Page 1

NORTH COUNTY TEAMS

Groundhog Dinner

HEAD FOR POST SEASON

Tonasket Kiwanis Groundhog Dinner at THS Commons, Friday, Feb. 5 from 5-7 p.m.

See Pages A8 & A9

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2016 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Oroville School Board tackles discipline issue

WE’VE GOT SPIRIT

Staffs In-House Suspension and Solutions Rooms (IHS), rather than being sent home. High School Principal Kristin Sarmiento was asked to explain how OROVILLE – In an effort to get a students were disciplined in her building. “It starts with a positive reinforcement handle on discipline, especially what to do with suspended students, the school system. We have student expectations board approved the hiring of a para- posted and they are reviewed often. We also meet once a week professional for each building to give them “I’ve been talking to to go over problems that we are working an in-house option for parents, they want on,” she said. improper behavior. The high school The approval came something done teaches social behavafter a lot of discusnow! I think In-House iors, but when there sion between the to be a secondary board, administrators, Suspension would be needs intervention because a teachers and parents a great program.” problem is escalating at the Monday, Jan. the school arranges 25 meeting and the Kolo Moser, School Director, for teacher and parent previous board meetOroville School Board contact and perhaps ing in December. The even teacher, parent paras will be assigned and counselor contact. to monitor a place for “Typically the first one or two times students who are being disciplined, in the elementary it will be something like the having school detention handles the Solutions Room that was staffed there in problem. There is after school detention past years. In the high school it will be for repeat offenders and they find out a place where suspended students can spend their time in In-House Suspension SEE DISCIPLINE | PG A2 BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photos Oroville High School held a Spirit Week leading up to this week’s high school athletic events including wresting against Chelan and Republic on Wednesday and boys and girls basketball against Manson on Thursday. Above, Some of Oroville’s Cheerleaders fire up the crowd at a bonfire behind the Catholic Church. Left, Alexis Allenby is caught by Mikaela McCoy, Bonnie Roley and Jennifer Cisneros to complete a stunt during the game against Manson. Below, James Thacker dressed as Oscar the Hornet shows his spirit.

Jeffko elected as Mayor Pro Tem for Tonasket Approve Stewart’s mission to keep flags up to code BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - City Council Member Claire Jeffko has been named Mayor Pro Tem for the next two years, replacing Jill Vugteveen who has servied in that role since January 2014. A mayor pro tempore assumes mayoral duties in the event of a mayor’s absence. Jeffko, a city council member the past two and a half years, said she had confidence in her ability to fulfill the role. City council members made a motion allowing decorated war veteran Michael Stewart to take over raising and lowering flags in Tonasket; modifying flag poles with winches and keeping flags and poles up to code. Stewart said he embarked on this mission when he approached a local business and asked them to lower the flag on 911. “She refused, because it was too difficult,” said Stewart. Stewart said the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy would pay for new cables to

modify flag poles. Stewart said he would like to see American flags taken down if they were not treated with respect, adding it was usually due to a lack of education. Stewart had been at Tonasket High School earlier in the day to present information on proper flag etiquette and said he would be happy to share the information with other interested organizations. Stewart said he ordered a new City of Tonasket flag at his own expense to fly at the Tonasket Visitors and Business Resource center. Jeffko offered to kick in $75, and Mayor Patrick Plumb offered to pay for shipping. In department reports, City Clerk and Treasurer Alice Attwood said she was approached by Oroville’s Arnie Marchand about starting a Neighbor Day where councils of neighboring cities would tour each others’ cities and share ideas. Police Chief Darren Curtis said a fulltime position as a police officer has been

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

NVH board approves purchase of new equipment

Replacing aging cardiac monitor, endoscope BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

North Valley Hospital registered two patients over 103 years old in 2015, according to Jana Symonds in her yearend report at North Valley Hospital’s Jan. 28 board meeting. If investing in high-quality equipment helps more Okanogan County residents live longer along with increasing hospital revenue, NVH is on the right track. “Investing revenue back into equipment is what we are about,” said NVH Board Member Herb Wandler. The comment was in response to Board Member Adam Tibbs questioning a request made by NVH’s Kelly Cariker for a new GE Cardiac Monitor System at a cost of $99,818.16. “It’s a very expensive system, but this

does all our cardiac monitoring,” said bypassing the possibility of human error Cariker. “We want to do anything we can retyping in vital signs read electronically. for the safety of our residents within the “It’s more the standard of care in larger zip code.” facilities,” said Cariker. “We would be Cariker said the hospital’s current car- the first Critical Access Hospital (CAH) diac system is “well in the county to have past it’s end of life and this.” starting to be a con“We owe it to our “We want to do anycern, as they no longer patients,” said Zwicker. thing we can for the make parts for it.” “Anyone with any type Cariker said a new safety of our residents of cardiac monitorsystem was budgeted ing that needs done within the zip code.” in last year, and venneeds this equipment. dors brought in differ- Kelly Cariker, Chief Information Officer We don’t want to be in North Valley Hospital ent equipment for staff a position to have to to test. The GE model ship anyone out.” they chose is compatWhen Tibbs asked ible with the system already in place, why the request was being made now, Cariker said they budgeted almost Cariker said he didn’t want to wait until $118,000 for a new system, and CEO the current system failed to order the Mike Zwicker had negotiated a steep dis- new one. count to bring the price down to under “This isn’t something you can bring in $100,000. a vendor and get it installed in a week,” The new system will access direct- said Cariker. “This can take up to a ly into the hospital’s computer system, month to get installed.”

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 112 No. 4

“We want this for best practice,” added Zwicker. “When anyone comes into ER it is best to monitor them; it’s one of the first things we do.” “The system we have now is older equipment and we always worry about the viability of equipment over five years old. Anytime something is five to seven years old it becomes obsolete; technology is always changing,” explained Cariker. “This is one of those pieces of equipment we can’t get away with not having,” said Helen Casey. Surgery Manager Trevor Rise said every time he has been on the floor, at least one patient was being monitored on the system. The motion was moved and seconded to purchase the cardiac unit, with no one opposed. Rise next approached the board to request the purchase of a Pentax HD endoscopic system with a five year service contract at a cost of $155,362.54. “This is a capital budget item that has

SEE EQUIPMENT | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US

Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com katherine@gazette-tribune.com / ext. 5052 Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

been on the agenda the past six years.,” said Rise, adding the hospital does over 200 procedures per year; a service the hospital has been providing for almost 20 years. “Our current system is over ten years old, and in medical years that’s a long time. We’re going on year 14, so it is past it’s life expectancy,” said Rise, adding he had just received a letter from Olympus saying the hospital’s current model was no longer supported. Pentax sales representative Mark Pyle said Olympus owns 80 percent of the market on this equipment, thus they were able to dictate to hospitals when they needed to update their systems. “We knew this day was coming and it is here,” Rise said. Rise said the hospital in Republic has the Pentax system. “I took my surgery tech up there and we looked at it and we both like it. They have had it two years

Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

A3 A4 A5

Calendar Classifieds Real Estate

A5 A6-7 A7

Sports Schools Obituaries

A8-9 A9 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 4, 2016

LOCAL NEWS DISCIPLINE | FROM A1

FEELING APPRECIATED

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket School District honored school board members with a dinner and certificates of appreciation Wednesday, Jan. 27 in recognition of ‘School Board Appreciation Month.’ Pictured, l-r are Joyce Fancher, Lloyd Caton, Ernesto Cerrillo, Catherine Stangland and Jerry Asmussen.

EQUIPMENT | FROM A1 and are very pleased with it.” Dr. Donald Sebesta performed five procedures over a two-day trial run with the equipment. “It’s like the difference between driving a 1953 Chevy and a brand new one,” said Sebesta. “You can see the entire colon at once so you don’t have to move the scope around.” “Plus you get a better quality picture,” said Rise. “The old system is not even comparable; the clarity difference between the two

is incredible.” The system has interchangeable equipment for both upper and lower scopes so doctors can perform pulmonary as well as gastrointestinal procedures. “So if you do decide to go into pulmonary work you don’t have to go out and buy another scope,” said Pyle. “I do six or eight scopes a week here, and they need this,” said Sebesta. “This would work for lung cancer or colon cancer.”

When Tibbs asked why the hospital was choosing to switch over to Pentax when Olympus owned the majority of the market, Rise responded price was one factor; a new Olympus model cost closer to $200,000. “Most major teaching institutions all use Pentax,” said Rise. “This has been talked about in the budget for quite a long time,” said Board Director Helen Casey. Board member Dick Larson moved to approve the purchase and Wandler seconded it.

OHA presents: Inside the Gem, Lost Lake TONASKET - The Lost Lake wetland supports an astonishing degree of biodiversity, with several wetland types and a complex web of life. On Saturday, Feb 5, local botanist George Thornton, along with a panel of speakers, will share an inside view of this incredible biological resource. From aquatic insect-eating plants to Northern Harriers swooping through the air in search of prey, the wetland is a hub of activity. More loon chicks have been hatched at Lost Lake than at any other lake in Washington State, using the wetland fringe for nesting. Throughout the site, various kinds of wetlands foster the growth of rare plants and rich wildlife, as the mix of land and water transitions from forested seepage wetland to shrub swamp to calcareous fen. The presentation starts at 6:30 p.m. and will include an overview of: Wetland types, and a closeup look at rare plants that grow in the wetland (George Thornton); Habitat enhancements, such as nesting boxes and habitat piles (Lee Johnson); Onsite research into the intricate relationships between organisms, land, and water; specifically, the pollination of a rare orchid by mosquitoes (Chloé Lahondère and Clément Vinauger); How the Lost Lake Preserve is being used to increase understanding of wetland and forest ecology (Julie Ashmore).

there are consequences, they miss sports, etc.,” Sarmiento said. In the junior high some teachers have voluntarily been giving up their lunch hours so students can serve lunchtime detention. Teacher. “Most of the time it does work,” said Sarmiento, who added that Saturday school detention doesn’t work as well. “That’s because some students want to be suspended... our ultimate goal is we want them in class, we want to be teaching them,” she said. Sarmiento said the Discipline Committee had met all last year and worked with a program called A Time to Teach, which teacher Jay Thacker had experience with in Goldendale, Wash. It teaches the best practices and alternatives to suspension and expulsion. School Director Kolo Moser said, “Students are still being suspended and you’re having them come down to the office. It seems like nothing is being accomplished because nothing is being taught.” Sarmiento replied, “We used to have in-house suspension and it was held in the old superintendent’s office, which doesn’t go directly into the school. They must work to catch up on assignments. Because they couldn’t see any of their friends they didn’t like it as it was taking the social piece away.” Sarmiento said this went a long way toward creating an atmosphere where the student didn’t want to get suspended again. “The room was staffed by a

parapro to help the student who did not teach. While there was no new material, it gave the student a chance to catch up,” she said. “Have you spoken with the staff about the in-house suspension room?” asked School Director Ryan Frazier. “Yes, they’re constantly asking when it is coming back,” said the principal. Lisa Cone, a parent, asked why the in-house suspension had gone away. She said when her son was in the elementary they had a Solutions Room and it went a long way in helping her son deal with issues. “My kid came here when he was seven-years-old and he had a lot of issues, the Solutions Room was amazing,” said Cone. “He needed a place to go to calm down. Mrs. Jewett ran it at the time and now that he is in high school and she is there she is still the number one person he goes to for help.” Sarmiento said the In House Suspension Room went away due to staffing issues. “So your recommendation is having In-House Suspension,” asked School Director Mike Egerton, the board chairman. “We need to do something,” she replied. Moser said he had four people with legacies in Oroville saying they were going to take their kids out of school. “In-House sounds good to me,” he said. “A lot of times if we can remove that audience (other students) the behavior changes. Some kids just want to be suspended and sent

home. If they are suspended they get behind... it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy,” Sarmiento said, adding, “A lot of times some of these kids have never been exposed to appropriate behavior.” Superintendent Steve Quick asked how the board was going to fund staffing two rooms. “My recommendation is to talk to the principals and see how high a priority it is,” he said. “I’ve been talking to parents, they want something done now,” said Moser. “I think In-House Suspension would be a great program.” Parent Chris Allen said this was something that couldn’t wait until next year. “Both principals do a good job. This board makes progress and I think now’s the time to get the teachers what they need,” Allen said. “As of this year is this a high priority?” asked Frazier. Principal Sarmiento said it was. Chairman Egerton suggested the district dip into the reserves to fund the two parapros, one for each building, for the next four months until the end of the school year and address staffing the positions for the next school year at budget time. “We will have to use reserves as basic education funds don’t cover it,” said District Business Manager Shay Shaw. “I move we fund an In-House Suspension Room in the high school and a Solutions Room in the grade school,” said Moser. His motion got a second from Frazier and was approved by the board unanimously.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 offered to a candidate, dependent on his passing all exams. Plumb asked Curtis if he was happy with the Public Safety Testing process Tonasket opted for rather than doing all testing in-house, and Curtis said he felt it provided a larger candidate pool due to a broader base for advertising. He and Attwood said they had “four really good candidates” apply for the position.

Curtis also requested the city extend the two-hour parking rule two blocks to include Seventh Street. Right now it only covers First to Fifth streets. Curtis said a business was parking their rig for 24 hours at a time, interfering with snow plowing. Curtis next approached the council about renovations to the Police department building. “We need a new building and I doubt that we’ll see that in my

lifetime, but we have some funding set aside and would like to renovate with a new roof and renovations to the upstairs and officers’ quarters,” said Curtis, adding that he had a budget of about $50,000. Curtis was advised to meet with Tonasket’s Building Department Superintendent Christian Johnson for a Request for Proposals.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Meet Rick Cruea, new Kinross general manager As Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn (KRB) begins our eighth year of mining ore at Buckhorn Mountain, we can’t help but express our heartfelt appreciation to the communities, employees, friends, families and neighbors who have helped make our operation a success. You may recall that the Buckhorn Mine was originally scheduled to close after a seven year mine life, in mid-2015. As a result of the dedicated work of our talented employees throughout various facets of the operation, the Buckhorn Mine has been able to exceed its anticipated mine life and is therefore not scheduled for closure until mid-2016. As has been the case this past year, we will continue to update the life of mine plan as closure approaches. Meanwhile, the KRB site has experienced some recent changes in management. Mark Ioli, who has been Vice-President & General Manager of KRB since 2011, is now the Vice-President & General Manager of Reclamation Operations for all of Kinross’ North America sites. Fortunately for us, he decided that he and his family love the area too much to leave it, and he will continue to live in Ferry Rick and Annette Cruea with grandkids Asher and Ryker. County in his new role. sure. I remain fully committed to the people in this “While it saddens me to no longer be an integral community.” part of the day-to-day operations and fantastic Taking his place as VP/GM of KRB is Rick workforce, I am looking forward to plugging back Cruea. Rick has worked for Kinross in various lointo the Reclamation Operations across North cations in the United States, Brazil and most reAmerica while staying close enough to ensure a cently in Chile. He has 42 years of experience in seamless transition of the Buckhorn Mine into clo- the mining industry and is looking forward to add

working at Kettle River to his career experiences. “I just recently joined the Kinross Kettle River Buckhorn team and I am very happy to work with such a great group of people in such a beautiful location. I will be living in Republic with my wife Annette and we both look forward to getting to know people in this wonderful community. I have six adult children, nine grandchildren and two great grandchildren, and I look forward to many of them visiting the area.” Rick fully understands and has experience in addressing the many sensitivities and emotions surrounding the realities of closing a mining operation. As everyone is acutely aware of the short mine life at our Buckhorn Mine, he wants to assure the community that the local team and Kinross continue to look for opportunities to continue operating the Kettle River Mill, but at this point there is nothing is definite. “We, however, are working very hard to explore all possibilities.” Over the next couple of months, Rick will be going around to local community meetings to introduce himself and get to know the people of our region. If you’d like an opportunity to meet with him, please contact Deana Zakar at 509-775-8525. Meanwhile, if you see either Mark or Rick around town, please take a moment to congratulate them both on their new roles within Kinross.


FEBRUARY 4, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Anthony Thomas Thompson, 34, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Jan. 15 to harassment (gross misdemeanor) (lesser included of harassment [threats to kill]). The court dismissed a charge: second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). Thompson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 181 days suspended and credit for 183 days served. He was fined $600 for the July 16, 2015 crime. Garrett Thomas Peterson, 22, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 28 to POCS (heroin). The court dismissed charges of use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. Peterson was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,719.50 for the April 1, 2015 crime. William Christopher Taylor, 22, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 26 to POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. Taylor was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 73 days suspended, and fined $1,760.50 for the Jan. 10 crimes. Shane Michael Heisey, 29, Oroville, pleaded guilty Jan. 26 to attempted POCS (methamphetamine). Heisey was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $2,260.50 for the Dec. 17, 2105 crime. Katherine Louise Evers, 27, Kelowna, B.C., pleaded guilty Jan. 26 to use of drug paraphernalia (lesser included of POCS [cocaine]). Evers was sentenced to 12 days in jail with credit for 12 days served, and fined $510.50. The crime occurred Sept. 26, 2015 and the Oroville Port of Entry. The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 29 for Michael James Danner, 29, Omak, for possession of marijuana (with intent). The crime allegedly June 16, 2015. The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 27 for Donald Manchester, 62, Riverside, for two counts of unlawful use of a building for drug purposes. The crimes allegedly occurred March 10, 2015. The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 27 for Jamie Lisabeth Wallace, 62, Riverside, for three counts of delivery of marijuana, two counts of manufacturing marijuana and one count of possession of marijuana (with intent). The crimes allegedly occurred March 1, April 9, May 7 and June 16, 2015. The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 27 for Aleta Johanne Sewell, 68, Kirkland, for three counts of delivery of marijuana, and one count each manufacturing of marijuana and possession (with intent). The crimes allegedly occurred March 10, April 21, May 27 and June 16 in Okanogan. The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 27 for Jared Patrick McLaughlin, 25, Tonasket, for residential burglary and thirddegree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2015 in Winthrop The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 27 for Christopher Oliver, no middle name listed, Tacoma, for possession of marijuana (with intent). The crime allegedly occurred June 16, 2015 in Okanogan. The court issued a criminal summons Jan. 29 for Vickie Lucille Scholla, 64, Omak, with seconddegree theft (by color or aid of deception). The crime allegedly occurred between Jan. 1, 2011 and Nov. 14, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Dusty Lynn Simpson, 36, Okanogan, with three counts of third-degree assault (of a law enforcement officer). The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 10. The court found probable cause to charge Michelle Lynn Carden, 27, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) and introduction of contraband. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 21. The court found probable cause to charge Jerry Michael Fuller, 58, Curlew, with harassment (threats to kill). The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 16. The court found probable cause to charge Jonathan B. McKinney, 42, Tonasket, with residential burglary and second-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred between Nov. 1 and Dec. 28, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Cory Lee Craig, 27, Omak, with first-degree burglary and second-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 23. The court found probable cause to charge Trevor Ray Godwin, 43, Tonasket, with second-degree malicious mischief (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 11. The court found probable cause to charge Jillian Marie Lewis, 28, Duvall, with POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin), firstdegree DWLS and obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 4, 2015 in Omak.

JUVENILE

A 15-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Jan. 20 to attempted theft of a motor vehicle. The boy was sentenced to 30-40 weeks at

CIVIL

The state Department of Revenue assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes, penalties and interest: Scroungers 2nd-Hand Emporium, Omak, $1,361.44; Sully’s Cafe, Loomis, $5,534.43. The state Employment Security Division assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment benefits, penalties and interest: Jake Thornton, Oroville, $219.41; Stacee Lavigueure, Oroville, $482.30; Dwight Holcomb, Oroville, $227.30; Terrance W. McGinness, Tonasket, $4,390.08; George P. McPeak, Okanogan, $933.18; Royce W. Knowles Jr., Omak, $622.12; and Wendy M. Hamm, Omak, $2,236.13.

DISTRICT COURT

Robert Ellis Allen, 32, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Mary Lou Barber, 69, Omak, guilty of second-degree criminal trespassing. Barber received a 90-day suspended sentenced and was fined $413. Derrick Lynn Barrett, 34, Tonasket, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of fourth-degree assault.

Barrett was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $988. Lisa Louise Best, 44, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Best was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,083. Anthony William Carden, 18, Omak, had a charge dismissed: possession of a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle. Sandra Dee Cooper, 46, Omak, not guilty of sale of liquor to a person under the influence. Joseph Darwin Cormier, 25, Okanogan, guilty of violation of a nocontact order. Cormier was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 355 days suspended, and fined $873. Margaret Lenore Ferris, 60, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Jessica Elizabeth Freiley, 23, Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree theft. Freiley was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 360 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,716.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JAN. 25, 2016

Harassment on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan Harassment on Hayden Creek Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on. Mule Deer Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Edmonds St. in Omak. Television reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on N. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Fig Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Alexander Henry, no middle name listed, 29, booked for DUI. Jesse Lee Eugene Coyne, 31, booked on two counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and one count of second-degree unlawful hunting of wild birds. Israel Corrales Bejar, 24, DOC detainer. Kyle Steven Scott Cate, 24, DOC detainer. Ryan Patrick Taylor, 37, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

TUESDAY, JAN. 26, 2016

Theft on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Sex offense on Cow Camp Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Bull Run Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Trespassing on Bull Run Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. near Omak.

Fraud on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Threats on E. Third Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Juniper St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Assault on E. Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Drugs on E. Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Tori Fontae Tomma, 32, booked for first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Shimika Rosita Havier, 20, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: attempting to elude, DUI and MIP/C; and two State Patrol FTA warrants: second-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Robert David McCoy, 28, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Bobbie Jo Day, 47, court commitments for POCS and possession of drug paraphernalia.

gan. Harassment on Hendrick Loop Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Vehicle prowl on E. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Tammy Jean Davidson, 53, court commitments for third-degree DWLS and hit-and-run (attended property). Roger Joe Duncan, 41, court commitments for DUI and no valid operator’s license without ID. Ryan Paul Mulligan, 29, booked on an order of production. Robert Stanley Carlson, 54, court commitment for DUI. Angelica Valle Galvan, 39, booked on three counts of delivery of a controlled substance; and one count each of POCS, obstruction and possession of drug paraphernalia. Nathaniel James Edenso, 36, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants, all for contempt of court.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 2016

Assault on Copple Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. DUI on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Gene Charles Olson, 42, DOC detainer. Elizabeth Patricia Bauman, 27, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for a drug court violation. Franciska Mary Strub, 47, booked for first-degree DWLS and hitand-run (attended vehicle). Darcy Kim Edwards, 43, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Chace Kenneth Clarence Taber, 24, booked on an FTC warrant. Peggy Ann Ochoa Rosales, 55, booked for DUI. Dustin Hale Jones, 40, court commitment for DUI.

SUNDAY, JAN. 31, 2016

Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Greenacres Rd. near Riverhside. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Main St. in Oroville. Kile William Beeman, 25, booked on an FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Tyson Jordan Williams, 25, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and obstruction. Sarah Lynn Hall, 23, booked for first-degree trafficking in stolen property and second-degree theft.

Drugs on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Conconcully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Assault on Viewmont Dr. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. DUI on S. Main St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Amber Dawn Woods, 25, booked on five Omak Police Dept. FTA warrants, all for third-degree theft. Baldomero Yvarra Valdovinos, 77, booked on an FTA warrant for forgery. Timothy Charles Lewis, 45, booked for two drug court violations and a DOC detainer. Leonardo Trejo Hernandez, 29, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Gregory Eric Digiovanna, 41, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

THURSDAY, JAN. 28, 2016

Warrant arrest on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Morris Rd. near Okano-

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

SATURDAY, JAN. 30, 2016

BEYERS

Thank You... Mike Buckmiller

212 N Highway 97 • Tonasket WA

509-486-2183

would The family of like to express our sincere appreciation for all the love and support during his illness and death. We would like to thank his medical staff at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the staff at North Valley Hospital and Dr. Doug Wilson, and our friends and family at Gold Digger Apples. Thank you everyone for the many expressions of kindness, support and love you have shown us during this difficult time for our family. It has been comforting to each of us.

Hours 8am - 8pm 7 Days A Week We gladly accept EBT Quest cards and WIC checks.

Family Pack!

Surprise Your Sweetheart with

Warrant arrest on E. Third St. in Tonsket. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Rodney Allen Fisk, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft and a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Esperanza Sue Morales, 21, court commitment for DUI. Mandi Marie Smith, 37, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS.

FRIDAY, JAN. 29, 2016

Flowers!

6

Family Pack!

98

Boneless Beef New York Steak

178

Bone-In Pork Country Style Ribs

lb.

lb.

100% Natural Pork

CU$TOMER CA$H

®

Every Card is a Winner Bring it Each Time You Visit Our Store

AWARD SECTION DO NOT TAMPER WITH SEAL

Every card is a WINNER!

 Valentine Candy  Floral Arrangements  Balloons & Gifts

Phone:

COURTS CORRESPONDENT

the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration for the Dec. 31, 2015 crime. A 15-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 20 to minor in a public place exhibiting the effects of liquor. The crime occurred Aug. 27, 2015. In a second case, the same girl pleaded guilty Jan. 20 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. She was sentenced to a total of four days in detention with credit for four days served. A 17-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Jan. 20 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The boy was sentenced to 16 hours of community service for the Oct. 16, 2105 crime. A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 27 to fourth-degree assault. The boy was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for two days served, and seven hours of community service converted to one day in detention with credit for one day served. The crime occurred Jan. 18. A 12-year-old Okanogan girl pleaded guilty Jan. 27 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The girl was sentenced to ten days detention with credit for ten days served, and seven hours of community service converted to one day in detention with credit for one day served. The crimes occurred Jan. 17.

Name:

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

All cards are subject to verification and are void if tampered with in any way, illegible, mutilated, or if any materials contain mechanical, typographical, printing, or any other errors or if card obtained by unauthorized means. Void where prohibited by law.

WILD CARD wins groceries!

Win up to $1,000 in prizes instantly!

FILL YOUR CARD TWICE AS FAST! DOUBLE PUNCH DAY! Friday • February 5, 2016 All purchases doubled on your card!* (You buy $30 – We punch $60) *Power Punches Not Doubled

Blossom & Briar 509-476-3193

Just 2 miles N of Oroville 33436 US Hwy 97, Oroville, WA 98844

*NO PURCHASE NECESSARY (See participating store for individual store odds, awards available and complete rules.) © 2016 Store Marketing Associates, under license.

58

Hass Avocados

Choice Lemons

¢

Great for homemade guacamole for your football party!

ea.

88

2/

A refreshing complement to your favorite football beverage!

¢

32nd Annual

Tonasket Kiwanis GROUND HOG

DINNER! – FRIDAY –

Feb. 5, 2016  5 to 7 p.m.

Western Family Chili with Beans

Tonasket High School Commons

Selected Vtys., 15-oz.

Adults (13+): $9.50 Children (12 & under): $4.50

*Bulk Sausage will also be available at $3.00 per lb.

Selected Vtys., 11.5 to 18-oz.

7 6

2/$

Frito-Lay Variety Pack Chips Selected Vtys., 20-ct.

98

Stouffer’s Party Size Frozen Entrees Selected Vtys., 57 to 90-oz.

1098

— www.centerplacemarket.com —

PreSchool: Free Menu: Sausage, Potatoes, Vegetable, Coleslaw, Beverage, & Dessert

88

¢

Frito-Lay Party Size Chips

We reserve the right to limit quantities and to correct pricing errors. No sales to dealers. Not responsible for typographical errors.

All Profits go into Youth/Community Fund!

Ad Effective Dates February 3 Thru 9, 2016


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 4, 2016

PAGE A4

THE TOWN CRIER Let the town’s theme grow naturally

I attended last Saturday’s economic roundtable at the Oroville Grange Hall and found it surprisingly good. While this is one of a long line of “we got to do something” about the local economy meetings that I’ve been to over the past three decades (well almost), there is something to be said for those who are concerned about the economic health of Oroville and the surrounding communities. There were several people who offered up their ideas on which direction we should be heading. Some of the old ideas about a town theme resurfaced, but who wants to be another Leavenworth, Winthrop or even Republic – we’re already late to that game. Perhaps the most true conclusion was get something going first, the theme will come about naturally. Deana Zakar was there representing the Buckhorn Mine and spoke about the company’s efforts to soften the financial blow the eventual closing of the mine will have on Okanogan and Ferry counties. Mikkel Gredvig from the Solar Out of Shop in Tonasket spoke about the opportunity to My Mind get on board in the alternative energy field. He Gary A. DeVon said he was the only solar business in Okanogan and Ferry counties and that business was good and there was room for more people in the field. Vicki Eberhart, president of the North American Wool Co-op, talked about the opportunities that will follow once the Eco Fiber Mill is up and running. Chris Branch was there from the city and Clyde Andrews the Chamber of Commerce President. Perhaps Howard Zosel got some of the most attention talking about the opportunity that the last two fires have presented to the area. Zosel, from Zosel lumber said that the timber damaged by the fire was unique and could be made into many products including flooring and other products; products that put glued together wood composites to shame. However this unique looking wood has to be used soon or it loses its value for lumber. That kind of goes along with the artisan vibe that was spoken of, craftsmen creating quality products that could be sold using local materials – like wool and fiber from the Eco Mill, lumber milled locally. Zakar said that when a survey was done in the area people still valued the industries that used our natural resources – land for farming, timber, cattle and mining. Finding a way to use these products and make them totally unique to the area, make our area known for adding value to what we have. Perhaps a theme of sorts did come out of the meeting, sponsored by the Oroville Grange, after all - A town full of artisans. Not to forget John Marcille, who spoke about his long history of organic farming in the area .John and Susan’s High Mountain Farm has been certified organic since 1983. There is a lot of room for more of these kinds of farms as people look to locally grown produce to set their table. Farming and cooking are arts of their own and would fit in with the artisan theme. Another meeting on economic development I went to in Tonasket years ago spoke of the Buy Local Campaign in Snohomish County. I still have a poster from that meeting from the King-Pierce County Farm Bureau. It says in big letters over a photo of beautiful produce – “Homeland Security” and under the photo it says, “Buy local. It matters.” Words to live by while keeping our friends and neighbors in business, creating new business and making more jobs. I don’t know if everyone got the same ideas I did from the meeting, but rather than doing this every five years or so, maybe we better starting meeting on a regular basis. There are a couple revitalization groups that have started up and I encourage everyone to give them your ideas and support.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Back from the past

Dear Gary, It seems my ghost of letters past is being prodded back to life. OK. I could not respond to Bill Slusher for two reasons. First, I was hoping some of the three different ethic local groups that he labeled wrong-evil-users would respond. Didn’t happen. Not even the Canadians he insulted. I’m half Canuck. Second, I don’t like to be publicly or privately hated. It’s wrong. As I said years ago – and meant it – I hate nobody. Even Dubya I elevated above hate. Just expressed my disdain. B.S. relied on “Shock Jock” opinions- hoping for negative to his views – Hate back

letters. I couldn’t jump in his cowpies. Nor could I rely to the “sage of the sage” Tonasket version of B.S. Alas, good ‘ol J.C. from Everett rose to the call in my absence. Well done. You never fail to spur the facts. Thank you. So here we are. The GOP contenders have quite an uphill battle ahead. The Trump-Cruz debacle is perfect fodder for the dysfunctional power group called “Republicans.” Fight over morsels. Who can score the most insults. Trump “trumps” that one. He does have Sarah Palin screeching her nonsense in his favor. Go Sarah! Caribou Barbie is such a respected, knowledgeable kook. What better way to egg-beat far right brains.

Confusion say: Mentally challenged exgovernor that backs pompous, boisterous, ego inflated hot air back billionaire is good for opposition! Progression can exist with narrow mindedness. It creates a smarter zealot. Live and love, Learn and laugh, Dan Dixon Oroville P.S. Weighing your occasional liberal views against Slusher’s non-stop conservative glop was like a mouse and elephant on each side of a teeter-totter. So long B.S…don’t let the door hit ya….Feels good to get your feet back on the ground, eh Gary?

Public Records Laws need fixing – to a point OPINION BY JOHN MCCALLUM CHENEY FREE PRESS

According to a recent study by the Center for Public Integrity, Washington state is the 12th best in the nation for openness, which isn’t saying much apparently as it received a D-plus and the ranking reflected a decline when it comes to governmental openness and integrity. In Spokesman-Review writer Jim Camden’s story on the study, Washington Secretary of State spokesman Dave Ammons noted the state typically gets high marks in other studies for its public records disclosure laws and governmental transparency. “But it’s something you never stop working on,” Ammons added. That’s something news media outlets and government officials likely agree on — our public disclosure laws need work. How and where that work needs to occur will differ. One of the biggest concerns for Washington’s public officials is dealing with large public records requests that tie up limited resources for extended periods of time, preventing employees from concentrating on other tasks. Sometimes these requests are simply fishing expeditions by private citizens with a beef looking for faults or attorneys handling class action suits looking for as many potential money pots as possible. Other times, these records requests come from individuals engaged in research with potential commercial value. The city of

Cheney is currently filling such a request by two professors from separate universities engaged in a joint research project. The professors, who have submitted their request to other Washington cities, have asked for all police reports resulting in felony arrests, warrant or in-view, from 2012 – 2014, including additional data such as if charges were filed. The request was filed Oct. 2, and according to Cheney Finance Department officials, they have just recently provided all the information for 2012. They’re still working on 2013 and 2014. Association of Washington Cities governmental relations advocate Candace Bock said other cities have received requests so large, that they cannot meet the entire request immediately, and must release the information over time as filled. Accordingly, the AWC has listed “strengthening” the Public Records Act, particularly when it comes to requests that “do not provide a public benefit proportionate to the taxpayer dollars needed” by allowing cities to recoup more of their costs through charging “reasonable” fees along with resolving conflicts outside the courtroom. We agree cities and counties need some help in dealing with these forms of requests. But only to the point that the help does not add more exemption to existing Sunshine laws. Passed in 1972 with over 72 percent of the vote, Initiative 276 set up what was at the time the nation’s premier open records and

public disclosure laws. Since then, hundreds of exemptions have been added to those laws, making public disclosure difficult at times, not only for media organizations such as ours but particularly for the average citizen. Our relationship with local public agencies regarding record requests has mostly been good. But there have been times that have given us pause. Every so often, a public official balks at providing copies of information already publicly presented because they are not sure that information should be given to the media specifically. There have been times we have had to ask for public information that really should have been made available at a public meeting. On one occasion, a request was filled slowly, and with many questions asked and eventually lacked some requested information, the agency citing exemptions that, when examined against other information submitted, were backed by flimsy reasoning. We agree work needs to be done on this state’s public records and disclosure laws. But that work should be eliminating the numerous exemptions that have clouded the intent of the original law. And while we understand concerns about the cost of filling public records, and agree there should be some relief, we think they might want to take an inward look at why they’re experiencing that burden. Or as Ammons put it in a Nov. 17 interview, “The ones who have exemptions are the ones who are now screaming bloody murder.”

Government needs to work better OPINION BY LEE H. HAMILTON

Whoever wins next November’s presidential election, it’s a sure bet that at some point he or she will vow to set the federal government on the straight and narrow. Maybe the new President will even resort to the timehonored pledge to create a government “as good as the people.” It’s a bracing sentiment. But you’ll want to take it with a grain of salt. Our history is filled with remarkable government accomplishments. Our involvement in World War II and hands-on approach to the postwar reconstruction of Europe and Japan, our role in ending the Lee Hamilton Cold War, the interstate highway system, extending the right to vote to all our citizens, federal research and support for ending diseases such as polio... There’s a long list of crucially important efforts the federal government has executed well. Yet every American ought also to be alarmed by an expanding list of missteps and blunders. In a report last month for the highly capable and too-little-noticed Volcker Alliance — whose goal is to improve government effectiveness — NYU Professor Paul C. Light drew attention to what he calls “a shocking acceleration in the federal government’s production of highly visible mistakes, miscalculations, and maladministration.” He went on to say, “The aging bureaucracy can no longer guarantee faithful execution of all the laws, and it has become increasingly unpredictable in where and how it will err.”

A moment’s reflection will call to mind a sobering litany of failures: the inability to stop the 9/11 attacks; the confused, inadequate response to Hurricane Katrina; the even more confused response to the 2008 financial collapse; shortfalls in the care of our veterans; bridge collapses, mining accidents, and other failures caused by inadequate funding for inspection and regulation; the breaches in White House security; the fact that we’ve now been fighting a war on terror for nearly 15 years with no end in sight... It’s enough to make the staunchest champion of government action lose hope. These failures can occur for many reasons: muddled policy, insufficient resources, poor organization, lack of leadership, lack of skills, sometimes even outright misconduct. The question isn’t really what or who is to blame. It’s how we turn things around and reverse the accelerating pace of breakdowns. To start, the executive and the legislative branches need to focus on the implementation of policy. A lot of hard work goes into its creation, both on Capitol Hill and in the agencies, but the sad truth is that much less attention goes to how it’s going to be carried out. This is largely in the hands of the President, but Congress has a crucial role to play both in crafting the law to account for how it will be implemented, and then in pursuing oversight afterward. Both branches need to pay attention to how they will assess effectiveness, anticipate problems, make sure that staffing is adequate, and provide necessary resources. Second, if making policy today is complicated, so is implementing it. This means that we need skillful people within the government to carry it out. Let’s be blunt. You don’t

want a second-rate lawyer negotiating arms control or trade agreements. You don’t want third-rate scientists defining drinking-water requirements. Getting things right means hiring good people, retaining them, and then making sure they’re held to account with wellconceived metrics. Finally, we have to put an end to the politics that so often stymies policy. Too often these days, the losers of a policy debate immediately turn to torpedoing it. They block the filling of key positions, cut funding, twist the objectives, or impose hiring freezes. They block policy changes that would improve implementation, put unqualified executives in control, or tolerate misconduct and confusion. Some government failures aren’t the result of muddled policy, lack of leadership, or incompetence; they’re the result of what amounts to calculated sabotage. Most Americans want government to work well. We want it to enhance the quality of our lives and our communities. Arguments over the appropriate size of government are important, but that’s not the issue here. The issue is that when a policy is adopted, it needs to be executed effectively. Whoever our next President turns out to be, let’s hope he or she takes that charge seriously. Lee Hamilton is a Distinguished Scholar, Indiana University School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. For information about our educational resources and programs, visit our website at www.centeroncongress.org. “Like” us on Facebook at “Indiana University Center on Representative Government,” and share our postings with your friends.


FEBRUARY 4, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Not ready for Monday I’m not ready for Monday. Can’t I have another Sunday?. Rains have just about cleared away the snow and lots of green grass is showing. I wonder if that is why so many deer are being seen, looking regal and like they are “King of the road.” In driving past the old “FAO’s” Restaurant, it appears that work is being done. This is the second time for such sights being seen there and then it stops and nothing is completed. I think it would be nice to have another eating establishment in town... and some other new businesses. Maybe when spring arrives there will be something happening. Hughes Department Store is making some adjustments and will continue on with business. That was good news to learn. Headlines in the paper last week tell us that Mr. Quick, high school superin-

tendent, is resigning. To some that will be good news, to others not so. Condolences go out to the family of Glenda (Gideon) Wisdom Preston who passed away last week after suffering a heart attack. It seems there is an epidemic of cancer in our community. Some of those afflicted are Mike Tibbs, Marge Finley, Judy Ripley, Winnie Barker and Mr. Westlland, of World of Gaia. Some have just been diagnosed while others have had procedures and having followup treatments. Hopefully all will have good reports. Eleanor Thorndike Gausman, formerly Oroville, now East Wenatchee, can be added to the above list. Ray Ballard Had a recent heart attack but seems to be doing well, at this time. Don and Joan Dixon will be leaving the area, moving to Oregon. Don is a retired veterinarian. Joan has been the pianist at the United Methodist Church

New van to get over the mountains

USAF LEGACY UPDATE

SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL STEWART US ARMED FORCES LEGACY

For those interested, our county commissioners recently approved the OCVB’S [veterans board] request for funds from its budget to pay the one half cost of a new Ford Flex van, all-wheel drive to get our veterans over the mountain safely to Spokane VAMC and back. It is not wheelchair accessible so those needing that service must arrange for that vehicle to come up from Wenatchee via the veterans RHC at North Valley Hospital. Our veterans are getting great support from our commissioners as the new and available programs come on line in our county. Building a workable program is an ongoing process, yet look what is available to our veteran population.

Much credit has to be given to our new county service officer Eric Fritts. His ability to be innovative with the need for state of the art records keeping and benefits access is greatly appreciated. His talents are just what the office needs. And those skills were apparent as he put together a wonderful Power Point presentation of the Codes and Proclamations given to civilians as to the reasons the Flag of our county exists and how to pay proper respect to it. Hastily arranged at the THS via Mr. Terris and Mr. Riley for the morning of the 26th, two classes of their students met in the school library with Eric, Jan Lewis, Roger Castelda and

Valentine’s Day fast approaching

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

A happy February to all and hope that your January was a pleasant one. It is almost time to think of a little something for a friend or loved one with Valentine’s Day sneaking up on us.Winter is still toying with us and I hope all are staying nice and warm this winter. Tuesday will see our Taco Tuesday upon us, so come on in from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. and enjoy some delicious tacos with your friends. Wednesday one of our pool league teams will be here

Full line up for the Tuesday programs SUBMITTED BY RALEIGH CHINN

hoping to win their game starting at 7 p.m. Come in and help cheer the team to victory. Thursday at 1 p.m. the pinochle players have been hosting a Thursday game so come in and enjoy the game with other people. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. on Friday for our hamburger night and the smell of those hamburgers and other foods will get you to drooling. Bingo will start at 7 p.m. on Friday and is a great time for all. Get those daubers ready and come and try at the chance to hit the big jackpot. Saturday we will have Joker poker at 7 p.m. and Linda will spin some awesome

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Boy, how time flies by while you are having fun. Here it is the start of February, already, and we are gearing up for our monthly Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser on Saturday, Feb 13, at the Oroville Senior Center, 1521 Golden Street, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange

BIRTHS Kaden Wade Hayworth was born to Heather Babb and Billy Hayworth of Oroville, Wash. on Monday, January 25 at 7:23 a.m on Monday, January 25, 2016 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. He weighed seven pounds, 12 ounces at birth and was 21 inches long. He joins big brother Silas, age 4. His maternal grandparents are Jay Babb of Loomis, Wash. and Dorothy Abberton of North Dakota and his paternal grandparents are Billy Hayworth Sr. of Oroville and the late Wanda Cline of Oroville. Juan Andres Bautisa Camacho was born to Yesenia Camacho Garcia and Juan Bautista Cruiz of Tonasket, Wash. at 4:23 p.m. on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. He weighed nine pounds, five ounces at birth and was 22 inches long. Kennedy Elaine Clark was born to Falisha and Brandon Clark of Tonasket, Wash. at 3:20 a.m. on Sunday, January 17, 2016 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She weighed eight

juice, and milk; all for just $8 US. Our Tuesday programs are also open to the public, so if you see one you are interested in, feel free to come. They start at 11 a.m. On Tuesday, Feb. 9 we have two teachers from Uruguay on an exchange with the Oroville School District. Feb. 16 is our monthly Business Meeting and pounds, three ounces at birth and was 22 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Ray and Delia Laurie of Tonasket and her paternal grandparents are Steve and Tammy Clark of Tonasket.

MARRIAGE LICENCES Jan, 5, 2016 Laura Kay Preston, 37, Winthrop, Wash will wed Nathan Henry Michelsen, 37, Winthrop, Wash. Jan. 6, 2016 Diane Marie Lowell, 56, Malott, Wash. will wed Stanley Sher-

312 S. Whitcomb

for many years and surely will be missed a lot. A farewell potluck dinner will be held in their honor next Sunday, after church. What does a clock do when hungry? Go back for seconds! Congratulations to Bob and Margaret Hirst, on their wedding anniversary, Thursday, Feb. 4. A reminder of the Kiwanis Ground Hog Dinner, tomorrow night, Friday, Feb. 5th, not Saturday night as is the usual time. What a pleasant surprise to have Joanie (Emry) Raymond call on us last Sunday afternoon. Joanie lives on Vashon Island and that is where Vivian Emry, her mother, now makes her home. She also called on Candy (Churchill) a high school friend when they were both students in Oroville. I have a book that I call “My Big Book of Stuff” and it has no rhyme or reason when it comes to being alphabetized, I just stick things in, at random, and once in a while attempt to sort it out, but that never really happens. I keep the memo-

myself, Michael Stewart. We discussed the various laws, attitudes, and customs usage of our Flag. We have been invited back for the next semester’s students and look forward to doing so. In the near future we are going to rework the Flag poles located at the USAF Legacy and the one in the triangle at the north end of town. As all the poles in use in Tonasket are in need of a much easier method of raising and lowering the various flags some of us have taken that on as a responsibility to remedy. To our younger veteran population! As you begin your return to civilian life or are in the middle of that event, know that many folks have worked very hard to help provide your era of veterans the best services available. A lot more, than many before you could access. Find us when you need assistance. To our communities! Thank you for your unwavering support. tunes at 8 p.m. for karaoke. Break out those dancing shoes and your singing voice and come have a great time with friends. Sunday breakfast will be served from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. and pinochle will start at 1 p.m. On Feb. 13 don’t forget to come in and help out our local FFA Alumni and enjoy a great steak feed at 5:30 p.m. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows. Dave Russell and Ted Paris took home first place and second place went to Jo Porter and Ken Cook. Jerry Cooksey and Zoe Manring grabbed the last pinochle of the day. Carol Ross and Ward Seim had low score of the day. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state. on Feb. 23, Lynn Chapman will fill us in on the Streetscape Committee activities. Senior lunch menu for Thursday, Feb. 4 - roast beef, Friday, Feb. 5 – sweet and sour pork and Tuesday, Feb. 9 – clam chowder. Can you believe that we had 10 pool players last Friday at two tables? Pinochle results from last Saturday were: Most pinochles: Mary Lou Barnett, High man: Jim Frye, High woman: Bev Holden. Door Prize: Evelyn Dull. Through for the week: Happy Valentine’s Day! man Cook, 76, Malott, Wash. Jan. 8, 2016 Courtney Roxanna Harker, 19, Vernon, British Columbia will wed Wesley Aaron Shaver, 21 Vernon British Columbia Jan. 15, 2016 Wilma Jane Colburn, 68, Oroville, Wash. will wed Carl Charbonneau, 61, Oroville, Wash. Jan. 28, 2016 Aspen Spring Hayes, 33, Twisp, Wash. Stratton will wed Matthew Joseph Stratton, 34, Twisp, Wash. Joanna Rose Wilson, 30 Okanogan, Wash. and Joshua Wayne Allenby, 27, Okanogan, Wash.

509-486-0615

rial cards from funerals, sorta together, Stewed some apples she thought might and that’s as close as it gets to being in spoil, any sort of order. Anyway, when I put Churned the butter, baked a cake, Ruth Leslie’s card in the book, I ran Then exclaimed, “For goodness sake! across this item, and it is so The calves have got out of like her, I just had to print it. the pen!” It’s called Mama’s Mama... Went out and chased them A tribute to Ruth in again. “Mama’s mama, on a winGathered the eggs and ter’s day, locked the stable, Milked the cows and fed Returned to the house and them hay, set the table. Slopped the hogs, saddled Cooked a supper that was the mule, delicious, And got the children off to And afterward washed all school. THIS & THAT the dishes, Did a washing, mopped the Fed the cat, sprinkled the Joyce Emry floors, clothes, Washed the windows and Mended a basket full of hose. did some chores, Then opened the organ and began to Cooked a dish of home-dried fruit play, Pressed her husband’s Sunday suit. When you Come to the End of a Perfect Swept the parlor, made the bed, Day.” Baked a dozen loaves of bread. (I was told there were over four hunSplit some wood and lugged it in, dred signatures in the memorial book Enough to fill the kitchen bin, the day of the funeral.) Cleaned the lamps and put in oil. ‘Til next week.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CCC Talent Show

TONASKET - The annual Talent Show in it’s 17th year will be held on Saturday, Feb. 6 at 6 p.m. A baked potato dinner will be at 5 p.m. with toppings, salad, dessert and beverage for $5. Bud McSpadden will be back as emcee. Don’t miss this fun event. Price of admission will be $6 for CCC members, $7 for the general public. Performers and kids under 12 are free. Kiwanis Ground Hog Dinner

TONASKET - The 32nd Annual Tonasket Kiwanis Ground Hog Dinner will be Friday, Feb. 5 in the high school commons from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The menu is sausage, potatoes, vegetable, coleslaw, beverage and a dessert. Adults (13+), $9.50, children 12 and under, $4.50, pre-school, free. Bulk sausage will also be available at $3 per pound. All profits go into the Youth/ Community Fund. Tonasket Gun Club Trapshooting

TONASKET - Tonasket Gun Club trapshooting this Sunday, Feb. 7 at 10 a.m. and runs weekly through February. Practice each Wednesday at 1 p.m. Club members will help new shooters. Oroville Gun Club Trapshooting

OROVILLE - Inland NW Trapshooting at the Oroville Gun Club this Sunday, Feb. 7 at 1 p.m. and runs weekly to Feb. 28. Practice shooting is every Saturday at 1 p.m. The Oroville Gun Club will again raffle off a Henry Rifle or cash equivalent for first prize. Second is “the Family Gourmet Banquet from Omaha Steaks. Get raffle tickets from a club member or stop by Paul’s Service. Tonasket School Board Reschedules Meeting

Tonasket - The Tonasket School Board has canceled the Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016 regular meeting and will hold it on Monday, Feb 8, 2016. The meeting will be in the board room starting at 7 p.m. Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed

OROVILLE - The Oroville Episcopal Church will be hosting a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed on Tuesday, Feb. 9 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the church hall on 604 Central Ave. The breakfast includes pancakes, sausage and homemade applesauce. Tickets are available at the Oroville Pharmacy or at the door. Adults, $6, seniors, $5 and children 12 and under, $3.

OROVILLE - The Oroville American Legion, Hodges Post #84, will be having their annual Crab Feed on Saturday, Feb. 13 starting at 5 p.m. in the Legion Hall. Tickets are available from R.L. “Louie” Wilson at 509-476-3438 or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique or the American Legion at the bar. ‘It’s Showtime 2016!’

OROVILLE “It’s Showtime 2016” live entertainment starts on Saturday, Feb. 13 at Vickie’ s Backdoor Club, Main St., Oroville. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Show starts at 7 p.m. Live Music, free admission, all refreshments $1.00 each. Proceeds benefit the Oroville Library. Future show days are Feb. 20, Feb. 27 and March 5. Green Okanogan Recycling Center Benefit Auction

TONASKET - Save the date for the Green Okanogan Recycling Center benefit auction Saturday, Feb. 13 at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket. At 5 p.m. the doors open with a silent auction, then at 6 p.m. there is an enchilada casserole dinner and 7 p.m. a live auction. All proceeds from this event will go toward purchasing the property just south of Tonasket that GO is currently leasing. Dinner is $10, the event is free. If you have items to donate or need more information, call 509-486-0674. Bible Camp Fundraiser

OMAK - Conconully Bible Camp is having a dinner and dessert auction Saturday, Feb. 20 at 5 p.m. It will be held at Cornerstone Christian Fellowship In Omak. Come hear what is going on at camp and enjoy some good food and fellowship! Dinner is $5 per person or $20 per family. If you have any questions, or would like to donate a dessert, please contact Leann Bevier at 509·322· 5233. Becoming a Contractor for Disaster Response & Recovery

TONASKET - There will be a pancake dinner served on Tuesday, Feb. 9 at 6 p.m. at the Holy Rosary Church in Tonasket. Everyone is welcome to come celebrate the beginning of Lent, which is called Shrove Tuesday. Senior Center Pancake Feed

Pesticide Recertification Class

OROVILLE - The Oroville Senior Center will be hosting a Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser on Saturday, Feb. 13, at the Oroville Senior Center, 1521 Golden Street,

OMAK - The Okanogan County Noxious Weed Control Board will be holding a Recertification Class on Thursday, Feb. 25 at the 12 Tribes Resort Casino, 28968

Shrove Tuesday Pancake Dinner

Reach Your Constituents

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

US-97, Omak. Class size limited to around 100 people, so please pre-register. The class will be from 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., with topics including: Glypho-what?: Learn what’s behind the headlines about glyphosate; What’s New at Bayer? New products, new apps and new training options; plus updates on Esplanade and Perspective; A bacterial approach to Cheatgrass management; Puncturevine: Easy to Kill, Hard to Control; and Post Fire Restoration. There will be no charge for the class; credits will be available. For more information call the Noxious Weed Office at 509 4227165, or stop by, Room 102 in the County Courthouse. Local Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. OROVILLE - The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386. Listing Your Item

The Community Bulletin Board allows listing your event up two weeks prior to the day/s it occurs. Send to P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 or email to editor@gazettetribune. Our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info phone number. You may place an event online by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 REGULAR SHOWTIMES Oliver, B.C. Sun.–Mon.–Tues.–Thurs.....7:30p.m. Fri.–Sat....7:00 &9:00p.m. (unless otherwise stated)

STAR WARS

PG

HARRISON FORD. THURS.- TUES. FEB. 4-9.

THURS.-TUES. FEB. 11-16. 7:30.

THE HATEFUL EIGHT

18A

EXPLICIT VIOLENCE - JENNIFER JASON LEIGH.

THURS. - FRI. FEB. 18 - 19. 7:30.

THE BIG SHORTCOARSE

14A

LANGUAGE - CHRISTIAN BALE. SAT. 7:00 & 9:30. SUN. MON. TUES. FEB. 20, 21, 22, 23. 7:30.

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

Two New Releases this week!

Schedule for Fri. Feb 5 - Thurs. Feb. 11 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

KUNG FU PANDA 3

PG

95 min

ANIMATED COMEDY, REALD3D. JACK BLACK. FRI. 7:00. SAT. *3:45, 6:30. SUN.

*3:45, 6:30. MON.-THURS. 7:00.

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

THE FINEST HOURS

PG13

117 min

ACTION/DRAMA. CHRIS PINE, CASEY AFFLECK. FRI. 6:15, 9:15. SAT. *3:15, 6:15, 9:15 . SUN. *3:15, 6:15. MON.-THURS. 6:30.

Reach THE 5TH WAVE SCI-FI/ 113 PG13min 2.7 Million ACTION. CHLOE GRACE MORETZ, RON Readers YOU NEED HELP – They need work. LIVINGSTON. FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:30,

Advertise inadvertising 6:30, 9:30. SUN.*3:30, 6:30. MON. 6:45. throughout Washington YOUskills NEED HELP – They byneed work. Community your job in 106 Community Newspapers! Reach over 2 million readers with many

SUNSHINE CLOTHS! Just $5.00 each

American Legion Crab Feed

PATEROS - An open house on Becoming a Contractor for Disaster Response & Recovery on Tuesday, Feb. 23 from 1 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. at the Pateros Fire Hall, 191 Industrial Way. (Fire Hall: the big green building on river side of Hwy. 97) Class is free, space is limited, Register online, at the door, or by calling 360-464-6043. Approximately $10 million in contracts were awarded in Okanogan County during 2015. If you’re interested in providing the equipment, goods or services needed before, during, and after fire season to help aid fire and other incident support, you won’t want to miss this workshop

We’ve Got You Covered

Put a shimmery polish on your Gold or Silver Jewelry –

from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, and milk; all for just $8

Reach over 2 million readers with many Newspapers, LOWthroughout COST • Washington ONE CALL aby • Key ONE BILL skills advertising Source of Local Region or the Entire State! your jobBuy in a106 Community Newspapers!

DIRTY GRANDPA

R

102 min

COMEDY - ZAC EFRON, ROBERT DE NIRO. LOW COST •Call ONE• One CALLPayment • ONE BILL FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. SUN. One 509-476-3602 Buy a Region or the Entire State! *3:45, 6:45. MON-THURS 7:00 Political News

Request a free information kit today:

Call this Newspaper for Details

Request a free information kit today:

509-476-3602

Adult $9.00

*Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


PAGE 6 A6

OKANOGAN 2016 OKANOGAN VALLEY VALLEYGAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE|• FEBRUARY February 4, 4, 2016

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

Oroville $700/mo 2 bed / 1 bath New kitchen, cozy home in town. Fenced yard. Tenant pays utilities. Call (509)560-0736 for more information.

AVAILABLE RENTALS; 3 BR Home $850. 2 BR, 2 BA home $700. 2 BR apt $650. 1 BR Apts start at $550. Sonora Shores $695. SUN LAKE REALTY 509-476-2121 Oroville Senior Living, Henderson Apartments, on Lake, N. Oroville, 3 miles on Boundary Point rd, 2 bdrm, in good shape, no smoking, no pets. Taking applications, $675/month, first and last. (509)476-2449

Announcements WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF February 1, 2016 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

(360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ANTIQUES ANTIQUE SALE, Snohomish Star Center Mall & Citywide, 500 Dealers, up to 40% Off, Fri-Sun Feb 5-7 (360) 568 2131 www.myantiquemall.com EARLY BIRD Automobile, Antique and Collectible Swap Meet. Puyallup Fairgrounds, February 13 & 14, Saturday, 8-5. Sunday, 9-3, admission $5.00. For information call 1 (253) 863-6211.

EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance Agents Needed * Leads, No Cold Calls * Commissions Paid Daily * Lifetime Renewals * Complete Training * Health & Dental Insurance * Life License Requires. Call 1-888713-6020

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Help Wanted

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Subscribe to the...

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

We are looking for YOU to join our team!

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee / supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing EVENTS-FESTIVALS quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 is welcome. million readers in newspapers stateWe have the following wide for $275 classified or $1,350 opportunities available: display ad. Call this newspaper or

HELP WANTED

Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Health General

DRIVER Okanogan County Transportation seeks relief driver immediately in the Tonasket and Oroville areas, CDL with passenger endorsement preferred but not required. Must be 25 years of age; pass background check, pre-employment and random drug testing and DOT physical. Apply in person at 431 5th Avenue W., Omak, Wa or find the OCTN application and background check online at www.octn.org under employment options. EOE Lee Frank Mercantile Tonasket, WA We are accepting applications for a FULL-TIME SALES & YARD POSITION. Experience preferred. Lifting required. 324 S. Whitcomb Ave Tonasket, WA 98855 509-486-2105

OKANOGAN ADMIN: Certified Medical Coding Specialist Full time WIC Registered Dietician/Nutritionist Full time OMAK MEDICAL: Clinic Custodian Full time, 32 hrs/week MA-C Full time BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time position Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Roomer Full time, Bilingual required MA-Certified Full time RN Case Manager Full time Dentist Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

Twisp/Okanogan Dental: Dental Assistant 2 Full time positions. Travel between clinics is required. Bilingual Spanish/English preferred. Must be available Saturdays. Patient Registration Full time. Travel between clinics is required. Bilingual Spanish/English required. Must be available Saturdays.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

cated within or close proximity to the City of Tonasket and to deliver diesel to the Waste Water Treatment Plant on request. Bids shall be quoted at a set amount over supplier’s cost at time of delivery and verification of that cost must accompany monthly billings. Bids shall exclude Federal taxes. Bids are to be submitted on a form available at the City Clerk’s office at 209 S. Whitcomb Avenue or call 509-486-2132. Mailing address: P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA 98855. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any informality. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 28 and February 4, 2016. #OVG679612

Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd N, Okanogan, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL A THAT PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 33 NORTH, RANGE 22 E.W.M., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE AT THE WEST END OF THE TWISP BRIDGE ON STATE HIGHWAY 20; THENCE SOUTH 19 DEG. 05’71” WEST 212.20 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 66 DEG. 27’11” WEST 104.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEG. 17’52” WEST 83.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEG. 21’43” WEST 69.38 FEET THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 35’17” WEST 34.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 4 DEG. 00’05” EAST 568.89 FEET THENCE SOUTH 88 DEG. 38’05” EAST 26.49 FEET TO POINT A, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEG. 38’05” EAST TO THE ORDINARY HIGH WATER MARK ON THE WEST BANK OF THE METHOW RIVER; THENCE FOLLOWING SAID ORDINARY HIGH WATER MARK NORTHERLY TO A POINT LYING SOUTH 66 DEG. 27’11” EAST OF THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. (SAID POINT OF BEGINNING BEING NORTH 19 DEG. 05’21” EAST 450.15 FEET FROM POINT A); THENCE NORTH 66 DEG. 27’11” WEST TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. PARCEL B A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY AND UTILITY LINES AS DESCRIBED IN EASEMENTS RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NOS. 752318 AND 752321. More commonly known as: 621 METHOW VALLEY HWY E, TWISP, WA 98856-9829 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/9/2008, recorded 5/14/2008, under 3132488 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from JOHN E CRAMER, AND CARRIE L CRAMER, HUSBAND AND WIFE , as Grantor(s), to LS TITLE OF WASHINGTON , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follo wing amounts which are now in arrears: $109,332.27 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $237,987.98 , together with interest as provided in the Note from 3/1/2011 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real proper-

ty will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/12/2016 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 2/1/2016 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 2/1/2016 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 2/1/2016 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOHN E CRAMER, AND CARRIE L CRAMER, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 621 METHOW VALLEY HWY E, TWISP, WA 98856-9829 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 5/31/2013 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 2/9/16 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1989 Plymouth Voyager Lic# 897-WQJ Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 4, 2016. #OVG678363 PUBLIC NOTICE Contractors and Vendors Lists As authorized under RCW 35.23.352 (2), and RCW 35.23.352(8), the City of Oroville is updating their Small Works Roster, consisting of contractors interested in performing work for the City of Oroville which is estimated to cost less than $100,000 and their Vendor’s List, consisting of vendors interested in providing supplies, materials, equipment or services between $7,500 and $15,000 through telephone and/or written quotations. In awarding contracts for such projects, the City of Oroville shall invite proposals from all appropriate contractors or vendors who have requested to be included on the Small Works Roster and/or Vendors List, and shall select the lowest responsible bid. All contractors and vendors, where required by law, must be properly licensed or registered in this state. The City of Oroville actively seeks participation by minority or women owned firms who otherwise qualify. Individual Assurity Bonds acceptable. Forms may be secured at the Oroville City Hall or by calling 509-4762926. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 4, 11, 2016. #OVG680251 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-15-673648-SW APN No.: 3322170314 Title Order No.: 150152613-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): JOHN E. CRAMER, CARRIE L. CRAMER Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3132488 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 2/12/2016 , at 10:00 AM at the main entrance to the

Crosswords

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Public Notices Notice of Call for Bids For Gasoline and Diesel Requirements For 2016 & 2017 Sealed bids to supply gasoline and diesel for the years 2016 & 2017 will be received by the City of Tonasket until February 23, 2016 at 7:00 p.m., at which time the bids will be opened at the regular City Council meeting. Regular-grade, mid-grade, and super unleaded gasoline and diesel shall be available 24 hours a day at a key lock or guard card supply station lo-

Continued on next page

23. “From Here to Eternity” wife

8. Employment terminations

24. Strategy board game

9. Betting game

25. Big blowout

10. Simple sugar

29. Horizontal trellis on posts

11. Gown fabric

31. Unlawful

12. Bailiwicks

33. Something outstandingly difficult (British)

13. Talks raucously

37. Snoopy, for one

24. Rodeo sight

38. Not straight

25. Kind of lettuce

39. Cause oneself to consider

26. On the safe side, at sea

41. Large, brightly colored handkerchief

27. Bed board

42. Tenth month

28. Type of gas that reduces knock (hyph.)

44. “-zoic” things

30. Smallest of the Great Lakes

45. Young bird 48. Pie cuts, essentially

32. Press and release a mouse button

50. Advanced

34. Boris Godunov, for one

51. Rectories 56. Arm bone

35. “Empedocles on ___” (Matthew Arnold poem)

57. The “A” of ABM

36. Scandinavian shag rugs

58. Italian dry white wine

40. Pertaining to the sacred texts of Islam

59. 20-20, e.g. 60. ___ Piper 61. “Come in!”

ANSWERS

Across 1. Goes (for)

62. Arid 63. “God’s Little ___” 64. Aquarium fish

6. Take into custody 10. “Don’t go!” 14. Kind of skeleton 15. ___ Minor 16. Halo, e.g. 17. Asian plant’s flaxlike fiber 18. Vice president under Jefferson 19. Ball of yarn 20. Director of an opera 22. Applaud

21. Discerning

41. Kind of manner 43. Trade goods or services without money 45. Hints 46. Axe handle 47. ___ tube 49. Atlas enlargement

Down 1. Delhi dress

51. Perry Como’s “___ Loves Mambo” 52. Bang-up (hyphenated)

2. Final, e.g.

53. General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (acronym)

3. Walk lamely

54. “... happily ___ after”

4. Wild animal’s den

55. “Buona ___” (Italian greeting)

5. Aerodynamic 6. 1972 Liza Minnelli musical film 7. Money lender


FEBRUARY 2016• O | OKANOGAN VALLEYGGAZETTE-TRIBUNE February 4,4,2016 KANOGAN VALLEY AZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-15-673648-SW IDSPub#0093035 1/14/2016 2/4/2016 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, and February 2, 2016. #OVG665003

18000 International Blvd, Suite 550, SeaTac, WA 98188, Telephone (206) 246-8772 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. #OVG678089

DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 21, 2016. /s/Sandra Lynne Downing Sandra Lynne Downing, Personal Representative 12774 90th Ave, Surrey, B.C. V3V6G5 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Mark A. Reinhardt Mark A. Reinhardt, WSBA 24723 18000 International Blvd, Suite 550, SeaTac, WA 98188, Telephone: (206) 246-8772 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. #OVG678077

You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 31st day of December, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, and serve a copy of your answer upon the uudersigned attorneys for plaintiff, LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE, at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with

the clerk of said court. This is a Complaint for Judicial Foreclosure of Deed of Trust. DATED: December 17, 2015 LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE By: /s/ Benjamin D Petiprin Benjamin D. Petiprin, WSBA# 46071 Attorneys for Plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette - Tribune on December 31, 2015, January 7, 14, 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. OVG675143

8

7

1

6

4

3

4

3 9 8

1 5

8

2

1

7

4

5

2

7

7

5

1

5 9

6 8 3

2

3

9

5

7

6

4

4

1

6

6 5

5

2 1

3 1

7

5

9

4

8

8

8 9 2

6 7

5 6 3 9

8

2 8 4 7 1

7 1 5 2 6

6 7 9 5 4

4

8

2 8 1 3

1

4 6 3

6 7

3

8

5

2

2

9

4 1

7

6

3

6 1

3 9 4

1

9 3 8 4 5

2 7 6

3

4 9 6 1 7

8 2 5

5

1 8

4

5

5

3 6

4

8

6

2 9

7

2

7

8

7

6

4

2

9

3

3

1

1

9

6

9

1 9

3

2 4 5 1 7 6 8

8

4

9

3

6

7

4

7

6

7

8

4

8 3

2 5 1

1 5 9 3 2

3 5 2 1 4 8

9 6 7

1 7 8 9 3 4

5 2 6

5 3 4 6 2 7 1

8 9

2 9 1

8

6

4 5

8

7 9

5

6

3

2

7

1

4

3

3 4 5 1 7 9 8

1

2 3

4

4

5

5 6

2

3

3

Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

7

4

3

9

9

7

1 4

8 6 5 2

2 9 8 7 6

4 6

3 2

1 4

8

6

5

3

5 3 1

9 5 7

7 2 8

6

2

9

8

3

4

5 8

4 1 2

5 3 4 1

2

7 8 9

1

8 6 4

6 5

9 3

4

9

2

1

1

7

7

5

7 9 3 6

3

2 7

9 5

3

4

8

1

7

2

6

5 9

5

9 7

1 6 5 3 4 2 8

Puzzle 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

4 8

2

4 1 2 5 7

6

9

9

1 6

8 3

1

9

4

6 3 7 1 8

5 4 2

5 6 9 2 3

7 8

7 2 8 3 4 5 1 6

9

5

3 7 2 6 1 9 8

4

8

4 1 9 3 7 6 2 5

2 9 6

8 5 4 7 3 1

Puzzle 9 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

5

8 5

7 9

2 4

7

1

9

6

3

9

8 1

2

6 8

3 7

6

2

1

Puzzle 12 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

7

2

4

8 4 7

7 2 3 9

4 8 1 5 6

4 8 6 7 5

1 9 2 3

3 1 4 8 7 2

6 9 5

6 5 8 9 1 4 7

3 2

9 7 2 3 6

2

4 2

1

9 3 7 8

5 4 1

8

5

6 5 4

7 8 9 3 6 1

8 3 1

5 4 6 2 7 9

Puzzle 6 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.60)

1 6 8

7 2 9 3 4 5

4 7 2 3

5 6 8 1 9

9 3 5 4

1 8 2 7 6

6 5 1 8 7

2 9 3 4

2 9 7 5 4 3

6 8 1

8 4 3 9 6 1 7

5 2

7 2 6 1 3 5 4

9 8

3 1 9 2 8 4 5 6 7

5 8

4 6 9 7 1 2 3

Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Concrete

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

RYAN W. GUNN n Family

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Wow

“The Water Professionals”

Looking for something?

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County

Attorney at Law

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

Well Drilling

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Serving all of Eastern Washington...  Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems

Colville  Spokane  RepublicLic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

.51)

9

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory

1

8

*Please remember, it takes a lot of work and effort to sell your home. Your agent can only list and advertise your home, they need your help to sell it. They want your home to sell as much as you do!

6

6

1516 Ironwood

Corner lot with large front yard. 2 Bedrooms with 1 Bath on main floor and an additional attic area that can be 2 small extra rooms or a larger office, play room, extra guest room. Lots of potential for this cute home. Fresh paint and new floor coverings inside. This is a HomePath property. NWML#868506 $74,900

5

3

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

1. Fix what needs fixed! Finish all unfinished projects: Example - Patch holes, fix leaky sinks and toilets, etc... 2. Useable space is a key factor: Example - Make a junk room into an office. 3. Declutter! Put everything away and ready to move: Example - Family photos, knickknacks, etc... 4. Paint! It is amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do. Make it a soft, neutral color. 5. Open your rooms up! You want everything to look bigger! If you have too much furniture in a room, decide which pieces to keep and find a place to store the rest. Arrange the remaining furniture to make the room look larger. 6. CLEAN! CLEAN! CLEAN! Make everything sparkle!

8

1

509/476-3378

2

4

– Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon –

Brilliant, expansive views from this gorgeous property. Nearly 185 acres featuring 2 lakes and a creek! Wide open spaces and grasslands with plenty of building sites. Level and rolling acreage and lightly treed. What more could you ask for? MLS#802010 $200,000

3

4

HELPFUL HINTS TO SELL YOUR HOME

1510 Main St., Oroville  509-476-4444

www.windermere.com

.54)

5

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

2

7

9

8

7

9

509-476-3602

1

3

8

Sponsored by

8

9

3

Medium, difficulty rating 0.46

9

5

5

Puzzle 8 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

5

5

2

6

6

Puzzle 11 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

6

6

1

4

2

.48)

7

9

2

6

6

7

ANSWERS

3

1

4

9

3

2

9

5

9

2

6

1

4

1

6

9

4

7

4

4

8

5

7

5

3

2

2

2

7

6

0.54)

9

8

8

9

7

6

3

3

2

5

8

2

7

8

1

3

7

9

7

1

8

5

2

7

4

5

4

1

2

5

1

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

9

4

9

8

Stage the exterior of your home too. Stage the exterior with fresh paint, immaculate landscaping and even outdoor furniture to set up a Sunday brunch on the deck. Buyers often fantasize about enjoying their backyards by entertaining and spending time outside.

6

The exterior

5

www.gazette-tribune.com

1

1420 Main St.  P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602  866-773-7818

9

Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

REAL ESTATE Guide HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS

Sudoku

3

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, a limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN, a deceased individual; Julian Castro, solely in his capacity as Secretary for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NINE MILE RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; DOES 1 through 10, inclusive, and ROES 1 through 10, inclusive. Defendants. NO. 15-2-00443-5 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION (60 DAYS) THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID DEFENDANTS ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN:

6

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of DAVID R. VERBOIS, Deceased. Case No.: 15-4-07269-0 KNT PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. lf the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 21, 2016 /s/Mark D. Verbois Mark D. Verbois, Personal Representative 34414 SE Carmichael St, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Ryan Y. Rehberg, Ryan Y Rehberg, WSBA 32374

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of BRIAN WILLIAM DOWNING, Deceased. Case No.: 15-4-06796-3KNT PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets.

2

COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/ consumers/homeownership/post_ purchase_counselors_foreclosure. htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/12/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Lauren Esquivel, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality

Public Notices

5

Continued from previous page

Public Notices

7

Public Notices

PAGE A7 7


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 4, 2016

OBITUARIES

Dennis Edward Rawley

DENNIS EDWARD RAWLEY Dennis Edward Rawley, 75, of Tonasket died January 28, 2016 at his home in Tonasket. He was born September 24, 1940 in Sacramento, California, the oldest of seven children born to parents John and Gladys Rawley. Denny moved with the family to Nespelem when he was five, before finally moving to Tonasket where his father bought a small farm where they raised a few cows, pigs, chickens and a small apple orchard. In 1957 he married Ann Marcy and began working for the North Central Washington Telephone Exchange

at the age of 17, earning just $1.00 an hour. The following year they moved to Republic and a daughter, Sandy, was born in August 1959. They divorced in 1960. Denny served the Republic community in a variety of roles including Justice of the Peace, Coroner, Assistant Police Chief as well as delivering the Sunday Spokesman Review. Denny met Rose Taylor of Republic and they were married in the spring of 1961. Three sons were born before they moved to Tonasket in 1967. Denny loved the outdoors where he enjoyed camping, fishing trips to Canada, the Methow Valley and the San Juan Islands. He enjoyed hunting deer and grouse, but his real love was elk hunting. In 1964, along with his best friend Tom Hull, he established an elk hunting camp in the Naneum Ridge area affectionately known as Whisky Corner, aptly named by other hunters due to the amount of empty whisky bottles on display. Denny’s sons and several of his grandchildren continue to hunt from this camp to this day. Denny enjoyed a lifelong passion for bowling and watching boxing on TV. He thoroughly enjoyed gardening, caring for his lawn and was an avid woodcutter. He not only cut wood for his own home, but for many others in the area. Denny was well known for raising a vegetable garden of which he prided himself in quality tomatoes, having as many

as 200 tomato plants. In 1985, he retired from CONTEL Telephone Company where he had served as a lineman, installer-repairer and central office foreman. Even after retirement he would receive calls at home from people in the valley in need of telephone repair. In 1986, he started his own business, DenRose Produce, initially raising plants to sell and after two years transitioned to general yard care where he cared for customer’s lawns, rototilling, weed control, insect control, fertilizing and watering. Denny sold his interest in DenRose Enterprises and retired permanently in 2006. He continued to pursue outdoor interests and served as the President of the Bonaparte Snowmobile/ATV Club for over 20 years. Memberships: Tonasket Eagles Aerie #3002 President and was the District Deputy for all the Eagles clubs in Okanogan County, Treasurer; Bonaparte Snowmobile/ATV Club President, NRA, U.S. Armed Forces Legacy, Tonasket, Sons of the American Legion. He is survived by his wife Rose M. Rawley; daughter Sandy and Don Stanley of East Wenatchee; sons, John E. and Christina Rawley of Tonasket, William F. and Shelly Rawley of Spokane Valley, James L. Rawley of Renton and daughter-in-law Doris Rawley of Tonasket; his half-brother Wayne Rawley of

Riverside, brother Dale Rawley of Oroville, sisters Judy and Roger Paine of Spokane, Susan and Ellson Miller of East Wenatchee, Brenda and Randy Riggan of Forks and Wendy and Val Bitton of Connell; 15 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Denny was preceded in death by his parents, John and Gladys

Erin Anne Sneeringer

ERIN ANNE SNEERINGER Erin Anne Sneeringer, born June 9th, 1954, passed away peacefully at home with her family on Wednesday the 27th of January, 2016. In all essence of

Rawley of Tonasket, half-brother Stanley of Grand Coulee, brother Jack of Tonasket and granddaughter Rachael of Tonasket. Thank you to Dr. Stuhlmiller and Nurse Benie of North Valley Family Medicine, Nurse Stacy and the staff of Frontier Hospice and a very special thank you to Dr. Jim Helleson for his many

years of care for Denny. A celebration of his life will be held at the Tonasket Eagles, on February 6, 2016 at 11 a.m. The public is welcome. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Frontier Hospice of Omak located at 800 Jasmine Street, Suite 2, Omak, WA. 98841, www.frontierhhh.com/omak.

her words may good prevail on mother earth. Also may we all acknowledge that Death leaves heartache no one can heal, Love leaves memories no one can steal. Erin was a very loving and happy; wife, mother, friend, grandma, daughter, and sister. Erin lived and enjoyed life in California, Florida, Macedonia, Colorado, Germany, and Tonasket, Wash. Erin made Tonasket in the lovely Okanogan County her home and sanctuary. Once and upon a fond time she raised a beautiful family with her husband Charles. The best of times were experienced by all of those who were blessed with her presence. As a woman who had a huge heart she touched many people with her friendship and desired all those who knew her to remember with joy and happiness for the times that everyone spent together. She leaves behind a husband in Charles Sneeringer, sons Isaac and Micah Sneeringer, daughterin-laws Ana and Tania Sneeringer,

grandchildren Suriyah, Rebecca, Kyle, Daniel and Nicholas who in living around the world try to live with a love taught to them by Erin exhibiting to all they touch the lessons and model Erin exhibited through the way she lived her life. May she rest in peace, her memories and lessons will never be lost as their impact will last generations. We love you and although the physical presence is no longer with us your memories and lessons will be with us for the rest of our lives and passed on to our future generations. Erin worked for many years as a care provider to the elderly. She loved to provide the much needed love and care for our elders and made it her life of passion to assist many lovely people and their families in need of care No services will be held. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

Okanogan Valley

SCHOOLS

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Submitted photos

Gear-up’s Dawn Miller with Vex team members Trevor Miller Ethan Godinez, Xavier McCoy, Olivia Finsen, Seraphina Marie, Emily Grunert, Paul Fuchs, Michael Oaks, Coach Laara Peters-Kessler (not pictured Brayden Thompson and Leo Chen). Below the to award winning team of Godinez, Fuchs and Chen, with Coach Peters.

Oroville robotics team earns top award at Vex Robotics Tourney

ments worldwide. community, and they earned “On the way students learn life- a First Place trophy for their OROVILLE – One of Oroville long skills like team-work, com- efforts,” adds Peters. “We have School District’s three Robotics munication, perseverance, proj- one more tournament to compete Teams took first place with their ect management…and more,” in before the State Tournament. presentation of “Why Are Bees said Peters. The Wenatchee Tournament, Dying?” a projWhile the featured 80 matches that run ect researched main focus like clockwork, one right after and present- “Our students went the is on build- another. All of Oroville’s teams ed by Trevor a robot did well on the Robotics playing extra mile to produce a ing Miller, Paul then compet- field, each one of them in the top Fuchs and top notch project that ing with it, 10 at one time or another, but it Leo Chen, at the program all comes down to what team you was particularly relthe Robotics also offers are paired with, how skilled they Tournament in the option are and how well you can make evant to our agriculture Wenatchee on to research your alliance with them work, Saturday, Jan. based community...” and pres- according to Peters. 23. Laura Peters, Coach ent a Science “Thanks to everyone for doing This win Oroville VEX Robotics Teams Project. such a great job, and thanks to may help the “Our stu- parents who instill a sense of team qualidents went the curiosity in their children, the fy for the State Tournament at extra mile to produce a top notch willingness to put forth the effort Central Washington University project that was particularly rel- and the perseverance to get the in Ellensburg on Feb. 27 and a evant to our agriculture based job done!” she said. win there may send the team to the World Championship in Louisville, Kentucky, April 20. “GEAR-UP is proud to sponsor Robotics, the after school program designed to get kids curious and excited about STEM, that is Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, using Robotics as the platform,” said team coach Laara Peters. Students work in teams together, using an incredible VEX Robotics kit, to design and build a robot, complete with motors and sensors, to compete in head to head competition with students, first from Washington State, then if successful, with teams from all over the world. There are 12,000 teams from 32 The top award winning team of Ethan Godinez, Paul Fuchs and Leo Chen, countries and about 1000 tourna- with Coach Peters. THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming diversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 4, 2016

SPORTS

Wrestlers seeded for Districts

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Austin Wood pinned Liberty Bell’s Tanner White during Saturday’s (Jan. 30) League Mixer in Oroville. The two will face off again in the quarter-final round of Districts next Saturday (Feb. 6) in Tonasket.

Oroville’s Yohnny Castillo tosses a Bulldog off his back before winning this match against Okanogan. Castillo will face Okanogan’s Jaric Cook in the 132-pound quarter-final match at Districts Saturday, February 6.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

A League Mixer in Oroville Saturday, Jan. 30, finalized District seedings for Central Washington B League teams in the North Division. Districts take place at Tonasket High School Saturday, Feb. 6 beginning at 10 a.m. It will be a 12-man tournament in a 16-man bracket, so four top wrestlers received BYEs (advancing to the next round without competing) to the championship round; Tonasket’s Dawson Bretz and Devin Walton, and Okanogan’s Brenden Warren and Joe Mintzer. In the 106-pound weight class, Bretz wrestles the winner between Oroville’s Luis Vasquez and Brewster’s Javier Rosario for the championship. Tonasket’s Walton and Okanogan’s Warren will meet up for the championship round at 113. Brewster’s Jose Garcia wrestles Oroville’s Brigido Ocampo; while Paul Luther of Okanogan wrestles Jeffery Luna of Tonasket. The winners of those matches will compete for the 120-pound championship. At 126, Jilio Espino of Pateros wrestles the winner between Oroville’s Drake Fox and Tonasket’s Tim Freese; while Leithan Gillespie of Okanogan

wrestles Vance Frazier of finals, Okanogan’s Myron Super Okanogan’s Dwight Belgarde. a quarter-final match between Tonasket. The winners of those meets up with Oroville’s Hunter Also in quarter-finals, Zion Ryker Shaul of Okanogan and two matches will compete for the DeVon; and Luis Solis of Pateros Butler of Tonasket wrestles Slade Kaleb Martin of Liberty Bell. championship. quarter-final faces off against Rade Pilkinton Ginter of Pateros while Oroville’s Meanwhile, In the semimatches take final round at place between 132, Defending Rycki Cruz of State Champion Tonasket and Trevor Peterson Finlay Holston of Tonasket of Liberty Bell; wrestles the and Oroville’s winner of a Kacey Dewitte quar ter-f ina l and Okanogan’s match between Jalen Moses. O k a n o g a n ’s At 160, Jaric Cook O k a n o g a n’s and Oroville’s Tony Klepec Y o h n n y wrestles the Castillo. winner of a Meanwhile, qu ar t e r- f i n a l q u a r t e rmatch between final matchBrewster’s Gabe es between Garcia and O k a n o g a n ’s O k a n o g a n’s Sean ParkDalton Swayze. Epley and To n a s k e t ’s O r o v i l l e’s Wyatt Pershing Jeffrey Rounds; and Pateros’s and Liberty Brian Chavez Bell’s Tanner face off in the White and Katie Teachout/staff photo semi-finals. Austin Wood L i b e r t y of Tonasket Oroville’s Hunter DeVon employed a favorite cradle method to pin this 138-pound Pateros grappler in his second Bell’s Jacob match of the day Saturday, Jan. 30. DeVon will wrestle Okanogan’s Myron Super in the District quarter-finals. will determine McMillan and the other semiTonasket’s Zach final participant. of Tonasket for placement in the Lofthus have BYE’s to the semiRyan Scott wrestles Okanogan’s At 138, Carlos Cruz of Pateros semi-final match. final round at 170. McMillan Riley Prescott. wrestles the victor between Liberty Bells’ Merritt Fink will face the winner of a match Defending 152-pound State Okanogan’s Cooper Sloan and at 145 wrestles the winner of a between Oroville’s Nick Clase Champion Jorge Juarez of Tonasket’s Austin Rimestead in quarter-final match between the semi-finals. In the quarter- Tonasket’s Garrett Wilson and Tonasket wrestles the winner of and Okanogan’s Austin Eastridge;

while Lofthus awaits the outcome of a match between Liberty Bell’s Ivan Johnson and Okanogan’s Arnulfo Mercado. Tonasket’s Isaac Gomez has a BYE to the semi-final round at 182, where he wrestles the winner between Liberty Bell’s Mason Johnson and Okanogan’s Julian Cates. Meanwhile, Austin Warren of Okanogan faces off against Zane Scott of Oroville in the quarter-finals; while Alex Garcia Lopez of Liberty Bell has a quarter-final match against Chris Varelas of Brewster. Oroville’s Scott Hartvig wrestles the winner of 195-pound contenders Hunter Bennett of Okanogan and Spencer Gariano of Tonasket. The winner of that semi-final match will go against the winner of a semi-final match between Okanogan’s Jesse Weitman and Tonasket’s Dylan Kalma. In the 220-pound finals, Okanogan’s Mintzer wrestles the winner between Tonasket’s Garrett Thomas and Oroville’s Charlie Arrigoni. At 285, Alex Garcia takes the Districts Championship title with no contenders. The North Division teams meet up with the South Division teams at Regionals the following weekend (Feb. 13) in Kittitas, and State Finals are held at the Tacoma Dome Feb. 19-20.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville’s Nick Clase lost to this Okanogan Bulldog in his first match Saturday before winning a match against Liberty Bell’s Ivan Johnson by Injury Default. Clase faces Okanogan’s Austin Eastridge in the quarter-finals at District, with the winner wrestling Liberty Bell’s Jacob McMillan in the semi-finals at 170.

Tonasket’s Garrett Wilson pinned his Pateros opponent in the 145-pound class. Wilson will face Okanogan’s Dwight Belgarde in the quarter-finals at District; the winner wrestles Liberty Bell’s Meritt Fink in the semi-finals.

STANDINGS

SPORTS SCHEDULE

Through games of February 1 BOYS BASKETBALL CWB LEAGUE NORTH Brewster Lake Roosevelt Oroville Liberty Bell Manson Okanogan Bridgeport Tonasket

League Total 12-0 18-0 9-2 11-3 8-4 11-5 7-5 11-7 4-8 8-8 4-8 4-12 3-9 4-13 0-12 0-16

CWB LEAGUE SOUTH

Mabton Warden Kittitas Waterville White Swan Soap Lake

8-1 6-2 4-3 2-5 1-4 0-6

14-5 15-3 7-3 8-9 1-5 1-10

Friday, Feb. 5 Basketball - Bridgeport at Tonasket JV 4:30 pm, girls varsity 6 pm, boys varsity 7:30 pm Basketball - Oroville at Brewster JV 4:30 pm, girls varsity 6 pm, boys varsity 7:30 pm

GIRLS BASKETBALL CWB LEAGUE NORTH Okanogan Brewster Lake Roosevelt Tonasket Oroville Liberty Bell Manson Bridgeport

League Total 10-0 13-0 9-1 9-4 8-2 9-5 5-5 6-8 4-6 5-9 2-8 3-11 2-8 4-10 0-10 2-12

CWB LEAGUE SOUTH

Mabton Waterville Kittitas Warden White Swan Soap Lake

9-10 7-2 4-4 4-4 0-6 0-7

17-2 14-3 4-5 13-4 0-6 0-16

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Seventy-five mini-cheerleaders performed during halftime of the Lady Tigers basketball game Friday, Jan. 30 after attending a week-long camp put on my Coach Jamie Portwood and the Tonasket cheerleaders, including Brianna Gutierrez (above). “They’re always so fun to work with,” said Portwood; in her eighth and final year as cheer coach. “They really looked up to us, and that was awesome to see,” said cheerleader Alyssa Montenegro. “They would all come up and hug us afterward and wouldn’t let us go.” The Tiger gymnasium was packed for the performance.

Saturday, Feb. 6 Wrestling - CW2B League North Districts at Tonasket, 10 am Tuesday, Feb. 2 Basketball - Tonasket at Oroville, JV 4:30 pm, girls varsity 6 pm, boys varsity 7:30 pm

POST-SEASON (if qualified) Basketball - 2B Districts at Eastmont HS Main Gym Feb. 6-20, except Feb. 10 games are at Wenatchee HS Basketball - 2B State at Spokane Arena Mar. 3-5 Wrestling - CW2B League Regionals at Kittitas Feb. 13 Wrestling - Mat Classic XXVIII State Competition at Tacoma Dome Feb. 19-20


FEBRUARY 4, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

SPORTS

Hornets third in league as season winds down BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville’s Nathan Hugus drives the baseline and walks a tightrope while staying in bounds as he blows past a Manson defender Thursday, Jan. 28.

Oroville’s boys basketball team was positioned at third place in the North division of the Central Washington B League as of Monday, Feb. 1, with a home game scheduled against Tonasket Tuesday, Feb. 2. The Hornets end their regular season with an away game against first-place Brewster Thursday, Feb. 4. If the Hornets hand the Bears a loss, it will be their first one of the season. The Hornets played Bridgeport Tuesday, Jan. 26; beating the Mustangs 64-46. “We did a good job on the boards are were able to hang on to a lead because we didn’t allow many second chance points,” said Oroville Head Coach Jay Thacker. “Bridgeport also plays with a ton of heart.” Scoring for Oroville were Nathan Hugus (28), Bryce Glover

(16), Spencer Martin (11), Juan Lopez (7) and Sage Sarmiento (2). Mustangs putting points on the board were Brevin Evenson (19), Edward Martinez (9), Clay Morris (8), Omar Picazo and David Ochoa with three each and Edgar Alcantara and Nincanor Palacios with two each. The Hornets had another home game Thursday, Jan. 28, beating Manson 64-20. “We have really been working on our defense,” said Thacker. “It showed tonight, with a great effort on the defensive end.” Scoring for the Hornets were Andrew Mieirs (23), Glover (20), Martin (9), Dakota Haney (3) and Sarmiento and Lopez with two each. Manson scoring was done by Escalara and Vanderholm with six each, Charlton with three, Lamar and M. Cameron with two each, and B. Cameron contributing one.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Above, Tonasket’s Jordan Thrasher makes his way past Lake Roosevelt’s Josiah Desautel during the second quarter of Friday’s (Jan. 29) game against the Raiders. Thrasher made several three-point swishers, but the Tigers lost 39-78. The Raiders are currently at second place in the North Division of the Central Washington B League. The Tigers lost a game by just two points earlier in the week (Jan. 26) to Okanogan, 65-63; a huge improvement over their 80-56 loss to the Bulldogs Dec. 18. The Tigers were scheduled to travel to Oroville Tuesday, Feb. 2 before hosting Bridgeport Friday, Feb. 5. When Tonasket played Bridgeport Jan. 12 the Tigers lost by just seven points, so they have a good chance of defeating the Mustangs on their home court in their last game of the season. Left, Morgyne Hjaltason is towered over by Lake Roosevelt’s Lachell Bearcub as she makes her way to the basket Friday, Jan. 29.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Above, Tonasket’s Kayla Willis puts the 11th point on the board for the Tigers during their home game against Lake Roosevelt Friday, Jan. 29. The Tigers lost 53-41 to the Raiders, but not before tying up the game in the third quarter and even taking a brief lead. Jenna Valentine put in two points to bring the score to Tigers 27, Raiders 29. Valentine put in a free shot after being fouled to bring the score to 29-28, then Ellie Alberts put in two points to finish the third quarter with the Tigers in the lead, 32-31. The Raiders are currently in third place in the NCW2B North. The Lady Hornets were tied in fourth place in the league before Tonasket dropped the game against Lake Roosevelt. Tonasket was scheduled to travel to Oroville Tuesday, Feb. 2 for a game that would determine District seedings. The North Okanogan teams finished a game just three points apart when they played in Tonasket January 9. The Lady Hornets won 35-33.

Oroville and Tonasket girls draw close in league BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Lady Hornets and Lady Tigers were tied at fourth place in the NCW2B League’s North Division after the Hornets won two games last week and before the Tigers lost a game to Lake Roosevelt. The Hornets defeated Bridgeport 41-28 Tuesday, Jan. 26; and Manson 33-24 Thursday, Jan. 28. “Oroville led throughout the game, but neither team shot very well from the field,” Oroville Assistant Coach Bill Cottrell said of their game against Manson. “The difference in the game might have been the Lady Hornets’ excellent defense holding Manson to 11 points in the first half, and 13 points in the second half. This went along with a steals/turnover ratio of 24/10.” Cottrell said Lady Hornets Hannah Hilderbrand and Jordyn Smith were both nursing sprained ankles, but “played very well regardless.” Hilderbrand led the scoring with 11, followed by Mikayla Scott (9), Faith Martin (5), Pie Todd (5) and Sydney Egerton (3). Scoring for Manson were M. Ward (8), B. Ward (7), Mendoza (5) and Clausen (4). In their victory over Bridgeport at home Jan. 26, the Hornets “jumped out to a 30-9 halftime lead and did not look back,” said Cottrell, “although the Fillies crept closer in the second half.” Cottrell said Oroville’s leading scorer and rebounder Hannah Hilderbrand suffered an injury in the first quarter and did not return to the game. Another starter, Jordyn Smith did not suit up for the game due to an ankle injury suffered against

Liberty Bell January 23. “So the Lady Hornets had to play shorthanded with only six players available for most of the game,” said Cottrell. Scorers for Oroville were Martin (12), Scott (11), Sydney Egerton (8), Havannah Worrell (6), Hilderbrand (2) and Katherine Egerton (2). “Pie Todd filled in well defensively for Hilderbrand in the post but did not score,” Cottrell said. Bridgeport scorers were S. Martinez (10), T. Trujillo (4), V. Santana (4), C. Gameros (4), L. Ellis (2), K. Craig (2) and E. Saucedo (2). The Lady Hornets’ JV team defeated Bridgeport 53-31, with Sheridan Blasey leading all scorers with 32 points. Cottrell said he was looking forward to the Tuesday, Feb. 2 home game against historic rivals Tonasket. “In terms of district seeding, it is a must-win for both teams, who are currently tied for fourth

DENTISTRY

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Services • Mental Health • Chemical Dependency • Developmental Disabilities • Psychiatric Services • Therapeutic Housing Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Toll free: 866-826-6191

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

www.wvmedical.com

www.okbhc.org HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Healthcare Services  Anti

Coagulation Clinic

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Hornet Jordyn Smith goes for the jumper over two defending Manson Players during the Thursday, Jan. 28 victory over the Lady Trojans. place in the NCW2B North,” said Cottrell Jan. 28. The Lady Hornets beat the Lady Tigers by just three points, 35-33 when the teams met up in Tonasket Jan. 9.

 Radiology

 Behavioral

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 OPTICAL

Tonasket

Emergency www.nvhospital.org VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program 

 Ophthalmology

 Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151

YOUR AD HERE

Advertise In The

School District

Maintenance & Operations Levy Building the Future

Yes

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm

February 9, 2016

Paid for by Tonasket Schools Levy Committee

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

509-476-3602 Ext 3050

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 04, 2016  

February 04, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 04, 2016  

February 04, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune