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Electric Mirror: CEO named Entrepreneur of Year, 8-9

Executive of the Year Everett’s ATS CEO leads ambitious growth • 6-7 MAY 2016 | VOL. 19, NO. 2

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Owner of Zinc Art + Object in Edmonds searches artist colonies and vintage shops for her store’s offerings, which include art and furnishings. Pages 14-15

COVER STORY Aviation Technical Services CEO Matt Yerbic named HBJ Executive of the Year, 6-7

Bothell entrepreneur creates light, portable exercise machine . . . . . 18 PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . 19 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . 20

BUSINESS NEWS

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . . . 21

$10 million settlement closes the books on Frontier Bank . . . . . . . . . . 4

PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . 22-23

Electric Mirror president-CEO named HBJ Entrepreneur of the Year . . . .8-9 Adams & Duncan partner receives Emerging Leader award . . . . . . . . 10 Snohomish Eagles Club made over into wedding venue . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Brown Sugar Kids a passion of 9-year-old (with parental assist) . . 13 Monroe’s Canyon Creek Cabinets remodels showroom . . . . . . . . . . 16

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 26-27

BUSINESS BUILDERS Andrew Ballard: Why you should do a win-loss analysis regularly. . . . . . 24 Monika Kristofferson: One way to keep your year on track . . . . . . . . 24 Tom Hoban: Washington real estate attracts Chinese investment . . . . . 25

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COVER PHOTO Aviation Technical Services CEO Matt Yerbic stands in hiis company’s factory floor in Everett. Contributed photo

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Settlement closes books on Frontier Bank Former execs of Everett-based bank pay $1 million to FDIC By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

FILE PHOTO

The Frontier Bank at the intersection of Hewitt and Colby avenues in downtown Everett in 2010.

EVERETT — Former executives of closed Frontier Bank agreed to pay $1 million to settle a professional liability lawsuit brought by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The settlement also calls for their insurer to pay

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calls. Frontier Bank was headquartered in Everett and had 47 branches in Washington and Oregon. The bank was one of several local community banks that failed after lending too much to real estate developers during the recession. The state Department of Financial Institutions closed the bank April 30, 2010. Its assets were seized by the FDIC and sold to Union Bank of San Francisco. In 2013, the FDIC filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Seattle seeking $46 million in damages, alleging that 12 former officers and directors of Frontier Bank breached fiduciary duties and were negligent in issuing 11 poorly vetted real estate loans in 2007 and 2008. The lawsuit said Frontier was one of the biggest commercial banks headquartered in Western Washington at the time of its failure, with $3.6 billion in assets and $3.1 billion in deposits. The FDIC alleged that the bad loans led the bank to become critically under-capitalized. The executives named in the lawsuit included Frontier Financial Corp. founder and longtime executive Robert J. Dickson, of Everett, who was chairman of the board at the time the 11 loans were made. Also named were Dickson’s son, John J. Dickson, also of Everett, who was at times chief executive officer and president. Other Frontier Bank defendants were former executives Michael J. Clementz, of Indianola; Randy E. Deklyen, of Bothell; David A. Dorsey, of Everett; James W. Ries, of Everett; Robert W. Robinson, of Bainbridge Island; and Lyle E. Ryan, of Everett. Also named were former members of the board Lucille M. DeYoung, of Woodinville; William H. Lucas, of Everett; Darrell J. Storkson, of Mukilteo; and Mark O. Zenger, of Edmonds. Frontier had adopted an aggressive growth plan that focused on what is

known as ADC lending — loans for acquisition of property, development and construction. From 2005 to 2007, Frontier’s real estate loans increased by more than 58 percent — $1.2 billion, according to the lawsuit. The bank pursued this strategy despite recognition and discussion by board members and executives of an increasingly precarious housing market and limited capital for lending. In 2007 and 2008, the FDIC alleged, the bank issued 11 multimillion-dollar loans to various borrowers who later defaulted, including a $22 million loan to a borrower whose liabilities to Frontier would then exceed $53.8 million. Another loan involved a complicated $5.5 million deal to support development of Streamline Tower in Las Vegas, a later-troubled 21-story luxury condominium project. In the settlement, the defendants said that it is in their best interest to enter the agreement to “avoid the uncertainty and expense of further litigation.” “The settling defendants expressly deny each and every claim made against them, individually and collectively, but enter into this agreement solely for the purpose of resolving the disputed claims, without the necessity of further litigation and expense, and without admission of liability,” according to the settlement agreement. The professional liability lawsuit was scheduled for trial this spring, but the settlement terms were reached in October. Last year, the FDIC reached a roughly $6.4 million settlement with two executives with City Bank of Lynnwood, founder and Chief Executive Officer Conrad D. Hanson, of Clyde Hill; and a senior vice president who oversaw construction loans, Christopher B. Sheehan, of Lake Forest Park. The City Bank settlement called for the full amount to be paid by the bank’s insurer.


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6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR

For the adventure, spirit of flying Aviation Technical Services CEO worked his way up from cleaning planes, loading baggages By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

T

he success of Matt Yerbic’s career is based on looking both forward and upward. Growing up in Alaska, flying was a way of life. His uncle owned a small airline and he frequently flew in the family’s Cessna-185 or Super Cub. By 6 years old, he was often looking at the world from thousands of feet above. “Airplanes and aviation run in my blood,” Yerbic says. “It was so fundamental to our lives. I still can’t stand below and help but look at planes flying through the air.” That undercurrent of innovation and adventure still influences him as chief executive officer of Everett-based Aviation Technical Services, also known as ATS. The company provides heavy maintenance and repair services plus aviation modifications and upgrades to clients from around the world. Founded in 1970, the company employs about 1,800 with facilities in Moses Lake and Kansas City, Missouri. In 2014, the company expanded to Fort Worth, Texas, with the acquisition of Texas Air Composites. However, its main heart and home remains in Snohomish County. About 75 percent of ATS’s workforce is based at its Everett facility. “We are working on several more (company) acquisitions right now and really broadening not only our geographic reach, but our capabilities and product services,” Yerbic says. “We continue to remain bullish on Washington and are looking at a couple companies in the state.” For his efforts at growing ATS and also being a leader in the aerospace industry and in the community, Yerbic has been named The Herald Business Journal Executive of the Year. It’s just the most recent award for Yerbic and his company, which was also named independent MRO of the Year by Aviation Week this spring. Yerbic’s leadership is a crucial component of ATS’s growth and success. He is in his ninth year at ATS and part owner. In 2013, Yerbic and a team of industry partners purchased the company. “Being in an ownership position gives us a nimbleness and flexibility to continue to do what we think is important,” Yerbic says. “The most important thing to me

FILE PHOTO

Matt Yerbic (right), of Aviation Technical Services, shares a laugh on a panel during the 2013 Governor’s Aerospace Summit in Everett. For his role in leading ATS and his leadership in the aerospace industry and community, Yerbic has been named The Herald Business Journal Executive of the Year.

is that we are decent human beings in how we interact with our employees and customers.” It is a hands-on approach. Yerbic is a familiar face making the rounds and chatting with employees by name. From the executive offices to the

factory floor, everyone’s contributions are equally valued. He began his own career at Alaska Airlines. As a college student, he went to school in Alaska during the day and worked the graveyard shift cleaning planes, loading

baggage and cargo. “It was winter with the winds blowing up to 50 miles an hour and a 20-below windchill factor. I was station manager with 40 employees at the end of the earth. I realized how important friends and coworkers are in making it through the


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EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR day,” Yerbic says. John Monroe, chief operating officer of Economic Alliance of Snohomish County, has seen Yerbic walk his talk. Yerbic serves on the executive board of Economic Alliance, which identifies local needs, concerns and advocates to local and state leaders. “A few months ago, Gov. Jay Inslee visited ATS and Matt took him out on the floor. I watched Matt stop and talk to the door rigger and the person stripping insulation,” Monroe says. “He knew them by name and was genuinely interested in how they were doing and any issues he could help improve.” Such care extends beyond the work week. ATS offers scholarship and matching fund programs for employees and their children to pursue continuing education. “The path I took helped me understand the hard work that goes into a business from the ground up,” Yerbic says. “Access to job positions at various levels is critical to a healthy job base. I’ve seen folks shine who’ve taken very different paths. Someone loading an airplane could one day become CEO.” Like Yerbic, Monroe’s career path traversed all rungs of the corporate ladder. Monroe worked his way from an entrylevel position at Boeing to executive by the time he retired. “Matt brings in kids right out of high school and places them into a spectrum

Absolute Manufacturing Aerojet Rocketdyne Aviation Technical Services The Boeing Co. Cadence Aerospace/ Giddens Operations Carbures

Previous winners 2015 — David Beyer, president, Everett Community College 2014 — Buzz Rodland, CEO, Rodland Toyota 2013 — Rick Cooper, CEO, Everett Clinic 2012 — Mark Duffy, CEO, Mountain Pacific Bank 2011 — Steve Klein, CEO, Snohomish County PUD 2010 — Cathy Reines, CEO, First Heritage Bank 2009 — Brett Magnan, Execuitve VP, Tulalip Resort Hotel of entry-level positions. He wants to help people reach a level of responsibility they can accept and handle,” Monroe says. “When someone shows trust in you, that makes an employee really value their relationship to the business.” That also translates into broader community service. ATS encourages employees to be engaged community ambassadors. The company has long supported charitable organizations such as United Way and raises money through raffles, bake sales and golf tournaments.

2008 — Eric T. Overton, CEO, Sparling 2007 — Kevin Goodwin, CEO, of Sonosite 2006 — Gail Larson, CEO, Providence Everett Medical Center 2005 — Carol Nelson, CEO, Cascade Bank 2004 — Ricky Wens, president, Engineering Support Personnel 2003 — Bill Weaver, president, Canyon Creek Cabinets 2002 — Eileen Odom, president, GTE Northwest 2001 — Bob Dickson, CEO, Frontier Bank “There is a heritage and culture that surrounds ATS, so it’s really important to find ways to be a good business who is part of the community and invests in people. That’s our mission,” Yerbic says. Yerbic is also chair of the Aerospace Futures Alliance, a coalition of businesses and leaders from across the state. While Washington is renowned for its aerospace industry, Yerbic is adamant about not taking it for granted. “There are always other areas who would love to have a bigger piece of what we have. It’s incredibly valuable,” Yerbic

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says. “As a community, we need to remain focused and continue to earn the right to have this fantastic industry.” His advocacy includes such issues as ensuring taxes and benefits support companies looking to expand or relocate within the state. Also, he is dedicated to improving the region’s infrastructure and transportation systems to ensure ease of commerce. Monroe believes that Yerbic’s successful guidance of ATS partially stems from Yerbic’s own passion for family. Yerbic wants to provide job opportunities and an environment that encourages employees to develop beyond the hours they clock at the office. “The perception of executives is that they work 24/7 and that’s their whole life. That’s the only way to run a successful business and build a career,” Monroe says. “Matt has time to put life in perspective and also is a family man. That is a leader you want to emulate.” Yerbic’s family legacy of aviation now extends to his 3-year-old son who has visited ATS and is enchanted by the workings of the “big, cool machines.” “He loves going to the airport and flying,” Yerbic says. “To him, it’s still an adventure. That’s what got all of us into this industry to begin with. “It was that sense of adventure and spirit that first put the Wright brothers into the air. That’s what it should still be about for all of us.”

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8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR

PHOTOS BY ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Jim Mischel Jr., Electric Mirror president and CEO, stands in front of mirrors with built in video, lights and Blue Tooth controls in the company’s Everett showroom.

The vision behind Electric Mirror By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

J

im Mischel learned his most valuable business lessons long before he started Electric Mirror. It happened around the breakfast table. Through his childhood and teen years, he listened to his parents discuss his father’s dental practice — business plans, growing the customer base, making payroll. “As kids, my siblings and I were mostly there for the French toast,” Mischel laughs. “I didn’t fully realize it at the time, but we grew up in a small business environment. What better education could you have than being part of those daily business conversations?” It embedded a lifelong sense of entrepreneurship. Mischel launched his first businesses as a teenager. He tried his hand at window washing and a bold, albeit unsuccessful venture, selling meat. “I sold venison because it was so

“As we grow, probably three-quarters of the workforce will be in Everett. ... We want to invest in this community and put down roots for our long-term impact.” — Jim Mischel healthy, but it turned out people weren’t into eating Bambi in a big way,” Mischel recalls. Mischel found success when he founded Electric Mirror, a company projected to exceed $60 million in sales this year with exports to 72 countries worldwide. Their product lines include lighted mirrors and mirrors with embedded televisions, Blue Tooth and more. They have a strong presence in the hospitality and hotel markets, education, stadiums and sports arenas, plus high-end residential clients. Mischel is The Herald Business Journal’s Entrepreneur of the Year for cre-

ating Electric Mirror and growing the company in Snohomish County. Electric Mirror’s workforce currently hovers around 400 employees and is expected to increase to 1,000 in the coming five years. The anticipated growth was a motivation for moving into a larger, 120,000-square-foot facility in south Everett in February. “As we grow, probably three-quarters of the workforce will be in Everett. It’s one of the reasons we decided to relocate to a new building. We want to invest in this community and put down roots for our long-term impact,” says Mischel, who serves as Electric Mirror’s CEO and

president. As of last year, a new division and salesforce were created to specifically target the burgeoning market of healthcare needs. “It happens all the time that I walk into a hotel or restaurant and there is our product,” says Mischel. “I was in the Middle East and had an Oh my gosh! moment seeing one of our mirrors. Now I take a digital camera with me when I travel.” Mischel’s vision of entrepreneurship is heavily rooted in Electric Mirror manufacturing its products in the United States. He estimates that 80 to 90 percent of products are American-made. Recent, major acquisitions of new equipment will further increase overall efficiency and capability for local production, he said. “When we decided that our next factory would be in Everett, that’s a multi-million dollar investment in the community. It’s a big decision because there is a strong pull to put everything in China,” Mischel says. “Our vision, though, is really tied with the American dream. We wanted to just dou-


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ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR ble down on the whole concept of ‘Made in America.’ I think that shows.” Electric Mirror also supports outside entrepreneurship by using local suppliers whenever possible. Mukilteo-based Coastal Manufacturing has worked with the company for upward of seven years providing precision sheet-metal work. The relationship is so close that some employees have worked at both companies. “As a manufacturing company, we hate to hear someone is going overseas. It’s certainly happened to us over the years and to all manufacturing across this county,” says Philip Letley, owner of Coastal Manufacturing. “Electric Mirror treats us like an extra shift for their production line. It’s refreshing to deal with someone like that who is truly a partner.” Mischel views Everett as a welcoming incubator for small and growing businesses, which he considers “the engine of growth for the entire U.S. economy.” Everett city officials welcomed Electric Mirror and helped smooth the way for the company’s relocation. Another enticement was the qualified workforce ranging from engineering expertise to hands-on manufacturing. “There are a lot of people doing interesting things in Snohomish County and Everett in particular. We want to pull from that wealth of employees to come participate in our vision,” Mischel says.

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Electric Mirror president and CEO Jim Mischel Jr. (left) stand behind a screen with his father, Jim Mischel Sr., brother Aaron and mother, Faith, in the company’s new manufacturing plant in Everett. Jim Mischel credits discussions around the family table for his business sense.

As Electric Mirror expands, a primary goal is maintaining a culture of creativity and innovation. For Mischel, those are foundational elements of entrepreneurship. He began developing Electric Mirror’s business plans during law school. He first pitched his ideas to established companies, but was turned down. Those concepts are now some of Electric Mirror’s most profitable products. “At the time, it felt like a negative when

those companies said no, but it turned out to be an opportunity,” Mischel says. “Small business allows people to come together, pursue an inspiration and grow an idea. That’s why I make a point to encourage other young entrepreneurs.” One of Mischel’s mottos comes from his mother, Faith, who advises people to “outthink their boss.” Mischel endeavors to minimize company bureaucracy so employees are empowered to think out-

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side the box. “I take pride in knowing that companies like Electric Mirror are coming from the Pacific Northwest and there are people who are entrepreneurs with products as good as theirs,” Letley says. Electric Mirror’s bottom line of dollars and cents is impressive. At its core, however, the company is driven by family sense. Mischel estimates that there at least 25 families working at Electric Mirror — parents, sons, daughters, cousins. It mirrors his own experience. His parents and siblings are all involved with the company. While they no longer gather around the family table every morning, his mother still delivers homemade breakfasts to the office. ”It’s one of the perks,” Mischel laughs. “When we say it’s a family business, it really is a family business. That’s the essence of who we are.”


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EMERGING LEADERS

Everett lawyer wins inaugural award Adams & Duncan partner honored for work with nonprofits, city commissions By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

An Everett lawyer who has served on several nonprofit boards and who has also held positions on several city commissions was named in late April the recipient of the inaugural Emerging Leader award. Chris Adams accepted the award at a reception at the Shack Arts Center in downtown Everett attended by more than 100 people including wife Megan, and sons Dillon, 7, Liam, 5, and Jack, 1 1/2. “What an honor to be up here with the nominees and four finalists,” Adams said. “There are so many people in this room that I respect and honor and who are mentors to me.” The Herald Business Journal along with its partners — accounting firm Moss Adams, Economic Alliance Snohomish County, Puget PR and Leadership Snohomish County, Schack Art Center andShawn O’Donnell’s Irish Pub — introduced the Emerging Leader award to recognize the next generation of leadership for the county. “There is an abundance of wonderful things happening it made it easy to highlight the nominees we’re getting to meet tonight,” Herald publisher Josh O’Connor said. Moss Adams partner in charge Rob Grannum told the crowd that the event dovetails with his firm’s mission. “We’ve got over 100 professionals in our office down the street,” Grannum said. “That’s why we’re really behind something like this, because we work really hard to develop leaders to serve our community and help our clients.” Adams is a partner at Adams & Duncan law firm in Everett, a firm where six out seven lawyers are under the age of 40. Adams was a member of Everett’s planning commission and was chairman in 2013 and 2014. He’s also worked on the city’s salary and charter review commissions. He’s a former board president of Sherwood Community Service helping people with disabilities, served on the board and executive committee for Providence Hospital and worked on the Everett YMCA board, chairing that nonprofit’s 2015 annual campaign. Adams, whose wife is the leadership/ Associated Student Body teacher at Kamiak High School, has also worked pro bono legal counsel for several nonprofits. One of his proudest achievements was

PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Chris Adams (center) stands with his son, Liam, 5, at a reception naming Adams the recipient of the 2016 Snohomish County Emerging Leaders award. Adams, a partner at Adams & Duncan law firm in Everett, was honored for his work serving on nonprofit boards, city commissions and other volunteer activities.

Experience Momentum employees (from left) Laura Mickelson, Teresa Seto, Erin Gettman and Karen Hogan cheer for their boss, Shanon Tysland, who was nominated and selected as a finalist for the 2016 Snohomish County.

the work he did as co-chair for Everett’s Community Street Initiative Task Force. That commission recommended embedding a social worker within police, expanding a program for people who frequently are in crisis and started work on expanding housing opportunities. He said he enjoys being a part of something bigger than himself and being part

of a community that has given him as much as he’s given. He notes the county has a long history of dedicated people who raise money or give of their time to make a difference. Last fall, The Herald Business Journal solicited nominations of people who are accomplished in their field and are working to make the county a better place to

live and work today and into the future. More than 50 people were nominated, and many were nominated multiple times. Of those, the field was cut to a dozen finalists. “We did have to narrow it down to four and then pick one,” emcee Amy Drewel said. “The judges came together to review the top four nominees and they took a blind vote and of course it came out 2-2-2-2.” Adams was eventually selected the winner. The other three were George Kosovich of the Verdant Health Commission; Lisa Lefeber, director of strategic communication and policy for the Port of Everett; and Shanon Tysland, owner of Experience Momentum, a Lynnwood health and fitness business. Other finalists were John Bonner of Everett Community College; Terrie Battuello with the Port of Everett; JJ Frank of the Marysville/North County Family YMCA; Joy Ingram, development director for Clothes For Kids; Sara McArdle, senior graphic designer with United Way of Snohomish County; Sarah Olson, deputy director of the City of Lynnwood; Zsofia Pasztor, owner of Innovative Landscape Technologies and founder of nonprofit Farmer Frog; and Shawn Smith, youth and community pastor with New Hope Christian Church in Everett.


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Snohomish fraternal hall finds new life Businessman remakes old Eagles Hall into wedding venue, shops By Emily Hamann The Herald Business Journal

Scott Swoboda has been planning his restoration of the Eagles Hall in Snohomish since he was a little boy. “I drew this whole thing, just like you see it, when I was 10 years old,” he said. At that point, the building, which opened around 1906, had fallen into disrepair. Swoboda grew up across the street, at his parent’s general store, where the Snohomish Bakery is now. He owns the nowrestored three-story building at 801 First St. The ground level is home to a wine shop, a homegoods store and a popular frozen yogurt shop. Below that, opening soon, will be an Italian restaurant. On the top floor is the immaculately restored Feather Ballroom, with a catering kitchen, bar and event space. There are many wedding venues in Snohomish County. Few, if any, come with a celebrity endorsement, especially from someone with the star power of actor Chris Pratt. In January of this year the “Guardians of the Galaxy” star posted on his Facebook page about the Feather Ballroom, writing, “My two friends back where I grew up in Snohomish, WA have completely restored the beautiful historic Feather Ballroom. The place is just gorgeous.” Swoboda knew Pratt when the actor was just a kid growing up in Lake Stevens. Pratt hung out with Alex Petrakopoulos, who will now be running the restaurant Swoboda is building in the bottom floor of the building. That will open this summer. “[Petrakopoulos] was the first person to go in there with me after we bought it,” Swoboda said.

PHOTOS EMILY HAMANN / HBJ

Scott Swoboda points to a chandelier in his newly remodeled wedding venue, Feather Ballroom. He created the space out of Snohomish’s former Eagles Hall.

“I drew this whole thing, just like you see it, when I was 10 years old.” — Scott Swoboda

Petrakopoulos helped Swoboda with a lot of the work to restore the building Petrakopoulos and Pratt are still close friends. “He is exactly the same today as when he was 16,” Petrakopoulos said. He brought Pratt by while it was still in progress. Pratt loved the space and hopes to organize summer concerts there, with proceeds going to charity. The building was built in the early 1900s as a meeting place for the Fraternal Order of Eagles, a service club that started in Seattle. As the Snohomish chapter of the club aged, its membership dwindled, and they were looking to move to a smaller space. In 2005, the Eagles sold it to Swoboda specifically because, he said, “I don’t change buildings.” Instead, he restores them. Since he was little, he had dreamed of returning the building to its former glory.

“If I went into a negative cash flow for the rest of my life,” he said, “I wasn’t going to change what this thing is.” Off came the corrugated siding that covered the outside walls, and some windows. Out came layers of plaster and stucco and low ceilings that were slapped up over the original ceilings. In total, about a dozen semi-truck loads of rubble and debris was stripped out of the building. The original sprung floor is still in the ballroom, built for dancing “It kinda moves with you,” Swoboda said. New lights, with programmable colors, hide behind molding and shine upward, showing off the curved ceiling. Swoboda had wicker-style chairs custom made to match what would have been popular when the building was built. The floor in the bride’s dressing room and the

The Feather Ballroom has gotten the endorsement of movie star Chris Pratt, who would like to organize charity concerts in the space.

women’s bathroom is real linoleum, imported from Northern Ireland. “It’s real expensive, but it will last forever,” Swoboda said. The building is the magnum opus of Swoboda’s work in Snohomish.

He has restored half a dozen of the downtown’s historic buildings, including the Oxford Saloon and the Triangle Building across from City Hall, and more of its residences, plus buildings in Everett and Seattle.

Restoration is just Swoboda’s side project. At his regular job, he runs distribution in Washington for the Bramble Company, a furniture manufacturer. The old-style furniture, which can be ordered with a pre-distressed finish, looks right at home in his old buildings. He’s promised his partner, LynnD Stiles, that the Eagle’s Hall is his last project. “He never has one project going on at a time,” she said. “It’s like eight.” At least, she says, “it’s never boring.” After this, he says, he’s going into retirement. Well, what he calls retirement: a scant 40-hour work week. Stiles handles the booking and planning for events that happen at the Feather Ballroom, as well as their other event venue, the Snohomish Event Center at 1011 Second St. Their offices are across the street from the Eagles Hall, in what used to be an old gas station, which, of course, Swoboda restored. Swoboda has been restoring old buildings since he was a teenager. One summer he started working for Everett Olson, a Snohomish businessman who was heavily involved in the community. Olson became a mentor for Swoboda, who helped him with his own restoration projects. Swoboda was small and young enough that he could crawl underneath the buildings to clear them out. “One whole summer I never saw daylight,” he said. After that, Swoboda knew what he wanted to do with his life. He went back to school and quit on the first day. He was 15. “I could see that two and two make four,” he said. “That’s about all you need for a business.” He has always loved antiques, and old buildings. But, he says, really it’s about not letting a good thing go to waste. “I’m not so much into restoring buildings as I am not getting rid of something that still has value to it,” he said.


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Edmonds girl has eye for fashion Brown Sugar Kids features T-shirts with family dog as model By Megan Brown For The Herald Business Journal

Every artist has a muse, and 9-year-olds are no exception. Kayla Ogunsemore’s muse has platinum blonde hair and twinkling hazel eyes. He sits patiently through fittings and photoshoots, wearing everything from Batman masks to Russian fur caps. Tangle, a 5-year-old Labrador retriever, is the face of Kayla’s debut fashion line, Brown Sugar Kids. Named after Kayla’s childhood nickname, “Brown Sugar,” the collection includes eight designs, each featuring Tangle in a different costume. Kayla’s parents, Wendy and Olugbenro “Olu” Ogunsemore, are the founders of Brown Sugar Kid’s parent company, the clothing brand Trustee Apparel, based in Edmonds. “The world doesn’t need another shirt,” Wendy Ogunsemore said of their motivation for starting Trustee. “The world needs more conversations.” Kayla’s line was a way to wear her passion for helping animals on her sleeves. “I love all animals and I really wanted to help them,” she said. She was turned away from volunteering at a local animal shelter because of minimum age requirements, Kayla found her own way to help animals: donating a portion of her line’s proceeds to local animal shelters. “Tangle inspires me,” Kayla said. “He’s so soft, and cheers me up when I’m sad.” As Kayla’s best friend, Tangle was the best choice to represent Brown Sugar Kids. Tangle waits for her at the door when she gets home from school. They go for walks together. At the end of the day, they snuggle up together in Kayla’s bed. “I get my best ideas when I sleep,” said Kayla. “I dream up cute new costumes for Tangle to wear.” Sometimes she even wears Tangle to bed. Brown Sugar Kids, like Trustee Apparel, prints on a special polyester blend, resulting in a pajama-like softness and breathability similar to top selling athletic brands. “When we first got the shirts, the kids really wanted to sleep in them,” mom Wendy said of the ultra soft fabric. Kayla has two brothers, Malakai, 6, and Isaiah, 3, who serve as her models. They don’t complain when Kayla raids their closets for clothes to put on Tangle. They even offer suggestions for her next shoot. “They like sports,” Kayla said of her brothers. “But they help me come up with new ideas.” She’s always brainstorming for her next session with Tangle. Creativity is in the Ogunsemore bloodline. Kayla’s great-grandfather was a photographer,

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Nine-year-old Kayla Ogunsemore’s family dog, Tangle, is featured in a line of clothing that the Edmonds girls designs called Brown Sugar Kids. Below, Kayla models one of the T-shirts that she’s designed with the help of her parents, Wendy and Olugbenro “Olu” Ogunsemore.

For more Trustee Apparel sells adult and children sizes XS to XL. Prices start at $30. For more info, go to www.brownsugarkids.com/.

and other relatives include sculptors, painters and fabric weavers. Olu Ogunsemore is an acclaimed photographer who spent his childhood in the U.S. and Nigeria. He’s inspired by the rich colors of Nigerian fashion and the dynamic sartorial scene in New York City. His mother encouraged him to take pride in his own artistic ideas. “She always told me to write down everything,” he said. “Your art and your ideas are your currency.” Kayla’s ideas are kept in a red spiral notebook, with the words “Brown Sugar Empire” written in bold Sharpie on the cover. Inside, she sketches new designs with Tangle. Kayla has dreams to expand her brand’s repertoire soon. “Next I want to use cats,

dogs and baby animals.” Other children submit pictures of their own dogs to her on Instagram. While Kayla and her photographer dad are growing their collection creatively, her mom taps into her marketing experience to grow the business behind the scenes. Wendy Ogunsemore was raised in Samish Island. She moved to New York City after graduating from the University of Washington. A job in media marketing had her running in the same circles as Kayla’s father. The two married and moved to Edmonds 10 years ago. Their combined experience in marketing and photography makes them a strong partnership in a competitive industry. They want to pass that diverse

skill set on to Kayla. “It was important for us to support the creative process for her, and for her to see how to turn that creative into a business that you’re proud of,” Wendy said. “There’s definitely some girl power in there, too.” For now, the creative aspect of the business is what drives Kayla. She browses Pinterest and Instagram for inspiration from fellow artists. Kayla’s favorite part of the business is photographing Tangle with her dad. Olu positions the lights, and then it’s up to Kayla to direct Tangle and take the pictures that are printed on the shirts. They wake up early to work on shoots together. “I’ll wake up and find them in the living room,” said Wendy. It reminds her of their wilder New York days. “I’d wake up to him working and find all these random people in our living room, and he’s doing a photoshoot.” Olu still flies to New York for photography gigs and family visits. Sometimes, the whole family gets to tag along. Kayla’s must-see recommendation for your next trip to the Big Apple: the swanky two-story Toys R Us. The Brown Sugar Empress deserves no less.


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Playfulness, fun showcased at Zinc Edmonds owner scours artist colonies, vintage stores for displays at her shop By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

The shop beneath the bright orange sign in downtown Edmonds is all about “making your world FUN to live in” — the tagline on the back of Laura Zeck’s business card. She’s the proprietor of Zinc Art + Object. The store at 102 Third Ave. S., Suite B offers a mix of past and present, the cleverly designed and repurposed and the brightly imagined, crafted and illuminated. It’s a testament to Zeck’s love of art, her many contacts in the art world and her willingness to hunt high and low, from artists’ colonies to vintage stores across the country, for her special finds. “Often described as fresh, edgy and inspiring,” states the store’s website, “we are constantly on the hunt for the new, the unusual, the extremely well-made and that special something that will spark a conversation and a smile.” There’s slapstick humor in the banana flasks (think Mae West’s, “Is that a banana in your pocket…?”) and in a tray of bottle-opener dentures, but there’s a lot more that’s useful and seriously sustainable, like wallets, Dopp kits and backpacks fashioned from used bicycle inner tubes and tires — naturally sleek and waterproof by Seattle company Alchemy Goods, started by a bike commuter who had his messenger bag stolen. “He couldn’t find one that he liked as much as the one he had,” Zeck said, “but he had all these inner tubes lying around his apartment.” Another story in the seemingly “meantto-be” category belongs to Oxgut Hose Company, which Zeck said was started by a woman dating a San Francisco firefighter. At the station when a firehose was about to be scrapped, the woman salvaged the hose and eventually started a line of wine carriers and placemats sewn from old firehoses. Yellow-gold in color, the wine bags for sale at Zinc are “cool, they’re functional, they’re ‘reuse, recycle’ and, at the same time, they do something good,” Zeck said. Oxgut Hose Company — based in Emeryville, California and named for the ox gut used in the first known firehoses in ancient Greece — donates a portion of sales to the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation, to help child burn victims, according to oxgut.com. “Just as much as we love finding new life for fire hose, we love honoring its original purpose: saving lives.” That gives her chills, Zeck said. An artist in her own right, Zeck’s “The Secret Life of Seeds” painting hangs on the wall at Zinc and was recently featured in North End Metro Magazine, with

PHOTOS BY DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Owner Laura Zeck got the “retail itch” and started Zinc Art + Object three years ago. The business, which is changing its name from Zinc Art + Interiors, offers a mix of art and furnishings with an emphasis on fun.

“I wanted to show artwork because I love art, and I think investing in real art versus posters is important for our culture.” — Laura Zeck Zeck, 47, named one of its top five favorite artists. Three years ago, Houzz.com featured a Ballard interior-design project of Zeck’s as Kitchen of the Week. The store’s name comes, in part, from the zinc plates — backed in orange — that Zeck etches on in her print-making, she said. Her husband, graphic artist Jesse Doquilo, 55, who co-owns the shop with her, is also well-known in the region. His modern-object wood furniture, featuring strong grains and dramatic angles, is for sale at Zinc. The collection includes side tables called Gracer tables, named for the couple’s 10-year-old daughter, Grace. Zeck said they met while he was president of the 700-plus-member Seattle chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Artists. Zeck had just finished her graduate degree at the University of Washington in fine arts, painting and printmaking, had been hired by Filter — which places graphic designers, illustrators, project managers and the like in

At Zinc Art + Object in Edmonds, a backpack made with used bicycle tires offers a sturdy, messenger bag with the bonus of coming from recycled materials.

contract and other positions — and was sent to a meeting of the graphic artists group. She and Doquilo started working together on a committee and got along well, Zeck said. When she discovered he owned a painting by one of her favorite artists — famed Northwest artist Fay Jones — she said she knew he was the man for her. The couple bought and remodeled a house together in Seattle’s Central District, Zeck said, but moved to Edmonds in 2007, not long after Grace was born. When Zeck lost her studio space

because the building that housed it sold, they decided to open a shop. “We just always kind of had that retail itch,” she said. The store opened in December 2013 as Zinc Art + Interiors, because she thought the name might dovetail with her interior-design business, Zeck said. Instead, it was confusing to potential customers, who expected a showroom on the site. So the name is in the process of changing to Zinc Art + Object. Some of the objects include Adirondack chairs made from plastic milk jugs, hanging lights mimicking bubble-wrap,


MAY 2016

Two halves of a whale makes a unique book holder for sale at Zinc Art + Object in Edmonds. Owner Laura Zeck scours artist colonies and vintage shops looking for her merchandise.

The space recently featured “The Archivist of the Sky” by Philadelphia artist Deidre Murphy, who attended the Kansas City Art Institute with Zeck. Her displayed paintings portray brightly colored birds perched on brown twigs and dotted lines, against bold backdrops of dark pinks and brilliant blues. Posted next to the paintings, a series of numbers referred to possible “install-

ment” payments, Zeck said. If buyers think they can’t afford $3,600 for a painting, she explained, they might feel better breaking it down into three installments of $900 or nine installments of $400. Her goal is to show people “that buying art is worth it,” she said, “and it’s not that much different than having a car payment.” As for Zinc, it’s still a labor of love. Zeck

said she has two “awesome” employees that she pays, but has yet to pay herself, even pouring everything from her interior-design projects back into the store. “It’s a marathon,” Zeck said of the business. “It’s not a sprint kind of a thing.” And it’s all about bringing FUN into her customers’ lives. As she said of art, “If you love something, why wouldn’t you invest in it?”

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and chocolates from around the world. There’s jewelry from local silversmiths and bead crafters, artisanal handbags from Brooklyn-based artists, and honey from a local beekeeper in the business of removing unwanted bees and wasps from buildings. There are “found photographs” of strangers, enlarged and framed, hanging on the wall, a result of Zeck’s forays into vintage stores. “I have a thing for somebody else’s memories,” she said. There’s a couch built to last generations, from a Mukilteo company that builds eco-friendly, made-to-order furniture to reduce waste, practicing and teaching the Japanese “Kaizen” method of continuous improvement. A “Cavalletta” chair by the same company perches on a table at Zinc Art + Object. It can be ordered in a variety of fabrics and has three different leg choices; this one is in a shade called blossom and has white legs to play up its delicacy. “It’s very curvaceous and it’s got a zipper up the back and it kind of reminds me of a female figure,” Zeck said. And like so many things in her shop, it’s somewhat more than an object. “It’s like an art piece too,” Zeck said, “so that’s why we have it sitting on a table — so you don’t miss it.” Impossible to miss is the gallery space adjacent to the retail shop and entered through a wide, open doorway. The gallery was added in November, Zeck said. “I wanted to show artwork because I love art,” she said, “and I think investing in real art versus posters is important for our culture.”

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Canyon Creek remodels showroom By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Co. completed a remodel of its 6,000-square-foot showroom, replacing 10 displays including two that feature conference rooms. The showroom is open for the general public, but generally contractors send homeowners to look through cabinetry options, said Cindy Draper, Canyon Creek’s marketing manager. “It’s for ideas and inspirations is what it’s geared for,” Draper said. The showroom has about 35 displays at any one time. Draper said the company plans to redesign the displays in a continuing process to keep the showroom fresh. The showroom is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays at the Canyon Creek manufacturing plant at 16726 Tye St. SE, Monroe. New designs include a cornerstone black walnut display in the Windsor door style with a toffee stain. The display features a mantel-style hood and is full of creative storage options with pantry pull-outs, a larder cabinet and drawer organizers. The backsplash is made with copper pennies. There’s a contemporary conference room in Millennia with the Lanai door style in carbonized bamboo with a natural stain. A cornerstone kitchen

Workshop aims to help inventors The Herald Business Journal

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Canyon Creek Cabinets Co. has remodeled its 6,000-square-foot showroom in Monroe to give a fresh look to its offerings. The displays are meant to give consumers ideas and inspiration.

display with banquette seating has been added in the Garrison door style, in maple with a graphite stain. One room was completely redesigned to include a laundry room in Millennia, Quincy door style, maple with ash and thunder paints from the Canyon Creek’s recently introduced Curated Collection. Another kitchen display is made with shaker maple

with icing paint. The island has inset cabinetry, with panels that match the curves in the upper glass doors. Canyon Creek Cabinet Company opened in 1981 and makes “affordable, custom frameless and framed style cabinetry for every room in the home.” The company sells cabinets mainly to kitchen and bath dealers and contractors throughout the

Puget Sound area. About 400 people work at Canyon Creek designing and constructing cabinetry. The company made a

26,000-square-foot addition to the south end of the manufacturing plant last year. That project was unrelated to the new showroom.

ARLINGTON — An upcoming workshop with The NW Innovation Resource Center and Everett Community College Corporate and Continuing Education Center will cover topics aimed to help early stage entrepreneurs and inventors. The guest speaker at the event will be Lara Merriam-Smith, an inventor who took a product to market and successfully sold it on QVC. Her talk will cover the basics that you need to know about product development, prototyping, intellectual property, finding the first customer, branding and more. The event is planned from noon to 2 p.m. May 11 in the City of Arlington, City Council Chambers located at 110 E. Third St. Arlington. Parking is available. The City of Arlington is providing this program to assist entrepreneurs and businesses.The event is free but registration is required at https:// www.eventbrite.com/d/ wa--arlington/events/ The NW Innovation Resource Center is a non-profit that supports economic opportunities through entrepreneurial innovation in northwest Washington. For more information, visit the nonprofit’s website at www.nwirc.com. To learn more about EvCC’s Corporate and Continuing Education Center, visit www.everettcc.edu/ccec.

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Device puts exercise on the go Bothell woman invents Excy machine that she says has helped change her life By Maya Sullivan For The Herald Business Journal

Most of us want to look and feel good. Yet, finding the time to exercise is a challenge. Excy can fit that need. It is a lightweight portable unit that is used for resistance training or as a recumbent bike that can be used almost anywhere. Michele Mehl came up with the idea when she was 40. She said, “I was out of shape and wanted to lose 25 pounds. I thought about the idea for a few years. I was busy running Buzz Builders, a marketing and public relations firm and lost sight of my health.” The Bothell woman was motivated to come up with a more convenient method of getting and staying in shape that would fit into her busy lifestyle. “I was pretty obsessed with wanting this system in my life and kept thinking about it nonstop,” she said. “I had an ‘ah ha’ moment when I was riding a dirt bike with friends. There was a minor accident. A grandma, who is in great physical shape, fell off her bike and immediately got up and went on biking.” That incident motivated Mehl to talk with her uncle Mike Rector about her idea. He is a retired engineer who has

been involved in designing prototypes of many hightech products and is an avid cyclist who has ridden over 150,000 miles. Rector is co-founder and created the prototypes, which is named Excy by combining the first letters of ‘exercise cycle.’ “When designing Excy, we knew we had to reach a magical balance between portability and maximal utility,” Rector said in an email. “We wanted a wide variety of functional fitness exercises available over a wide range of intensities. But keeping it small and light was always a guiding factor.” An early prototype helped Mehl recover from a broken leg that she got while skating with her son. Although she had a severe fracture with a blood clot, she started using an Excy only a few days after surgery. The four models include the Excy Keeper, Excy Ultimate, Excy Classic Cycling and the Excy Strength System. Each unit offers different levels of intensity ranging from one to 30 pounds of resistance, and focuses on different aspects of improving one’s physical fitness. People with a variety of fitness levels, including those with chronic pain and disabilities, can use these systems. Mehl said, “I met a

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PHOTOS IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Michele Mehl, of Bothell, recently launched sales for her portable exercise device, Excy, after first coming up with the idea three years ago on a trip to a skatepark with her son. “If we could take these moments in life when we’re idle and turn them into movement, it’d be a huge benefit,” Mehl said. Her machine simulates the movement of an exercise bicycle.

woman who has arthritis and limited use of her arms. She started exercising slowly with Excy and eventually achieved fullarm rotation.” Excy is a good tool for “high intensity interval training.” According to Web MD, that type of training involves changing the pace or intensity of the activity. This is done by alternating between short intervals of pushing to one’s limits then going at a slower pace. This sequence is repeated for a total of 20 to 60 minutes. There are many benefits to high intensity interval training, including burning calories and fat more quickly than regular exercise, losing fat but not muscle and building endurance, according to Health Fitness Revolution website. Excy systems match the calorie burn of spin bikes and other equipment usually found in gyms and physical therapy offices. Mehl uses Excy 20 minutes a day as a total body exercise cross training system for cardio and strength training. She says, “It has changed my life. I’ve had some of my best workouts watching TV with the family.” Excy units are portable,

Using a webbed spindle that provides friction, resistance on the Excy can be adjusted via a rubber knob on top of the exercise device, which was designed by Michele Mehl.

weighing only 10 pounds and can be used almost anywhere. Places such as an office breakroom, in the front yard or while on conference calls. The unit folds down, making it ideal for small homes and apartments; and even fits in overhead bins on airplanes. The units are all metal and are built at outof-state manufacturing plants, Mehl said. Mehl and her husband, Steve, invested money to develop, build and test the prototypes. Mehl relayed that, “We had gone through almost a thousand

hours of testing using all fitness levels. This includes scenarios ranging from fitness beginners to athletes, rehab to weight loss and seniors to children with special needs.” They then went to Kickstarter to obtain funds to take Excy to the next level. It only took 20 days to raise the money. Excy was ready to ship almost immediately. Their first customers were Kickstarter contributors. They gave feedback on the pros and cons of using the equipment, which helped in making refinements.

Mehl demonstrates various ways to use Excy in YouTube videos. Units ship with a quick-start guide that includes exercise routines. A free coaching app is available on iTunes. A special launch price is being offered until May 31. “I had the idea for Excy and just couldn’t let go of my obsession,” she said. “I need this system in my life and so do other people. It is my goal to help people be healthy.” For more information, visit the company’s website at https://excy.com/.


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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

PEOPLE WATCHING EVERETT — Snohomish County Executive Dave Somers has hired Lacey Harper to manage the county’s external relations, including with other governments, businesses, nonprofits and educational institutions. Harper was most recently the director of Lacey Harper outreach for Gov. Jay Inslee. She is a resident of Everett and has been active in public affairs locally and across the state. LYNNWOOD — Stantec’s Lynnwood office has added four new support staff members. Nicole Messner is the new Electrical Project designer. Her projects include the Everett Clinic in Shoreline. Maureen Hardman is a CAD technician. Her current projects include work for the Port of Seattle. Project administrator Debra Steventon has more than 35 years’ experience and administrative assistant Gwen Matlock has worked in human resources and administration for many years. Also, Adnan Ahmed joined the firm as a project manager in its Information Communication Technology consulting practice. ARLINGTON — Bill Cochinella and Dallas Speed, two of Arlington’s water treatment plant operators, have accepted a plaque to commemorate 15 years of treatment goals being exceeded at the plant. For 15 years, the Arlington Water

Department has met or exceeded Washington State Department of Health and Federal Clean Drinking Water requirements. Only four other water treatment plants in Washington have matched this success.

work with TB Photovoice, Rugg has built partnerships with tuberculosis survivors and their families, health departments, media outlets, tuberculosis organizations, anti-poverty organizations, schools and churches.

EVERETT — Snohomish resident Chett Hill recently opened NorthWest Consulting, 2722 Colby Ave., Suite 720, Everett. The business offers individual and couples counseling in a private and confidential setting. Hill, a graduate of University of Washington and City University of Seattle, has Chett Hill 20 years of counseling experience. For more information, go to www.northwestconsulting.org.

BOTHELL — The University of Washington Bothell has selected Jennifer McLoud-Mann to receive the 2016 Distinguished Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity award. McLoudMann is an associate professor of mathematics Jennifer McLoud-Mann in the School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Last year, she was part of a team that discovered the 15th way to interlock identically shaped pentagons with no holes or gaps covering a plane.

LYNNWOOD — On April 20, principal Kevin Allen of Meadowdale High School in Lynnwood was presented with a Patriot Award by John Van Dalen, ombudsman for the Washington Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Committee. The award was in recognition of the support Allen has for his employees and their spouses serving in the Guard and Reserve. SNOHOMISH — Teresa Rugg, executive director of Snohomish-based TB Photovoice, has been selected as a Center for Disease Control and Prevention TB Elimination Champion. Through her

EVERETT — Snohomish County Tomorrow, a cooperative forum with representatives from Snohomish County and 19 of its cities as well as the Tulalip Tribes, recently elected new officers for 2016. Lake Stevens Mayor John Spencer and County Councilman Brian Sullivan will serve as committee co-chairs this year. Snohomish Mayor Karen Guzak and County Councilwoman Stephanie Wright will share the vice-chair responsibilities. EDMONDS — Landau Associates has

added a number of new hires including two in Edmonds. Jeovani Huerta-Avila is an assistant scientist who will be assisting with environmental remediation and groundwater monitoring projects. Nick Navarre, EIT, is a staff engineer-in-training assisting the Environmental Remediation group with operation maintenance and monitoring, and water sampling. BOTHELL — Janelle Silva is the recipient of the University of Washington Bothell’s 2016 Distinguished Teaching Award. Silva is an assistant professor of community psychology in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. She came to Janelle Silva UW Bothell in 2012 and has a doctorate from the University of California, Santa Cruz in social psychology with an emphasis in feminist theory. EVERETT — Senior living management executive Scott Eckstein has been appointed to lead the hospitality business management program in senior living at Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett. Eckstein will teach Introduction to Senior Living Management and begin developing it for online delivery. He will also develop a new online certificate targeting senior housing industry professionals and associations.

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

BUSINESS BRIEFS ARLINGTON — Smokey Point Distributing announced that it earned a first place national safety award from the Truckload Carriers Association. Last year, the Arlington company was honored with another safety award by Great West Casualty Company. MARYSVILLE — Hundreds of local volunteers helped clean and revitalize the Marysville Boys & Girls Club as part of Comcast Cares Day. Local Comcast employees, in partnership with the Marysville Boys & Girls Club, spent the day painting, organizing and landscaping at the club. TULALIP — The Tulalip Tribes plans to host the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association’s 18th Annual American Indian Tourism Conference Sept. 12 to 14 at the Tulalip Resort Casino. The event is the only national native conference of its kind designed to share knowledge, experience and best practices from tourism programs around the U.S. EVERETT — The Port Commission has awarded a nearly $1.1 million contract to Everett-based Nickel Brothers to relocate the iconic 1923 Weyerhaeuser Building from its current location in the Port of Everett Marina to the Port’s new Boxcar Park. The Port said the venerable structure could be used as an outdoor performance venue and marine club-

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managed non-profit. Prior to this, the center was under the management of Seattle-based SoundGenerations. It is the second largest senior center in the United States with 2,727 members. There are branches in Bothell, Kenmore and Mill Creek.

mere Real Estate founder John Jacobi and his wife, Rosalind. The gift also includes two new endowed faculty chairs at the Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies. The new minor begins in fall 2017.

BOTHELL — The Property Drone Consortium, a collaboration created to promote research, development and the establishment of regulations, standards and specifications for the use of Unmanned Aircraft System, has announced its roster of charter members, including EagleView Technologies of Bothell.

EDMONDS — Edmonds Center for the Arts has received an award of a $50,000 grant from the Hazel Miller Foundation to support several of its family and community programs. The foundation has supported Edmonds Center for the Arts since 2011. It awards about $500,000 annually to charities and non-profit organizations.

MILL CREEK — The City of Mill Creek is partnering with the University of Washington Bothell to improve business processes at City Hall. A UW Business Consulting Team will work with city staff to build on work recently completed by the city’s Lean Team.

May 17: Swire, Siantang May 24: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Source: Port of Everett house in the 2020 timeframe. EDMONDS — The Best Western Plus Edmonds Harbor Inn in Edmonds received the Champion Best Western Rewards Award at the Best Western Hotels & Resorts’ District II meeting held in Spokane. The award recognizes hotels that demonstrate extraordinary support of Best Western’s guest loyalty program. BOTHELL — The Northshore Senior Center has become an independent, locally

OLYMPIA — Workplace deaths in Washington declined to a near-historic low in 2015, according to a new Department of Labor & Industries report. Last year there were 58 work-related deaths in the state — 18 fewer than in 2014. Falls continue to be a leading cause of work-related deaths, accounting for 25 percent of the fatal incidents last year. SEATTLE — The University of Washington will create an undergraduate minor in real estate studies thanks to a $5.4 million gift from retired Winder-

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LAKE STEVENS — Professional organizer and productivity consultant Monika Kristofferson will present a workshop on how to best organize and control your email box. The event is 6 to 7 p.m. on May 19 at Lake Stevens School District Educational Service Center, Room B, 12309 22nd St. NE, Lake Stevens. Cost is $20. Call 425-335-1668 to pre-register. EDMONDS — Peoples Bank has announced that it’s opening its newest office in Edmonds this spring. Vern Woods will serve as vice president and branch manager for the location at 111 Main St., Suite 102. Woods has more than 20 years of banking experience. Bellingham-based Peoples Bank operates 25 branches and three loan production offices in Washington.

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MAY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA.

Arlington Arlington Reptiles: 203 S Olympic Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1530; 360-435-4687; Reptiles Squamish Tribe Of Indians: 3322 236th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223; 360-572-3012; Nonclassified Establishments Top Secret Body and Paint: 18935 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8763; 360-925-6670; Automobile Body-Repairing and Painting Top Secret Coatings: 18935 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8763; 360-651-2540; Coatings-Protective-Manufacturers Top Secret Upholstery: 18935 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8763; 360454-0682; Upholsterers Vintage Restoration: 431 N Olympic Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1244; 360-386-8091; Nonclassified Establishments

Bothell Divya Performing Arts: 18311 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-5233; 425-892-8216; Theatres-Live Haley’s Cottage: 740 238th St. SE, Bothell, WA 980214311; 425-415-1647; Nonclassified Establishments Optimal Insurance Choice: 15329 Sunset Road, Bothell, WA 98012-4741; 425-2255582; Insurance Risk Strategies: 3904 168th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-7649; ; Nonclassified Establishments

Edmonds Bistro 76 Cafe and Catering: 18401 76th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-5826; 425-582-8020; Restaurants Crowder Construction: 7918 203rd St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-6853; 425-361-2795; Construction Companies First Financial Northwest Bank: 184 Sunset Ave., Edmonds, WA 98020-4134; 425-670-9239; Banks Madigan Security Consulting: 320 Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3567; 425-3612787; Security Systems Consultants Northwest Physical Medicine: 549 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3149; 425-9675480; Physical Therapists Premier Therapy and Associates: 21401 72nd Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-7702; 425-582-0930; Health Services Silver Lake Project: 6320 138th Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-3242; Nonclassified Establishments Trillium Apartments: 4902 148th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-4018; 425-361-1801; Apartments

Everett Axis Apartments: 12118

Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5536; 425-212-9262; Apartments Buzz Inn Steakhouse: 3121 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-4420; 425-512-8097; Restaurants Chirobody: 10315 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4268; 425-338-5537; Chiropractors CMSI: 13131 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208; 512-298-0778; Nonclassified Establishments Courtyard: 3003 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4022; 425-259-2200; Hotels and Motels Cricket Wireless: 11014 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5132; 425-948-7541; Cellular Telephones (Services) CVS/Pharmacy: 11918 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204-5509; 425-353-7687; Pharmacies Detail In The River: 9629 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-7198; 425-5128328; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Flor De Loroco: 1717 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3520; 425-252-2288; Nonclassified Establishments Harvey’s Pub: 3615 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-5027; 425-258-8124; Nonclassified Establishments Homestage NW: 3231 Broadway, Everett, WA 982016001; 425-404-3601; Nonclassified Establishments Independent Beer Bar: 1801 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3610; 425-212-9517; Beer and Ale-Retail Justjet Properties: 5520 128th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-9541; 425-409-3131; Real Estate Maya Services: 209 E Casino Road No. E, Everett, WA 98208-2610; 425-2492192; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Pac Ventures: 2030 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-2318; 425-374-2568; Nonclassified Establishments Safety Beginning: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2857; Safety Consultants Sound Specialized Services: 524 132nd St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-7301; 425-361-1957; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Sound View Glass Inc.: 12310 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-8518; 425-3223663; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc Sprague Pest Solutions: 3302 McDougall Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4435; 425-4043279; Pest Control Ultralux: 2213 Everett Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3784; 425-374-7834; Nonclassified Establishments Wright Stuff: 1705 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3520; 425-258-3161; Nonclassified Establishments

Lake Stevens Hot Diggity Dog Grooming: 11020 60th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8726; 425-335-0912; Pet Washing and Grooming Steel Works: 12760 60th

St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9619; 425-334-4240; Welding and Steel Fabrication

Lynnwood Allure Interior Solutions: 15125 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2319; 425-5829561; Interior Decorators Design and Consultants Cont. Labor Source LLC: PO Box 623, Lynnwood, WA 98046-0623; Labor Organizations Enterprise Rent A Car: 2228 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7008; 425-4122731; Automobile Renting Far West Ti: 6925 216th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 980367358; 425-673-9396; Nonclassified Establishments Guardian Security: 19401 40th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4612; 425-673-8056; Security Control Equip and Systems-Whls PGI Auto Detail: 16626 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3113; 425-7456099; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Portland: 4120 194th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036; 971-352-3817; Nonclassified Establishments Reroof Clay Tile: 16716 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3100; 425-412-2729; Roofing Contractors Seattle Findings: 19109

36th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5767; 425-582-7419; Nonclassified Establishments Ultrafino Hats: 6333 212th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7499; 425-778-6722; Hats-Retail Verco: 21315 67th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036; 425-673-9567; Nonclassified Establishments Zipbop Lynnwood: 18623 Highway 99 No. 140, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4552; 425-387-2056; Bars

Marysville Innovative Investments: 502 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4501; 360-548-3067; Investments Mattress Firm: 16516 Twin Lakes Ave., Marysville, WA 98271-4726; 360-652-8874; Mattresses Rancho Grande: 9214 State Ave., No. A, Marysville, WA 98270-2265; 425-275-2654; Nonclassified Establishments Studio 271: 17500 25th Ave. NE, No. A203, Marysville, WA 98271-4751; 360-631-5312; Nonclassified Establishments

Mountlake Terrace Blue Water Yachts: 7116 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2183; 425582-8106; Yachts

VI Media: 6808 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2187; 425-673-9621; Nonclassified Establishments

Mukilteo Castival Pools and Spas: 12303 Harbour Pointe Blvd., Mukilteo, WA 98275-5202; 425-322-3806; Swimming Pool Contactors Dealers and Designers SW Auto: 3600 South Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275; 425-438-2886; Nonclassified Establishments Think Thai: 11811 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5442; 425-374-3860; Restaurants

Snohomish Hawaii’s Donut: 2801 Bickford Ave., No. 103, PMB 12, Snohomish, WA 98290-1734; Doughnuts Mata Amritanandamayi Center: 22404 134th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-3923; 360-668-7779; Nonclassified Establishments NPR Commercial Construction: 2801 S Machias Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-4740; 425-335-1117; Construction Companies

10101 270th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8090; 360-926-8614; Nonclassified Establishments Hope Lincoln Hill Housing: 27522 72nd Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6051; 360-572-4037; Nonclassified Establishments IT Printed Graphics and Design: 9328 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8072; 360-629-7976; Graphic Designers North County Road Services: 18513 75th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6953; 360-652-8620; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Rubumco Painting Inc.: 26925 103rd Drive NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8006; 360-631-5443; Painters Shima Japanese Restaurant: 10007 270th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8021; 360-629-7799; Restaurants

Sultan Mr Kitsune VIP Game Lounge: 413 Main St., Sultan, WA 98294; 360-793-2347; Cocktail Lounges

Woodway Quinn 178: 23914 W Woodway Lane, Woodway, WA 98020-5229; Nonclassified Establishments

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1583881


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

PUBLIC RECORDS Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between March 1 and March 31.

201603010182: March 1; Whitman, Russell A., 3608 158th Place SE, Bothell

Federal tax liens

201603010184: March 1; Mayberry, Michael G., PO Box 515, Lake Stevens

201603010172: March 1; Aliabadi, Afshin (+), 12601 NE 128th Way, Apt. G17, Kirkland 201603010173: March 1; Barrettes Custom Painting and Finishes (+), PO Box 1704, Edmonds 201603010174: March 1; Le Chanh, T., 16722 57th Place W, Lynnwood 201603010175: March 1; Satex Inc., PO Box 207, Marysville 201603010176: March 1; Harris, Jacob, 3343 Catherine Drive, Lake Stevens 201603010177: March 1; Navarro, Jose L., 9009 W Mall Drive, Apt. 1712, Everett 201603010178: March 1; Morgan, Don, 5705 95th Place SW, Mukilteo 201603010179: March 1; Kroll, Michael W., 11531 23rd Drive SE, Everett 201603010180: March 1; Caleeo, Gustavo, 1013 Pine St., Everett 201603010181: March 1; Dick, Benjamin, 9623 62nd Drive NE, Marysville

201603010183: March 1; Gonzales, Karin R. (+), 10121 Evergreen Way, Suite 25-655 Everett

201603010185: March 1; Marshall, Gregory, 1604 Hewitt Ave., Suite 507, Everett 201603010186: March 1; Mahlman, Michael J. (+), 319 118th Drive NE, Lake Stevens 201603010187: March 1; Heckman, Jenifer (+), PO Box 103, Stanwood 201603010188: March 1; Thain Boatworks Inc., 17833 59th Ave. NE, Suite B, Arlington 201603010389: March 1; Robertson, Dale, PO Box 2095, Everett 201603010390: March 1; RC Concrete Pumping Inc., 19132 Grannis Road, Bothell 201603010391: March 1; Southard, Jennifer J., 8710 Fifth Ave. W, Apt. G128, Everett 201603010392: March 1; Gonzales, Robert, 10121 Evergreen Way, Suite 25-655, Everett 201603010393: March 1; Largent, Mizzy M. (+), 11011

52nd Ave. SE, Everett 201603010394: March 1; Rodgers, Mary, 10311 Parkview Mountain Ave., Las Vegas

Schwindt, Kelly S (+), 24805 147th St. SE, Monroe 201603160122: March 16; Hess, Tera L, PO Box 2051, Granite Falls

201603090113: March 9; Coronado-Perez, Christian (+), 3927 Colby Ave., Everett

201603160123: March 16; Newell, Shelley M., 3230 252nd St. NE, Arlington

201603090114: March 9; VEP East Inc., 2373 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo

201603160124: March 16; Pacific Masonry Inc., PO Box 966, Marysville

201603090115: March 9; Petrakopoulos, Stephanos J., 15615 Utley Road, Snohomish

201603160125: March 16; Riojas, Michael B., 7828 150th Place NW, Stanwood

201603090116: March 9; Integra Services Inc., 26910 92nd Ave. NW, C5-163 Stanwood

201603160126: March 16; Riojas, Lola C., 7828 150th Place NW, Stanwood

201603090117: March 9; Wisdom, Greg L., 1325 74th St. SE, Everett 201603090118: March 9; Pedersen, Eric C., 7744 18th Ave. NW, Seattle 201603090132: March 9; Faries, Debra R. (+), 14625 Main St., Apt. S1, Mill Creek 201603090133: March 9; Camacho, Ramon T. (+), 4814 168th St. SW, Apt. 3, Lynnwood

201603160127: March 16; Maude’s Happy Adult Family Home Inc., 916 93rd St. SE, Everett 201603220275: March 22; Kim, Eugene, 4130 214th St. SW, Apt. B, Mountlake Terrace 201603220276: March 22; Chitewere, Chengetayi, 1414 161st St. SW, Lynnwood 201603220277: March 22; Tillman, Mark, 6706 73rd St. NE, Marysville

201603090134: March 9; Mixing Inc., 12101 Huckleberry Lane, Arlington

201603220278: March 22; Gunderson Catherine (+), PO Box 1251 Sultan

201603090135: March 9; Connors, Martea A. (+), 11003 23rd Drive SE, Everett

201603220279: March 22; Foots, Abby M. (+), 111017 55th Ave. W, Mukilteo

201603090136: March 9; Stokes, Stacy Douglas, PO Box 884, Stanwood

201603220280: March 22; Kvinge, Terje, 3520 156th St. SW, B-6, Lynnwood

201603090137: March 9; Reynoso, Julian H., 17605 Valley Circle Drive, Bothell

201603220281: March 22; Peterson, Todd M., 3103 Rim Drive, Everett

201603150413: March 15; Lake, Kent (+), PO Box 1236, Lake Stevens

201603220282: March 22; Powers, Teri L. (+), 6922 McPherson Road, Arlington

201603150414: March 15; Ewing, Traci M., 13820 Lake Road, Lynnwood

201603220283: March 22; Slaton, John L., 15433 Country Club Drive, Unit B303, Mill Creek

201603150415: March 15; Hayes, James, 20623 60th Ave. NE, Arlington 201603150416: March 15; Doremus, Kay S., 8607 Cascadia Ave., Everett 201603150417: March 15; Martinez, Yuliana, 9110 42nd St. NE, Lake Stevens 201603150418: March 15; Cooper, Darrin L., 21310 139th Place SE, Monroe 201603160121: March 16;

201603220284: March 22; Rogers, Eddie, 5725 200th St. SW, Apt. 7, Lynnwood 201603220285: March 22; G&M Manufacturing Inc., 20902 67th Ave. NE, 392, Arlington 201603220286: March 22; El Cazador-Sequim Inc., 2930 216th St. SW, Brier 201603220287: March 22; Diel&Sons (+), 17511 38th Drive NE, Arlington

201603220288: March 22; Patty Eggnest (+), PO Box 2312, Lynnwood 201603230053: March 23; SOS Bookkeeping Inc., 6101 200th St. SW, Suite 205, Lynnwood 201603230054: March 23; SOS Bookkeeping Inc, 6101 200th St. SW, Suite 205, Lynnwood 201603230055: March 23; First Class Concrete Inc., 20721 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish 201603230056: March 23; Morrison, Ann (+), 5025 Sunset Lane, Everett 201603230057: March 23; Morrison, Scott H., 5025 Sunset Lane, Everett 201603230058: March 23; SCP Enterprises Inc., 1429 Ave. D, No. 515, Snohomish 201603230059: March 23; Cook, Peter G., 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish 201603230060: March 23; Cook, Carolyn Y., 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish 201603230061: March 23; Wired Electric Inc., 13300 Bothell-Everett Highway, PMB 687, Mill Creek 201603230062: March 23; Lopez De-Arriaga, Cassandra (+), 1812 Hewitt Ave., 204, Everett 201603230063: March 23; Brueske, Cathleen M. (+), 23516 81st Ave. SE, Woodinville 201603230064: March 23; Moses, Judy (+), 7027 21st Drive NE, Tulalip 201603230065: March 23; Wallace, Gerald, 16825 48th Ave. W, Suite 135, Lynnwood 201603230066: March 23; Coronado-Perez, Christian (+), 3927 Colby Ave., Everett 201603230067: March 23; Generation Drywall Inc., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201603230068: March 23; Glowaski, Joel K., 4415 Hoyt Ave., Apt. 3, Everett 201603230069: March 23; Laurens Adult Family Home Inc., 2728 144th St. SW, Lynnwood 201603230070: March

YOUR PROFITS ARE OUR PRIORITY We put the interests of your business first, whatever your business banking needs. From lending to merchant services or commercial real estate finance, explore your options with an expert you can trust.

201603290358: March 29; Carlyle, Nancy L., 14826 228th Ave. SE, Monroe 201603290359: March 29; Cook, Renita J. (+), 14425 Fourth Ave. W Lynnwood 201603290360: March 29; Two 2nd Chance Human Resource Center (+), 6405 218th St. SW, Suite 305, Mountlake Terrace 201603290361: March 29; Abele, Annette Von (+), 437 Sprague St., Apt. B, Edmonds 201603290362: March 29; Freeman, Tracy D. (+), 10714 Vernon Road, Lake Stevens 201603290363: March 29; Petty, Linda I. (+), 2613 Larlin Drive, Everett 201603290364: March 29; Sanchez, Sara L., 27503 Fern Bluff Road, Monroe 201603290365: March 29; Medhaug, Jan, 5116 Colby Ave., Everett 201603290366: March 29; Nobach, Ryan P. (+), PO Box 3369, Arlington 201603290367: March 29; Monro, Robin J. (+), 10431 Trombley Road, Snohomish 201603290368: March 29; Monro, Stephen K., 10431 Trombley Road. Snohomish 201603290369: March 29; Bio Management Northwest Inc., 18318 Parkcrest Court SE, Yelm 201603290370: March 29; Nelson, Ajeshni (+), 12432 40th Ave. SE, Everett 201603290405: March 29; Cascade Materials and Aggregate, 12030 92nd St. SE, Snohomish 201603290406: March 29; Whitlock, Peggy (+), 14217 Westwick Road, Snohomish 201603290407: March 29; Hutton, Laura B., 4518 113th Ave. SE, Snohomish

Federal tax lien — paid for 201603090545: March 9; Moser, Bruce M., 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201603090546: March 9; Moser, Louise S., 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish

201603010189: March 1; Peterson, Kimberly (+), 3609 169th St NE, Unit 3194, Arlington 201603010190: March 1; Prendiville, Kirby E., 17114 29th Drive SE, Bothell

O: 425-609-5428 M: 206-931-1785

201603010191: March 1; Aaron Automotive Inc., 7625 44th Ave. NE, Marysville

Federally insured by NCUA All Washington state residents are eligible to join. 1584969

61164_Ad_BusinessCard.indd 1

201603290357: March 29; Stephens, Sandra L., 19326 Bothell-Everett Highway, Apt. SP23, Bothell

Release of federal tax lien

Heather Odegaard Sr. Commercial Relationship Manager 11127 Evergreen Way S | Everett, WA 98204

1572139

23; Duback, Debbie L., 9002 Ninth Place SE, Lake Stevens

4/4/16 2:37 PM

201603010192: March 1; Robinson, Jon F., 19926


MAY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

PUBLIC RECORDS Ballinger Way NE, Apt. 12, Shoreline

Coolbaugh, Janice G., 14225 61st Place W, Edmonds

201603010193: March 1; Doremus Center, Kay S. (+), 2720 W Marine View Drive, Everett

201603090141: March 9; Belden, Russell S., 20706 32nd Place W, Brier

201603010194: March 1; Doremus Center, Kay S. (+), 2720 W Marine View Drive, Everett 201603010195: March 1; Doremus Center, Kay S. (+), 2720 W Marine View Drive, Everett 201603010196: March 1; Montoya, Janet (+), 3929 149th Place SW, Lynnwood 201603010197: March 1; Mukilteo Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201603010198: March 1; Lowell, Russell D., 15519 Third Drive SE, Mill Creek 201603090119: March 9; McCampbell, Donna M., 8312 186th St. SW, Edmonds 201603090120: March 9; McCampbell, Donna M., 8312 186th St. SW, Edmonds 201603090121: March 9; McCampbell, Donna M., 8312 186th St. SW, Edmonds 201603090138: March 9; Stephenson, A. Lower (+), 607 Stitch Road, Lake Stevens 201603090139: March 9; Erisman, Donald B. Jr., 5814 73rd Ave. NE, Marysville 201603090140: March 9;

201603090142: March 9; West Electric, 16410 84th St. NE, DLL, Lake Stevens 201603090143: March 9; Dickey, Debbie L. (+), 618 19th St., Snohomish 201603090144: March 9; Nadat-Florer, Sylvia (+), 18 115th St. SE, No. B, Everett 201603090145: March 9; Creasey, Janien M. (+), PO Box 397, Monroe 201603090146: March 9; Jones, Christy, 15911 Sturtevant Ave., Stanwood 201603090147: March 9; Johnson, Robert H. Jr., 6611 184th Drive SE, Snohomish 201603090148: March 9; Chiwaukum Ridge, PO Box 6091, Edmonds 201603150419: March 15; Mukilteo Sports Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201603150420: March 15; Mobile Panel Alignment (+), 7614 77th Drive SE, Snohomish 201603150421: March 15; Littrell, Russ T., 24106 57th Place W., Mountlake Terrace 201603150422: March 15; Brown, Steven P., PO Box 357, Snohomish

201603150423: March 15; Favela, Armando J., 1926 W Casino Road, Apt. F-105, Everett

22; A Brewed Awakening (+), 6021 204th St. SW, Apt. 202, Lynnwood

201603150424: March 15; Garvie, Rebecca M. (+), 23816 74th Ave. W, Edmonds

201603220293: March 22; Bristol Design and Construction, 2006 196th St. SW, Suite 111, Lynnwood

201603150425: March 15; Parsons, Kristie L., 19713 35th Ave. SE, Bothell

201603220294: March 22; Royal, Marla J., 36207 160th St. SE, Sultan

201603150426: March 15; Gasline Mechanical Inc., PO Box 1108, Woodinville

201603220295: March 22; Hoover, Mark W., 13504 NE, 124th St., Kirkland

201603150427: March 15; Chaney, Arlene S., 927 132nd St. SW, Apt. M-3, Everett

201603220296: March 22; Corner Coffee Bar & Cafe Inc., 18401 76th Ave. W, Suite 103, Edmonds

201603150428: March 15; Renfro-Wilson, Anna M, 8719 Bowdoin Way, Edmonds 201603150429: March 15; Hastings, Tony H., 1812 116th Drive NE, Lake Stevens

201603220297: March 22; Corner Coffee Bar & Cafe Inc., 18401 76th Ave. W, Suite 103, Edmonds

201603150430: March 15; Smith, Leann C. (+), 7202 203rd St. SE, Snohomish

201603220298: March 22; Corner Coffee Bar & Cafe Inc., 18401 76th Ave. W, Suite 103, Edmonds

201603150431: March 15; Brombach, Karen C. (+), PO Box 14832, Mill Creek

201603220299: March 22; Sawyer, Michael D., 4313 80th St. NE, B, Marysville

201603220289: March 22; Chamberlin, Michael, 22121 95th Place W, Edmonds

201603220300: March 22; Petersen, Eddward L., 1508 148th St. NE, Apt. A, Arlington

201603220290: March 22; Mukilteo Sports Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201603220291: March 22; Mukilteo Sports Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201603220292: March

(+), 7928 Mukilteo Speedway, Suite 1, Mukilteo 201603220304: March 22; Sawyer, Michael D., 4313 80th St. NE, B, Marysville 201603230072: March 23; Kenney, Kathryn J., 13504 51st Drive SE, Everett 201603290371: March 29; Coronado-Perez, Christian (+), 11611 Airport Road, Suite 206, Everett 201603290372: March 29; Thomas, Penny D. (+), 5711 100th St. NE, Unit 75, Marysville 201603290373: March 29; Gardener, Coreena, 73042 13th Place SW, Apt. 303, Edmonds 201603290374: March 29; Clarke, Adele M., PO Box 1762, Stanwood

Release of federal tax lien — paid for 201603040575: March 4; Flores, Jose M., 11532 192nd Drive NE, Arlington 201603240220: March 24; Janssen, Bryan F., PO Box 544, Edmonds 201603310586: March 31; Janssen, Bryan F., PO Box 544, Edmonds

Satisfaction of Employment Security lien

201603290375: March 29; Brown, Kathleen E., 4011 166th St. NE, Apt. A, Arlington

201603230218: March 23; Earls Landscape, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

201603290409: March 29; Money Machine Inc., 18001 Bothell Everett Highway, Suite H, Bothell

Withdrawal of federal tax lien

201603220301: March 22; Bala, Wendy, 2306 Rainier Ave., Everett

Partial release of federal tax lien

201603220302: March 22; Ryan, Kristin M., 7911 189th Place SW, Edmonds

201603230071: March 23; Thomas, James A., 5711 100th St. NE, Unit 75, Marysville

201603220303: March 22; Mukilteo Sports Lodge

Brewer, Linda L., 23532 82nd Ave. SE, Woodinville

201603290408: March 29;

201603160128: March 16; Clark, Erik R., 12425 43rd Drive SE, Everett 201603160129: March 16; Henrikson, Robert J., 8031 53rd Ave. W, Mukilteo 201603220305: March 22; Andersen, Amy J., 16119 73rd Place W, Edmonds

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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

A win/loss analysis can improve sales C

onducting a win/loss analysis always leads to actionable insights that can increase your sales conversion ratio. What would the cost/ benefit be to your organization if you increased conversions, and subsequently sales revenues, by 10 percent? My experience is that the benefit far exceeds the cost. Most companies don’t conduct this easy and eye-opening analysis. And the ones that do are usually motivated by an increase in customer attrition or a decrease in sales conversion. But you don’t need to wait for sales or wins to wane before conducting a win/loss analysis. When I talk with owners and managers who haven’t done a win/loss analysis, their typical response to the question, “why not?” is, “I already know what our customers would say.” I then share my favorite quote by William McComb, the former chairman of Johnson & Johnson: “We slip from our obligation to know what consumers are thinking… into believing we can think for them and understand their actions.” There is no good argument for not doing a win/loss analysis on a regular basis. Properly done, a win/loss analysis

Andrew Ballard

The wrong way to do a win/ loss analysis is to ask your sales reps why they won or lost the business. The right way is to ask your customers and lost leads.

(and acting on the results) can improve your Growth product and Strategies service mix, inform innovation and product development, increase your competitive advantage, improve customer acquisition and retention, as well as boost your revenues and profits. A win/loss analysis involves gathering and reviewing both quantitative and qualitative data. The quantitative data is easy — divide your number of won business opportunities by the total number of qualified leads; the remainder is your sales conversion ratio (percentage). Establish a baseline and take action to improve your ratio. How? By gathering and acting on qualitative data.

The wrong way to do a win/loss analysis is to ask your sales reps why they won or lost the business… there is no objectivity in this approach. The right way is to ask your customers and lost leads. Customer interviews should be conducted by a third party. If you need to do interviews internally (to save money), make sure the person doing the phone interviews does not have a sales or customer-facing role in your organization. What type of questions should you ask? Why did we win (or loss) the business; which competitor did we win/ lose the business from/to; what is our key competitive strength; what is a key competitive weakness; what is your primary deciding factor; how can we improve our product or service; and how can we improve our sales process. You will customize questions based on your business

situation and sales process. It is important to set up these win/ loss interviews soon after the business was won or lost. After completing an interview, whether you won or lost the business, always mail a thank you card to the respondent. This should not include any sales language or offers, only a sincere thank you. Another significant benefit it that, with the data, you can better align your sales and marketing departments/functions. Don’t fall into the trap of assuming you know what your customers and prospects would say; the risks of not conducting a win/loss analysis are high, and the rewards for doing so are even higher. In summary, conducting a win/loss analysis has both top and bottom line benefits to your organization. Establish your baseline sales conversion ratio, and then interview customers and lost prospects soon after you won or lost their business. Then analyze and act on the data to optimize your people, performance, process and products. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

‘Word of the year’ can help focus on change

F

or the last three years, I’ve chosen a “word of the year” to embrace instead of making a list of New Year’s resolutions. At the end of the year, I take my time to mull over words that may fit how I want to live my life the following year. I consider both my personal life and my business life to find just the right one. According to Statistic Brain, who used data from the University of Scranton, 45 percent of Americans regularly create New Year’s Resolutions, but only 8 percent keep them. Those aren’t the best odds when you’re working toward creating positive changes in your life. So, I look at my “word of the year” as a simpler way to embrace change that feels manageable and easy to stick with throughout the year. As you’ve probably guessed, my word this year is focus. Why focus? For starters, there’s a myriad of ways to have our focus challenged by distractions, interruptions, creative ideas, email, social media, projects and so much more. According to Maura Nevel Thomas in Personal Productivity Secrets, the term “time management” is ‘out’ with a more meaningful shift to the term “attention management.” After recently reading that in her book, I realized that focus really is a great word for me this year. It’s fantastic to brainstorm and then choose your word, but you have to be

able to keep it in the forefront to remember what your word is and embrace it when life gets busy, as it will. Here are some of the ways I’ve Monika kept focus in front Kristofferson of myself: I printed the word with my label Office maker and placed Efficiency the label on the printer that sits on my desk. I used the word focus as the background on my laptop. I downloaded the word focus as a photo on my phone and used it for the screen background. I change my laptop and phone photos regularly so I don’t start to tune them out. I’d have to say, I feel that my third year in, I’m doing a much better job of keeping my word in my conscious, remembering what it is and using it. Here are some of the ways I’ve used it so far: When I feel myself starting to bounce around from task to task when I’m working, I tell myself, “focus.” And it really helps! Sometimes we simply need to remind our brains to rein it in. I work from home, which can be a blessing and a challenge.

I’m sure many of you know, when you are home “working,” you are fair game for family to come in and chitchat for a few minutes. With teenagers at home, I know my time with them is limited before they are off to college and doing their own thing. So, I’m really working to focus when they come in to chat by turning my chair toward them and away from my laptop so I can actually listen to what they are saying. I remind myself to focus when I’m trying to do just one more thing before I get out the door. No matter what your word is if you have one, you probably have times when your own focus is challenged. Here are a few tips and tricks you can try out to stay focused: You can say, “Right now I am…” and fill in the blank for what you’re doing to get your mind to stay on the task at hand. “Right now I am returning phone calls.” “Right now I am working on payroll.” “Right now I am reading a chapter in a book.” When you’re working on critical tasks, aim to work for 96 minutes of uninterrupted time. Why 96 minutes? That’s 20 percent of an eight-hour work day and you can dramatically increase your productivity if you work with complete focus for 20 percent of

your day. It doesn’t mean you’re off the hook for the rest of the day though, you still have work to do. But the reality is, you aren’t going to be interruption-free or focused for eight hours straight. Critical tasks are tasks that could have serious ramifications if they aren’t completed such as negative legal or financial consequences or missed deadlines. Turn off your phone tones-texts, emails and social media alerts. Place your phone face-down on the desk so you don’t see it light up when something comes your way. Shut your door if you have one. Don’t get sucked into the social media vortex if one of your tasks is to connect or post on social media for your business. Get sucked in later when you’re on your own time and it’s time to relax. Staying focused can be a challenge for most of us on a regular basis with our task loads, the Internet, smart phones and creative minds. You’ll probably find you need to remind yourself to focus on a regular basis and that’s OK; just keep at it and it will get easier and easier to get yourself back on track. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.


MAY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

BUSINESS BUILDERS

China influence on local real estate may be permanent

C

hinese companies and individuals have been aggressive buyers of U.S. real estate in recent years, mostly out of concerns that their own real estate market may collapse on artificially stimulated growth and a volatile Chinese stock market. Just in the past few years alone, Chinese companies or individuals have purchased the 60-story One Chase Manhattan Building for $725 million, the $1.4 billion General Motors office tower, the Detroit Free Press Building for $9.4 million, and the Waldorf Astoria for $2 billion. Changes in the Real Estate Property Tax Act in 2015 have made investing even easier and other vehicles, such as the EB5 program, have backed local qualified projects like the new Downtown Everett Potala Market Apartments. China’s premier, Xi Jinping, has been hard at work trying keep this exodus of capital from leaving his country. But unless he enforces his mandate to reinvest in China or changes how the Chinese government manipulates markets, it’ll be impossible to reverse the flow. According to Kristi Heim, president of the Washington State China Relations Council, the Seattle area is attractive to Chinese buyers “not only (for) the financial value but also the culture and environment.” Washington state now ranks second only to California for Chinese home buyers in the U.S. Worldwide, interest rates are low, job growth is finally steadily improving in the U.S. and there’s little reason for the Fed to increase interest rates just yet. All of this still makes the U.S. real estate market a safe haven and an attractive place to own real estate of any kind. The Seattle area’s popularity seems to be particularly appealing to the Chinese, though, with more local purchases in the past year than any year prior.

What this all means for the Puget Sound real estate market is a bit hard to gauge. Some real estate experts think this is the new normal for Seattle and the Puget Sound region. If Chinese capital goes back to China or leaves for other safe havens, it could dampen demand and bring prices down here,

Washington state now ranks second only to California for Chinese home buyers in the U.S. so it is a topic of conversation to be sure. But the more likely scenario is that Chinese capital is here to stay as the conditions that

create volatility in China are tied to government manipulation of markets, breeding distrust and encouraging investors to

keep looking elsewhere. That is unlikely to change anytime soon, so Seattle remains a top option for foreseeable future. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

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26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

09/11

1,161

837

9

8,938

42,100

15,800

22,100

$4,117,816

233.81

10/11

1,226

828

8.8

9,342

42,300

15,000

21,900

$4,165,352

11/11

1,041

854

8.7

9,989

43,100

15,000

21,700

$4,317,909

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1.067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$9,496,443

235.92

234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942


MAY 2016

Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

09/11

$60.51

455,591,472

192

3,896

$3.86

10/11

$65.79

493,315,047

214

3,883

$3.80

11/11

$68.69

518,192,703

188

3,334

$3.67

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

N/A

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

N/A

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

N/A

6,995

1/16

$120.13

N/A

N/A

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

Prime Pacific

is the Place for your Small Business needs.

SBA Loans for Businesses

We invest in your business to help you succeed! At Prime Pacific Bank, we recognize that small business owners sometimes may not be able to get traditional loans due to lack of collateral or equity. Fortunately, our bank is pleased to tell you that you can still get the loan services you need for your business to grow and expand! We offer Small Business Administration government guaranteed loans for businesses. Among other benefits, SBA loans can give you: ■ Longer Term Financing ■ Eligibility to purchase real estate, inventory and other needs ■ Fixed Interest Rates

1572157

ECONOMIC DATA

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

■ And much more!

Building Our Community, One Business at a Time Main Branch

Kenmore Branch Mill Creek Branch

$2.35

2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036

6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028

2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012

6,910

$2.33

425-774-5643

425-415-6564

425-357-1516

643

7,298

$2.02

929

9,209

$2.12

Mention this ad and receive a free gift when you open a new account.


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MAY 2016

Bernie Garcia, Moctezuma’s World traveler Photographer Fiery foodie

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Bernie Garcia—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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© 2016 Heritage Bank Member FDIC

Herald Business Journal - 05.01.2016  

i20160509074147667.pdf

Herald Business Journal - 05.01.2016  

i20160509074147667.pdf