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Looking up Lynnwood’s $1 billion makeover • 6-7

Big sale: County’s most expensive home, 11

Killer art: True Fire pioneer branches out, 14-15 MARCH 2016 | VOL. 18, NO. 12

Supplement to The Daily Herald

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2 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

April L. Hogan SVP/Retail Banking Manager

Robert E. Fadden SVP/Commercial Loan Officer

FAMILIAR FACES AT NEW PLACES We are happy to announce that April Hogan and Robert Fadden have joined our team. April and Robert have more than twenty years’ experience assisting business owners, professional practices and individuals in the South Snohomish and North King County market areas. It’s their level of commitment to the community that makes them a natural fit. So if you want to do business with a truly local bank, come see us.

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MARCH 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Work has started on CityCenter Apartments in Lynnwood, one of nearly two dozen major projects planned in the city .

COVER STORY

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Lynnwood expects $1 billion worth of construction in the next few years, 6-7

James McCusker: Overcoming obstacles we create for ourselves . 16

BUSINESS NEWS

Kevin Hogan: New bank cards take time getting used to . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Appliance recycler JACO suffered from falling metal prices . . . . . . . . . 4

Andrew Ballard: Rely on research, not instinct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Port of Everett has ambitious plans for waterfront . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Tom Hoban: Stopping growth takes away someone’s hopes, dream . . . 19

Tulalip Tribes holds onto Plant Farm property for future . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Monika Kristofferson: How to replenish your willpower . . . . . . . . 20

County’s most expensive home comes with picture-book view . . . 10 Boeing is reducing its workforce to cut costs of building planes . . . . 12 Snohomish’s Killer Paint owner pioneers his craft . . . . . . . . . .14-15

BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . 21 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . 22 ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 24-25 BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 26-27

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Maureen Bozlinski 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 mbozlinski@heraldnet.com

Contributing Writers: Deanna Duff, Emily Hamann, John Wolcott Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, James McCusker, Andrew Ballard, Kevin Hogan, Tom Hoban Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO A crane helps build CityCenter Apartments across from the Lynnwood Convention Center. Kevin Clark / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3


4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

Jaco plagued by drop in metal prices Longtime county business shut down abruptly By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Appliance recycler Jaco Environmental suffered from a sharp downturn in scrap metal prices last year but probably was doomed even had metal prices not fallen so far, said a court-appointed receiver tasked with liquidating the company. Jaco Environmental, with headquarters at 18323 Bothell Everett Highway south of Mill Creek, closed Nov. 23 after more than 26 years in business. The company employed 350 full-time workers and 1,500 subcontractors in 28 states, said Mark J. Welch, a principal with Morris Anderson, the company appointed as receiver by King County Superior Court. Of those, 154 people worked locally. Jaco Environmental was too aggressive by bidding too low on contracts with public utilities and private businesses to recycle appliances, Welch said. “Once they had a contract, they were losing money every time they picked something up,” Welch said. “It was costing them more than they would make in revenue.” Jaco Environmental ran into financial difficulties last year and stopped sending rebate checks to thou-

FILE PHOTO

Jaco Environmental workers remove a refrigerator from an Everett home in this 2005 photo. Jaco, which was based in Snohomish County, but had centers across the country, closed In November after metal prices plummeted.

sands of consumers the last four or five months it was in business, Welch said. As Jaco’s assets have been liquidated, all those consumers have been repaid to the tune of $4.5 million, Welch said. “The priority to me is all the creditors, but most importantly to make sure all of these consumers get taken care of,” Welch said. “They bought a refrigerator knowing that they would get a rebate.” Jaco Environmental president Terry Jacobsen and controller Mike Jacobsen did not reply to messages sent to their LinkedIn accounts. The company got its start in Snohomish County but spread around the U.S. and had contracts

with dozens of utilities and private companies, such as Best Buy, to pick up refrigerators and other appliances and then recycle pieces of the equipment. On its website, Jaco Environmental said that it would recycle 95 percent of the components and materials of discarded appliances. The remaining 5 percent was “productively used as ‘fluff’ to facilitate the decomposition of biodegradable landfill material.” The company was one of the major recyclers used by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Responsible Appliance Disposal Programs. About half of the program’s partners, including utilities, retailers, manufacturers

and states, relied on Jaco, according to the EPA. “Our understanding is that the market is in the process of accommodating the gap left by the Jaco Environmental receivership,” an EPA spokesman said in an email. Welch said the company would get paid from the utilities and other companies wanting to dispose of old appliances and also would make money off selling scrap metal. During the past year, scrap metal prices fell dramatically. The value of a ton of scrap metal dropped from $340 in January 2015 to $170 in December, said Joe Pickard, chief economist for the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries in Washington, D.C.

“When you see a slowdown in China or Europe or other parts of the world like we’ve been seeing, that has a big impact on our industry,” Pickard said. But demand is not the only problem. He said metal producers are producing an excess. That’s hurt recyclers. Jaco executives blamed the falling scrap metal prices for their woes last year in an email to Best Buy. The email dated July 31, 2015, is part of a lawsuit against Jaco by Best Buy, which is seeking to recoup debt owed to the company. “As stated earlier, the various obligations we have here at Jaco are being evaluated and prioritized as we continue to manage

through a tremendous and continuing reduction in scrap,” the email said. “It is clear of course that the amounts owned and the amounts due today (July 15, 2015) will not be timely paid.” Jaco is also being sued by advertising firm Runyon Saltzman Einhorn, in Sacramento, California, and by KeyBank, its biggest creditor, which is seeking $15 million, according to one lawsuit. Welch said the company didn’t file for bankruptcy because company executives didn’t have a plan to emerge from its debt. So company executives walked away. Since then, Welch and his company have been liquidating Jaco’s assets. He said they’ve moved all of the equipment out of Jaco’s recycling centers. They’ve sold parts of Jaco to a Georgia company and are seeking to sell equipment to Jaco competitors. He said the dive in scrap metal prices hurt the company. “You’ll never survive if you’re living on commodities,” Welch said. “That’s shown time and time again.” But he said what truly hurt the company was bidding too cheaply for the work it was doing. While that worked for years, it eventually caught up with Jaco. “There are a lot of companies that have been around for a long time that don’t make it,” Welch said. “The price of doing business goes up. The cost of equipment and the cost of labor keeps going up.”

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MARCH 2016

Port of EVERETT

March 1/8 Port Commission Mtgs March 11 Community Bus Tours

Creating Economic Opportunities

(RSVP Required; sign up @ portofeverett.com/bustours)

March 24 Waterfront Place Open House

Port of EVERETT

EXECUTIVE

Sign up to take a Port Bus Tour to get an inside look at Port operations. We have two tour times available on March 11. Details and registration @ portofeverett.com/ bustours.

You’re Invited! Waterfront Place Open House Come explore the latest on the Port’s waterfront development JOIN US FOR A WATERFRONT PLACE OPEN HOUSE! COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE

Info @ portofeverett.com/marina/ services, click on “Auction” tab)

March 2016

REPORT

CALENDAR

March 1-9 Online Vessel Auction

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

T H U R S D AY, M A R C H 2 4 | 4 - 7 P. M . PORT OF EVERETT BLUE HERON ROOM 1 2 0 5 C R A F T S M A N W A Y ( 2 ND F L O O R ) , E V E R E T T , W A 9 8 2 0 1

Come to the Port of Everett’s Waterfront Place Open House to explore the latest happenings with waterfront development, including information on housing, retail, restaurants, public access, marina programs, events and more!

SEAPORT

Port staff is working on a phasing plan to realize the Port Commission’s Capital Initiative No. 1, which provides direction to Prepare for Larger Ships at the Seaport.

MARINA

In April, the Port will begin construction on three interim public access spaces around its marina facilities, including a new public plaza in the South Marina and installation of picnic shelters at Boxcar Park and Jetty Landing Park.

REAL ESTATE

The Port has installed 10 interpretive boards around its trail system to illustrate features planned for development in each Waterfront Place District.

Port of Everett Commission Authorizes Notification to Kimberly-Clark of Its Intent to Acquire Property On February 9, 2016, the Port of Everett Commission directed staff to proceed with the acquisition of the Kimberly-Clark property within the vicinity of 26th Street and West Marine View Drive to support maritime port purposes. The authorization provides staff the flexibility of reaching a purchase and sale agreement through negotiated means, but also reserves the Port’s legal authority to acquire the property for public purposes with payment of just compensation. The Port of Everett is committed to cooperatively working with Kimberly-Clark to agree on a purchase and sale agreement that is mutually beneficial to both parties. 1524510

Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

Information you would like to see in next month’s update? Please e-mail lisam@portofeverett.com

Stay Connected! Visit www.portofeverett.com ‘Like’ us on Facebook; ‘Follow’ us on Twitter and Instagram


6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

COVER STORY

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

A worker carries a ladder during construction of the seven-story CityCenter Apartments in Lynnwood, Wa. Lynnwood is experiencing a jolt of construction with two dozen major projects and more than $1 billion in development started or soon to be under way.

Has Lynnwood’s time arrived? Apartment wave

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Seven major apartment projects are on the horizon in Lynnwood that would add more than 1,600 units in the city.

S

tand on the corner of 196th and 36th avenues, outside the Lynnwood Convention Center, and you can see the growth coming. A crane towers to the south, putting up a seven-story apartment building. A couple of blocks to the west, a second crane is building an eight-story apartment building. “I think the buzz is going out there now that the projects are happening,” said David Kleitsch, the city’s economic development director. “I think you’re going to have a lot more buzz when they start going vertical.” These are big projects for the city that will forever change Lynnwood’s skyline, but it’s just a harbinger of things to come. The city is expecting a jolt of construction with nearly two dozen major projects in the pipeline. So far, only six of those developments are under way. The projects are a mix of public and private investments that will notably add more than 1,600 apartments to the city. In all, the city expects more than $1 billion worth of construction in the next four years.

Here is the breakdown of the apartments by units: ■ CityCenter Apartments, 347 ■ City Center Senior Living Apartments, 308 ■ Lynnwood Place (Phase 2), 330 ■ Reserve at Scriber Lake, 295 ■ Evergreen Village Apartments, 231 ■ Grantwood Apartments, 116 ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

A worker talks with a crane operator on a radio during construction of the sevenstory apartment building called CityCenter Apartments in Lynnwood.

Engineer Chevy Chase, whose firm CG Engineering is working on a couple of the early projects, said he’s not surprised by the amount of development coming to Lynnwood. “It seems like it’s time for it to me,” Chase said. “We had this long recession and there was pent-up demand. It seems

like it’s long overdue.” Now, the city is trying to get ready for all the new people — and the traffic and demands for public service that will entail. “There are lots of moving parts right now, but we’re trying to get it all on the same train tracks,” Lynnwood

■ Alderwood Mixed-Use Apartments, n/a Source: City of Lynnwood

Mayor Nicola Smith said. “So we’re ready for our growth and will be excited about it.” Two of the most visible projects already begun are the seven- and eight-story apartment complexes near the convention center.


MARCH 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

COVER STORY Current projects

168th Ave. SW

1 City Center Senior Housing Apartments 2 CityCenter Apartments 3 CVS Pharmacy 4 Edmonds School District transportation facility 5 Lynndale Elementary School 6 Reserve at Scriber Lake

Pending projects

5 524

12

76th Ave. W

The CityCenter Apartments is to the south of the convention center. It will include 347 units and is an affordable housing complex. To the west is the 308-unit City Center Senior Living Apartments. Both projects are in what the city envisions as Lynnwood’s City Center, a planned downtown for a city that never developed one. A third apartment project is just getting started, called the Reserve at Scriber Lake Apartments, adding 295 units in a fivestory building by the lake near Highway 99. Also under way is work on the Edmonds School District’s maintenance and transportation facility, visible off I-5 in south Lynnwood, and Lynndale Elementary School, in west Lynnwood. In the coming-soon category: Developers have submitted plans for a 150-room, six-floor Hilton Garden Inn Hotel just to the south of CityCenter Apartments, and the 231-unit Evergreen Village Apartments, along Highway 99. The city expects three more major apartment complexes to move forward, including the second phase of Lynnwood Place, the mixed-use development at the Costco near Alderwood mall. The Edmonds School District is to build another elementary and add a second story to a third elementary. Edmonds Community College has its own plans for a $36 million science, engineering and technology building on campus. The project is at the top of the wish list for the state’s community colleges and could be funded as early as this year. Together, the projects represent a massive investment. “With the rate of development seemingly accelerating, there are lots of reasons to think that the next 10 to 15 years is going to be Lynnwood’s decade,” said

Lynnwood’s Major Projects 44th Ave. W

— Paul Krauss

Lynnwood’s big projects

64th Ave. W

“There are lots of reasons to think that the next 10 to 15 years is going to be Lynnwood’s decade.”

5

19

16 17 18

8

14 23 15

405

Lynnwood 3 6 9

10 11

525

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5 13 1 21 2 22 7

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2,000 feet THE HERALD

7 Hilton Garden Inn Hotel 8 Evergreen Village Apartments

16 Mercedes Sprinter Dealership

9 Evergreen Recovery Center

17 Keller Supply Building

10 CarMax Auto Dealership

18 Lynnwood Elementary School

11 Acura Dealership Expansion

19 Spruce Elementary School

12 EdCC Science, Technology & Engineering building

20 Sound Transit

13 Grantwood Apartments

22 Poplar Way Extension Bridge

14 Lynnwood Place — Phase 2

21 196th Street SW Improvements

15 Alderwood Mixed-Use Apartments

23 Sanitary Sewer Lift Stations and Force Main

Paul Krauss, the city’s community development director. Lynnwood typically approves about $50 million worth of development in a typical year. Last year, the city approved $201.5 million worth of construction projects. The city expects another $200 million in construction this year and another $200 million of construction projects in 2017. Then, in 2018, Sound Transit is expected to start on the $400 million Lynnwood segment of light rail. In all, that’s more than $1 billion in construction And the city isn’t really seeing the development yet that will happen when light rail reaches the City Center by 2023. Could another recession put a damper on growth? Of course, Krauss said. “Economic cycles come and go. God forbid they will ever be as severe as the last one,” Krauss said. “You have boom times and you have times when things go

slow.” But that construction is coming. A recession may delay some development, but eventually it will be built, Krauss said. With so much construction planned, people have expressed concerns to Mayor Smith. She said the city has worked to push development away from neighborhoods and into the City Center or around Alderwood mall, which is considered a regional growth center, or along Highway 99. As Kleitsch puts it, the city is trying to protect its neighborhoods. Still, there will be challenges, particularly with traffic in a city that already attracts large numbers of out-of-town shoppers to Alderwood mall or to other retailers and restaurants. Two major road projects are planned to help with the traffic headaches. The city of Lynnwood already has $20 million to widen 196th Avenue from the Conven-

tion Center to the west, to Fred Meyer, a little less than a mile. The work would add a lane in each direction, plus wider medians and wider sidewalks. There also will be bus lanes. The city is also hoping to build a $30 million bridge west of Lowes, across I-5. That project, called the Poplar Way Bridge, would create a new route for traffic getting off the freeway to get to Alderwood mall. Smith said that city staff is trying to figure out how to provide police and fire services and parks to so many new people. She said she’s not concerned that so many of the new housing projects are apartments. “We found a lot of young people moving into Lynnwood — it’s their lifestyle not to be burdened with a mortgage payment,” Smith said. “They would much rather be flexible and be mobile.” She said those apartments will also provide needed housing for the city, which is expecting to add 20,000 residents within 20 years. The affordable-workforce CityCenter project will be a place to live for many of the city’s restaurant and retail workers. The City Center Senior Housing Apartments will provide housing for older people who want to live in the community. Other projects are planned to provide a diverse stock of housing for the city, including Lynnwood’s first development with homes reaching up to a million dollars, near Hall’s Lake. Nearly half of the new apartments coming to Lynnwood will be built in the City Center area around I-5 and 196th Avenue. That, along with the new hotel and coming light rail and a plan to add City Hall in the area, will energize the City Center, bringing an urban feel to that part of the community. When those people arrive, restaurants and shops are expected to follow, Kleitsch said. Chase, the engineer whose company is working on the CityCenter Apartments, said he expects the projects will transform that area. “I think there’s a domino effect,” Chase said. “As they’ll start all that work that whole area is going to change.”

City plans, braces for even more traffic The Herald Business Journal

Traffic is already a challenge for Lynnwood, with Alderwood mall and a wealth of restaurants and shops attracting people every day. “There’s 37,000-plus people who live here at night,” Lynnwood Mayor Nicola Smith said. “But the traffic doubles during the day with people not only coming to work but people coming in to shop and eat. On the weekends, it can triple.” And now the city is looking to add more than 1,600 apartments. Moreover, Sound Transit is extending

light rail to Lynnwood by 2023. That will bring thousands of more people driving to town to start their rail commute. City staff are working on how to fix traffic and also provide other public services, including police and fire service and parks for all the new residents. As part of the plan, the city wants to spend $50 million on two major projects in the City Center, what Lynnwood hopes will become the city’s downtown near I-5 and 196th Avenue. The first project would widen a 0.7mile stretch of 196th Avenue from the Convention Center to Fred Meyer.

The $20 million project would add a lane in each direction, widen medians and create better sidewalks. There also will be bus lanes. The project is fully funded and the city expects work to begin in the next year or two. A second major project in the City Center includes what is called the Poplar Way Bridge project, which would build a bridge from Poplar Way west of Lowe’s across I-5 to 33rd Avenue W. This would give commuters a new way to get to Alderwood mall and would also disperse traffic from the City Center. Smith said new roads won’t be enough.

The city is also working with transit agencies to handle the new growth and also looking at bike lanes and sidewalks for people to get around. She also noted that the City Center will gain a more urban feel. She noted that an eight- and seven-story apartment buildings going up near the Lynnwood Convention Center intentionally limited parking spaces. “We’re saying you live in City Center where you have access to transportation in and out of the city, to your work, to your shopping and eating,” Smith said. “You don’t need a car.


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

Port sets new course on waterfront By Deanna Duff For The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — In 2014, Mark Beattie relocated from Spokane for a job at Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett. Living near campus and in the community was an important factor, so he and his wife joined the waiting list for living space at the in-progress Waterfront Place Central development. “We were interested because of the convenience factor of being able to walk to retail spots and events,” says Beattie, program coordinator and clinical assistant professor for WSU’s School of Hospitality Business Management. “In choosing where to buy, that walkability factor really enhances overall property values.” In January 2015, the Everett City Council approved the Port of Everett’s development project along 65 acres of central waterfront property in north Everett inside the Port’s Marina district. The Port is acting as master developer in concert with private partners. The extent of development is a maximum of 1.5 million square feet of mixed-use development including a planned 660 housing units. According to Terrie Battuello, the Port’s chief of business development, an initial focus will be on luxury apart-

CONTRIBUTED GRAPHIC

The Port of Everett is pursuing a new vision for the central waterfront area in north Everett. This year, the port expects to build roads, sidewalks and infrastructure to allow for development.

Waterfront place An open house on Waterfront Place is scheduled from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. March 24 at the Blue Heron Room, 1205 Craftsman Way in Everett. ments, which longterm could be converted to condos. Additionally, the plan includes two hotels with a total room count of 200 and 400,000-squarefeet of office space and 40,000-square-feet retail space. There has long been intent to develop the property. A previous plan, Port Gardener Wharf project, fell through during the Great Recession. Prior master developer, Everett Maritime, filed for bankruptcy in 2009. Battuello

estimates the Port spent about two years navigating the legal process to regain control of the property. “The Port itself has a really strong, vested interest in the outcome, which I find very appealing and I think most real estate developers will as well,” says Robert Holmes, one of the project’s consulting developers and founder The Holmes Group (THG), a real estate development firm. According to Battu-

ello, the Port is investing approximately $40 million in public infrastructure such as roads, sidewalks and parks. Much of that work is being done this year. A project highlight is around 17 acres of open space and 15 designated, public areas. Private development costs are projected to be around $330 million. The development will be divided into sections and stages including Fisherman’s Harbor, Millwright District, Wharf’s Edge, Craftsman District and the Esplanade wrapping around the water’s edge. Unique features are planned for each area. Fisherman’s Harbor will include the Pacific Rim Plaza showcasing the flags of international trading

partners ranging from Canada to Japan. A particular highlight will be the relocation of the historic Weyerhaeuser house — a 1920s, red-roofed historic building — to Boxcar Park, a 2-acre park along the Snohomish River. “This is a unique piece of real estate with so much history. The vision is to tap into the waterfront’s more human elements and the industrial and historical identities through materiality, building form and even roof lines,” says Rich Whealan, The Miller Hull Partnership and principal architect in charge of the project. Whealan cites intent and planning to help ensure the area develops an organic identity rather than feeling like a pre-fab-

ricated community. This includes the building of a new bridge linking Everett’s upper neighborhoods to the waterfront and the focus on history. Additionally, Whealan cites “maker spaces” as encouraging active, local entrepreneurship. The smaller-sized, leasable spaces in Fisherman’s Harbor are geared towards artisans and craftspeople. Timing precluded Beattie from waiting for a Waterfront residence, but he remains excited about the larger job opportunities awaiting his hospitality business students via new hotels and restaurants. “Professionally speaking, this project affords a lot of industry interactions and collaborations given the hotels and restaurants in one location,” Beattie says. Battuello says that 2016 will include developer recruitment and getting the infrastructure work underway. She estimates that vertical construction on housing will start in spring 2017 with hotel development commencing possibly later that year. “My view is that once people become aware of this — lenders, investors, developers — it will generate even more overall interest,” Holmes says. “The Port’s task right now is to really tell the story of this project to as many people as possible to raise awareness of the amazing opportunities that exist in the greater Everett area.”

Tulalips see potential in former Plant Farm By John Wolcott For The Herald Business Journal

For more than 20 years, the Plant Farm property in north Marysville, adjacent to I-5, was a well known destination for gardeners. Then, the business closed in late 2014. The Tulalip Tribes have purchased the 45-acre site, which still has the Plant Farm signs and greenhouses on the property. “We have no immediate plans for the site, it was an investment we made because of the prime

location of the property, adjacent to Interstate 5 and just south of the Lakewood Crossing Shopping Center,” said Mel Sheldon Jr., chairman of the Tulalip Tribes board of directors. Records show that the tribes purchased the land for $12.5 million on March 17, 2014, according to Marysville planning manager Chris Holland. In the same area, the Stillaguamish Tribe purchased 5.4 acres adjacent to the former Plant Farm. The Stillaguamish Tribe operates Angel of the Winds casino and hotel, a

JOHN WOLCOTT / FOR HBJ

The Tulalip Tribes purchased the former Plant Farm because of its prime location along I-5 and proximity to major shopping centers.

popular attraction north of Arlington. The land was purchased by the tribe on

June 14, 2011 for $2.3 million, according to Marysville planning department

records. Eric White, vice chairman and controller for the Stillaguamish Tribe’s accounting department, said the land was bought before Marysville’s annexation and is bordered on three sides by the Tulalip Tribes’ property. “We have no concrete plans at the moment,” he said. “The land includes a group of trees at the south end of the former Plant Farm property.” There’s no doubt the area is close to prime retail development and housing. There are two major

shopping centers nearby — the Lakewood Crossing Shopping Center with Best Buy, and Costco and the just coming online The Marketplace, with Dick’s Sporting Goods and other stores. In that area, two new major housing developments are opening with several hundred new apartments. The shopping centers and apartment properties — as well as the former Plant Farm property — are part of a large area annexed recently by the city of Marysville.


MARCH 2016

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10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

A vacation when you walk in the door Edmonds home sold last year for $2.79 million, most expensive in county By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EDMONDS — It all comes back to the view. The most expensive home sold in Snohomish County in 2015 features a picture-book panorama of Port Gardner. “I likened it to — I don’t know if you’ve been to Big Sur south of Caramel, but I likened it to that view,” said Wendy Lister, the listing agent for the property. The house sold for $2.788 million last spring, the top-priced home in the county to sell last year, according to the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. Lister declined to identify the buyers of the property. The nearly 8,400-square-foot house sits behind a gated 3 acres in Edmonds, said Lister, who has been with Coldwell Banker Bain for 30 years and owned her own real estate office before that. “This home was oneof-kind, without question,” Lister said. “It was on a beautiful piece of property.” The home was built in 1973 but has been remodeled extensively. Coming into the property, visitors are greeted by a porte-cochère lit with bright globe lighting that could hold several vehicles. White terrazzo tile covers most of the main floor. The color scheme is bright white with black trim with an accent of rough log pillars and river rock. “I’ve probably been in thousands and thousand and thousands of homes,” she said. “That design I can tell you I never entered a home that way it was very interesting very dramatic.” Lister said the home features colossal living and dining rooms, with a piano

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

A view of the sunset from piano the room of this Edmonds home. The 8,400-square-foot home was purchased for $2.788 million, making it the most expensive home sold in Snohomish County last year. Below to the left, the house sits on 3 acres behind a gate in north Edmonds. Below to the right, the house comes with a swimming pool, tennis courts and a full-sized cabana.

room around the corner. The house also featured one of the longest hallways that Lister had seen in years. The home had seven bedrooms, including two that were added in one of the remodels. The view is what makes the house special. And that’s why the architects built a wall of glass on the western side of the house to look out onto the saltwater. It’s the

“I don’t know if you’ve been to Big Sur south of Caramel, but I likened it to that view.” — Wendy Lister type of view where you could spend hours waiting for the sunset. The backyard features lush landscaping highlighted by pine trees. A tennis court looks over the water on one end.

A swimming pool sits invitingly next to a resortsized cabana with a full kitchen. “It was a full-vacation every time you walked through the door,” Lister said.

Lister said she was born into the real estate business. Her father was a nationally known broker who had her take notes when he visited properties. She married a real estate

agent and two of her three children followed her into the career. She sold the Edmonds home last spring. “It’s always a beautiful time to sell with all the blooms out,” Lister said.


MARCH 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

Jokes keep coming for cartoonist By Emily Hamann The Bellingham Business Journal

BELLINGHAM — Despite the success he’s found in it, drawing cartoons and illustrating was not George Jartos’ first choice as a career. “I was doing sculpture,” he said. “But I knew I could never make a living at it.” Before he went into semi-retirement, Jartos was a prolific cartoonist and illustrator. His work appeared in greeting cards, Reader’s Digest, Better Homes & Gardens, Penthouse and many more. He still does sell a cartoon to The Wall Street Journal from time to time. Most of his cartoon work are jokes told in one panel, called a gag cartoon. He says the jokes usually come to him as he’s trying to fall asleep. “It would be annoying,” he said, “Because I’d keep coming up with cartoons and I’d have to wake up and write them down.” Drawing has always come easily to him. As a kid in Connecticut, he practiced drawing cartoons he saw in comic books and magazines. Mad Magazine was one of his favorites. “I always liked art,” he said. “It was something I could always do.” That talent helped him, oddly enough, when he was in the military. He was deployed to Korea. “I originally started doing gag cartoons when I was in the Army,” he said. He drew cartoons for a newspaper that was handed out to the troops. “I did those so I could get out of doing Army stuff.” He spent some time in and out of art school, while at the same time playing football. He was studying fine art in New York when he discovered his passion for sculpture. “For 10 years, I did sculpture and worked odd jobs,” he said. He moved to Washington. For a while, he worked on a fishing boat. He was never able to make any money off his sculptures. “I was tired of being broke all the time,” he said. So, he put his natural talents for drawing to

EMILY HAMANN / BBJ

George Jartos spent a career as a cartoonist for publications including Cosmopolitan, Reader’s Digest, Penthouse and continues to draw cartoons in The Wall Street Journal.

work. He started illustrating — drawing art for advertisements, logos, pamphlets and posters. One time he illustrated a textbook that a French teacher at Western Washington University had written. When work was slow, he’d supplement his income by drawing gag cartoons. That’s how it started, anyway. “George has got a really good sense of writing gag cartoons,” said John McColloch, Jartos’ friend and fellow Bellingham cartoonist and illustrator. McColloch was a fan of Jartos’ work long before he met him. “He is quite famous,” he said. At the height of his career, Jartos was a syndicated cartoonist. His work regularly appeared in The Wall Street Journal and other major national magazines. Jartos is semi-retired now. He lives in downtown Bellingham in a studio apartment. Art and cartoons, some his, some by other artists, hang on the walls. His desk is full of cans of different kinds of pens and markers. Books and records fill shelves running along the length of his studio apartment. Conspicuously missing? A computer. He doesn’t have one. He does all his art by hand. To submit his cartoons, he has them photocopied and sends them to magazines in the mail. He

goes to the library occasionally to see if there’s any email or activity from the website that a friend built for him. That friend, Ron Austin, is a filmmaker who

along with co-director Louise Amandes just made a documentary on Pacific Northwest cartoonists called “Bezango, WA.” Jartos’ work is featured in the

film. “I just love his work,” Austin said. “It’s hilarious.” Like McColloch, Austin was a big fan of Jartos’ before they met. Austin spotted Jartos drawing one day at a cafe in Bellingham. “It was as if I’d seen a rockstar,” he said. His favorite cartoon of Jartos’ is of an ice cream truck. Painted on the side, it says “I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice scream.” On top, instead of a giant ice cream cone, is a huge head, yelling. The ice cream man wonders “Why do kids keep running away?” Austin says that’s the perfect example of Jartos’ humor. “It makes a perfect gag cartoon,” Austin said. “You should be able to look at it and get the humor within two seconds.” McColloch said Jartos delivers on both crucial aspects of cartooning. “He’s a very good art-

ist,” McColloch said. “He also has a great sense of humor.” Unlike Jartos, McColloch has embraced technology in his artwork. He works almost completely digitally, drawing on what is essentially a big digital drawing table. “[Jartos] is sitting there, and he’s hand-painting it and hand-lettering it,” McColloch said. “That’s what makes his work so far apart.” With the decline of print, work for people like Jartos is getting harder to find. “A lot of newspapers now, they aren’t taking on any new cartoonists,” he said. Magazines are publishing fewer cartoons all the time. Just like print media, since the advent of the Internet, cartoonists have been struggling to find a business model that works. “The industry is changing,” he said.

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12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

Boeing to trim jobs, layoffs possible By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

The Boeing Co. is cutting the number of workers who design and build commercial airplanes, starting with executives and managers. The cuts are necessary to stay competitive, Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Ray Conner said in February. The Chicago-based company said in a statement that it is “taking

thoughtful steps to reduce the cost of designing and building our airplanes.” Reductions will start with executives and managers. “We will also use attrition and voluntary layoffs. As a last resort, involuntary layoffs may be necessary,” the statement said. Boeing is looking at cutting costs where it can, including from travel expenses and its supply chain. Despite booking record

profits in recent years, Boeing faces internal and external challenges that could strain cash flow. The company has to either raise revenue or cut costs to successfully navigate the challenges. Boeing faces a lot of pressure to keep down the price of airplanes, especially its biggest money-maker, the Everett-built 777. The classic 777 is being replaced by the 777X, which is to start produc-

tion in 2017, with first delivery in 2020. To keep the classic 777 assembly line in Everett busy until then, Boeing has to sell about 140 classic 777s. But to close sales, the company has had to offer deep discounts. Boeing and rival Airbus have huge order backlogs, but global economic tremors have raised concerns in the industry that a recession could be coming. An economic downturn — or simply concerns of

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one — along with persistently low oil prices could prompt some airlines and airplane lessors to delay or cancel plane orders. Nonetheless, Boeing and Airbus both say they are committed to making more commercial airplanes than ever. Boeing says it will increase 737 production in Renton from 42 a month now to 57 a month by 2019. The company’s announcement last month that it expects to deliver fewer 737s this year has some industry watchers worried that introducing the new 737 MAX will be more difficult than previously expected. Boeing also is increasing 767 and 787 production, and starting 777X production. The 787 increases are scheduled to come in North Charleston, South Carolina, not Everett. At the same time, Boeing plans to make fewer 747s and classic 777s in the next few years. Workforce cuts are more likely in programs with planned production decreases. China’s economy has dramatically slowed, raising concerns that Boeing and Airbus could lose orders in their

backlogs today. About half of Boeing’s commercial backlog is tied to “emerging markets, where there are real concerns over growth and foreign exchange pressures,” said Rob Stallard, an investment analyst with RBC Capital Markets, in a note to investors. Also in February, the Securities and Exchange Commission reportedly was investigating whether the Boeing Co. properly accounted for the costs and expected sales of two of its best-known jetliners. The probe centers on projections Boeing made about the long-term profitability for the 787 Dreamliner and the 747 jumbo aircraft. Both planes are among Boeing’s most iconic, renowned for the technological advancements as well as the development headaches they brought the company. SEC enforcement officials reportedly have yet to reach any conclusions and could decide against bringing a case. The issues involved are complex, and there are few black-and-white rules governing how companies apply program accounting.

Muilenburg to serve as Boeing chairman By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

Boeing Co. Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg has been elected to succeed Jim McNerney as chairman of the board of direc- Dennis tors, starting Muilenburg March 1. Boeing independent Lead Director Kenneth Duberstein will stay on in his role. Muilenburg, 52, succeeded McNerney as the aerospace giant’s 10th

CEO in July 2015. He started with Boeing as an engineering intern in 1985. Leaders of the union representing engineers and technical workers at Boeing credited Muilenburg for setting a collaborative tone during negotiations for the most recent labor agreements, which members passed Feb. 18. McNerney’s tenure saw several high-profile clashes with labor, including the Boeing’s 2009 decision to put the second 787 final assembly line in a non-union shop in South Carolina.


MARCH 2016

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

Airbrush artist plays with True Fire Snohomish’s Killer Paint owner takes art out of garage By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

A legend in the world of custom-painted cars and motorcycles, Mike Lavallee, owner of Killer Paint Airbrush Studio in Snohomish, is ready to take his artistry out of the garage and into the home. Lavallee is the inventor of True Fire, a trademarked airbrush-painting technique that makes flames look like real fire, rather than the more stylized version of a flame seen previously on hot rods and muscle cars. He’s demonstrated his True Fire technique in YouTube videos and in classes he’s taught, both at home and abroad, as well as on TV shows like “Overhaulin’,” “Monster Garage” and “Rides” — shows geared mostly toward men obsessed with cars, trucks and motorcycles. Within the last 15 years, custom painters around the world have picked up on Lavallee’s True Fire technique and there is now a seemingly endless supply of forums, blogs and YouTube videos on the topic. “Mike Lavallee made his style effect very, very popular,” says Svee Wheeler, in one such video entitled ‘How to airbrush true fire with water-based paints’. “He pioneered it, really, and there are others that do it as well.” While the 56-year-old Lavallee’s ultimate goal

is to have his own TV show, he said he’d also like to team up with interior designers and decorators to help customize homes. “I don’t want to be known as just the fire guy,” he said. “I will take it and I will run with it and I will wear it as a badge of honor. But it’s not all that I do.” He can paint anything, Lavallee said, and he’s developed a technique to etch porcelain, which can’t be sanded, so paint will stick to it. He’s painted refrigerators, sinks and toilets and he’s even painted urinals for the Rock Wood Fire Pizza restaurants. (“If there’s fire when you pee, it must be Lavallee” states a caption under photos of some of those urinals on convozine.com.) “I do everything, anything to do with artwork,” Lavallee said. “I can take that old refrigerator that’s in grandma’s basement, rusty, and turn it into something that plays Pink Floyd music and that’s got artwork all over it and custom shelves.” You might say Lavallee was born to make art. He talks about loving to draw from the time he first picked up paper and crayons around the age of 2. “Dinosaurs were my thing,” he said. Later he drew other animals and, encouraged by his high-school English teacher, entered and won national contests. He decided that he wanted to study art in college and then paint movie posters. That was back in the days before home computers and Photoshop, he said, when movie posters were hand-painted. But his father had different ideas and steered

PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Killer Paint founder Mike Lavallee has been an innovative force in the airbrush industry and works out of his studio in Snohomish. Below, Lavallee works on airbrushing an eagle onto the fender of a custom bike at the studio.

him toward Butera School of Art in Boston to learn sign-painting. “My dad, being a practical Yankee, decided he wanted his son to have a trade,” Lavallee said. It wasn’t until he visited the school that he realized there was more to sign painting than “No Parking” signs and menus and the like, he said. There was “beautiful artwork” being done with gold leaf and glass and carving, so he agreed to the change of plan. After graduating from the two-year program, he got a job with a sign company, getting some

real “hands-on learning”, he said, in digging holes for signposts, as well as in designing, painting and hand-lettering signs. He quit after a year and set up shop in his parents’ garage. He was around 20 years old then, he said.

Around that time he learned airbrushing from his father, a taxidermist who used it to paint fish and other things. When Lavallee learned to paint fancy pin-striping and scrollwork designs seen on cars and motorcycles,

someone suggested he go ply his trade at a motorcycle rally held annually in Laconia, New Hampshire. “So I took my little paint kit, I made a banner and I drove my ’72 Nova up to Laconia and set up shop,” he said. He made more money in one weekend than he had all month in the sign business, he said. Thus began the next phase of his life, when for nearly two decades he traveled the circuit from Maine to Florida to South Dakota and back. “I did motorcycle rallies and gained a really good reputation for my work for


MARCH 2016

years and years and years of traveling like a gypsy,” he said. He was married twice in his 20s, Lavallee said, but neither marriage lasted long. Then in Indiana, he met a woman from Everett who was in the truck-lettering trade. He followed her back to the Pacific Northwest and she showed him around Washington. “It was beautiful,” he said. “She showed me the rainforest and I fell in love.” Not with the woman, as it turns out. “The relationship didn’t work out, but the Pacific Northwest did,” said Lavellee, who now lives in Lake Stevens. He opened his shop in Snohomish in 1999, he said. Around that time he also decided to set up a booth at the Seattle Roadster Show, then held at Qwest Field Event Center. It would prove to be a momentous decision. The day before the show opened, Lavallee set up and then took a stroll around the venue to check

A custom airbrushed sink featuring carp swimming around the drain is seen at Mike Lavallee’s Killer Paint studio in Snohomish.

out the cars. That’s when he came upon a black ’32 Roadster with a man partially beneath it, polishing the underside of the car’s fenders. Lavallee noticed a small scratch in the orange pinstriping “I can fix that scratch for you,” he said. “What? What scratch?” the man spluttered. Lavallee showed him and then returned to fix the scratch early the next morning, settling on a

fee of $20, which he figured would pay for his lunch. When the man said he’d have the car owner come over later with the money, Lavallee figured he’d never see the $20. He shrugged and chalked it up to karma. But hours later, the man did visit Lavallee’s booth, along with the red-headed owner of the car, who handed over the $20. In a story Lavallee’s told over and over, in inter-

views and in YouTube videos and on Killer Paint’s website, that’s how he came to meet Chip Foose, of Foose Design, a man well-known for his expertise in the world of cars. That meeting led to Lavallee flying down to Southern California, at Foose’s expense, to paint his fire on the side of a ’51 black Chevy pickup truck later featured on the cover and centerfold of Classic Truck Magazine. That

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

led to more projects with Foose and to international exposure for Lavallee’s True Fire at the annual Specialty Equipment Market Association show in Las Vegas. Next Jesse James of West Coast Choppers contacted him, offering him a spot on the Discovery Channel’s “Monster Garage” show in exchange for Lavallee painting a truck that James later drove in AutoZone commercials. Lavallee also painted his True Fire on motorcycles for James and for singer-songwriter Kid Rock. Since then, Lavallee’s appeared on more episodes of “Monster Garage”, as well as “Overhaulin’” (now off the air) on the Velocity Channel and TLC’s “Rides.” He’s also appeared on “Miami Ink,” “Rock the Boat,” “Hot Rod TV” and “Evening Magazine.” He became friends with crab fisherman Phil Harris, one of the captains on the Discovery Channel’s “Deadliest Catch” when he painted Harris’ motorcycle. After Harris died in

2010 after a stroke at the age of 53, Lavallee painted two motorcycle gas tanks that fit together in the shape of a heart and served as urns for Harris’ ashes. With one buried in Bothell next to Harris’ mother and the other buried at sea in a crab pot off Dutch Harbor, Alaska — a fisherman’s rendezvous — all Lavallee has left are photographs. Still, it’s clear that project was an act of love. Looking back, Lavallee marvels at the twists of fate that have so far defined his life, especially the tiny brushstroke needed to fix that scratch in a pinstripe. It measured no more than 1/16 of an inch, he said. “But that brushstroke changed my life,” he said. “It changed my life and it changed the lives of just about every custom painter on the planet. “It started the ball rolling for this thing I call True Fire. That changed the custom-paint industry. And now this technique that I came up with and made popular is now an industry standard. And the name True Fire is an industry term.”

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT!

Top nominees will be honored at an event in Spring 2016 and featured in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal. They’re emerging leaders of Snohomish County, the people in business and industry who shape the county for the better today and into the future. The Herald Business Journal, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and Leadership Snohomish County honor the next generation of leadership in our community. The

Emerging Leaders Award was created to annually recognize an emerging individual whose leadership has made a positive impact on Snohomish County. It pays tribute to an individual who exemplifies outstanding professional values: demonstrates the ability to go above and beyond the expectations of a leader; and serves as an inspiration to the community.

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To place an ad in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal call Maureen at 425-339-3445 or email at mbozlinski@heraldnet.com


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Look in mirror when problems arise Y

our business doesn’t have to just stand there and take every punch that the competition or the economy throws at you. By predicting the future you can learn when to dodge, when to block and when to bust a few moves yourself. When it comes to business, the main obstacle to predicting the future successfully is ourselves. Whenever there is a performance issue we tend to blame outside factors instead of ourselves. It’s the economy, the weather, the big-box competition…the usual suspects. It is probably some sort of psychological survival mechanism that allows us to function in a world over which, it seems, we have little control. That makes it understandably human, but in business it can get in the way of taking action in time to dodge or address a threat before it knocks us silly. Bank lending officers are very good at recognizing this side of our human nature. Usually they meet business borrowers several times a year in order to review the latest financial results for the business. After being through hundreds of these sessions experienced bank officers recognize most of our defense mechanisms and work through them. Their job isn’t to harass you (although it can seem that way to a busy entrepre-

neur sometimes) but to see that you are taking actions to ensure that your business will survive and prosper. Business owners often approach these meetings with James a combination of dread and survival McCusker instinct. The abiding concern of this Business instinct is to prevent 101 the lending officer from losing faith in the borrower’s management team and the “story” behind the enterprise. That may get you through one meeting but it is not likely to get you through two, certainly not with an experienced loan officer. Instead of viewing these meetings as an obstacle course that must be endured, most businesses would be better off if CEOs approached the meeting as an opportunity to test their analysis against the experience of the loan officer. There is no doubt that the CEO knows the business better than the lender, but the lender often has a better idea of what can, and cannot, be determined by analyzing a

financial report. A financial statement is a description of what happened in the past, but you can use your analysis of it to predict the future. Generally speaking, things don’t just happen to a business. Mostly they are the result of decisions made and actions that you or your competition take. Forces such as the overall economic climate affect your business, too, but not as much or as often as we might think. Eventually, of course, the impact of the actions made shows up in the financial statement and is, more than anything else, the result of actions you initiated, took in response to other’s actions, or failed to take in response to changes. Even the most humdrum elements of a financial statement, the parts people usually skip over, are trying to tell you about the future. There is general agreement that the portion of the statement that people find the least interesting is the fixed asset accounts. But even there, the numbers are telling us a story about the capital strength of the business and how that will affect its future strategy and tactical moves. The income statement accounts dealing with profit margins are the real treasure trove of data with predictive value, though. Look first at the operating margin, the profit earned from sales after

you deduct the cost of goods or services sold. Here you should be prepared with some recent history of that margin, for this could be significant in deciding how to respond to any challenge. Margin shrinkage due to rising costs may not be directly related to your competition, for example, while shrinkage due to price or revenue declines often reflects competitive pressures, and some loss of your customer loyalty. The answers to these questions prompted by the financials are in your sales and customer analysis, but to make solid predictions of the future you have to become practiced in how to spot “pre-emergent” problems by analyzing the balance sheet and income statement. If you are feeling a bit uncertain or just rusty in that area, your lending officer or a trusted advisor can probably help. Most entrepreneurs and successful CEOs tend to be what the psychologists call, “action-oriented.” Taking the time to analyze your financials shouldn’t, and won’t, change that, but it may help to focus those actions and find a way for your business to succeed — no matter what the competition throws at you. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

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Email Herald Business Journal editor Jim Davis at jdavis@heraldnet.com or go to www.TheHeraldBusinessJournal.com If you know of a dedicated, private- or public-sector business executive or small-business owner who excels in business, community involvement and supporting Snohomish County economic development, we want to know. The winners selected for our 2016 Executive

of the Year and Entrepreneur of the Year will be featured in the May issue of The Herald Business Journal and will be honored during the Economic Alliance Snohomish County annual recognition luncheon in that month.

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18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

What to know about new bank cards A

re you ready to dip instead of swipe? Sounds like a new dance move, doesn’t it? In reality, it’s the new way consumers will soon use debit and credit cards at all restaurants, retail locations and businesses large and small. Over the next two to three years, all U.S banks and credit institutions will have switched their customers from the traditional magnetic swipe cards to EMV (Europay, MasterCard and Visa) chip cards or, more commonly known as, “chip cards.” For anyone who has traveled abroad, it’s evident the United States is behind its contemporaries in its ability to universally accommodate chip cards. According to EMVCo, a global organization tasked with managing secure payment transactions worldwide, Europe is close to full-market chip card adoption, with 97 percent of all card-based payments using EMV technology, and more than 95 percent of card readers equipped for the technology, as well. Back in the U.S., consumers and merchants alike would be wise to begin preparing now for our own impending shift, ensuring a smooth transition on both sides of the sale. For merchants and financial institutions, the switch to chip cards means upgrading point-of-sale terminals and software, and understanding new rules for liability. Consumers will need to activate new cards and learn a new transaction process. The reason for the change is sim-

ple: security. The old-school magnetic stripe is easily hacked — just consider recent data breaches at big-box retailers. With the magnetic stripe, information Kevin is static and stored Hogan with all of the user’s most sensitive data, Guest making it easier for fraudsters to lift the Column information and use that sensitive data over and over. The chip card, on the other hand, uses an encrypted small metallic computer chip which creates a unique one-time code for every transaction, making it nearly impossible for thieves to steal the information and duplicate it for multiple uses. The result is greater protection against fraud. To prepare for the big switch, here’s what merchants and consumers need to know: For merchants: Plot your timeline and budget. If you haven’t already made the switch, consider a timeline and budget for your eventual transition. For businesses, consult your point-of-sale provider to research potential costs and leg work associated with the transition as most will have to purchase new terminals and software. The average cost of one EMV sales terminal ranges from $200 to $1,000, and the size of your business and the

Studies show that businesses, mostly small merchants, are well behind the Oct. 1 deadline, which means liability will fall solely on their shoulders. complexity of your payment system will determine the amount you need to spend. Communicate and Educate. Once the transition is made, merchants should promote the new process to employees and customers and provide adequate training to ensure speedy check-outs and transactions without hiccups. Liability. Following an Oct. 1, 2015 deadline, the liability of fraud shifted to merchants if they have not updated their card readers to EMV. Conversely, the financial institution will be liable for fraud if they have not provided updated cards to their customers. If you haven’t yet switched to EMV processing, you’ll need to create an interim strategy for accepting liability until you’re fully protected. For consumers: Plan ahead. Talk with your bank to get a sense of timing and ensure new cards are being mailed out. Many credit card and banking institutions are sending out new cards now while some are waiting until the card’s next expiration date, which can take up to two years. Be mindful and monitor your mail closely to ensure you don’t throw the card straight into your recycling bin or shredder. Have patience. Rest easy because if

you’ve made the transition to chip cards you are now more secure; however consumers will need to be a bit more patient. The ‘dipping’ method of an EMV card requires a few more seconds than the quick swipe we’re used to. Consumers ‘dip’ their card into the card reader and then wait to follow the prompts on the screen before removal. Liability. You can be worry free with the new liability shift that comes along with the EMV cards as consumers are provided zero-dollar liability if a card were to become compromised at an ATM or point-of-sale provider. Studies show that businesses, mostly small merchants, are well behind the Oct. 1 deadline, which means liability will fall solely on their shoulders. Merchants should leverage their business banking relationship to learn insights, receive support and plan their transition now. Though the investment and changes are cumbersome, the payoff will outweigh the cost of being left behind. Before you know it, you’ll be ready to dip. Kevin Hogan is a senior vice president at the Lynnwood-based Pacific Crest Savings Bank.

How to improve revenue through research

R

elying on your gut, when it comes to developing marketing strategy, usually leads to more Rolaids than revenue. Developing marketing strategy based on your customers’ preferences and perceptions is always a better bet. This is the second article of a two-part series on conducting “do it yourself” marketing research. February’s column (Supply-demand decisions need insight) covered the first two steps: planning and designing a marketing research study. This installment addresses the final two steps: collecting and analyzing. Collecting: After planning and designing the research project you’ll be ready to conduct the study. But before you begin customer interviews or e-mailing an online survey link, test the instrument and collection process for glitches. There’s nothing worse than collecting all of the data, reaching your sample goal (the number of respondents you were aiming for) and finding out there was a problem in the collection process that renders your data useless. Conduct a short test to make sure the

survey design and collection methodology are free of errors. Be sure the wording (and sequence) of your questions don’t bias responses. ResponAndrew dents also can unintentionally cause Ballard errors, respondent confusion and Growth fatigue are common. Strategies Examples: if a respondent is confused by a question, they may not be answering the question you intended. That means the data has no validity. Also, if the interview or survey is too long, the respondent may become burned out and the accuracy and completion rates wane. Be sure the wording of all your questions is simple and clear, and that your questionnaire is not too long — best practices suggest five-minutes max for an online survey and not longer than 15 minutes for a phone interview. Working with an experienced third

party can minimize collection errors; however, as the client, you should review test results to make sure everything is in order before burning through your customer database. Analyzing: You’ll begin this final step by “scrubbing” the data (correcting entry errors). After errors have been omitted, you’ll format, code and tabulate the data. When possible, it’s best to enter answers directly into a database when conducting interviews. I recommend formatting your research data in a standard spreadsheet such as Excel. Multiple-choice and ranking answers can be coded (using numbers) to speed up entry and tabulation. By entering question numbers in the column header and responses by row, you can tabulate data by sorting and grouping answers to each question…this process will surface dominate themes. Calculate response groupings to get percentages for each question. You are looking for data (values) that are statistically relevant. For example, if 67 percent of your customer base indicates they prefer product attribute “A” over “B,” you can be relatively confident in featuring

(or providing) attribute “A,” knowing it has greater consumer appeal. A common analysis technique is to cross tabulate the data sets, which is achieved when you combine two or more sets of data, e.g. compare respondent demographic variables (independent) to how a “value” question was answered (dependent variable). You gain a much better understanding of the market when cross tabulating independent to dependent variables — income bracket to preferred attribute, respectively. Start with a simple project — a basic data set is far better than no intelligence at all. It will take some planning and design before you can conduct and analyze a marketing research study, but the up-front investment will pay dividends down the road. Before making a high-impact business decision, verify the best path to take before embarking on the journey. My favorite quote is “test before you invest,” probably because it is mine. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.


MARCH 2016 MARCH 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

When is is enough enough enough enough on on growth? growth? When

II

have been giving talks on entrepreneurship have been giving talks to college students on entrepreneurship around the country the to college students past twothe years. Afterthe a around country recent one at Ave Maria past two years. After a University in Ave Florida, a recent one at Maria student asked the provocUniversity in Florida, a ative question “Is provocgrowth student asked the goodquestion or bad?”“Is growth ative Myor answer good bad?”came from theMy heart: “Attacking answer came from growth is “Attacking an attack on the heart: someone hopes growth is else’s an attack onand dreams for their life”.and someone else’s hopes I explained that a dreams for their life”. no-growth position I explained that a smacks of selfishness no-growth position if too extremeofand can ulti-if too smacks selfishness mately take extreme andcommunities can ultithe wrong over mately takedirection communities time. The direction real culprit in the wrong over most of America, I added, time. The real culprit in is poor most ofplanning America,for I added, growth, not growth is poor planning for itself. Here in Pugetitself. growth, notthe growth Sound to see Hereit’s in easy the Puget we’re not Sound it’s always easy togood see at planning growth. we’re not for always goodConat strained by geography, planning forour growth. Conwe see congested roads, strained by our geography, long when shopping, we seelines congested roads, overcrowded schools, and long lines when shopping, the rising costschools, of housing. overcrowded and Growth, seems, comes the risingitcost of housing. in fits anditstarts, a nice Growth, seems,not comes tidy line.not a nice in fitssmooth and starts, But limiting developtidy smooth line. ment the But doesn’t limitingsolve developproblem, it just makes ment doesn’t solve the it worse. If we don’t buildit problem, it just makes the roads anddon’t infrastrucworse. If we build tureroads to support growth, the and infrastrucpeople will be forced to ture to support growth, compete and people will beeventually forced to we price ourselves out of compete and eventually viability send theout major we price or ourselves of employers other viability or to send theplaces. major Boeing opening a plant employers to other places. in Southopening Carolina was Boeing a plant about more than moving in South Carolina was to a right-to-work state. It about more than moving spoke to our risingstate. costsItof to a right-to-work doing to business here,costs which spoke our rising of are linked to growth mandoing business here, which agement are linkedchallenges. to growth manSave the environment, agement challenges. you say?the The notion that Save environment, development and thethat you say? The notion environment and are always development the at odds is a form of giving environment are always up.odds Good and at is aplanning form of giving deploying the best ideas up. Good planning and into a growth deploying the environbest ideas menta works. called into growthIt’s environ“smartworks. growth” some ment It’s by called and offers a pathway that “smart growth” by some attempts balance. and offerstoa find pathway that Paradoxically, most attempts to find balance. who rail against most growth Paradoxically, probably dependgrowth on it who rail against even if they don’ton know probably depend it it. Any one drawing Socialit. even if they don’t know Security depends Social absoAny one drawing lutely ondepends a growing tax Security absobase ofonyounger employed lutely a growing tax Americans to payemployed into base of younger Americans to pay into

the system, for example. Social Security, after all, is the system, for example. a payment transfer Social Security, aftersystem, all, is some endowment that anot payment transfer system, keeps growing. Run out of not some endowment that taxpayers and you run keeps growing. Run outout of of Social Security taxpayers and you benefits run out unless you think it’s fair of Social Security benefits to impose taxes unless you higher think it’s fairon younger people. to imposeworking higher taxes on Necessity beingpeople. the younger working mother of invention Necessity being thein a new world where all mother of invention in8 of us are connected abillion new world where all 8 billion of us are connected

by super computers held in our hands should held by super computers give great should hope, I tell in ourushands students. I illustrate give us great hope, I the tell power of Ithis connectivity students. illustrate the in entrepreneurship terms power of this connectivity butentrepreneurship it applies to all forms in terms of idea-sharing innobut it applies to and all forms vation. We’re just of idea-sharing andnow innounleashing that power. vation. We’re just now The reality we will unleashing thatis power. probably be inisboth posiThe reality we will tions in our We probably be lifetimes. in both posifind ourselves resisting tions in our lifetimes. We find ourselves resisting

change in our neighborhood but to see change in wanting our neighborgrowth our careers. hood butinwanting to see We feelin strongly about growth our careers. supporting a growing We feel strongly about economy, but become supporting a growing frustrated but withbecome the impact economy, of it whenwith it touches us in frustrated the impact negative of it whenways. it touches us in There’sways. no simple negative answer except that we There’s no simple must always answer exceptview thatgrowth we in thealways context of change, must view growth planning and the effect on in the context of change, planning and the effect on

others. Denying someone else theDenying chance tosomeone purothers. sue the dreams for else the same chance to purthemselves their for famsue the sameand dreams ily that we enjoy is selfish. themselves and their famThat of ily thatcan wenever enjoybe is part selfish. the equation. That can never be part of Hoban is CEO theTom equation. of Tom The Coast of HobanGroup is CEO Companies. him at of The CoastContact Group of 425-339-3638 or tomhoCompanies. Contact him at ban@coastmgt.com or visit 425-339-3638 or tomhowww.coastmgt.com.orTwitter: ban@coastmgt.com visit @Tom_P_Hoban. Twitter: www.coastmgt.com. @Tom_P_Hoban.

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Learn to replenish your willpower A

ccording to Merriam-Webster, the definition of willpower is: “The ability to control yourself.” As well as: “Strong determination that allows you to do something difficult.” Have you ever had to rely on willpower to accomplish something? I bet you have. I really don’t think a task has to be difficult to need willpower to push us to get things done from time to time or maybe even a lot of times. There are many reasons why we may need to lean into willpower to knock things off of our task lists. We may have work in front of us that’s boring, intimidating, rote, tedious or have work we just don’t happen to like. I’m quite confident that we’ve all heard productivity tips like, “Never check email in the morning.” “Do your most important task first thing in the morning.” I do agree with these concepts because they help us get vital tasks done and out of the way, hopefully before distractions and interruptions compete for our attention. But, recently, I learned that there’s actually another reason you should make it your goal to get important tasks done first thing in the morning. It’s because our willpower is usually strongest first thing in the day and tends to wane as the day progresses. Isn’t that a great thing to do — harness your willpower and start

your day strong? I Will power loses steam the longer the day goes on and you have to replenish willpower, according to Gary Keller in his book, “The One Thing.” Monika Think of willKristofferson power like a solar light outside in your garden during the Office summer. All day Efficiency long, the bright sun is replenishing the light so it can glow brightly all night. As the night turns into morning, the solar light has lost much of its brightness. Well, our willpower starts out strong after a good night of sleep. We wake up refreshed and ready to tackle the day after eating a good breakfast. As the day continues on, our willpower starts to diminish. There are many things that can cause our willpower to diminish. Let’s look at examples of each of these ‘chippers.’ Filter distractions: As you’re working you may be dealing with distractions such as social media updates, people walking by your office, people asking you ques-

tions or even a sunny day outside your window. These things can cause you to need to bring your focus back to the task at hand. Resisting impulsive behavior: You may have work in front of you and have to continually resist impulsively looking at social media, texting and checking email. Suppressing Emotions: Maybe you’re mad at someone you work with or your spouse without the opportunity to talk or hug it out. This can cause your willpower to wane as you suppress those emotions to keep them below the surface. Doing tasks you don’t like to do: I imagine you’ve had something you couldn’t avoid doing that just sapped your energy because it didn’t employ your strongest skills. Maybe it was accounting, taxes, payroll, editing an article or preparing to give a talk. Doing something you don’t like to do can really be a willpower zapper. These are only a few of the ways our willpower can be stressed. No matter how it can be diminished, I think it’s important to look at how we can replenish it. Allow the sunshine to reboot your solar light. When we use our willpower, we actually experience a drop in glucose levels.

So, it’s not only important to do a body good with proper nutrition, but also our minds. When you feel tired and hungry, don’t reach for that candy bar for a quick pick-me-up, but instead refuel with foods that keep blood glucose levels on an even keel. Invest your time to consult with a nutritionist for ideas for healthy snacks and meals that will serve your body and brain well. Make sure you take breaks. It’s so challenging to do this when you feel overwhelmed and under the gun with deadlines looming ahead. But taking a break to stretch and take a few deep breaths will make you more productive in the long run. In addition to breaks, be sure to get the proper amount of sleep every day. We don’t have full control of how our willpower is challenged during the day as our personal solar light fades with the passing hours, but we can be in charge of doing our best to foster good habits to improve our willpower and get important tasks done in the morning when our willpower is shining brightly. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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MARCH 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys has recognized Everett Family Law attorney Rebecca Torgerson by honoring her with their 2015 10 Best Family Law Attorney for Client Satisfaction award. Attorneys who are named to the list must pass a rigorous selection process. Torgerson is an Everett native and a partner at Brewe Layman.

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE

MARYSVILLE — Columbia College has announced the hiring of James Marrow as campus director at Columbia College-NS/Everett-Marysville. Marrow is responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the campus, including class scheduling and student and faculty recruitment. Marrow joins Columbia College after having served 23 years in the U.S. Navy.

Ship port calls 2015: 133

EVERETT — Attorney Charles Bates has been honored by Martindale-Hubbell for his 25 years of service to Washington state communities and organizations. Charles Bates, who Bates lives in Everett, joined Cocoon House in April as their education and employment coordinator and regularly volunteers with the Washington State Association of Youth Courts, the Washington State YMCA — Youth & Government program and the Boy Scouts of America.

Long-term includes regularly scheduled vessels only. Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 9 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 7

Barge port calls 2015: 61 March 1: Westwood, Westwood Victoria March 8: Swire, Siangtan March 8: Westwood, Westwood Robson March 15: Westwood, Westwood Columbia March 22: Westwood, Westwood Pacific March 25: ECL, TBD Source: Port of Everett participating in two annual peanut butter drives to help fight hunger in the region. Through May 10, donations can be brought to any IAM 751 union hall in Puget Sound, including the Everett Union Hall at 8729 Airport Road. EVERETT — Economic Alliance Snohomish County is accepting nominations for its awards

EVERETT — Toraya Miller has accepted the position of vice president/branch manager at Coastal Community Bank’s Toraya downtown Miller Everett location after serving as the bank’s vice president/internal auditor for nearly seven years. Miller has more than 15 years of experience working in audit and compliance within the financial industry.

referenced his passionate approach to client service and the fact that he has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to clients and the Everett community.

EVERETT — Frontier Communications Corporation announced that Chris Lyons was named vice president and general manager of the company’s Chris Lyons Washington operation. He will report directly to Melinda White, West Region Area president. Lyons’ primary office will be in Everett.

LYNNWOOD — For the third year, Comcast Business will seek out innovative startup companies and entrepreneurs to participate in its Innovations 4 Entrepreneurs essay competition. Startups and entrepre-

STANWOOD — Julie Vess, executive director at Safe Harbor Free Clinic in Stanwood, is leaving her position to take the same post at the Stanwood Community & Senior Center. She begins her new job on April 1. Vess

BOTHELL — Associated General Contractors of Washington has named Bothell’s Paul Mayo of Flatiron Construction its Contractor of the Year. Mayo was honored for being a key contributor to help pass a state transportation package during the last legislative session. EVERETT — D.A. Davidson has named financial adviser Jeff Decker from the company’s Everett office to the firm’s most prestigious honors club. The Chairman’s Council award

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BOTHELL — Money magazine has ranked University of Washington Bothell third in the nation on its list of “25 great, accessible colleges for aspiring scientists and engineers.” The early-career median salary for UW Bothell science, technology, engineering and mathematics graduates is $64,100, according to the PayScale.com figures used by the magazine. UW Bothell followed Maine Maritime Academy and Texas A&M University on the list.

Transmissions of Marysville

SNOHOMISH — Professional Compounding Centers of America has named Michelle Frediani of Kusler’s Compounding Pharmacy in Snohomish as its Pharmacy Technician of the Month for February. The award honors technicians who have demonstrated excellent service to patients, healthcare providers, and pharmacy colleagues. Frediani has been at the pharmacy for nearly 10 years. EVERETT — Members of Machinists Union District Lodge 751 are

presentation at the Annual Meeting on May 12 at Tulalip Resort Casino. Nominations are open to the public through April 1 at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Y7ZCDZP or at the EASC website. The Herald Business Journal is also presenting its 2016 Executive and Entrepreneur of the Year awards at the event. Nominations for those awards are at the HBJ website through April 5.

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helped launch Safe Harbor in 2009. LYNNWOOD — The Verdant Health Commission announced that superintendent Carl J. Zapora has decided to retire at the end of 2016. Zapora has served as superintendent since February 2011, when he was hired by the Board of Commissioners of Public Hospital District No. 2, Snohomish County, to oversee the launch of the Verdant Health Commission. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — The Muscular Dystrophy Association Western Washington moved to Mountlake Terrace from South Lake Union where it had been for eight years. The new office will offer improved family support and decreased overhead so more funds go toward research, services and support for people with ALS, muscular dystrophy and other related muscle diseases.


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Jan. 1-31. 16-10109-MLB: Chapter 7, Martin Dale Dinsmore and Sandra June Dinsmore; attorney for debtors: Lawrence M. Blue; filed: Jan. 11; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Jan. 1 and Jan. 31.

Federal tax lien

201601040291: Jan. 4; Highland Glass (+), 4502 148th St. NE, Marysville 201601040292: Jan. 4; Seen On Screen TV Inc., 4017 Colby Ave., Everett 201601040293: Jan. 4; Reis, Kim S., PO Box 1629, Edmonds 201601040294: Jan. 4; Gaare, Patricia L. (+), 1010 State Ave., Unit 398, Marysville 201601040295: Jan. 4; Vehrs, Lara L. (+), 11128 Algonquin Road, Woodway 201601040296: Jan. 4; Lis, Heidi L. (+), 5930 77th Drive NE, Marysville 201601040297: Jan. 4; Lis, William S. III, 5930 77th Drive NE, Marysville 201601120147: Jan. 12; Crissinger, Christine A., 13521 14th Ave. Drive SE, Mill Creek 201601120148: Jan. 12; Carreon, Edgar I. (+), 2707 Bickford Ave., Suite F, Snohomish 201601120149: Jan. 12; Nuss, Russell S. (+), 17610 11th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601120150: Jan. 12; Sound Storage Management Inc., 15722 OK Mill Road, Snohomish 201601120151: Jan. 12; Lynnwood Cleaning Services (+), PO Box 741, Lynnwood 201601120152: Jan. 12; Bio Management Northwest Inc., 18318 Parkcrest Court SE, Yelm 201601120153: Jan. 12; Gloria Jeane Hauling and Highway Rehab Inc. (+), 8920 84th St. NE, Arlington 201601120161: Jan. 12; Carver, Ruth I., 10924 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo 201601120162: Jan. 12; Champion, Su L. (+), 3802 Colby Ave., Everett 201601120163: Jan. 12; Armstrong, Lynn D. (+), 7006 115th St. NW, Tulalip 201601120164: Jan. 12; Armstrong, James F., 7006 115th St. NW, Tulalip 201601120165: Jan. 12; Green, Lester, 1010 100th St. SE, Apt. 724, Everett 201601120166: Jan. 12; NS Clinic Inc., 4629 168th St. SW, Suite B Lynnwood 201601120167: Jan. 12; Noetzelman, Jeremy J., 5662 95th Place SW, Mukilteo 201601120168: Jan. 12; Alvarado, Rebecca (+), 5603 83rd Place NE, Marysville 201601120169: Jan. 12; Lind-Smith, DA (+), 14121 211th St. SE, Snohomish 201601120170: Jan. 12; Millett, Maria (+), 1010 State Ave., Unit 715, Marysville 201601120171: Jan. 12; Cruz, Glenn C.

Dela (+), 3111 132nd St. SE, Apt. C-308, Everett 201601120172: Jan. 12; Orca Electrical Contractors, PO Box 14693, Mill Creek 201601120173: Jan. 12; Top Wholesale (+), 18503 Highway 99, Suite C, Lynnwood 201601120174: Jan. 12; SCP Enterprises Inc., 1429 Ave. D 515, Snohomish 201601200260: Jan. 20; Frederickson, Cindy M. (+), 14031 Highway 9, Snohomish 201601200261: Jan. 20; Everett Floral & Gift (+), 4522 Evergreen Way, Everett 201601200262: Jan. 20; Nbu Construction (+), 2615 Russell Way, Everett 201601200263: Jan. 20; Brooks, Robyn A., 722 E Highland Drive, Arlington 201601200264: Jan. 20; Tokareff-Clark, M. (+), 107 Seventh N., Apt. 200, Edmonds 201601200265: Jan. 20; Yourist, Harry R., 20202 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201601200266: Jan. 20; Beard, John, 5719 Highway Place, Apt. 20, Everett 201601200267: Jan. 20; Cory, Jean M., 4707 75th Place NE, Unit A, Marysville 201601200268: Jan. 20; Royea, Karen K., 11000 16th Ave. SE, Apt. 611 Everett 201601200269: Jan. 20; CR Siding Inc., 15530 73rd Ave. SE, Snohomish 201601200270: Jan. 20; Martin, George, 8628 Monte Cristo Drive, Everett 201601200271: Jan. 20; Concrete Creations Inc., 4006 172nd St. NW, Stanwood 201601200272: Jan. 20; Nelson, Stuart G., PO Box 1126, Everett 201601200273: Jan. 20; Nelson, Deborah, 20014 82nd Ave. W Edmonds 201601200274: Jan. 20; White, Jared (+), 2225 143rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201601200485: Jan. 20; Cassys Coffee Company (+), 36023 U.S. 2, Sultan 201601200486: Jan. 20; Anjou Wellness Spa (+), 4895 76th St. SW, Mukilteo 201601200487: Jan. 20; Mill Creek Lodge (+), 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201601200488: Jan. 20; Lacasse Construction (+), 3217 Grand Ave., Everett 201601200489: Jan. 20; Gonzalez-Sandoval, F. (+), 8628 Monte Cristo Drive, Everett 201601260069: Jan. 26; Joffre, Crawford W., 421 85th Place SW, Apt. B203, Everett 201601260070: Jan. 26; Charleston, Kevin T., PO Box 283, Marysville 201601260071: Jan. 26; Bradley, Kelly J., 20902 67th Ave. NE, Apt. 370, Arlington 201601260078: Jan. 26; Gavilanes, Diego P., 2512 140th Place SE, Mill Creek 201601260079: Jan. 26; Albright, Kane E., 3516 204th St. SW, Apt. A301, Lynnwood 201601260080: Jan. 26; Elliott, Diane J. (+), 15550 174th Ave. SE, Monroe 201601260081: Jan. 26; Connell, Susan C. (+), 12527 26th Ave. SE, Everett 201601260082: Jan. 26; Clark, Kathy (+), 12425 43rd Drive SE, Everett 201601260083: Jan. 26; Lebaron, Isaias E. (+), 21114 22nd Ave. W Lynnwood 201601260084: Jan. 26; Grube, Martine (+), 5110 Narbeck Ave., Everett 201601260085: Jan. 26; Caton, Judy A., 1429 Ave. D, Snohomish 201601260086: Jan. 26; Valdillez, Erica (+), 12115 19th Ave. SE, Apt. E104, Everett 201601260087: Jan. 26; Allen-M, Teresa A. (+), 23618 150th St. SE, Monroe

201601260088: Jan. 26; Ness, Jennifer (+), 122 164th St. SW, Suite 103, Lynnwood 201601260089: Jan. 26; Mithen, John G., 24320 Firdale Ave., Edmonds 201601260090: Jan. 26; Tanielian, Deborah (+), 9221 172nd St. NW, Stanwood 201601260091: Jan. 26; Wetzel, Andrea L. (+), 7209 193rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201601260092: Jan. 26; Wetzel, Milynn E., 7209 193rd Place SW, Lynnwood

Partial release of federal tax lien 201601120154: Jan. 12; Thomas, Robert J., 21231 89th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601120155: Jan. 12; Schuett, Wayne L., 8212 75th St. NE, Marysville 201601120156: Jan. 12; Schuett, Wayne L., 8212 75th St. NE, Marysville 201601200490: Jan. 20; Vice, Jason, 13719 28th Drive SE, Mill Creek

Release of federal tax lien 201601040298: Jan. 4; Tamarack Saloon (+), 18802 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington 201601040299: Jan. 4; Tamarack Saloon (+), 18802 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington 201601040300: Jan. 4; Jakesd Corporation, 13300 Bothell Everett Highway, 303 PMB 6, Mill Creek 201601040301: Jan. 4; Advanced Mobility Of Arlington (+), 5406 232nd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201601040302: Jan. 4; Pewers, James K., 15905 Highway 99, No. 22, Lynnwood 201601040303: Jan. 4; Dorgan, James W., 31330 68th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201601040304: Jan. 4; Cliff, Jacqueline A., 14201 15th Place W, Lynnwood 201601040305: Jan. 4; Cliff, Christopher A., 14201 15th Place W, Lynnwood 201601040306: Jan. 4; Telschow, Tiffany (+), 2712 179th Place NE, Marysville 201601040307: Jan. 4; Dorgan, James W., 31330 68th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201601040308: Jan. 4; Liu, Grace S. M. (+), 1607 85th Ave. NE, Bellevue 201601040309: Jan. 4; Mark 2 Collision Center (+), 18205 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201601040310: Jan. 4; Anderson, Christopher J., 9018 10th St. NE, Everett 201601040311: Jan. 4; Mark 2 Collison Center (+), 18910 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201601040312: Jan. 4; Anderson, Christopher J., 3219 203rd St. SW, Lynnwood 201601040313: Jan. 4; TPC Construction Inc., 3202 163rd Place SE, Mill Creek 201601040314: Jan. 4; Schmeising, Debra A., 13627 26th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201601040315: Jan. 4; Tamarack Saloon (+), 18802 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington 201601120157: Jan. 12; Guenthner, Deborah A. (+), 20902 67th Ave. NE, Apt. 332, Arlington 201601120158: Jan. 12; McJimson, Daniel L. Sr., 1814 60th St. SE, Apt. 5, Everett 201601120175: Jan. 12; Thomas, Robert J., 21231 89th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601120176: Jan. 12; Etarsky, Damian, 1815 Larch Way Apt. A, Lynnwood 201601120177: Jan. 12; McGinnis, Michael J., 1501 172nd Place SW, Lynnwood

201601120178: Jan. 12; Stewart, Jeffrey K., 14204 60th Ave. W, Edmonds 201601120179: Jan. 12; Miller, Thomas P., 5001 180th St. SW, Unit 29, Lynnwood 201601120180: Jan. 12; Mookherjea, Subhabrato, 8514 SW 210th Place, Edmonds 201601120181: Jan. 12; Thomas, Robert J., 21231 89th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601120182: Jan. 12; Corner Coffee Bar & Cafe Inc., 18401 76th Ave. W, Suite 103, Edmonds 201601120183: Jan. 12; Thomas, Robert J., 21231 89th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601200275: Jan. 20; Thomas, Ann M., 24224 47th Avenue NE, Arlington 201601200276: Jan. 20; Mitchell, Susan E., 112 Alder Ave., Apt. 10, Snohomish 201601200277: Jan. 20; McKay, Ian N., 16530 Three Lakes Road, Snohomish 201601200278: Jan. 20; Knowlen, Shelia A. (+), 24025 104th Place W, Edmonds 201601200279: Jan. 20; Thomas, Ann M. (+), 21231 89th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601200280: Jan. 20; Wohlhuter, Brian D., 2213 161st Ave. NE, Snohomish 201601200281: Jan. 20; Wohlhuter, Kelli J. (+), 2213 161st Ave. NE, Snohomish 201601200282: Jan. 20; Thomas, Ann M., 21231 89th Ave. NE, Arlington 201601260093: Jan. 26; Schiefer, Eric P., 5833 123rd Place NE, Marysville 201601260094: Jan. 26; Longhorn Saloon, 18802 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington 201601260095: Jan. 26; Bubbles Laundry, 1242 State Ave., Suite I, Marysville 201601260096: Jan. 26; Summers, Howard A. Jr., 12917 203rd Ave. SE, Monroe 201601260097: Jan. 26; Blackwood, Ronald, 8427 Gold Way, Everett 201601260098: Jan. 26; Triunfo, Gloria V., 20027 56th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201601260099: Jan. 26; Donatone, Angeli C., 7007 Lake Ballinger Way, Edmonds

Release of federal tax lien — paid for 201601120639: Jan. 12; Burns, Martin A., 19638 80th Place W, Edmonds 201601200735: Jan. 20; Chappell, Sandra L., 5817 Cady Road, Everett

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201601040289: Jan. 4; Classic Glass Window, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201601220331: Jan. 22; Imperial Management Corporation, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax lien 201601040316: Jan. 4; Barnett-Frazier, A, 19607 Sixth Drive SE, Bothell 201601120159: Jan. 12; Ryner, Leah L., 4224 211th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201601260100: Jan. 26; Grant, Mindy R., 7611 13th St. SE, Lake Stevens 201601260101: Jan. 26; Villanueva, Cecilia C., 23706 99th Place W, Edmonds


1538740

MARCH 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

07/11

1,207

851

10.1

10,388

41,100

15,700

21,800

$4,169,784

233.25

08/11

1,325

916

9.1

9,443

41,400

15,900

22,100

$4,591,484

09/11

1,161

837

9

8,938

42,100

15,800

22,100

$4,117,816

10/11

1,226

828

8.8

9,342

42,300

15,000

21,900

$4,165,352

11/11

1,041

854

8.7

9,989

43,100

15,000

21,700

$4,317,909

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1.067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$10,477,405

233.81

235.92

234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385


MARCH 2016

Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

07/11

$70.47

446,373,984

241

3,935

$3.78

08/11

$66.86

521,884,745

227

4,181

$3.75

09/11

$60.51

455,591,472

192

3,896

$3.86

10/11

$65.79

493,315,047

214

3,883

$3.80

11/11

$68.69

518,192,703

188

3,334

$3.67

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

N/A

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

N/A

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

N/A

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

N/A

6,910

N/A

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

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26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA.

Arlington Arlington Fuel: 16710 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8435; 360-653-8420; Oils-Fuel (Wholesale) Arlington Grocery Outlet: 123 E Burke Ave., Arlington, WA 98223; 510-845-1999 Bayshore Concrete: 16419 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8405; 360-6538678; Concrete Contractors Chinook Lumber: 21015 Highway 9 NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8260; 360-435-9900 Kayak Point Construction: 18933 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6316; 360-435-5435 Schrimnir Systems: 17522 143rd Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5851; 360-386-8833; Nonclassified Establishments Shorty Cakes: 3813 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8421; 360-322-7225; Bakers-Retail Welch Marketing and Manufacturing: 12812 234th St. NE, Arlington, WA 982238532; Marketing Programs and Services

Bothell Autel Robotics Inc.: 22522 29th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98021-4443; 425-415-3910; Engineers-Electronic Dynamic Distributions: 3614 182nd St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6775; Distribution Services Foreign-Domestic Auto Repairs: 20201 13th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98012-7711 Fuji Film Sonosite: 18421 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-5245; 425-4081459; Nonclassified Establishments Goods Market: 20717 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-7139; 310-323-3992; Food Markets JC Penny: 18601 W 33 Ave. W, Bothell, WA 98012; Department Stores

Mad Lab Graphic and Print Shop: 17624 15th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-5106; 425419-4419; Printers (Manufacturers) Practical Sparrow Cafe: 720 238th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98021; 425-402-4402; Restaurants Primrose School of Mill Creek: 13218 45th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-4309; 425-2256944; Schools Route 527 Motor Sports: 18724 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-6838; 425-424-1333; Nonclassified Establishments Super 301 Inc.: 107 162nd Place SE, No. A, Bothell, WA 98012-1263; Nonclassified Teriyaki & Pho: A600, Bothell, WA 98021; 425-869-3670; Restaurants

Edmonds Cheap Electric Contractors Co.: 18313 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds, WA 980202347; Electric Contractors Emergency Heating and AC Co: 23916 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-9260 North Sound Church: 201 Fourth Ave. N, Edmonds, WA 98020-3116; 425-678-8459 On Site Copy Machines Services: 130 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-4130; Copying and Duplicating Service Puget Sound Yacht Services: 400 Admiral Way, Edmonds, WA 98020-4128; 206-6603630; Yachts Typing Agent: 51 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-4111; 425-582-2496; Typing Service

Everett ATP USA Inc.: 10805 32nd Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-7530; 425-353-7046 Accurate Installation and Design: 6905 Broadway, Everett, WA 98203-5339; 425-3537387; Nonclassified Establishments Broadway Steetwear: 1832 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-2349; 425-212-9710; Clothing-Retail

Child Strive: 14 E Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204; 425-353-5656; Nonclassified Dren’s Smoke Market: 2406 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-3063; 425-789-1695 Garage Door Repair-Everett: 2722 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3557; 425-953-9915 Hippie Spa: 11632 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-4864; 425-212-9451; Health Spas IGT Aerospace: 3101 111th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-3590; Aerospace Industries (Manufacturers) Mini Health Spa: 9629 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-7198; 425-353-6710; Health Spas My Hair Salon: 11632 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-4864; Beauty Salons NW Total ATM: 208 Heather Road, Everett, WA 98203-1911; 425-595-4025; Automated Teller Machines On Site Auto Glass Services: 1431 112th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4821; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc. Panda Wok: 520 128th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-9362; 425-374-2185; Restaurants Paroba College: 9930 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-3883; 425-355-3696; Schools-Universities and Colleges Academic Remarkable Renovations: 1732 124th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-6579; 425-9486075; Remodeling and Repairing Building Contractors Snoco Solid Waste Facility: 600 128th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6353; 425-316-9240; Waste Disposal Solutions Insurance Group: 4809 132nd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6241; 425-316-8463; Insurance Terry’s Precision Products: 1102 Shuksan Way, Everett, WA 98203-7155; General Merchandise-Retail Tortas Locas Tienda: 9601 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204; 425-903-4018; Restaurants Victim Support Services: 5023 Claremont Way, Everett, WA 98203-3321; 425-252-6081; Crime Victim Services

We Know Feet Inside and Out! From simple sprains to major pains, the doctors at Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett are trained exclusively to diagnose and treat ankle and foot problems. When experience, knowledge, and personal attention are important to you – give us a call and meet these special doctors. Let us help you put your best foot forward! SECOND LOCATION! Alpine Foot & Ankle Clinic 17432 Smokey Point Boulevard, Arlington WA • 360-653-2326 www.alpinefootandankle.com Practicing at both locations:

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1520766

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425-339-8888

www.ankleandfootnorthwest.com 1524559

Viventium: 4718 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-2831; 425-374-7703; Nonclassified

Granite Falls Caseworks Install Inc.: 194414 Skinner Road, Granite Falls, WA 98252; Installation Service New Day Community Counseling: 101 E Stanley St., Granite Falls, WA 98252; 360-6915055; Counseling Services

Lake Stevens Darcy C Baker Property Management: 5112 99th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 982588700; Real Estate Management

Lynnwood Bella Construction Services: 17606 Larch Way, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8203; 425-7455557; Construction Companies Bouchard & Associates Inc.: 6226 196th St. SW, No. 1A, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5959; Nonclassified Establishments Cask & Trotter: 18411 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4456; 425-967-5245; Nonclassified Establishments Celeste Boutique: 4201 196th St. SW, No. 160, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6776; Retail Cheap Electric Contractors Co.: 19324 Alderwood Mall Parkway, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4817; Electric Contractors Cheap Heating & Air Conditioning: 19332 36th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5710; Heating Contractors Emergency Heating & AC Co/: 4220 Alderwood Mall Blvd., Lynnwood, WA 98036-6766; Heating Contractors Fairway Independent Mortgage: 19031 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731; 425673-4101; Real Estate Loans Gresham Financial: 15517 40th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2348; 425-582-0334;


MARCH 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

BUSINESS LICENSES Financial Advisory Services Guardian Security: 2031 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7080; 425-673-9184; Security Control Equipment and Systems-Wholesale Herbal Nails & Spa: 2109 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-3800; Manicuring Jackson Lawn Care: 16825 48th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6401; 425-835-0548; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Keeboo Car Wash: 19406 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036; 425-361-1155; Car Washing and Polishing Linear Employment Pro: 3717 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5774; 425-6788274; Employment Agencies Lynnwood Sports-Physical Therapy: 18521 76 Ave., No. 110, Lynnwood, WA 98037; 425670-1200; Physical Therapists Medicare Exchange: 19031 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731; 425-361-1764 Mizumi: 19400 36th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5706; 425-361-1055; Nonclassified Moe’s Market: 15620 Highway 99, No. 7, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1476; 425-743-0300 Mukilteo Cafe: 12315 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1553; 425-322-3796 On Site Appliance Repair: 5621 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6106; Appliances-Household-Major-Repairing On Site Copy Machines Services: 16003 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1429; Copying and Duplicating Service Performance Chiropractic: 18623 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4552; 425-3612269; Chiropractors Quality Auto Center: 20420 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7450; 425-582-7397 Ryann: 2322 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7010; 425-835-0041; Nonclassified Establishments Spencer Home Solutions: 15620 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1475; 425-3617197; Nonclassified Establishments Summit Financial Inc: 3400 188th St. SW,

Lynnwood, WA 98037-4747; 425-361-7084; Financial Advisory Services Windshield Replacement On Site: 3021 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6925; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc.

Marysville Blu Berry Yogurt: 1206 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-3645; 360-386-8694; Yogurt Derron Investments Inc.: 13501 51st Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7765; Investments Diedrich Espresso: 1309 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270; 360-657-2233; Coffee Shops Emerald City Foods II Inc.: 1522 Third St., Marysville, WA 98270-5082; 360-572-0316; Food Products-Retail Forrest M Malone Services: 1626 Seventh St., Marysville, WA 98270-4602; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Glam Commercial Properties: 2707 171st Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4740; 360-652-7041; Real Estate Management Mod Super Fast Pizza: 319 State Ave., No. 101, Marysville, WA 98270-5027; Pizza NW Total ATM: 14549 46th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98271-3412; 360-322-6024; Automated Teller Machines NW Meadow Fabrications: 606 Cedar Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4547; 360-653-8492; Assembly-Fabricating Service (Manufacturers) Qdoba Mexican Grill: 2631 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4825; 360-652-8385

Mill Creek Concept Occupational: 15808 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1500; 425-2256867; Nonclassified Establishments Giggle & Wiggle: 3226 132nd St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5666; 425-338-2481 Greek Pita: 16212 Bothell Everett Highway, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1603; 425-224-4451 Milluxury Nail Spa: 1018 164th St. SE,

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Mill Creek, WA 98012-1502; 425-967-8182; Manicuring Mission Office: 16124 35th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6199; 425-338-5564 Northshore Capital Funding: 15712 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1573; 425357-1227; Financing Washington-Everett Mission: 3321 156th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8332; 425337-8648; Nonclassified Establishments

Monroe Emergency Heating & AC Co.: 20310 Old Owen Road, Monroe, WA 98272; Contractors FX Pro Detailing: 19003 Lenton Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1316; 425-485-1353; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Tractor Supply Co.: 13650 Roosevelt Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2818; 360-794-0558; Farm Supplies (Wholesale)

Mountlake Terrace Juneau’s Garage: 21404 56th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-3102; 425-5828432; Automobile Repairing and Service

Mukilteo Beach Front: 10226 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4504 Benefit Solutions NW Inc.: PO Box 6, Mukilteo, WA 98275-0006 GRE Strategies Inc.: 5823 St. Andrews Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4858 Great Clips: 11700 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275; 425-512-9651; Salons Jireh Asphalt & Concrete: 12303 Cyrus Way, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5737; 425-9034079; Asphalt and Asphalt Products Sydney Bakery and Wine Bar: 613 Fifth St., Mukilteo, WA 98275-1533; 425-374-8297 Unique Reflections and Hair: 12704 Mukil-

teo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5720; 425-405-3259; Beauty Salons Vartan Product Support: 11524 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5416; 425349-0053; Nonclassified Establishments

Snohomish Dishwasher Repair and Services: 1208 First St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2737; 360-2174136; Repair Shops Free Mobile Services Auto Glass: 323 Second St., Snohomish, WA 98290-3007; Automobile Glass-Service and Installation Fruit Of The Root: 9929 Airport Way, Snohomish, WA 98296-8229; 360-568-3099; Fruits and Vegetables and Produce-Retail Garage Door Repair-Snohomish: 1830 Bickford Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-1749; 360-863-7803; Garage Doors-Repairing Same Day Auto Glass Repair: 304 Ave. A, Snohomish, WA 98290-2837 Snazzy Badger Pub: 907 1st St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2906; 425-260-8911; Bars

Stanwood Old Cedar Home Market: 6809 284th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9547; 360-7224172; Food Markets Pacific Telecommunications: 7202 281st Place NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-4509 Riverland Realty: 9902 270th St. NW, No. A, Stanwood, WA 98292-8091; 360-926-8402; Real Estate Tech Machining USA: 1918 Sunday Lake Road, Stanwood, WA 98292-9238; 425-754-8221 Warm Beach Health Care: 20420 Marine Drive, No. N, Stanwood, WA 98292-6160; 360926-8275; Health Services Washington Tree and Lawn Services: 17415 W Lake Goodwin Road, Stanwood, WA 98292-8920; 360-652-9151; Tree Service

LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III

Friday, April 1 | 7:30 pm $39, $34 & $29 | Youth/Student $15 The 2010 GRAMMY® Award-winner for Best Traditional Folk Album is by far the most candid diarist of the singer-song-writers, wringing more human truth out of his contradiction than any other songwriter of his generation.

PATTI LuPONE Thursday, April 21 | 7:30 pm $79, $74 & $69

An American actress and singer best known for her work in stage musicals, Patti LuPone is a two-time GRAMMY® Award winner and a two-time Tony Award winner. She is also a 2006 American Theater Hall of Fame inductee.

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Ana Moura is a Portuguese fado singer, and the youngest fadista to be nominated for a Dutch Edison Award. An international star who has performed with The Rolling Stones and Prince, she brings the requisite soul and a contemporary sensibility to the longing-filled Portuguese music called fado.

ec4arts.org | 425.275.9595 410FOURTHAVENUENORTH EDMONDSWA98020 1536107


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2016

Dr. Brenda Kodama Cascade Eye and Skin Centers Dermatologist Northwest Master Gardener Pug lover

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Dr. Kodama—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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HeritageBankNW.com | 800.455.6126 1517285

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Herald Business Journal - 03.01.2016  

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Herald Business Journal - 03.01.2016  

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