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FEBRUARY 2016 | VOL. 18, NO. 11

The hangover What went right, wrong with privatization • 4-5

Sales tax: What’s too much? 6 Supplement to The Daily Herald

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FEBRUARY 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

A customer walks past a display case of high-end liquor at the Costco in Lynnwood .

COVER STORY Was liquor privatization good for the state? 4-5

BUSINESS NEWS Sales tax creeps close to a dime in south Snohomish County . . . . . . . . 6 Are taxes the best way to a greener future? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Firm hopes to convince Canadian businesses to move south . . . . . . . . 9 Stanwood entrepreneurs build a more sanitary pet dish . . . . . . . . . . 10 Longtime Herald employee named ad director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Bothell’s Essentia Water sees rapid growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

New survey measures Snohomish County business optimism . . . . . 16

BUSINESS BUILDERS James McCusker: How respect is needed in the workplace . . . . . . . 19 Andrew Ballard: Don’t make supplydemand decisions in vacuum . . . . 20 Tom Hoban: Rental market picture improves in Puget Sound area . . . 22 Monika Kristofferson: Get organized without being embarrassed . . . . . 23 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . 24-25 BANKRUPTCIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . 26 ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 28-29

Paradise Market brings the world to Mountlake Terrace . . . . . . . . 12

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 30-31

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Maureen Bozlinski 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 mbozlinski@heraldnet.com

Contributing Writers: Deanna Duff, M.L. Dehm Oliver Lazenby, Megan Brown, Jennifer Sasseen Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, James McCusker, Andrew Ballard, Tom Hoban, Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Pocock Racing Shells president Bill Tytus and John Tytus at their Everett shop. Ian Terry / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal. 1495957

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3


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COVER STORY

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

A Costco customer walks past cases of vodka and other liquors at the chain’s Lynnwood store. Costco, grocery stores and other large businesses won the right to sell hard alcohol in the state after voters approved Initiative 1183 in 2011.

Who won and lost the liquor battle Consumers pay more for hard alcohol while state is seeing an increase in revenue By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

P

eople are buying more bottles of booze in Washington, and, in many cases, paying more for it four years after voters took the state out of the liquor business. Washington consumers are buying 5 million more liters a year of vodka, gin and whiskey and other spirits since voters passed Initiative 1183, which ended the government monopoly on hard liquor. Those same consumers are paying a couple of dollars more per liter post-privatization — up to $24.52 in 2014, compared with $22.28 in 2011, according to a report from the state Office of Financial Management. That’s a little more than a

10 percent increase per liter. “Prices went up, so you’d expect consumption would go down, but consumption has gone up, too,” said John Guadnola, executive director of the Washington Beer & Wine Wholesalers Association, which fought the measure. “That tells me that the relative ease of availability has prompted people to buy more than they would have otherwise.” And that has fueled a healthy increase in revenue for the state. State and local governments received $316 million in net revenues from liquor taxes in fiscal year 2011, the last full year before privatization. In fiscal year 2015, the state made $366 million — a $50 million a year bump in revenue. That’s a 15 percent increase.

One of the reasons the state is seeing such an increase in tax revenue is because Washington taxes liquor more than any other state in the nation. “We have the highest pricing and highest taxes by a mile,” said John McKay, an executive for Costco, which backed I-1183. Consumers pay $35.22 in taxes for every gallon of spirits, according to a survey by Washington, D.C.-based Tax Foundation in 2013. The next-highest state tax rate is Oregon’s, at $22.73 a gallon. Most states charge $10 or less a gallon of liquor taxes; there are 3.78 liters in a gallon. The bottom line for the state might be the most black-and-white way to measure whether the initiative was a positive for the state. It’s harder to gauge the social costs of privatization, or the effect on employment. Even the cost to the consumer can be disputed. McKay said Costco tracks multiple

Liquor taxes Here are the 10 highest tax rates for liquor per gallon in the U.S. 1. Washington, $35.22 2. Oregon, $22.73 3. Virginia, $20.56 4. Alabama, $18.24 5. North Carolina, $13.02 6. Iowa, $12.99 7. Alaska, $12.80 8. Michigan, $11.92 9. Utah, $11.26 10. Idaho, $10.92 Source: Tax Foundation, 2013


FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

COVER STORY Liquor

Liters

State*

Costco** QFC**

Safeway**

Fred Meyer**

Winco**

Captain Morgan Spiced Rum

1.75

$39.95

$34.30

$40.33

$44.09

$34.94

$39.29

Jose Cuervo Especial Silver Tequila

1.75

$39.95

n/a

$42.74

$41.94

$37.94

$37.64

Grey Goose French Vodka

1.75

$64.95

$53.58

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Smirnoff Vodka

1.75

$29.95

$27.07

n/a

$31.94

$28.94

$27.93

Absolut Vodka

1.75

$47.95

$40.33

$33.99

$44.94

$39.94

$44.41

Bombay Sapphire English Gin

1.75

$54.95

$46.35

$54.99

n/a

$47.94

n/a

Maker's Mark Kentucky 1.75 Straight Bourbon

$62.95

$60.86

$66.84

n/a

$59.94

n/a

Absolut Vodka

0.75

$22.95

n/a

$15.99

$22.40

$19.40

$22.40

Jim Beam Bourbon

0.75

$18.95

n/a

$18.48

$19.40

$17.40

$18.29

Jack Daniels Black Old No. 7

0.75

$24.95

n/a

$31.74

$27.40

$25.40

$24.49

A look at liquor prices at state stores before privatization and at grocery stores post-privatization. Prices include the liter tax and the 20.5 percent sales tax. * May 1, 2012; **Stores in Everett in mid-January brands of liquor and is now offering lower prices than before privatization. A survey of some of their products bears that out. So what retailers are charging could vary wildly. Even what people are buying could be different. “It’s difficult to generalize what liquors are being bought and whether that’s changed,” McKay said. “We certainly offer a lot more high-end liquors than you would have seen in liquor stores — you know, Louis XIII cognac, for instance.” Since Prohibition ended in 1933, Washington controlled a monopoly on liquor sales and consumers needed to go to state-controlled liquor stores to buy spirits. The state set the hours of operation, the price of products and decided what could be sold in the state, and when restaurateurs could make purchases for their business. That changed when Costco poured millions of dollars into an effort to bust the state-run liquor businesses. The first measure in 2010 failed, but a second one, Initiative 1183, in 2011 passed, 59 percent to 41 percent. Suddenly, Washington consumers went from only being able to buy hard alcohol at small liquor stores to being able to buy spirits at grocery stores and warehouse businesses like Costco and BevMo! The number of places where someone could buy hard alcohol jumped almost overnight. Before privatization, there were about 330 state-run stores. After the initiative, there were more than 1,400

“Prices went up, so you’d expect consumption would go down, but consumption has gone up, too.” — John Guadnola locations that sold hard liquor. With more locations, more people are buying hard liquor. The report from the Office of Financial Management states that 26 million liters were sold in 2011, the last year before privatization. In 2013, the first full year post privatization, Washington consumer bought 31.6 million liters, or an increase of 21 percent. That number stayed about the same for 2014. Oddly, while consumers are buying more alcohol now, they’re actually buying less hard alcohol at restaurants, bars and taverns, according to the report. Before privatization, what are called “on-premise” locations sold 9.3 million liters of hard liquor in the state in 2011. That’s down to 8.7 million in 2014 even though there’s been an increase in establishments since the end of the recession, according to the Office of Financial Management report. The consumption at restaurants doesn’t track with what the Washington Restaurant Association is seeing, said Anthony Anton, president and CEO of the group. He said that restaurant sales have been up the past three years and restaurant survival rates are also up. A big

component of that is liquor sales in those establishments. Either way, the state government is clearly benefiting from the private sector running the liquor industry. Before privatization, the state made money on liquor through a liter tax, sales tax and a calculated markup that paid for the costs of running the liquor stores and distribution. It also generated a tidy sum for state and local governments. With I-1183, the state still collects a liter tax and sales tax but no longer collects a markup on the alcohol. Instead, the state charges a license fee to distributors. That fee was 10 percent on gross sales for the two years after the measure. It’s now dropped to 5 percent. Distributors also were forced to pay a one-time, $150 million fee for distribution. In total revenue, the state collected more money before privatization. Since the state is no longer paying to run the liquor business, it’s actually seeing a net gain in revenue. Supporters of I-1183 believe the measure was successful at allowing the marketplace to run the industry without hurting the state.

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“I think it’s been good for the state, it’s been good for convenience and I think it’s been good for competitiveness,” Anton said. “All that being said, I don’t think it’s been fully implemented and it will be better.” He said his association is fighting over sales taxes that restaurateurs are charged buying liquor at wholesalers like Costco. Normally, a restaurateur can present a reseller permit at wholesaler and won’t have to pay sales tax on an item. But the state hasn’t allowed restaurateurs to use reseller permits when buying hard liquor. The association is trying to change that by lobbying in Olympia and fighting it in the court system, Anton said. Guadnola, of the Washington Beer & Wine Wholesalers Association, disagrees, saying that the initiative that voters approved clearly spelled out what taxes would be charged and that those taxes were meant to hold the state harmless. He said the I-1183 backers are trying to re-imagine the initiative. “They should at least have the courage to say they wrote it to say X and they want to change it to say Y,” Guadnola said. Does he believe the initiative has been good for the state? “If you want to say did it benefit the state, it depends on how you define it,” Guadnola said. “If you’re talking about whether the state lost money, no it didn’t. But the people are probably paying more than they did otherwise.”


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TAXES & FINANCE

Sales tax to climb near 10 percent By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

If you thought that Seattle had the highest sales tax rate in the state, well, yeah, you’d be right. But the city isn’t alone. Seattle and Mill Creek share the top spot at 9.6 percent. That’ll soon change. Mill Creek and several other south Snohomish County cities will surpass Seattle this April when a new 0.3 cent sales tax kicks in to pay for improved bus service for Community Transit. People in Mill Creek will pay a 9.9 percent sales tax. People in Edmonds, Mukilteo, Lynnwood, Mountlake Terrace, Brier and north Bothell will pay 9.8 percent sales tax. “I knew we were among the highest,” said Mill Creek City Councilman Mike Todd. “I didn’t know we were the highest.” And it’s inching close to the point where south county residents will pay a dime or more on sales tax for every dollar spent. That could be problematic for future tax measures that call for increasing the sales tax.

“I can’t really tell you what’s the pain threshold but it’s one that a lot of people are thinking about.” — Edmonds Mayor Dave Earling “It’s a number, but it’s kind of psychological,” Todd said. One of those tax measures coming down the turnpike could be Sound Transit 3, which the Sound Transit board is considering placing on the November ballot. The board is still deciding how much to ask voters for — and what taxes would be included — in the measure that is expected to expand light rail throughout the region and bring it to Everett. Edmonds Mayor Dave Earling sits on both the Sound Transit and Community Transit boards. He said that he and Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring voiced concern about asking voters to raise the sales tax 0.3 percent for Community Transit last November. The Community Transit board eventually voted unanimously to ask for the tax increase and it was approved 51 percent

to 49 percent in November. Earling said he’s a fiscal conservative, and policymakers need to be cautious in asking for any tax increases. But he said it’s easy to see a need. “These sorts of projects are terribly important,” Earling said. “We do have projections of population increases and a constrained transportation system.” But will voters shy away from charging themselves a dime or more on sales tax? “I can’t really tell you what’s the pain threshold but it’s one that a lot of people are thinking about,” Earling said. There is no upper limit for the amount of sales tax that a community can approve, said Beverly Crichfield, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Revenue. The state takes 6.5 percent of the sales tax. The rest pays for local measures. Washington has the fourth highest average state and local sales tax rate in the

nation behind Arkansas, Tennessee and Louisiana, according to the Washington, D.C.,-based Tax Foundation. One of the reasons that the state’s sales tax rate is so high is because the state is one of the few that doesn’t charge an income tax, Todd said. When people gripe about the sales tax, Todd said he reminds them there are plenty of exemptions like on food and rent. He also said that people usually don’t mind paying the sales tax when they can see it going to something tangible. “What I’ve seen if people feel a connection to something you see locally, they feel OK about that,” Todd said. He pointed to the reason that Mill Creek is slightly higher than its neighboring cities. In November 2012, Mill Creek voters passed a 0.1 percent increase in the sales tax to pay for public safety. Even though it was during the recession, voters approved the measure 67 percent to 33 percent. He noted that 0.1 percent is just a small amount on each transaction. “It’s a penny on a $10 purchase,” Todd said. “I kind of go back to would you put a penny in the dish by the cash register for better police services? Most people would.”

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TAXES & FINANCE

Carbon tax may land on ballot this fall Competing climate change measures could be brought to voters By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

Many in Washington believe that it’s time to clear the air regarding climate change. Now environmental groups are currently proposing different approaches to do that. As the 2016 ballot season nears, voters may face multiple options of how best to tackle the challenge. Non-partisan group Carbon Washington organized Initiative 732. Modeled after a carbon tax British Columbia implemented in 2008, its main points include instituting a $25-per-metric ton tax on carbon emissions from fossil fuels. It would also reduce the state sales tax from 6.5 percent to 5.5 percent and effectively eliminate Washington’s Business & Occupation tax. A rebate program would be offered to 400,000 low-income households. Carbon Washington formed in 2009. According to Yoram Bauman, founder and co-chair of Carbon Washington, the group has long been interested in “taking

a swing at the ball” in terms of backing an initiative. I-732 collected over 350,000 citizen signatures. It is an initiative to the Legislature, which means it will be considered by lawmakers who can then enact it into law or place it on the 2016 ballot. “Washington state contributes 2 percent or less to national emissions, but it’s arguably an ethical responsibility for us to do our part,” Bauman says. “We can be a model for the nation and world in terms of showing a path forward that works for the economy and environment.” Proponents contend that I-732 is revenue neutral. The tax increase would be negated by tax cuts. Bauman estimates it will generate $2 billion in carbon taxes annually. The measure would raise gasoline prices about 25 cents per gallon and coalfired electricity by about 2.5 cents per kilowatt-hour. Natural gas is cleaner, so it would only increase by about 1.2 cents per kilowatt-hour. Hydro, wind and solar wouldn’t pay the tax since they’re renewables. The producers of the fossil fules would be charged the increase and they would then pass it along to consumers. “In broad strokes, what we find is that the way our policy works means most households pay a few hundred dollars more for fossil fuels (yearly) and a few hundred less in taxes” Bauman says. The point of revenue neutrality has

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“In the short term, clearly not everyone is on the same page on exactly what we should do, but everyone is on the same page in terms of needing to act.” — Greg Small generated debate. In 2015, a nonpartisan analysis was requested by the then chairman of the House Finance Committee. Using estimates tax return data and information from Carbon Washington’s website, it estimated a $675.4 million cut to the state budget over four years. “We think there are some signifiant problems with the analysis...,” Bauman says. “We continue to think I-732 is revenue neutral and possibly slightly revenue positive. We have to wait for the official fiscal note from the Office of Financial Management.” Budget issues are of primary importance to I-732 opponents. The Alliance for Jobs and Clean Energy is voicing concerns. Formed in January 2015, the coalition is comprised of more than 150 organizations also dedicated to addressing climate change. “At a time when the state needs to be investing in education, healthcare and other priorities, we have concerns about the revenue impacts,” says Gregg Small, executive director of Climate Solutions, a founding member of the alliance and chair of the organization’s board of governors. “We feel that climate change shouldn’t add to the burden and doesn’t have to.” The alliance also believes that I-732 fails to invest in clean energy solutions on a larger and more personal scale. “From a policy perspective for the alliance, we believe in limiting carbon pollution, a fee on carbon pollution and then investing that money to generate clean energy solutions,” Small says. “We want protections for the most impacted and a just transition for fossil fuel workers into cleaner forms of energy.” Small said would prefer an effort that would rally the state’s entire community advocating to address climate change. According to Small, the alliance worked

closely with Carbon Washington during December 2015 to discuss unifying the two groups’ efforts behind one ballot measure. That did not come to pass. “We describe it as being on the same team, but we’re not on the same page right now,” Bauman says of the split between Carbon Washington and the alliance. “It’s a source of disappointment all the way around.” His organization is now considering their own measure. However, Small cites concerns that a competing measure might confuse voters. They will continue discussions during the coming months to determine a course of action, which might include avenues completely outside an initiative. “There is an enormous call for action coming from all quarters,” Small says. “In the short term, clearly not everyone is on the same page on exactly what we should do, but everyone is on the same page in terms of needing to act. That is a really good thing.” Even some I-732 supporters agree there is value simply in bringing climate change conversations to the forefront of policy discussion. The Snohomish County Democrats endorsed I-732 while also remaining open to other proposals. “We’re not necessarily throwing all weight behind I-732. It’s the one approach that’s been brought to us at this point,” says Richard Wright, chair of the Snohomish County Democrats. “There may be other initiatives in the works. There is also the work by the governor and there might be legislative remedies attempted. ” “I think, generally speaking, the Snohomish County Democrats will be supportive of any initiative brought before us to combat climate change,” Wright says. “We take the environment seriously and want to leave behind a better planet than we inherited ourselves.”

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

BUSINESS NEWS

Could Canadian businesses head south? As loonie drops in value, Canadian firms could sell goods for more in U.S. By Oliver Lazenby

The Bellingham Business Journal

A new company that hopes to lure Canadian businesses south of the border is having some success already. Opportunity Northwest started in September and provides a variety of services for companies that are moving to Whatcom County, as well as for companies that are already here. Bruce MacCormack, a managing partner with the company and former chairman of the Bellingham Angels investor group, said he sees potential for attracting light manufacturing companies from the Lower Mainland of BritBruce ish Columbia to move to MacCormack Whatcom County. By selling products in the U.S. and expanding their presence in the states, Canadian companies could

benefit from the weak Canadian dollar. The loonie dropped below 70 cents U.S. in January — for the first time since 2003 — so a Canadian company could get a 30 percent bonus on every item it can sell in the U.S. That’s a strong incentive to expand to Whatcom County, MacCormack said. “Whatcom County retailers may be hurting, but for those wanting to make money off selling products in America, now is the time,” he said. MacCormack’s partners in the business are Charles Rendina and Garry Montgomery. McCormack calls Opportunity Northwest a concierge for everything a business relocating to Whatcom County might need. That includes consulting services for VISA and immigration issues, assistance with public relations and branding, relationships with local real estate agents and banks and the knowledge to guide foreign companies through local city and county permitting processes, MacCormack said. It’s not just the disparity in currency prices that’s attractive to Canadian firms, MacCormack said. Canadian businesses can also benefit from the relatively cheap price of commercial real estate in Whatcom County. Commercial real estate is generally cheaper in the county than north of the border because the Lower

“The border, if you think about it in terms of a wall, it’s thick. Sure it’s close, but it’s thick. And it became thicker after 9/11.” — Chris Lawless Mainland’s population is so much denser, MacCormack said. In October, Opportunity Northwest brokered its first big deal, a funding package for T.C. Trading Services of Blaine. Opportunity Northwest worked with investors to secure $10 million in funding that includes a line of credit and a construction loan for the company’s expansion. T.C. Trading Company offers storage, and delivery services for companies that do business across the border. How much demand is there for Opportunity Northwest’s services? MacCormack said the group is in the discussion stage with several interested Canadian companies. Chris Lawless, chief economist with the British Columbia Investment Management Corporation, said the border is a complicated barrier for most Canadian companies. “The border, if you think about it in terms of a wall, it’s thick,” Lawless

said. “Sure it’s close, but it’s thick. And it became thicker after 9/11.” Lawless told MacCormack that while relocating or opening in the U.S. is too complicated for most Canadian companies, it is feasible for a small percentage of businesses. Through Opportunity Northwest, MacCormack and his partners hope to make that wall thinner for businesses moving to Whatcom County. And besides, MacCormack pointed out, a small margin of businesses in the Greater Vancouver metropolitan area is a big deal to Whatcom County, which, as of 2013, had less than 10 percent of Vancouver’s population. MacCormack foresees Opportunity Northwest finding a niche in a particular industry and building specific expertise over time, he said. “It’s a bit of an experiment,” MacCormack said. “It’s like the beginning of any company. You’re never quite sure how it’s going to pan out or how well it will work.”

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FEBRUARY 2016

Pet business makes meals a snap Stanwood partners develop pet dish with disposable liners By M.L. Dehm

For The Herald Business Journal

There is nothing unusual about an entrepreneur having a great idea and then developing and marketing a new product. But it’s not so common to have two very different yet marketable ideas going at the same time. Which takes precedence? For business partners Janet Spangler and Randy Redel of Stanwood, the choice was not difficult. They went with their No Mess Pet Dish, a rubber-footed plastic base tray that securely holds a disposable paper liner. The disposable liners can be changed at every meal so the pet always has a clean sanitary dish and the owner never has to wash a dirty pet bowl. “We’ve got the provisional patent on it,” Spangler confirmed. The pair are selling the dish and trays on their website at NoMessPetDish.com and will debut their product at the Seattle Pet Expo on June 4 and 5. “A clean dish in a snap — we call them click and toss liners,” Spangler said. “It still surprises me that no one else has done it.” The pet dish wasn’t the first product for the pair. Spangler and Redel came up with the pet dish idea when the friends first became business partners in another planned venture, the Image Awareness Center, back in 2010. Spangler, a longtime image consultant who has worked on television commercials and radio voiceovers, had already formed the Colors Made Easy Personal Palette System for image consultants and was planning to launch the Image Awareness Center for training and consulting purposes. She brought in longtime family friend Redel and another colleague, Dione Gleave, as partners. Redel worked in broadcasting and multimedia. Much of that work involved compiling videos and conducting seminars. As a busy single professional, he used to save time and energy by feeding his cat out of paper bowls that he could throw away or burn. At the same time, Spangler had six cats that she fed using ceramic bowls. She had 15 ceramic bowls that had to be rotated and washed regularly to ensure her cats were always eating from a clean dish. Redel’s paper bowl method intrigued Spangler but she was less than satisfied with the way paper bowls moved easily across the floor and tipped over. Experiments to develop an efficient disposable pet dish for personal use had resulted in the first prototype of the No Mess Pet Dish in 2013. Both Redel and Spangler tested sub-

PHOTOS BY M.L. DEHM / FOR THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Fleur the cat eats from a No Mess Pet Dish that was developed by business partners Janet Spangler and Randy Redel of Stanwood.

Stanwood entrepreneurs Randy Redel and Janet Spangler developed the No Mess Pet Dish, a rubber-footed plastic base tray that securely holds a disposable paper liner.

sequent prototypes at home including a dog-sized bowl for Spangler’s dog, Sasha. With Gleave’s agreement, the Image Awareness Center was going to stay on the back burner for a little while longer so Spangler and Redel could push their pet dish concept first. “We went up to Artisan Industries in Arlington,” Spangler said. “They do injection molding. We thought that would be a great place to have our dishes made, somewhere local.”

A company was formed, a provisional patent obtained and the domain name was locked in place. They also developed a video for the project that drew on the past experience and skill sets of both partners. Redel created the video and Spangler, along with her pets, was the talent. A few weeks ago, the No Mess Pet Dish became available for purchase at the website and the company’s Facebook page was launched.

As the dish was invented purely as a convenience for busy people, both inventors were a little surprised that the health aspect seems to be what is driving initial interest in the product. They’ve since learned that many veterinarians advise cat owners to feed an all wet food diet but that some owners refuse because it is messy. There is also a risk of germs to both humans and pets from handling dirty pet dishes. These were outlined in a report by the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine in 2014. Disposable dishes could cut that risk. “I guess that’s the important thing for any entrepreneur or any new business that is starting out,” Redel said. “You find a need and you solve it. That’s what we hope that we have done.” As for the future, No Mess Pet Dish is applying to be on the entrepreneur reality show Shark Tank. Spangler and Redel are also waiting for feedback from shelters and veterinarians who have been invited to try the product. Then there is the other business venture that was put on hold — the Image Awareness Center for image consultations and training — which is far enough along that Spangler has her studio near completion. “Maybe in a year or so we’ll do a big launch for that,” she said. But at the moment, it’s all about the pets.


FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

BUSINESS NEWS

Herald hires new advertising director Longtime employee promoted after rising through the ranks By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

The Daily Herald’s new advertising director can draw on deep familiarity with the community and the newspaper in her new role. Carrie Radcliff was promoted Jan. 19 from advertising sales manager to the head of the advertising department. Radcliff, 48, grew up in Snohomish County and has spent her entire working career at The Herald. “What I hope to accomplish is to obviously grow revenue for The Herald, provide our advertisers with solutions to help their businesses grow and develop a sales team that works well together, works hard and has a lot of fun,” Radcliff said. Publisher Josh O’Connor said Radcliff is a strong asset to The Herald who “exemplifies outstanding professional values in everything she does.” “People that know Carrie Radcliff describe her as a sales dynamo, hard

working, organized, fun, energetic and a leader,” O’Connor said. “It’s an absolute privilege to work with her every day and I’m excited about the sales direction that she’s taking our business.” She replaces Pilar Linares, who returned earlier this winter to her home state of Texas where she took a job as vice president of sales at the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Carrie Radcliff The newspaper industry faces tough challenges, but The Herald has a strong audience within the county, able to reach 332,000 people through print and online products, Radcliff said. “As the media business becomes a lot more fragmented, we really need to listen to our customers and learn their needs and match that with the products we have,” Radcliff said. “We’re not just a daily newspaper, we have a website, we put on events, we have magazines.” She also noted that The Herald is part of Sound Publishing, which publishes 49 newspapers throughout the state. With those titles, her sales staff can help advertisers reach markets outside of

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the county. Radcliff joined The Herald 26 years ago when she was hired as an advertising intern after graduating from Central Washington University. When the internship ended, she was offered a full-time job as an advertising assistant. She worked her way up through the organization in a variety of advertising departments including private party classified, real estate, local, regional and national retail sales. Radcliff grew up in Mountlake Terrace and wanted to return to Snohomish County. Her parents, Mike and Alix O’Donnell, still live in Everett and she has extended family throughout the area, including a sister, Paige Jensen, and a brother, Shawn O’Donnell, who owns Shawn O’Donnell’s American Grill & Irish Pub in south Everett. Radcliff lives in Snohomish with her husband, Brent, who is a teacher at Lowell Elementary School in Everett. The Radcliffs have a son, Kendall, 21, who attends Everett Community College, and a daughter, Madison, 18, who attends the University of Washington. Radcliff said she deeply cares for the

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community and the newspaper. She noted that she’s read the newspaper not just for the news of the day but also for granular details, including marriage licenses and divorce proceedings and births and obituaries. “I loved (the newspaper) as far as looking at the high school sports, who are the kids who are getting honors and did I know them or their parents,” Radcliff said. “I just like reading about what’s happening.” She said the goal of the advertising department is to listen to the local business community, connect them to the newspaper’s audience and provide innovative advertising that increases the advertiser’s brand awareness. Radcliff serves on the Leadership Snohomish County board of directors and is an active member of the South EverettMukilteo Rotary Club. She also encourages her sales staff to spend time reading stories every morning and take notice of bylines to learn who is covering the community. “I think that’s one thing that has kept The Herald so strong is we have such a local following,” Radcliff said. “We put out a great product. I always tell the sales staff we should be proud of what we sell and proud of what we have to offer.”


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

Essentia says time has finally arrived By Megan Brown

For The Herald Business Journal

BOTHELL — In 1997, Ken Uptain was handed a bottle of water that changed his life. The water didn’t sparkle or contain any exotic flavors. Its special characteristic was pure science: a high pH level, promising better hydration. Uptain was hooked right away. “I started drinking it, and I felt like this was such a quality product, and it made me feel so much better,” Uptain said. “I decided that this water really had a place in the market.” He’d been introduced to alkaline water, which is specially filtered and formulated to improve pH. Uptain, now 63, had just retired from a career selling real estate in Seattle. So much for retirement. He launched the Bothell-based Essentia Water the following June, in 1998. Alkaline water has been popular in Japan for decades, but hadn’t infiltrated the American bottled water market yet. “Back then, 99 percent of waters were sourced from mountain, glaciers, spring, and you essentially ‘make it’ and label it ‘glacier, mountain, spring water,’ ” Uptain said. “This product is one where we take municipal water, we purify it, clean it, and make a product that’s faster hydrating than any other.” However, municipal water just doesn’t sound as romantic as glacial spring water. Uptain discovered that when the product launched, the public wasn’t interested in experimenting with their water just yet. “When I launched the brand in June of 1998, within a year I realized that the product was ahead of its time, and that the consumer wasn’t ready for a product like ours,” Uptain said. “I realized I was pushing this thing uphill, and decided to scale back and take orders.” In the meantime, he made the most out of his retirement. “I played a lot of golf, I played in the stock exchange, I remodeled my house.” In 2008, Uptain crept back out of his semi-retirement. A 10-year ramp up would make most businesses question their product. Though it took patience, Uptain said he never lost faith. As he’d expected, widening public per-

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Bothell’s Essentia Water founder and CEO Ken Uptain said he expected the American market more receptive to an alternative bottled water.

ception and popular health trends made the American market more receptive to an alternative bottled water. A more adventurous consumer led to a boost in popularity of alkaline water, artisan-well water, mineral water and sparkling water. Today’s bottled water brands need to satisfy taste buds to attain loyal customers. Pretty photos of snow-capped

mountains on the label no longer cut it. Essentia Water is bottled in suave, black and red 1-liter bottles. Many health and grocery stores carry the water, and it’s readily available online. Essentia Water’s director of clinical studies and scientific research, Dr. Ralph Holsworth, discovered the water in his local Whole Foods Market in Denver,

Colorado. At the time, Holsworth, used a machine in his office to make his own alkaline water for his family practice patients. He was impressed by the pH level that Essentia Water achieved, and reached out to Uptain in 1998 to get involved. Holsworth was brought on board to study and develop the product. Now, his patients can’t get enough of it. Seattle has become the third largest market for Essentia, which has headquarters at 22833 Bothell Everett Highway, Suite. 220. That’s behind Southern California and New York. Uptain wasn’t expecting that degree of local popularity. “It surprises me because we haven’t done any marketing here in Seattle. We really didn’t have brand ambassadors until just a few months ago,” he said. Brand ambassadors, who attend marathons and health events, introduce potential customers to the product. This personal contact and word of mouth has become instrumental in growing the brand. Building that relationship is part of Uptain’s personal philosophy. “I think it’s pretty proven that having one-on-one contact with consumers is the best, most effective way to get the word out,” Uptain explained of the technique. “And we’re starting to get talked about a lot.” Essentia doesn’t release sales numbers, but the company did say it expects to grow 90 percent in the next year. At the close of 2013, the company employed just eight people. Today, there are 52 employees located throughout the country, with plans to hire an additional 15 more this year. As far as production, Essentia outsources the work to three bottled beverage co-packers, one each in California, Texas and New Jersey, and is actively seeking additional plant capacity in the Pacific Northwest and the southeast U.S. Although Uptain is thrilled with Essentia’s success, he doesn’t seem surprised. He never lost faith in the product or the public coming around. Uptain lives in Bothell with his wife, Cathy, and has no plans to relocate Essentia Water headquarters. “I don’t think I would live anywhere but the Seattle market,” he said. “I just love this area.”

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FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

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Email Herald Business Journal editor Jim Davis at jdavis@heraldnet.com or go to www.TheHeraldBusinessJournal.com If you know of a dedicated, private- or public-sector business executive or small-business owner who excels in business, community involvement and supporting Snohomish County economic development, we want to know. The winners selected for our 2016 Executive

of the Year and Entrepreneur of the Year will be featured in the May issue of The Herald Business Journal and will be honored during the Economic Alliance Snohomish County annual recognition luncheon in that month.

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

Paradise Market caters to global palate By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

A small grocery store that opened recently in Mountlake Terrace offers foods from exotic locales, expertise on how to cook them and — coming soon — a taste of the cuisine from its delicatessen. Paradise Market co-owners, Akbar Quadri, 46, and Mohammed Yusef, 57, said they hope to have a deli/restaurant up and running in a corner of their store within the next few months. The store is located at 23204 57th Ave. W., across the parking lot from Double D Meats, Diamond Knot Brewery and the Snohomish Pie Company. Natives of India and Fiji, respectively, Quadri and Yusuf grew up eating many of the foods they’re selling, which originate from India, Pakistan, Fiji, Mexico and the Mediterranean. African and American foods will soon join the mix, Quadri said.

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Paradise Market, owned by Akbar Quadri (pictured) and Mohammed Yusuf, sells food from multiple cultures, and is located at 23204 57th Ave. W in Mountlake Terrace.

The store caters to the more global palate that’s developed as people travel the world and experience different cuisines, then

return home and want to re-create those dishes, he said. He’s given customers tips on how to prepare certain foods and is con-

sidering offering cooking lessons in the future. “They love to cook themselves,” he said. “They love to learn, they

want to learn and we love to help them.” Yusuf knows a lot about Fijian foods and those of Fiji neighbor New Zea-

land, but Quadri has professional cooking experience, having learned at the side of an older cousin who died of a heart attack a couple of years ago, he said, with a catch in his voice. Besides being a great cook, Quadri said, “he was my best friend and my best cousin.” Quadri said his first job after arriving from India at the age of 20 was at a print shop in Seattle’s University District. When he tired of the business, he turned to restaurant work, eventually putting his cousin’s cooking lessons to use when he opened his own Indian restaurant in Shoreline, where he now lives. It did well for a year or two but couldn’t weather the recession, he said. It might have been different if he’d had Yusuf at his side back then, he said, calling his friend “a one-man show” for the extensive knowledge he has of construction and other trades,

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT!

Top nominees will be honored at an event in Spring 2016 and featured in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal. They’re emerging leaders of Snohomish County, the people in business and industry who shape the county for the better today and into the future. The Herald Business Journal, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and Leadership Snohomish County honor the next generation of leadership in our community. The

Emerging Leaders Award was created to annually recognize an emerging individual whose leadership has made a positive impact on Snohomish County. It pays tribute to an individual who exemplifies outstanding professional values: demonstrates the ability to go above and beyond the expectations of a leader; and serves as an inspiration to the community.

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FEBRUARY 2016

ensure humane slaughter. Prior to slaughter, the animal must have been fed a natural diet that did not include animal by-products. Quadri said all the meat at Paradise Market is halal and is also considered kosher. Paradise Market offers fresh organic lamb, goat and beef raised locally, as well as frozen lamb and goat imported from New Zealand, Quadri said. It also sells halal chicken from a Canadian company and from another based in

“We want to socialize with people here. No matter what kind of religion you are, we want to be friends.” — Mohammed Yusuf Chicago. Fish and seafood is also sold. Yusuf and Quadri said they worked for months extensively remodeling the Paradise Market site, previously an archery range. It needed a lot of clean-up and updating, including electrical and

plumbing work, they said. Dry products on the shelves include bags of both white and brown rice, lentils, black-eye peas and chickpeas — also known as garbanzo beans — wheat, rice and soy flours in various sizes. There are jars of pickles, garlic and ginger pastes,

chutneys and marinades, cans of enchilada sauce and refried beans, packets of ready-to-heat-and-eat Indian meals and a large selection of teas. The store also sells fresh produce and some more unusual frozen foods like guava and mango pulp, taro leaves, Fijian cassava

and lotus root, as well as tandoori naan bread and samosas. Non-food items include hair oils, shampoos and lotions, as well as paper products like paper towels and napkins. Atypically for a grocery store, Paradise Market also sells some clothing imported from India, jewelry and prayer rugs and caps from Turkey. Prayer beads will also be available soon. “We’re thinking this needs to be a one-stop shop,” Quadri said.

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including auto mechanics. He and Yusuf have known each other for years, he said, but grew closer in recent years and started looking to open a business. Yusuf, who lives in Brier, said he moved to the area from Fiji about 19 years ago, the last of his family to do so at the urging of his brother, who is a retired military doctor living here. The population of Fiji is multinational and he grew up with Hindu and Christian friends as well as Muslim, he said. He and Quadri are aware of recent anti-Muslim sentiment in the news, but said politics have no place in their business. People in the community, including local police, have been welcoming, they said. “We want to socialize with people here,” Yusuf said. “No matter what kind of religion you are, we want to be friends.” “Our door is open for the community,” Quadri said. “We respect everybody.” Like Quadri, Yusuf said he also experienced financial hardship during the recent recession. He had to sell off some of the trucks in the small trucking company he owns, shipping freight from Seattle to Los Angeles and back. But he’s been slowly rebuilding the company. The two friends were driving around talking about starting a business together when they spotted the Mountlake Terrace location, they said. The proximity of a mosque just down the street on 56th Avenue helped them decide that a store selling halal meat was needed in the community. Halal means “permissible” under Islamic law and rejects pork, as well as meat taken from the hindquarters of animals, according to www.thekitchn.com. The slaughter of a halal animal is called “zabihah” and must follow certain guidelines, including the pronouncement of Allah’s, or God’s, name during slaughter, either by a Muslim or the “People of the Book (Christian or Jew)”. The animal must be conscious during slaughter, which is accomplished with a very sharp knife to slit the throat quickly and

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

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16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

Survey: Business Prime Pacific is the Place for your owners optimistic

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The Herald Business Journal Staff

EVERETT — A new economic study finds that most businesses surveyed in Snohomish County expect economic stability or growth this coming year and a majority expected revenues to increase year over year. Everett’s Coastal Community Bank is working with Western Washington University’s Center for Economic and Business Research on the report. “We think the perspective of businesses in Snohomish County is unique — it’s not always the same as that of Seattle-based businesses,” said Laura Byers, Coastal’s executive vice president of marketing. “So we wanted to get that perspective.” The web-based survey was emailed to an estimated 1,276 county businesses in December. Of those, 255 businesses responded within a three-week period. The first survey was designed to provide baseline observations of the current business environment in the county and collect data for future forecasts. Coastal and Western plan to conduct the survey each quarter. Byers noted the stock market turmoil in January. “Will we have a different feel in three months compared to what we had in December?” she said. Key takeaways from the first survey include: ■ 95 percent of businesses expect eco-

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New report surveys Snohomish County business owners. To read the full report, go to http://tinyurl.com/ SnoCoBusinessOptimism. nomic stability and/or growth in the county; ■ 61 percent of businesses expect revenues to rise from the previous year and of those who expect revenues to rise, 46 percent expect the growth to come from new customers; ■ 56 percent of respondents expect to invest at the same level as last year while 33 percent expect to invest more than last year; ■ 62 percent of businesses expect growth in net profits over the next five years, 40 percent expect growth in employment, 45 percent expect growth in equipment, 32 percent expect increases in gross margin, 17 percent expect increases in square footage, while 17 percent do not expect any growth. The survey also found that the level of optimism for businesses throughout the county remains high, averaging around 75.56 out of 100. Business owners who would like participate in future reports can contact Coastal at www.coastalbank.com.

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EVERETT — Students can now apply for a software engineering program to be offered starting this fall at Washington State University in Everett. The number of students accepted into the program depends upon the level of interest. It will be the fifth degree program offered at WSU North Puget Sound. Software engineering is a two-year, full-time bachelor’s degree completion program available for transfer students. Students will attend lecture and laboratory courses at the University Center located on the Everett Community College campus. “WSU North Puget Sound at Everett, working with all the University Center partners, is creating more and more exciting opportunities for students in Snohomish, Island and Skagit counties to pursue their higher-education dreams and succeed in the 21st Century workforce,” Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson

said in a statment The software enginnering courses will be taught in person by WSU faculty, via interactive video from WSU Pullman and online through the university’s Global Campus program. The degree focuses on advanced courses on software development, testing, maintenance and management — all specialities of high demand among computer and IT industries. Students who apply early have the best opportunties for financial aid. WSU began offering classes for a mechanical engineering degree through the University Center in 2012. The center is a WSU-managed collaboration of public and private colleges based on the EvCC campus. Two years later, WSU launched bachelor’s degree programs in electrical engineering, communications and hospitality-business management. In June, the university received money to add courses in software engineering and data analytics.


FEBRUARY 2016

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17


18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

Whistle Workwear expands in Everett Expansion allows store to add offerings, keep quirk

“This has always been one of our highest volume locations.” — Scot Deide

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

JIM DAVIS / THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Whistle Workwear in Everett moved into a new store at 10203 Evergreen Way, more than three times bigger than its former site in the same shopping center.

one of our highest volume locations,” Scot Deide, Whistle Workwear’s

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person, there’s a lot of crossover type gear and lifetstyle clothing as well,” Scot Deide said. One of the things that the business brought with it during the move is its personality. The store has added a Model A with the extra space. The store kept falling-through-the-ceiling Joe, the legs of mannequin wearing jeans and boots that looks like a worker dropped from the roof. And Stanley the Bear came along with the move and is situated near the entrance. “I can’t tell you how many times people have taken their pictures with Stanley,” store manager Russ Weaver said. “I can’t count that high.”

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EVERETT — Whistle Workwear started 20 years ago in Puyallup, but one of its busiest stores has always been the location in Everett. That’s why the business moved late last year into a new location at 10203 Evergreen Way, filling the storefront once occupied by Pacific Fabrics. At 18,800 square feet, the new store is more than three times the size of the former site just a short distance away in the same shopping center. “This has always been

in work boots, rain gear, safety and work apparel. It was started in 1995 by Del Deide, Scot’s father who remains a co-owner. With the expansion, the Everett store will now employ 19 full- and parttime workers up from 14. And the store is looking to add a few more employees. The inventory at the new store has also been expanded. The Everett store will carry a selection of Western wear for men and women, new workwear from Timberland Pro, a new section devoted to women and scrubs and expanded safety gear and Dickies workwear. The store also expanded the offering of footwear to almost 300 different styles of shoes and boots. “If you’re an outdoor

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Respect can be big motivator at work next to Kobe Bryant was particularly revealing about both men. And there is a management lesson in it as well. Nance’s diary reads, “Our last game before the trip was at home against Indiana. We were on the bench together when Metta World Peace got a steal. Kobe looked at me and said, ‘You see Metta? You need to watch him every possession, because defensively, he is it. And you can do that.’ I just think it’s cool that he thought I could become a Metta World Peace-type defender. In my mind, I already believe defense is what I do and where I can make an impact. If Kobe believes it, shoot, it must be possible.” Performance in sports at the professional level — and at every level, really — is a variable mixture of talent, motivation, and self-confidence, a genetic makeup that helps with injuries, and, lastly, a little bit of luck. Rookies, in particular, face many challenges to their self-confidence, less from the hazing that they receive than from the pace of the game and the skills of the players. Professional sports do not have a monopoly on rude awakenings for workplace newcomers. Rookies there just come under a lot more public scrutiny. What a break it is for a rookie, then, to have an established expert, a star player in the case of Kobe Bryant, express confi-

dence that you could be one of the best. For a rookie in information systems, marketing, customer service or food preparation, it works the same way. The established expert might be the chief information officer, a product manager, a division manager or the shift Supervisor, but everything else is the same. When you are new to the workplace, if someone you respect professionally and who knows your capabilities expresses confidence in you it will have a strong, positive effect on how you approach your job. Depending on the workplace, it could make the difference between just going through the motions every day and becoming a star performer. The underlying psychology is not complicated, but it does rely on two key concepts that aren’t always easy to come by in the workplace. The first is respect. When people we respect express a high opinion of us it inspires us to try and live up to their expectations. A manager who isn’t respected, who isn’t good at his or her job, though, is not likely to inspire anyone. There are exceptions to this rule but they remain rare. The second key concept is knowledge of your abilities. A comment from a manager that sounds like it was cribbed from a motivational speech will be

neither credible nor effective. In the case of Kobe Bryant’s statement to Larry Nance, of course, Bryant knew exactly what Nance was doing, and was capable of doing, on the court. Today’s workplaces are a bit more complicated than a basketball court, though, and it will take a manager more time and effort to keep an eye on the workers, especially the new ones, to understand their capabilities well enough to know when they would profit from a motivational boost. Love and respect are not identical, of course, but love, like respect, can have a role in bringing out the best in people. Most of us know a businessmen or businesswomen who honestly attribute their success to the fact that their husbands or wives “had faith in them, who knew I could do it…even when I wasn’t sure.” They wanted to live up to the expectations their wives or husbands had for them. Most workplace rookies have, or will acquire, doubts about their abilities. Good managers know this and know how powerful their opinion of a rookie worker can be. So pick the right time, and use it. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

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arry Nance Jr. is in his rookie season with the Los Angeles Lakers. He plays as a power forward, a position that mixes subtle choreography with lessthan-subtle muscle and demands as much attention and energy on defense as it does on offense. Nance is writing a “Rookie Diary” James to share his expeMcCusker riences in breaking into the NBA. It Business is being published in The Players’ 101 Tribune, a new publication started by legendary New York Yankees shortstop, Derek Jeter, to give fans sports stories in the athletes’ own words. As you might expect, the diary describes some of the ribbing that he, like most rookies, endured as a new member of the team, some of his mistakes – yes, he did bobble the first pass thrown to him, causing a turnover and score by the other team. Nance also describes some of the things he learned about the game, and about himself. One brief conversation he had while on the bench sitting


20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Supply-demand decisions need insight T

his article is not about supply chain management; rather, how marketing research data can improve your company’s market position. When you bring the “demand” side of the marketing equation into the “supply” side of business decision making, you produce better revenue results. It doesn’t matter what life stage your business or product is in, research data is the genesis of strategy. Because marketing research is such a critical business and marketing function, this is the first of a two-part series. This series will outline a basic “how to” guide on properly planning, designing, collecting and analyzing a marketing research study. Part one covers planning and design. Plan: The first step in conducting an accurate study is to analyze your business situation and marketing problem or opportunity. The purpose of marketing research is to solve problems, seize opportunities and answer key questions about how to best market your products and services. After you’ve analyzed your business situation (I recommend a SWOT Analysis — catalogue your internal Strengths, Weaknesses, and external Opportunities and Threats), identify the data gaps and define the objectives

of your research project. Example: If the problem is that you are losing share to a key competitor, the objective could be stated, “Determine why we are losing Andrew market share by Ballard identifying how our customers perceive Growth our products vs. those of brand ‘X.’” Strategies It is important that your study remain focused on solving one problem or marketing situation at a time. Attempting to address more than one issue (or objective) may cause problems in the design and collection phases of your study. Design: Guided by your research objective, design your study by considering data sources and methodology. First determine which of your marketing questions can be answered by secondary sources, e.g. your database or syndicated data (research you can purchase from aggregators or resellers, like Nielson). An effective and free secondary source on market data is through the Sno-Isle

It doesn’t matter what life stage your business or product is in, research data is the genesis of strategy.

Library — http://sno-isle.org/research/ business-finance. The questions that can’t be answered through a secondary source are the ones that will constitute your survey. Short surveys produce the best results. In the example above (losing market share), you’d query customers about their attitudes toward your products and those of brand “X.” Your questions should be sequenced in a way that won’t lead or bias the respondents’ answers. There are many ways to glean customer insights: focus groups, telephone interviews, online, mail, packaging and point-of-sale surveys. While online surveys through vendors like SurveyMonkey and KwikSurvey have free versions, phone interviews produce far better results because you can probe answers. Finally, you’ll design your sample (identify respondents). The two fundamentals of sampling are size and segment. Your sample size should be large enough to deliver a high confidence level in the data, but not so

large that the study becomes time and cost prohibitive. It is easy to find “sample calculators” online. I recommend qualitative, small sample interviews. You’d be surprised how much information you can gather from only two to 30 interviews. I’ll address tabulating the data in the second article. In terms of segment, be sure that your sample accurately represents the segment population you are researching, e.g. if 70 percent of your customers are middle-income women between 35 and 54, then 70 percent of your sample should statistically represent that profile. Developing marketing strategy based on customers’ preferences and perceptions is always a good business decision. Be sure to check out March column for part two of this series: collecting and analyzing your marketing research data. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

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Port of Everett Commission Authorizes Land Purchase with Panattoni Development Company for Riverside Business Park

Everett Sail and Power Squadron has announced two upcoming boating courses in the Everett area. • January 16: FREE Boating Seminar — Using GPS • Starting February 8: 7-week America's Boating Course For more information, please visit usps.org/Everett or contact Jim West at 425.778.0283 or by e-mail at phnx789@msn.com.

On January 12, the Port of Everett Commission authorized the CEO to enter into a Purchase and Sale Agreement (PSA) with Panattoni Development Company for approximately 9.68 acres of the Port’s 38-acre Riverside Business Park, located off West Marine View Drive on the Snohomish River. The PSA includes a site plan that depicts a 205,000 square feet light industrial building for the site inside Lots 5 and 6. Panattoni has developed 8 million square feet of commercial space in the Puget Sound, and was recently named NAIOP’s Industrial Developer of the Year for the Puget Sound. “We are very excited to expand our presence in Snohomish County,” said Bart Brynestad, Partner with Panattoni Development Company, Inc. “We will work to create at least 200 new jobs for this community through our partnership with the Port of Everett. This is a great site with even better access and we are looking forward to finalizing the purchase and sale agreement and getting under construction. The negotiated sale price for the land is approximately $2.852 million. Panattoni has a 90-day study period, with three, 30 day extension options. The transaction is expected to close before the end of the year. The Port continues to market the remaining 28 acres of build-ready land at the park (Lots 2, 3, 4 and the remaining portions of 5). The industrial and commercial park is currently

permitted for uses ranging from light, medium and heavy manufacturing, distribution to high tech and office. About the Riverside Business Park The Port of Everett purchased the 85-acre Riverside Business Park from Weyerhaeuser in 1998. The property has been sub-divided into seven (7) parcels and consists of approximately 38 usable acres for a industrial business park. Over the years, the Port has improved the property with fill, roadways and utilities. The Port Commission’s goals for the property have been to support jobs and tax base for the city. The Port has sold nearly 21 acres of the business park since 2007 to support job creation in the Port District. With this Purchase and Sale Agreement, 28 acres remain available for industrial development.

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22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Rental market rebounds from recession T Tom Hoban Realty Markets

he Puget Sound rental housing market has been on a strong run in the past three years, helping many landlords recover from losses suffered immediately after the market crash of 2008-09. Over the past three years, occupancy rates have been hovering a little above 95 percent, considered a healthy balance between supply and

demand. Not since the peak of supply in the year just before the crash of 2008 have we seen as much new product coming on line as we anticipate this year, with 9,530 new apartment units scheduled to be added in mostly the metro area of Seattle/Bellevue this year. This surge will soften the double-digit rent increases in the urban core

For renters, it marks another year of higher-than-inflation rates of rent increases. of the Puget Sound region especially in communities where technology jobs are abundant. Overall hiring in the Puget Sound region is expected to remain healthy in the 2.5 percent

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range this year (down from 3 percent in 2015), or 48,100 jobs compared to 56,100. Much of the job growth outside of technology sector is expected to be in the construction industry, which rental market experts usually identify with an asterisk noting that those jobs are a by-product of import/ export related jobs and the re-trading of those core industry dollars inside the economy. This year, aerospace employment appears to be relatively stable, especially since news came in January that Boeing appears to have reached a deal with its largest engineering union, Society of Professional Engineering Employees Association. Occupancy rates should hold steady just above 95 percent this year as a result, still slightly favoring landlords but very close to the 95 percent equilibrium mark. Rental concessions and incentives could tick up a bit as the new product is absorbed. But they will be mostly isolated to the newer product itself unless landlords have been under-managing their properties in recent years and find themselves offering an inferior product

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just as the new offerings comes on line. Rent increases of between 4 percent and 6.3 percent are anticipated market-wide, down slightly from a 7.6 percent growth rate last year and more in line with 2014’s 6.1 percent. With operating costs growing between 5 percent to 8 percent per year on existing product, that level of increase allows landlords to keep pace with rising operating costs and enjoy a reasonable return on investment. It also allows them to generate enough in reserve to keep their physical assets in good condition. For renters, it marks another year of higher-than-inflation rates of rent increases. A lot of eyes are on the Chinese economy and other more macro threats to U.S. trade, in particular. Experienced investors and landlords in the Everett market remember well the Sept. 11, 2011 attacks and the impact that had on the rental housing market and worry about such catastrophic events as well. Barring anything like that, 2016 should be a good year for the rental market in most areas of the Puget Sound. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

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FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Don’t be embarrassed, get organized H

ave you ever looked around your cluttered office and considered hiring a professional organizer to help you get a handle on your papers, files and stuff? Fortunately, professional organizers are gaining more and more exposure thanks to shows like A&E Hoarders and books like, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Monika Organizing.” OrgaKristofferson nizing has only been an industry Office for a few decades, so the more expoEfficiency sure we can get the better so we can get out there and help the people who want it. It makes me happy that more and more people are posting on social media asking their friends if they know a professional organizer. I believe that type of referral is going to assist people in being more accepting of our help. But there are usually roadblocks to people asking for help and I’d have to say

a big roadblock is embarrassment. A few years ago, I was preparing to have a professional organizer over to my home for a social event and I started getting nervous. I had to stop and tell myself, “You’re a professional organizer, too, and the house is organized!” I get it that it’s hard to let people into our personal spaces, especially if we aren’t proud of them. If you’re a business owner, I think it can be especially hard to let someone see your piles because you may feel like the disarray makes you look unprofessional. Well, I’m here to say that there are too many reasons disorganization happens to even list them all here. So, when a professional organizer comes to help, they walk in with the knowledge that something probably took you off track and they certainly aren’t going to look at the piles and think you’re lazy or some other negative adjective. They want to figure out what’s going on and then help you through the process so you aren’t feeling overwhelmed as you get organized. They aren’t there to judge. Secretly, we organizers are a little giddy inside knowing how much we can make the space change for the positive. We look forward to seeing you look as elated as we feel with the results. Let’s take a look at just a few of

the downsides of being disorganized in the business office. When you’re disorganized: ■ It feels stressful when you feel scattered ■ It feels stressful when you can’t find something you need ■ Time is wasted searching for important documents ■ You may be losing money by not invoicing in a timely manner ■ You may be losing money by actually losing cash, checks or gift cards in your piles ■ You may be losing business by not servicing your clients efficiently ■ You may be embarrassed to have clients come to your office for appointments ■ You may be embarrassed to have co-workers or superiors see your office Let’s take a look at a few of the upsides of being organized in the business office. When you’re organized: ■ You feel more in control of your environment ■ It’s easier to focus on your work without distractions ■ It’s more comfortable to invite people into your office for a meeting or appointment ■ You can work more efficiently in an organized space where you can find

things quickly ■ It’s easier to prioritize your work when you’re not surrounded by piles If you’re ready to take the leap from thinking about getting help to picking up the phone to hire a professional organizer, follow these tips: ■ Ask people you know if they know a professional organizer or, even better, have worked with one. ■ Make sure the organizer has a professional website. ■ Don’t be afraid to ask questions about their experience. ■ Make sure you hire someone you feel comfortable with since you’ll be working closely together. Don’t organize the space before the professional organizer gets there so they can really see what’s working and what’s not working. This will help them find solutions that work for you. I imagine you wouldn’t be embarrassed to hire a lawyer, a tax professional, a business coach or a doctor-all helping professions. If this is your time to get a handle on things in your office, don’t be embarrassed, get help and get organized. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — A rheumatologist has been elected to serve as president of the board of directors for The Everett Clinic. Dr. Shawn Slack takes over for cardiologist Harold Dash, who served 11 years as president for the board. Slack has served on the board of directors since 2002. Dr. Shawn He joined The Everett Slack Clinic in rheumatology and also worked in the Walk-In Clinic until 2010. EDMONDS — Landau Associates has made several staffing changes in its Edmonds office. The company welcomed staff biologist Jim Hearsey. He will assist the Permitting and Compliance group with natural resources permitting support. Patti Segulja-Lau has joined as a project environmental specialist. Dylan Frazer was promoted to senior project geologist. Jon Polka was promoted to senior staff EIT. LAKE STEVENS — Two local designers won awards from Houzz, a website dedicated to contractors and design professionals. Kelly DuByne, owner of Lake Stevens-based Distinctive Interior Designs, won for design and Marlie Bilbruck-Boerger, owner of Lake Stevens-based interior design firm An Interior Matter, won for best customer service. The Best of Houzz is awarded annually in three categories: Design, Customer Service and Photography. LANGLEY — Goosefoot, a local non-profit community development organization, plans to present a check on Thursday in support of the South Whidbey School District Garden Program. In 2014, more than $22,000 was raised from the community and Goose Grocer matched the total amount, donating $44,726 to the garden program. In 2015, $26,048.39 was raised and Goose Grocer once again matched the whole amount to $52,096.78. MILL CREEK — The City of Mill Creek and Google will offer a free program called Let’s Put Our Cities on the Map to help local businesses increase their presence online. Free workshops are available at 9 a.m. Thursday, at 6 p.m. Feb. 11 and at 10 a.m. Feb. 13. RSVP by calling Sherrie at 425-921-5717 or email sherrier@cityofmillcreek.com. MILL CREEK —Award-winning Elle Marie Hair Studio — Mill Creek is the host for the next Economic Alliance Snohomish County Business After Hours networking gathering. The event is from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 4 at 17917 Bothell-Everett Highway, Suite 102, Bothell. The event is free to attend but please RSVP so the host has an accurate headcount. http://tinyurl.com/z79lvyu. LYNNWOOD — The 2016 Pacific Northwest Fly Fishing Show comes to the Lynnwood Convention Center Feb.

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Long-term includes regularly scheduled vessels only. Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 3 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 3 Ship port calls 2015: 133 Barge port calls 2015: 61 Feb. 2: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Feb. 9: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Feb. 9: Westwood, Westwood Pacific Feb. 16: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Feb. 22: ECL, Cosmic Ace Feb. 23: Westwood, Westwood Fraser Source: Port of Everett

13 and 14. It includes casting demonstrations, seminars, fly-tying, and more all geared to Washington, Oregon and British Columbia anglers. Admission is $15 for one day, $25 for two days. Film Festival admission is $15 or $10 with paid admission to the show. Parking is free. For details, visit http://flyfishingshow. com/ EDMONDS — Carol K. Nelson, Pacific Region Executive and Seattle Market President of KeyBank, will serve as the 2016 chairperson for the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement in the Puget Sound. Carol Nelson Go Red For Women’s icon day is National Wear Red Day, Feb. 5, when everyone is encouraged to wear red to help raise awareness about heart disease in women. EDMONDS — Edmonds Center for the Arts welcomes back Taproot Theatre for a second series of improvisational theatre workshops for people with memory loss, their family members and care partners. The six-week workshop series is on Monday mornings from 10:30 a.m. to noon, from Feb. 8 until March 14. For cost and additional information, contact the Box Office at 425-275-9595. MUKILTEO — Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett has announced the spring 2016 commencement ceremony will take place May 15 at the Future of Flight in Mukilteo. Previously, graduates have traveled to Pullman to take part in commencement exercises. About 50 students from the mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, hospitality business management and integrated strategic communication programs will graduate this spring.

MILL CREEK — USA Landscape Materials has partnered with Pacific Topsoils to offer customers the ability to order their landscape materials online instead of driving to its locations throughout Snohomish and King counties. The company said the landscape materials are competitively priced with free delivery. For details and ordering, homeowners, landscape companies and developers can go to www.USALandscapeMaterials.com. EVERETT — Economic Alliance Snohomish County has adopted a resolution supporting Sound Transit 3 expansion to Everett via Paine Field, with an extension to the Everett Community College/WSU campus. In June, the Sound Transit Board will finalize the list of projects that will be put before the voters in November for funding. According to the organization, this particular expansion could benefit local and regional economies. EVERETT — A net of 652,569 square feet of additional industrial space was leased by Snohomish County tenants in the 2015 calendar year, according to Economic Alliance Snohomish County. At the end of the year, the county’s industrial vacancy rate was 5.7 percent. Notably, Underwood Gartland and Panattoni Development in Southwest Everett welcomed several new business tenants. EVERETT — Thousands of senior citizens and low-income customers will be able to receive help with their electric bills this year through energy assistance programs offered by Snohomish County Public Utility District. For an application or more information about the PUD’s assistance programs, customers should visit www.snopud.com and click on “Your Account” or call Customer Service at 425-783-1000. SEATTLE — Low-interest federal disaster loans are now available to certain private nonprofit organizations in Washington following November 2015 storm, flooding and landslide damage. The filing deadline to return applications for property damage is March 15, 2016. Disaster loan information and application forms are available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling 800-659-2955 or emailing disastercustomerservice@sba. gov. TULALIP — The Tulalip Resort Casino has appointed Puget Sound native Jeremy Taisey as the new chef/ general manager of its four diamond Tulalip Bay Restaurant. Prior to joining the resort’s culinary team, Taisey worked at the Woodmark Hotel Kirkland, Las Vegas’ Bellagio Hotel, The Regent Hotel Beijing, the Pine Valley Resort Beijing and other local area hotels. MUKILTEO — Contractor Mike Janes, who owns The Janes Company, was selected as the winner in a drawing for an all-expenses-paid trip for two to Nashville, Tennessee, from Lochinvar,

a manufacturer of high-efficiency water heaters and boilers. The prize package includes accommodations for four days, as well as tickets to the world’s largest country music festival in June 2016. Janes is a Lochinvar VIP contractor in Mukilteo. EVERETT — The Bra Shop, a program of Citrine Health in Everett, has announced that employee Devyn Cox has successfully completed certification as a mastectomy fitter. Devyn, who is from Devyn Cox Mountlake Terrace, has been an employee of Citrine Health since June. EVERETT — During the holiday season, AAA Washington teamed up with local shelters, food banks and other charitable organizations to provide unused toiletries for those in need. A total of 25 AAA Washington locations participated in Soap for Hope campaign. The program’s eighth year proved to be the most successful year yet, bringing in 148,159 items or 12,347 pounds across Washington and northern Idaho. LYNNWOOD — Online registration is now available for the Verdant Healthier Community Conference on Feb. 29 at the Lynnwood Convention Center. The event will bring together several of the Puget Sound region’s leading experts in health, wellness and community building. Cost is $49 per person and includes a healthy breakfast and lunch. Scholarships are available. Go to visit www.verdanthealth.org. EVERETT — OrcaCon, the Snohomish County Tabletop Games convention, enjoyed a successful event hosting 698 nerds, geeks, and table-top game enthusiasts from as far away as London, England. OrcaCon will begin its 2017 planning with a brand new Kickstarter campaign in April, and general registration in May. For more information, visit www.orcacon.org and follow its social media channels on Facebook and Twitter. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — The City of Mountlake Terrace has partnered with government website specialist CivicPlus for the launch of its newly redesigned government website, www. cityofmlt.com. The city’s website was last updated in 2007. The new website includes improved functionality that boosts site visitors’ ability to interact with City of Mountlake Terrace offices. SNOHOMISH — Marlin and Diana Newhouse of Snohomish are new members of the American Angus Association. The American Angus Association is the largest beef breed association in the world. It helps members to advance the beef cattle business by selecting the best animals for their herds, marketing quality genetics for the beef cattle industry and quality beef for consumers.


FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

BUSINESS BRIEFS OLYMPIA — The Washington State Department of Revenue has made it easier for businesses to view or print their reseller permit. Businesses can now print their reseller permit directly from their online My Account via the Revenue website. Before adding this feature, a business needing its reseller permit had to contact Revenue and ask for a reprint to be mailed. LYNNWOOD — Edmonds Community College’s Board of Trustees has gained two new members, Tia Benson Tolle, and a new student trustee, Omar Abdulla. Benson Tolle will serve a term which will run through Tia Benson September 2020. She replaces board member Tolle Dick Van Hollebeke, who finished his term in September. Abdulla will serve a term which will run through June 2016. He replaces Girish Chummun. Outside of the college, Abdulla Omar Abdulla is a part-time sports instructor at the Dale Turner YMCA in Shoreline. Gov. Jay Inslee made the appointments of the two trustees in early January. SEATTLE — Boeing aircraft and arti-

facts will be highlighted at The Museum of Flight in Seattle to celebrate the company’s 2016 centennial. Go to www. museumofflight.org for details. LAKE STEVENS — The City of Lake Stevens and the Chamber of Commerce have announced the new Business Retention and Expansion program. During the next year, city officials and chamber ambassadors will meet with local executives and business owners to ask them about their needs, future plans, and how they think the local business environment could improve. The aggregated information will be used for future planning. EDMONDS — Through May 21, The Savvy Traveler in Edmonds will offer a series of seminars on destinations ranging from Hadrian’s Wall to Morocco. Each presentation features photos and commentary from seasoned travel experts. Space is limited so please call 425-744-6076 for reservations. More details can be found at www.savvytravelerstore.com. The store is located at 112 5th Ave. S, Edmonds. EVERETT — The Port Gardner LeTip chapter is hosting a business mixer at 7 a.m. Feb. 9 at Everett Station, 3201 Smith Ave., Everett. LeTip is for small business owners or principles to help each other with business leads or tips. For more information, contact Nick Schmid

of Dutch Masters Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning at DutchMastersCleaning@ gmail.com or call 425-353-5890.

industry and all layers of the supply chain. To register: www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1757627.

BOTHELL — Alder Biopharmaceuticals CEO Randall Schatzman has ranked at No. 6 in a list of top U.S. CEOs compiled by ExecRank. The list ranks the top CEOs of small market capitalization companies in industries ranging from consumer brands to energy companies. Randall Schatzman A complete list of the rankings can be found at http://execrank.com/2015-rankings/2015-execrank-top-small-cap-ceos/.

LAKE STEVENS — The Lake Stevens Chamber of Commerce has announced its fourth annual C-Trail 5k/10k/Kids Fun Run with a new Chase the Leprechaun feature on March 12. Registration is now open on the chamber website. Visit http://lschamber.org/ and select C-Trail Run under Things To Do for more details, or visit page on Active. com by searching C-Trail with the ZIP code 98258.

SNOHOMISH — Author and Herald Business Journal columnist Monika Kristofferson is the guest speaker for the Snohomish Chamber of Commerce meeting from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Feb. 16 at Snohomish Faith Church, 1220 22nd St., Snohomish. The professional organizer and productivity consultant personally tailors organizing systems and motivational methodologies. LYNNWOOD — The Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance’s 15th Annual Aerospace Conference, Flying into the Future, comes to Lynnwood Feb. 9 through 11. The three-day event will examine the future of the aerospace

HOOKING UP WITH

Saturday, February 13, 2016 | 7:30 pm $34, $29 & $24 | Youth/Student $15 An improvisational comedy enterprise, best known as the first ever on-going improvisational theater troupe in the U.S. and Canada. The Second City has produced multiple television programs and has consistently been a starting point for comedians, actors, and directors.

From simple sprains to major pains, the doctors at Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett are trained exclusively to diagnose and treat ankle and foot problems.

SPANISH HARLEM ORCHESTRA

Friday, February 19, 2016 | 7:30 pm $39, $34 & $29 | Youth/Student $15 A Latin dance music orchestra based in the U.S. founded by Aaron Levinson and Oscar Hernandez. This Latin Jazz Powerhouse won the 2005 GRAMMY® Award for Best Salsa/ Merengue Album and the 2010 GRAMMY® Award for Best Tropical Latin Album.

When experience, knowledge, and personal attention are important to you – give us a call and meet these special doctors. Let us help you put your best foot forward!

BOSTON BRASS

Friday, March 4, 2016 | 7:30 pm $39, $34 & $29 | Youth/Student $15

10% off for Seniors 62+ & Military on ECA presented events! 1500525

ec4arts.org | 425.275.9595 410FOURTHAVENUENORTH EDMONDSWA98020

CAMANO ISLAND — Windermere Real Estate in Camano Island has been honored by the state of Washington for its extensive commitment to community. Secretary of State Kim Wyman presented owners Randy and Marla Heagle with an honor roll certificate at the 2015 Corporations for Communities ceremony on Dec. 16. The Camano Island Windermere team contributed to the Windermere Foundation and 26 other non-profits in 2015.

We Know Feet Inside and Out!

THE SECOND CITY

For 27 years, Boston Brass has set out to establish a one-of-a-kind musical experience combining classical arrangements, burning jazz standards, and the best of original brass quintet repertoire into an unforgettable performance.

EVERETT — Port of Everett Commissioner Troy McClelland was elected in November as president of the Washington Public Ports Association, which means the Port will now have a role in addressing policy issues at the highest level in the state. McClelland first joined the commission in 2009.

SECOND LOCATION! Alpine Foot & Ankle Clinic 17432 Smokey Point Boulevard, Arlington WA • 360-653-2326 www.alpinefootandankle.com Practicing at both locations:

Dr Jarrod Smith & Dr Robert Stanton

1495959

3131 Nassau Street • Everett, WA 98201 (across from Providence Everett Medical Center, Pacific Campus)

425-339-8888

www.ankleandfootnorthwest.com


26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Dec. 1-31. 15-17133-MLB: Chapter 7, Northline Industries Inc.; attorney for debtor: Dallas W. Jolley Jr.; filed: Dec. 3; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 15-17182-CMA: Chapter 11, James M. Willett and Janet E. Willett; attorney for joint debtors: Larry B. Feinstein; attorney for special request: Jesse A. P. Baker; filed: Dec. 8; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 15-17558-MLB: Chapter 7, Ronald W. Colwill Jr. and Heather M. Colwill; attorney for joint debtors: Matthew D. O’Conner; special request: Pro se; filed: Dec. 31; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Dec. 1 and Dec. 31.

Federal tax liens 201512020076: Dec. 2; Thompson, Vincent R., 7019 Woods Creek Road, Monroe 201512020077: Dec. 2; Cozart, Anjanette M. (+), 9916 39th Drive NE, Marysville 201512020078: Dec. 2; Myers, Mary L., 10404 Eighth Place SE, Lake Stevens 201512020079: Dec. 2; Stanford Cleaning Services (+), 8129 Beverly Blvd., Everett 201512080331: Dec. 8; Cumpton, Sean M., 322a 172nd Place SW, Bothell 201512080332: Dec. 8; Carpenter, John S., 15220 220th Street SE, Snohomish 201512080333: Dec. 8; Dhillon, Gurparrdee, 18930 Bothell Everett Highway, Apt. F102, Bothell 201512080334: Dec. 8; TVV International Inc., 11128 Algonquin Road, Woodway 201512080335: Dec. 8; Parry, Blaine, 107 164th St., Apt. 1-304, Bothell 201512080336: Dec. 8; Rubatino, Frank H., 10416 Sandy Beach Drive, Lake Stevens 201512080337: Dec. 8; Mercado, Joseph, 7909 212th St. SW, Unit 1, Edmonds 201512080338: Dec. 8; A Brewed Awakening, 6021 204th St. SW, Apt. 202, Lynnwood 201512080339: Dec. 8; Ness, Jennifer (+), 1211 164th St. SW, Suite 103 Lynnwood 201512080340: Dec. 8; Accurate Electric & Service Inc., 7003 70th Drive SE, Snohomish 201512080341: Dec. 8; AR Solutions Inc., PO Box 3, Mukilteo 201512080342: Dec. 8; Turck-Zbytek, Lori, 15508 35th Ave. W, Apt. 3, Lynnwood 201512080343: Dec. 8; Hutton, Laura B., 4518 113th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201512080344: Dec. 8; American Painting Systems Inc., PO Box 5297, Lynnwood 201512080345: Dec. 8; Stokes, Gerri, 5900 64th St. NE, Unit 191 Marysville 201512090232: Dec. 9; Lebaron, Christin A., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynwood 201512090233: Dec. 9; Lebaron, Isaias E. (+), 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynwood 201512090234: Dec. 9; Baker, Valerie, 12104 58th Place SE, Snohomish 201512090235: Dec. 9; Baker, James S., 12104 58th Place SE, Snohomish 201512090236: Dec. 9; Vera, S. (+), 1205 W Casino Road, Apt. A104, Everett 201512090237: Dec. 9; Santana, Eliezer, 1205 W Casino Road, Apt. A104, Everett 201512090238: Dec. 9; Unitedgeneralcontractors.net, 820 Cady Rd., Apt. A303, Everett 201512090239: Dec. 9; Barrett, Ken, 14911 Chain Lake Road, Monroe 201512090240: Dec. 9; McClung, James C III, 6308 147th St. SW, Edmonds 201512150332: Dec. 15; Pacific Masonry

Inc., PO Box 966, Marysville 201512150333: Dec. 15; Lauren’s Adult Family Home, 2728 144th St. SW, Lynnwood 201512150334: Dec. 15; Norpoint Shooting Center, 8620a 172nd St. NE, Arlington 201512150335: Dec. 15; Yi, Choongha (+), 3521 156th Place SE, Bothell 201512150336: Dec. 15; Barnhart, Holly (+), 4829 112th St. SE, Everett 201512150337: Dec. 15; Lizotte, Loretta, 14816 239th Place SE, Snohomish 201512150338: Dec. 15; Hennerberg, Amy S. (+), 7727 10th St. SE, Lake Stevens 201512150339: Dec. 15; Stephens, Tonya S. (+), 13416 Pacific Pointe Lane, Mukilteo 201512150340: Dec. 15; Brand, Todd L. Hilden, 609 54th St. SW, Everett 201512150341: Dec. 15; Sporty’s Beef & Brew (+), 6503 Evergreen Way, Everett 201512160293: Dec. 16; Pickle Time Inc., 3625 C 148th St., B102, Lynnwood 201512160294: Dec. 16; Custer, Tammy, 29520 28th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201512160295: Dec. 16; Smith, Robert T., 1232 Rucker Ave., Everett 201512160296: Dec. 16; Jackson, Nikki (+), 23814 84th Ave. W, Edmonds 201512160297: Dec. 16; Nick, Dion M., 4601 108th St. NE, Marysville 201512160298: Dec. 16; Sound Garage Door Company Inc., 14524 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville 201512160299: Dec. 16; Pacific Bay Wood Design (+), 32615 Cascade View Drive, Unit 1A, Sultan 201512160300: Dec. 16; SCP Enterprises Inc., 1429 Ave. D 515, Snohomish 201512160301: Dec. 16; Bradley, Matthew D., 9407 50th Ave., Marysville 201512160302: Dec. 16; Wired Electric Inc., 5808 146th Place SE, Everett 201512220480: Dec. 22; Pringle, Evelyn, 2327 Lombard Ave., Everett 201512220481: Dec. 22; Welch, Constance (+), PO Box 15050, Mill Creek 201512220482: Dec. 22; Second Chance Human Resource, 3307 Rucker Ave., Everett 201512220483: Dec. 22; Erickson, Audrey P., 18326 Smokey Point Blvd., Apt. No. 211, Arlington 201512220484: Dec. 22; Sporty’s Beef & Brew (+), 6503 Evergreen Way, Everett 201512220485: Dec. 22; Ace Enterprises Inc., 29718 94th St. SE, Monroe 201512220486: Dec. 22; Flores, Sonia (+), 1233 167th Place SW, Lynnwood 201512220487: Dec. 22; Wright, Susie L. (+), 11010 Algonquin Road, Woodway 201512220488: Dec. 22; Protek Roofing Inc., 3216 124th St. SE, Everett 201512230239: Dec. 23; Renovation & Remodeling, 7704 176th St. SE, Snohomish 201512230240: Dec. 23; Grasseth, Heather J. (+), 3405 172nd St. NE, Suite 5, No. 245, Arlington 201512230241: Dec. 23; Barrettes Custom Painting-Finishes (+), PO Box 1704, Edmonds 201512230242: Dec. 23; Juniors Construction (+), PO Box 306, Lynnwood 201512230243: Dec. 23; Bubbles Laundry (+), 1242 State Ave., Suite I, Marysville 201512230244: Dec. 23; Renovation and Remodeling Specialists, 7704 176th St. SE, Snohomish 201512230245: Dec. 23; Spencer, Kirk D. (+), 19818 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201512230246: Dec. 23; Spencer, Kirk D., 19818 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201512290268: Dec. 29; Hartwick, Donna J. (+), 4405 88th St. NE, Marysville 201512290269: Dec. 29; Kraft, Margaret F., 4407 Meridian Ave. N, Tulalip 201512290270: Dec. 29; Manchester, Mark B., 13102 42nd Place W, Mukilteo 201512290271: Dec. 29; Andrews, Jennifer (+), PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201512290272: Dec. 29; K Fox Insulation Inc., PO Box 3293, Arlington 201512290273: Dec. 29; Axiom (+), PO Box 1309, Issaquah 201512290274: Dec. 29; Howell, Darlene E., 8714 E Sunnyside School Road, Marysville 201512290275: Dec. 29; Prevo, Tammy M., 8121 139th Ave. SE, Snohomish

201512290276: Dec. 29; Atkinson, Mark, 10118 169th Drive NE, Granite Falls

Partial release of federal tax lien 201512080346: Dec. 8; Lundberg, Venusfe C., 5015 60th Ave. NE, Marysville

Release of federal tax lien 201512020080: Dec. 2; Korn, Marshall J., 1118 Duchess Road, Bothell 201512020081: Dec. 2; Jays Automotive Machine Shop (+), 11303 Highway 99, Everett 201512020082: Dec. 2; De-Arriaga, C. Lopez (+), 20114 Filbert Road, Apt. B, Bothell 201512020083: Dec. 2; Bradley, Kam (+), 18802 67th Ave. NE, Arlington 201512020084: Dec. 2; Kennedy, Michelle (+), 5422 138th Drive SE, Snohomish 201512020085: Dec. 2; Dickson, Marc A., 21616 Yeager Road, Monroe 201512080347: Dec. 8; Rock Solid Trucking Inc., 2225 Cherry Road, Lake Stevens 201512080348: Dec. 8; Chaban, Sergey (+), PO Box 15132, Mill Creek 201512080349: Dec. 8; Chaban, Sergey (+), P O Box 15132, Mill Creek 201512080350: Dec. 8; Hardy, Robert V., 12623 52nd Place W, Mukilteo 201512080351: Dec. 8; Agee, Bob T., PO Box 109, Mukilteo 201512080352: Dec. 8; Sessa, Maureen D. (+), 2320 121st St. SE, Everett 201512080353: Dec. 8; Stull, Edward N., 1530 35th Ave. W, Apt. Space 30, Lynnwood 201512080354: Dec. 8; Smith, Steven J., 30922 68th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201512080355: Dec. 8; Malone, Marc A., 325 170th Place SE, Mill Creek 201512080356: Dec. 8; Lilikas, Sophia, 8521 Holly Drive, Apt. 7, Everett 201512080357: Dec. 8; Clark, Erik R., 12425 43rd Drive SE, Everett 201512080358: Dec. 8; Day, Daniel R., 4324 172nd St. SW, Lynnwood 201512080359: Dec. 8; Munro, Daniel (+), PO Box 6091, Edmonds 201512080360: Dec. 8; Webster, Tracy L., PO Box 322, Lake Stevens 201512080361: Dec. 8; Rock Solid Trucking Inc., 2225 Cherry Road, Lake Stevens 201512080362: Dec. 8; Rock Solid Trucking Inc., 2225 Cherry Road, Lake Stevens 201512090244: Dec. 9; Van-Wyngarden, Jaime J., 221 State Ave., C351, Marysville 201512150342: Dec. 15; Edwards, Kenneth S. (+), 1818 Fifth St., Marysville 201512150343: Dec. 15; Axiom HVAC Inc., 14325 E Lake Goodwin Road, Stanwood 201512150344: Dec. 15; Blue Seal Inc., 1313 Bonneville Ave., Suite 201, Snohomish 201512150345: Dec. 15; Thulesen, Marjorie R., 7119 281st Place NW, Stanwood 201512150346: Dec. 15; Thulesen, Marjorie R., PO Box 2692, Stanwood 201512150347: Dec. 15; Affordable Environmental, PO Box 40, Mountlake Terrace 201512150348: Dec. 15; Sanner, Rebecca M. Neel, 5711 100th NE, Unit 21, Marysville 201512150349: Dec. 15; Blue Seal Inc., 1313 Bonneville Ave., Suite 201, Snohomish 201512150350: Dec. 15; Barajas, Silvia (+), 28631 224th Place SE, Maple Valley 201512150493: Dec. 15; Smith, Linda (+), 4012 Colby Avenue, Suite 103, Everett 201512160303: Dec. 16; Williams, Jesse D., 13625 57th Drive SE, Everett 201512160304: Dec. 16; Williams, Jesse D., 13625 57th Drive SE, Everett 201512160305: Dec. 16; Sweet, Paula (+), 3611 173rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201512160306: Dec. 16; Williams, Jesse D., 13625 57th Drive SE, Everett 201512220489: Dec. 22; Duvaul, Denise T., 5709 235th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201512220490: Dec. 22; Duvaul, Denise T., 5709 235th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201512220491: Dec. 22; Jakes D Corp., PMB 6147 13300 Bothell-Everett Highway, Mill Creek 201512220492: Dec. 22; Puget Sound

Security, 1624 Grove St., Suite A, Marysville 201512220496: Dec. 22; Buehler, Janet, 10619 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201512220497: Dec. 22; JBK Trade Service, PO Box 14308, Mill Creek 201512220499: Dec. 22; Buehler, Janet, 10619 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201512220500: Dec. 22; Kneeland, Joseph C., 4440 Chennault Beach Road, Mukilteo 201512220501: Dec. 22; Roberts, Curtis, 926 E Marine View Drive, Everett 201512220503: Dec. 22; Roger Elton Insurance Inc., 127 E Hazel Ave., Burlington 201512220504: Dec. 22; Jakes D Corp., 19414 Eighth Place W, Lynnwood 201512220506: Dec. 22; Sperbeck, Wendy L., 20007 45th Drive SE, Bothell 201512220507: Dec. 22; Jakes D Corp., 19414 Eighth Place W, Lynnwood 201512220508: Dec. 22; Silver Lake Childcare, PO Box 14938, Mill Creek 201512220509: Dec. 22; Schmeising, Andrew M., 13627 26th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201512290277: Dec. 29; Barnett-Frazier, A., 19607 6th Drive SE, Bothell 201512290278: Dec. 29; Chaban, Sergey, PO Box 15132, Mill Creek 201512290280: Dec. 29; Quin, Karen R., 8931 57th Drive NE, Marysville 201512290281: Dec. 29; Johnstone, Jeremy S., 515 Highway 9 NE, Suite 105, Lake Stevens 201512290282: Dec. 29; Johnstone, Jeremy S., 515 Highway 9 NE, Suite 105, Lake Stevens 201512290283: Dec. 29; Moss, Carol B., 2340 SE Harlow Ave., Troutdale, Oregon 201512290284: Dec. 29; Moss, Carol B., 2340 SE Harlow Ave., Troutdale, Oregon 201512290285: Dec. 29; Belanger, Lisa M., 18111 25th Ave. NE, Apt. J105, Marysville 201512290286: Dec. 29; Breckon, Heather R., 20262 Adrian Road NE, Soup Lake 201512290287: Dec. 29; Lund, Karen, 15824 36th Ave. W 17, Lynnwood 201512290288: Dec. 29; Richards, Ernest S. Estate Of, 10025 23rd Drive SE, Everett

Release of federal tax lien — paid for 201512020001: Dec. 2; Endrigo, Mark S., 523 61st St. SE, Everett 201512100487: Dec. 10; Calderon, Jessie A., 7725 87th St. NE, Marysville 201512210642: Dec. 21; McCoy, Joseph, 1304 Chestnut St., Apt. 8, Everett 201512210667: Dec. 21; O’Neil, Sean, 6207 First Drive SE, Everett 201512300216: Dec. 30; Classic Glass Window Cleaning (+), 14710 Main St., Apt. AA207, Mill Creek 201512300217: Dec. 30; McCoy, Joseph H., 14608 Main St., Apt. Y-308, Mill Creek

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201512040243: Dec. 4; Anchor Home Comfort, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201512080363: Dec. 8; Villa, Salina C. (+), 1609 1/2 Fifth St., Marysville 201512090242: Dec. 9; Lee, Hyung M., 11108 Chennault Beach Road, Apt. 2611, Mukilteo 201512090243: Dec. 9; Lee, Hyung M., 11108 Chennault Beach Road, Apt. 2611, Mukilteo

Withdrawal of federal tax lien after release 201512160307: Dec. 16; Hardy, Robert V., 12623 52nd Place W, Mukilteo

Withdrawal of federal tax lien 201512090241: Dec. 9; Rosbarsky, Terri S. (+) 3303 Monte Villa Parkway, Suite 340, Bothell


MAKE (IT) HERE FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

MAKE (IT) HERE MAKE (IT) HERE Glacier Peak, Snohomish County, WA

1 IN ADVANCED MANUFACTURING ST

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Snohomish County has the highestenergy. concentration of advanced manufacturing life science, and renewable Countysignifi has the concentration of advanced jobs west of theSnohomish Rockies; boasting canthighest high-technology activity in multiple Snohomish County has the highest concentration advanced manufacturing jobs west ofrenewable the Rockies; boastingof significant clusters including aerospace, life science, and energy. Snohomish County has the highest concentration of advanced Snohomish County has the highest concentration of advanced high-technology activity inthe multiple clusters boasting including aerospace, manufacturing jobs west of Rockies; significant manufacturing westofofthetheRockies; Rockies; boasting significant manufacturing jobs jobs west boasting significant life (P) science, and renewable energy. 425.248.4219 Learn more:

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Learn more: (P) 425.248.4219


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

06/11

1,279

866

10.1

10,737

40,200

15,200

21,500

$4,202,089

07/11

1,207

851

10.1

10,388

41,100

15,700

21,800

$4,169,784

08/11

1,325

916

9.1

9,443

41,400

15,900

22,100

$4,591,484

09/11

1,161

837

9

8,938

42,100

15,800

22,100

$4,117,816

10/11

1,226

828

8.8

9,342

42,300

15,000

21,900

$4,165,352

11/11

1,041

854

8.7

9,989

43,100

15,000

21,700

$4,317,909

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1.067

1,189

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$10,765,437

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 233.25

233.81

235.92

234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831


FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 29

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

06/11

$73.93

543,602,022

213

4,196

$3.86

07/11

$70.47

446,373,984

241

3,935

$3.78

08/11

$66.86

521,884,745

227

4,181

$3.75

09/11

$60.51

455,591,472

192

3,896

$3.86

10/11

$65.79

493,315,047

214

3,883

$3.80

11/11

$68.69

518,192,703

188

3,334

$3.67

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

N/A

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

N/A

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

N/A

6,995

N/A

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1500722


30 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA.

Arlington

A Balanced Life: 4032 167th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8447; Nonclassified Brainless Clothing: 17410 73rd Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8192; Clothing-Retail Center Public House: 14009 Club Way, Arlington, WA 98223; Hotel Management Chelsea’s Furry Kid Services: 19702 48th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223; Pet Services Dee’s Salon: 6206 188th St. NE, No. 69, Arlington, WA 98223-7789; Beauty Salons Exquisite Home Cleaning: 26508 Tronson Road, Arlington, WA 98223; House Cleaning Homegrown NW: 733 Lakewood Road, Arlington, WA 98223-5479; Nonclassified IXL 502: PO Box 3658, Arlington, WA 98223-3658; Nonclassified Innovative Home Theater: 17310 McRae Road NW, Arlington, WA 98223-2801; Home Theater Systems JBT and Associates: 106 E Gilman Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1017; Nonclassified KCID Solutions: PO Box 3282, Arlington, WA 98223-3282; Nonclassified KAFE Neo Woodstone Taverna: 7705 204th St. NE, No. 101, Arlington, WA 982235096; 360-322-6943; Restaurants Manna Bakery Whole Body Foods: Smokey Point, Arlington, WA 98223; Bakers-Retail Mike Werlech Construction: 19600 63rd Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6318; 360-4355321; Construction Companies Moes Espresso: 5917 195th St. NE, No. 1, Arlington, WA 98223-6429; Coffee Shops Senses Spa: 3323 169th Place NE, Arlington, WA 98223; 360-548-3024; Health Spas Three Cedars Dog Boarding: 10112 124th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6236; Pet Boarding Sitting and Kennels Up The Grove Jo: 18932 66th Ave. NE, No. C, Arlington, WA 98223-4732; 360-435-5194

Bothell 55 Sporting Goods: 4006 212th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98021-5404; Sporting Goods-Retail Arrowwood Russell: 23310 14th Place W, Bothell, WA 98021-9147; Nonclassified Ascension Solutions: 17907 25th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6636; Nonclassified Brand C Events: 724 203rd St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-9685; Events-Special Chelsea Anne and Co.: 24235 21st Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98021-9527; Nonclassified City Experience: 128 170th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-4929; Nonclassified DandD: 21907 43rd Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98021-7282; Nonclassified Evergreen Cannabis NW: 22610 61st Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-8023; Marijuana Dispensary Hot Creperie: 22023 Seventh Place W, Bothell, WA 98021-8145; Restaurants

Jobb Mind M: 105 196th Place SW, Bothell, WA 98012-7078; 425-967-5829; Nonclassified Krafty Keytags: 14618 46th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-4756; Manufacturers Orale: 18930 Bothell Everett Highway, No. A3, Bothell, WA 98012-6848; Nonclassified PR Inc.: 18826 19th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98012-8719; Nonclassified Ralph Lauren: 4318 147th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-4714; 425-948-7108; Clothing-Retail Ruchi Indian Restaurant: 22623 44th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98021-9044; Restaurants Seattle Stamps: 19215 25th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6968; General Merchandise-Retail Shelley Petillo Consulting: 4603 152nd Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6101; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Susie Sweet Tooth: 3220 217th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98021-3530; Nonclassified

Darrington NW Cascade Cabins and Remodeling: PO Box 148, Darrington, WA 98241-0148; Home Builders Wooden Whatknots-Whitehorse: PO Box 216, Darrington, WA 98241; Wood Products

Edmonds American Legion Post 66: 117 Sixth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3426; 425-245-8545; Veterans’ and Military Organizations Debauchery Catering: 10016 Edmonds Way, No. 253, Edmonds, WA 98020-5107; Caterers EC Enterprise Inc: 22511 80th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-8201; Nonclassified Edmonds Memory Care: 7280 210th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026; 425-361-2914; Nonclassified Evolved Marketing Group: 111 Sunset Ave. N, Edmonds, WA 98020-3229; 425-967-5874; Marketing Programs and Services Holy Moly Outdoors: 18106 Andover St., Edmonds, WA 98026-5427; Nonclassified International Investor’s Mgmt: 345 12th Place N, Edmonds, WA 98020-2980; Investment Management Mastgech: 21911 76th Ave. W, No. 100, Edmonds, WA 98026-7918; 425-673-6492 Merritt Performance Armory: PO Box 1341, Edmonds, WA 98020-1341 N Blackstone: 18614 76th Ave. W, No. D, Edmonds, WA 98026-5802; Nonclassified

Everett Addicted Expresso: 1831 Silver Lake Road, Everett, WA 98208-2516; Nonclassified Alpha Supported Living Services: 207 E Beech St., Everett, WA 98203-4340; 425-5128030; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Antzoom: 1523 132nd St. SE, No. C203, Everett, WA 98208-7200; Nonclassified Borden Woodworking: 4007 112th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7769; Woodworkers

Cindy Smith Insurance: 2707 Colby Ave., No. G, Everett, WA 98201-3564; Insurance Coast Workplace Solutions: 2829 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3456; 425-595-5711 Collins Alliance: 13814 50th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9564; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Crew Cleaning Specialist: 5320 141st Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-9458; Janitor Service D&S Enterprises: 1832 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2214; Nonclassified Devine Intervention: 1001 W Casino Road, No. A303, Everett, WA 98204-4954; Nonclassified Everett Merger Sub P.A.: 3901 Hoyt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4918; Mergers and Acquisitions Farms and Market: PO Box 2448, Everett, WA 98213-0448; Farms Freaky Fast Broadway: 2602 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-3045; Nonclassified George T Law Office: 3221 Oakes Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4407; 425-317-9333; Attorneys Hair By Danica: 10220 3rd Ave. SE, No. 713, Everett, WA 98208-3988; Beauty Salons Heroic Enterprise: 10414 Rosewood Ave., Everett, WA 98204-3619; Nonclassified JH Kaushal: 4030 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4836; 425-789-1620; Nonclassified Jamie King Photography: 5017 View Drive, Everett, WA 98203-2423; Photography KRKO: 1315 Fifth St., Everett, WA 98201; 360-563-5275; Nonclassified Kirtley Cole Associates: 2820 Oakes Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3667; 425-609-0410 Le Gourmet Grind: 13027 Bothell Everett Highway, Everett, WA 98208-7226; 425-9487040; Gourmet Shops Little B Bars: 3414 Everett Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3873; Nonclassified Milsport Arms: 1910 112th St. SW, No. E, Everett, WA 98204-3774; Nonclassified N Zimmer Supplemental: 2624 58th St. SW, Everett, WA 98203-1472; 425-349-3113 North Sound Roofing and Moss: 12908 54th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9530; Roofing Contractors Paradise Gardens: 309 77th Place SW, Everett, WA 98203-6212; Nonclassified Perfect Touch: 11630 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204-6724; 425-374-8010; Nonclassified Prall Media Group: 1921 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2243; Nonclassified Qin and Qin Paper Art: 2415 123rd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6293; Paper Products-Retail (Wholesale) RELW: 9502 19th Ave. SE, No. A, Everett, WA 98208-3851; Nonclassified RHM Logistics: PO Box 13332, Everett, WA 98206-3332; Logistics Rebekah’s Crochet Corner: 7320 2nd Drive SE, Everett, WA 98203-5577; Needlework and Needlework Materials-Retail Rotana Pizza: 10121 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-3885; 425-374-3051; Pizza S Holte Tune: 4924 33rd Ave. W, Everett, WA 98203-1343; 425-347-3748; Nonclassified Safety Beginning: 222 SW Everett Mall

Way, Everett, WA 98204; Safety Consultants Sew Jamie Kay: 1401 Merrill Creek Parkway, No. 1102, Everett, WA 98203-7133; Sewing Contractors (Manufacturers) Sound Ent Consultants: 3726 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-3787; 425-322-5579; Physicians and Surgeons Spa Ziveli: 8300 Beverly Blvd, Everett, WA 98203-6614; Health Spas Star City Vape: 13601 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5496; 425-412-3016; Electronic Cigarettes State Of Mind: 805 112th St. SE, No. F201, Everett, WA 98208-5099; Nonclassified Tacko Cleaning Services Inc.: 1009 112th St. SE, No. A206, Everett, WA 98208-5018; Janitor Service Tropical Smoothie Cafe: 11300 47th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9668; Restaurants US Tool Group: 2701 94th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-2128; 425-353-0491; Tools-New and Used Wicked Ink: 2408 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-3019; 425-512-9544; Nonclassified

Gold Bar Potted Plants: PO Box 292, Gold Bar, WA 98251-0292; Plants-Retail Smokey Point Concrete: 43530 U.S. 2, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9396; 360-793-0110; Concrete Contractors Wind Up Wonders: 41205 Larson Drive, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9568; Nonclassified

Granite Falls Beach Wish: 23019 135th St. NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8516; 360-691-5860 Blower Door Testers Inc.: PO Box 833, Granite Falls, WA 98252-0833; Educational Assessment Gardner and Gardner: 201 N Bogart Ave., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8406; Nonclassified

Lake Stevens Alba Soft: 2830 99th Ave. NE, No. B, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9514; Nonclassified Farris and Furlan: PO Box 1191, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1191; Nonclassified Gourmet Dinner Spices: 8324 158th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7807; 360-3227724; Spices Hanson Survivor: 20 N Rhodora Heights Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9707; 425-3771499; Nonclassified Inspired Education Consulting: 12004 30th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8442; Educational Consultants Ishop: 7619 12th St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7339; Nonclassified Lash Out: 11209 94th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8967; Make-Up Studios Nadine Whitmore Art: 8204 101st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8979; Art Galleries and Dealers Noble Actual International: 423 102nd Drive SE, No. G4, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-

Turn Key Auto Service

Specializing in Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Volvo,

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Show your vehicle some love and protect your investment with Positive Car Care .

425-265-1111

TurnKeyAutoService.com

2210 112th St SW ,Everett WA

Located on the corner of Airport Way and 112th S.W. (near Everett Boeing Plant) 1512563

15% off Parts and Labor on Any Repair. All of our work is backed by a 24K/24 month limited warranty on new parts and labor. Must present this coupon to take advantage of the special.

Can not be combined with any other special or discount. Max Discount $150.00. Expires 2/29/2016


FEBRUARY 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 31

BUSINESS LICENSES

Lynnwood 10log: 4124 Fieldstone Drive, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6975; Nonclassified 12green: 13722 39th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6266; Nonclassified A Better Living: 16101 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1483; Nonclassified Akai Interior and Exterior Prod: 2921 158th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5955; General Merchandise-Retail Alpha Supported Living Services: 17607 54th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3547; 425582-9435; Services Not Elsewhere Classified AM PM Lynnwood: 16629 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3163; 425-745-5097 Angela’s Divine Salon: 202 164th St. SW, No. 4a, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8189; Salons Blackbear Landscape NW: 15001 35th Ave. W, No. 32-103, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8418; Landscape Contractors Campbell Ridge Inc: 12314 Beverly Park Road, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1513; 425-3555023; Nonclassified Chin Legal Group: 4215 198th St. SW, No. 106, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6738; Attorneys Edward Jones: 3405 188th St. SW, No. SS, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4744; 425-775-0305; Financial Advisory Services Fajardo Evangel: 18018 15th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4915; 425-774-0615; Churches Fight Or Flight Self Defense: 3414 156th St. SW, No. B, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2415; Martial Arts Instruction Frobl Inc.: 420 205th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7207; Nonclassified Genesis Realty: 18623 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4552; 425-361-7098; Real Estate Glass Glass: 15725 2nd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6614; 425-742-3403; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc. Healthy Infusion At Amy’s: 3503 188th St SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037; Health Services Innovative Design Works: 19101 36th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5759; 425-361-1901; Nonclassified Johnson Dynasty: 18606 52nd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4550; 425-775-9138; Nonclassified KUSH Brothers: 20404 63rd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7428; Nonclassified Lambrou Car: 6311 Dale Way, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5147; 425-771-0768; Nonclassified Lifetime Bridal: 15631 Ash Way, No. E313, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5370; Bridal Shops Michael’s Carpet Cleaning: 7020 208th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5856; 425-6738944; Carpet and Rug Cleaners

Mo Painting: 121 209th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7986; Painters Mukasa Immaculate N: 18805 38th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7637; 425-670-6570; Religious Organizations Patterson Biz: 530 150th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2682; 425-742-9265 Rotana Pizza: PO Box 5101, Lynnwood, WA 98046-5101; Pizza Shred-It: 6116 211th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7526; 425-640-9711; Business Services Not Elsewhere Classified Shrestha Traders: 2125 178th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8253; Nonclassified TL Lower Ridge: 15612 26th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5966; Nonclassified Urban Wireless: 20907 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7380; 425-678-8165; Cellular Telephones (Services)

Marysville Addicted Espresso: 14606 51st Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271; Coffee Shops At Large Brewing: 7809 29th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6849; Brewers Autumn Imaging: 4717 68th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6927; Nonclassified Baby Boomer Furniture Outlet: 310 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-5028; 360-3868157; Furniture-Dealers-Retail Bev’s Healing Hands Homecare: 4931 73rd Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8854; Home Health Service Blueline Automotive: 6109 55th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-4107; Automobile Repairing and Service Foxy Lady Cafe: 9109 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2504; 360-925-6231; Restaurants GG Smokes: 1102 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4243; 360-653-6842; Cigar Cigarette and Tobacco Dealers-Retail Hop Jacks: 2623 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271; 360-652-9172; Nonclassified Jade Spa: 9501 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2235; 360-653-8189; Health Spas Jeffs Texas Style BBQ: 9214 State Ave., No. 1, Marysville, WA 98270-2265; Restaurant Lex Scripta: 13217 41st Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270; Nonclassified Local Roots Marijuana: PO Box 559, Marysville, WA 98270-0559; Marijuana Dispensary Mccarthy Home Inc.: 16201 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville, WA 98271-5900; 360-6537660; Nonclassified McCoy Chains: 5624 125th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-6641; 360-659-3859 Mobile One: 2631 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271; 360-652-8157; Nonclassified Motoshippers: 1242 State Ave., No. 315-I, Marysville, WA 98270-3672; Nonclassified Pho Yummy: 1508 Second St., Marysville, WA 98270-5123; 360-386-8875; Restaurants Sparks and Recreation Co.: 7313 30th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6931; Amusement and Recreation Not Elsewhere Classified

Victoria Latino Products: 9214 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2265; Retail

Mill Creek Hope For Healing Counseling: 14616 35th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5703; Counseling Services NLJ Enterprises: 13400 Dumas Road, No. H6, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5584; Nonclassified NW Cutting Edge Masonry: 13617 29th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5607; Masonry Strafford Counseling Services: 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1737; 425745-5445; Counseling Services TDJ Investments: 13219 46th Ave. SE, No. 302, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4315; Investments

Monroe Hoekstra Law Group: 16322 224th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9160; Attorneys Island Contractor Supply: 16372 177th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1943; 360-8042191; General Merchandise-Retail Moving Muscles Massage: 14411 254th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272; Massage Therapists Newmeck Construction: 17208 177th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9151; Construction One Stop Pawn Shop: 19002 Lenton Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1353; 360-794-7904; Pawnbrokers Thompson Reflexology: 15022 228th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9490; Reflexologists

Mountlake Terrace Adult Family Home: 24324 52nd Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5615 Birchfield Environmental: 23511 46th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-6332; Environmental and Ecological Services Elevation: 4406 228th St. SW, No. 6, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4453 Fai Organize: 5320 212th St. SW, No. F201, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043; Consultants Maloy Consulting Services: 23430 55th Ave. W, No. B, Mountlake Terrace, WA 980435222; Consultants RN Professional Assessment: 22110 38th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4235; Miscellaneous Personal Services

Mukilteo Clean The Muk: 12303 Harbour Pointe Blvd., No. Z3, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5202 Digvest: 1024 Terrace Court, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2204; Nonclassified JNA Innovators: 8210 Mukilteo Speedway, No. B, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2900 Privatags: 5524 128th St. SW, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5536; Nonclassified S Vinfin: 1024 Terrace Court, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2204; Nonclassified Synthworks: 4824 Pointes Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6081; Nonclassified

Quil Ceda Village Bulldog RV Transport: 8825 34th Ave. NE, No. L129, Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8085; Trucking

Snohomish AAA Auto and Truck Repair: 6919 142nd Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9048; Automobile Repairing and Service A L-R F Consulting: 15411 69th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6101; Consultants Cochran Body: 19808 80th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7930; 360-217-7394 Copper Top Bar and Grill: 907 First St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2906; Restaurants D Smith Scan: 6727 126th Place SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8650; 425-379-7600 Douglas Corp: 501 Ave. C, Snohomish, WA 98290-2427; Nonclassified HD Properties: 18710 126th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-8615; Real Estate Hastings Car: 5427 138th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-4656; 360-863-2196 Icon Power Washing: 9701 148th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7009; Patio and Deck Cleaning and Restoration JC Tile: 12520 86th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6218; Tile-Ceramic-ContractorsDealer Martin Trade: 12633 75th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6286; 360-863-6651 Maximoff Solutions: 19900 76th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7920; Nonclassified Moesof: 15731 88th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6161; Nonclassified Outlaw Alley Barbershop: 16511 Railroad Way, Snohomish, WA 98296-8177; Barbers Purple Seed: 7112 205th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5165; Seeds and Bulbs-Retail Ramsey Property Management: 12502 182nd Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-8623; Real Estate Management Snohomish Mercantile: PO Box 2407, Snohomish, WA 98291-2407; Retail Wicked Voodoo Espresso: 15817 67th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8602; Coffee Shops

Stanwood Gather Market: 8616 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5994; 360-629-3125; Food Markets Hat’s Off Inc: 26477 77th Ave. NW, No. 100A, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-926-8036 JS Affordable Customs: 7123 276th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-7431; Nonclassified Soft and Dry Carpet Cleaning: 15825 W Lake Goodwin Road, Stanwood, WA 982928915; Carpet and Rug Cleaners

Tulalip Arlington Transmission: 2125 116th St. NE, Tulalip, WA 98271-9421; Transmissions-Automobile-Manufacturers

1500520

1946; Nonclassified North America’s General Store: 8302 2nd St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3335; General Merchandise-Retail SG Enterprises: 1006 89th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2436; Nonclassified True To Earth: 215 86th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3360; Nonclassified


32 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2016

Mike Morse, Morse Steel 4th generation owner Runner Sports dad

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Mike Morse—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

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Herald Business Journal - 02.01.2016  

i20160201092710877.pdf

Herald Business Journal - 02.01.2016  

i20160201092710877.pdf