Page 1

life

The time of your

Spring 2016

YOUR GUIDE TO MATURE LIVING, HEALTH, FINANCES AND LIFESTYLE

25th annual

Older Americans C O N F E R E N C E Wed, May 18 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Elks Lodge, 4131 Pine Road NE, Bremerton

FREE TO THE PUBLIC • SPACE IS LIMITED (See page 3 for more details)

PAINLESS AND NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT

FOR SKIN CANCER

SPONSORED BY

• Ideal for facial skin cancers on the nose, forehead, ears and eyes • Highly targeted treatment with excellent cosmetic results and cure rate • Short course of treatment • Painless, non-invasive alternative • Clinically proven and FDA-approved

HIGH-TECH CARE WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH

A SUPPLEMENT OF THE BAINBRIDGE REVIEW, NORTH KITSAP HERALD, CENTRAL KITSAP REPORTER, BREMERTON PATRIOT AND PORT ORCHARD INDEPENDENT

(360) 697-8000

www.peninsulacancercenter.com


2

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Spring Brings A New Community of Friends My mother came from a very large close-knit family.

Every summer she organized our family reunion consisting of her sisters, brothers, and their children. She would cook wonderful meals and the kitchen would fill the house with wonderful aromas. Mom no longer hosts the reunions since Dad had passed away. At the last gathering she looked extremely tired. The family thought it would be best if we found her a new home where others could keep her company and occupied throughout the days. Somewhere that would take care of her the same way she had taken care of us all those years. We did not just want anyplace to be her home but a place where she had activities, warmth, care and most importantly love. We decided that Liberty Shores & Harbor House in Poulsbo would be the new home that would be perfect for mom. Liberty Shores & Harbor House is a trusted and deficiency free senior care provider specializing in assisted living and memory care. They offer the finest care, given by the most committed staff.

Call and schedule a free tour and lunch and you will experience our community filled with warmth and new friends.

Liberty Shores

SENIOR LIVING

Harbor House MEMORY CAR E

LIKE US ON

360-779-5533

19360 Viking Avenue N.W., Poulsbo

www.libertyshores.com


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

3

Welcome to the 25th Older Americans Conference Keynote speaker Tony Ventrella will tell some stories — and talk about staying happy as you grow older By LESLIE KELLY

lkelly@soundpublishing.com

T

he older Tony Ventrella gets, the more he’s learning. And that’s just the way it should be, he said. “In America, we don’t seem to revere seniors like they do in other countries,” he said. “Other places, seniors are held in high esteem. They are honored for their knowledge. But here, we tend not to do that.” Many times, seniors are looked at as a burden, he said, and some seniors themselves think their lives are over. But as Ventrella likes to say, “Every day is an opportunity to learn something.” As the keynote speaker at the Kitsap County Older Americans Conference this year, Ventrella plans to tell seniors about his own experiences and about what keeps him going. “I’m a storyteller,” he said. “I’ll share a lot of stories about the people I’ve met.” One of those individuals is a friend who, at 84, ran the New York City Marathon with him. “I was half his age,” he said. “I was 44 and he kept up really well. He was very inspiring.” Being a senior is no reason to think that you’re too old to learn new things, he said. Or try new things. “Seniors have the experience and the knowledge which they need to share with others who are younger than they are,” he added. An interesting statistic, he said, is that 10,000 people — Baby Boomers all — turn 65 every day in the U.S. “With that, we’re going to have to change how we look at seniors,” he said. “We will have the greatest number of people over the age of 65 that this country’s ever seen.” Ventrella has written two books and is working on a third. His books are about keeping a positive attitude and enjoying life. “Your attitude makes a big difference in your life,” he said.

Former sportscaster Tony Ventrella will speak about happiness. Contributed photo His third book is titled “Same Air,” and addresses the fact that we all breathe the same air. “It’s based on something (President John F. Kennedy) said in a speech,” Ventrella said. “We all breathe the same air. We are all in this together. What we each do affects the other and we need to figure out a way to get along before we eliminate our civilization.” He’s planning on running for office as a way to do his part to make there world a better place. He plans to announce his candidacy for the U.S. House of Representatives soon. “People are surprised that I’m a Democrat,” he said. “The biggest factor in that is that I don’t like all the big money in politics. People think that having been in the media, I have money and I am a Republican. But that’s not the case. They’re also surprised that I don’t have a college degree.” Ventrella was sports director at KING 5 and KIRO 7 television for 22 years. During his career, he covered two Olympics, several World Series, Super Bowls, International Figure Skating events, Final Four basketball tournaments and three Rose Bowls. He started his career as a barber, trained by his father who also was a barber, and had his own shop. But radio was his true love and he did that on the side. At one time, Ventrella ran his shop, did play-by-play of high school football and wrote the entire sports section of his hometown newspaper while acting in

community theater and playing softball in two leagues. He went from radio to television sports and worked in Connecticut, Indiana and then in Seattle. He got into public speaking after he received honors and awards from community groups. “I figured if they were going to give me the mic, I better have something good to say,” he said. For the past 10 years, Ventrella has been digital media host for the Seattle Seahawks. He produces and hosts videos — team, corporate partner, and community outreach — on team websites. He also has a background in theater directing and acting in dozens of productions back east and in the Pacific Northwest. He is a board member of the Evergreen Family Theatre in Redmond; he played “Scrooge” in a production of “A Christmas Carol” and Morrie in “Tuesdays with Morrie.” People still recognize him when he’s out. “They know my face,” he said. “They say ‘How do I know you? You were on TV but I forget your name.’ I tell them ‘That’s OK. I can’t remember my name most the time either.’ ” His bucket list? He doesn’t have one. “That idea is overplayed,” he said. “Most of us are doing the things we love every day, and if we’re not, that’s a problem. I’ve had the chance to travel. I’ve interviewed political figures, all-time great athletes. I have a great family — three kids and nine grandchildren. I’m very grateful.” But he doesn’t fault others who want to make a bucket list. “Today, and every day, my bucket list is to glorify and be grateful for being healthy,” he said.

Conference Agenda

For the past 25 years, seniors throughout Kitsap County have gathered annually to learn about resources that are available to them as they grow older. The 2016 Older Americans Conference is no different. Participants will have the opportunity to get to know each other and to see just how many programs and activities there are in the county that cater to them. The conference theme is “Your Silver Lining ... Blaze a Trail.” Events begin at 8 a.m. May 18 at the Elks Lodge in Bremerton. • 8 a.m.: Doors open. Registration, hot

breakfast buffet, booths. • 9 a.m.: Presentation of Colors by the Bremerton JROTC; Pledge of Allegiance. • 9:10 a.m.: Welcome by Sigrid Howard, president, Long Term Care Alliance. • 9:20 a.m.: Presentation of the Older Americans Day Proclamation by Kitsap County Commissioner Ed Wolfe. • 9:30 a.m.: Remarks by Alfred Pinkham Jr., chairman of the ALTC Advisory Council. • 9:40 a.m.: Remarks by a representative of contributing sponsor CHI/ Harrison. • 9:50 a.m.: Presentation by Robert Law, division chief medical officer CKF&R 911, “Behind the Scenes.” Law has been with Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue since 1985. He started as a volunteer firefighter in January 1981. For three years, he volunteered as a firefighter and worked for a private ambulance service in Bremerton. After moving into a resident firefighter program, he attended and graduated from Tacoma Community College with a certificate in paramedicine. In August 1985, Law was hired as a paramedic firefighter in Silverdale. Since that time, he was promoted through the ranks: lieutenant, captain, battalion chief, and division chief of fire training. He has an associate’s degree from Olympic College and is working on a bachelor’s degree in public administration. Law is in charge of CKF&R’s medical division. The medical division includes 20 certified paramedics, roughly 80 EMTs and a fleet of 11 transport aid cars or Medic units. He is married to Christine Law, an assistant supervisor for Kitsap County CENCOM. They have three children and two granddaughters. • 10:30 a.m.: Break. Visit sponsor and vendor booths, mid-morning snack. • 11:30 a.m.: Keynote: Tony Ventrella, “Key to Happiness.” • 12:30 p.m.: Closing remarks: Sigrid Howard. • 12:30 p.m.: Tony Ventrella will be available for autographs and photos. Visit sponsor and vendor booths. Jazz band entertainment. • 1:30 p.m.: Adjourn. The conference is sponsored by the Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care, Givens Community Center, 1026 Sidney Ave., Port Orchard. 360-3377068 or 360-337-5700, www.agingkitsap. com.


4

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Liberty Shores in Poulsbo is a friendly, active place Senior-living community focuses on a warm “at home” atmosphere that appreciates its veteran residents

“Residents do not adjust to you; you need to adjust to them,” she said. She realizes that Liberty Shores will be adjusting again as the Baby Boomers start to arrive; they want to preserve their younger lifestyle.

By LIBERTY SHORES STAFF

A

ny first-time visitor pulling down the driveway at Liberty Shores Assisted Living and Harbor House Memory Care Communities realizes immediately they have come to a place that appreciates and honors the various branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. Prominently displayed and aligning with the U.S. Flag are five flag poles, displaying the service flags for the Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard. Liberty Shores and Harbor House have had the privilege for the past 18 years to take care of aging veterans; the formal display of the flags shows allegiance to that dedication. The communities are typically the home-setting for 10 to 14 veterans at any given time, and recognizing them for their service to the country has been a paramount honor for the staff at Liberty Shores and Harbor House. The Fireside Room, which offers a breathtaking vista of Mount Rainier, also has one wall dedicated as the Wall of Honor, showcasing various framed photos of veteran residents stemming from their service time as well as a present-time photo, with a listing of assignments and accomplishments. The present display of flags around the gazebo was dedicated during a special ceremony with the local chapter of the Veterans of Foreign Wars on Memorial Day 2014. This is an active place and you can do it all or you can do just what you want — entertain guests, take in some live entertainment, watch TV with friends in the home-like Bay Room, which has a kitchen and snacks, or enjoy a glass of wine on the expansive deck overlooking the bay. How about venturing out on a mystery drive? Once a week, activity director Erica Applewhite picks a secret destination in Kitsap or Jefferson County and doesn’t reveal the location until residents are loaded on the bus. Amazingly, we have quite a few adventure seekers who live here, so they don’t seem to be daunted by not knowing where they will go until buckled into their seat, Applewhite said. When so

Liberty Shores, located in Poulsbo, offers comfortable private and semi-private rooms at its Harbor House Memory Care center. Leslie Kelly photo much of our daily routines can be ordered or programmed, it’s sure nice to have something that’s a mystery. Administrator Sigrid Howard added, “Most seniors have such extended lives today. We want to provide a level of service that accommodates those active lives. The beauty of this place sets the tone for the quality of living Liberty Shores and Harbor House strives to provide: Personal care with a holistic team approach designed to address all physical, mental, social and spiritual needs; respect for who residents were and who they are today; integrity in every facet of services and care; dignity as the ultimate goal in providing care, while preserving and respecting the dignity of residents; and exceeding residents and families expectation.” Liberty Shores offers familiar amenities and services. Studio and one- and two-bedroom apartments are each outfitted with a mini-kitchen with refrigerator and microwave. Each apartment has a call-light system to alert staff when a resident needs assistance, and each unit has cable service available. Apartments are furnished with the residents’ personal belongings. Three meals a day are served restaurant style, with such choices as daily specials, accommodation of special dietary needs, and a made-to-order salad bar. Other services include housekeeping and linen services; free use of laundry facilities; transportation for shopping, scheduled medical appointments and community events; programs coordinated

by an activities director; recreation and exercise areas; a beauty salon and barber shop; and a 24-hour bistro-type snack bar stocked with nutritious snacks and drinks. Howard said additional services set Liberty Shores apart: 24-hour onsite licensed nursing staff; 24-hour, seven-daya-week admissions; full-time restorative care coordinator, offering customized exercise programs to help residents maintain, restore or obtain their highest level of physical abilities; Wander Guard support, to provide enhanced security for residents with early stages of memory loss; full-time social worker on staff to provide emotional and interpersonal support to residents; BlueStep, an Electronic Medical Charting system that can be accessed by physicians, medical staff and families from a secure, private log-in; and Family Connect, an online informational page which allows families real-time updates on their loved one’s health, activity and social well-being. All told, Liberty Shores and Harbor House employs more than 100 — that’s almost one employee per resident. The staff is striving every day to give residents a life where they have all the freedom that they desire as they age. The average age of residents is 90. People are retiring later in life and living longer. Many are able to live at home longer now than in years past. According to Howard, the only way you can be successful in elder care is to continually adjust to the changing times.

HARBOR HOUSE MEMORY CARE Harbor House, located adjacent to Liberty Shores, offers comfortable private and semi-private rooms, which are furnished or can be furnished with the residents personal belongings. Harbor House Memory Care has three floors and combines security in housing and health care to aid in residents comfort and ensure their health and safety. Its design is focused on comfort and familiarity to allow residents to maintain their independence and privacy. Personal rooms are outfitted with photos of family and friends, while common areas and memory stations encourage individual and group activities. A highlight of the first floor: A theater room with theater-style seating, coffee shop, and Memory Lane-style visiting area for before or after the film. Adorning the walls are movie posters from Hollywood’s “Casablanca” era. Comfortable couches offer a peaceful respite location as well. A fireplace at the end of the hallway on first floor offers again a peaceful ambiance, encouraging residents to sit in the comfortable overstuffed leather chairs. Activities are scheduled seven days a week, including board games, Bible studies, exercise classes, day trips and other special outings. Outside, the courtyard features gardens where residents have grown plants and vegetables that have won awards at the Kitsap County Fair. Harbor House Alzheimer’s Community also offers daycare and respite care for all stages of dementia patients, seven days a week. AN INVITATION TO VISIT Howard said prospective residents of Liberty Shores or Harbor House are invited to take a tour and enjoy a complimentary lunch. “We know you will applaud our standards and see why we have been recognized for exceptional customer service and quality care,” she said. “We offer a comprehensive selection of living options and support services. We encourage and support aging in place and have the staff and services to make it happen.”


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

5

Kitsap long-term care advisory council serves many By LESLIE KELLY

lkelly@soundpublishing.com

T

hey’re helping seniors get their needs met. They serve as advisers. But they’ve all encountered their own unique issues navigating the needs of seniors. They are the Advisory Council to the Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care. Among the members is Al Pinkham, the council chairman. Pinkham spent 24 years in the U.S. Navy and, following that, served three terms on the board of the Peninsula Community Health Services. He then decided to join the Advisory Council for the Area Agency on Aging. As chairman, he said he is dedicated to hearing the concerns of seniors and caregivers to seniors and the aging population and working to meet those needs. “When I finished my terms on the community health board, I said ‘What else can I do to help the senior population?’ ” Pinkham said. “Then I found this group.” After three years on the council, he’s seen some things that Kitsap County is

doing well to serve its senior population. And he’s seen things that need work. “We have a great amount of services available here,” he said. “But we need to get that message out to more people.” In the last year, the council has visited all of the senior centers in Kitsap County, listening to seniors to learn what is important to them and what needs are not being met.  “Transportation is a big issue,” he said. “What good is having places where seniors can get the care they need if they physically can’t get there?” The council has met with Kitsap Transit to help improve bus service, but there is much left to be done. The council will continue to look for innovative ways to help seniors and those who are challenged meet their transportation needs.  Another big issue for seniors is that many of them don’t want to ask for help. “There’s a strong resistance to asking for help,” he said. “Some seniors think of it as welfare. But the fact is that the programs are being paid for with tax dollars and these seniors have worked all their lives and paid into taxes for years and

Personalized Home Care Services Since 1975, ResCare has provided services that help individuals maximize their independence and quality of life. We provide personalized home care services to people of all ages, physical conditions and cognitive abilities in the comfort of your home, the hospital, a long-term assisted living facility or other place of temporary or permanent residence. 3100 NW Bucklin Hill Rd., Suite 108, Silverdale Phone: 360-698-8590 • Fax: 360-698-8592 Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30am - 5pm

years. Just like with Medicare and Social Security, they’ve earned the help.” Vice Chairwoman Mari Van Court said she found her way to the council after being the designated caregiver for three elderly relatives. “As a family nursing practitioner, I thought I knew what I was doing,” she said. “But I was completely blind-sided by what was involved.” The combination of legal paperwork, finances and navigating the health care system was overwhelming to her. And it consumed her time 24/7. So she sought out a support network for caregivers and found that with the county’s Division of Aging. “They saved my life,” she said. “Now I want to get the message out to other caregivers.” Van Court sees a need for better transitions from hospital to nursing care and back home for seniors. She’s hoping to be able to work on making that happen. She thinks the county is doing good work with making respite care available to caregivers and wants to see that caregivers know what’s available to them when

they need help. Council member Michaelene Manion had experience working with the disability network, having had a disabled son. She also helped her mother through a number of strokes and dementia in the 1990s. “I saw so many people in convalescent homes who needed help that they weren’t getting,” she said. “I decided I wanted to fight for those who don’t have a voice.” Manion has been on the council since 2009. She points to things such as dental care and vision care that need addressing. She is working with the other council members to gather information and “make sure Olympia and the others with the power to fund programs” know what’s lacking. Kitsap County is doing many things right, such as planning for the future, council members said. Statistically, by 2020, one in four residents will be older than 60. “The county is planning well and seeking our advice on long-range issues for the aging population,” Van Court said. See LONG TERM, Page 10


6

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Denture and dental center can care for many issues By ANDERSON DENTURE STAFF

A

nderson Denture & Dental Center in Poulsbo has dentists and denturists that can care for all your needs, from fillings to dentures to implants. A denturist is the only professional legislated exclusively to serve individuals with removable dental prosthetics. A denturist’s entire required curriculum of study focuses on the oral health of those individuals needing a dental prosthetic and the actual fabrication of that appliance. The denturist actually makes your dentures. Your denturist is an expert in the design, construction, insertion and adjustment of removable dental appliances. Your licensed denturist has graduated from an accredited college denturist program and

Denturist Bruce Anderson

passed the state’s board of health two-day examination. This board examination not only includes the sciences involving oral health

issues, but also the technical skills necessary to actually fabricate your denture. This expertise makes choosing a denturist the best possible choice to help you derive the maximum benefit from up-to-date dental prosthetic technology. When you choose a denturist for your denture needs, you can be assured of expert personalized care. Knowing you are being seen by the individual who will actually make your dental appliance offers confidence that your unique needs will be met. Your denturist is devoted to creating full or partial dentures that fit well, look natural and attractive, and allow you to maintain a healthy smile. Since your dental appliance is actually made at your denturist’s office, the quality

of care is constant, personal and expedient. Also, adjustments, repairs and relines can be made rather quickly, often while you wait. Denturists’ fees are affordable because there are no outside cost markups or outside delays. Most insurance companies honor the services of a denturist. You will be pleased by choosing a denturist for your denture care. You will receive personalized, confidential quality care and professional service, and be surprised at the affordability. The attention to detail and the warm personal service will make your visit to a denturist enjoyable. It’s a decision you’ll be comfortable with. Call 360-779-1566 to set an appointment with one of our dentists or denturists.

County agency on aging works to connect seniors with services By AGING AGENCY STAFF

Kitsap County Aging and Long Term Care, or ALTC, is a division of the Kitsap County Human Services Department and is the locally designated Area Agency on Aging for Kitsap County. ALTC was created through the collaborative action of citizens, aging-network service providers and the Kitsap Board of County Commissioners in 1980. An ALTC Advisory Council makes recommendations as to programs and services provided by the agency, and advocates with elected officials regarding the interests and needs of older adults and adults with disabilities living in Kitsap County. The ALTC’s mission is to work independently and through community partnerships to promote well-being of older adults and adults with disabilities. ALTC has 14 subcontracts with local providers for various services to support older persons, as well as 18 Medicaid supportive subcontracts to assist those served through the Medicaid. Stacey Smith, administrator, said, “ALTC is available to answer questions and help people make decisions that will positively affect their lives. We provide unbiased information and referrals to local services that support citizens making informed choices, experience positive outcomes, and connect to local resources. There are often relatively simple and low-cost options available to help people remain living in their own homes and

communities. We’re here as a way for people to get the information they need as they make important life decisions,” she said. ALTC’s Senior Information & Assistance Program expects it will assist more than 1,240 people in 2016. Community Living Connections is a specifically-designed local resource database of services to older persons. Other in-house programs include the Family Caregiver Support Program, which helps individuals taking care of family or friends, expected to serve at least 300 caregivers this year. Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA) anticipates providing approximately 1,500 consultations to local community members for free information on Medicare options and cost savings programs. Last year, SHIBA volunteers helped people in the local community save a combined, estimated $95,000 in premiums and prescription co-payments. Long-Term Care Ombudsman expects to assist 2,500 people residing in nursing homes, assisted living or adult family homes throughout Kitsap County. The Medicaid Long-Term Care Case Management Services assists individuals with disabilities over the age of 18 years, eligible for Medicaid and independently living in the community. On any given day, ALTC serves more than 950 individuals throughout the county through this program. ALTC also operates a Title V Senior

Community Services Employment and Training Program for individuals older than 55 who are interested in re-training and seeking employment. “If any of these services interest you or could assist you to continue to live independently in Kitsap County, please give us a call,” Smith said. “Folks don’t realize ALTC is their local resource. They have contributed to our existence their entire working lives. Now, we are here to support them in their golden years.” ALTC purchases services from private and public agencies and arranges for service delivery for individuals who meet eligibility requirements. ALTC uses a variety of state, federal and local funding sources, including the federal Older Americans Act, Medicaid, Respite, the national and state Family Caregiver Support Program, the state Senior Citizens Services Act, and individual and community donations. Here are the service numbers expected for 2016. • Information and Assistance & Community Living Connections: 1,240 individuals served. • Family Caregiver Support Program: 300 caregivers served; 5,491-plus hours of respite care for 56 caregivers; 80 counseling sessions; 138 trainings; 32 individuals served in support groups; and 35 individuals who will receive home-delivered meals, legal services or durable medical equipment.

• Long-Term Care Ombudsman: 500 investigations or interventions; 2,500 individuals served. • Medicaid Long-Term Care Case Management Services: 950 individuals served. • Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA): 1,500 direct consumer contacts for assistance. • Title V Senior Community Service Employment & Training Program: Training and employment opportunities for 12 eligible participants. • Congregate Meals: 31,400 meals for 775 individuals. • Home-Delivered Meals: 42,000 meals for 375 individuals. • Kinship Caregivers Support Program: Support for 60 caregivers raising other family members’ children. • Mental Health/Substance Abuse Counseling: 385 hours of counseling for 85 individuals. • Senior Drug Education: Community events providing expert information regarding the safe use of prescribed medications for older adults. • Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program: 685 individuals each receiving about $40 worth of fresh food and produce. • Legal Services: 370 hours of (noncriminal) legal services for up to 120 individuals.


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Anderson Dental and Denture has been helping people smile since 1995 • Denturist & Dentist on Staff • Crowns & Bridges • Cosmetic & General Dentistry • Extractions

• • • • •

7

If time, quality & gentle care are important to you. . . then we are here to serve

Emergency Care Dentures / Partials Denture Repair Relines (Same Day) Dental Crowns & Implants

Most Insurances Accepted

FREE*

New patient consultation and oral exam *X-Rays excluded. Must present this ad to receive.

800-990-9116

19410 8th Ave. N.E., Suite 102, Poulsbo • 360-779-1566 • 800-990-9116

email: AndersonDenture@hotmail.com • www.andersondenturedental.com


8

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

HAVE YOU OR A LOVED ONE

SUFFERED A CARDIAC EVENT? We provide rehabilitation services for patients recovering from heart surgery, heart attack, or those at risk of a cardiac event.

LESSEN YOUR RISK FACTORS...WE CAN HELP! EFFECTIVE TREATMENT INCLUDES: Cardiovascular Risk Assessment One-on-One Exercise Guidance Nutritional Education Stress Management Smoking Cessation

Call Today for your FREE Consultation BAINBRIDGE ISLAND (206) 842-6288

KINGSTON 360-895-9090

NK MEDICAL CENTER (360) 779-3764

BREMERTON 360) 792-1015

PORT ORCHARD (360) 895-9090

POULSBO VILLAGE (360) 779-3777

SILVERDALE (360) 613-1834

Getting you back to work, sports, life.....at any age


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

9

Kitsap Physical Therapy helps cardiac patients recover By LESLIE KELLY

lkelly@soundpublishing.com

J

erry Mecham and Karen Kline are shining examples of how cardiac conditioning can help heart attack survivors regain their physical stamina. Mecham, 70, had congestive heart failure and had to have open heart surgery in May 2015. His heart was enlarged and he had to have an LVAD, a pump to help his heart work, inserted in his chest. The LVAD helps the left ventricle pump blood to the aorta. The aorta is the main artery that carries oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the body. “I was always so weak,” Mecham said. “I couldn’t even walk from the front door to my truck.” But after his surgery, he began to feel better. Still, his ability to walk and his breathing weren’t what they should be. So his cardiologist sent him for physical therapy. He chose Kitsap Physical Therapy and Sports Clinics in Kingston. “The doc said I needed cardiac physical therapy,” Mecham said. “I hated the idea. I’d never been to physical therapy before and the idea of somebody telling me I had to do this or that wasn’t what I wanted.” But he went along with the idea and found the physical therapists at KPT to be wonderful. “Those guys, they really watched over me,” he said. “I was assigned to one of them each time I came in and they kept track of my pulse and watched how I did things.” At first, he could only do one minute on the stationary bicycle. That amounted to about 200 feet in distance. “We worked up to two minutes and now we’re at seven,” he said, noting that that’s one and a half miles. “I do two sets of seven minutes with a break in-between.” He can also do seven minutes on the treadmill, usually two or three sets. And he uses an arm bicycle which works his upper body. In the four weeks that he’s been in cardiac rehab therapy, he’s seen a great deal of improvement in how he feels and what he can do. “It’s a marked improvement,” he said. “I can walk to my truck without feeling tired and I even walk the dog.” Currently, his time at the physical therapy gym is every Monday, Wednesday and Friday for an hour, first thing at 8 a.m. sharp. “I hate exercising,” said the former Washington state ferry captain who

Karen Kline jokes with Rob McDowell, a physical therapist, while she does her workout on the treadmill. Kline is recovering from heart surgery. Leslie Kelly photo retired in 1997. “But I hate being out of breath more. Boy, have they ever been helpful. I can tell that the physical exercise is helping.” After his retirement from the ferry system, he went back to work for the state Attorney General’s office as a witness for the state. He also worked for 14 years at Coast-to-Coast Hardware in Poulsbo. He’s active in the community and hopes to have more good years in him. His short-term goal, however, is to be able to put on his socks. “I can’t do that yet,” he said. “I can’t bend over to do that. But I’m getting closer.” While Mecham knew he had signs of heart trouble, Kline did not. Also 70, Kline owns her own business and encountered significant stress in the year prior to her heart surgery. “I just thought it was indigestion,” she said of her chest pains. “As women, we don’t realize that that’s a sign of heart problems.” She made a trip to the emergency room, but her heart issue wasn’t caught that day. It was a few weeks later when she told a friend about how she was feeling. “The friend said ‘You need to go to a cardiologist right now,’” Kline said. She made an appointment with Dr. John Banzer, a cardiologist with The Doctors Clinic in Silverdale. “He told me I needed surgery,” Kline said. “They had to put in a stint.” She said she didn’t realize how her stress had affected her body. And soon

after surgery, her doctor sent her to cardiac physical therapy. She, too, chose Kitsap Physical Therapy in Kingston. “At first I thought this was just another way to milk the insurance companies,” she said. “But they assigned me to Rich (McDowell), and he got it that I was a type A personality. He helped me get the stress under control.” Like Mecham, she’d never had physical therapy before and wasn’t much of an exerciser. “They taught me how to breathe properly from the stomach,” she said. “Because I am exercising and using my yoga breathing, my heart rate and my blood pressure have dropped.” Now she wears a FitBit so she can monitor her own vitals. “In a way, it’s taught me to fix myself,” she said. “I’m focused on the fix because I don’t want to be a victim.” After several weeks working with a physical therapist, she’s continuing her training on her own. She’s met another person in rehab at Kitsap Physical Therapy and now they work out together twice a week. Still working in her retail business, and working with her husband at their Christmas tree farm, she never wants to retire. “My goal is to stay healthy, stay active and stay alive,” she said. “I’m still having a lot of fun.” Any time Rich McDowell, a physical therapist at KPT, gets a new patient, he’s ready.

At KPT there’s a standard protocol when introducing a cardiac patient to exercising, once he or she has had a cardiac event. “We do a full evaluation on them and assess the risk factors before we ever get them up and going on equipment,” McDowell said. “That includes a muscular, skeletal and orthopedic study, and we assess their cardiovascular health.” A stress test, where the patient walks on a treadmill to see how long they are able to maintain their walking, is common. “With all that, we have a base measurement and we can formulate a treatment plan and set appropriate goals,” McDowell said. “Cardiac rehab has always been offered by KPT, but in the past five or six years we’ve developed a formal program. We knew there was a need to offer something locally. Many of the people who needed it around here (Poulsbo and Kingston) were having to drive to Bremerton to get it. We saw the need and we jumped up and met it.” The program is well known at all KPT locations and many of their patients come by way of word-of-mouth. “We are always having conversations with the local cardiologists and surgeons,” McDowell said. “We’re proud of this program. But many of our patients learn about us from other patients who’ve been here.” Steve Goldrick, another KPT cardiac rehab specialist who practices at the KPT Silverdale Clinic, said cardiologists, surgeons and family physicians, and friends refer patients to KPT. Goldrick has been a physical therapist with KPT for five years. He’s a board-certified orthopedic clinical specialist. He’s a doctor of physical therapy and specializes in orthopedic work, occupational therapy, chronic pain management and cardiac rehab. Just how long the rehab will last, depends on the patient, Goldrick and McDowell said. “It varies,” McDowell said. “Some (patients) have a history of exercise and we just need to guide them. Some have never exercised and we work with them to make it a part of their lives. Getting it to be a routine is the goal.” A physical therapist works one-on-one with each cardiac patient to watch their heart rate and make sure that they are doing their exercise correctly. McDowell See CARDIAC, Page 10


10

Cardiac

Continued from page 9 finds that once a patient gets a treatment plan and begins walking on the treadmill, and sees improvement, they are committed. “That helps keep them coming in three times a week,” he said. Once patients are released from physical therapy they receive a 30 day pass to use the gym and to encourage them to continue exercising on their own. He stressed that continued cardio exercise can be as simple as a walk in the neighborhood, or using equipment like a treadmill at home. “In many rural places, there are no gyms close by,” he said. “What do you do if there’s no where to work out? Just getting out and moving is the key. Start to move the body again and get into an exercise routine.” Goldrick said patients who have had a heart attack or heart surgery need someone who understands how they are feeling. “They’ve been knocked down a peg,” said Goldrick. “They’re not up to the level they were before the heart attack. They’re frustrated and they want to be able to do what they’re use to doing.” The job of the physical therapist is to walk along side of them and be a coach and a booster. “We’re there to help them reach their goals,” Goldrick said. “But that’s not just about exercising. It’s about being able to

Long Term

Continued from page 5 Pinkham said as far as funding goes, aging issues may not be the priority now, but both the state and the U.S. Congress are paying attention. “They know what’s coming (with an aging population),” he said. “They understand the costs of health care at the end of life and they’re looking for ways to reduce those costs. It’s a hard discussion, but it has to happen.” Such things are Advance Health Care Directives help, he added. Another concern of the council is the overwhelming loneliness of the aging population. Reaching out to seniors is crucial. “So many elderly are lonely and they won’t ask for help,” Pinkham said. “But with the work of the agency and the council, we’re improving that. We’re trying to get the word out that help is available. There’s

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

physical therapist for 16 years, learned about cardiac rehab during an internship in a hospital cardiac unit. He’s aware that some people who have had heart attacks or strokes, or heart surgery, are reluctant to get going again. “I saw that in my own family,” he said. “My grandpa had a stroke and was prescribed physical therapy following that. I had a hard time convincing my grandma that he needed to get moving. She kept saying all he needed was rest. But once she saw him improving, she saw he needed it.” Goldrick said the patients can be hesitant. “Having a heart attack is extremely stressful,” he said. “There is a degree of hesitancy because they don’t want another event. So it’s a balancJerry Mecham and Rich McDowell take a walk around the ing act and that’s where Kitsap Physical Therapy sports clinic in Kingston. Contributed photo physical therapists come into play. We are there to make sure do what they were doing before, things they are working at a level that is right for like their hobbies.” them.” McDowell, also a board-certified As for a national trend that shows fewer orthopedic clinical specialist, has been a women with heart conditions are referred

for cardiac rehab, McDowell isn’t seeing that in Kitsap County. “We have an equal balance of men and women here,” he said. “There’s just so much research out there that shows the benefit of aerobic exercise that people are understanding its value, especially when they have or have had heart problems.” Goldrick said KPT is different from other physical therapy places because it’s owned by the physical therapists. “We’re hometown people,” he said. “Many of us grew up around here. We have a certain sense of pride in watching our business grow and making sure our patients are satisfied.” And, he said, in many cases, the physical therapists are able to keep in touch with their former patients because many decide to continue their exercising at KPT fitness gyms. “We will see each other coming and going,” Goldrick said. “They’ll tell me how many minutes they’re doing on the treadmill, or say ‘check out my grip strength.’ I love being able to keep in touch with them and make sure they’re doing well.” Kitsap Physical Therapy and Sports Clinic has locations in Silverdale, Bainbridge Island, Poulsbo, Kingston, Port Orchard and Bremerton and was founded in 1979. Its mission is to play a valuable role in helping the people living in our communities to overcome the physical limitations (and sometimes mental) restrictions that interfere with their ability to fully participate in their activities of daily living.” For more information or to make an appointment, go to www.kitsappt.com.

information out there and problems can be solved.” One way, he said, is the 2-1-1 telephone resource number. Another is to go to your local senior center. Not only are there activities there to keep seniors from being lonely. But there are resources to help with a variety of issues.

Port Orchard; Alfred Pinkham Jr., Silverdale; Rosemary Pinneo, Tracyton; Mari Van Court, Port Orchard; and Connie Wurm, Port

About the county’s Area Agency on Aging Advisory Council: The purpose of the Advisory Council to the Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care is to make recommendations to the staff and the board of county commissioners regarding the development and support of the division’s mission and objective. More specifically, the purpose of the Advisory Council is to work with the county to develop and administer the area plan, to conduct public meetings and hearings, to represent and advocate for the interests of older and disabled residents of Kitsap County and

to review community policies, programs and actions that affect older people. The Advisory Council currently has eight members: Audrey Barbakoff, Bainbridge Island; Sharon Cromley, Bremerton; Nadine Geister, Port Orchard; Michaelene Manion,

life

The time of your

Spring 2016

YOUR GUIDE TO MATURE LIVING, HEALTH, FINANCES AND LIFESTYLE

Copyright 2016 Sound Publishing

Orchard.

Regional publisher : Terry Ward Special publications editor : Leslie Kelly General manager: Donna Etchey Sales representatives: Sharon Allen, Tawna Grisham, Jessica Martindale, Marleen Martinez, Bill McDonald, Ariel Naumann Creative services: Bryon Kempf, manager; Mark Gillespie, Kelsey Thomas, John Rodriguez, Vanessa Calverley, Johanna Buxton

For information about upcoming special publications, call 360-779-4464.


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

“In my new grandson, I saw a world without hate and anger. I saw happiness, peace and optimism ...”

11

THERAPY COMES IN ALL KINDS OF PACKAGES. Especially ones with four legs.

A new branch on the tree By JEFF TOLMAN Columnist

I

held my younger son’s new child. My baby’s baby. A new branch on the family tree. A new life. A new story to be written. Immediately I noticed what I didn’t see in this newborn. Hate. Prejudice. Anger. Blind ambition. Instead, I saw happiness, peace, optimism and potential. A one-of-a-kind human he is, with a common, but at the same time unique, story to live. In his first weeks of life outside mom, the baby has already conquered many life tasks. Eat. Sleep. Spit up. Cry. Poop. Pee. Stick his tongue out. Listen to Pa’s stories as if they are fascinating. Look bigeyed at the new, wondrous, exciting world existing outside the basinette. Wrap his grandparents’ hearts around his tiny little fingers. The world has not yet soiled Zach with demands, expectations and keeping-upwith-the-Joneses. As when I first held my other grandchildren, Kinzie and Miller, cuddling Zachary I thought about my job description as a grandparent. My initial reaction was that the ad would read something like this: WANTED: A positive role model for new parents and a new baby. Requirements include unlimited love, perspective, the ability to laugh and hug and look at life’s bigger picture. Communications skills to convince new parents that sleep will come again, that being a teenager is a temporary affliction, that everyone will survive the ups-anddowns life brings and that “this, too, will pass” are preferred. A recent episode in Poulsbo Municipal Court made me alter and simplify my grandparent job description. A grandmother came before me, arrested for allegedly teaching her grandchildren how to shoplift at a local store. She casually pleaded guilty and awaited sentencing. I couldn’t imagine the allegations to be true. “Ma’am,” I said, “I am a parent and grandparent who has spent lots of my waking hours trying to help my kids and grandkids be good people and citizens.

Columnist, lawyer and judge Jeff Tolman. Contributed photo

Make sense out of this for me. The allegations are shocking and appalling.” I waited for her to respond, wondering what she had to say. Then she spoke. “Do we have to have all this chatter? Or can you just sentence me?” There was no more chatter. Just a firm sentence to someone who’ll likely be back in some court again, as will, I suspect, her grandchildren in years to come. Her grandkids don’t have much of a chance of having a life not filled with police officers, public defenders, prosecutors and judges. Put simply, “monkey see, monkey do.” That grandmother helped me understand better Zachary’s parents’ and grandparents’ ultimate job: to give him a chance. To help him find and be himself, to write his individual story. To let him know he is loved and valuable. To be part of a team that shows him how to live life right. Without stealing, without courts involved in his life. To always remember, “monkey see, monkey do.” — Jeff Tolman is a lawyer and judge in Poulsbo and a periodic contributor to the North Kitsap Herald.

Copyright Jeff Tolman 2015. All rights reserved.

We know it can sometimes be a bit of a transition making the move to assisted living. That’s why pets are not only welcome at Bainbridge Senior Living, they’re encouraged. It’s just one of the many reasons to consider Bainbridge Senior Living. Just ask Fido. (By the way, if you’re not a pet person, don’t worry, your petless privacy will be 100% respected.)

MADRONA HOUSE WYATT HOUSE MADISON AVE HOUSE WINSLOW MANOR


12

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

‘Elder Orphans’ represent a growing number here By LESLIE KELLY

lkelly@soundpublishing.com

T

hey are called “Elder Orphans” and they represent a growing number of Americans who are coming into their senior years without anyone to watch over them. Just ask Richard Tizzano, a Poulsbo attorney who specializes in Elder Law. Many people are familiar with him because of his free seminars throughout Kitsap County, where he helps seniors to know their health care and legal options. “All seniors need to be asking ‘Who’s got your back?,’ ” Tizzano said. “Everybody needs to have someone to watch over them – someone to be their advocate.” Elder Orphans refers to the coming wave of childless and unmarried Baby Boomers and seniors who are aging alone. Many have no surviving spouse, may never have had children, and have lived long enough to have no surviving family or close friends. “What about those who don’t have family watching over them?,” Tizzano said. “Or those whose family live far away and haven’t noticed that things are falling through the cracks?“ He’s seen that happen when seniors come to get his guidance. Sometimes they even reach out to him to be their advocate. “I’ve had clients ask ‘Can you be my Power of Attorney?’, or they’ll say ‘Are there people out there I can hire to do this?’” he said. He strongly advises seniors to think ahead and ask themselves ‘is there someone who has my back?’ Tizzano recommends that seniors attend a seminar where he speaks about choosing an advocate to be your Power of Attorney. He talks about the health care options when a senior can no longer live on their own and what financial assistance may be available. “There’s really no simple answer,” he said. “But knowing what the options are and being able to choose what’s right for them, gives the senior the feeling that they are in control.” Tizzano recently had a husband and father come see him. His wife had been in nursing care for more than nine months and he had maxed out his credit cards to pay for her care. He had just received a notice from the care home that he needed to pay another $30,000. “I helped him fill out an application for Medicaid, and we found that Medicaid

Richard Tizzano

Contributed photo

would pay the costs back three months,” Tizzano said. “But I kept thinking how I wished he’d come to see me earlier because he still had the credit card debt that he can’t pay.” Tizzano said that Medicaid is still a strong and fully operational program in the U.S. and can help with nursing home costs in most cases. “It remains to be seen how long that will be the case, given the national debt,” he added. Usually someone enters the arena of elder care after they have an accident, or a medical need that lands them in the hospital. Tizzano said they will then need time in a rehabilitation center, and then may be able to go home, but need specialized care at home. Or, in some cases, they will need to move to a nursing facility. “Seniors need to know the options and the costs ahead of time,” he said. “Seniors need to ask themselves ‘how am I going to pay for this?’” There are programs including Medicaid, veterans benefits, and others, he said. One options is Long-Term Care Insurance, which is less expensive the younger you start it. And there are plans that allow your survivors to get a payout if you don’t use it, just like a life insurance policy. Elder Orphans are also coming about because Baby Boomers are independent people, he said. Each day 10,000 people in America turn 65. And many of them have been focused on their careers and hence, don’t have a lot of close friends.

He tells a story of a comedian who has an act where he tells his wife that he doesn’t have close friends. He asked, ‘If I die, are there six people you could ask to carry my coffin?’ “Then he sets out to make six good friends to take that burden off his wife,” Tizzano said. “There’s a lesson in there. Start now to intentionally be friendly. And think about making more than one good friend, because you don’t know who’s going to go first.” Tizzano began giving his seminars two years ago. He offers two hours of private consultation for $200 to anyone who attends a seminar and still has questions. His calling to help others came to him when he was 12. That was when his mother, who was only 42, had a stroke that left her paralyzed on the left side for the rest of her life. “It was a Sunday and my dad woke me up to say that mom was sick, the ambulance was here and that he was going to the hospital with her,” Tizzano recalled. “Because I was the only child, I’d be alone at home.

“I watched them leave and then my first thought was ‘Hey, now I don’t have to go to church.’ But I can still feel what came next, just like I was standing right there in the hallway of our New York City apartment. Something told me ’You better go to church, because those people care about us and we need them to pray for us.’” Tizzano said that the lesson from that is to be a part of things and reach out to friends and neighbors because you never know when you’ll need help. “There’s a lot of pain in the world,” he said. “You can either be a part of the problem or the solution.” Tizzano is a 1992 graduate of the University of Puget Sound School of Law and is a partner in the Sherrard McGonagle Tizzano law offices in Poulsbo and on Bainbridge Island. He practiced law in California before moving to Poulsbo. He and his wife have six children, five still living at home. Four of his children were adopted through the foster care program in Washington. His office is at 19717 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. His phone is 360-779-5551.


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

We provide solutions that give you

Legal Peace of Mind

• Adult Guardianships • Elder Law • Special Needs Trusts • Estate Planning • Adoptions • Wills • Powers of Attorney ...and More • Probates Elder Law & Estate Planning Attorney, Richard C. Tizzano

“If you fail to plan, you have planned to fail.” Benjamin Franklin

Remain Independent ~ Preserve Your Wealth FREE monthly Legal & Estate Planning Seminars to help you age in place

Visit www.legalpeaceofmind.com to learn more

360.779.5551

19717 Front Street NE, Poulsbo Subscribe to our monthly Aging Options E-Newsletter @ http://bit.ly/1Vjqrj5

13


14

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Peninsula Cancer Center on the cutting edge of care Great service and innovative care available in your own hometown By PENINSULA CANCER CENTER

A

diagnosis of cancer is a scary thing. You want the best possible care utilizing state-of-the-art technology in a comforting environment in your own community. You can have that here at Peninsula Cancer Center. Peninsula Cancer Center’s mission is to provide superior radiation treatment with compassion, innovation and VIP service to cancer patients. Cancer care is both an art and a science. Healing, after all, takes place not just on the physical levels, but on the emotional and spiritual planes as well. At Peninsula Cancer Center you can expect: • Respect: We promise to make each visit as easy and efficient as possible. Our physicians and staff review a patient’s case together beforehand to make sure his or her needs are not only met, but anticipated. • Flexibility: Appointments are not rushed. Patients set the schedule and take as much time as they need to discuss their care with physicians and staff. • Accessibility: Peninsula Cancer Center physicians are always available, by email or phone, to their patients and to anyone diagnosed with cancer who wishes to speak about his or her case to an expert

Patients diagnosed with cancer can be treated close to home in Kitsap County at the Peninsula Cancer Center in Poulsbo. Contributed photo in their field. • State-of-the-art technology: Leadingedge equipment and the most recent radiation techniques are utilized to deliver optimum treatments so patients can achieve the best possible medical outcomes. • Warm ambiance: Comfortable spaces, abundant natural light, warm colors, regional works of art from Bainbridge Arts and Crafts — all contribute to a soothing, healing atmosphere. • Community of caring: We partner with community resources to enhance the

Spring cleaning for your portfolio Now that spring has officially sprung, you might look around your home and decide it’s time for some sprucing up. But you don’t have to confine your efforts to your house and yard — you can also engage in a little “spring cleaning” in your investment portfolio. Here are a few suggestions for doing just that: • “Dust off” your investment strategy. Dusting is a big part of spring cleaning. Light fixtures, shelves, windowsills — they can all acquire layers of dust and grime that need to be whisked away. And if you’ve left your investment strategy unexamined for a long period, it too may need to be “dusted off” and re-evaluated. Over time, your financial goals,

family situation and even risk tolerance can change, so it’s a good idea to review your overall strategy to make sure it’s still appropriate for your needs. • Get rid of “clutter.” Once you start tidying up your house, you might be surprised at all the “duplicates” you find — a broom in a bedroom, another broom in the laundry room, a third in the garage, and so on. Just as you probably don’t need multiple brooms, so you may find that you have many versions of the same type of investment in your portfolio. If you own too many of the same investment, and a market downturn affects that particular asset, your portfolio could take a big hit. You may be better off by selling some

patient experience: Bloedel Reserve for Strolls for Well Being; free massage for patients on treatment provided by Mary Briner, LMP, CMLD; prostate nutrition classes; and Survive and Thrive for female cancer survivors. Peninsula Cancer Center has been awarded a second three-year term of accreditation in radiation oncology by the American College of Radiology (ACR). The ACR is the nation’s oldest and most widely accepted radiation oncology accrediting body, with more than 600 accredited sites and 27 years of accredita-

of the too-similar investments and using the proceeds to diversify your holdings. • Remove “stains” on your portfolio. As you clean your carpets and furniture, you might notice some stains that should be removed. And when you look through your portfolio, you might find some “stains” in the form of chronically underperforming investments. Instead of holding on to these vehicles with the hope that they will eventually turn around, you might consider selling them and using the proceeds to purchase new investments, which can help fill any gaps you may have in your holdings. • Consolidate your accounts. Have you ever discovered a stapler in one drawer, a roll of tape in the linen closet and a bunch of marking pens on your desk? All these items may be useful, but for the sake of efficiency (and to cut down on frustrating searches), you might want to consolidate them in one

tion experience. When you see the ACR seal, you can rest assured that your treatment will be done at a facility that has met the highest level of quality and radiation safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting specific Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards after evaluation by radiation oncologists and medical physicists who are experts in their field. Peninsula Cancer Center is helping to pioneer a new tool that is proven to protect prostate cancer patients from the negative effects of radiation therapy. Upon FDA approval, Peninsula Cancer Center was the first center on the West Coast and one of the first nationwide to adopt the advanced technology. On May 5, 2015, Dr. R. Alex Hsi performed the first procedure utilizing SpaceOAR® hydrogel. The SpaceOAR System is intended to temporarily position the anterior rectal wall away from the prostate during radiotherapy for prostate cancer, creating space to protect the rectum from radiation exposure. Hsi was recently featured on the local KING5 Health Watch (www.king5.com/news/ health/cushioning-the-effects-of-prostateradiation/122901092). Peninsula Cancer Center provides world-class radiation treatment for cancer patients: top doctors, state-of-the-art equipment, the latest research and science and a great support system. To make an appointment with doctors Madsen, Hsi or Foxlee, call 360-697-8000.

place. And you could do something similar with your investments. Specifically, if you have some stocks here, a couple of certificates of deposits there, and some IRAs at still another place, you might consider consolidating them with one financial services provider. With all your investments in one place, you could possibly reduce the fees and paperwork associated with maintaining your accounts. And when you eventually start taking withdrawals from your IRA and 401(k), you may find it easier to calculate these required distributions if they’re coming from just one place. But just as importantly, when you consolidate your investments with one provider, you may find it easier to follow a single, unified investment strategy. So, there you have them — some spring-cleaning ideas to help you energize your portfolio. And you won’t even need a dustpan. — Submitted by Edward Jones


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

15

HIGH-TECH CARE WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH PAINLESS AND NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT PAINLESS AND NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT

FOR FORSKIN SKINCANCER CANCER

(360) 697-8000

www.peninsulacancercenter.com

• Ideal for facial skin cancers on the nose, forehead, ears and eyes • Highly targeted treatment with excellent cosmetic results and cure rate • Innovative prostate cancer care, offering rectum-

Ideal for facial skin cancers on the nose, • •Short course ofeyes treatment protecting technology and short forehead, earsSpaceOAR and course stereotactic treatment options

• Ideal for facial skin cancers on the nose, Highly targeted treatment with excellent • •Painless, non-invasive alternative • Team approach for breast cancer patients from forehead, ears and eyes cosmetic results and cure rate

initial diagnosis to survivorship programs • •Clinically proven and FDA-approved • Highly targeted treatment with excellent Short course of treatment

• Painless, non-surgical treatment for skin cancers cosmetic results and cure rate • Painless, non-invasive alternative with superior cosmetic results

• Short course of treatment • ACR accredited - meeting highest industry • Clinically proven and FDA-approved standards care • Painless,for non-invasive alternative

• Exceptional service from a devoted staff of top • Clinically proven FDA-approved doctors, nurses andand therapists

HIGH-TECH CARE PERSONAL HIGH-TECH CAREWITH WITH A A PERSONAL TOUCHTOU

HIGH-TECH CARE WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH (360) 697-8000 (360) 697-8000 www.peninsulacancercenter.com www.peninsulacancercenter.com

(360) 697-8000

www.peninsulacancercenter.com


16

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Kitsap County Aging Older Adults and Unpaid Caregivers of an Adult We’re Here for You!

If you are age 60+ (or helping someone in that age range) call us for free information on retaining independence, planning for the future and finding and applying for programs and services that meet your legal, housing, social, financial, employment, nutrition, and mental health needs. As your local Area Agency on Aging we provide unbiased assistance, regardless of income or assets. Contact the Caregiver Support Center for free personal, customized support as an informal, unpaid caregiver of an adult and information on help with caregiving activities (including possibility of paid respite)! One phone number connects you to either local program! (360) 337-5700, 1-800-562-6418, TDD 360-307-4280, Mon.-Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Visit us online at www.agingkitsap.com See our ads below and on the next page for more details…and stop by and visit with us at our table at the Older American’s Conference on May 18th!

ARE YOU CARING FOR OR HELPING AN ADULT

Kitsap Businesses Invited to Partner In “Waste Free Holidays”

“Give Experiences Instead of Stuff” Participating businesses offer discounts of 15-50% on tickets or gift certificates for: • Music • Plays • Museums • Sporting Events • Restaurants • Spa or Salon Services • Lodgingof • Tanning • Auto Services supporter adult family or friends, and more

As an unpaid contact us for more information on:

FREE

You may be able to save as much as $4000 a year with the following programs: The Medicare Savings Programs can pay Part A and Part B premiums and other expenses like deductibles and copayments. Extra Help for Medicare Part D prescription drug plans can pay monthly premiums, deductibles and copayments.

You may want to apply if...

Medicare Savings Program Your gross monthly income/assets are less than $1,337/$7,280 (individuals) or $1,802/$10,930 (couples) Medicare Part D Extra Help Your gross monthly income/assets are less than $1,485/$13,640 (individuals) or $2,003/$27,250 (couples) Visit the Kitsap County Aging & Long Term Care booth at the conference for more information and application assistance. Or call Senior Information & Assistance at 360-337-5700

Need help understanding your Medicare coverage? Your Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisor (SHIBA) is as close as your telephone! If you need help understanding your current Medicare coverage or you’re trying to find a new plan, call:

1-800-562-6900

ASK US ABOUT

Gift services may only be purchased from Nov. 16 - Dec. 31

• Information & Education • Help with caregiving activities • Caregiver Library • Counseling Visit www.wastefreeholidays.com • Personal Caregiver Consultationto register your • business. Specialized Services or contact Colleen Minion - Pierce 360&337-4568 • Support Group Information • Training Conferences Brought to you by Kitsap County Solid Waste Division as a way to reduce holiday waste.

Your business can be recognized on of yourself Take care the Waste Free Holidays website as taking care of someone else well aswhile print ads and a brochure. There is no cost to join.

9857 Silverdale Way NW, Silverdale • Mon-Fri 11:00AM - 2:00PM or by Appointment Kitsap County prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, genetic information, veteran or military status, or disability.

SHIBA is sponsored locally by Kitsap County Aging and Long-Term Care

Protect yourself from fraud! Safeguard your personal information. Never give out your Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security Number to strangers. To report or discuss possible fraud or scams, call SHIBA at: 1-800-562-6900 or go to www.insurance.wa.gov


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

17

& Long Term Care We want to share this message about safe Medication Management You and Your Medicines

As you get older you may be faced with more health conditions that you need to treat on a regular basis. It is important to be aware that more use of medicines and normal body changes caused by aging can increase the chance of unwanted or maybe even harmful drug interactions. As you get older, body changes can affect the way medicines are absorbed and used. For example, changes in the digestive system can affect how fast medicines enter the bloodstream. Changes in body weight can influence the amount of medicine you need to take and how long it stays in your body. The circulatory system may slow down, which can affect how fast drugs get to the liver and kidneys. The liver and kidneys also may work more slowly, affecting the way a drug breaks down and is removed from the body.

Drug Interactions

Because of these body changes, there is also a bigger risk of drug interactions among older adults. Therefore, it’s important to know about drug interactions. • Drug-drug interactions happen when two or more medicines react with each other to cause unwanted effects. This kind of interaction can also cause one medicine to not work as well or even make one medicine stronger than it should be. For example, you should not take aspirin if you are taking a prescription blood thinner, such as warfarin, unless your health care professional tells you to. • Drug-condition interactions happen when a medical condition you already have makes certain drugs potentially harmful. For example, if you have high blood pressure or asthma, you could have an unwanted reaction if you take a nasal decongestant. • Drug-food interactions result from drugs reacting with foods or drinks. In some cases, food in the digestive tract can affect how a drug is absorbed. Some medicines also may affect the way nutrients are absorbed or used in the body. • Drug-alcohol interactions can happen when the medicine you take reacts with an alcoholic drink. For instance, mixing alcohol with some medicines may cause you to feel tired and slow your reactions. It is important to know that many medicines do not mix well with alcohol. As you grow older, your body may react differently to alcohol, as well as to the mix of alcohol and medicines. Keep in mind that some problems you might think are medicine-related, such as loss of coordination, memory loss, or irritability, could be the result of a mix between your medicine and alcohol.

What to Ask Your Doctor or Pharmacist

• What is the name of the medicine and what is it supposed to do? Is there a less expensive alternative? • How and when do I take the medicine and for how long? • Should it be taken with water, food, or with a special medicine, or at the same time as other medicines? • What do I do if I miss or forget a dose? • Should it be taken before, during, or after meals? • What is the proper dose? For example, does “four times a day” mean you have to take it in the middle of the night? • What does your doctor mean by “as needed”? • Are there any other special instructions to follow? • What foods, drinks, other medicines, dietary supplements, or activities should I avoid while taking this medicine? • Will any tests or monitoring be required while I am taking this medicine? Do I need to report back to the doctor? • What are the possible side effects and what do I do if they occur? • When should I expect the medicine to start working, and how will I know if it is working?

• Will this new prescription work safely with the other prescription and OTC medicines or dietary supplements I am taking? • Do you have a patient profile form for me to fill out? Does it include space for my OTC drugs and any dietary supplements? • Is there written information about my medicine? Ask the pharmacist to review the most important information with you. (Ask if it’s available in large print or in a language other than English if you need it.) • What is the most important thing I should know about this medicine? Ask the pharmacist any questions that may not have been answered by your doctor. • Can I get a refill? If so, when? • How and where should I store this medicine?

Did you know?

Your local Area Agency on Aging, Kitsap County Aging & Long Term Care, sponsors Medication Management Senior Drug Education events. Please contact us if you want to be on a list of individuals interested in attending upcoming free workshops. Call (360) 337-5700 or (800) 562-6418.

You’re invited!

Come see us at the Kitsap County Aging & Long Term Care booth at the Older American’s Conference Wednesday, May 18th! We’re featuring our Senior Information & Assistance, Caregiver Support and local Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors programs. We will be available to provide materials, answer questions and help to schedule one to one assistance appointments.

Kitsap Businesses Invited to Partner In Pick up your FREE medication management pill box organizer and FREE medication management materials including informational brochures, medication management charts “Waste Free Holidays” (supplies are limited). Information about programs and local resources that help with the cost of medications will also be available.

Assistance services or online support Experiences includes: “Give • BenefitsCheckUp RX screening help! www.benefitscheckup.org • Insurance coverage options and information from your local Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors Program! www.insurance.wa.gov • Research and compare Medicare plans and options and Medicare Part D information! Participating businesses offer www.medicare.gov discounts of 15-50% on tickets or • Information and support for informal caregivers; Caregiver Personal Survey: www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/home-and-community-services/caregiver-resources certificates for:

Instead of Stuff”

gift

• Music • Plays • Museums • Sporting Events • Restaurants • Spa or Salon Services Senior Information & Assistance • Lodging • Tanning • Auto Services A FREE service for people ages 60 and over and more

360-337-5700 or 1-800-562-6418

services to turn inGift Kitsap Countymay for: only be purchased WhereAnswers Nov.about 16 - service Dec. 31 tofrom questions & opportunities

Assessment of needs & referral to local services Assistance finding & applying for programs & services Visit www.wastefreeholidays.com Advocacy on important issues to senior register your business. or contact Colleen Minion - Pierce 360 337-4568

“Promoting the well being of older people and assisting them in maintaining their Your independence.” business can be recognized on Brought to you by County Aging Kitsap Kitsap County Solid Waste Division & Long Term Care Services as a way to reduce holiday waste.

the Waste Free Holidays website as well as print adsKitsap and County’s a brochure. Area Agency There is no cost to join. on Aging


18

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

2016 25th Annual EMERGENCY SERVICES Crisis Line (available 24 hours/day)............... 800-843-4793 ........479-3033 Emergency Department: Harrison Bremerton .............................. 744-6710 Emergency Department: Harrison Silverdale................................. 744-8975 Emergency Department: Navy Hospital ..........................................475-4232 Women’s Emergency Shelter (after 5 P.M.).... 800-843-4793 ........479-3033 Kitsap Sexual Assault Center 24HR Crisis Help Line .......................479-8500 Police, Fire or serious Medical emergency................................................911 Veteran’s Crisis Line..........................................800-273-8255

INFORMATION & REFERRAL Elder Care Locator (www.eldercare.gov)...... 800-677-1116 Peninsula 2-1-1 (www.win211.org) ...............877-211-9274 ..................211 Senior Information & Assistance (www.agingkitsap.com) .......................800-562-6418 ........337-5700

HEALTH & WELLNESS Hospitals Harrison Medical Centers (www.harrisonmedical.org): Harrison Bremerton .............................866-844-9355 ........744-3911 Harrison Silverdale....................................................................744-8800 Harrison Medical Center Social Work-Bremerton.................744-6584 Harrison Medical Center Social Work-Silverdale...................744-6584 Navy Hospital Bremerton ...............................800-422-1383 .......475-4000 VA Puget Sound Health Care System – American Lake Division....................................................800-329-8387 VA Puget Sound Health Care System – Seattle......................800-329-8387

CLINICS & REFERRAL Harrison Clinics & Referrals............................866-844-9355 Harrison Imaging Centers: Poulsbo ...............800-972-9264 ....... 479-6555 Harrison Imaging Centers: Bremerton ..........800-972-9264 ....... 479-6555 Harrison Imaging Centers: Silverdale ............800-972-9264 ........337-6500 Harrison Imaging Centers: Port Orchard .......800-972-9264 ........337-6500 Harrison Bainbridge Island Urgent Care..................................206-855-7500 Harrison Bainbridge Island Primary Care................................206-855-7600 Harrison Belfair Urgent Care..............................................................277-2975 Harrison Belfair Primary Care ............................................................277-2950 Harrison Palliative Care ..................................................................... 744-5618 Harrison Port Orchard Urgent Care .................................................. 744-6275 Harrison Port Orchard Primary Care ................................................744-6250 Harrison Port Orchard Rehabilitation ..............................................744-6220 Harrison Poulsbo Primary Care ........................................................779-4444 Harrison Silverdale Adult Rehabilitation.........................................744-8980 Harrison Silverdale Pediatric Rehabilitation...................................744-6080 Hospice of Kitsap County (www.hospicekc.org).............................698-4611 Bremerton Kitsap County Health District (www.kitsapcountyhealth.com).............................................337-5235 Eye Care America Senior Eye Care Program (www.eyecareamerica.org) .................877-887-6327 Kitsap County Medical Society-Physician Referral .........................689-2928 Peninsula Community Health Services Centers (www.pchsweb.org).................................................................377-3776

MAY 6, 2016

Older Americans Conference Resource Directory Bremerton Food Line (www.bremertonfoodline.org) ................. 479-6188 Central Kitsap Food Bank...................................................................692-9818 Harper Church (South Kitsap)............................................................871-1230 Life Care Community Food Bank at Spirit of Life Lutheran Church, Port Orchard ..........................876-9244 North Kitsap Fishline (www.nkfishline.org) ..................................779-5190 Salvation Army....................................................................................373-5550 Share Net Food Bank (Eglon, Hansville, Indianola, Kingston, Port Gamble, Suquamish).........................................................297-2266 South Kitsap Helpline (www.skhelpline.org) ...............................876-4089 St. Vincent DePaul-Assistance Office.......................................479-7017 ext.2 Hearing Resources Audiologists Northwest (www.help2hear.com)...........................800-770-1605 .......479-4065 AVADA Audiology & Hearing Care - Port Orchard (www.avada.com).................................................................... 874-0953 AVADA Audiology & Hearing Care - Bremerton (www.avada.com).....................................................................415-0412 Harbor Audiology & Hearing Services .......................................253-2036641 Hear For Life Audiology LLC (www.hearforlifeaudiology.com) .................................206-842-6374 Hearing Loss Association of Washington (Volunteer – Private Residence) ......................................lvm 871-0997 Hearing Solutions ..............................................................................692-6650 Hearing, Speech & Deafness Center Tacoma Voice/TTY.............................................866-698-1748 ....253-475-0782 Toll Free ....................................................866-421-5560 Kitsap Audiology.................................................................................373-1250 Miracle Ear ...........................................................................................301-8131 Nilsson Audiology & Hearing Clinic...................................................362-1404 Sight Life/NW Lions Foundation for Sight/ Hearing Assistance (Not for Eyeglasses) ..........................................................206-682-8500 Office of Deaf & Hard of Hearing– Video Phone: 339-7382.....Voice/TTY: 800-422-7930 .........902-8000 Peninsula Hearing...........................................800-540-8698 ........697-3061 Washington Relay Services (www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/odhh/telecommunication-relay-services) ............711

HOME HEALTH & SUPPORTIVE CARE

Home Health Services Gentiva/Kindred Home Health Services (www.gentiva.com)..............................888-436-8482 .......373-6966 Harrison Home Health (www.harrisonmedical.org) ....................744-6699 Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (Navy Visiting Nurse) (www.nmcrs.org) Bremerton ..................................................................................627-2187 Bangor........................................................................................396-6704 Caregiver Support Resources Caregiver Support Program (www.agingkitsap.com) .......................800-562-6418 ........337-5700 Kinship Caregiver Support Program, Kitsap Community Resources ..................................................473-2032 Lutheran Community Services NW (www.lcsnw.org) ...................................800-378-5771 ........377-5511 Chore & Personal Care Services A Helping Hand ...............................................877-281-7111..206-686-7440 EDUCATION Care Plus Home Health AARP Smart Driver..........................................866-955-6301 (www.mycareplus.com) ...................... 877-670-0098 ........373-8016 Red Cross - NW Region (www.redcross.org/wa/seattle) ..... 206-323-2345 Catholic Community Services Kitsap Regional Library (www.krl.org)........877-883-9900 (www.ccsww.org)..................................800-642-8019 ........792-2066 Bainbridge Island..............................................................206-842-4162 Comfort Keepers Downtown Bremerton..............................................................377-3955 (kitsap@comfortkeepers.com) ............ 877-885-4663 ........373-5678 Kingston......................................................................................297-3330 Fedelta Care Solutions Little Boston ...............................................................................297-2670 (www.fedeltahomecare.com) .............. 877-333-3582.. 206-362-2366 Manchester.................................................................................871-3921 Martha & Mary at Home Outreach Bookmobile ...............................................................405-9112 (www.marthaandmary.org).................877-266-2856 .......871-4425 Port Orchard ...............................................................................876-2224 Haven In Allyn Homecare (haveninallyn.com)............................... 277-0636 Poulsbo .......................................................................................779-2915 Home Instead Senior Care (www.homeinstead.com/616) Silverdale ....................................................................................692-2779 Kitsap County ............................................................................782-4663 Sylvan Way (E. Bremerton)......................................................405-9100 Gig Harbor.......................................................................... 253-514-9201 Lutheran Community Services NW Home Care FOOD & NUTRITION RESOURCES (www.lcsnw.org) ...................................800-378-5771 ........377-5511 Food Assistance (DSHS) Community Service Office (CSO#18) Kitsap Home Care Services .................................................................. 877-501-2233 ........473-2200 (www.kitsaphomecare.com)...............888-449-9048 ........377-7307 Senior Programs KWA Home Care (www.kwacares.org) ........888-508-2780 ........479-1707 Bremerton Services Association dba Meals on Wheels Kitsap: The Personal Touch, LLC (www.thepersonaltouch4u.com) ......... 895-3980 ..................................................................888-877-8511 ........377-8511 ResCare HomeCare Services (www.rescarehomecare.com)........698-8590 Home Delivered Meals, Congregate Meal Sites, 50-60 Meals, Caregiver Support Visiting Angels (www.visitingangels.com) ....................................602-0609 Meals, Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program, Nutrition Education and Dietary Medicaid Services Counseling (www.mealsonwheelskitsap.org) Assisted Living/COPES/Adult Family Homes Food Banks (DSHS) Home & Community Services ..800-422-7114 ........473-2299 Bainbridge Island Helpline House All other Medicaid Services (DSHS) (www.helplinehouse.org)................................................206-842-7621 Community Services Office ................... 800-338-7410 ........473-2200

Volunteer Services Island Volunteer Caregivers of Bainbridge Island ..................206-842-4441 Lutheran Community Services Senior Companion Program..................800-335-8433 ........377-5511 Volunteer Chore Services ................................866-246-3642 .......405-0072 Hospice Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care ......866-969-7028....800-338-8305 Group Health Hospice Program Referral.......800-332-5735 Hospice of Kitsap County (Office) (www.hospicekc.org) ...............698-4611 Adult Day Care Services Ashley Gardens of Bremerton (www.cascadeliving.com).............478-7277 Bay Pointe (www.baypointeretirement.com) ...............................373-9904 Elder & Adult Day Services .................................................................377-9810 Harbor House (www.libertyshores.com) ........................................779-5533 Marine Courte (www.marinecourte.com).......................................373-8551 Orchard Pointe.....................................................................................874-7400 The Ridge - Silverdale........................................................................697-4488 Medical Equipment Resources Airgas Sales & Service .....................................800-626-1380 ........373-2579 Apria Healthcare (www.apria.com) ............. 800-446-1447 .......698-0552 iMotion Medical Equipment and Wellness .....................................692-3003 Hanger Clinic Prosthetics (www.hangerclinic.com) .....................888-880-6976 ........478-2087 Lincare..............................................................800-925-6404 ........792-9414 ROTEC.................................................................800-542-5775 ........479-8811 Tim’s Home Medical Supplies (www.timshomemedicalsupplies.com)... ...877-455-8543 ........782-1922 Personal Safety Medic Alert Bracelet (www.medicalert.org)..........................800-432-5378 Phillips Lifeline (www.lifelinesys.com)...................................800-332-7799 Phillips Medication Dispensing Service...................................800-332-7799 ResponseLink .................................................. 844-394-8953 253-298-1395 Safety Choice Medication Management SystemComfort Keepers .................................... 877-885-4663 ........373-5678 Safe Return (ID Bracelet/necklace) Alzheimer’s Association .........................800-272-3900206-363-5500 Safetyline (www.marthaandmary.org) .......877-266-2856 ...... 871-4425

FINANCIAL & CONSUMER RESOURCES Attorney General Consumer Protection....... 800-551-4636 Apprisen (www.apprisen.com) .....................800-244-1183 253-588-1858 DSHS - Community Service Office.................. 800-338-7410 .......473-2200 Office of Insurance Commissioner – Consumer Protection Hotline (www.insurance.wa.gov) ....................800-562-6900 Social Security Administration/Supplemental Security Income (www.ssa.gov)........................................ 800-772-1213 Washington State Dept. of Veterans Affairs (www.dva.wa.gov).................................800-562-2308 Taxes AARP Tax Aide Program ..................................888-227-7669 Internal Revenue Service ................................800-829-1040 ....... 698-5861 Property Tax Exemptions Kitsap County Assessor’s Office ............337-7160 Insurance Medicare Claims Information Hotline ..........800-633-4227 Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA) (www.insurance.wa.gov) .....................800-562-6900 Washington State Insurance Commissioner & Fraud Hotline ......................................800-562-6900 Home Repairs & Modification Bremerton Rehabilitation Loan Program........................................473-5375 Independent Living Program Housing Resources Bainbridge Island ............................206-842-2041 Housing Kitsap (www.housingkitsap.org)...800-693-7070 ........535-6100 USDA Service Center (loans and grants) Port Angeles Office...........................................................452-8994 ext.4 Volunteer Chore Services (minor modification)....................866-246-3642 ext.3 .......405-0072 Home Weatherization & Energy Assistance Kitsap Community Resources (www.kcr.org) ................................ 377-0053 Energy Assistance Program......................................................479-1507 Weatherization Program......................................................... 377-0053 Puget Sound Energy Efficiency Hotline ........800-562-1482

LIVING SITUATIONS Housing Referral Service Housing Solutions Center of Kitsap County (KCR)...........................473-2035 Housing Resources Bainbridge Island .....................................206-842-1909 Peninsula 2-1-1 (www.win211.org)...............866-736-9634 ..................211 Veteran Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) ...................................536-7520 National Homeless Veteran Call Center.........877-424-3838 Senior Information & Assistance....................800-562-6418 ........337-5700

Shelters YWCA/ALIVE Program Office (24-hr Hotline) ............................479-1980 ........479-5118 Victim Support Services (24-hr Hotline) 800-500-5513 .206-780-2931 ALIVE House (Suquammish) ............................................206-780-2931 Bainbridge Helpline House (referrals) (www.helplinehouse.org)................................................206-842-7621 Benedict House (Male) .......................................................................377-6136 Crisis Line (referrals to shelters) (www.crisisclinicofthepeninsulas.org) 800-843-4793........479-3033 Salvation Army (Assistance) ..............................................................373-5550 St. Vincent DePaul (Female) ..............................................................473-2035 After Hours .......................800-843-4783 or 479-3033 Subsidized Housing Bremerton Housing Authority (www.bremertonhousing.org) ...479-3694 Bay Vista Commons...................................................................377-8300 Bay Vista Communities ............................................................479-4600 The Firs Apartments ................................................................. 373-8479 Shadow Creek Apartments ......................................................377-0232 Tamarack Apartments ..............................................................377-0232 Tara Heights................................................................................377-0232 Winfield Apartments ...............................................................479-4600 Housing Kitsap (www. housingkitsap.org) .800-693-7070 ........535-6100 Finch Place (Bainbridge Island) • Fjord Manor (Poulsbo) Golden Tides I, II, & III (Silverdale) • Madrona Manor (Port Orchard) Orchard Bluff (Port Orchard) • Port Orchard Vista (Port Orchard) Alternative Subsidized Housing BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Finch Place ......................................................................... 206-842-0724 Island Terrace..................................................................... 206-842-1280 Rhododendron Apartments/ 500 Madison...................206-842-8144 Virginia Villa ......................................................................206-842-5482 Winslow Arms ....................................................................206-842-3611

BREMERTON

Charter House............................................................................377-0808 Eastwynd Apartments.............................................................479-3444 Frank Chopp Place .....................................................................377-7744 Marion Court Apartments ....................................................... 377-8806 Max Hale Center......................................................................... 792-2117 Park Place....................................................................................698-7345 Pinewood Manor .......................................................................377-4977 Shadow Creek Apartments ......................................................377-0232 Tamarack Apartments ..............................................................377-0232 The Firs ...................................................................................... 373-8479 The Vintage (www.vintagehousing.com).............................479-8300

KINGSTON

Kingston Ridge...........................................................................297-7003 Robinswood ...............................................................................297-4144 Time Square Apartments .........................................................297-7188

PORT ORCHARD

Cedar Heights .............................................................................876-5320 Conifer Ridge ..............................................................................871-2869 Heritage/Viewmont East Apartments....................................895-1454 Conifer Woods Apartments......................................................871-5581 Village Green .............................................................................871-4883

POULSBO

Hostmark Apartments I, II, III ..................................................779-4687 Fjord Manor ................................................................................535-6100 Fjord Vista II ................................................................................535-6100 Peninsula Glen Apartments .....................................................697-3942 Winton Wood Apartments.......................................................779-3763 Wood Creek Apartments ..........................................................697-1824

SILVERDALE

Danwood Apartments ..............................................................662-1100 Martin Avenue .......................................................................... 377-0053 Silvercrest Apartments .............................................................692-4233 The Vintage – Silverdale (www.vintagehousing.com) ......308-9600 Retirement Apartments BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Winslow Manor.................................................................206-842-2500

BREMERTON

Bay Pointe Retirement Community (www.baypointeretirement.com).....................................373-9904 Canterbury Manor (www.episcopalretirement.org) ............377-0113 Claremont Senior Living (www.meridiansenior.com).......... 377-1717 The Vintage (www.vintagehousing.com).............................479-8300 The Willows ...............................................................................479-8522

GIG HARBOR

The Lodge at Mallard’s Landing (www.thelodge-gigharbor.com)................................253-235-3552


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

2016 25th Annual KINGSTON

Martha & Mary Village Green Senior Apartments (www.villagegreenseniorliving.com).................................297-2836

PORT ORCHARD

Park Vista Retirement, Assisted Living and Memory Care Unit (administratorPKV@livebsl.com) (www.parkvistabonaventure.com)....................................871-2323 Home Helpers (www.staffordcare.com) ...............................876-4461 Ridgemont Senior Apartments...............................................876-4461 Washington Veterans Home .................877-838-7787 .......895-4700

POULSBO

Liberty Shores (www.libertyshores.com) ..............................779-5533 Martha & Mary Retirement Apartments – The Ebenezer (www.marthaandmary.org) .............................................. 598-4357 Brookdale Montclair Poulsbo (www.brookdale.com) ..........697-2223

SILVERDALE

Country Meadows (www.encorecommunities.com) ..........692-4480 Clearbrook Inn (www.encorecommunities.com)..................692-1228 Crista Shores (www.cristaseniors.com)...800-722-4135 ....698-0900 The Vintage (www.vintagehousing.com).............................308-9600 Assisted Living

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Madison Avenue House ...................................................206-842-3694 Madrona House (www.bainbridgeseniorliving.com)..206-842-2500 Wyatt House......................................................................206-780-3646

BREMERTON

The Cottage ................................................................................373-0553 Ashley Gardens of Bremerton (Memory Care) .......................478-7277 Bay Pointe (www.baypointeretirement.com)......................373-9904 Bay Vista Commons (www.bayvistacommons.com) ..........377-8300 Claremont Senior Living (www.meridiansenior.com).......... 377-1717 Cypress Gardens .........................................................................479-4130 Marine Courte (Memory Care) (www.marinecourte.com) ..................................................373-8551

GIG HARBOR

Brookdale Harbor Bay (Memory Care) (www.brookdale.com) ................................................253-858-7790 Brookdale at Gig Harbor (Independent and Assisted Living) (www.brookdale.com) ................................................253-858-5300 Olympic Alzheimer’s Residence ...................................... 253-851-5306 The Lodge at Mallard’s Landing (www.thelodge-gigharbor.com) (Independent and Assisted Living) ............................253-858-4990

PORT ORCHARD

Orchard Pointe Memory Care Community (Dementia Care) ....................................................................874-7400 Park Vista by Bonaventure Retirement, Assisted Living and Memory Care Unit (administratorPKV@livebsl.com) (www.parkvistabonaventure.com) ....................................871-2323 Stafford Suites (www.staffordcare.com) ............................... 874-1212 Liberty Place..............................................................................876-0980 Washington Veterans Home (www.dva.wa.gov) ........................... 877-838-7787 .......895-4700

Older Americans Conference Resource Directory SILVERDALE

Northwoods Lodge (www.encorecommunities.com)........................................698-3930 Adult Family Homes Adult Family Home List: (fortress.wa.gov/dshs/adsaapps/lookup/AFHPubLookup) Home & Community Services (DSHS)............800-422-7114 ........473-2299 Senior Information & Assistance (Call for a list)..800-562-6418..337-5700

TRANSPORTATION RESOURCES Ambulance Services Air Lift Northwest ............................................800-426-2430 Bainbridge Island: Bainbridge Island Ambulance, Inc. ..........206-842-2676 Olympic Ambulance ....................................... 800-445-2257 ........377-7777 Cabulance Services Around the Sound Transportation (dispatch@around-the-sound.net).....................................253-858-7088 Northwest Transport Inc. ...............................800-600-9225 Olympic Ambulance ...........................................................................377-7777 ParaTransit Services ParaTransit Services .........................................800-756-5438 ........377-7176 Transit Services Kitsap Transit ....................................................800-501-7433 ........373-2877 Kitsap ACCESS (reservation line) ....................800-422-2877 ........479-7272 Dial – a – Ride (limited service).....................800-422-2877 Volunteer Transportation Angel Flight West (www.angelflightwest.org)....888-426-2643 Island Volunteer Caregivers of Bainbridge Island ..................206-842-4441 Volunteer Chore Services ................................866-246-3642 .......405-0072

COUNSELING RESOURCES Counseling Referral (Crisis Line) .................... 800-843-4793 ........479-3033 Helpline House of Bainbridge Island (www.helplinehouse.org)....................................206-842-7621 ext.12 Kitsap Mental Health Services – Access Line .................................405-4010 Senior Information & Assistance (referral) ...800-562-6418 ........337-5700 Substance Abuse Counseling ADATSA Information (Bremerton Community Services Office)..877-501-2233 ....473-2200 Al-Anon/ Alateen (www.kitsap-al-anon.org)...800-344-2666 Alcoholics Anonymous (www.aa.org)............... 800-562-7455 Alcoholics Anonymous- District 10 Kitsap Peninsula ....................830-6283 Alcoholics Anonymous- District 43 Port Orchard & Gig Harbor ....329-2841 Crisis Triage Services at Kitsap Recovery Center..............................337-4625 Gamblers Anonymous.....................................855-222-5542 Kitsap Recovery Center.......................................................................337-4625 Narcotics Anonymous .....................................877-861-6156 Nicotine Anonymous ...................................... 877-879-6422 Senior Information & Assistance (referral) .. 800-562-6418 ........337-5700 WA Tabacco Quitline .......................................800-784-8669 Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program (US Navy Retirees & Family) .....................................................475-5350

SUPPORT GROUP RESOURCES

POULSBO

Harbor House (Memory Care) (www.northwestcare.com) .................................................779-5533 Liberty Shores Assisted Living (www.northwestcare.com) .................................................779-5533

SILVERDALE

Clearbrook Inn (www.encorecommunities.com)..................692-1228 Crista Shores (www.cristashores.org)....................................698-0900 The Ridge (Memory Care) (www.encoreridge.com)............697-4488 Skilled Nursing Facilities Kitsap County Long Term Care Ombudsman...800-562-6418.....337-5714 Nursing Home Residents Neglect Hotline ...800-562-6078 BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Island Health & Rehabilitation Center............................206-842-4765 Messenger House Care Center.........................................206-842-2654

BREMERTON

Alzheimer & Caregiver Support Alzheimer’s Association, Western & Central WA Chapter............800-848-7097 Poulsbo – Martha and Mary Health Center ..........................649-6793 Toll-Free Telephone Support Group ....800-848-7097 Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group (Harrison Medical Center)........................................................744-6920 Bremerton

Ashley Gardens of Bremerton ..................................................478-7277 Canterbury Manor (www.canterburymanor.org).................377-0113 Claremont Senior Living (www.seniorlifestyle.com)............ 377-1717 Marine Courte at Bay Pointe (www.marinecourte.com) ....373-9904 Memory Connection at Lutheran Community Services NW (www.lcsnw.org) ..................................................................377-5511

Bremerton Health & Rehabilitation Center ............................377-3951 Forest Ridge Health & Rehabilitation Center .........................479-4747 Stafford Healthcare at Belmont (www.staffordcare.com) ..479-1515

Port Orchard

Life Care Center of Port Orchard (www.lcca.com) ................ 876-8035 Stafford Healthcare at Ridgemont (www.staffordcare.com) ....................................................876-4461 Washington Veterans Home (www.dva.wa.gov).............................877-838-7787 895-4700

POULSBO

PORT ORCHARD

POULSBO

Martha & Mary Health Services (www.marthaandmary.org) ...............................................779-7500

19

Life Care Center of Port Orchard (www.lcca.com) ................ 876-8035 Orchard Pointe Memory Care...................................................874-7400 Stafford Suites (k.strom@staffordcare.com) ......................... 874-1212

Harbor House (www.libertyshores.com) ...............................779-5533 Martha & Mary Health Services (www.marthaandmary.org) ...............................................779-7500 Bereavement Compassionate Friends ..............................................692-0217 or 620-4831 Harrison Pallative Care Team.............................................................744-5618 Hospice of Kitsap County Bereavement Services (www.hospicekc.org)................................................................698-4611

Island Volunteer Caregivers – Grief Support Group ..............206-842-4441 Survivors of Suicide (scarletto02@q.com) .......................................871-9136 Understanding Grief Support Series - Harrison Medical Center ...744-5618 Cancer Support After Breast Cancer Diagnosis Hotline (www.abcdbreastcancersupport.org).800-977-4121 American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org)................................800-227-2345 ...253-272-5767 American Cancer Society Discovery Shop ........................................613-4139 Group Health ....................................................800-992-2279 Harrison Med. Center Cancer Support..............................................598-7500 Kitsap Cancer Services.......................................................................204-6399 Live Strong- YMCA .............................................................................698-9622 Look Good, Feel Better (Breast Cancer Support)...800-227-2345 Men’s Cancer Caregiver Support Group (Harrison Health Partners)........................................................598-7500 Cancer Caregiver Support Group - Silverdale ..................................598-7500 Susan G. Komen for the Cure .........................877-465-6636 Women & Cancer Support Group - Poulsbo ....................................598-7500 Women & Cancer Support Group – Bremerton.............................744-4990 Additional Support Groups/Resources AIDS/HIV Client Services.................................. 877-376-9316 AIDS/HIV Washington Hotline........................800-272-2437 YMCA/ALIVE: Battered Women & Children ....................................479-0522 American Diabetes Association Support Groups (www.diabetes.org)...............................888-342-2383 American Lung Association ...........................800-586-4872 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) (www.alsa.org).....................................800-782-4747...253-254-8909 ALS Support Group .......................................866-786-7257...253-254-8909 ALS Online Chatroom for PALS (http://webwa.alsa.org) Arc of Kitsap & Jefferson Counties .................800-613-0813 Arthritis Foundation ...........................................................................547-2707 Harrison Sleep Disorder Center - Bremerton .................................. 744-6812 Harrison Sleep Disorder Center - Poulsbo ........................................744-1635 Harrison Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine .......................................479-8022 Brain, Head Injury Support Group Bainbridge Island.............................................................206-842-8005 Bremerton .................................................................................744-8980 Silverdale ...................................................................................744-8960 Caregiver Support Center................................800-562-6418 ........337-5700 Caregiver Support Group: First Lutheran Church Port Orchard ...............................................................................876-3901 CHADD (Children & Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder) ..................................................................800-233-4050 ....... 779-5362 Compassionate Friends (Relatives dealing with grief) (www.compasionatefriends.org).........877-969-0010 Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America – NW......................425-451-8455 Diabetes and Nutrition Counseling Center ...888-825-3227 ....... 744-6910 Epilepsy Foundation 24/7 Helpline...............800-332-1000. 206-547-4551 Grandparent Support- Bainbridge Island Senior Center........206-842-1616 Olympic Peninsula Kidney Center...........................................479-5908 ext.3 Kitsap Community Resources- Kinship Care (Grandparents raising grandchildren) ................................... 377-0053 Kitsap Recovery Center.......................................................................337-4625 Kitsap Sexual Assault Center Women’s Support Group .................479-1788 Multiple Sclerosis Society Hotline- Greater NW Chapter (www.nmss.org) ...................................800-344-4867 National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) (namikitsap.org) .....................................800-273-8255 ........377-2910 NAMI –Bremerton, Poulsbo, Silverdale, Bainbridge Island .........440-6211 Ostomy Support Group of America (www.ostomy.org) Support Line ..........................................800-826-0826. 206-748-1410 Parkinson’s Disease Association (www.apdaparkinson.org) ...................800-223-2732 Parkinson’s Disease Support Group Poulsbo .......................................................................................779-7178 Bremerton .................................................................................744-6220 Polio Support Group for Kitsap County ........800-609-5538 ........692-1381 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder .......................800-273-8255 Better Breathers (Respiratory Support)..........................................744-6687 The Ridge – Silverdale (Dementia/Alzheimer’s/Caregiver Support) .........................697-4488 Stroke Support Group (Harrison Silverdale Rehab) .......................744-8980 Take off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) (www.tops.org)..........................275-2179 Veteran’s Caregiver Support Line (www.caregiver.va.gov)..855-260-3274

SENIOR OPPORTUNITIES Volunteer Opportunities Meals on Wheels Kitsap (www.mealsonwheelskitsap.org) .......888-877-8511 ........377-8511

Elder and Adult Day Services .............................................................377-9810 Harrison Medical Center Volunteer Services...................................744-6570 Hospice of Kitsap County (www.hospicekc.org)............................698-4611 Island Health & Rehabilitation .................................................206-842-4765 Kitsap County Volunteer Services Coordinator (www.kitsapgov.com/volunteer)............................................337-4650 Long Term Care Ombudsman.........................800-562-6418 ........337-5714 Senior Companion Program at Lutheran Community Services NW .....................800-335-8433.. 253-272-8433 Martha & Mary Health Services (www.marthaandmary.org) .....779-7500 United Way (www.unitedwaykitsap.org) .......................................377-8505 Volunteer Chore Services ................................866-246-3642 .......405-0072 Education Kitsap Computing Seniors (www.kitsapcomputingseniors.org) . 888-901-5805 Kitsap Regional Library (www.krl.org).........877-883-9900 .......405-9100 Goodwill Job Training & Education Silverdale ................................................877-448-3446 .......698-6776 Bremerton ..............................................877-448-3446 ........373-3692 Employment Foster Grandparents (Catholic Community Services) .............866-246-3642 .......405-0072 Kitsap Community Resources ...........................................................478-2301 Unemployment Benefits ............................... 800-318-6022 Vocational Rehabilitation - Silverdale ...........800-548-1406 .......698-4360 Washington State Senior Employment Program ...........................337-4756 Work Source Kitsap County ...............................................................337-4810 Senior Organizations & Centers Bainbridge Island Senior Community Center..........................206-842-1616 Bremerton Senior Recreation Center (www.ci.bremerton.wa.us) .....................................................473-5357 Givens Senior Center (South Kitsap) .................................................337-5734 Kitsap County School Retirees Association......................................871-2415 NARFE (Retired Federal Employees) (www.narfe.org).........800-627-3394 North Kitsap Senior Center ............................................................... 779-5702 Port Gamble S’Klallam Elders’ Center...............................................297-9827 Silverdale Community Center............................................................337-5350 Suquamish Tribe Elders’ Lodge .........................................................598-3135 Village Green Community Center (Kingston) ..................................297-1958 Legal & Protective Resources Look in your local yellow pages under “Associations”, “Attorneys”, “Lawyers”, “Elder Law”, or “Estate Planning” (visit: www. washingtonlawhelp.org) Adult Protective Services (Home & Community Services)....877-734-6277 Dispute Resolution Center ..............................800-377-6583 .......698-0968 Office of Public Guardianship Services – WA State Courts (www.courts.wa.gov) ...............................................................753-3365 Kitsap County Long Term Care Ombudsman...800-562-6418.....337-5714 Kitsap County Volunteer Attorney Services.....................................479-6125 Northwest Justice Project (CLEAR) ..........................................888-201-1014 CLEAR*Sr. (60 and older, regardless of income)............888-387-7111 Nursing Home Complaint Line ......................800-562-6078 Veterans Project ...............................................855-657-8387 Washington Disability Rights (www.disabilityrightswa.org)..............800-562-2702 Washington State Bar Attorney Referral .........................................373-2426 This directory is a limited listing of resources and services. If you cannot locate what you need, further information may be available. Call Senior Information & Assistance at 360-337-5700 or 1-800-562-6418. The information contained herein is provided as a public service with the understanding that Kitsap County Government, Senior Information & Assistance and the Long Term Care Alliance makes no warranties, either expressed or implied, concerning the accuracy, completeness, or reliability of the information or the suitability of any listing for any purpose. Kitsap County Government, Senior Information & Assistance and the Long Term Care Alliance do not endorse any commercial providers or their products. This directory is a limited listing of resources and services. If you cannot locate what you need, further information may be available. Call Senior Information & Assistance at 360-337-5700. This information contained herein is provided as a public service with the understanding that Kitsap County Government, Senior Information & Assistance and the Long Term Care Alliance makes no warranties, either expressed or implied, concerning the accuracy, completeness, or reliability of the information or the suitability of any listing for any purpose. Kitsap County Government, Senior Information & Assistance and the Long Term Care Alliance do not endorse any commercial providers or their products.


20

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Options for making new friends when you’re over 55 It’s not that easy to reach out and make friends when you’re older, but there are plenty of places where you can try By LESLIE KELLY

lkelly@soundpublishing.com

O

K. So you’re a 55-or-older “senior” and you’ve landed in a place where you don’t know anyone, or you just want to create a new set of friends. You’re not a church-goer and you feel you’re too young for the community senior centers or the “Red Hat” society. Here’s a handful of suggestions of places, events, and activities where you might find new friends, and maybe even find that special person to spend time with. • Join a quilting group, or a sewing class. There’s the Kitsap Quilters at www. kitsapquilters.com. They meet at 7 p.m. every fourth Tuesday of the month in Poulsbo and beginners are welcome. For sewing and craft classes, give JoAnn’s a try. Located at 2886 NW Bucklin Hill Road in Silverdale, classes are posted at the store and can be found online, or call 360692-1300. • Sign up to become a Master Gardener. Through the Washington State University Extension Service and Kitsap County, there’s the opportunity to learn all you need to know to garden beautifully while helping the environment. Just go to www.ext100.wsu.edu/kitsap/gardening/ master-gardeners/become-a-mastergardener/ and read about the classes and seminars that are available. • Attend a wine tasting. With wine tasting rooms in every part of the county, this is the perfect place to drop in and meet new people. Eagle Harbor Wine Co. on Bainbridge Island at 278 Winslow Way E, is a popular one. Call 206-842-4669 or go to their website at www.ehwineco.com. Or try Olalla Valley Vineyard & Winery, 13176 Olalla Valley Road SE, Olalla, call 253-851-4949. Website: www.olallavalleyvineyard.com • Combined the artist within you and your love of wine and try a “Tile and Taste” evening at Kitsap Mosaics at 18827 Front St. in Poulsbo. Create a fun set of coasters, picture frame or choose from other select items, while enjoying a glass of wine and appetizers, every Friday from

Joining a cooking class and enjoying a meal together with the other students is one way to meet new friends. Others include hiking groups and book clubs. Contributed photo 6 to 9 p.m. Cost $40. Call 206-422-0787 or 360-930-0741. •But if that’s not quite your style of art, several local bookstores, including Eagle Bay Books on Bainbridge (www.eaglebaybooks.com) and Liberty Bay Books (www. libertybaybooks.com) in Poulsbo have sponsored adult coloring nights where wine is sometimes offered. Liberty Bay Books calls it “Coloring and Cocktails” and it’s offered at both Liberty Bay Books in Poulsbo and Bremerton. Speaking of which, joining a book club is just one other way to meet people. Check with your local library or bookstore to connect to a group. • Go hear music at a community concert. During the summer, there’s plenty to choose from with concerts at the waterfront gazebo in Port Orchard, on the waterfront in Bremerton and in the parks on Bainbridge Island and in Poulsbo. Check the parks department websites for specifics. • Join an outdoor group and go hiking or learn to fish. Olympic Outfitters is a place to go to learn about fly fishing. See more at www.peninsulaoutfitters.com/ product-category/fly-fishing-classes/. If you’ve never been in a kayak and want to try, check out the classes offered at Olympic Outdoor, www.olympicoutdoorcenter.com. There’s also standup paddle boards to try. For those who want

a hike try the Kitsap Outdoors group on MeetUp.com. The Kitsap Outdoors Meetup Group is an outdoors group dedicated to bringing introductory hikes, snow travel, camping, backpacking, and biking to the citizens of Kitsap County. Starting where the Clear Creek Trail leaves off, they know area parks, the Olympics and Mount Rainier. Go to www.meetup.com/Kitsap-Outdoors/ for more. And there’s the North Kitsap Trails association at www.northkitsaptrails.org, where you can work outdoors and help keep up local trails. • Sign up for an adult education class with your local park department or at Olympic College. If you’re really committed, check out the culinary program at Olympic College. • Try bingo or bunco or trivia night at a local pub. There’s a schedule of pub trivia events throughout the county in Kitsap Weekly each Friday. A local group, called the Bunco Divas love playing Bunco, drinking responsibly, bringing a variety of food and beverage, having fun conversation, enjoying a wonderful host who prepares a delightful event and the social aspect of being able to just have fun for one night a month. Find them at www.meetup.com/TheBunco-Divas. For bingo, all the local casinos offer it and there’s the ARC Bingo at 3243 Perry Ave. in Bremerton. Call 360-

377-5074 for hours and more information. • Sign up for a cooking class. There’s always cooking demonstrations at Central Market in Poulsbo, and Town & Country on Bainbridge Island. Or try Heyday Farm on Bainbridge Island. Find more at www.haydayfarm.com. A recent class was Bolognese and Barolo, a class on pasta sauce making with a meal that followed. • Try Kitsap Computing Seniors at www.kitsapcomputingseniors.org. This group is a place where you can go to get your techie questions answered while meeting others. The group meets at Sheridan Park Community Center, 680 Lebo Blvd., Bremerton. • Volunteer at a nonprofit you support. There’s the Kitsap Humane Society shelter for the animal lover in you, Habitat for Humanity if you’re more of a builder-type, and there’s always a need for more hands at all the local food banks. To find out more about local nonprofits go to www. kitsapgreatgive.org. •And the Kitsap County website has a list of volunteer opportunities and county boards that have vacancies at www.kitsapgov.com/volunteer/default.htm. Another option are the local schools. Many of the elementary schools have a “Grandparent” program where you will be matched to a student and meet to read or do other projects. • If you want to start online, try www. meetup.com and look for the Kitsap Singles group or the Peninsula Boomer Zoomers group. Kitsap Singles is for any age person and it’s purpose is to get out and do things, not necessarily find someone to date. Their schedule is filled with things like Happy Hour at the Boat Shed in Bremerton, Trivia Time at Whiskey Creek Steakhouse, Hike 4 Miles, and even a weekend white water rafting trip. They also offer “Rock and Bowl” in Silverdale. • The Peninsula Boomer Zoomers is a singles activity group for ages 50 and above on the Kitsap Peninsula. Members come from Gig Harbor to Port Angeles and all points in between. The goal is to get out and play. Activities include dinner, movies, hiking, camping, traveling, parties, playing cards, dancing, bike riding, wine tasting, museums, bowling, mini golf, rafting, kayaking, boating, coffee, plays, outdoor concerts and indoor concerts.


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

21

Nothing’s easy about aging in place By TERRYL ASLA

tasla@soundpublishing.com

No matter how old (or young) you are, you need to read Aaron Murphy’s book, “Aging in Place,” before you buy or rent your next home. I wish this book had been available back in 2012 when my wife and I made our last move. As a professional in the senior housing field, I was determined that we buy find a home and location with features that would enable us to live there the rest of our lives; what Miller calls aging in place and defines as “the concept that you can and should be able to stay in your residence or current living situation, or choose the location of your residence and your community, for the remainder of your life.” So, I thought I knew what we needed. What I didn’t know how to do was convince my wife. To say that she didn’t share my concerns is putting it too mildly. The more adamant I became, the more resistant she became, at one point threatening to buy a three-story house with the bedroom on the top floor and the bathroom in the

basement, if I didn’t shut up about aging in place. In retrospect, her concern wasn’t intellectual (she is way smarter than am I), but emotional. Like so many baby boomers, she didn’t want to admit she would ever be a senior. Eventually she realized the convenience features that make it easier to age in place are good for people of all ages; wide doors that are easy to navigate in a wheelchair also make it easier to move a big piece of furniture, too. And we wound up buying a house (or in our case a houseboat) that had most of the convenience features we may someday need. Still, I could have saved myself, and her, several years of grief and arguments if Murphy’s book had been available — especially the section on how introduce the topic (“The Soft Startup,” page 34). A Kitsap County architect and certified aging-in-place specialist, Murphy doesn’t spend a lot of time and pages on all of the possible physical features of a home designed for all ages. Rather, he focuses on the process of deciding why to buy or build such a home and how to get it done

Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.

See AGING, Page 22

grow younger

Over 700 Slots | Table Games | Poker Room | Cigar Room Casual & Fine Dining | Center Bar & Lounge Catering & Banquets | Event Center

OPEN 24 HOURS

NEW HOTEL OPENING IN FALL 2016

Follow us on:

www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468

The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe.

24-hour Admissions Line: 360.271.3902 57454

360-876-8035 • 2031 Pottery Ave. LifeCareCenterOfPortOrchard.com Joint Commission accredited

Kingston, WA

See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casino’s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Some restrictions may apply. Point Casino promotions, offers, coupons and/or specials may not be combined without marketing management approval. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, to attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133. TPC-5839-7 Time of Your Life.indd 1

4/21/16 4:22 PM


22

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Martha & Mary AT HOME offers geriatric care management By LESLIE KELLY

lkelly@soundpublishing.com

C

harlie was an 84-year-old veteran who lived in Kitsap County. He had moved away, but came home to retire here. He didn’t have any family members close by. As Charlie aged, he began to have health problems and he wound up in a local hospital. When he was feeling better, he wanted to go home, but the hospital wouldn’t release him until they knew he was returning to a healthy situation where he would get the care he needed. That’s when Carrie Mulcahy, Director of Care Management for Martha & Mary AT HOME in Poulsbo, got a call from Charlie’s attorney asking for help. “Many times in situations like this, the person is helped through the Division of Aging,” Mulcahy said. “But there are those gray areas where there’s no one to help. That’s where we come in.” The Martha & Mary AT HOME care management program started in 2011. In her role, Mulcahy assesses a person’s current living situation, reviews their medical records, and makes suggestions about their current and future care needs. “Initially, we got Charlie home care services through Martha & Mary AT HOME,” she said. “The program sends private duty in-home caregivers to help clients with bathing, dressing, meal preparation, housekeeping and medications oversite.” He was having stomach and bowel trouble and he wasn’t eating right, she

Carrie Mulcahy, director of Care Management. Contributed photo

Sound Publishing: Your Community, Delivered: Bainbridge Island Review, Bremerton Patriot, Central Kitsap Reporter, North Kitsap Herald, Port Orchard Independent

Aging

Welcome to the Comfort Inn On the Bay

Guest Laundry Copy/Fax Free Hot Breakfast Pet Friendly

Enjoy a wealth of amenities in a convenient location. Visit Historic Downtown during the The Older Americans Conference!

1121 Bay Street, Port Orchard 360.895.2666 www.comfortinnportorchard.com

said. “We worked with him and his caregivers to encourage a healthier diet. But he refused to go to the doctor. He feared he’d be sent back to the hospital and he didn’t want that.” Fortunately, Mulcahy was able to find a physician who would see Charlie at his house for medical care. Over time, Charlie ended up in the hospital emergency room following a bad fall. He was placed in intensive care where it was soon discovered he had Stage Four cancer. Working with the hospital discharge planners, Charlie agreed to a short term

Continued from page 21 successfully. As he points out, planning ahead can help you avoid having to move to a retirement community or assisted living facility and, in the process: • Save your hard-earned money. • Save your lifestyle in your home. • Extend your finances during retirement. • Extend your happiness, longevity, and safety at home. • Save your independence, your dignity, and your right to choose your housing situation (page 53). He walks the reader through the process in a very logical and readable manner, including a number of real-life stories that put a human face on the facts and

stay at Martha & Mary Health and Rehab Center, but eventually he insisted on returning home. “As time passed Charlie’s health got worse and he declined overall. At that point we worked to get Hospice services started for him and increased his in-home care to 24 hours a day,” Mulcahy said. “What’s important in this story, is that Charlie was able to receive care on his own terms, the way he wanted to,” she said. “He was able to be at home and his wishes were respected.” Like Charlie, most seniors out there in their 70s and 80s wish to actively participate in care decisions about their own health, Mulcahy said. Because of the geriatric care program at Martha & Mary, there is a stopgap program in place to help seniors who do not have family in the area. Mulcahy said she works with family members who are out of state, attorneys, neighbors and caregivers with power of attorney. “Sometimes they just need a home care expert to look at the big picture,” she said. Generally, when she is called she does an initial assessment, looking at the residence, for safety issues, for its ease at which the senior can get about, and then she reviews records from physicians involved in the case. “I look at the situation holistically, and at any physical concerns from my head to toe clinical assessment,” she said. “I work with other health care professionals to develop a comprehensive care plan that is geared toward meeting safety, health and

welfare needs.” The initial assessment is about $300, and is privately paid, although some insurance companies are beginning to offer coverage for this service. “From there, it depends on what issues are at play,” she said. “But a key focus of what I do, is to keep this services affordable for families that need it.” Another example was a woman in her 90s who was hospitalized and needed to have her home assessed for safety. Mulcahy knew the woman didn’t want to go into a nursing home, but once she saw the home where the woman lived, she determined it would not be safe for her to return home. “The stove didn’t work and she had been using the shower as a closet,” Mulcahy said. In that case, she was able to recommend to the client’s family that the woman move to an assisted living facility. Mulcahy said geriatric care management began on the East Coast more than 25 years ago. It’s only made its way to this area in the past five years. She has an LPN and a bachelor’s degree in health care administration and a master’s degree in health care management. She is certified by the National Academy of Certified Care Managers and a member of the Aging Life Care Association and is required to take continuing education annually. To contact her at Martha & Mary AT HOME, call 360-394-5458, or email cmulcahy@marthaandmary.org.

figures. First he provides the reader with background concerning the explosion in the number of older adults. Then, he explains what successful aging in place should look like. He then moves into the “how-to” process: how to start the discussion with your family; how to be an active listener; the importance of planning ahead and hiring a professional team to help; and, finally, choosing the right community. If, like me, you are among the nine-outof-10 people who want to stay in their own homes for as long as possible, read this book. “Aging in Place: 5 Steps to Designing a Successful Living Environment for the Second Half of Life,” by Aaron Murphy (2014). Published by Entrepreneur Publishing, Poulsbo, Washington. Available online at Amazon.com.

“Aging in Place.”

Contributed photo


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

CARING FOR GENERATIONS A full spectrum of senior care offerings to meet your needs. Post-hospitalization rehab that gets you well and gets you home. An award-winning in-home care program that supports your desire to remain independent. And, a geriatric care management team that will advocate for your needs and be your guide in today’s complex health care system. Exceptional care that feels like family, we are your trusted care partner.

23


24

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

A new style of medical practice Dr. Marie Matty & Dr. Andrea Chymiy

have practiced medicine in the Kitsap Community since 2003

Enroll Now

Accepting New Patients!

(360) 979-0569

~ Most insurance plans accepted ~ Becoming a patient at Pacifica Medicine & Wellness offers you many benefits • We limit our practice to 1/4 the normal number of patients seen by typical primary care doctors, enabling us to devote significantly more time to our patient panel. • Easy appointment scheduling: online or by phone • Enhanced access and communication: You will have 24/7 access to your doctor and staff via telephone and email • Same day or next day appointments when needed with your doctor

• More time with your doctor allowing all your questions to be answered – you will never feel rushed • Wellness focus allows access to health coaching, acupuncture therapy, massage therapy and weight management services under one roof • Research shows this style of practice improves all patient health outcomes (including decreasing hospitalization rates by 90%!), saves money and improves overall satisfaction • Convenient and user friendly online access to your health care information through our patient portal

Preventative care for all ages • Chronic disease management • Wellness focus

WE PROVIDE: Geriatrics, Pediatrics & Women’s Health • Same day / Acute care visits

PACIFICA MEDICINE In the Central Plaza Building near Central Market 19980 10th Ave. NE, Suite 202 • Poulsbo, WA 98370 (360) 979-0569 • www.pacificamedicine.com e-mail: info@pacificamedicine.com


MAY 6, 2016

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

25

Stafford Healthcare: Generations of experienced care Old-fashioned values are the culture of the community at Stafford Suites in Port Orchard By STAFFORD SUITES STAFF

S

ince 1945, the Ostrom family has been privileged to serve older adults in a unique and special way. Our success stems from old-fashioned values that have been instilled within the culture of each community. Local, family ownership drives an experience that sets us apart from facilities run by national corporations. The hallmark quality of all of our communities is in making each guest feel like they are valued and respected members of our family. Our mission is to serve. We are a group of highly skilled professionals who serve with expertise and compassion. We offer first-rate accommodations with attention to detail at every level. Our organization is built on a philosophy of caring. This philosophy is at the heart of everything we do. We are focused on results and we achieve those results by adhering to timeless operating principles and values. We have a proven track record of excellent customer service and are proud of our history of consistent, professional care provided in all of our locations. We provide several levels of senior care in Kitsap County; Ridgemont Senior Apartments in Port Orchard are independent senior retirement apartments, Stafford Suites Assisted Living Community in Port Orchard provides full-service assisted living apartments, and our two Skilled Nursing Communities are Stafford Healthcare at Belmont in Bremerton and Stafford Healthcare at Ridgemont in Port Orchard. Ridgemont Senior Apartments provide individual private apartments, one hearty meal per day, weekly housekeeping services, activities and scheduled transportation. The Senior Apartments are managed by Karin Stewart, who has been on our team for more than 26 years and is knowledgeable about all aspects of senior care. Karin makes her residents her first priority and is passionate about providing excellent customer service. Stafford Suites Assisted Living Community provides a safe, warm, caring environment and offers a full range of

Staff at Stafford Suites works to make residents feel like part of the family. Contributed photo

A group of residents from Stafford Suites prepares to go on an outing. Contributed photo

services for seniors to enjoy. Executive Director Denise Hoyt, RN, has been in her role since the doors opened 18 years ago. At Stafford Suites residents can choose from private studio, one, or two bedroom apartments. They receive three delicious meals a day served restaurant style in the

Dining Room, weekly housekeeping, a full range of activities directed by a full-time Activity Director, qualified nursing staff on-site 24/7, a full-time Nurse Wellness Director, scheduled transportation to medical appointments, a full service salon in house, diverse library, gift shop and many other amenities.

Resident independence, freedom of choice and respect are all hallmarks of the Stafford Suites philosophy of caring. Stafford Healthcare at Belmont, under the direction of Administrator Robert Washbond, and Stafford Healthcare at Ridgemont, under the direction of Annette Crawford, provide professional skilled nursing and rehabilitation services for those needing a higher level of care. They are staffed with exceptional professionals; RNs, LPNs, therapists, social services staff, dieticians, chefs and direct care staff. They provide a high level of skill and expertise in caring for seniors and specialize in assisting them to achieve the highest level of health and functioning possible. They are at the forefront of innovative techniques, therapies and technology in the ever-changing and challenging healthcare field. Both skilled nursing facilities have a physician on-staff who provides direct care and oversight of the healthcare team and plan of care. Both communities offer short-term rehabilitation care in our state of the art Transitional Care Units. Our teams of physicians, nurses and therapists collaborate to provide rehab and nursing services to assist clients to return to their previous living environments with improved health and functioning as quickly as possible. In addition, there is longterm care available for those who require this higher level of personal and medical care on a more permanent basis. Both of our skilled nursing facilities are rated as 5 Star by the Centers for Medicare Services. All of our communities share a strong history of performing very well in the Washington state DSHS Survey process and are known for exceptional quality care. We strive to be good neighbors and community members. We are members of the Bremerton, Belfair and Port Orchard Chambers of Commerce, the Rotary Club of Bremerton and the Kiwanis Club of Port Orchard among other regional and county organizations. We are compassionate healthcare professionals who treat you like family. Please come visit one of our communities soon and experience the difference our tradition of family values can make in the lives of seniors.


26

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Peninsula Hearing offers new Lyric hearing device By MATT CLIFTON Peninsula Hearing

W

e have been offering a new and different concept in hearing care called the Lyric. Lyric has been around for a few years; however, Dr. Megan Nightingale at Peninsula Hearing in Poulsbo is the first hearing professional on the peninsula to offer Lyric. The Lyric concept is one similar to extended wear contact lenses for the eye. For those clients for whom Lyric is a good fit, they tout their natural hearing ability with little inconvenience or fuss. Lyric is still the only extended wear hearing device available. The concept centers on a very small device (about the size of a pinto bean) that is placed deep in the ear canal within about 4 millimeters of the ear drum. The device stays put in the canal until the battery dies which can be up to 4 months. The device is then taken out of

Megan Nightingale

Contributed photo

the ear canal by a trained professional and

A new way of defining ‘age’ By TERRYL ASLA

tasla@soundpublishing.com

Human beings are not cans of soup. There’s no expiration date when you magically become “old.” Still, the most widely used definition of “old” remains age 65, the calendar age that for most of the 20th century was the point in life at which Americans became eligible for Social Security. But it turns out there was no scientific reason for government officials to choose that particular age. Social Security was set up during the darkest days of the Great Depression and officials back then were focused on setting up a national pension system that would encourage older men to leave the struggling job market. A historian who studied U.S. retirement history, William Graebner, reported that before officials settled on age 65, they considered going as young as age 50 and as old as age 70. After the National Institute on Aging (NIA) was created in 1974, research on aging in this country began in earnest. Most NIA aging research applications defined “old” as aged 60 or 65 years and older. This further solidified calendar age in the minds of scholars and the public. But as research progressed, it became

apparent people over 65 years of age weren’t all alike. In an effort to avoid comparing apples to oranges, researchers tried dividing old age into three stages: the young-old (aged 65-74), the old (aged 75-84), and the very old (aged 85-plus). That didn’t work so well either. Some researchers reported that the three age groups still appeared to be made up of both the healthy and unhealthy, even among the very old. In 2010, Robert Butler, MD, founding director of the National Institution on Aging, admitted “there is nothing magical or scientific about 65 …or any other number in defining old age.” So what is “old?” All definitions of everything, not just the concept of “old,” are based on classification systems developed by human beings. It’s how we make sense of the world. “This is a newspaper.” “That is a car.” “He is old.” The important thing to remember about classification systems is that they need to accurately define groups of things or people that share the same characteristics. In the case of “old,” a meaningful classification is one in which everyone who is said to be “old” shares most of the same characteristics. Beginning in the 1980s, some research-

a new one placed back in the canal. The device is designed to be worn 24 hours a day – seven days a week. While the thought of a traditional hearing aid being worn 24/7 is not very pleasant, Lyric when properly placed in the ear canal can hardly be felt. The mechanics of the Lyric is surrounded by a spongy material that allows moisture to escape and the ear canal to breathe which is very important for ear canal health. The advantage of having a hearing device placed so close to the ear drum is that the sound is very natural because not as much amplification is needed as with a traditional device. Also, by virtue of the placement of Lyric the brain can take advantage of the ears natural background noise fighting capabilities. Lyric is very convenient for the user as well. One does not have to change batteries

or take the device on and off the ear. The device can be adjusted for volume and turned into what is called sleep mode for nighttime use by using a magnet tool. Lyric is sold on a subscription basis for one, two or three years at a time. The makers of Lyric and Nightingale do state that Lyric is clearly not for everyone. There are some people who cannot have anything in their ear canal and some whose hearing issues are so great that it is beyond the amplification ability of the device. For the people who have tried it, and liked it however, it is a miracle. “They rave about it,” said Nightingale. Should Lyric not be right for you, we do offer a variety of traditional styles with the latest technology. If you are interested in learning more about the Lyric concept in hearing care, give us a call for a complimentary evaluation. Call 360-697-3061 or 800-540-8698.

ers in the fields of sociology and psychology suggested dividing later life in two. So, besides childhood (the first age) and middle age (second age), they proposed a third age (the well elderly or “wellderly”) and a fourth age (the “illderly”). So, older adults, regardless of their calendar age, who are in relatively good health and socially engaged may be said to be in the third age. The fourth age is typified by the onset of all the negative stereotypes of old age: failing health and increasing social isolation. What makes this new classification system so useful is that it compares apples to apples. Membership in the fourth age is based on measurable losses in three or more of the following: vision, hearing, mobility, cognition, strength, and physical illness. So, someone can be classified as being in the fourth age when they are still in their 50s if, for example, they have early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Or, like some of my friends, can still be in the third age even when they are well up into their 90s. Calendar age has nothing to do with it. Four ages theory can be extremely useful if you are concerned about a parent, friend, or loved one. If they exhibit three or more of those losses, then they should be encouraged to seriously consider the need for additional assistance. Adapting a home to meet changing physical needs, participating in restorative exercise programs that target mobility and strength losses, moving closer to their caregivers — these are the kinds

of things that can help them prolong their quality of life, independence, and sense of aging successfully. Not sure if a friend or loved one is in the fourth age? In 2013, I reported on my findings from a small study that included comparing driving a vehicle and membership in the third or fourth ages. I found that participants in the third age, who had none of the losses listed above, still drove regularly. Those on the cusp of the fourth age (one to two losses) tended to self-restrict their driving and avoided driving at night. Those in the fourth age no longer drove at all and were dependent on others for transportation. My findings were supported by the kinds of losses leading to driving cessation reported in the driving safety research literature. Bear in mind that driving cessation may not be a valid indicator in all cases. Some healthy people don’t drive at all, or only rarely, because they choose not to or don’t need to. They may live in an urban village where everything is within easy walking distance or in a community that has great mass transit. Likewise, some individuals in the fourth age may continue to drive a vehicle simply because they have no other option or even out of sheer stubbornness. At age 71, Asla is still in the third age. In addition to writing for peer-reviewed academic journals, he is a reporter for the North Kitsap Herald and assistant editor of Kitsap Military Times.


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

This is an exciting time for overall health awareness and how important your hearing is to your overall health. Call today and let us help you achieve the healthiest hearing you can have just like the thousands we have helped over the past 25 years. DR. MEGAN NIGHTINGALE

27


28

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 6, 2016

Time of Your Life North Kitsap - Spring TOYL - 2016  

i20160509151850569.pdf

Time of Your Life North Kitsap - Spring TOYL - 2016  

i20160509151850569.pdf