 92 Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-322-3000; Nonclassified

Tulalip Everett Hotel Group: 2115 116th St. NE, Tulalip, WA 98271-9421; Hotels and Motels Vickki’s Bookkeeping Service: 4425 Meridian Ave. N, No. 4, Tulalip, WA 982716840; Accounting and Bookkeeping

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26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

10/11

1,226

828

8.8

9,342

42,300

15,000

21,900

$4,165,352

11/11

1,041

854

8.7

9,989

43,100

15,000

21,700

$4,317,909

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1.067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 235.92

234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942


JUNE 2016

Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

10/11

$65.79

493,315,047

214

3,883

$3.80

11/11

$68.69

518,192,703

188

3,334

$3.67

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

N/A

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

N/A

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

N/A

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

N/A

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

Prime Pacific

is the Place for your Small Business needs.

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1607671

ECONOMIC DATA

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

■ And much more!

Building Our Community, One Business at a Time Main Branch

Kenmore Branch Mill Creek Branch

2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036

6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028

2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012

425-774-5643

425-415-6564

425-357-1516

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28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JUNE 2016

Mike Morse, Morse Steel 4th generation owner Runner Sports dad

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Mike Morse—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

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© 2016 Heritage Bank Member FDIC

Herald Business Journal - 06.01.2016  

i2016060110122031.pdf

Herald Business Journal - 06.01.2016  

i2016060110122031.pdf