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Journal

The

NEWS | San Juan County Sher­ iff’s Log [2] ARTS | From prison to prestige, the story of one man’s art [11] SCHOOL | Community service projects [10] SPORTS | Wolverine update [16]

WEDNESDAY, January 20, 2016 n VOL. 109, NO. 3 n 75¢

School The power of mentorship SMP levy up talks go on By Courtney Oldwyn Special to the Journal

It’s not uncommon for Dylan Allen to stay after school to work in the computer lab, his brain whirring as he learns to repair the main computer server and fix networking problems. The Friday Harbor High School sophomore is set to join the work force this spring as a technology assistant at Friday Harbor High School. Since the beginning of the school year, Dylan has been participating in an after school technology internship helping with the school’s networking system, server maintenance and computer repair. Recently the school offered to turn his internship into a paying position as a technical assistant to his advisor Technology Support Technician Nicholas Groseclose who participated in a similar after school program during his time as a Friday Harbor High School student. With this job Dylan stands to gain even more real world, handson experience in the field he’s planning to study in college and later base his career on. This technological equipment, staff support and training are available to students like Dylan in part because of school district levies passed by county voters over the past few years. On Feb. 9 the San Juan County school district will again ask residents to vote, this time to reauthorize another four year Capital Projects and Technology Levy to help fund certain improvements and projects in county schools. A levy is essentially a property See LEVY, Page 4

By Anna V. Smith Journal reporter

Staff photo/ Anna V. Smith

At right is Katie Loring, a local attorney, who is in the 4H mentor program and mentors fourth grader Ashlynn Wilson. By Anna V. Smith Journal reporter

When Dennis Conrad and Andy Quiroz hang out, they’ll go to the beach or walk dogs from the animal shelter. They talk about their days, about the Seahawks and watch island foxes skitter by. They’re good friends, and have hung out often for about two years. The two didn’t meet in Andy’s fourth grade class, in fact Conrad is 69 years old and Andy is 10. The two met through the 4H Washington State University Extension Mentor Program, partnered with the San Juan Island Family Resource Center, a program that links school-aged children with mentors in the community. Susana Quiroz, Andy’s mother, said that before the mentor program, due to speech delays and being

a middle child in a large family, he was somewhat reticent and shy. Since being in the program, Quiroz said that he’s become involved in football, soccer and basketball, had new experiences like an overnight camping trip and has become more social. “For Andy it has helped him tremendously, from the social development to gaining confidence, and since he doesn’t have his dad with him really having a positive male figure in his life,” Quiroz said. “Overall, the help of Dennis has changed this wonderful shy kid into an awesome confident kid who now looks forward to challenges.” A myriad of issues stack up against parents who are trying to make it by in the San Juan Islands, including a small stock of affordable housing, high rental prices and the financial difficulties that come with seasonal jobs and, sometimes, seasonal unemploySee MENTORS, Page 3

The San Juan County Council held special meetings on Lopez, San Juan and Orcas last week about the Shoreline Master Program after a number of islanders asked for more time for public input and better explanations of the changes from the 1998 updates to the SMP. The SMP is a required document under the state Shoreline Management Act, adopted in Washington in 1972. San Juan County created their first SMP in 1978, and has done major updates since 1998. For the islands, the SMP is particularly important to the San Juans’ 400 miles of coastline, as it dictates what sort of development is allowed, protects sensitive areas and promotes public access to the shore. The SMP applies to land 200 feet inland from the ordinary high See SMP, Page 4

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How to reach us

Office: 378-5696 Fax: 1-888-562-8818 Editor: editor@sanjuanjournal.com


2 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016 

County Sheriff’s Log Jan. 6 • A San Juan Island deputy found a vehicle off the roadway in the area of False Bay Road and Bailer Hill Road with the driver still in the vehicle. Fire responded to assist and the driver was treated and released. Minimal vehicle damage and no reportable property damage. • A deputy on Lopez responded to Mackaye Harbor Rd for a possible burglary complaint. The investigation revealed the entry resulted from a misunderstanding between the home owner’s property manager and a potential

renter. No further action was taken. • San Juan Island deputies located a Friday Harbor resident who threatened to harm himself, and brought him to the hospital for treatment. • An Orcas Island deputy responded to an Eastsound residence in regards to a claimed hit and run while in Seattle. A courtesy report was taken. Jan. 7 • A Friday Harbor resident reported having her debit card stolen from her mailbox. The debit card was then activated and used at several locations by an

FIBER UPDATE Rock Island Communications has been busy installing fiber optic broadband to homes and businesses around the county. This historic undertaking will provide fast, reliable Internet up to 200Mbps+ to those who want it. We’re currently managing hundreds of construction projects countywide. Here are some of the groups we’ve been working with to date: Current Group Projects: Elderberry on Orcas Island Matia View on Orcas Island Morning Light on Orcas Island Suncrest on Orcas Island Whiskey Hill on Lopez Island Cape San Juan on San Juan Island Mineral Point on San Juan Island Spring Point on Orcas Island Mineral Heights on San Juan Island The Highlands on San Juan Island Upcoming Group Projects: LCLT Tuatara Rd on Lopez Island Cayou Valley on Orcas Island Gary Oak on San Juan Island Portland Fair Area on San Juan Island Panorama Place on San Juan Island Brown Island on Brown Island Salmon Point on Lopez Island

MONTHLY FIBER MEETUPS You Can Get Connected Too! Learn more about organizing at rockisland.com, or attend one of our monthly meetings. MONTHLY FIBER MEETUPS Monthly Group Organizer Meeting: Learn more about organizing your group at this session. Next Meeting: January 13, 2016 – 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. This meeting will be held on Orcas Island (meetings will rotate islands every month).

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unknown subject. The incident was reported to her financial institution and the account was closed. The investigation continues. • An Orcas Island deputy had a call back to an Orcas resident regarding an on going civil matter with family members. A report was made to document these continued per her request. Jan. 9 • Lopez deputies took a report for a theft of an automotive part. The investigation is ongoing. • An Orcas Island deputy made a traffic stop in

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com

Eastsound. The driver was believed to be under the influence of alcohol. The driver was arrested for driving under the influence. She was processed and released with a promise to appear in court. • A deputy stopped a Lopez Island resident for failing to stop at a stop sign in the 4100 block of Center Road. The driver was issued a ticket for failing to stop and for not having a valid driver’s license and released. • Lopez deputies contacted a wanted subject at his residence and arrested him without incident. Jan. 10 •A Friday Harbor resident returned home and

found someone had entered the home, cooked some food they brought, watched something on the big screen TV and then left. Nothing was taken or damaged. Homeowners suspects it is Seahawks play off related. The investigation continues. • A Lopez Island deputy checked on a van parked after hours at Agate Beach Park. Jan. 11 • A wallet was turned in to dispatch with ID and debit cards, no cash. An attempt was made to contact the owner by phone, but it may be an old number. Dispatch will make a further attempt by mail to contact the owner, and the

wallet and contents will be held for 90 days as required by law, and then destroyed if unclaimed. • A deputy in Friday Harbor received a report of a dog at large. The dog was brought to the animal shelter. Jan. 12 • A Lopez Island man was arrested on a charge of domestic violence after deputies were called on a reported disturbance aboard a boat in a Lopez marina. The man was also held on an outstanding arrest warrant from Kitsap County. He was lodged in jail pending a court appearance.

Man charged with two counts of assault and resisting arrest By Cali Bagby Journal editor

Jesse L. Goncalves, 29, of Friday Harbor, has been charged with assault in the fourth degree, assault in the third degree for violence against an officer on duty and resisting arrest. At around 6 p.m. on Dec. 30, a deputy at the American legion called the San Juan County Sheriff ’s Office with a complaint of a disorderly person. According to the deputy’s report, the bartender said that Goncalves had to be “escorted out because of his crazy behavior.” Deputies learned that Goncalves had allegedly been sneaking past security into the private club by entering in with a group of members. Once inside, the bartender told

deputies that Goncalves went behind the bar and started banging together metal cocktail shakers. After being escorted from the bar, the bartender reported that Goncalves drew a Nazi Swastika on his hand and sat at a table. It was observed that Goncalves appeared to be intoxicated, had dilated pupils and was mumbling incoherently. According to the deputy’s report, when another man at the legion approached Goncalves to introduce himself, Goncalves responded by saying, “Do you want some donuts?” and violently punched the man. At this point legion members escorted Gonclaves outside. The bartenders recalled Goncalves pretending to have an invisible machine gun and fired off rounds with his hand as he exited the building.

At 6:45 p.m. deputies received a call that a male was kicking a power box near M&W Auto. Goncalves was located shortly after, walking along Spring Street. According to documents, when the deputy pulled up to him, Gonclaves extended his middle finger and was then placed in handcuffs. When a second deputy came onto the scene, his report states that Goncalves threatened to “crush bones.” As he was being helped into the car, Goncalves kicked one of the deputies in the knee. The deputy reported that the suspect tried to kick him a second time, but missed and instead spit in the face of the other deputy. The state has set bail at the amount of $50,000.

The annual San Juan County ‘point-in-time’ homeless survey San Juan County’s 2016 Point in Time Homeless Count will be conducted on Thursday, Jan. 28. Count organizers and volunteers work with local family resource centers, food banks, churches, healthcare providers, senior centers, libraries, the sheriff ’s office, and many other community support service providers to conduct the count. The count, initiated by the state of Washington in 2005, is conduct-

ed annually at the end of January. Agencies not open on the day of the count are authorized to conduct the survey on their business day closest to Jan. 28. Last year’s San Juan County count identified 134 individuals, 74 of whom were living out of doors, in vehicles, in abandoned buildings, or buildings unfit for human habitation. The remaining 60 people were staying in temporary, unstable living arrange-

ments, often with friends or family. Results of previous counts can be viewed online by searching Annual Point in Time Count. For questions or to help with the count, contact Melanie Rollins, San Juan County Affordable Housing Coordinator, Health and Community Services, 378-4474, melanier@sanjuanco.com

Planned Internet outage, Jan. 19-21 On Jan. 19, 20, 21, at 12:01 a.m. CenturyLink will upgrade switches serving the San Juan Islands. During the upgrade, Internet service will not be accessible for approximately 30 minutes each day. All phone services, including 911, will remain available in a reduced capacity.


Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 3

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com 

Mentors

Continued from page 1 ment. Despite the islands being an outdoor vacation destination for many people, some parents have difficulties finding time to spend time with their children outside of home. “What I see is a lot of these parents on their own; they aren’t all single parents, but they’re working parents,” said Barbara Ellis, program coordinator of the 4H Mentor Program. “They’re working hard to get by and make it here. It’s a difficult community to make a living in, especially for families. When 90 percent of your effort is just to get by, recreation is kind of off your radar.” Ellis, who raised her own children on the islands, said that it was an eye-opener when she realized that not all local kids were regularly able to explore the islands and community because their parents might be too busy juggling work and home life. “The mentors can expose the kids to so much in our community that the kids might not otherwise get a chance to see,” Ellis said. “The national park trail systems, the museum, things that maybe their parents might not be inclined to take them. Its sort of opening their world to their own community.” The free 4H mentor program, which started one year ago, partners with the San Juan Island Family Resource Center’s mentor program for funding, referrals and resources. As of now, the partnered program has 26 mentors, and a number of children on a wait list for mentors. Adults who sign up commit to meeting up with their mentee one hour a week for one year. After a thorough screen-

ing process, mentors are matched up with local kids depending on their interests. Mentors take their mentees fishing, horseback riding, on hikes, to the museums, or to different events on the islands. Conrad, who Andy describes as “nice” and “cool,” is a retired pastor. Two of Andy’s siblings are also mentored in the program. “It means having a good friend to hang out with, and I look forward to spending time with Andy, and watching how he has grown and matured,” Conrad said. “It’s a good experience.” Andy, a fourth grader, says he has fun going to South Beach with Conrad, volunteering at the animal shelter and talking about football. “He plays with me and I don’t really like to be alone, and he’s great at teaching me how to read,” Andy said. Although the mentor program doesn’t focus on academics, pairs focus and plan activities based on what the mentored children like to do, or what they want to get better at. Since one of Andy’s favorite subjects at school is reading, they sometimes work on that by writing or reading together at the library. “He’s been doing this for two years,” Conrad said. “Andy has really gotten better at reading and writing. Mentoring isn’t tutoring, but we like to work on stuff together.” A 2014 study by Mentor: The National Mentoring Partnership found that children who were at risk of not completing high school but who had mentors were 81 percent more likely to participate regularly in sports and extracurricular activities, more than twice as likely to hold a leadership position in club or sports teams, and 78 percent more

likely to volunteer regularly in their communities. Linnea Anderson, probation counselor for San Juan County, said that these sort of results might not be immediately obvious when a child gets a mentor. “We’re kind of like gardeners, we plant a bunch of seeds but we can’t control the weather,” said Anderson, who has worked for the state as a mentor. “We may never know if they bloom or not. I feel like that can be frustrating for some people because they put in so much work but they never see the corn harvest.” An important thing to keep in mind from the perspective of the mentor is to never underestimate the power that a caring and non judgemental relationship can have on a person’s life. Anderson said that she talked once with a boy who had just graduated high school, and had a mentor from second to seventh grade. He told Anderson that he would not have been able to make it through those years without his mentor. “Humans crave connection and a lot of times teachers and parents have a sort of agenda, teachers want them to do their homework, parents want their children to do well, and mentors just allow them to just ‘be,’” Anderson said. At the basis of mentorship is friendship, and being a dependable person in a child’s life. Katie Loring, a local attorney, is also in the program and mentors fourth grader Ashlynn Wilson. “It means being a friend and being someone Ashlynn can count on,” Loring said. “It keeps me grounded, and we do lots of fun activities that I might not do otherwise.” Ashlynn, a ten-year-old of seemingly boundless energy, rides horses with

BLM planning meetings

The last week of January, the Bureau of Land Management planning team will host a series of public meetings focused on the management of human uses and trails within the San Juan Islands National Monument. This is a great opportunity to talk to the BLM about types of human uses islanders would like to see facilitated or prohibited, and to what degree, within different parts of the monument. Maps will be used to make this input geographically specific. The

maps will include the current trail inventory and participants will advise what they think the trail network should eventually look like. Islanders will also have the opportunity to weigh in on other issues not related to recreation. The BLM will incorporate input from these meetings into the spectrum of approaches considered in the draft management plan.

January 25

Eastsound Fire Hall 5:30 - 8 p.m. 45 Lavender Lane, Eastsound, Orcas Island

January 26

Friday Harbor Grange #966 5:30 - 8 p.m. 52 First Street North San Juan Island

January 27

Woodman Hall 5:30 - 8 p.m. 4102 Fisherman Bay Road Lopez Island

January 28

Anacortes Public Library, 4:30 - 7 p.m. 1220 10th Street Anacortes

Loring, goes to San Juan Community Theatre productions and plays board games during their two hour, once-a-week time together. When Ashlynn acted as a vegetarian vampire in the musical “We Are Monsters” with her mother, Loring went to see her act. Ashlynn sees the value of a mentor the same way as one would a friend. “Sometimes if you’re lonely or bored you can hang out with them and it makes you feel better,” Ashlynn said. She has also gotten involved in the 4H horse clubs, which Ellis says is another way to get children engaged with their community, as 4H leaders. The mentor program also hosts Family Night Out for the mentored kids and their families, which creates a network of parents. “This group is kind of becoming a family for them, and it’s very sweet,” Ellis said. “The parents are starting to connect, the kids are setting up play dates together and they’re really feeling a part of the community, and that’s been really great to see, its very heartwarming.” The program was looking to expand to other islands

after such a successful first year, but weren’t granted the additional funding, since so many programs are just getting started in other counties in Washington. But eventually, Ellis said, it would be great to partner with mentorship programs on Orcas Island and Lopez Island to combine resources and reach more kids. Although the need varies, right now the program is looking for more male mentors, as they have six boys waiting to enter the program. Since the 4H program joined the existing San Juan Island Family

Resource Center Mentor Program, the number of kids has doubled. In addition, they now offer translation services for parents of Hispanic families who are not bilingual. To sign up for the program as a mentor or those interested in signing their children up for the program, contact program coordinator Barbara Ellis at 360-3707665 or Jennifer Armstrong, director of San Juan Family Resource Center, at 360378-5246.

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Levy

Continued from page 1 tax voted in to help fund specific school district projects that are not supported by the basic education funding allocated by the state. Government school funding comes from two places. The majority comes from the state, which provides general funding for things like teacher salaries, school building utilities and various basic school supplies. Next is the federal government which gives money to special education programs and helps meet the needs of at-risk students. Federal funding is governed by the Every Student Succeeds Act, which recently replaced the No Child Left Behind Act. The gap between funding received and what it actually costs to run a school district is left to the district to make up, usually in the form of levies and sometimes bonds. In 2012, San Juan County voters passed the previous Capitol Projects and Technology Levy which “expires” this year and, if passed, will be replaced by the new levy. Much like a magazine subscription, a new levy must be voted in every four years. If this levy passes it will fund various building improvements and projects as well as technological advances such as a new Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics building at the Friday Harbor Elementary

School. It is the technological improvements made possible by 2012’s voter-passed school levy that allow kids like Dylan Allen to gain such valuable hands on experience in the world of computers and technology. The technological advances made possible if this levy passes are not the only way it will support district schools but they are an important part. According to Michele Mayer, co-chairman of the Capital Projects and Technology Levy Committee, earlier access to up to date technology is something these kids need in order to be on par with their peers when they hit college. A STEM building at the elementary school will allow children access to solid “academically geared technology earlier,” said Mayer. Other projects earmarked to be funded by this year’s Capitol Projects and Technology Levy include a remodel of the Turnbull Gym’s locker rooms which have not been updated since the gym was opened in the 1980s. Structural problems at the Friday Harbor Middle School are also on the repair list along with modernizing both school’s libraries and kitchens. Turnbull Gym is a community owned asset which was built on tax payers dollars, Mayer said. “They (the tax payers) wouldn’t want to see that building crumble.” Opponents of this year’s levy say that the increase from the 2012 levy is too

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high; that it doesn’t follow reasonable income and cost of living increases. The previous levy’s tax worked out to cost about $170 per year for a home assessed around $500,000. The reauthorized 2016 levy will cost county homeowners about $230 per year per $500,000 home value which is approximately a 35 percent increase. The levy committee has been clear that the process of choosing which projects and tech advances to fund has been fairly and thoroughly chosen. One of the high priorities of the committee is transparency. They’ve gone so far as to list the projected cost breakdown of each project on their website at www.sjlevy. org. “The technology we have now with the STEM building and what these kids can play with is leaps and bounds past what we had before,” said Groseclose, who participated in an internship similar to the one Dylan Allen participates in. Groseclose said there were times during college tech classes that he could say to himself, “I know this stuff! And it was because of the hands on experience I had here at school.” Ballots for the levy will be sent out Jan. 22 and must be received by Feb. 9.

SMP

Continued from page 1 water mark and then seaward from the ordinary high water mark to the county line. Newly-appointed chairman Jamie Stephens council began the meetings by explaining that an updated SMP is required every seven years, and it has been 17 since the last update. Updates to the SMP are a state-defined process, and council has been batting around the idea of an update since as early as 2008.

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com

Contributed photo/ Courtney Oldwyn

Elementary school student Brason Flowers during the robotics club in the high school STEM building.

Beginning in the spring of 2015, the council began doing community outreach in regards to the SMP. In total, they have received 107 pages of comment summary since releasing their proposed draft of the regulations. The current draft is the work of four years of public hearings, meetings with stakeholders, a citizen Planning Commission in 2011 and county council workshops. Director of Community Development Erika Shook and Senior Planner Colin Maycock presented a slide-

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show that detailed the SMP process and some important changes that were being made. Most of the changes, according to the staff that presented, were to simplify the SMP while adhering to the original goals and ensuring ecologically nondestructive shoreline regulations. “[We are] working to make sure there aren’t too many regulations,” said Shook. Some points of contention raised by citizens were the elimination of dual designation below the ordinary high water mark, the amount of time allowed for the final step in the public process and changes to nonconforming use regulations. Shook said that the dual designations were eliminated because they were complex and hard to understand, and that the staff found it difficult to administer. According the presentation, aquatic uses will be consistent with uses allowed in adjacent upland designations. “The dual designation is gone, but the protections are still there,” Shook said. Questions previously submitted to council continued to be read, ranging from definitions of zone designa-

tions to how the plan affects the ecology of the shoreline. Planning Manager and Deputy Director Linda Kuller was also present to answer submitted questions. After council had finished answering the submitted questions, they turned the microphone to audience questions. Though council took the audience’s questions into consideration, the public comment period has officially closed. Stephens said the council will only reopen public testimony if substantial changes are made to the SMP draft. Council members assured community members that once the plan has been agreed upon, it must then go to the state ecological department for review. They also continued to emphasis that the purpose of the update is to make the regulations easier to understand. “Once we get all done, it’ll be a lot simpler,” said Kuller. The next county council meeting on the SMP will be held on Jan. 20 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sounder reporter Mandi Johnson contributed to this story.


Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 5

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com 

Councilman Rick Hughes Camping reservations to run for re-election for island residents By Colleen Smith Armstrong Journal publisher

County councilman Rick Hughes is vying for a second term as the district two representative. “I’m having fun. It’s one of the best jobs I’ve ever had – and I’ve had some cool ones,” said Hughes, who was elected to his first term in 2013. His current term expires December 2016. Prior to moving full time to Orcas, Rick was an executive with ESPN.com and one of the first online advertising sales executives with clients ranging from Nike, Microsoft and Electronic Arts. Now he and his wife Marlace own and operate Ray’s Pharmacy in Eastsound. Hughes has filed his candidacy with the state but cannot submit paperwork to the county until April. If more than two candidates file for the seat there will be a primary

election. The two winners of that race will go on to the general election in November. Hughes says he has been a part of major changes at the county including working on some of the “most important” county legislature: growth management act, shoreline master plan and Eastsound subarea plan. “There is still so much to do,” he said. “I want to make sure the community is set for the next 25 years.” Hughes is still passionate about economic development, affordable housing and renewable energy and, if re-elected, hopes to make more strides in those areas. “I want to represent the working and middle class families in this community,” he said. “People need to feel safe to talk to the county. We are here to serve the public. The county isn’t your enemy. We are your partner.”

San Juan County Parks and Fairgrounds is offering early camping reservations at any of county campgrounds for year-round residents. Between Thursday, Jan. 21 and Friday, Feb. 26, residents of San Juan County can reserve individual campsites for any dates during the season (no waiting until 90 days in advance and competing with outof-county visitors for those campsites!) Reservations must be made through our admin office and cannot be made online for this program. If islanders miss this window, summer camping res-

County needs assessment online The Opportunity Council is pleased to announce its 2015 Prosperity Project, a community needs assessment, is completed and now available on the Opportunity Council website. As a community action agency, the Opportunity Council conducts community surveys on needs and services. “This report demonstrates many local families and individuals are struggling to pay for basic survival needs,” said Greg Winter, Opportunity Council executive director and one of the project organizers. “We

also found that some of the most important services that families seek are very hard to get. These hardships are not restricted to any one area or demographic in our communities,” he added. The 2015 Prosperity Project is a continuation of the 2006 Prosperity Project that was convened by the Whatcom Coalition for Healthy Communities. The goal is to gain a detailed and broad understanding of the experiences of people living in poverty as a step toward making recommendations about resources and service allocation in our commu-

VOTE YES FOR OUR SCHOOLS!

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Capital Projects & Technology Levy Don‛t forget to vote by Feb. 9!

PLEASE RECYCLE!

nities. In 2010, this community-wide assessment was extended to Island and San Juan counties, resulting in the 2011 Prosperity Project reports. The 2015 report provides an update of this needs assessment and includes data from household surveys in Island, San Juan, and Whatcom County. “This report would not be possible without our sponsors and the cooperation of many community organizations throughout the threecounty region who helped to distribute surveys to their clients,” Winter said. “Each and every response pro-

vided valuable information and helps paint a picture of the experiences of those in our communities with lowincomes.” Sponsors for the project include Whatcom Community Foundation, United Way of Whatcom County, OPALCO, and the Washington State Department of Commerce. For more info or a copy of this report, call Kaitlyn Miller at the Opportunity Council, 360-734-5121, ext 331, or Jackie Lafata-Rinker at ext. 333. View it online at www.oppco.org/publications

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ervations can be made using the public online reservation system a maximum of 90 days in advance, (opens March 7). Reservations can be made at any San Juan County campgrounds: San Juan County Park on San Juan Island (west side of San Juan), Odlin County Park (Lopez Island), Shaw County Park and Fairgrounds R.V. sites (Friday Harbor). Email for a reservation form at parks@sanjuanco. com . Please complete one form for each camping stay and include second and third choice options if you can. Completed forms can

be emailed, mailed (350 Court St. #8, Friday Harbor WA, 98250), or dropped off at our new Fairgrounds office (849A Argyle, just inside the fairgrounds main entrance) between January 21 and Feb. 26. Payment in full is required at time of reservation. Payment can be made via cash, check, or credit card. Remember that this early program is only for residents of San Juan County. We may ask for government ID such as Driver’s License or voter registration card, showing a San Juan County address.


OPINION

Write to us: The Journal of the San Juan Islands welcomes letters from its readers. Letters should be typewritten and not exceed 350 words. Preference is given to local writers and topics. They must be signed and include a daytime phone. Send to editor@sanjuanjournal.com or 640 Mullis St., West Wing, Friday Harbor 98250. Letters may be edited.

6 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016 

Letters to the Editor Yes for the levy

As graduates of San Juan Island public schools and recent college graduates, we’d like to ask you to vote yes for the renewal of the school district Capital Projects and Technology Levy. We are grateful for the excellent education provided to us by San Juan Island schools, which enabled us

Almanac TEMPERATURES, RAINFALL LOPEZ High Low Precip Jan. 11 46 30 — Jan. 12 49 43 .06 Jan. 13 49 41 — Jan. 14 45 33 — Jan. 15 46 32 — Jan. 16 52 42 .25 Jan. 17 49 45 .06 Precipitation in January: 0.47” Precipitation in 2016: 0.47” Reported by Jack Giard Bakerview Rd. ORCAS Jan. 11 Jan. 12 Jan. 13 Jan. 14 Jan. 15 Jan. 16 Jan. 17

High Low Precip 44 32 .08 49 44 .15 49 43 .06 44 42 — 44 35 — 50 44 .31 51 48 .06 Precipitation in January: 0.89” Precipitation in 2016: 0.89” Reported by John Willis, Olga

SAN JUAN High Low Precip Jan. 11 46 28 .04 Jan. 12 50 43 .04 Jan. 13 48 43 .01 Jan. 14 48 39 — Jan. 15 46 32 — Jan. 16 51 43 — Jan. 17 50 45 .04 Precipitation in January: 0.46” Precipitation in 2016: 0.46” Reported by Weather Underground Roche Harbor Water Systems SUNRISE, SUNSET Jan. 20 Jan. 21 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan. 24 Jan. 25 Jan. 26

Sunrise Sunset 7:54 a.m. 4:52 p.m. 7:53 a.m. 4:53 p.m. 7:52 a.m. 4:55 p.m. 7:51 a.m. 4:56 p.m. 7:50 a.m. 4:58 p.m. 7:49 a.m. 4:59 p.m. 7:47 a.m. 5:01 p.m.

to go on to undergraduate and graduate school. In college, we realized the importance of technology education in primary and high school. Our college peers tended to have had earlier access to advanced math classes, computer programming courses, and hands-on science programs that gave them an advantage in the university setting. Unless our students on San Juan Island are given the tools early on to keep up with technology, they will fall behind their peers in future academic settings. One portion of the upcoming levy provides funds to develop space at the elementary school for STEM activities, allowing students to start using technology at a young age, and all the way through their school careers. The levy will also provide for replacement of aging computers, and training and support to teachers in using the new equipment, all of which are vital to the STEM education of San Juan Island students. We’ve found that STEM education can provide many benefits later in life outside of traditional STEM settings, including helping to develop critical problemsolving and communication skills, in addition to providing the tools to succeed in an increasingly digital world. PABLO LOPEZ, FHHS Class of 2009 HANNAH SNOW, FHHS Class of 2010

Renew the levy

We encourage all eligible voters to join us and vote yes for our children, schools and community in the upcoming election on Feb. 9. The renewal of the Capital and Technology Levy will help ensure that our students continue to receive a first-rate educa-

The Journal of the San Juan Islands (ISSN num­ ber: 0734-3809) is published weekly for $40 a year to San Juan County addresses; $60 per year to Washington state addresses; and $60 per year to out-of-state addresses by the Journal of the San Juans at 640 Mullis St., Friday Harbor, WA.

tion in Friday Harbor. Island voters have a long history of supporting our schools, and it is critical now more than ever to continue our investment in the future. The requested renewal is $0.455 per $1,000 of assessed value. This means that a homeowner with a $500,000 property is contributing $227 per year towards our schools and it is important to note that this is not a new tax. The funds will be used for projects such as a science, technology, engineering, and math classroom at the elementary school, addressing structural problems at the middle school site, and modernizing locker rooms at Turnbull gym at the high school. These are just a few examples of projects that have been identified as top priorities by a committee consisting of a wide range of community members. Strong schools are the foundation upon which vibrant communities are built. Please vote yes to renew the Capital and Technology levy on Feb. 9. TRAVIS AND JENNIFER AYERS Friday Harbor

Vote yes on levy

I am proud to live in a community that supports its schools. Most of us live in Friday Harbor on purpose rather than by accident, and strong, vibrant schools are a part of what makes this community such a desirable place to live. Whether or not you have children of school age, we all benefit by taking good care of the youngest members of our community. Their energy and enthusiasm enrich us all. We have another chance to give our support to our local children. The San Juan Island School District is seeking voter approval for the reauthorization of the capital and technology levy

Group Publisher Colleen Smith Armstrong publisher@sanjuanjournal.com Editor Cali Bagby editor@sanjuanjournal.com Reporter Anna V. Smith asmith@sanjuanjournal.com

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com

for the years 2017-2020. The district is asking voters to approve a four-year levy of $0.455 per $1,000 assessed value. This equates to an approximate annual cost of $227 for a home assessed at $500,000. Of course, most of us do not like to pay taxes. However, this is not really a brand new levy; it simply replaces the one that is set to expire. Yes, the cost has gone up slightly, but quite honestly, what hasn’t? Meanwhile, statewide school funding continues to erode, and it doesn’t cover the cost of maintaining our buildings anyway. Our schools are aging, and require continued maintenance for the safety of our children and their hardworking teachers and staff. Please join me in supporting the upcoming school levy on Feb. 9. Thank you. KAREN MEENAN San Juan Island

Office Manager/Reporter Heather Spaulding hspaulding@sanjuanjournal.com Graphic Designers Shane Watson swatson@sanjuanjournal.com

Leash your dogs at the gravel pit

It is not stated on the board that the gravel pit is an off-leash dog park; but assumed. This has gotten out of hand for a number of reasons. First there are no gates so the location is unsecured. Which means that dogs can get out and onto the road, resulting in the death of an animal or potential car accident. The second reason is that people walk and jog there to keep fit. It is disconcerting when an unleashed dog runs up to them and jumps on them or barks at them or they step in dog poop. This is the third reason that the off-leash dogs are out of control. People are not picking up after their dogs and there is dog poop everywhere. I always walk my dogs on leash to keep them safe and under total control. I went to walk my

Mailing/Street Address 640 Mullis St., West Wing Friday Har­bor, WA 98250 Phone: (360) 378-5696 (888) 562-8818 Fax: (800) 388-2527 Classifieds: Copyright © 2015 Owned and published by Sound Publishing Co. Founded Sept. 13, 1906 as the Friday Harbor Journal. The Journal was adjudged to be a legal newspaper for the publication of any and all

dogs this morning and barely got through the entrance and my dogs were attacked by three dogs off-leash. The owners yelled for them but they did not immediately respond. The gravel pit is for every body and all these off-leash dogs are ruining it for many. There are two secure offleash dog parks on Mullis Street, and out at Roche Harbor. Go there to play with your dog off-leash, but all dogs that go to the gravel pit should be on leash to be considerate to the other people who use it; and pick up your dog poop. Leaving it is rude and inconsiderate. If you agree and want to complain about the off leash out of control dogs at the gravel pit, call Island Rec 378-4953. ROBERTA ROBERSTON Friday Harbor

legal notices, San Juan County Superior Court, May 6, 1941. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jour­nal of the San Juan Islands, 640 Mullis St., West Wing, Friday Harbor, WA 98250. Member of Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, National Newspaper Association.


The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com 

Editorial

Investing in the future

Wednesday, January 13, 2016 —7

Guest column

How it’s going so far this year with Washington State Ferries –Submitted by Washington State Ferries staff

During the week of Jan. 15, Washington State Ferries reported that 2015 had an increase in ridership, and the state’s oldest ferry, Evergreen State, was decommissioned.

2015 saw big jump in ridership

By Cali Bagby Journal editor

There seems to be two periods in my life: the one before I met Adia and the one after. For almost two years while living on Orcas I have been an unofficial mentor to Adia Dolan, a vibrant, talented and now 16-year-old overall superstar, whether it comes to soccer or theater or enjoying life in general. When people asked me how I came into Adia’s life, I say, “I didn’t have a choice – she chose me.” After meeting on the set of the musical “Oliver” at Orcas Center in 2013, it was clear that Adia and I would have a beautiful friendship. I’m not the only person who has been lucky enough to be chosen. She has a host of people guiding her from her father to many friends and islanders who have known her since she was a little girl. After her mother died five years ago, figures like her official mentor, Suzanne Olson, became even more critical to Adia’s life. As her mentor, or as she calls me her “sister figure,” I have learned some hard lessons such as how to set boundaries and how to make time for calamities that one cannot predict – like the terrifying moment when Adia showed up at my office after being bumped by a car. She came away with only a few scratches, but it was a reminder of how unsafe the world can be. This week, we are running a story on page 1 about the power of being a mentor, not only for the two people who form a long-lasting bond, but for the overall health of a community. The fact that we live in a place where people are willing to invest in the lives others, especially younger others, means we are willing invest in ourselves and grow as people. I have learned so much from Adia and it has made me want to be a better person, to be the kind of person that she respects and can come to for advice. Despite all the growing pains we have experienced together, most of the time Adia and I just have fun. Whether I’m watching her fierceness on the soccer field, having a quick chat when she comes by the office or taking a hike and listening as she breaks into song, it’s always an adventure. One way to get involved in your own adventure is to be a part of the mentor program here on San Juan Island. To sign up for the program as a mentor or those interested in signing their children up for the program, contact program coordinator Barbara Ellis at 360-­370-­7665 or Jennifer Armstrong, director of San Juan Family Resource Center, at 360­-378­-5246.

In 2015, we carried 23.9 million total riders, an increase of 2.9 percent over 2014 and the highest level since 2006. The number of vehicles carried system-wide was up 2.4 percent and the number of passengers increased by 3.4 percent over 2014. Interestingly, our two smallest routes saw the largest increases. Ridership

Fond farewell

I am two weeks into retirement already and am finally getting around to writing the love letter that I meant to compose before leaving the employ of the Community Foundation. Nine years ago a recruitment committee composed of Charles Anderson, Carla Wright, Krista Mattox, and Wendy Wood did me the great good favor of hiring me as the first paid employee of the foundation. Thinking it would be a lazy, part-time, semi-retirement type of job, I gratefully accepted. Within days of accepting the job offer, I was asked if I wouldn’t mind working full time instead. And seven years later I was asked to be the foundation’s first executive director. So much for that semiretirement idea. But I believe no person on earth has been happier or more fulfilled in a

on the Point Defiance/Tahlequah route increased by 9 percent and Port Townsend/Coupeville ridership increased 8.9 percent over the previous year. The Seattle/Bainbridge route carried the most total riders, 6.3 million people. The Mukilteo/ Clinton route to south Whidbey Island carried 2.2 million vehicles, more than any other route. All of WSF’s 2015 traffic statistics are available online.

Evergreen State

Built in 1954, the Evergreen State is our oldest ferry and will soon be put up for sale. The 87-car ferry boasts World War II surplus drive motors, and has served as a workhorse carrying tens of thousands of passengers and vehicles for more than six decades. It has also been

job. I wish I could spend the rest of this letter naming names, telling stories, thanking each and every donor, board member, nonprofit employee/volunteer for making this job such a daily delight. Instead, I will just encourage every San Juan Islander to spend time to get to know your Community Foundation. You have every reason to be proud of your foundation, to appreciate their counsel, sound investments, and support of community endeavors that ensure the quality of life on this island. The foundation is now poised on the brink of a new era as Carrie Unpingco takes over the reins as executive director, supported by Development Director Michel Vekved and new front office staff. Two new board members begin their service with the first 2016 quarterly board meeting in January, while other long-

PUBLIC MEETINGS n Marine Resources Committee Meeting, Jan. 20 at 8:30 a.m. at Islanders Bank Annex, Blair Street. n Board of Health Monthly Meeting, Jan. 20, 11:45 a.m. Legislative Hearing Room, 55 Second Street. n San Juan Island School District Board Meeting, Jan. 20, 5 p.m., Friday Harbor High School Library. n San Juan County Parks and Recreation Commission Meeting, Jan. 21, 8:40 a.m., 849A Argyle Ave. n Building Advisory Council Meeting, Jan. 21, 11:45 a.m. Fire District #3, 1011 Mullis Street. n Veterans Advisory Board Meeting, Jan. 22, 11:45 a.m. Legislative Large Conference Room, 55 Second Street. n Agricultural Resources Committee Meeting, Jan. 27, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., 221 Webber Way, Lower Level.

home to many crew members and engineers over the years and a lifeline for island communities throughout Puget Sound. This truly is a bittersweet goodbye, but with two new Olympic Class ferries in service and two more under construction, it iss time to retire the Evergreen State and focus our resources on newer, larger vessels. The Evergreen State was originally slated for decommissioning last spring, but was called back into service over the summer while other vessels were out of service for maintenance or repairs. Potential buyers interested in owning a piece of history will be able to bid for the vessel once it is posted for sale through the state surplus process.

serving board members provide the continuity and history to ensure that the original mission continues to be fulfilled. Foremost among all those who have brought the foundation to a position of strength and trust in the community is Board Chair Charles Anderson. While he may object to my singling him out in this letter, the recognition of his contributions for well over 10 years is beyond overdue. There are no words sufficient enough to convey the breadth, width and depth of his selfless service. This is true for other board members, as well. For all their volunteer work they receive no pay other than the gratitude they well deserve and the satisfaction of weaving together the strands that become the strong fabric of a healthy community. To all involved over the years - thank you again for the gift of this long association. I love and respect you all. SUSAN MATTHEWS Friday Harbor

Offended by broadband article

I was offended by the info-mercial you called a news story on broadband in the islands. I’ve been using fiber optic-based broadband at my home on Orcas Island since the

turn of the century successfully communicating with mainland telephone companies as a freelance telecommunication network engineer. I was part of the team that laid the first in this nation’s combination submarine power conductor with imbedded fiber optics that linked Orcas to Shaw and Shaw to Lopez in 1984. The technology had been used in Italy and Japan earlier so we, Pacific Telecom and OPALCO, used Sumitomo cable for the Orcas-Shaw run and Perelli cable between Shaw and Lopez. We have an interesting telecommunication system history in these Islands and its unfortunate that your reporter chose to ignore it. I use Centurytel Broadband with very few problems. It is fast enough for me to transmit my work to WSDOT and various telephone companies any time I need such a link. Your news article suggests that what I do daily is not possible. I worked for OPALCO for a day and a half, having been asked to review their fiber plan. I gave them two answers; 1) Your plan is well conceived, and 2) You’ll never pay for it unless you drive Centurytel and all other providers off the islands. Your article seems to be designed to do just that and I object to your use of this newspaper for such a purpose. MICHAEL BAKER Orcas Island


8 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016 

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com

Fish for Teeth program turns five years old –Submitted by Matt Marinkovich Fish for Teeth President

Fish for Teeth is starting its fifth year of turning premium Alaskan rockfish into healthy teeth for islanders who cannot otherwise

afford dental care. The rockfish is the key ingredient in the fish tacos that fund the ToothMobile, where all those teeth get fixed by local volunteer dental professionals. These all-important fish

tacos (they’re actually burritos) will be sold on Jan. 22 at Ace Hardware from 11-2 p.m. for a $7 donation to Fish for Teeth. These tasty tacos also feature fresh salsa from Pablito’s Taqueria, Tillamook cheese, and other

quality ingredients. All profits go to support Fish for Teeth. Fish for Teeth programs will also benefit from the sale of delectable black cod tips donated by Matt’s Fresh Fish for $15 each, frozen

Crossword Puzzle Across 1. Canine cry 5. Actors 9. Beer buy 13. Gulf V.I.P. 14. ___ vera 15. Long, long time 16. One who uses secret means to influence others 19. Some deer 20. Occupied place of authority 21. Emigrant 23. Heroin, slangily 24. Chill 25. Transition between leaf and stem 28. Dupe 32. About 33. Bank deposit 34. A pint, maybe 35. Bite 36. Circumvent 38. Egg on 39. Crystal meth, in slang 40. Coaster 41. Fetch 42. Place to put the feet up 44. Divine 46. Ram 47. "___ Brockovich" 48. Modest 51. Toughened 55. "Catch!" 56. Evening meal 58. Crumbs 59. Live wire, so to

into one pound vac-packs. Matt’s Fresh Fish will also be selling frozen, vacuumpacked sockeye salmon fillets, sides or portions, for $9 or $10 per pound. The ToothMobile is also the Medical Teams International Mobile Dental Van. Fish for Teeth brings the van to Friday Harbor each January, May, and October. The money raised by fish tacos just about pays for a ToothMobile visit; individual donations by caring community members close the gap. To date our local volunteer dental professionals have provided an estimated 370 visits, equal to $235,000 in dental services. We must recognize the generous and continued support from those doing the work in the dental van. Lead by Dr. Michael Horn, just about every local dental professional has spent time in the van. Thank you Team Tooth, including those volunteers in reception and intake. It also takes a small army to put the tacos together; we draw from a pool of about 30 individuals who show up when they

can to crank out over 300 fish tacos. Thank you Team Taco. The sustainability of our program is also made possible by generous in-kind donations and “help-outs” by local individuals and businesses. Special thanks goes to the following: Friday Harbor Suites for a generous rate on accommodations for the dental van driver; Mullis Center for dental van site; Ace Hardware and San Juan Island Community Theater for fish taco site; Cynthia’s Café for ingredients; American Legion for kitchen to prep ingredients; Pablito’s Salsa for a great deal on delicious salsa; Matt’s Fresh Fish for donation of wild Alaskan rockfish; Mullis Street Storage for housing our equipment; Family Resource Center for distributing applications; San Juan County Health and Community Services for collecting and storing applications until volunteers schedule the appointments. Lastly, thanks to this wonderful community as a whole for making a program like this possible.

Sudoku speak 10. All excited 60. Husk 11. Merlin, e.g. 61. Hail Mary, e.g. 12. "___ quam 62. As recently as videri" (North 63. When repeated, Carolina's like some shows motto) 17. Ornamental Down loop 18. Wine and dine 1. A harsh cry 22. Mixed-breed 2. Arabic for dog "commander" 24. Battery contents 3. Euros replaced 25. Place for a them barbecue 4. Of urgency 26. Legislate 5. Relating to a tail 27. Article of faith 6. Assert without 29. Romeo's rival proof 30. "Home ___" 7. Auction cry 31. Doorstop shape 8. Golf ball support 33. Blue 9. Brief____ 36. Flying high

37. Blow off steam 38. Before birth 40. Blue books? 41. Pipe type 43. Haunt 44. Seed used in the kitchen 45. Cantankerous 48. Hack 49. Bickerer in the "Iliad" 50. Song and dance, e.g. 51. Soon, to a bard 52. 100 kurus 53. Give off, as light 54. Drop 57. Alter vow (2 wds) Answers to today's puzzle on page 20

Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column, and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. Our puzzles are medium difficulty. Puzzle answers are on page 20


Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 9

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com 

Calendar Tuesdays, Ongoing German Film Series, IMA, free. This event occurs the second and fourth Tuesday of the month at 5:45 p.m. The language is German with English translations. All are welcome.

Wednesdays, Ongoing German speaking group, Griffin Bay Bookstore, 4:30 - 6 p.m., free. Participants range from beginners to individu­ als whose native language is German. The group is open to the public and welcomes speakers of all proficiency levels. The group meets weekly. Caregiver support group, Mullis Center, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., free. Open to the public, this support group pertains to unpaid caregiv­ ers. It meets every second and fourth Wednesday of the month. Badminton and Ping Pong, Adult Drop-in, 8-10 p.m., Turnbull Gym. Join fellow islanders on Jan. 20 for adult drop-in badminton or ping pong games. $3 punch tick­

ets available. This group also meets for games on Jan. 25 and 27.

Summers for this lecture as part of the Arthur Whitely Winter Lecture Series.

3210. Also plays Jan. 22-24.

Wednesday, January 20

Island Rec Basketball, Adult Drop-in 8 - 10 p.m., Hall Gym. Join fellow islanders for adult drop-in basketball games. Smiles, laughter and friendly competition are in abun­ dance. $3 punch tickets avail­ able. Also on Jan. 26 and 28.

Fish tacos to benefit Fish for Teeth, Ace Hardware, 11-2 p.m., $7 suggested donation. These tasty tacos feature wild Alaskan rock­ fish caught and donated by Matt’s Fresh Fish, fresh salsa from Pablito’s Taqueria, Tillimook cheese and other quality ingredients. All profits go to support Fish for Teeth. For more info: www.fish­ forteeth.com.

Foster Care Information Night, San Juan Island Library, 6:30 p.m., free. Join us to learn what it takes, who can foster and how else you can be involved. We will dis­ cuss what trainings are nec­ essary to get licensed, where you can take them and how to sign up, and what type of homes are needed for what age groups. More informa­ tion: 360-720-0969.

Thursday, January 21 Lavendera Massage Presents Community Wellness, Lavendera Massage, 6:30 p.m., free. Explore a myriad of healing therapies through free 15 minute clothed treatments including massage, energy work, and intuitive reading. Richard will be doing mas­ sage, Heather will be talking about yoga and nutrition, and Tamara will be doing some Crystal Reiki. Biomaterials from the Sea - a naturalist swims with Edison, 7 p.m., The Commons at UW Friday Harbor Labs. Join Adam

Indoor soccer, 6:30-8:30 p.m., fair building. Drop-in program for soccer enthu­ siasts and beginners alike. Ages 16 and over, $5 drop-in fee. Also on Jan. 26.

Friday, January 22

Saturday, January 23

Mended Hearts support group meeting, Peace Island Medical Center, 10 - 11:30 a.m., free. Monthly meeting supporting heart patient from diagnosis through recovery and beyond. For more informa­ tion contact Rick Rubin at oz@rockisland.com.

Island Rec Scooter ’n Trike and Open Skate, 5:30-6:30 p.m. scooter/trike and 7-8:30 p.m. open skate, fairgrounds building. Bicycles with train­ ing wheels allowed during scooter/trike times. Drop-in fee $2/$3 respectively, with family discounts and scholar­ ships available.

“The NeverEnding Story,” 7:30 p.m. San Juan Community Theatre. The Friday Harbor High School Drama Group, under direc­ tion of Jenni Merritt, presents this classic adventure about the power of imagination and friendship. Tickets: $16 adults; $8 student reserved. www.sjctheatre.org or 378-

Know Your Island Walk, English Camp National Historic Park visitor lot, 1 to 4 p.m., free. Mike Vouri and Ken Arzarian will lead us on a search for the mysterious Military Road, the first road on San Juan Island. The walk will be moderate on good trials, about 3 miles, dogs are welcome on leash. For more

information: info@sanjuan­ islandtrails.org Bingo by the Soroptimists, Mullis Center, 2 p.m., $5 minimum. A weekly bingo session for four winter weeks with a break for refresh­ ments. Ai WeiWei: Fault Line, IMA, free. One of the most influ­ ential artists and most closely followed dissident political voices in the world. The show is on display until April 11. Dana Lynn Louis: As Above So Below, IMA, free. An installation by Portlandbased artist Dana Lynn Louis, recipient of the 2016 Contemporary Northwest Art Award. Shows until Monday April 4.

Sunday, January 24 Island Rec Teen Open Gym, Turnbull Gym, 7 p.m., free. For those wanting to get out of the house and hit the hoops, among other gym play.

Monday, January 25 Free Contra Dance, San Juan Island Grange, 7:30 p.m., free. All dances taught. Singles or couples, you’ll dance with everybody to live old time music. New band

members welcome. The Wild Side Series: Winter - In the Dark of Night, San Juan Island Library, 7 p.m., free. After dark many wild animals are active. Tiny wild mice are scurrying around, foxes are hunting and owls are silently swooping down to catch their prey. Join Shona Aitken to find out which nocturnal animals live on the San Juan Islands and how they are adapted for their life in the dark of night.

Tuesday, January 26 Island Rec Roller Hockey, fair building. There are three age groupings for roller hockey - ages 5-8 from 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.; ages 9-15 from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m.; adults 16+ from 7:30 - 9 p.m. Volunteer coaches provide instruction for the younger groups! $4 drop-in fee or $45 for season pass for youth and $6 drop in fee for adults. On Book! Readers Theatre, 7:30 p.m., San Juan Community Theatre. “110 Stories,” a drama capturing the grief and resilience of New York City in the wake of Sept. 11. Free admission.

Building tips to avoid attracting bats

Cali Bagby/staff photo

A baby long-eared myotis bat stranded on publisher Colleen Smith Armstrong’s deck Most homes in San Juan County are still being built without regard for the way they attract bats, says Kwiaht ecologist Russel Barsh. The result is scores of preventable conflicts between people and bats each year, which in the past have frequently led to the eviction of bats and decimation of bat populations in the islands. Bats are San Juan County’s most diverse and abundant mammals. Barsh has been able to identify nine species of bats in the islands since 2013 by recording and analyzing the sound spectra of bats’ echolocation chirps. “I’ve recorded more than 500 night passes by bats over some of the islands’ lakes and ponds in summer,” Barsh says. Island bats fly less often in winter, he found, and tend to hunt in wooded areas rather than open waters. To better monitor bats’ seasonal movements, and response to changing weather patterns, Barsh has been installing weatherproofed ultrasound recorders on Lopez, Orcas, and San Juan Islands that will continue to “eavesdrop” on bats nightly for years. He has identified bats from nearly 20,000 flyovers recorded thus far. “Once or twice a month,” Barsh says, “I get a call from an island homeowner who has found a live bat inside a bedroom, bathroom or storage area; or found evidence of a bat colony living inside an attic, roof or crawl space; or discovered dozens of sleepy bats

while re-roofing or re-shingling.” While there is little cause for fear—there has been no case of humans contracting rabies or another disease from contact with a bat in San Juan County—homeowners are often concerned about smell, dampness, unsightly guano (good in the garden but not on the carpet), Kwiaht helped 156 San Juan County homeowners with excluding bats from living space, or from roofs or walls so that homes can be insulated or re-surfaced. Kwiaht has also designed and built 11 custom bat houses for displaced bats colonies. Some boxes are large enough for 200 bats. Re-homing a bat colony is tricky. Barsh says that a 50 percent success rate is very good. A better approach, cheaper and less stressful for humans and less likely to harm any bats, is to design and build our homes with bats in mind. Tiles, shingles, unscreened vents, and cracks or spaces greater than half an inch in width on the roof or exterior walls of a home offer day roosts for bats, especially if they have rough surfaces such as cedar shakes or unfinished sawn timbers. Bats try to squeeze into small spaces to conserve body heat. A single tile roof can be home to a hundred or more bats. Day use of exterior surfaces rarely interferes with human activity, in any case, and tiles, shingles and clapboards can be replaced in fall when bats disperse for winter. If an exterior gap leads into an attic, wall or crawl space, however, bats may form a maternity colony with dozens to hundreds of related females gathering every year from April to August to birth and nurse bat pups. Colonies are few; only about one in ten of the homes that Barsh has been asked to assess. But warm, dry, safe colonies are critical to the survival of our islands’ bats, and may be protected by law. Enticing a colony to a new home such as a custom bat house, and discouraging it from returning to its original home, can be a two- or three-year process. Bats are easy to exclude from potential entry holes with hardware cloth. Unlike rats, they do not gnaw through wood or metal. But installing hardware cloth patches after a home has been built can be tedious and costly. Barsh says that gaps around the ends of roof beams, loose flashing around chimneys and sky lights, and narrow spaces between overhanging roofs and walls are the entry points he finds most frequently. These defects, and the choice of materials for roofs and exterior walls, can all be addressed when houses are designed and built. “Bats are beneficial neighbors, nonetheless” Barsh says, pointing out bats are the main predators of the moths whose caterpillars damage orchards and gardens each in the islands, as well as the principal natural control of mosquitoes and biting flies. “You don’t want bats to leave your property; just not necessarily to live inside your home.” Kwiaht’s recommended solution is including an exterior space for bats in the original designs for a house. “It can be as simple as a deep, narrow slot beneath the eaves, warmed by the heat from inside the house, that can be detached temporarily if needed for home repairs.” This gives bats their own separate, warm apartment, and in return, bats sweep the surrounding area of moths and mosquitoes and leave homeowners a neat outdoor pile of guano for the garden. For further information contact: kwiaht@gmail.com


10 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016 

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com

Get your brain in gear for Knowledge Bowl 2016 Submitted by the Board of Directors San Juan Public School Foundation

The 22nd annual Knowledge Bowl will be held on Monday, February 8, at the Community Theatre at 7 p.m. Our fabulous Friday Harbor High School Jazz Band will begin performing at 6:30 and the Friday Harbor Middle School Parent Teacher Association will be offering baked treats in the lobby before and during the event. There will be raffle items during intermission as well. School teams consist of the eighth graders, a team of freshmen and sophomores, and one of juniors and seniors. These students will be going head to head with four local service group teams: Kiwanis, Soroptimists, Lions, and Journal file photo

The first winners of the evening last year was the eighth grade team, with a landslide victory in the costume contest.

BELIEVE in FANTASTICA FHHS Drama Group: The Neverending Story Thursday-Sunday, January 21-24 San Juan Community Theatre

Rotary. Groups will match wits to answer tricky questions on a range of topics in this family-friendly game of trivia. Join the fun, and see if you can answer the questions! The event is emceed this year again by Brent Snow, school board member, with entertainment during intermission by the Jazz Band. The Knowledge Bowl is presented each year by the San Juan Public Schools Foundation. Through its main fundraising events, the Phone-a-Thon and Business Partnership Program in the school directory, the foundation this year has donated over $100,000 to supplement our local public education needs! Tickets for this fun family event are $5 for adults and $3 for children, and are available at the door the night of the event. Watch the Journal for an in-depth story about this year’s Knowledge Bowl. You can also find it online at www.sanjuanjournal.com.

School’s community projects solve problems at home and afar By Anna V. Smith Journal reporter

This year’s Friday Harbor High School’s Community Service-Learning Class went as far as Papua New Guinea and Romania, and as close as the high school itself. The 27 student-generated projects focused on addressing problems in a community service-oriented way, both at home and abroad. “It’s a required course, but it’s so important because it brings all their skills that they’ve learned throughout school high and puts them to good use,” said Jenny Wilson, who has taught the class at the high school for the last four years. Wilson said that a long part of the process is actually choosing the project itself, which takes about three weeks, to find an issue that the students feel passionate about. The students work singly or in pairs, and are accompanied by a mentor. The first step in choosing their project looks at whether they want to help people, animals or the environment, and make a list of problems that need to be addressed in the world and locally. Then, they make a set of goals and dive in to try and make a difference in just one semester. According to Wilson, the class is fairly student-run, with a nominated president and vicepresident, so that the students take ownership of their projects.

This year’s president was Jillian Brandli, who did a project with Yasmin Sarah on a local arts program. The vice president was Griffin Cuomo, who based his project on access to school supplies in Papua New Guinea. Brandli and Sarah’s project looked at the STAR Program at Friday Harbor Middle School, a supervised afterschool program hosted by Island Rec. “We were very interested in working with children and working with them, we had both taken art classes at the high school,” Brandli said. Together with mentor Jennifer Armstrong of the Family Resource Center, the pair set up a twice weekly, one hour long class that they taught throughout November of varying art projects such as origami. Overall, Brandli said, the two learned to work with multiple nonprofit organizations like 4H, Family Resource Center and Island Rec, as well as networking, deadlines, teaching and grant proposal writing. Juniors Iella Parker and Haileigh Allen also took the approach of teaching in their project for the class, though they focused on the local middle school and teaching environmental lessons. Working with mentor Binney Haenel at the middle school, they found that recycling wasn’t as widespread or available as it could be. The two used posters, trivia and lesson plans to spread awareness.

“For our first class, we went in really prepared, but it turned out that a couple days of research only filled 15 minutes,” Allen said. It was a tough lesson to learn, but helped them to be more prepared with future classes. Although the two hadn’t considered pursuing a job in teaching after high school, they both said that the experience broadened their horizons in terms of a future in teaching. It also empowered them to know that they could create lesson plans and successfully work with kids. Parker said she became more knowledgeable about recycling, but learned even more about teaching skills like communication and keeping a timeline. Brandli, Parker, Allen and 24 other students spent 30 minutes Wednesday, Jan. 13 showcasing what their goals were, what they learned, and what aspects of the project were difficult to their friends and family. “That’s the touching part, really,” Wilson said. “I love that evening because the parents are just amazed at how poised their child is at giving their presentation because the project came from their heart so they’re able to be very genuine about it and very proud. It’s lovely to watch.”


The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com 

Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 11

ISLAND SCENE

Ai Weiwei : Art, survival and beauty By Heather Spaulding Journal reporter

Ai Weiwei was just a baby when his father, poet Ai Qing, was sentenced to hard labor for defending intellectualism against the Cultural Revolution in 1958. The family was exiled to the far reaches of China’s Xianing providence, where they spent the next 16 years struggling to survive. These were experiences Weiwei would never forget and would later prepare him for a life as not only an artist, but an activist. Weiwei’s art has been shown in the Tate Modern Museum in London, the Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., Taipei Fine Arts Japan, Martin Grapius Berlin, as well as other venues across the globe. His human rights activism helped propel him into the spotlight. Headlines have called him the most dangerous man in China. Human rights will be a major focus when the San Juan Islands Museum of Art brings “Ai Weiwei: Fault Line” to its halls Jan. 23 through April 11. The show, made up of several exhibits including photographs and sculptures inspired by the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan, China. Approximately 70,000 people died in that earthquake, including more than 5,000 children attending school. The exact number of students killed remains unclear, as the Chinese government has refused to publicize that information, according to the documentary “Never Sorry” by Allison Klayman. Undaunted by the lack of documentation, Weiwei made it his mission to find out the name of each child, and calculate the exact number of casualties. He gathered volunteers of all ages for his Investigation of the Sichuan Earthquake. One year after the quake, Weiwei began work on an

intense untitled project in Munich, Germany. Across the façade of the Haus der Kunst Museum, he installed a wall of blue backpacks, bright pinks, yellows and other bright colors thrown in the mix representing the children lost in the disaster. “The thing about Ai Weiwei is that he is an artist who hasn’t shied away from human rights. That is very rare in the art world,” said Ian Boyden, executive director of SJIMA. Boyden himself lived in China for a number of years, and met several of Weiwei’s friends. It was through those contacts he was able to ask Weiwei if he would be interested in doing a show in Friday Harbor. In 2012, Weiwei was awarded the Vaclav Havel prize for Creative Dissent from the Human Rights Foundation in New York. He is currently working on an exhibit in Lethos, Greece in an attempt to help refugees. Ai Weiwei has been very clear however, it is up to the audience to decide what his work means. In the case of the Chinese government, the work is threatening. According to “Never Sorry,” officials have posted surveillance outside his studio in Beijing, interrogated him on multiple occasions, detained him for 81 days, beat Weiwei severely enough to cause a cerebral hemorrhage requiring emergency surgery, accused him of tax crimes for which there is no evidence, and shut down his blog. “People say I am fearless, but I am not. I am fearful. I act more brave because I know the danger is really there. If you don’t act, the danger becomes stronger.” Weiwei says in the documentary. In fact his childhood taught him the essence of survival in the face of that danger. Weiwei spent his youth on the edge of the Gobi desert, where the family found shelter in

a cave while his father served out his sentence. Necessities like food and water were a daily struggle. In the 1980s, Weiwei moved to New York City, during the Reagan era, and Iran-Contra hearings. He was part of the first generation to be able to study abroad under China’s new “opening up,” and while art engaged him, Weiwei could often be found watching TV, shocked a government would go through a cleansing process in public. He moved back to Beijing in the early 90s when his father’s health began to fail. “Freedom is a pretty strange thing. Once you’ve experienced it, it remains in your heart, and no one can take it away. Then, as an individual, you can be more powerful than a whole country,” Weiwei says as he smiles wryly in the documentary “Never Sorry.” For those not familiar with his work, Weiwei uses a combination of materials and mediums. “He provides you with a set of pieces, and you, the viewer, get the pleasure of putting that together,” Boyden said, describing one of the exhibits in Fault Line, which is made up of coffin-like boxes. Within each box are pieces of replicated re-bar carved from marble. If the re-bar was made out of iron, there might not be much of an impression, but marble usually has some other associations to it. Some might be reminded of ancient Greek statues, others counter tops, others still, may be reminded of tombstones. The marble was quarried from Sichuan, the very province where the earthquake occurred. “So there are multiple layers in this piece. Now you, the viewer gets to test yourself. Is this political? Is it about equality? Depending on where you sit, your own experiences, is where you will draw your conclusions,” said Boyden. The exhibit runs Jan. 23 until April 11. IMA is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Monday.


12 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016 

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com

Original Fairy Tale Ballet at the theatre

A Grimm-style ballet fairy tale takes us into the lushly romantic,  dark,  light and sensual in the latest offering from contemporary and professional ballet company, La Danse De La Mer. Lord of the Stark Realm features internationally-

renowned dancers Danny and Sylvain Boulet of Seattle and is set to music from Beethoven to Megadeth to Fauré to John Lennon – on stage one night only at San Juan Community Theatre Saturday, Feb. 6 at 7:30 p.m. This new ballet begins

where last year’s sell-out Prince of the Rain Realm left off, with the lovers – who are now lost and disoriented – travelling through the mysterious Stark Realm. In addition to the Boulets, Caitlin Ross, Kerry Ratza, Michelle and Ian

Powerful Readers Theatre on Jan. 27 and 28 Sarah Tuft’s powerful and humanizing account of New York City’s darkest day is the latest addition in the On Book! Readers Theatre series at San Juan Community Theatre on Wednesday and Thursday, Jan. and 28 at 7:30 p.m. “110 Stories” captures the grief and resilience of New York City in the wake of Sept. 11 through the words of those who experienced it directly - not only the firefighters and police, but the ironworkers, chaplains, canine handlers, nurses, photojournalists, and the homeless who witnessed the horrific events and saved lives that day, too. Together these unflinching first-person testimonials offer catharsis by revealing the hope, humor, and compassion that emerged in the midst of this tragedy.

Directed by Julie Laidlaw, the reading features more than 23 islanders, including: Cole Arendt, Robert Carrieri, Eric Concord, John Cornell, Pete Dawson, Scott Dow, Peter Goddy, Candace Gossen, Lynda Guernsey, James Gull, Carolyn Haugen, Carrie Jewett, Keith Keyser, Julie Laidlaw, Deb Langhans, Trudy Loucks, Corinne Morrell, Pat Rishel, Kes Stephens, Ted Soares, Greg Swinford, Paul Walsh and Tori Zehner. Doors open at 7 p.m. with festival seating in the Gubelman Theatre. Admission is free. For more information on the series and other Theatre events, visit www.sjctheatre. org

The Wild Side: A four-part nature series at the library The Wild Side Series: Winter- In the Dark of the Night is the first in a four-part Nature series run in partnership with Wolf Hollow Wildlife Rehabilitation Center and Kwiaht Center for the Historical Ecology of the Salish Sea. The first part to the event is Monday, Jan. 25 at 7 p.m. at the library. When winter comes we all want to hibernate. But what about the nocturnal animals who wake as we head to bed? Come listen to experts speak about owls and other wild animals that are active at night when we are asleep. Refreshments courtesy of the Friends of the Library.

Randall and Stephen Moore will be dancing, as well as renowned Turkish classical dancer Ferah Bakuy. Soprano Angela K. Morgan (“The Golden Voice of Daniels Recital Hall” in Seattle) will share her vocal talents in one scene and island cellist Sasha von Dassow will provide live music from backstage.

Director and choreographer Lina Downes calls the visual aspects of the ballet “stunning,” including a vibrant and surprised-filled set designed by Michael Seibert and Travis Steckler and staging from professional stage director and actress Mary Lou Mills. The ballet is produced by professional choreographer Michael Blue. Downes says folks who did not see the first ballet will have no problem catching up with the story; she also stresses that while the performance is considered an adult ballet, parents should think of it more as having a PG-13 rating. The evening’s business partner is Coho Restaurant. Tickets are $17 for adults, $9 for student reserved, with $5 student RUSH one hour before the show. The SJCT Box Office is open Tuesdays through Fridays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. or tickets may be purchased on-line at www.sjctheatre.org

SAN JUAN COMMUNITY THEATRE 100 Second Street Friday Harbor, WA

Thu.-Sat., January 21-23 •7:30 pm Sunday, January 24 • 2:00 pm Friday Harbor High School Drama Group

The Neverending Story

Adapted by David Craig; Based on the novel written by Michael Ende Directed by Jenni Merritt The power of books comes alive in this imaginative adventure featuring more than 25 island high school students. Business Partner: Kings Market Tickets: Adult $16; Student Reserved $8; $5 Student RUSH

Weds.-Thurs., Jan. 27-28 • 7:30 pm On Book! Readers Theatre

COMMUNITY

NOTICES MONTHLY

CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP

Meets on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. at the Mullis Center

JAN 21

SAN JUAN COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION COMMISSION MEETING 8:40am Parks & Fair Admin meeting room, County Fairgrounds, 849A Argyle Road, Friday Harbor

JAN 23

AI WEIWEI TO OPEN “FAULT LINE” AT SJIMA The San Juan Islands Museum of Art (SJIMA) presents an exhibition of work by Ai Weiwei, one of the most influential artists and most closely followed dissident political voices in the world.

Sat., Jan. 23, 11am 540 Spring Street, Friday Harbor Your

Headqua rters

This bulletin board space, donated by Friday Harbor Drug Co. & The Journal of the San Juan Isla nds available to nonprofit com , is munity ser vice clubs, churches & organizations at no charge. To reser ve space, call Cherie Sarrett 8 days prior to publication at The JOURNAL: 378-5696.

110 Stories

Sarah Tuft’s drama captures the grief and resilience of New York City in the wake of September 11; directed by Julie Laidlaw FREE Admission.

For more event info or to purchase tickets:

www.sjctheatre.org SJCT Box Office: 378-3210

Prescriptions Gifts & Watches Toys & Candy 210 Spring Street Friday Harbor

378-4421


Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 13

The Journal of the San Juan Islands | SanJuanJournal.com 

IMA art show inspired by conflict in Mali By Anna V. Smith

Staff photo/ Anna V. Smith

Special to the Journal

Right: Artist Dana Lynn Louis.

Sometimes the most effective ways to make change in the world is not to focus on problems across the world, but rather the ones closest to home. Portland-based artist Dana Lynn Louis’ latest exhibit “As Above, So Below” implores audiences to consider the ways they can make an positive impact on the world. The show is inspired by nearly a decade of work Louis devoted to Ko-Falen, a cultural center in Bamako, Mali, which she also cofounded. Once civil war broke out in 2012, Louis had to leave. “As an artist, I feel that it’s my duty right now, instead of illuminating all the pain, to try to provide spaces where people can try to gain a sense of levity and hope, maybe feel inspired to take action,” Louis said about her exhibit at San Juan Island Museum of Art. “And that action could just being kind to each other, not necessarily traveling to another country and starting a non-

profit.” Louis’ present and past exhibits relate directly to people and their impact on the world around them. A 2014 exhibit in the Hoffman Gallery at Lewis and Clark College in Oregon called “Clearing” began after Louis worked at Oregon State Hospital, a psychiatric hospital where mentally ill inmates are treated, and felt that many of the patients needed to talk about themselves, what their hopes and dreams are. Contrary to what Louis expected, the patients were eager to talk to her, and she got an overwhelmingly positive response from them. “And I thought, you know, it’s not just people who are mentally ill or locked up that have hopes and dreams of what they wish were different, or regrets or whatnot. So that’s what inspired the envelope project with ‘Clearing,’” Louis said. That project, which started with a few sealed

THE REVENANT A frontiersman on a fur trading expedition in the 1820’s fights for survival after being mauled by a bear and left for dead by members of his own hunting team. Starring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hardy, Will Poulter

envelopes that contained people’s, wishes, hopes and dreams with a bit of mica affixed to the front, burgeoned into a total of 3,000 responses from all over the world. At the end of the project, the envelopes were burned, and just the bits of mica remained. The ceremony was live-streamed to people in Germany, Pakistan and beyond; anyone that contributed could watch. Components of the project make an appearance in the current installation, including the burn bowl with the mica pieces, the

video of the burning and a map with pins to mark all the countries that the envelopes came from. The current installation also has a number of hanging sculptures, and a painting on the glass of the atrium to integrate the very building into the exhibit. “My work at present is dealing with trying to create a bit of softness and care relative to the things that are going on around the planet right now, environmentally and culturally and socially,” Louis said. The painting that drapes across the glass walls of the

The Or when you

Thursday-Sunday, January 21-24 San Juan Community Theatre

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24-HOUR MOVIE LINE: 370-5666 STATE-OF-THE-ART PROJECTION All donations to PAL go directly to grant recipients. INFRARED SOUND FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED

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human world and animal world, I think there is a lot of potential if everyone felt like they could be powerful to work towards healing.” “As Above, So Below” opens Jan. 23 and runs until April 4 in the San Juan Islands Museum of Art atrium, open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday to Monday.

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We will be showing as many Oscar-nominated A HAND UP films as possible NOT A HAND OUT in the future You make a difference ★ Check out our Facebook page for the latest updates. when you round up your monthly www.facebook.com/FridayHarborPalaceTheatre?fref=ts ★ OPALCO bill to help a needy islander!

atrium resembles strings of beads, which Louis said was intentional, as stringing beads together has cultural significance in a number of cultures, such as prayer beads. “These really base acts have a lot of reverberation, and the potential for that to heal our communities, our countries, our worlds, the

Before you reach for the shovel or �ire up the backhoe, dial 811 to locate buried utility lines. Be Safe!

Connect to OPALCO read your Co-op Connector Ted Leche is celebrating his 90th birthday with a party on

Jan. 23, at Saint David’s Thedate pie andon coffee recepKeepChurch. up to tion is from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday. The church is on the happenings andchildren otherwill corner ofCo-op Park and Marguerite. All the Leche be home and celebrating with their father. help. Pleaseevents join us andlike greet winter Ted and hisoutage family. The Rev. It’s Edward also known as Father allD.inLeche, our III, e-newsletter. Ted, is Vicar Emeritus at Saint David’s Episcopal Church. Orcas & church Lightfrom Cooperative He served as thePower Vicar of the 1967-1988. He celebrated the 60th anniversary ofSubscribe his ordination as anat today Episcopal Priest last June. Read that story online at www. www.opalco.com/about/email-signup/ sanjuanjournal.com


PNW MarketPlace!

14 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016

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jobs Employment General

ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS WORK ORDER CLERK OPALCO is seeking a dependable and friendly team player with a good working knowledge of computer and office systems and the ability to learn quickly. Primary function is to organize and process work orders and perform administrative tasks in support of the Engineering & Operations department. Applicant must be well organized with a strong attention to detail, and have the ability to interact with people in a positive and tactful manner. Applicant must be skillful in creative and logical problem solving and the ability to work well with others. High school diploma or equivalent is required; must have the equivalent of at least one year of experience in administrative support. This is an Eastsound based, bargaining unit, full-time position. Salary and benefits are competitive. Applicants may obtain a detailed job description and employment application online at www.opalco.com. Please submit your cover letter, professional resume, employment application and references to Bev Madan (bmadan@opalco.com). Position is open until filled

Immediate Hotel Openings! The Island Inn at 123 West Friday Harbor is looking for an EXPERIENCE AMBASSADOR (a really friendly Front Desk person)! As an Experience Ambassador, you’ll provide unbelievable guest service by phone, e-mail and INN person so you’ll need to be extremely positive, well-spoken and techsavvy. We ask that you live on San Juan Island with transportation to town, and also be really energetic and detail oriented. Apply online 123west.com/team.aspx

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MULTI-MEDIA ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT Be a part of the largest community news organization in Washington! Do you have a proven track record of success in sales and enjoy managing your own territory? Are you competitive and thrive in an energetic environment? Do you desire to work in an environment which offers uncapped earning opportunities? Are you interested in a fast paced, creative atmosphere where you can use your sales expertise to provide consultative print and digital solutions? If you answered YES to the above, then we are looking for you! The Journal of the San Juans, in beautiful Friday Harbor in the San Juan Islands of Washington State, is looking for self-motivated, results-driven people interested in a multi-media sales career. As part of our sales team you are expected to maintain and grow existing client relationships, as well as develop new client relationships. The successful candidate will also be goal oriented, have organizational skills that enable you to manage multiple deadlines, provide great consultative sales and excellent customer service. If you have these skills, and enjoy playing a pro-active part in impacting your local businesses financial success with advertising solutions, please email your resume and cover letter to:

Port of Friday Harbor BOOKKEEPER/ ACCOUNTING CLERK. Full time employment, wage $23-$26/hr. DOE. Full benefits. Job description and application form on website portfridayharbor.org Applications accepted until 5pm 1/31/16. Position open until filled. (360)378-2688 or phyllisj@ portfridayharbor.org

The Eastsound Sewer & Water District (ESWD) has an immediate opening for an ADMINISTRATIVE / OFFICE ASSISTANT with experience in financial billing & receipting. The District is looking for a highly motivated person who is willing to learn all aspects of administrating a utility district. The position will begin at half time and may become full time. The employee will work under the direction of the Eastsound Sewer & Water District Office Manager. The position will begin at four (4) hours per day, Monday through Friday. The hours may be flexible between 9AM and 4PM. The employee will answer the telephone, take messages, answer questions, refer callers to the appropriate person, learn all computer processes including data entry, account management, billing, receipting and other functions as assigned or changed by the Office Manager. Microsoft Office experience is a must. Experience preferred with the above tasks along with a history of accuracy, timeliness, and a cooperative attitude. Starting salary is dependent on experience and may be adjusted after a six month probationary period . The position may also include some benefits after this trial period. Please submit a copy of your resume along with a cover letter to: Eastsound Sewer & Water District P.O. Box 640 Eastsound, WA 98245 Or, email your resume and cover letter to: eastsoundsewer@rockisland.com

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This position receives a base salary plus commissions and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off, and 401K. Position requires use of your personal vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance.

Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employee (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Truck Driver Needed Full time experienced truck driver needed, class A CDL with current medical card. Drug freen environment, good pay & benefits. Please call Island Excavating for an appointment.

(360)376-2122

Roche Harbor Resort Now hiring HOUSEKEEPERS Seeking experienced housekeepers to join our team, for year round positions. Responsibilities include cleaning guest rooms, public areas, and processing laundry. Must be a team player with attention to detail. Wage $11-$14/hour DOE. Apply online at www.rocheharbor.com/jobs or send email to the new lodging manager at lodgingmgr@ rocheharbor.com lodgingmgr@rocheharbor.com

San Juan County is seeking an ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST I based in Friday Harbor. For a detailed job description and application materials. visit www.sanjuanco.com or call 360-370-7403. Open until filled. First Screening on January 22, 2016. EOE. San Juan County is seeking a SR. PROJECT ENGINEER based in Friday Harbor. For a detailed job description and application materials. visit www.sanjuanco.com or call 360-370-7403. Open until filled. First Screening on February 4, 2016. EOE. Get the ball rolling... Call 800-388-2527 today.

Wanted Electrical Journeyman and or Apprentice. Call Guard Electric 360-378-6640

Schools & Training

CUSTOMER SERVICE R E P R E S E N TAT I V E TRAINING! Online Training gets you job ready in months! FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE for those who qualify! HS Diploma/GED required. & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-512-7120 EARN YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA ONLINE. Accredited Affordable. Call Penn Foster High School: 855-781-1779 NEW YEAR, NEW AIRLINE CAREERS GET FAA certified Aviation Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students. Career placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-877-8180783 www.FixJets.com

Electronics

professional services Professional Services Legal Services

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegal alternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

home services Home Services Property Maintenance

All Things Basementy! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing, Finishing, Structural Repairs, Humidity and Mold Control FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-800-998-5574

Computers: $50. LED TV’s: $75. Italian made handbags: $15. Top brands designer dresses:$10. Liquidations from 200+ companies. Up to 90% off original wholesale. Visit: Webcloseout.com Get The Big Deal from DirecTV! Act Now$19.99/mo. Free 3Months of HBO, starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX. FREE GENIE HD/DVR Upgrade! 2014 NFL Sunday Ticket Included with Select Packages. New Customers Only. IV Support Holdings LLC- An authorized DirecTV Dealer. Some exclusions apply - Call for details 1-800-8974169

flea market Flea Market

$139 DINING ROOM SET w/4 chairs & leaf extension 360-376-8090 $139 SEWING Machine 1930’s by “White” in the classic cabinet. Great condition 360-376-8090. Mail Order

domestic services Domestic Services Adult/Elder Care

A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-7172905

stuff Electronics

Dish Network – Get MORE for LESS! Starting $19.99/month (for 12 months). PLUS Bundle & SAVE (Fast Internet for $15 more/month). 800-278-1401

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90% on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-418-8975, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. CPAP/BIPAP supplies at little or no cost from Allied Medical Supply Network! Fresh supplies delivered right to your door. Insurance may cover all costs. 800-902-9352 Emergencies can strike at any time. Wise Food Storage makes it easy to prepare with tasty, easyto-cook meals that have a 25-year shelf life. FREE SAMPLE. Call: 844-797-6877 VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! 50 Pills SPECIAL - $99.00. FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW! 844586-6399 Miscellaneous

SAVE ON HOME INSURANCE WITH CUSTOMIZED COVERAGE. Call for a free quote: 855-502-3293


The Journal of the San Juan Islands I SanJuanJournal.com

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Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 15

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

Wanted/Trade

Dogs

Dogs

Acorn Stairlifts. The AFFORDABLE solution to your stairs! **Limited time -$250 Off Your Stairlift Purchase!** Buy Direct & SAVE. Please call 1-800-304-4489 for FREE DVD and brochure.

KILL SCORPIONS! Buy Harris Scorpion Spray. Indoor/Outdoor, Odorless, Non-Staining. Effective results begin after spray dries. Available: The Home Depot, Homedepot.com, ACE Hardware

Wanted: LIVING KIDNEY DONOR, Give the “Gift of Life” and help save my son. To become a living donor, all you have to do is register online at “UW LIVING KIDNEY DONOR”/ Kidney Transplant team, you will be asked if you are doing this for someone specific, my son’s name is Aaron Douglas. Aaron is 47 years old, he has been on dialysis for 4 years, he is a single father and my only child, his blood type is O+ which can match up with all other types. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your consideration! If you have any question you can contact us at: (H) 425-434-0838 , or(C) 206-556-6324, or email: trcycles@hotmail.com

8 AUSTRALIAN Shepherd Pups. Pure Bred. Parents very docile and friendly! Mom on site. 5 males and 3 females. Tails & dew claws done. Shots & worming will be. Taking deposits now, will make good family pets! $425 for Tri-Colors; $500 for Blue Merles and Red Merles. Call: 360-631-6089 for more info.

AKC Poodle Puppies Teacups Females Brown/White Partis, Brown & Apricot. Males - Brown & White Partis. Full of Love and Kisses. Pre-Spoiled! Reserve your puff of love. 360-249-3612

BEST SALE EVER!!! Need New Carpet or Flooring??? All this Special Number for $250.00 off. Limited Time. Free In Home Estimate!! Call Empire Today@ 1-844369-3371 Find the Right Carpet, Flooring & Window Treatments. Ask about our 50% off specials & our Low Price Guarantee. Offer Expires Soon. Call now 1-888906-1887 GET HELP NOW! One Button Senior Medical Alert. Falls, Fires & Emergencies happen. 24/7 Protection. Only $14.99/mo. Call NOW 888-772-9801 Get the ball rolling... Call 800-388-2527 today.

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug killer Complete Treatment Program/Kit. Harris Mattress Covers add Extra Protection! Available: ACE Hardware. Buy Online: homedepot.com

Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-7156786 for $750 Off. Wanted/Trade

OLD GUITARS WANTED! Gibson, Martin, Fender, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-4010440

1.25 million readers make us a member of the largest suburban newspapers in Western Washington. Call us today to advertise. 800-388-2527

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Custom Homes

PUREBRED Maremma Puppies. Available Feb. 2016! Looking for loving, great working forever homes for these incredible puppies. Include microchips and vet check. Superior parents. $800. Please call Elizabeth at 360-273-8445 for more information.

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MINI Australian shepherd Purebred Puppy’s, raised with family, smart, loving. 1st shots, wormed. Many colors. $550 & up. 360.907.7410 AKC Beautiful Westie puppies. Mom/Dad on site and up to date on shots. Very loving, loyal breed. Great family pet. Pups come with 1st shots, dewormed & AKC papers. Health guarteed. Pups are available now. Details call Tami:Onalaska. 360-880-3345, or bakertami21@gmail.com

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garage sales - WA Garage/Moving Sales San Juan County Cape San Juan

ESTATE SALE, Sat. 23rd, 10am-2pm. Living room, bedroom furniture, electronics, tools, suncast portable tool storage’s, file cabinets, etc. Free Items!! 605 Cape Dr.,

ConsIGnMenT

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for more information or to place your ad.

MOTORHOME wanted. Ca$h Paid! I’ll consider all sizes / types including travel trailers & trucks. Please call Paul or Mary Ann 360-633-3113. Vehicles Wanted

DONATE YOUR CAR 866-616-6266. FAST FREE TOWING -24hr Response – 2015 Tax Deduction - UNITED BREAST CANCER FDN: Providing Breast Cancer Information & Support Programs Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1800-430-9398 Reach readers the daily newspapers miss when you advertise in the Classifieds. 1-800-388-2527 or www.SoundClassifieds.com

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• Window Treatments by Hunter Douglas Carpet, countertops, hardwood floors, Decorator vinyl floors,• ceramic tile,Shades decorator shades Serving the San Juan Islands for 30 years Serving the San Juans since 1980 Open By Appointment

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transportation

BUIldInG / ConTraCTInG

assIsTanCe

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Motorhomes

Call Jack Walker for an 360-468-2460 appointment at 468-2460

Located in Eastsound

ConsTrUCTIon

FloorInG F LOORING

InTerIors

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Mon-Sat 10-5, open Sundays 15 Second St, Friday Harbor • 360-378-3828

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183 Lopez Rd., Suite E | (360) 982-7429

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16 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016

www.soundclassifieds.com

The Journal of the San Juan Islands I SanJuanJournal.com

SAN JUAN COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES

San Juan County, as an Equal Opportunity Employer, does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status in the provision of services, in programs or activities or employment opportunities and benefits. Direct inquiries to Administrative Services at (360) 378-3870. TTD relay at 1-800-833-6388. NOTICE OF INTENT TO LEASE AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER PROPOSED LEASE FOR REAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT 520 SPRING STREET, FRIDAY HARBOR FOR THE PROVISION OF MENTAL HEALTH AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY TREATMENT SERVICES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the San Juan County Council will conduct a public hearing for the purpose of receiving testimony on a proposed lease of real property to Compass Health at 520 Spring Street, Friday Harbor, WA for the purpose of providing mental health and chemical dependency treatment services to low income citizens. The public hearing will be held in the Council

Hearing Room at 55 Second Street, Friday Harbor, Washington, on Tuesday, February 2, 2016, beginning at 9:15 a.m. The hearing may be continued from time to time and place to place as may be desired by the Council without additional written notice. At the hearing, members of the public will be invited to speak and/or provide written statements regarding the proposed lease. After the public testimony portion of the hearing has ended, the Council will deliberate and consider modifications to the lease that are proposed by members of the public, the county employees or Council members. The proposed lease may then be executed with or without modifications. The following is a summary of the

proposed lease. The property included in the proposed lease includes a 6,065 square foot office building with a parking lot and an enclosed area for garbage/recycling. The proposed lease will provide Compass Health with the use of the property and office space at 520 Spring Street, which is also identified as San Juan County Tax Parcel #351491507000, (with the exception of 657 square feet occupied by the County Department of Health & Community Services Prevention Coordinator) for the amount of $850.00 per month for 24 months with the option to renew for an additional year at a rate to be negotiated. This space will assist Compass Health in providing services to Medicaid eligible and other low income residents under the

terms and conditions of their contractual agreements with San Juan County, the North Sound Mental Health Administration and the Washington Department of Social and Health Services. All persons wishing to be heard on this matter are encouraged to attend. Written comments may be submitted in advance of the hearing by mail or at the hearing by delivery in person. Please deliver 5 copies of all written comments to the Clerk of the San Juan County Council at 55 Second Street, Friday Harbor or mail to 355 Court Street#1, Friday Harbor, WA 98250. The Resolutions are filed at the Office of the County Council, 55 Second Street, Friday Harbor, WA and may be inspected and copies obtained at the Council offices during

each business day between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The Resolution may also be viewed 24 hours a day at the County website at http://www.sanjuanco.com. For more information please contact the Clerk of the County Council at 360-370-7472 and/or Mark Tompkins, Director Health & Community Services at 370-3517. LEGAL NO. SJ678293 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands, The Islands’ Sounder January 20, 2016

NOTICE OF APPLICATIONS AND PUBLIC HEARINGS (Planning Commission – PC; Hearing Examiner – HEX; County Council Hearing Room - CCHR) Permit Number

Description

Tax Parcel Number, Project Location, and Island

POPNSP -15-0001

Current use “Farm & Ag Conservation” tax abatement program

463632007, 2687 West Valley Rd. San Juan Island

PPROV0 -15-0061

Vacation rental

PPROV0 -15-0062

Vacation rental

PPROV0 -15-0063

Vacation rental

PSJ00015-0002

Marine railway

Applicant/Agent Name and Address

States Inn and Ranch, Inc. c/o Thomas Sandstrom,PO Box 668, Friday Harbor, WA 98250 Mark and Cynthia Deerfield, 451332002, 164 Mount c/o John Dunning, PO Box 488, Dallas Road, San Juan Friday Harbor, WA 98250 350352002, 566 Richard Schuettge, Ridgedale Road, 566 Ridgedale Rd., San Juan Friday Harbor, WA 98250 William and Margaret Bangs c/o Permit Resources, Cory 260524002, 2277 Deer Harbor Rd, Orcas Island Harrington, PO Box 1001, Eastsound, WA 98245 Jen and Erik Johnson, c/o 352641005, 67 Loon Point Francine Shaw, PO Box 2112, Lane, San Juan Friday Harbor, WA 98250

Date of Date Application Complete

Other Required Permits, If known

Existing SEPA SEPA Project Hearing Hearing Hearing Environmental Threshold Comments Comments Body Place Date Documents DET End Date End Date

-

-

-

-

-

PC

CCHR

NEW DATE 2/19/16

12/28/15 12/28/15

-

-

Exempt

-

2/10/16

-

-

-

12/30/15 12/30/15

-

-

Exempt

-

2/10/16

-

-

-

12/31/15 12/31/15

-

-

Exempt

-

2/10/16

-

-

-

2/3/16

2/19/16

HEX

Key Bank

4/21/16

-

-

12/21/15 12/21/15 HPA, Corps

Biological Evaluation

DNS

General Permit for Env. DNS 2/2/16 Checklist Biosolids Mgmt. LAND USE DECISIONS: Hearing Examiner Decisions: www.sanjuanco.com/cdp/hearingexdecisions.aspx; Planning Commission decisions: http://www.sanjuanco.com/planning/planningcommissionactions.aspx County Council decisions: http://www.sanjuanco.com/council/ordinances.aspx and http://www.sanjuanco.com/council/resolutions.aspx BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED: Permits issued by the Department of Community Development are searchable at https://services.sanjuanco.com/Default.asp. Select “Citizen Services,” then “Permits and Inspections,” then “Permits Inquiry” and enter search parameters To search a date range, use two periods between the date entries, i.e., after “Issue Date,” enter 11/17/2014..11/21/2014 and after “Permit Status,” select “Issued.” This will return a table of permits issued for the date range in question. There is no need to enter a permit type, unless you want to narrow your search. There are also links available on our website. (San Juan County is providing this information as a public service, in recognition that there will be occasional down times due to system updates.) SEPA COMMENT AND APPEAL: Anyone desiring to comment on the SEPA Determination can do so by submitting a written statement to Community Development, PO Box 947 (135 Rhone St), Friday Harbor, WA. 98250 no later than the comment date specified above. The SEPA Determination may be appealed to the Hearing Examiner pursuant to SJCC 18.80.140 within 21 days of the date of the SEPA Determination. APPLICATION COMMENTS: Any file may be examined by appointment during regular business hours at the Community Development, located at 135 Rhone Street, Friday Harbor. Comment on Notices of Application can be submitted in writing to Community Development at P. O. Box 947, Friday Harbor, WA 98250, no later than the end date for project comments specified above. Requests for copies of project decisions or staff reports or requests to provide testimony in a public hearing for a project, may be made by contacting Community Development: (360) 378-2354 * (360) 378-2116 * Fax (360) 378-3922 dcd@sanjuanco.com NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS: Hearing Examiner meetings on San Juan Island start at 10:30 a.m., in the Key Bank, Downstairs, Garden Rroom, 95 Second Street, Friday Harbor. Planning Commission meetings begin at 8:45 am. In the County Council Hearing Room, 55 Second Street, Friday Harbor. Any person desiring to comment prior to the hearing should submit a written statement to Community Development, PO Box 947, Friday Harbor, WA. 98250. Written comments may also be submitted at the hearing. A copy of the staff report for a hearing may be obtained from Community Development seven days prior to the hearing. NOTICE OF PERMITS: Information regarding all land use and building permits is available on the County’s website. A link is available on the Community Development homepage at: sanjuanco.com/cdp LEGAL NO LEGAL NO. SJ1516069 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands, The Islands’ Sounder, JANUARY 20, 2016

PSEPA016-0001

Coverage under General Permit for Biosolids Mgmt.

173113004, 107 Firehouse Lane, Orcas

Washington Water Service Co. c/o Roy Stanton, 107 Firehouse 12/31/15 Lane, Eastsound, WA 98245

1/11/16

Measuring up to your expectations one ad at a time. Are you searching for a better job or a more reliable car? Have you outgrown your apartment? Are you looking to get rid of that old couch and chair sitting in the garage? Whether you’re buying or selling, Sound Classifieds has it all. From automobiles and employment to real estate and household goods, you’ll find everything you need in the Sound Classifieds.

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Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 17

TOWN OF FRIDAY HARBOR LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF APPLICATION COMPLETENESS and NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF NONSIGNIFICANCE APPLICATIONS: The Town of Friday Harbor has deemed the following Planned Residential Development and SEPA Checklist applications complete. The applications, received by Homes for Islanders for the project known as Maypole Meadows, are proposing to develop property that is approximately 3.15 acres in size into 20 residential lots and 1 stormwater detention lot. The property is known as tax parcel #351391420 and is located on the south side of Malcom Street, Friday Harbor, Washington. Other applications under review are: 1) Stormwater Site Plan Report and 2) Traffic impact Analysis. 30-DAY PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD: January 20, 2016 to February 18, 2016. Please hand mail or deliver specific written comments on this proposal to: Land Use Administrator, Michael Bertrand, Town of Friday Harbor Community Development Department, 60 Second Street, or PO Box 219, Friday Harbor, WA 98250 no later than 4:30 PM. Or if you have questions on this proposal, or

would like contact 360-378-2810 between 8:00 AM and 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday. SEPA DETERMINATION: The Town of Friday Harbor, as lead agency, has determined that this proposal does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An Environmental Impact Statement is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed SEPA Checklist and other information on file; this information is available to the public on request. This Determination of Non-Significance is issued under WAC 197-11-340. Appeals may be made to the Department of Ecology and all other applicable agencies with jurisdiction. This 14-day appeal period ends February 2, 2016 RESPONSIBLE OFFICIAL: Mike Bertrand, Land Use Administrator P O Box 219, Friday Harbor, WA 98250 LEGAL NO. FH678340 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands January 20, 27, 2016.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING(S) NOTICE IS GIVEN that the following Councils, Boards and Committees of the Town of Friday Harbor will hold their regularly scheduled meetings at the following times. Agenda(s) will be posted at Town Hall and on the Town website: www.fridayharbor.org. -Town Council - Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 12:00 and 5:30 p.m. -Friday Harbor Arts Commission Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. LEGAL NO. FH678337 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands January 20, 2016. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE SERVICES FOR ENGINEERING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT OF THE TUCKER AVENUE RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT PHASE II Town of Friday Harbor Public Works Department is seeking a Consultant to provide a full range of Design and Construction Management Services for a federally funded project to reconstruct 0.267 miles of Tucker Avenue between Harbor Street and University Road (milepost 0.127 to

0.394) in Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, Washington (referred to as Tucker Phase II). A complete Request for Proposals is available on our website at www.fridayharbor.org or by contacting Town Hall at (360) 378 - 2810. LEGAL NO. FH677014 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands January 13, 20, 27, 2016. The Town of Friday Harbor, P.O. Box 219, 60 Second Street, Friday Harbor, WA 98250, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Tucker Avenue Improvements, is located at Tucker Avenue between Guard Street and approximately 60 feet north of Harbor Street in Friday Harbor, in San Juan County. This project involves 1.25 acres of soil disturbance for curb, gutter, sidewalk, driveway repair, traffic control, illumination, stormwater, and pavement improvement construction activities. The receiving water is the Puget Sound. Any persons desiring to present their

views to the Department of Ecology regarding this application may do so in writing within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Comments shall be submitted to the department of Ecology. Any person interested in the department’s action on this application may notify the department of their interest within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173-201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater PO Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 LEGAL NO. FH678129 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands January 20, 27, 2016.

MISCELLANEOUS LEGAL NOTICES File No.: 7037.107009 Trustee: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Grantors: Gay J Rosenthal Grantee: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT Series 2006-2 Trust Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20051207032 Tax Parcel ID No.: 261612008000 Abbreviated Legal: A portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter and Government Lot 1, Section 16, Township 36 North, Range 2 West of W.M., San Juan Co.,

WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assis-

tance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/ind e x . c f m ? w e b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a rc h & s e a rc h -

state=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. On February 19, 2016, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the San Juan County Courthouse, 350 Court Street in the City of Friday Harbor, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of SAN JUAN, State of Wash-

ington: That portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter and Government Lot 1, Section 16, Township 36 North, Range 2 West of W.M., described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast Corner of said Section 16; thence along the Northerly boundary of said Section 16, North 89 34’33” West, 1,007.28 feet to THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING of the parcel to be described; thence leaving said Northerly boundary South 0 degrees 25’27” West, 310.28 feet to a point on the North boundary of parcel described in Instrument recorded under Auditor’s File No. 102930, records of said County; thence along said North boundary North 89 34’33”

We are community & daily newspapers in these Western Washington Locations: • King County • Kitsap County • Clallam County • Jefferson County • Okanogan County • Pierce County • Island County • San Juan County • Snohomish County • Whatcom County • Grays Harbor County Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. We offer a great work environment with opportunity for advancement along with a competitive benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401k.

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The Journal of the San Juan Islands I SanJuanJournal.com

MISCELLANEOUS LEGAL NOTICES West, 130.89 feet; thence South 45 07’32” West, 409.07 feet; thence South 66 07’13” West, 438.18 feet to a point on a centerline of an existing 20 foot wide roadway and utility easement; thence along said centerline, North 61 03’08” West, 30 feet to a stake numbered “18” for reference purposes; thence continuing along said centerline North 39 39’53” West, 202.70 feet; thence leaving said centerline North 64 06’09” East, 423.36 feet; thence North 54 57’09” East, 731.11 feet to the True Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO an easement for roadway, utility and pipeline, over, across and under portions of the said Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter and Government Lot 1; said easement being 20 feet in width and lying 10 feet on each side of the following described centerline Commencing at the Northeast Corner of said Section 16; thence South 1 45’ West, 172.84 feet; thence South 1 23’53” West, 291.0 feet; thence South 5 17’53” West, 207.86 feet; thence South 1 46’52” East, 350.70 feet to a point in the County Road and THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING of said centerline; thence said centerline running North 87 43’45” West, 85.88 feet; thence South 73 59’45” West, 124.71 feet; thence South 56 40’30” West, 85.19 feet; thence South 66 52’15” West, 106.75 feet; thence North 79 29’08” West, 229.10 feet; thence North 17 17’30” West, 255.44 feet; thence North 41 36’53” West, 120.68 feet; thence North 57 05’30” West 207.03 feet; thence North 86 26’45” West, 153.91 feet to a point designated as Point “A” for reference purposes; thence said centerline continuing South 14 25’45” West, 174.10 feet; thence South 60 06’ West, 153.18 feet; thence North 84 30’30” West, 283.27 feet; thence North 77 39’45” West, 169.96 feet; thence North 61 03’08” West, 146.98 feet to a stake numbered “18” for reference purposes; thence North 39 39’53” West, 202.70 feet; thence North 10 06’50” West, 57.57 feet; thence North 53 17’33” West, 168.28 feet; thence North 38 25’33” West, 134.54 feet; thence North 21 55’53” West, 144.21 feet; thence North 51 54’53” West, 75.0 feet to the point of termination of said centerline. TOGETHER WITH an easement 30 feet in width for ingress, egress and utilities as declared, granted, conveyed and described in Declaration of Easement, recorded November 30, 1978, in Volume 46 of Official Records, at page 273, under Auditor’s File No. 104650, and Amendment of Easement, recorded June 13, 1997, under Auditor’s File No. 97061302, records of San Juan County, Washington. TOGETHER WITH an non-exclusive easement for access and maintenance for a well, as established by Instrument recorded December 20, 2002, under Auditor’s File No. 2002 1230029, records of San Juan County, Washington. Situate in San Juan County, Washington. Commonly known as: 65 Crane Lane Eastsound, WA 98245 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/01/05, recorded on 12/07/05, under Auditor’s File No. 20051207032, records of SAN JUAN County, Washington, from Gay J. Rosenthal, A Single Woman., as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as designated nominee for Home123 Corporation, Beneficiary of the security instrument, its successors and assigns to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT Series 2006-2 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2014-1222008. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 10/13/2015. If reinstating after this date, please contact NWTS for the exact reinstatement amount. Monthly Payments $55,112.58 Lender’s Fees & Costs $1,190.00 Total Arrearage $56,302.58 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,125.00 Title Report $2,469.00 Statutory Mailings $24.25 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $80.00 Total Costs $3,712.25 Total Amount Due: $60,014.83 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $1,120,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/15, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Proper-

ty on February 19, 2016. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/08/16 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/08/16 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/08/16 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Gay J. Rosenthal 65 Crane Lane Eastsound, WA 98245 Gay J. Rosenthal 7743 Woodrow Wilson Drive Los Angeles, CA 90046 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Gay J. Rosenthal 65 Crane Lane East Sound, WA 98245 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Gay J. Rosenthal 7743 Woodrow Wilson Drive Los Angeles, WA 90046 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/11/15, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/11/15 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature 13555 SE 36th St. Suite 100 Bellevue, WA 98006 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.107009 Rosenthal, Gay J.) 1002.283056-File No. LEGAL NO. J677088 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 20, 2016 & February 10, 2016

In the King County District, East Division Court of the State of WA for King County, Rebecca M Strisower, Petitioner vs. Christopher A Brunton, Respondent. Case 151-00488. The State of WA to Christopher A Brunton: You are hereby summoned to appear on Jan 21, 2016 at 1:00pm at 1309 114th Ave. SE, Suite 100, Bellevue, WA 98004 and respond to the petition. If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you pursuant to the provisions of chapter 10.14 RCW, for a minimum of one year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: contact with, surveilling of or being within 100 yards of Petitioner and her residence. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing and ex parte order has been filed with the clerk of this court. Signed Rebecca M Strisower, Petitioner. LEGAL NO. J675680 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands January 6, 13, 20, 2016.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR SAN JUAN COUNTY Non-Probate Estate of: VERONICA C. INMAN, Deceased. NO. 16-4-05003-2 NON-PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.42.020 The notice agent named below has elected to give notice to creditors of the above-named decedent. As of the date of the filing of a copy of this notice with the court, the notice agent has no knowledge of any other person acting as notice agent or of the appointment of a personal representative of the decedent’s estate in the state of Washington. According to the records of the court as are available on the date of the filing of this notice with the court, a cause number regarding the decedent has not been issued to any other notice agent and a personal representative of the decedent’s estate has not been appointed. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 1142.070 by serving on or mailing to the notice agent or the notice agent’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the notice agent’s declaration and oath were filed. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the notice agent served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.42.020 (2)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.42.050 and 11.42.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 20, 2016 The notice agent declares under penalty of perjury under the laws of the state of Washington on this 11th day of January, 2016, at Friday Harbor, Washington that the foregoing is true and correct. Marilyn P. Hughes, Notice Agent Notice Agent: Marilyn P. Hughes Attorney for the Notice Agent: Thomas D. Sandstrom Address for Mailing or Service: Law Offices of Christon C. Skinner, P.S. PO Box 668 Friday Harbor, WA 98250 Court of Notice Agent’s oath and declaration and cause number: San Juan County Superior Court Cause No. 16-4-05003-2 LEGAL NO. J677966 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 20, 27, February 3, 2016. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SAN JUAN In Re the Estate of: PAUL T. SCHWEDLER, Deceased. No. 15 4 05070 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent that arose before the decedent’s death must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the personal representative’s attorney(s) at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided un-

der RCW 11.040.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.040.051 and 11.040.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 6, 2016. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Virginia L. Schwedler ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: 609 Cape Drive Friday Harbor, WA 98250 ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: GODDULANGLIE Margaret C. Langlie WSBA #12714 LEGAL NO. J675703 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 6, 13, 20, 2016. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SAN JUAN In Re the Estate of: DELBERT F. WEBB, Deceased. No. 15 4 05069 7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent that arose before the decedent’s death must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the personal representative’s attorney(s) at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.040.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.040.051 and 11.040.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 6, 2016. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Greg M. Webb ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: 1470 Homewood Road, # 90-I Seal Beach, CA 90740 ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: GODDULANGLIE Peter W. Goddu, WSBA #11833 LEGAL NO. J675358 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 6, 13, 20, 2016. IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SAN JUAN CAROLYN MORGAN CRAWFORD, Trustee of The Carolyn A Morgan Revocable Trust UDT January 10, 2002, Plaintiff, v. JAKE-THOMAS KAWIKA MCGUIRE and MEAGAN A. MCGUIRE, husband and wife; JOHN AND JANE DOES, Nos 1 through 5, unknown occupants of the subject real property; and all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described herein, Defendants. No. 15-2-05170-0 SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIM-

ING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after January 13, 2016, and defend the above-entitled action in the aboveentitled court, and answer the Complaint of Plaintiff Carolyn Morgan Crawford, Trustee of The Carolyn A Morgan Revocable Trust UDT January 10, 2002, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff at his office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. In this action, Plaintiff seeks to foreclose Defendants interest in the property described as follows: PARCEL “A” (TPN 271414020000) Lot “B”, as shown, described and monumented on that certain Record of Survey for Andrea Johnson, recorded May 14, 1997 in Book 14 of Surveys, at page 68, under Auditor’s File No. 97051403, in the office of the Auditor of San Juan County, Washington, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 14, Township 37 North, Range 2 West, W.M. Situate in San Juan County, Washington. PARCEL “B” (TPN: 271452204000) Lot “C”, as shown, described and monumented on that certain Record of Survey for Andrea Johnson, recorded May 14, 1997 in Book 14 of Surveys, at page 68, under Auditor’s File No. 97051403, in the office of the Auditor of San Juan County, Washington, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 14, Township 37 North, Range 2 West, W.M.; and of Lot 4, Block 2 GIFFIN’S FIRST ADDITION TO EASTSOUND, according to plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 62, records of San Juan County, Washington. Situate in San Juan County, Washington. pursuant to those certain deeds of trusts, dated April 16, 2014, and recorded with the San Juan County Auditor under file #s 2014-0509008, 2014-0509009, and 2014-0509010, in which Defendants Jake-Thomas Kawika McGuire and Meagan A. McGuire are the Grantors and Plaintiff is the beneficiary. BRANDLI LAW PLLC Dated: January 6, 2016 By: /s/Stephen A. Brandli Stephen A. Brandli, WSBA #38201 Attorney for Plaintiff PO Box 850 Friday Harbor, WA 98250-0850 LEGAL NO. J677160 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 13, 20, 27, February 3, 10, 17, 2016. NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT Orcas Power & Light Cooperative is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the Rural Utilities Service (RUS), an agency of the US Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provision of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended; and the rules and regulations of the US Department of Agriculture. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/ complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter by mail at U.S. Department


The Journal of the San Juan Islands I SanJuanJournal.com

www.soundclassifieds.com

Wednesday, January 20, 2016 — 19

MISCELLANEOUS LEGAL NOTICES of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov. The person responsible for coordinating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts is Foster Hildreth, General Manager. LEGAL NO. J678179 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 20, 2016. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-15-680180-SW APN No.: 271531007000 Title Order No.: 150197560-WA-MSI Deed of Trust Grantor(s): DAVID D JOHNSON, HEATHER JOHNSON Deed of Trust Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2006 1130019 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 2/19/2016 , at 10:00 AM on the front steps of the main entrance to the San Juan County Courthouse, 350 Court Street #7, Friday Harbor, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of SAN JUAN, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 4, SHORT PLAT OF CEDARHILL LOT 4, A PRIVATE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN VOLUME 6 OF SHORT PLATS, AT PAGE 91 AND 91A IN THE OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF SAN JUAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, BEING A PORTION OF NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, W.M. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO THE COUNTY OF SAN JUAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON, FOR USE OF THE PUBLIC FOREVER, AS A PUBLIC ROAD AND HIGHWAY BY QUIT CLAIM DEED, RECORDED MAY 28, 1998, AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 19980528012, RECORDS OF SAN JUAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN SAN JUAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 409 CEDAR HILL ROAD, EASTSOUND, WA 98245 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/8/2006, recorded 11/30/2006, under 2006 1130019 records of SAN JUAN County, Washington , from DAVID D. JOHNSON, A MARRIED PERSON , as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Wells Fargo Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage PassThrough Certificates, Series 2007-4 . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follo wing amounts which are now in arrears: $23,710.48 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $431,715.27 , together with interest as provided in the Note from 1/1/2015 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described

real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/19/2016 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 2/8/2016 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 2/8/2016 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 2/8/2016 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME DAVID D. JOHNSON, A MARRIED PERSON ADDRESS 409 CEDAR HILL ROAD, EASTSOUND, WA 98245 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/20/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site:

http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/16/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-15-680180-SW IDSPub#0093435 1/20/2016 2/10/2016 LEGAL NO. J665005 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands January 20 and February 10, 2016. OPAL Community Land Trust Request for Qualifications General Contractor Eastsound, WA Request for Qualifications are currently being accepted by OPAL Community Land Trust from General Contractors for new construction and associated site work of 30 units of mixed income rental housing consisting of seven residential buildings and one Commons building. Property is located in Eastsound on Orcas Island. Deadline for submittals is 3:00pm on Friday, February 5, 2016. RFQ posted at www.opalclt.org/news or call OPAL Community Land Trust at 360-376-3191. OPAL Community Land Trust is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. LEGAL NO. SJ677317 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands, The Islands’ Sounder January 13, 20, 27, 2016.

Public Notice Accreditation The public is invited to provide commentary and statements on the qual-

ifications of Seattle Pacific University (SPU) as an accredited institution. SPU will be visited by a team of evaluators April 13-15, 2016, as part of its institutional accreditation process and comprehensive Year Seven Evaluation. SPU is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) and has been accredited by the NWCCU since 1936. The University was most recently reaffirmed in 2014 on the basis of a Year Three Evaluation which was expanded to include recommendations from a 2011 Year One Evaluation. Comments may be sent directly to the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities by mail at 8060 165th Ave NE, Suite 100, Redmond, WA 98052, or by phone at (425) 558-4224. Comments are considered by the evaluation committee with regard to an institution’s qualification for accreditation. Signed comments must be received by March 13, 2016, and will be forwarded to Seattle Pacific University, the members of the evaluation committee, and members of the Commission on Colleges. More information on the standards and process and Commission Policy A-5, Public Notification and Third Party Comments Regarding FullScale Evaluations, is available either via the Standards and Policies links on the Commission’s website (www.nwccu.org), or by contacting the Commission office directly. LEGAL NO. J678218 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 20, 2016. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO APPROPRIATE PUBLIC WATERS TAKE NOTICE: That Orcas Water Holdings, LLC of Eastsound, WASHINGTON on December 16, 2015, under Application No. S1-28812, filed for permit to appropriate public waters, subject to existing rights, from Cascade Lake in the amount of 4.01 cubic feet per second, for the purpose of hydropower generation. The source of the proposed appropriation is located in the NW¼ SE¼ of Section 31, Township 37 North, Range 1 West, W.M., San Juan County. Protests or objections to approval of this application must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections: protests must be accompanied with a fifty-dollar ($50.00) NON-REFUNDABLE recording fee (PLEASE REMIT CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ONLY) and filed with the Department of Ecology at the address shown below, within thirty (30) days from January 20, 2016 DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY CASHIERING OFFICE - NWRO-WR PO BOX 47611 OLYMPIA WA 98504-7611 LEGAL NO. J676646 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 13, 20, 2016. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO CHANGE AN EXISTING WATER RIGHT TAKE NOTICE: That North Lopez Services, Inc. of Lopez Island, Washington on January 6, 2016, filed an application of change to Ground Water Permit G1-00701P. Current permitted use is for 30 gallons per minute (gpm) and 18 acre-feet per year for multiple domestic supply, with a priority date of July 31, 1970. The point of withdrawal is located in the SE¼ SE¼ of Section 2, Township 35N, Range 2W, W.M., in San Juan County. The existing place of use is Government Lot 1 within Section 36, Township 36N, Range 2W, W.M. The request here is to reduce the permitted instantaneous rate to 4 gpm and the annual volume to 0.5 acre-feet per year. Also, to change

the place of use to the lands of Lopez Island lying within San Juan County as follows: T36N, R2W • NE¼ & SE¼ of SE¼, Section 35 • SW¼ of NW¼ and NW¼ & SW¼ of SW¼, Section 36 T35N, R2W • NW¼, SW¼, & SE¼ of NW¼, Section 1 • NW¼ & NE¼ of SW¼, Section 1, except for lands south of Port Stanley Road • NE¼ & SE¼ of NE¼, Section 2 • NE¼ of SW¼, Section 2 • SE¼, Section 2, except for lands east of Ferry Road • SE¼ of SE¼ of NW¼ of NW¼, Section 12 Protests or objections to approval of this application must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections: protests must be accompanied with a fifty-dollar ($50.00) NONREFUNDABLE recording fee (PLEASE REMIT CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ONLY) and filed with the Department of Ecology at the address shown below, within thirty (30) days from January 27, 2016. DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY CASHIERING OFFICE - NWRO-WR PO BOX 47611 OLYMPIA WA 98504-7611 LEGAL NO. J678561 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 20, 27, 2016. SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF SAN JUAN In the Matter of the Estate: DAVID AUSTIN DOWNING, Deceased. Probate No. 16-4-05002-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.020, 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorneys of record at the address stated below, a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty (30) days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditors as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the probate assets and non-probate assets of the Decedent. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 13, 2016. Linda Webb Downing, Personal Representative c/o Law Office of Douglas F. Strandberg, P.S. 245 Blair Street P.O. Box 547 Friday Harbor, WA 98250 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/Douglas F. Strandberg Douglas F. Strandberg, WSBA #926 245 Blair Street P.O. Box 547 Friday Harbor, WA 98250 LEGAL NO. J677325 Published: The Journal of the San Juan Islands. January 13, 20, 27, 2016

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20 — Wednesday, January 20, 2016 

Baney is EMT of the month – Submitted by San Juan EMS

Brandon Baney has been a part of San Juan Island EMS since the fall of 2013 and a nationally registered EMT since May 2014. Baney also volunteers for the fire department. He finished his Fire Fighter 2 Certification in 2013 and also responds as a wildland firefighter. He has worked as a foreman for Mike Carlson Enterprises since 2005. You may have seen him running the show on the Blair Street

project. He looks forward to graduating from the University of Phoenix, Online School of Business in 2017. He juggles all this while also being a father of two children. “I love the excitement of EMS and the satisfaction of leaving a call with a good feeling I made someone’s bad day better,” Baney said. We appreciate Brandon’s easy smile and commitment to this communities emergency services needs.

Basketball and wrestling update By Courtney Oldwyn Special to the Journal

Wrestling

Wolverine’s wrestling team competed in the King of the Mountain tournament this past Saturday in Darrington, and came away with multiple wins. Junior James Guard took second place in the 113 pound weight class, and fellow Junior Jesse Payne placed third, weighing in at 120. Seniors Ben Ware and Thomas Synoground placed third and fourth in their respective weight classes. Sophomore wrestler Wade Swirtz took sixth at 145 pounds.

Junior Hunter Rustad was out this week with a knee injury, but coach Taine Pyle is hopeful he will back on the mat this coming Wednesday Jan. 20 when the team wrestles in their final home match of the season against Concrete, Darrington and LaConner.

Girls basketball

The Lady Wolverine’s Varsity basketball team won one and lost one this past week. On Tuesday, Jan 12, the girl’s played Cedar Park Christian at home and came away with a 20 point win. The final score was 45-25. Once again LaConner proved tough

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to beat and the Wolverines couldn’t quite pull out a win in Friday’s away game, losing 46-25 on Jan. 15

Boys basketball

Friday Harbor Boys’ Basketball scored big in a blow out game against Cedar Park Christian last Tuesday, Jan. 12, winning the home game 59-15. Cross town rival LaConner won the away game Friday, Jan. 15 with a final score of 61-55. The Wolverine’s play an away game at Concrete this coming Thursday Jan. 21 at 3:30 p.m.

Pet of the week It’s the darndest thing. I’m strikingly handsome, I’m friendly, good-natured, affectionate and I don’t snore. I’ve got a very fancy pedigree – I am a Russian Blue/British Short Hair mix. Can someone explain to me why I’ve been here at the animal shelter for over six months? I’ve watched cats much less attractive than me get adopted into great homes and yet I’m still here waiting for someone to fall in love with me. What gives, Friday Harbor? Maybe you should come over to the animal shelter to meet me. I’m pretty sure you’re going to like me a lot. Just ask for me, “Smokie.” To contact the animal shelter call (360) 378-2158 or email pets2homes@interisland.net. To see other animals visit www.apsfh.com.

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Journal of the San Juans, January 20, 2016  

January 20, 2016 edition of the Journal of the San Juans

Journal of the San Juans, January 20, 2016  

January 20, 2016 edition of the Journal of the San Juans