Page 1

TONASKET HOLDS APPLE PIE

Tonasket Chamber Banquet

WRESTLING TOURNEY

Officer Installation & Awards Banquet at the CCC Thursday, Jan. 21.

See Page A8

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2016 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Strapped for cash, Tonasket declines stormwater funds

ICE FISHING FUN

TONASKET - Tonasket City Council members hit a deadline for approving or declining a standard loan of $27,500 along with a forgivable loan for the same amount from the Washington State Department of Ecology for a Stormwater Facility Plan. Mayor Patrick Plumb and members of the city council had tentatively accepted the offer made by the DOE for a Stormwater plan when the City was awarded the $27,500 forgivable loan in 2015, but still needed to sign an agreement to pay back a standard loan of the same amount. “At this time there are not funds in the budget for the loan payments,” advised City Clerk-Treasurer Alice Attwood,

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above, Members of the Bud Forthun family and friends attend the 12th Annual Northwest Ice Fishing Festival near Molson on Sidley Lake. The group makes it a tradition to fish every year in the tournament. This year Bud Forthun, seen here with his catch, took Oldest Angler at the awards ceremony that followed. Left, ice huts dotted Sidley Lake, perhaps more so this year than in years past. This Seahawk themed hut with a 12th Man flag won a special prize this year, the first for giving out prizes for the best hut.

SEE STORMWATER PG A9

Tonasket asking for school levy funds Seeking same rate as previous two-year levy BY KATIE TEACHOUT KTEACHOUT@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Voters in the Tonasket School District will be asked to vote Tuesday, February 9 on a two-year Replacement Maintenance and Operations levy for $1,690,224 at $3.49 per $1,000 of assessed property values. This is a replacement levy, not a new tax, and is set at the same rate as the 2014 levy. The current Maintenance and Operations (M&O) Levy supporting the district’s educational programs, maintenance and operations and technologies is set to expire at the end of 2016. The levy is vital for the maintenance of daily operations of the Tonasket Schools. The Tonasket School board recently

For full results of the contest, see page A9.

adding that an answer needed to be given to the DOE by the end of January. “If we don’t have the money to cover our obligation, how can we accept this (offer from DOE)?” asked Council member Jill Vugteveen. “Money is the ultimate factor here. We don’t have a fund for storm water here, so that’s not applicable.” In previous discussions, Plumb had proposed adding a $3 per month charge to every water and sewer customer inside the city limits that would raise about $14,000 and have a two-year ability to meet the obligation. Attwood expressed concern about adding a stormwater utili-

decided not to ask voters to approve a bond after the community was affected by wildfires this past summer. “We need the bond, but we can’t survive without the levy. My recommendation would be to postpone the bond; there is enough emotional angst in the community right now,” TSD Superintendent Steve McCullough said back in September. While the bond would have helped with capital improvements in the school district, the levy supports staff, curriculum, field trips, music art, PE, vocational programs, drama, athletics, FFA, technology, maintenance of the facility and much more. “It is an integral part of providing the high quality education your child receives at Tonasket Schools,” said McCullough, pointing out the recent public acknowledgment of this “high quality” the schools received. Tonasket

SEE LEVY PG A9

Fresh faces on Tonasket City Council BY KATIE TEACHOUT KTEACHOUT@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Two new members were sworn into service with Tonasket City Council at the Jan. 12 meeting. Jensen Sackman, who graduated from Tonasket High School last spring and is currently attending Wenatchee Valley College in Omak, said she decided to run for council because she didn’t know what she would like to do in the future and thought serving as a council member would be a good opportunity to expand her options. Sackman said an ASB class she took at THS helped her to feel comfortable in serving on the council. “I was secretary and V.P. of Publicity during high school, and ASB really helped me become comfortable with speaking to others and also being involved with my community,” said Sackman, adding, “I honestly don’t know what to expect during my time at council, but I am excited for this new learning experience.” Maria Moreno, also a recent graduate from Tonasket School District, said she ran for council because she wants to keep Tonasket a safe city for her daughters and neighbors to live in. “I want the Tonasket community to be more involved as a whole, and I couldn’t expect that without leading by

example,” said Moreno. “I want to make sure that our tax dollars are spent carefully and wisely. As a business owner in our community, I want to make sure the businesses all know they have support and I plan on advocating for them in the future.” Moreno is an owner of rental properties in town, and hoping to acquire more rentals. “I was born here in Okanogan County in 1993, and Tonasket is where I have always called home. I hope to raise my family here and retire here,” said Moreno. “Tonasket is where my two daughters go to school. I love Tonasket for various reasons, not limited to its natural beauty, its quality of life, quality of education for my children, and most importantly because of its people.” Claire Jeffko has been serving for two and a half years, “and I have four or more to go,” Jeffko said after being sworn in to serve again. Jeffko said she chooses to serve on city council for several reasons. “Firstly, I owe it to my community to serve. Secondly, I know I don’t make a whole lot of difference in our state and national venues, but I can and do make a difference in my town and county,” said Jeffko. “I wish more folks would run for the office. One gets an entirely different perspective sitting up there. And the knowledge I gain from my constituents

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 112 No. 3

is valuable.” The council approved a motion to allow the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce to install a privately-installed coin-operated water meter at the RV park across from Beyer’s Market. Chamber member Dave Kester presented the need for the meter, as the Chamber has been paying the extra charges on their water bill when people who aren’t registered guests at the RV park fill up personal water tanks and jugs. “This is an ongoing problem,” said Council member Vugteveen. “I hate to see the Chamber struggle, as it is a huge bill for them monthly.” Kester advised the city to either purchase their own meter or shut off the water in the summer at public sites where people have been taking water without a purchasing a permit or not correctly keeping track of the water they take. “The people who are doing it aren’t going to stop. They will come and get it from you once they can’t get it from us,” warned Kester. City Maintenance Supervisor Hugh Jensen said he has been working with City Engineer Jeff Moran of Varela and Associates on the problem. Part of Moran’s duties with the city is to design water and sewer improvements with the city. “He is coming over this month and

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Janet Sackman, a recent graduate of Tonasket High School, is sworn in to the Tonasket City Council by Clerk Alice Attwood at the council’s first meeting of 2016. we will look at different spots; we’re looking at something for a larger facility. Some people come in with a 250-gallon tank and fill that. Most people have five-gallon and one-gallon jugs; they fill them up and away they go,” said Jensen. “But I caught a guy at History Park with 100 feet of garden hose filling up from a spigot down there.”

SEE COUNCIL| PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US

Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com katherine@gazette-tribune.com / ext. 5052 Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

The council opted to wait to hear back from Moran before deciding whether or not to purchase a meter. Kester said the Chamber looked at a meter for $900 that accepts coins only, but decided to purchase one that also accepts dollar bills and costs $2300.

Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

A3 A4 A5

Calendar Classifieds Real Estate

A5 A6-7 A7

Sports Obituaries

A8-9 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 21, 2016

LOCAL NEWS FRESH FACES | FROM A1

Katie Teachoutstaff photo

Maria Moreno takes the oath Kester estimated the final cost with taxes, installation and other expenses to be between $3,900$4,000.

CONSIDERS ADDITIONAL ANNEXATION City Planner Kurt Danison said he is hoping the Utilities and Transportation Commission will approve a simple railroad crossing at Chief Tonasket Park at an upcoming UTC meeting Feb. 3. “I’ve prepared a strategy on annexation, and suggest we notify all landowners in the area, and follow the same process as we did in the Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive annexation,” Danison said as he provided the council with a list of 34 property owners in an area west of Highway 97 connected to the crossing. “If we want the funding, it requires improvements be made in city limits. The first step is to invite landowners to an informational meeting,” said Danison. “Most of those lands are occu-

pied, so we need to see if the folks in that area would be willing to be annexed. If council wants to go in that direction, we will send out a letter to them in the next week or so.” City Clerk and Treasurer Alice Attwood suggested waiting until after the February meeting with the UTC before approaching the landowners so the city has all the facts to be presented to them. Danison said the Okanogan County Planning Commission will meet this week, with the main item on the agenda being to finish the master shoreline plan. “Other communities are already in the throes of doing their final submittals, so we will learn from them, and hear the comments they get back from the DOE,” said Danison. Danison said the Okanogan Council of Governments (OCOG) met Monday, Jan. 11 and the Department of Transportation would be changing the way the organization is funded, as it is no longer a regional transportation organization. “We will now have to compete for funds to do projects, and there is no longer any funding for administration,” said Danison, adding that he hoped to finish the regional plan by the end of June. Danison introduced Michael Guss, the new Executive Director of North Central Washington Economic Development District, who came up from Cashmere to present information to the city council. Guss began working for the NCWEDD this past June, and prior to that he worked as a program manager for the Western Nevada Development District. He worked the last two years

Oroville Booster Club says...

THANK YOU

STORMWATER | FROM A1 as the rural liaison for Nevada Congressman Steven Horsford. The NCWEDD, whose offices are in Wenatchee, is made up of Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan counties. “We were just starting the process of looking at the economic impact of the 2104 fires when everything burned again. Before it was primarily Chelan, Pateros and Winthrop, but now literally every community has been impacted,” said Guss, who said there is federal funding available for some projects, as long as there is an economic connection. “In the past we ranked projects, but we are no longer going to do that,” said Guss. “Projects don’t go anywhere unless they have state or local nonfederal matching funds.” Guss said NCWEDD was working with the same agency that dealt with the Oso tragedy, “and I have gotten nothing but good referrals about them.” He said there were two parts to the fire recovery plan; engagement of the public and data collection of the impact, as it affected different communities in different ways. “I keep being asked what the impact to the city of Tonasket is, and I can’t honestly say,” said Plumb, “so this would be helpful to define that.” Guss said part of the contract with the firm is to publish a web-

site which will show 2013 data as a baseline before the fires struck. The City of Tonasket is a member of the NCWEDD at a cost of $250 per year. “I would like to continue to remind Wenatchee we are part of this; 97 does come all the way up here,” said Plumb. “There are going to be more fires and we will learn from this. I was just talking with Buffalo Mazzetti and he pointed out we learned a lot from the Barker Mountain Fire in 1985. You don’t understand the business community needs until you see the data.” “Twisp, Winthrop and Pateros are all committed, and we have a reasonably good buy-in throughout the county,” said Guss. Plumb thanked Guss for coming to the meeting. “You are a breath of fresh air to come all the way up here,” said Plumb. In other city business, the council voted to approve installation of an electric car charging station at the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center. Plug-In North Central Washington will be gifting the city with a free 80A charger, monitor and signage. The mayor and council chose Tuesday, Jan. 19 for their annual council goal-setting retreat. They will be meeting at the Kuhler at 6 p.m. The meeting is open to the public..

ty charge to the already increased water and sewer funds. “The timing is poor. We discussed going higher than the ten percent increase, but Alice (Attwood) and (Maintenance Supervisor) Hugh (Jensen) both advised against it,” said Plumb. “Once you have to start borrowing money to maintain service, your business is in trouble.” “We need to recover from the cost of the pump going out that drained our reserve funds before we take on any added expense,” said Vugteveen, adding that she didn’t feel the city should have to bear the burden of the entire cost of the stormwater project, as the flooding was partly caused by the DOT continually adding asphalt to the surface of the roads; causing additional runoff. “Maybe we could build some sort of storage facility on Third and Fourth Street,” said Plumb, adding that Jensen had identified some things he could do in-house. “The DOE offer of 50 percent (payment on the project) is great, but not enough. We are in an economically distressed area, especially after the wildfires two years in a row,” said Plumb. Council member Claire Jeffko said she was approached by a

business owner who came to her very upset about their business repeatedly flooding. “Somthing has got to change,” said Jeffko. “If you look at the curb in front of the Yoga Shop, the curb is virtually gone after the DOT raising the road.” “In the last three or four years, we’ve had more flash water than I’ve seen in the first 30 years I’ve been here,” said Jensen. “We are dependent on outside services helping us with this,” said Plumb. “I concur we can’t spend $27,500 we don’t have.” “This council supports creating that storm water fund; it’s just not something we can do right now,” said Vugteveen. Plumb advised the council vote on whether or not to accept the grant from DOE, so it would free the money up for another community if Tonasket wasn’t going to use it. Jeffko moved to decline the loan from the DOE, and it was seconded by Council member Dennis Brown. “Well that was sad,” sighed Plumb. The mayor and council chose Tuesday, January 19 for their annual council goal-setting retreat. They will be meeting at the Kuhler at 6 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Annual 2016 NW Ice Fishing Festival

THANK YOU

This event was sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce and hosted by the Molson Grange.

to all of our Sponsors, Volunteers and Community! Thank you for making our auctions a success! Auction proceeds benefit our local youth! Nulton Irrigation Les Schwab St. Enterprises Lakeside Storage Jim Prince Tamara Porter Shayne Thacker Blossom and Briar Massage by Leah Kally Berlinger Teresa Hawkins / Scrap it Up Beanblossom’s Neal’s Auto Body & Glass Egerton Orchards Don Pickering Remax Lake & Country Gordon Wooley Trucking Reman and Reload VIP Insurance / Mike Bourn Hughes Department Store Discount Fireworks Rob and Karen Monroe Jerry and Marcy King Umpqua Bank The Gazette Tribune Liberty Orchards Oroville Farmers Market John and Susan Marcille Hughes Woodworks The Trading Post Jennifer Burgard Oroville Golf Club St. Andrews at the lake Steve and Val Johnston Leanore Egerton The Pastime Bar and Grill Corey Murray Dave and Jaden Taber Best Deals D.L ll Life Eric Peterson D&R Glassworks Lefty Youglich Walnut Beach Resort Carol Byrum John and Cori Hilderbrand Silverwood Theme Park Ameristay Zosel lumber Veranda Beach Sunrise Inn Golden Chopsticks Debbie McCall Rattlesnake Canyon Sun Mountain Lodge The Oliver Theater Northwest Whole Sales Kootenai River Inn Oroville Youth Football Heart Hair & Nails Double G Farms Nathan Thompson Shine like You

Jack Hammer Productions Roberto’s Gelato Sheila’s Shoppe Humdinger Designs Sun Cove Resort Alpine Brewery Barbara Henderson Spence Higby Ship it to Us The Brown Jug Tam & Joyce Hutchinson Harold & Chris Jensen Cachola Family Walter Arnold Tony Lopez Joyce Callison Sam Bjellend Choice Auto Expressions Espresso Walter & Lindsey Acord Tedi Fletcher Dirty Paws Java Junkie Ed & Daphne Booker Cockle Custom Welding North Country Sales Tom & Diane Acord Osoyoos Ready-Mix Big Pink Ink Tattoos Oroville Building Supply Rivers Edge Embroidery The American Legion Okanogan Estates Best Western Duty Free America Thompson Bees Steve Blackler Debbie Call Oroville Pharmacy Rob Lawrence Tonasket Subway Matt & Robin Shellenbarger Garrett Construction Sierra Flooring B.C Devin Durkee Victoria and Brant Hinze OK Chevrolet Darcy Rounds Arnie Marchand Ryan Smith Double ‘A’ Logging Spokane Pump Okanogan Estates Brenda Whitehill Susan & Ted Christensen Joyce Forrester Kathy Jones Brian & Shelly Martin Kimmell Kismet Paula Mullikan Ken Neal Gordie & Andrea Cockle

You’re the greatest!

Sponsors cover prize amounts for Fishing Tournament and Pine Car Derby, fee for permit, advertising, plowing, EMT meals, office supplies, and other expenses. They included: Gold Sponsors: Kinross & Midway Building Supply Silver Sponsor: Mary Lou’s Hidden Treasures Bronze Sponsors: North American Wool Co-op Arm & Hammer Construction OK Chevrolet Car Derby Prizes Coulee Dam Federal Credit Union Tonasket Wells Fargo Bank Double ‘A’ Logging Prize Sponsors included:

The Grand raffle prize was the Camaray Package including two free nights in Jacuzzi Room, 30 Minute Massage from Jackie Daniels, a Bottle of Wine from Esther Bricques Winery & $50 gift certificate from Pastime Bar & Grill 7P Solutions Tonasket Feed Store Gazette-Tribune OK Chevrolet Akins Harvest Foods Nultons Irrigation Highland Stitchers Oroville Pharmacy Borderlands Historical Society Two Rebels Computer Techs Highlandia Jewelers Oroville Senior Citizens The Brown Jug Umpqua Bank Hometown Pizza Penny Cole Carol Cole US Bank, Tonasket Knob Hill Rancho Chico Community Auto Veranda Beach Resort Lani Thompson Sam Bjelland Coulee Dam Federal Credit Union Lee Franks Mercantile World of Gaia Subway Destination Osoyoos Reman & Reload Mary Lou’s Hidden Treasures The Split End Eden Valley Guest Ranch Wild Rose Floral Design North 40 Outfitters Tim’s Country Saw Shop Eden Valley Associates

A little about the army that put the festival on...

Tibbs Plumbing brought two bathrooms for the day at Sidley Lake, Pat Stice (Eden Valley Guest Ranch) operates the aerator at Sidley Lake and the Oroville Sportsmen Club, the one on Molson Lake. Marc Alden (7P Solutions) assisted by Larry Smith, Kay Sibley (Oroville VIC) and Arnie Marchand performed the sponsor and prize coordination. The Arts and Crafts Show, hall decorations, a coloring contest, and Bingo were all coordinated by Mary Lou Kriner (MaryLou’s Hidden Treasure’s). The Pinewood Derby was conducted by Robert and Steffi Fuchs with assistance from Clyde Andrews (Camaray Motel). The school parking lot plow job was by Dave Hilstad. The Okanogan County Road Crew managed by Mike Rairdan did a terrific job of plowing main roads and parking outlets at Sidley Lake. The huge Grange Hall was warm due to the fire team of Bob and Linda McDaniel operating the early 1900’s furnace. It takes 12 hours and a lot of wood stored by a huge group of Grangers and friends to warm up the whole hall (over 6000 square feet) in January. We appreciated the great breakfast by the Molson Grange and Lunch by our friends at Sitzmark. Bingo was by Molson Grange with Larry Smith as caller, assisted by Sandra Hilstad. Fishing registrars and raffle ticket sales were: Sandy Andrews (Camaray), Vicki Hart (Vicki’s Boutique) and Peggy Shaw (Umpqua). The fish judge was Dan Lepley and helpers. LifeLine Ambulance provided EMT and Aid Car service at Sidley Lake all day. Festival Chair was event founder, Robin Stice (Eden Valley Guest Ranch). Paperwork was by Robin Stice and Clyde Andrews. Advertising assistance was by North Cascades Broadcasting, Omak Chronicle and Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune funded in part with lodging tax dollars.

The 2017 NW Ice Fishing Festival is planned for January 14, 2017. Watch for news about an even larger Grand Prize!

See you next year!

Photos by Marcus Alden & Robin Stice


JANUARY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

COPS & COURTS COURTS CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Deena Jean Lazard, 27, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 12 to POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes occurred Dec. 26, 2014. In a second case, Lazard pleaded guilty Jan. 12 to POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. Those crimes occurred Oct. 28, 2015. Lazard was sentenced to a total of seven months in jail and fined a total of $2,621. The court issued Jan. 7 a criminal summons for James Leroy Spencer, 56, Okanogan, with DUI (felony), first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 24, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Martin Ray Hoffman Jr., 31, Tonasket, with forgery and third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 5. The court found probable cause to charge Jonathan B. McKinney, 42, Tonasket, with forgery, thirddegree theft and two counts of third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 30, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Christopher Loren Anguiano, 27, Oroville, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 6. The court fund probable cause to

charge Troy Steven Pierre, 19, Omak, with theft of a motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 31, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge William Christopher Taylor, 22, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 10.

JUVENILE

A 14-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 6 to minor in a public place exhibiting effects of liquor. The girl was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for three days served. The crime occurred Sept. 2, 2015. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 6 to POCS. The boy was sentenced to 20 days in detention with credit for 20 days served. The crime occurred Dec. 4, 2015. A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to third-degree theft. The crime occurred Aug. 7, 2105. In a second case, the same girl pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to firstdegree criminal trespassing. That crime occurred Aug. 13, 2015. The girl was sentenced to a four days in detention with credit for one day served. A 14-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The girl was sentenced to seven hours of community service converted to one day in detention with credit for one day served; and 14 days in detention with credit for 14 days served. The crime occurred Dec. 30, 2015. A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to POCS (marijua-

na) (with intent). The girl was sentenced to seven days in detention with credit for three days served. The crime occurred Oct. 23, 2015. A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to third-degree theft, obstruction and use of drug paraphernalia. The boy was sentenced to 25 days in detention with credit for 25 days served; and fined $5.20 in restitution to Wal-Mart. The crime occurred Dec. 4, 2015. A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to attempted residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. The boy was sentenced to 15 days in detention with credit for 13 days served. The crime occurred Jan. 1, 2016.

DISTRICT COURT

Jose Delfino Martinez Guerrero, 45, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Dustin Ryan Mathis, 26, Oroville, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Mathis was fined $200. Sidrac Mendoza Orozco, 30, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Mendoza Orozco was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $2,786. James Gregory Miller, 64, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Miller was fined $1,425. Chase Wayne Nicholson, 30, Omak, guilty of DUI. Nicholson was fined 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Devin Duran Palmenteer, 29, Omak, had two charges dismissed: POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams) and DUI. Palmenteer was fined $1,475.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Lana Lavon Rairdan, 54, Oroville, guilty of third-degree theft. Rairdan was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended and fined $468. Miguel Angel Ramirez Jr., 23, Omak, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Henry Floyd Robinson, 43, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Michael Stanley Rodom, 60, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and making a false or misleading statement to a public servant. Rodom was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 351 days suspended, and fined a total of $733. David Martin Roland, 39, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault and interfering with reporting (DV). The court dismissed an additional charge of interfering with reporting (DV). Roland was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,213.

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

FRIDAY, JAN. 15, 2016

Automobile theft on Ellisforde Church Rd. near Ellisforde. One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Theft on Seven Lakes Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Columbia St. in Omak. Threats on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Joseph Justin Roach, 70, booked for harassment (threats to kill), fourthdegree assault, DUI and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. David Raymond Brandon, 41, booked for a drug court violation. Delitha Gail Hahn, 38, DOC detainer. Brett Lawrence Giles, 25, DOC detainer, violation of a no-contact order and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order. Robert Charlie Atkins, 24, DOC detainer. Shane Lee Rich, 37, booked on three FTC warrants: two for DUI and one for trip permit violation.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13, 2016

Theft on Round Up Rd. near Oroville. Mail reported missing. Harassment on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on Bull Run Rd. near Tonasket. Weapons offense on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Harassment on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on 11th Ave. in Oroville. William Christopher Taylor Jr., 23, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia and two Omak Police Department FTC warrants, both for fourth-degree assault. Magen Amber Reeves, 24, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Troy Steven Pierre, 19, booked for theft of a motor vehicle and a DOC detainer.

One-vehicle crash on Pogue Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Public intoxication on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Jonathan Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Pine St. in Omak. Ezekiel Dan Zucati, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Benjamin Stewart Thomas, 31, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Christopher Milka, no middle name listed, 48, court commitment for DUI.

TUESDAY, JAN. 12, 2016

THURSDAY, JAN. 14, 2016

911 CALLS /JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JAN. 11, 2016

Fraud on Van Der Schelden Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Jaquish Rd. near Omak. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Soren Peterson Rd. near Omak. One-vehicle crash on Kermal Rd. near Omak. Assault on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket.

Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Kendall St. in Riverside. Theft on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Littering on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Kermel Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. One-vehicle rollover crash on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on

CHESAW

SATURDAY, JAN. 16, 2016

Violation of a no-contact order on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Tacoma St. in Okanogan. Harassment on Browns Hill Rd. near Wauconda. DUI on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan.

SEE COPS | PG A9

BEYERS

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

212 N Highway 97 • Tonasket WA

509-486-2183

MOLSON

Hours 8am - 8pm 7 Days A Week

Community Christian Fellowship

We gladly accept EBT Quest cards and WIC checks.

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

Family Pack!

Family Pack!

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Bone-In Assorted Cut Pork Loin Chops 100% Natural Pork

1

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

Boneless Beef Petite Sirloin Steak

lb.

CU$TOMER CA$H

®

298 lb.

Bring it Each Time You Visit Our Store

AWARD SECTION DO NOT TAMPER WITH SEAL

Every card is a WINNER! Name:

All cards are subject to verification and are void if tampered with in any way, illegible, mutilated, or if any materials contain mechanical, typographical, printing, or any other errors or if card obtained by unauthorized means. Void where prohibited by law.

WILD CARD wins groceries!

Win up to $1,000 in prizes instantly!

PLAY CUSTOMER CASH!

Pick Up Your FREE Rewards Card Today! Fill & win as many times as you want! WIN $1, $5, $10, $20, WILD CARD*, $ 50, $100, $500 or $1,000 in prizes! *Redeem a WILD CARD and all the groceries you just purchased are FREE!

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

68 Every Card is a Winner

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Lena Mary Oakes, 29, booked on an OCSO warrant for material witness. Garrett Thomas Peterson, 22, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: POCS, obstruction and thirddegree DWLS. Mark Freienmuth, 59, booked for third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Derrick Lynn Barrett, 33, booked for second-degree rape. Daryl Anthony McCraigie, 27, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI.

Spring Meadow Ln. near Oroville. One-vehicle crash on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Ferry St. in Omak. Fraud on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Fire on Riverside Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Wildwood Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Alex Gerardo Martinez Oros, 22, court commitment for DUI. David Glenn Ferrell, 33, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Ciara Marie Lasarte, 29, DOC detainer. Anthony Michael Lyons, 20, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 38, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for POCS (with intent) and a DOC secretary’s warrant.

Phone:

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

*NO PURCHASE NECESSARY (See participating store for individual store odds, awards available and complete rules.) © 2016 Store Marketing Associates, under license.

33

Russet Baking Potatoes

¢

A nice complement to a juicy steak!

Fuji Apples

Wonderful flavor! Northwest Grown Washington Extra Fancy

lb.

1

48 lb.

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming diversity and welcoming to all

Langers Juice Cocktail

4

2/$

Selected Vtys., 64-oz.

Western Family Yogurt

88

2/

Selected Vtys., 6-oz.

Family ¢ Western Paper Towels

3-Rolls Decorator Prints

199

— www.centerplacemarket.com — We reserve the right to limit quantities and to correct pricing errors. No sales to dealers. Not responsible for typographical errors.

Ad Effective Dates January 20 Thru 26, 2016


JANUARY 21, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Guest Editorial

Government needs to work better OPINION BY LEE H. HAMILTON

Whoever wins next November’s presidential election, it’s a sure bet that at some point he or she will vow to set the federal government on the straight and narrow. It’s a bracing sentiment. But you’ll want to take it with a grain of salt. Our history is filled with remarkable government accomplishments. Our involvement in World War II and hands-on approach to the postwar reconstruction of Europe and Japan, our role in ending the Cold War, the interstate highway system, extending the right to vote to all our citizens...There’s a long list of crucially important efforts the federal government has executed well. Yet every American ought also to be alarmed by an expanding list of missteps and blunders. In a report last month for the highly capable and too-little-noticed Volcker Alliance — whose goal is to improve government effectiveness — NYU Professor Paul C. Light drew attention to what he calls “a shocking acceleration in the federal government’s production of highly visible mistakes, Lee Hamilton miscalculations, and maladministration.” A moment’s reflection will call to mind a sobering litany of failure, from the inability to stop the 9/11 attacks to shortfalls in the care of our veterans. The reasons range from muddled policy or insufficient resources to outright misconduct, but the question isn’t really what or who is to blame. It’s how we turn things around and reverse the accelerating pace of breakdowns. To start, while a lot of hard work goes into creating policy on Capitol Hill and in the agencies, much less attention goes to how it will be carried out. Both branches need to focus on how they will assess effectiveness, anticipate problems, make sure that staffing is adequate, and provide necessary resources. Second, if making policy today is complicated, so is implementing it. This means that we need skillful people within the government to carry it out, which means hiring them, retaining them, and making sure they’re held to account with well-conceived metrics. Finally, too often these days the losers of a policy debate turn to torpedoing it. Some government failures aren’t the result of muddled policy, lack of leadership, or incompetence; they’re the result of what amounts to calculated sabotage. This needs to end. Most Americans want government to work well. When a policy is adopted, it needs to be executed effectively. Whoever our next President turns out to be, let’s hope he or she takes that charge seriously. Lee Hamilton is a Distinguished Scholar, Indiana University School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.

Editor’s Note: I’ll be back next week, just needed a break. Until then, I wanted to let our readers know that the response to our article about Hughes’ Department Store staying open has been huge both online at www.gazette-tribune.com and on social media. The response has been mostly positive with comments wishing Jack and Mary good luck, as well as pledging support. G.A.D.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Ted Cruz, naturalized or native born?

Dear Gary, Much has been made of Presidential candidate Ted Cruz’s eligibility for the office of President of the United States, and I would like to sort through all the dust that has been kicked up and clarify a few things. Since this is a matter of Constitutional law, we must first define the central terms of the dispute; namely: “natural born citizen” and “naturalized citizen.” Since 1891, Black’s Law Dictionary has been the turn-to/cornerstone for legal definitions. Black’s defines “natural born citizen” as: “The clause of the U.S. Constitution barring persons not born in the United States from the presidency.” Black’s also defines “naturalization” as: “The granting of citizenship to a foreign-born person under statutory authority.” Black’s further defines the “Naturalization Clause” of the Constitution as: “The provision (of the 14th Amendment) stating that every person born or naturalized (under statutory authority) in the United States is a citizen of the United States and of the state of residence.” Prior to the Civil War, the individual states of the Union determined the qualifications for citizenship within their jurisdictions-much as member nations of the European Union do today; a citizen of Germany does not become a citizen of Italy just because they are living or working in Italy—they remain citizens of Germany. After the passage of the 14th Amendment, the District of Columbia (D.C.) and Congress assumed those “citizenship” responsibilities so as to be able to provide citizenship status to the newly freed slaves who would not have met citizenship qualifications in many of the several states. This constitutional/statutory authority of D.C. was likewise extended to the territories and possessions of D.C. such as foreign U.S. embassies and military outposts and bases. Thus, those born in U.S. Territories or on military bases, etc., are considered to have been naturally born on U.S. soil. Now some background. American citizenship essentially began in 1776 with the Declaration of Independence and those individuals who signed it or swore allegiance to the Declaration and renounced their British citizenship and any loyalty to the King of England—a bold a life-changing event; and no one doubts the patriotism or citizenship of the signers, founders, or those at Valley Forge, or the many battles that ensued, who pledged their Lives, their Fortunes, and their Sacred Honor to the American cause and eventual victory over Britain in 1783. When the Founders met in 1787 to come up with a better alternative to the Articles of Confederation, the events and actions stemming from the 1765 Stamp act, the Boston Massacre, the Tea Party and other such events were fresh in the Founders’ minds and therefore certain strict requirements were established for Representatives, Senators, and President, so as to insure that these elected officials would be and remain loyal to the American cause which had been won at such high costs. Their great fear was that our government would be infiltrated and subverted to British rule from within by foreign influences, and so, strict age, citizenship, and residency requirements were set forth in the Constitution, namely: Representatives must be at least 25-years-old and a citizen (naturalized or natural born) for seven years; Senators must be at least 30-years-old and a citizen (naturalized or natural born) for nine years; and the President must be at least 35-years-old and a natural born citizen (notice: naturalized citizenship is not allowed here) for 14 years. The strictest loyalty/citizenship requirements were reserved for the President because he held the reigns of military power as

Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy and should Britain attempt to regain her lost Colonies (as Britain did during the war of 1812) the Founders wanted to be as certain as they possibly could be that the military destiny of the new nation would rest in sure, reliable, loyal, and trusted hands. John Marshall, our first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, laid out the policy that all disputes which might come before the Supreme Court must be interpreted with the intent of the Founders and the circumstances of our Nation’s birth firmly in mind—or as some would infer, by “Strict Construction.” To this end, the Court ruled in one of it’s first major cases, Marbury vs. Madison, that “All laws which are repugnant to the Constitution are null and void” from their inception. Justice Joseph Story, who was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Madison in 1811, served on that court for 35 years and left us with a wonderful early commentary on the Constitution published in 1833 in which he states in relation to the Presidential requirement of being a “natural born citizen”: “It is not too much to say, that no one, but a native citizen, ought ordinarily be entrusted with an office so vital to the safety and liberties of the people.” In summary, the statutory/naturalized citizenship of Ted Cruz, even though he was born in Canada, is not in question since his mother was a U.S. Citizen. Mr. Cruz is well qualified to serve as a Representative or Senator. However, with the obvious intent of the Founders and early commentary of the Supreme Court in mind, it is profoundly clear that Ted Cruz does not meet the Constitutional requirements to become President of the United States unless or until a majority of the several states approve an amendment to that fundamental “natural born citizen” clause of Article II, section 1, clause 5, of the United States Constitution. Mark Rabenold Tonasket, Washington

Tonasket Schools asking for levy support

Dear Gary, The Tonasket Schools are working hard now and also “building for the future”, constantly seeking to improve the quality and effectiveness of the education program for our children and families. Like our surrounding districts, we are once again asking for our community to continue their support for the maintenance of our grounds, buildings, innovative core programs and extra-curricular activities. Like all of our communities in the Okanogan, Tonasket has learned to survive and often times even thrive over the years, drawing on the many blessings of our area, including both the unique natural resources available to us and the resilience and creativity of the people. Of course we need every resource and bit of creativity we can get to meet the many challenges our families and businesses face every day, including mak-

ing a living in our rural economy, adapting to changing weather patterns, and learning to live in this rapidly changing world. The Tonasket schools work every day, K-12, to prepare our children to meet these challenges and also help them to appreciate and utilize the resources and strengths of the community in which they live. The Tonasket schools are counting on our voters to support our kids and our schools as they grow and meet the challenges of this changing, yet still beautiful world. Please vote “Yes! for our Maintenance and Operation levy, and remember to vote by Feb. 9th! Andy Jones, citizen Tonasket

Economic Roundtable this Thursday

Dear Gary, The economic downturn in the U.S. economy is hitting hard here in Oroville. Our Main Street is struggling from the lack of spendable Income in the hands of our people. Jobs are hard to find and often wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. We need local solutions from local people. To facilitate this process the Oroville Grange is hosting and Economic Round Table at the Grange 622 Fir St. Oroville on Saturday, Jan. 30. The Economic Round Table Schedule: 10 a.m.: Doors open for Registration, Socializing, Coffee and Doughnuts. 10:30 a.m.-11 a.m.: General discussion and Overview of current Economic conditions, Introductions by participants including current employment and ideas for the future. 11 a.m.-11:45 a.m.: Forestry and Mining Panel Discussion 12-12:30 p.m.: Lunch provided by Grange 12:45 p.m-1:30 p.m: Local Food Producers Panel Discussion (Small Farms, Farmers Market, Local Meat Producers, Orchards, Value-added Agriculture Products) 1:45 p.m-2:30 p.m.: Main St. Oroville (Ideas for new businesses and re-vitalizing existing businesses) 2:45 p.m.-3:30 p.m.: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism (Pacific Northwest Trail, yearround attractions, events to attract new visitors, guiding services, outfitters) 3:45 p.m- 4:30 p.m.: Service Contractors (Construction, Electric, Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning, Automotive) 4:30 p.m-5 p.m.: Concluding remarks and future plans for discussions and working groups. If you are unemployed or under-employed or are looking for a new way forward in planning your future economic security, plan to attend the Economic Round Table on Saturday, Jan. 30. By working together as a community we can solve the problems we face. WE hope to see you there. Contact Joseph Enzensperger 476-4072 or e-mail: jgenz4@gmail.com. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville Grange Master


JANUARY 21, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Flying there isn’t what it used to be Many times we hear things referred to as “The Good Ol’ Days,” Remember? Many times they really weren’t so good but they were different. For example, flying. In the “good old days” we’d decide to go see aunt Matilda, in Connecticut. So, we go to the airport and find out how much the ticket would cost. We look in our wallet and find that we don’t have enough money, so that’s it. We’ll have to save for a while and look into the facts again. But TODAY, we call the airport and find out the prices and it doesn’t matter how much it costs, we just say, “Put it on the Visa card.” And they say okay, and you give a date for going and they say, “arrive two hours before departure time.” The big day comes and away you go to the airport and you find a parking place, covered of course, and you can be sure it is as far away as it can get, and still be in the parking garage. So, you open the trunk, get out the suitcases, while your mate is frowning and thinking, “there is absolutely no sense taking this much luggage, to be gone two weeks. We’re just going for a visit, not moving, for crying out loud. So, onward and upward, dragging all the stuff and you secretly bless the guy who thought of putting wheels on suitcases. After you’re just about exhausted, you finally see

Lots of snow, so be sure to drive safely SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Well January has brought us much needed snow and I hope all make sure to drive safely while out and about. The Seahawks are out but will be back for us later this year. Remember the Eagles is a great place to come enjoy a good sporting event and the company of good friends. We would also like to say welcome back to the office to Sue Wisener and also a special thanks to Bev Montanye for her work in the back office. Tuesday will be our weekly Taco Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 7

Organic Produce Buying Club

the words you’ve been looking for, the airline desk, WAY down at the end of the building. If you look really old and tired and limp, noticeably, (all which is easily done) maybe a golf like cart will come whizzing by, loaded with happy, smiling faces, and you think, “darn, why didn’t I request one of those?” So, they call another cart and ask them to come and rescue these “poor ol’ folks”, so they do and take you even farther than you thought, and of course you hand them five bucks, or so, (as if they weren’t already being paid to do that job,) But, at least you got there before you collapsed. So, now you get down to the business. Need to see your I.D. So, you dig it out, and sure ‘nuff it’s you, they wanna know if you packed your own bag and has anyone, other than you had access to it. You assure them no one has, and you want to check one bag and have one carry-on, so you have your pills and other important things in your hand. So you put the I.D. card in it’s safety spot, with your money, and get in that line. Fine. You move about 80 feet and a different person wants to see your I.D. so you get it out again. Yep, it’s still you in the photo. So we move on and sure enough a third time, they want to see if it’s still you. So, this time I smarten up and think, “No sense putting that card away again, I’ll just put it in my pocket.”

TONASKET EAGLES p.m. So get on down here and enjoy some crisp or soft tacos. Bev Montanye will be here to make sure you get the most delicious tacos around. Wednesday the Pool League will be playing at 7 p.m. so come in and show your support for our teams and cheer a team on to victory. Bingo is back in full swing this Friday at 7 p.m. and will be a grand time as always. Get those daubers ready and come try for your chance at the large jackpot. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. on Friday to supply you with those scrumptious hamburgers and fries and other delights we all enjoy.

OROVILLE GRANGE

SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER MASTER, OROVILLE GRANGE

Our regular monthly meeting will take place on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016 at 6 p.m.. We will begin with a potluck meal sharing followed by our regular business meeting at 7 p.m. Items for discussion at the meeting will include: a discussion of insur-

MOVIES

ance, our new Organic Produce Buying Club Order and upcoming events for 2016. Guests and interested members of a community are welcome to attend. The plans for the Saturday, Jan. 30 Economic Roundtable at the Grange are taking shape. Registration will begin at 10 a.m. Coffee, tea and doughnuts will be provided. The Roundtable will begin with introductions and a short statement from each participant describing what they hope to

Oliver Theatre

250-498-2277 REGULAR SHOWTIMES Oliver, B.C. Sun.–Mon.–Tues.–Thurs.....7:30p.m. Fri.–Sat....7:00 &9:00p.m. (unless otherwise stated)

IN THE HEART OF THE SEA THURS - FRI.

PG

JAN 21-22 SHOWS 7 & 9:20PM

DADDY’S HOME

PG

OMAK THEATER

HAND-CARVED WOODEN

WILDLIFE PENS $5.99

PG13

93 min

SAT. *3:45, 6:45, 9:15 . SUN. *3:45, 6:45. MON.-THURS. 7:00.

Buy a Region or the Entire State!

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater PG13

ACTION/COMEDY - ICE CUBE, KEVIN HART. FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *3:15, 6:45, 9:45 SUN. *3:15, 6:45. MON.-THURS. 7:00.

THE REVENANT ADV.THRILLER. LEONARDO DICAPRIO, TOM HARDY 156 min FRI. 5:45, 9:15. SAT. *2:15, 5:45, 9:15 SUN..*2:30, 6:15. MON.-THURS. 6:30. R

13 HOURS: THE SECRET SOLDIERS OF BENHAZI

144 min R

HISTORICAL/ACTION - JOHN KRASINSKI, PABLO SCHREIBER. FRI. 6:00, 9:30. SAT. *2:30, 6:00, 9:30. SUN. *2:45, 6:30. MON-THURS 6:45 Adult $9.00

*Matinee $6.50

2.7 Million

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

So, we’re through that line and oop’s big belt, all by itself, and finally we’re I forgot my coat and that’s where the ready to try and find some transportaprecious ID card is. So, after turning the tion. That’s enough. You get the picture. coat wrong side out and shaking it, and I’ll bet you didn’t know that this no collapsible machine gun year May Day will be May fell out, we’re on our way to 14, the Saturday AFTER the plane and it’s raining... Mother’s Day. and that my friends is why Crazy geese could be you must allow two hours warm somewhere but stayed time for all these safety meain Oroville for the winter. sures of today. Why? Then you finally hear the Sometimes we have just engines rev-up and you start enough new snow to mess moving and just when you up the driveway and the TV decide you must be gonna dish. drive all the way to your I just wasn’t made for destination you hear a BIG THIS & THAT winter. I like barefoot...even roar and away we go off into Joyce Emry if the podiatrist does say it’s the wild blue yonder. All goes bad for your feet. well, and the big old bird Our dear friends Jing Ming and “Sholands and we unload and then we must find the luggage. It is, of course, WAY Sho” now have new names. It is “granddown at the other end of the terminal. ma and grandpa” as their daughter Grace So, by the time we get there, here are all and David have a little Isabella. Will she these basic black suitcases going ‘round be special or what? and round. Maybe yours has a pink ribA huge crowd filled the funeral chapel bon on it and you think, “Oh! There it last Saturday afternoon, paying their is but by the time you get close to the final respects to Mike Buckmiller. To belt, there it goes again. All the while, have touched so many people along the I’m thinking if my partner had let me get way is a fine tribute and Mike would the bright orange colored luggage, we’d have been very pleased at the size of the find it in a flash. So you look up and congregation. And not only did he leave here comes the basic black with the pink a lot of memories, his art work will last ribbons, but the folks won’t get out of forever. my way, and there it goes again, so we’ll I have just learned of the death of have to wait until it makes another cycle. And, so it goes. Next time I’m gonna get two long time members of the Molsonsomething besides black. Now, we have Oroville communities, that being Ruth all but one piece and of course we’re Leslie and Beverly (Nulton) Roth. It sure it is lost, so after a reasonable length seems winter does take its toll on some of time, and you’ve given up all hope, of our friends. ‘Til next week. here it comes, looking lonely on the

Hilltop mourns the lost of Ruth Leslie SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

It is with regrets that I must tell you of the passing of our dear long time friend Ruth Leslie at the age of 95, as of her last birthday in October. She will be missed by all who knew her. Her Service will be at the Grange Hall on Saturday, Jan. 23 at 2 p.m. Ham and scalloped potatoes will be provided. The rest of the meal will be potluck. So bring your best dish and visit with friends and relatives and say goodbye to our good friend. I was not able to attend the Ice Fishing Festival this year. So the information I give you here is sporadic and mostly just numbers. There were between 156 and 164 plates of pancakes sold. That is still the best Pancake Feed

One Call One Payment 509-476-3602

Request a free information kit today:

Call this Newspaper for Details

509.476.3602

HILLTOP COMMENTS around. More than 30 fish were caught. Kathy, Lani Thompson’s sister got third place in her division for her 28 ounce fish. Two guys from Brewster returned to the Grange Hall by 10:30 am, with their limits. One of those fishermen reported the First Fish of the day. Mary Lou Kriner was in charge of the Arts and Crafts tables. I was not able to speak to her prior to now, but I did talk to a couple of folks that had tales. The Highland Stitchers sold several handstitched tea towels and miscellaneous Seahawks items. The Knob Hill Club of Chesaw sold raffle tickets for the Fourth of July quilt, the rifle and their homemade baked goods. Sitzmark Folks served 80 (I think) lunches. The Pine Wood Derby was

held in the kitchen with divisions for both kids and adults. The youth division was won by Noah Alexander with the best looking car prize going to Mykle Jeffries. Aaron Willis had the fastest car in the adult division. Bingo was being played while they waited for the fishing report. The next Bingo night will be Friday, Feb. 5 at 7 p.m. in the Grange Hall. If you add up all of the numbers I have given to you here you will find all of those who attended had a good time and are making plans for next year. Catch – up time for the Pinochle winners for Monday, Jan 11. High Scores went to Del Wilder and Jan Harper. The Lows went to Darrel Bunch and Willie Penner. The Traveling went to Arleen Johnson with 37 players. The results for Jan. 4 were: Highs Larry Smith and Birdie Nelson the Lows went to Ray Visser and Shirlie Devereaux. No Traveling with 12 players present. Happy New Year.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Tonasket Chamber Banquet

TONASKET - The Tonasket Chamber of CommerceAwards Banquet and Auction is this Thursday, Jan. 21 at the Community Cultural Center at 411 Western Ave. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner is at 6 p.m. The function includes installation of the 2016 Chamber officers and the announcement of Citizen of the Year, Business of the Year, Organization of the Year and the Grand Marshals for the 2016 Founders Day Parade. There will also be both a silent and live auction. No host wine bar by Esther Bricques Winery. Tickets are $20 each and available for presale at Two Sisters, Lee Franks and Tonasket Interiors. For more information call Julie Alley at 509-486-1096 Tonasket Gun Club Trapshooting

TONASKET - Tonasket Gun Club trapshooting this Sunday Jan. 24 at 10 a.m. and runs weekly through February. There will be practice each Wednesday at 1 p.m. Club members will help new shooters. Our annual meeting will be Jan. 17 at 1 p.m.

Readers YOU NEED HELP – They need work. Oroville Gun Club Trapshooting Reach over 2 millionChoose readers with many a skills throughout Washington by advertising Region or Go your job in 106 Community Newspapers! OROVILLE - Inland NW Trapshooting at the Oroville Gun Statewide LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE BILL

Gift Cards Available!

102 min

Reach

We’ve Got You Covered

OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

RIDE ALONG 2

509-486-0615

TONASKET

Schedule for Fri Jan 22 - Thurs Jan 28 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

HORROR - NATALIE DORMER, STEPHANIE VOGT. FRI. 6:45, 9:15.

take away from the discussions. Following the first introductory remarks, we will break into groups discussing employment in five key areas: Forestry, Food Producers, Main Street Oroville, Outdoor Recreation and Tourism and Services Contractors. The Roundtable will end between 4 and 5pm after summary conclusions shared by the working groups. Lunch will be provided by the Grange to all participants. For more information on the Grange, its meetings or the upcoming Economic Forum, please contact Joseph Enzensperger, Grange Master at 509-476-4072 or email: jgenz4@ gmail.com

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

SAT. - SUN. – MON. – TUES. JAN. 23 - 24 - 25 - 26

THE FOREST

The Joker Poker drawing will be at 7 p.m. on Saturday and the pot is growing, so come see if you will be the next winner. Linda will be here Saturday also at 8 p.m. for karaoke and playing some tunes to get your feet in a dancing mood. Come enjoy some good music and singing and enjoy a wonderful Saturday night out. Sunday breakfast is back and will be cooking up that great food from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. Pinochle will be at 1 p.m. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows. Dave Russell took home first place and second place went to Wanda Sutherland. Ron Wisener grabbed the last pinochle of the day. Neil Fifer had low score of the day. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

312 S. Whitcomb

www.olivertheatre.ca

Didn’t need it again. Then, finally you’re given a boarding pass, with seat numbers, so then you look around and see if there is anyone you know, going where you’re going and sure ‘nuff there is, so you know you’re in the correct line and then you wait some more, and if you’re lucky and the attendant noticed how white your hair is, etc. she’ll write a big SP on your boarding pass and that means special boarding and that gives you permission to just pass up all those folks that are in line and as they give you dirty looks, just wave your SP card and away you go. Now, is when the real fun begins. Get in another line, get a plastic tub, put your carry-on stuff in it and remove your coat, so you need two tubs. Take everything out of your pockets.... Oh! good, there is where I put the I.D. card, so thinking I won’t need it again, back it goes, where it belongs in the wallet. Wrong! About this time you start wondering if you should go to the bathroom in the terminal or wait until on the plane, and then you remember just how small the airplane facility is, and there is always a waiting line there, too. If you’ve had a hip replacement, get under that archway. No, not that one. That’s for the ordinary folks. So under the archway we go and it buzzes and now she wonders if I’ve had a shoulder replacement. No, that’s probably the metal stays in my bra, so now we have to have a “pat down” but guess what, if you’re over 75, you don’t have to remove your shoes. Yeah! Now, put your feet on the yellow footprints. They are far apart and giant sized and short legged folks almost do the splits.

Club this Sunday, Jan. 24 at 1 p.m. and runs weekly to Feb. 28. Practice shooting is every Saturday at 1 p.m. The Oroville Gun Club will again raffle off a Henry Rifle or cash equivalent for first prize. Second is “the Family Gourmet Banquet from Omaha Steaks. Get raffle tickets from a club member or stop by Paul’s Service. School Choice Night

OROVILLE - The Second Annual School Choice Night will be Tuesday, Jan. 26 from 5-7 p.m. at the Oroville Public Library Annex. Refreshments. Call 509-485-2011 for more information. Pacific NW Trail Club

TONASKET - The Pacific

Northwest Trail Club will meet on Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 5 p.m.at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western, Tonasket. The are holding meetings down the Valley to encourage more participation from other communities. There will be a social hour and potluck dinner at 5 p.m. The regular Meeting will begin at 6 p.m. Agenda items for the meeting will include: 1) How to grow the membership; 2) Upcoming Benefit Concert, Feb. .27; 3) Trail Club in the Schools; 4) Summer Trail Crews; 5) Pacific Northwest Trail Days Aug. 6-7 and 6) Day Hikes and Trail Work Parties in 2016. For more info or interest contact Joseph Enzensperger 509-476-4072 or email: jgenz4@gmail.com Looking for Talent

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center is seeking local entertainers for the upcoming Talent Show on Saturday, Feb. 6. We would like children as well as adults and are looking for any kind of talent. The acts must be no longer than 10 minutes or the equivalent of two songs, dance routines, etc. Call Rick Braman at 509-476-2131 or the CCC at 509-486-1328 if you would like to sign up. OCTC Membership Meeting

OMAK - The Okanogan County Tourism Council invites people to join their colleagues in celebrating tourism in Okanogan Country on Wednesday, Feb. 3, at the 12 Tribes Resort & Casino in Omak, at 9:30 a.m. RSVP to Carolyn Davis at the office 509 826-5107 or cdavis@ economic-alliance.com by Jan. 29. This annual membership meeting helps to create opportunities to get to know others in the tourism industry and will increase your knowledge about how tourism is flourishing in the county and how, partnering and working together, can keep it growing. American Legion Crab Feed

OROVILLE - The Oroville American Legion, Hodges Post

#84, will be having their annual Crab Feed on Saturday, Feb. 13 starting at 5 p.m. in the Legion Hall. Tickets are available from R.L. “Louie” Wilson at 509-476-3438 or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique or the American Legion at the bar. Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509476-2386. Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board allows listing your event up to two weeks prior to the day/s it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. Our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. Place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking “Add an Event” on the homepage. Only items that are listed for the day/s and time period of occurrence will be approved. Do not list your item to appear every day of the week or month if it is only on one or two days, it will be rejected. Do not list it as an all day event if it takes place between set hours, i.e 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Once submitted, it can take up to 48 hours to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at editor@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.


PAGE A6 6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 21, 2016 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 21, 2016

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS; 3 BR Home $850. 2 BR, 2 BA home $700. 2 BR apt $650. 3 BR, 2 BA Apt $650. Sonora Shores $695. SUN LAKE REALTY 509-476-2121 Oroville Senior Living, Henderson Apartments, on Lake, N. Oroville, 3 miles on Boundary Point rd, 2 bdrm, in good shape, no smoking, no pets. Taking applications, $675/month, first and last. (509)476-2449 Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Think Green!

Did you know? We use...

l Soy Ink

l Recycled Paper l Excess paper

recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

Announcements WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JANUARY 18, 2016 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Subscribe to the...

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Found

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

We are looking for YOU to join our team! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee / supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN ADMIN: CFO Full time Certified Medical Coding Specialist Full time WIC Registered Dietician/Nutritionist Full time OMAK MEDICAL: Roomer Full time. Bilingual required. Clinic Custodian Full time, 32 hrs/week MA-C Full time BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

BREWSTER JAY AVE: Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time position Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics

Health General

BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Roomer Full time, Bilingual required MA-Certified Full time RN Case Manager Full time Dentist Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

North Valley Hospital Family Birthing Center is currently taking applications for an experienced

OB Nurse We have beautiful LDRP suites, a jetted labor tub, nitrous oxide pain management, child birth education classes and extensive breastfeeding assistance. Apply online at www.nvhospital.org or submit application to North Valley Hospital at 203 South Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509)486-3185. hr@nvhospital.org We’re more than just print!

Visit our website.

Twisp/Okanogan Dental: Dental Assistant Full time. Travel between clinics is required. Twisp Dental: Patient RegistrationPart time, 20 hrs/week. Must be available Saturdays. Dental AssistantPart time, 20 hrs/week. Must be available Saturdays. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge - Single Line, $6.50: Access Recovery Charge-Single Line $2.00 -Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone Service is provided as a part of local service rate. -Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. Low-income individuals may be eligible for the Federal Lifeline telephone assistance program that includes a discount from the above basic service charges. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 782-4680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 2016 . #OVG678061

12 AND 13, BLOCK 8, PLAT OF OMAK TOWNSITE, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME B OF PLATS, PAGE 39 RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 503 ASH ST SOUTH, OMAK, WA 98841 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/17/2006, recorded 7/24/2006, under 3105904 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from SHAWN METTLER, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY , as Grantor(s), to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE CO , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GATEWAY FINANCIAL SERVICES , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GATEWAY FINANCIAL SERVICES (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the certificateholders of the CWABS, Inc., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-17 . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follo wing amounts which are now in arrears: $77,571.92 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $74,049.16 , together with interest as provided in the Note from 4/1/2009 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/29/2016 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/18/2016 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/18/2016 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1/18/2016 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME SHAWN METTLER, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY ADDRESS 503 ASH ST SOUTH, OMAK, WA 98841 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if

applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 5/26/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/hom e o w n e r s h i p / p o s t _ purchase_counselors_foreclosure.ht m . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g ov / o f f i c e s / h s g / sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s

Notice of Appeal Hearing SEPA Appeal of DNS for CUP 2015-8 Morgan Septic Lagoon NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Okanogan County Office of Hearing Examiner will conduct an appeal hearing on January 28, 2016 to consider an appeal brought by Jerry Hauf against the Final Determination of Non-Significance for CUP 2015-8 Morgan Septic Lagoon. The appeal hearing will be conducted on January 28, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. in the Commissioners Auditorium in the Virginia Grainger Building in Okanogan, WA. Testimony and evidence will be presented at the hearing by parties with standing. Testimony relevant to the appeal issue will be accepted from interested parties. All testimony must be given under oath. Date of publication January 20, 2016 Information regarding this decision can be obtained from: Okanogan County Office of Planning and Development, Perry Huston, Director of Planning, 123 5th Avenue North, Suite 130 Okanogan, WA 98840 (509) 422-7218 or phuston@co.okanogan.wa.us Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 2016. #OVG678359 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-14-614659-TC APN No.: 1770081200 Title Order No.: 140045977-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): SHAWN METTLER Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GATEWAY FINANCIAL SERVICES Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3105904 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 1/29/2016 , at 10:00 AM at the main entrance to the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd N, Okanogan, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS

Crosswords

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Basic Service Annual Ad Skyline Telecom is a quality telecommunications services provider that provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: -Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50;

23. Building additions

7. Green citrus fruit

24. Telephone part

8. Brio

25. Look upon

9. Precedent setter (2 wds)

28. Accommodate

10. “La Traviata” mezzo

30. “Gladiator” setting

11. Enraged

31. Brewski

12. “He’s ___ nowhere man” (Beatles lyric, 2 wds))

32. Put up, as a picture

ANSWERS

Across 1. Breach

Public Notices

Continued on next page

4. Swiss wooden house

36. Title given to the highest executive officer (2 wds)

13. Pasta choice

39. Aims

22. “A jealous mistress”: Emerson

40. Anger

25. Commanded

41. Rinse, as with a solvent

26. “___ Brockovich”

42. Reduce, as expenses

27. Drove

43. Prevalent

28. Power glitch

44. Joined by treaty

29. Halftime lead, e.g.

48. Characteristic carrier

31. Fly high

49. Around 68 degrees indoors (2 wds)

32. Protective head covering

55. Bit

34. Alliance acronym

56. January’s birthstone

35. Hidden valley

57. Free from, with “of” 58. Like a stuffed shirt

37. Import-export difference (2 wds)

59. Ancient meeting places

38. Newborn infants

60. Armageddon

42. Animal companion

61. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto)

43. Breakfast food made from grain

62. Digital image components

45. Apparatus for weaving

63. “Much ___ About Nothing”

46. Water lily

15. Magistrate of ancient Rome in charge of public works 16. Euros replaced them 17. Anger 18. Serious narrative works for TV 19. Microwave, e.g. 20. House of Commons member

33. Jack-in-the-pulpit, e.g.

44. Come to mind

47. Candidate’s concern

10. Ado 14. Morgue, for one

21. Monetary units in Sierra Leone

48. Romance, e.g. Down

50. O. Henry’s “The Gift of the ___” 51. In the next month

1. Film crew member 2. Halo, e.g.

52. Waste product of protein metabolism

3. Equal

53. Outer layer of a fruit

4. Detroit’s founder

54. Taro plant’s edible root

5. Announce 6. Monroe’s successor


JANUARY 21, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE January 21, 2016 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices

Public Notices

Notice Seeking Comments regarding Juvenile Detention Options The Okanogan Board of County Commissioners is seeking comments from the public regarding options for providing juvenile detention facilities. Okanogan County currently operates its own juvenile detention facility. The law allows leasing detention space as an alternative. The Board of County Commissioners has initiated the discussion of a costbenefit analysis comparing the continued operation of the county owned facility versus leasing out-of-county detention space. This effort is primarily in response to concerns about the age and condition of the current juvenile detention facility which impacts level of service to both the juveniles and staff. The Board is seeking comments from interested members of the public, agencies, and private organizations. The current effort is directed at identifying the issues that must be evaluated in an effective cost-benefits analysis. Comments regarding the impacts, both adverse and positive, of either alternative are desired. Comments may be submitted in writing or electronically to: Perry Huston, Director; Office of Planning and Development; 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840; (509) 422-7218. phuston@co.okanogan.wa.us or Dennis Rabidou, Juvenile Administrator; PO Box 432, Okanogan, WA 98840; (509) 422-7264; drabidou@co.okanogan.wa.us Comments will be accepted at any time through the completion of the process. The duration of the process has yet to be determined. A meeting has been scheduled with the Board of County Commissioners and Okanogan County Superior Court for February 23, 2016 at 8:15 a.m. in the Virginia Grainger Building in Okanogan, WA to discuss the schedule of future meetings. Preliminary review of the comments received will begin then. Meeting schedules, meeting agendas, comments received, and other materials generated through the duration of this process may be found at www.okanogancounty.org/planning. Anyone who is unable to access the materials on the website or who wish to be placed on a notification list should contact Lauren Davidson, Office of Planning and Community Development for assistance; 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840; (509) 422-7160; ldavidson@co.okanogan.wa.us Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 2016. #OVG678552

tion under any of this organization’s programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts is Delinda Kluser, General Manager. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800)795-3272 (voice) or (202)720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity employer. Complaints must be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.” Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 2016 . #OVG678069

Deceased. Case No.: 15-4-06796-3KNT PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 21, 2016. /s/Sandra Lynne Downing Sandra Lynne Downing, Personal Representative 12774 90th Ave, Surrey, B.C. V3V6G5 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Mark A. Reinhardt Mark A. Reinhardt, WSBA 24723 18000 International Blvd, Suite 550, SeaTac, WA 98188, Telephone: (206) 246-8772 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. #OVG678077

for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: January 14, 2016. Signed: Vonna L. Harrison, Personal Representative Address for Mailing of Service: Joshua F. Grant, P.S. Attorney at Law P.O. Box 619 Wilbur, WA 99185 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 21, 28, 2016. #OVG677165

PUBLICATION (60 DAYS) THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID DEFENDANTS ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 31st day of December, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, and serve a copy of your answer upon the uudersigned attorneys for plaintiff, LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE, at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. This is a Complaint for Judicial Foreclosure of Deed of Trust. DATED: December 17, 2015 LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE By: /s/ Benjamin D Petiprin Benjamin D. Petiprin, WSBA# 46071 Attorneys for Plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette - Tribune on December 31, 2015, January 7, 14, 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. OVG675143 8

7

1

1

2 6

4

3

4

3

8

9 8

9

2 3

9

5

7

4 5

1

7

9

2

5

6

4

8

9

3

1

8

6

3 7 6 5

6 9

5

2 1

3 1

7

5

9

4

8

8

8 9 2 6 7

5 6 3

9 8

2 8 4 7 1

7 1 5 2 6

6 7 9 5

4

4

8

2 8 1 3

1

4 6 3

1 5

6 7

3 4

8

5

6

2

2 9

4 1

7

6

3

2

1

4

5

8

6

5

1

9

7 2

7

7

5

1

2

6 8 3

3 9 4

1

9

3 8 4 5 2 7 6

3

4 9 6

1 7 8 2 5

5

1 8 3 6 4

8 7

5

2

4

8

7

4

2 6

2 9

7

9 3 1

5 6

3 1 9

9

3

6

8

9

4 5 1 7 6 8

4

9

6

7

4

8 3

1 5 7

6

7

8

4

8

2 5 1

9 3 2

3 5

2 1 4 8 9 6 7

1 7 8 9

3 4 5 2 6

5 3 4 6 2 7 1 8

9

2 9

1

6 8 5 3 7 4

8 4 5 7 9

6 2 1 3

3 4 5 1 7 9 8

1

2 3 4

5 1

2

5 9 5 6

2

3 5

7 3

9

1 4

9

7

6

5

8 5 2

2 9 8 7 6

4 6

3 2

1 4

8 5

6 3

5 3 1

9 5

7

7 2 8

6

9 3

2 8 4

5 8 4 1 2

5 3

4 1

2 7 8 9

1 8 6 4

6 5 9

3

4 2 1 7

7

9

3

7

1 5

9 6

3 8 4 7

7

9

5

3 4

8 1

7

2

6

5 9

4 8 2

9 1 6

4 1

2 5 7 6 8 9 3

1

9

4

6 3 7 1

8 5 4 2

5 6 9 2 3 7

8

7 2

8 3 4 5 1 6 9

5 3 7 2 6 1

9 8 4

8

4 1 9 3 7 6 2 5

2 9 6

8 5 4 7 3 1

7 2 3 9

4 8 1

5 6

4 8

6 7 5 1 9 2 3

3 1 4 8 7

6 5 8 9 1 4

2

3

6 9 5

7 2

9 7

2 3 6

2 6 9 1 3 7

8

5 4 1 8

5

4 7 2 8 9 3

5

1

4

6

8 3 1

5 4 6 2 7 9

Puzzle 6 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.60)

9

1

7

6

1

8

6

7

5

2

3

9

4

3

2

4

8

Puzzle 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

5

1

8 4

3

2

Puzzle 9 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

2

Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

4

7

9 6

7

9

4 7

6

3

8

8

Puzzle 8 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

3

6

3

2

2

1

Puzzle 12 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

7

1

2

4

5

4 7 2 3 5 6

8 1 9

9

3 5 4 1 8 2 7 6

6 5 1 8

7 2 9 3 4

2 9 7 5 4 3 6

8 1

8

4 3 9 6 1 7 5 2

7 2 6 1 3

5 4 9 8

3 1 9 2 8 4 5 6 7

5 8

4 6 9 7 1 2 3

Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

Okanogan Riverfront and 8 Acres.

Beautiful Home3 Bedrooms+den/2 Baths Midway Tonasket & Oroville $137,900

To advertise in our Real Estate Section call Charlene 509-476-3602 ext. 3050

Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds. Check them out today!

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Concrete

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

RYAN W. GUNN n Family

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Wow

“The Water Professionals”

Looking for something?

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County

Attorney at Law

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

Well Drilling

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Serving all of Eastern Washington...  Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems

Colville  Spokane  RepublicLic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

1)

8

Missed out on that dream home?

1

6

1 story 3 bedroom home with views of the Okanogan River and public access to the waterfront! Well-kept home with hardwood floors, upgrades and partially fenced yard. Great location close to amenities but with the privacy you’re looking for! Excellent price and well worth a look! MLS#884023 $98,500

6

3

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Great river-view property just outside of town!

8

1

#1 Top Producer Office in North County

2

4

Wonderful sandy beach for great skiing or swimming. Property ready to build on or put an RV on for summer fun. Approved septic has been installed. 200 AMP for power on .46 acre. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation. NWML#882057 $395,000

3

4

101 ft of Beautiful lake Osoyoos lakefront.

4)

5

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

SUN LAKES REALTY

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

509/476-3378

2

7

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory www.windermere.com

1

7

9

509-476-3602

9

9

3

2

Puzzle 11 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

5

Medium, difficulty rating 0.46 Sponsored by

5

6

1

ANSWERS

2

6

6

4

2

6

8)

5

3

1

6

2

9

5

9

4

8

4

1

6

9

3

7

4

4

8

2

1

3

7

7

5

3

9

7

4

2

7

6

54)

3

1

8

9

7

6

7

8

2

5

8

2

5

8

2

5

4

9

6

9

7

1

4

5

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

5

9

1

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY Estate of MAXWELL A. HARRISON, Deceased. NO. 15-4 00070-3 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against Decedent must present the claim: Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: By filing with the foregoing Court the original of the signed Creditor’s Claim, and By serving upon or mailing by first class mail to us at the address provided below a copy of the signed Creditor’s Claim. The Creditor’s Claim must be presented by the later to occur of: Thirty (30) days after we served or mailed this Notice to you as provided in RCW 11.40.020(3), or Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the Creditor’s Claim is not presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective

9

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of BRIAN WILLIAM DOWNING,

Sudoku

3

Skyline Telecom is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin or handicap shall be excluded from participation in, or admission or access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimina-

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of DAVID R. VERBOIS, Deceased. Case No.: 15-4-07269-0 KNT PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. lf the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 21, 2016 /s/Mark D. Verbois Mark D. Verbois, Personal Representative 34414 SE Carmichael St, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Ryan Y. Rehberg, Ryan Y Rehberg, WSBA 32374 18000 International Blvd, Suite 550, SeaTac, WA 98188, Telephone (206) 246-8772 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. #OVG678089

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, a limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN, a deceased individual; Julian Castro, solely in his capacity as Secretary for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NINE MILE RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; DOES 1 through 10, inclusive, and ROES 1 through 10, inclusive. Defendants. NO. 15-2-00443-5 SUMMONS FOR

6

Sinlahekin Wildlife Area P.O.Box C Loomis, Washington 98827 January 11, 2016 TO: Prospective bidders FROM: Justin Haug, Manager Sinlahekin Wildlife Area RE: Call for bids on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Agricultural Lease The Department of Fish and Wildlife will be accepting sealed bids on approximately 37 acres (+/-) of agricultural fields on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area. Sealed bids will be opened at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Headquarters, 1680 Sinlahekin Road Loomis, Washington on February 8, 2016 at 1:30 p.m. Please call 509-223-3358 to receive your bid packet and/or if you have any questions regarding this lease. Bids will be accepted only if mailed and postmarked on or before February 8, 2016 or hand delivered before 1:30pm February 8, 2016 in ENVELOPES PROVIDED in Bid Packets ONLY. Completed bid packets should be mailed to: WDFW Sinlahekin Wildlife Area P.O. Box C Loomis, Washington 98827 ALL INCOMPLETE BIDS OR BIDS RECEIVED AFTER 1:30 P.M. ON February 8, 2016 WILL BE REJECTED. Please review the information sheet prior to submitting in your bid. THANK YOU Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 21, 2016. #OVG678308

Public Notices

2

sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 9/28/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-614659-TC IDSPub #0092253 12/31/2015 1/21/2016 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 31, 2015 and January 21, 2016. #OVG660858

Public Notices

5

Continued from previous page

Public Notices

7

Public Notices

PAGE A7 7


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 21, 2016

SPORTS

Competition tough at Apple Pie Tourney

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Jorge Juarez of Tonasket pins Liberty Bell’s Finlay Holston in the semi-final round of Saturday’s (Jan. 16) Apple Pie Tournament. Juarez had already pinned Dylan Walser of Chewelah, and went on to pin Taylor Flesher of Kettle Falls in the final round to take the 152 weight class championship.

Devin Walton took second place in the 113 weight class after pinning Warden’s Osvaldo Dominguez in 3:25, and beating Dayton Smith of Chewelah 7-0 in the semi-finals. Above, Walton has Smith in a near-fall situation.

13 Tigers place in top four BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – Warden came away with 218 points for the winning team score when wrestlers from a dozen schools gathered in Tonasket Saturday, Jan. 9 for the Apple Pie Tournament. Chewelah came in second (183) and Tonasket in third (163) with 13 wrestlers placing in the top four positions; followed by Reardan in fourth place (99). “We like winning these big tournaments, and this is a big one,” said Warden’s Coach Brent Cox. “Mitchell’s put together a very competitive tournament; he brought in a lot of good teams. This turned out to be one of our

round after pinning Warden’s Conneach West in just 36 seconds. Bretz was pinned in the championship round by Warden’s Anthony Martinez in 3:49. Walton also won his first match by a pin; in 3:25 against Osvaldo Dominguez of Warden. Walton won the semi-final round 7-0

over Warden’s Conner Massa. Pilkinton dropped the championship round 5-3 to Chewelah’s Johnathan Crise. Several wrestlers tied for third place, including Garrett Wilson (132) with Kaden Mackowiak of Chewelah; Austin Rimestad (138) with Reardan’s Colton

only had three matches; that’s just the way bracketing works. But the guys that made it to the finals, they didn’t have as many matches but the competition is a lot harder.” Also wrestling for Tonasket were Jeffrey Luna, Chris Freese, Tim Freese, Austin Wood, Brandon Baugher and Dylan Kalma.

Hornets suffer from injuries

Oroville left during the consolation round, with most of their team on injury reserve. “Only six wrestlers came today; we have quite a few that are injured,” said assistant coach Ed Booker. “Scotty Hartvig is pretty tough, but he’s hurt; and so are Drake Scott and Zane Scott. It’s

Jacob Loomis in 5:26 before being pinned by Tonasket’s Luna in 52 seconds. Johnny Castillo was pinned by Chewelah’s Ben Smith before going on to be pinned by

“Some of our guys lost early and had to battle back to place third or fourth. That’s a hard thing to do. They ended up with five matches.” Dave Mitchell, Head Coach, Tonasket High School

Kevin Date. “This is a tournament of mostly A schools that we have no business trying to compete in,” said Oroville Head Coach Chuck Ricevuto. “The best we could do was Louie Vazquez and Brigido Ocampo both falling one bout short of getting into the medal rounds. David Iniquez added a pin to the Hornet cause, but had to leave the tournament with an injury.” “Our tournament ran really well because of our awesome helpers—Mr. Terris and Mr. Anderson at the head table, and our helpers who were our timers, score keepers, runners and towel people were fantastic,” said Mitchell. “Meanwhile our hospitality room is the best in the state—a big thanks to all of our helpers!”

“This turned out to be one of our toughest competitions of the year.” Brent Cox, Head Coach, Warden High School

toughest competitions of the year. I told my kids it was going to be close, and they love close competition so they just ran with it.” Okanogan placed fifth with 73.5 points, followed by Medical Lake (67) and Kettle Falls (45). Brewster and Cashmere each scored 41.5, and Liberty Bell came in with 33, Cascade with 22 and Oroville with 15. Tonasket’s Jorge Juarez took the 152-pound championship with a 3:24 pin of Kettle Falls’ Taylor Flesher, after taking down Liberty Bell’s Finlay Holston in the semifinal round with a 3:30 pin. Tiger Zach Lofthus won the 170-pound championship 11-3 over Chewelah’s Quenton Smith. Lofthus pinned Okanogan’s Austin Eastridge one minute and eight seconds into the semi-final round. Placing second for the Tigers were Dawson Bretz (106), Devin Walton (113), Trevor Peterson (132) and Rade Pilkinton (138). Bretz pinned Oroville’s Louis Vazquez in 3:08 in the semi-final

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Rade Pilkinton and Warden’s Conner Massa were tied throughout most their semi-finals match until Pilkinton won 3-2 with an escape point. over Chewelah’s Dayton Smith. Warden’s Bryce Martinez pinned Walton in the championship round in 3:32. “We expect him to make it to State this year,” assistant coach Trampus Stucker said of Walton. Peterson had a BYE in the first round and pinned Ben Smith of Chewelah in 1:08 in the semi-final round before losing the championship round 2-0 to Warden’s Josiah Guerra. Pilkinton also had a first-round BYE before pinning Nate Kieffer of Reardan in 1:49 and winning the semi-final round 3-2

Kuykendall; Rycki Cruz (152) with Okanogan’s Jalen Moses; Isaac Gomez (182) with Andres Zurita of Cashmere; and Garret Thomas (220) with Cascade’s Tre Smith. Finishing in fourth place for the Tigers were Vance Frazier (126) and Zion Butler (145). “It was a good day for us overall,” said Coach Dave Mitchell. “Some of our guys lost early, and had to battle back to place third or fourth. That’s a hard thing to do. They ended up with five matches to battle back. Jorge and Zach took first, but they each

54-44 victory. Earlier in the week Oroville hosted Brewster (Tuesday, Jan. 12), with the boys losing 36-66 and the girls losing 55-41. “The Lady Hornets had a coldshooting first half which led to a halftime score of Brewster 31, Oroville 11,” said Coach Bill Cottrell. “In the second half, Oroville played much better and closed the gap, outscoring Brewster 30 to 24, but still not enough to get the win.” Faith Martin and Hannah Hilderbrand both scored 12, Katherine Egerton 10, Mikayla Scott six and Havannah Worrell one. Markie Miller led the scoring for the Brewster girls with 20, Maret Miller and Yvette Sanchez had 12, Marlissa Garcia seven,

Vanessa Terrones three and Abby Urias one. “This is the first time the Brewster girls have beat the Lady Hornets in three years,” said Cottrell. “Usually we handle them pretty well.” The next home games for the Hornets are Tuesday, Jan. 26 against Bridgeport; and Thursday, Jan. 28 against Manson. The Hornets travel to Liberty Bell Saturday, Jan. 23. The Tigers were scheduled to host Liberty Bell Tuesday, Jan. 19 and to host Brewster Friday, Jan. 22. Varsity girls’ games begin at 6 p.m. and the varsity boys play at 7:30 p.m. JV games begin at 4:30 p.m.

Tonasket girls, Oroville boys see wins BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tonasket Lady Tigers traveled to Manson Friday, Jan. 15 to beat the Trojans 35-25. The boys lost their game to Manson 46-64. Earlier in the week the Tigers traveled to Bridgeport where the Tuesday, Jan. 12 games saw the the Lady Tigers winning their game 53-31. The Tonasket boys had a close game, losing 60-53. “This was our most complete game of the year,” said Coach Mike Larson. “The team is starting to come together. The Hornets hosted Okanogan Friday, Jan. 15 with the girls dropping their game 61-5 against the defending State champions, and the boys coming away with a

Katie Teachout//staff photo

Trevor Peterson battles Warden’s Josiah Guerra in the final round of the 113-pound weight class after pinning Chewelah’s Keith Justice in just one minute and eight seconds during the semi-finals. just a few weeks to districts, so we want to be as healthy as we can be.” Wrestling for Oroville were Louie Vazquez, who pinned Blake Brown of Cashmere in 3:08 before being pinned by Bretz in the semifinal round. Vazquez was pinned by Cascade’s Axel Martinez in the consolation round. Brigido Ocampo pinned Cashmere’s Jaaziel Alviter in 1:46 but lost 15-0 to Brewster’s Jose Garcia. In the consolation round, Ocampo pinned Chewelah’s

Tonasket’s Wilson in 1:32. David Iniguez pinned Phoenix Hanks of Medical Lake in 3:14 before having to leave the tournament with an injury sustained during a match with Ozius Harden of Reardan. Kacey DeWitte was pinned by Gabe Garcia of Brewster in 46 seconds, and then pinned by Chris Hurt-Moran of Medical Lake. Nick Clase was pinned in 1:04 by Collin Thomas of Kettle Falls before losing 2-0 to Reardan’s

The next wrestling home meet for Tonasket is Tuesday, January 26 when they host Okanogan. The meet begins at 7 p.m. Oroville will have their Senior Night Wednesday, Jan. 27, hosting Eastmont JV and Liberty Bell starting at 6 p.m. The Hornets host Tonasket, Okanogan, Brewster, Liberty Bell and Pateros Saturday, Jan. 30 for a League Mixer that begins at 11 a.m.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Zach Lofthus took the 170-pound Championship title after beating Chewelah’s Quenton Smith (above) 11-3 in the final round of the Apple Pie Tournament. Lofthus pinned Okanogan’s Austin Eastridge one minute and eight seconds into the semi-final round, after pinning Collin Thomas of Kettle Falls in one minute, 59 seconds.


JANUARY 21, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

OUTDOORS

Northwest Ice Fishing Festival 2016 Tim Roberts takes Grand Prize THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

MOLSON – The Northwest Ice Fishing Festival took place last Saturday and despite storm warnings from the National Weather Service it was a perfect day, according to festival organizer Robin Stice, a member of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce which hosted the event. Stice said the expected colder weather cut the competition down for the event, but those present were delighted with the lower than expected turn out. “The north Okanogan County

road crew maintained the roads in terrific condition and temperates stayed in the high twenties. Many ice fishing participants had ice huts of some shape or form,” said Stice, who asked one man without an ice hut if he was warm enough and was told the weather was balmy for him as he was from North Dakota and that in such pleasant conditions an ice hut was unnecessary. “Those with structures enjoyed them,” she said. There were a total of 63 participants with 25 contestants catching 32 fish with a combined weight of 39.5 pounds. Three of the participants were youth and all three caught fish. The judge was Dan Lepley and Associates. Registrars were Peggy Shaw, Vickie Hart and Sandy Andrews.

PRIZES WERE AS FOLLOWS:

Bo Bradley from Woodenville, Wash. takes his fish in to be weighed.

Grand Prize for a total of two fish weighing in at 44 ounces went to Tim Roberts of Molson and he was awarded $500 from Kinross. 1st Fish Caught was awarded to George Webster with a trout weighing 13.9 ounces for a $25 Gift Certificate from North 40 plus a Subway Sandwich Certificate. Smallest fish of the day was caught by Jack Henlynn also for a $25 Gift Card from North 40 in Omak and Subway Sandwich Certificate.

1st Place Adult for $100 from Double A Logging, a Lee Frank’s Ice Fishing Bucket with ice scoop and other valuables and a -30°F Sleeping Bag from MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures of Tonasket went to Mark Webster for a 33.8 ounce fish. 2nd Place Adult: $75 from Midway Building Supply & an Ice Fishing Pole from MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures was awarded to Mark Scholla for a 31.2 ounce fish. 3rd Place Adult: $50 from Midway Building Supply and an Ice Fishing Pole from MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures was awarded to Kathy Buchanan for a 29.5 ounce fish. The Mystery weight was 16 ounces and Jim McCormick was closest with a 14.9 ounce trout. Jim won a -30°F Sleeping Bag from MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures of Tonasket and a Subway Sandwich Certificate. The Eldest Fisherman, fishing all day was Bud Forthun from Oroville at 73. He was presented a warm pair of working winter gloves from Tonasket Feed Store. In the youth division, 1st Place went to Darrell Nampuya for a 29.3 ounce fish and he was presented $75 from MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures of Tonasket & a Subway Sandwich Certificate. 2nd Place Youth for $50 from

MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures of Tonasket & a Subway Sandwich Certificate went to Makara Richter for her 25.9 ounce trout. Tyler Davis won 3rd Place Youth for $25 from MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures of Tonasket & a Subway Sandwich Certificate for a 13.7 ounce fish. Youngest fisherman went to

Darrell Nampuya, age 8 for an ice fishing pole donated by Eden Valley Guest Ranch. New this year, ice huts were in a contest all their own. One stipulation was to stop by and give festival staff the name of the hut and contact information to officially win. Criteria included a hut name, creative design and decorations. This year the “Hawk Shack” won, which was designed

and built by Deborah Thompson and Kathy Buchanan. The Hawk Shack was in SeaHawk colors and sported a 12th man flag and fishing pole. The Hawk Shack will receive a vinyl sign by Eden Valley Associates to place on their shack for future tournaments.

much older. The Alternative School building was old when we moved it in, so we will need to shift more resources into buildings and grounds,” said McCullough, adding, “They don’t build school buildings to last 100 years anymore.” McCullough gave an example of the school owning two major air conditioners, and each unit has a blown part that can no longer be replaced. “It’s part of the designed obsolescence,” said McCullough. “The units each cost over $200,000, but we can’t order parts for them anymore.” Forty-four percent, or $740,000 of the levy funds will be used for Special Programs and Staffing; i.e. senior projects, sixth grade camp, paraeducator/student contact time and staffing for art, music, PE, AG science and a counselor in every building. In the past, TSD has had to shorten school days due to budget cuts following five levy failures. Passage of school levies used to require a 60 percent threshold. Now it only requires 50 percent plus one person, or a

simple majority instead of a major majority. Tonasket’s previous two levies passed at 64 percent and 59 percent yes, allowing TSD to return to a normal length school day in 2014; adding 45 minutes of student contact time. “To keep doing this in a manner that is best for students requires us to keep staffing that was lost during those budget cuts,” said McCullough. “In particular, we believe the best way to is to continue a full art, music and physical education program to the elementary school. In addition to the value of the life-long skills they provide, these are proven by research to improve the capacity to learn in all subjects; and are especially correlated with improved learning in mathematics. ” $230,000, or 14 percent of levy funds will go towards Co-Curricular activities including drama, Knowledge Bowl, yearbook, athletics, cheerleading and marching band. Asked if kids were already required to pay to go to camps or engage in extracurricular activities including sports, McCullough

explained the majority of funding for any field trips or extra curricular activities comes from levy funds. “Sometimes there is a fee for kids to participate, but transportation is a huge chunk of the money for the special events,” said McCullough. “ Levy funds also pay for coaches’ stipends and equipment, including helmets that have to shipped out to be inspected each year. There are a lot of hidden costs, but curricular and co curricular events are a vital part of education. Art, drama and PE are here now because of the levy. What people often expect to be provided for their kids is not funded by the state, so you have to have the levy to support those programs.” The remaining 19 percent of levy funds, or $322,000, are directed towards curriculum materials and educational software, technology and device upgrades, as well as technology staffing. “Our students are the scientists, artists, farmers, teachers, tradespeople and business leaders of the future,” stated Tonasket School Board Chair Jerry Asmussen.

“Levy dollars support the programs and facilities that make their education possible.” McCullough said he has been getting a lot of positive feedback from the community about the levy, especially during recent presentations he has given to different groups in Tonasket. “The communities understand the importance of school levies to offering good programs,” said McCullough. For more information about this levy and the funding of Tonasket Schools, visit the Tonasket School District website at www.tonasket. wednet.edu. Ballots are expected to be mailed on Jan. 22. While the deadline for mail and online voter registrations was Jan. 11, persons not yet registered to vote have until Feb. 1 to register for inperson voting. Citizens over 61-years-old who earn less than $40,000 per year and/or persons unable to work due to disability may qualify to receive an exemption. For more information, call the Okanogan County Assessor’s office at 509422-7190.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

There was good ice and good weather for the twelfth annual Northwest Ice Fishing Festival on Sidley Lake. Sixtythree anglers tried their luck and 32 fish were caught. There were more ice huts this year than in previous years and huts and fishermen dotted the lake.

Watch for the results of the Pine Wood Derby in next week’s edition of the Gazette-Tribune.

LEVY | FROM A1 Elementary was recognized as a School of Distinction from the State of Washington for continuing growth in academics over the past five years, and Tonasket High School was recognized by Newsweek magazine for the ability to help students from low income families beat the odds and graduate from high school with the necessary skills for college and/or career. The levy, along with levy equalization funds, makes up 15 percent of TSD’s budget. Levy Equalization is state money paid to eligible districts to match excess general fund levies. These payments help school districts with above-average tax rates due to low property valuations. A school district does not get the equalization funds unless they pass a levy. Tonasket is eligible for $842,000 of Levy Equalization

funds. Asked how the levy funds, if approved by voters, would be spent by the school district, McCullough said the funds will be used in a similar manner as the current levy funding, with the goal of providing a similar level of service to the community. “We don’t have any plans for anything brand new or doing anything different, we just want to keep staff and move forward as we have been doing,” said McCullough. Specifically, that means approximately $398,000, or 23 percent of the levy funds, will be spent on Buildings and Grounds; i.e. custodial maintenance, grounds personnel, materials and supplies and energy costs. “Tonasket School District’s buildings are 20 years old, with some of the other buildings being

COPS | FROM A3 Two-vehicle crash on W. Cherry Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on N. Ash St. in Omak. Assault on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Central Ave. in Omak. DUI on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. David J.L. Condon-Soderberg, 22, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for firstdegree criminal trespassing. Patricia Estrella, 36, booked for DUI. Erica Rae Jensen, 27, booked for DUI. Gordon Lewis Bordeaux, 66, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). James Kirk Renfrow, 48, booked for DUI.

SUNDAY, JAN. 17, 2016

Assault on S. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Disorderly conduct on Hwy. 97 near Omak. DWLS on Ferry St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Jasmine St. in Omak. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville.

Jerry Michaell Fuller, 58, booked for felony harassment. Jeremiah Leonard Track, 28, DOC detainer. Denise Marie Gorr, 45, booked for second-degree DWLS. Alicia Jonele Wilson, 21, booked for disorderly conduct. KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

On your way home from Canada... Stop, Shop & SAVE at the Osoyoos Duty Free!

Great Deals!

Call 250-495-7288 Hwy. 97 S. Osoyoos, B.C. At the Canadian Side of the border www. osoyoosdutyfree.com

Patron Silver 700ml ...................................$27.85, no tax Bailey’s Irish Cream 1 ltr .........................$17.85, no tax Gentleman Jack 1 ltr .................................$17.85, no tax Polar Ice 1.14 ltr (*NEW size) ...............$14.27, no tax Bacardi White 1 ltr.......................................$12.85, no tax Captain Morgan Spiced 1 ltr................$13.56, no tax Tanqueray Gin 1 ltr ....................................$14.27, no tax Dewar’s White 1 ltr......................................$15.70, no tax All prices quoted in approximate U.S. Funds.

OROVILLE GUN CLUB SUBMITTED BY LINDA SCHWILKE

Sunday afternoon was a beautiful day for shooting; not too cold, not too windy and not too rainy! Only 3 shooters and 3 non shooters who showed up for the apple pie and meeting, and of course, the story-telling of years gone by. We all had a good time!

TRAPSHOOTING

Free shells and targets for youth age 15 and under. This program has been in place to help young people learn to shoot and proper safe gun handling. The club donates the shells and targets for 1 round (25 shots) per week. Parents come watch your kids learn a sport and skill that they can use all of their life. Scores for this week were: 22 - Logan Faris 17 - Vern Cole

12 - Paul Schwilke Practice is Saturdays at 1 p.m. and Inland Empire Shoot is Sunday at 1 p.m.

TONASKET GUN CLUB SUBMITTED BY ROBERT MCDANIEL 16 yd 223 – Jeff Taylor 22 – Rick Lind, Lloyd Caton Jr.,

Craig Jordan 21 – Stan Shields 20 – Robert McDaniel 19 – Jerry Asmussen 18 – Randy Cline, George Miklos 14 – Jeff McMillan Handicap 25 – Jeff Taylor 20 – Rick Lind 17 – Stan Shields 15 – George Miklos, Lloyd Caton Jr. 14 – Randy Cline, Jerry Asmussen

THE EFFECTS

Let’s face it, living with hearing loss can be frustrating, even dangerous. Hearing aids can allow you to function better in all areas of your life: YOUR HAPPINESS:

Do you feel uncomfortable at social gatherings? Are you missing the rewarding sounds of nature or your favorite music? Don’t let hearing loss affect your quality of life.

YOUR FAMILY:

Your grandaughter’s silly secrets, your wife’s soft “I love you...” These are sounds you definitely don’t want to miss.

YOUR SAFETY:

A car horn. An ambulance siren, fire alarms. Hearing loss can cause you to miss important signals that alert you to danger.

YOUR WORK:

If you’re missing important information on phone calls or in meetings, you may not be working at the level you want to be.

For your complimentary consultation call 509-422-3100

5 W. Central Ave., Omak • 509-422-3100 • 406 Burdin Blvd., Grand Coulee • 509-631-3004 • Toll Free 800-898-HEAR (4327)


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 21, 2016

OBITUARIES

Harriet Erikson Stangland

HARRIET ERIKSON STANGLAND Harriet Erickson Stangland, 91, died at home on January 16, 2016. She was born in Portland, Oregon in May 1924, the first child of

RUTH ELIZABETH LESLIE Ruth Elizabeth Leslie, age 95, of Chesaw, Washington, passed away at her home on January 14, 2016. Ruth was born, raised and lived in the Chesaw area attending Chesaw Myers Creek and Molson Schools. On December 15, 1941 she married Stewart Leslie in Okanogan, Wash. Together, they lived and worked side-by-side on the family ranch. On March 26, 1963, Stewart preceded her in death. Ruth worked in local apple warehouses, cooked at the Molson School and many camps for kids. She was a librarian and cook at both Molson and Oroville schools and was a member of Community Action for

BEVERLY ROTH Beverly Roth died peacefully in her sleep surrounded by fam-

Bruce James Derry

BRUCE JAMES DERRY Bruce James Derry arrived in this world on February 9, 1948 to Leroy and Helen Derry in Norfolk, Virginia. He took his journey on January 14, 2016 at the age of 67 years. Bruce’s father was an enlisted man in the U.S. Navy who worked his way through the ranks during WWII to become a Lieutenant Commander. When Bruce was a child the family travelled extensively in Europe. Bruce was taught old-school navigation by his father, and could still step outside any evening and identify all the constellations and stars by name.

Swedish immigrants. She attended Oregon State College where she met Gordon Stangland after the war. They were married in 1948 and together built one of the first ski areas in California near Lake Tahoe. In 1954 they settled in Placerville, Calif. where they raised their three children and operated an earth moving construction business, retiring in 1980. In 1995 they moved to Tonasket to share in the life of their only grandchild, Johanna. Harriet was devoted to her family and always considered the needs of others. She was community minded and participated in numerous clubs, boards and activities during her lifetime. Before Gordon died in 2011, they designated a substantial donation to help build a community swimming pool in Tonasket. She became passionate about the project and had hoped to live to see the pool completed. To that end, those wishing to honor her memory may kindly

make a donation to the Tonasket Swimming Pool, PO Box 1217, Tonasket, WA 98855. She stated that she never wanted to set the world on fire and that caring for her family was what she valued most and she did that admirably. She said she had a wonderful life and was happy with the way things turned out. Her family is grateful for her love, generosity and ever present support and encouragement as well as her pies, cookies and wonderful meals. For those who were lucky enough to know her, she cherished your friendship. Remember her smile, positive attitude and generosity. Harriet was preceded in death by her husband, Gordon, brother, Rudy Erickson and daughter, Katy Stangland. She is survived by her son David, (Catherine), daughter, Karen and granddaughter Johanna whom she described as the “light of her life.” At her request there will be no memorial service.

more than 30 years. She loved children and many of the activities she participated in involved children. She was a 75 plus year member of the Molson Grange, embroidered, quilted, stuffed toy animals for children, loved crossword puzzles and chaperoned countless children’s events for the Molson Schools. She was also a longtime member of the Knob Hill Home Economics, volunteered at the Molson Museum and always had a houseful of kids. Ruth was a wonderful cook and baker, and raised many children as if they were her own. One of her many achievements are the years she spent writing for “Hilltop Comments’ in the local newspaper. Ruth leaves behind son, Harry (Mildred) Leslie, daughters Mary Ellen (Don) Field, Dorothy (Cliff) Applebee, Ruthie (David) Allen, Georgia McCoy, Jessie (Bob)

Rise, Hazel (Jim) Chamberlin, Rose Ann (Leroy) Hirst and Heather Leslie; numerous grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren She was preceded in death by daughter Florence Jane; brother Harry Whyte, two sons-in-law; John Allen and Butch McCoy. Being known by many as “Grandma,” Ruth was loved and respected by so many people and will be dearly missed by them and more. Services will be held Saturday, January 23, 2016 at 2 p.m. at the Molson Grange. Interment will follow at the Molson Cemetery, Wynn Schell officiating. Memorials may be made to the Molson Grange or Molson Museum Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville is in care of arrangements.

ily and the loving staff of her last home at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket on January 13, 2016. She was born June 12, 1937.

Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements.

Bruce kept a picture of his father’s flagship, “USS Saratoga,” in a prominent place at home. Bruce respected and loved his Dad dearly and often said he’d have been a better man had his father just lived a little longer. After being stationed in New York, Maryland, Connecticut and California, the family was ordered to Bangor, Wash., where Bruce’s Dad retired. Bruce graduated in 1966 from Central Kitsap High School, where he was an excellent baseball and football player. A few months after graduation, he joined the U.S. Army. He was sent to the Defense Language Institute in the Presidio of Monterey, Calif., where he graduated with a Master’s degree in the Chinese Mandarin Language. He was then stationed in Thailand near the Laos and Cambodia borders. Bruce often reminisced about his life in Thailand when these cold Okanogan winters arrived, and always said how easier it was to live in a warm climate. He wondered whatever happened to his water buffalo, “Rooney.” Bruce said his only regret in life was that he didn’t remain in Thailand. Bruce had many occupations; he hoed sugar beets in southern California, worked the pear sheds in Oregon, pulled green chain in Port Ludlow, was a bouncer at the

Mountain Time tavern, was a rigger on Harbor Island and Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, handyman and landscaper, built recreational campers in Oroville and worked at Regal Fruit, Oro Fruit and Gold Digger sheds in varied capacities. Bruce was also a guard at Keyport and Indian Island. His favorite job of all was working on the weed crew for the USFS. He considered it a challenge to locate one musk thistle in the thousands of acres of forest. Bruce’s main motivation was fishing. He was proud that he had been skunked on just about every river in Oregon and Washington. He had his successes too, and in all probability steelhead and trout populations will increase with his passing. Bruce also enjoyed tying intricate knots used by sailors back in the days of clipper ships. It drove him crazy to see tangled rope or untied shoes. Bruce was a good man, slow to anger, but fierce when roused. He was a defender of the underdogs, always picked up hitchhikers, and fed strays. He never passed judgement on anyone and respected all cultures and beliefs. At Bruce’s request, no services will be held. He is survived by his best friend of 36 years and wife Kathryn (Kaye) Chester. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

JEANNE LORRAIN KRAHN

Jeanne Lorrain Krahn

Jeanne Lorrain (Ingertila) Krahn passed away peacefully at home in Mountlake Terrace, Washington. She was 88 years old. Jeanne was born February 16, 1927 to Wiljo and Gertrude (Erickson) Ingertila. She was born and raised on a farm in Kent, Wash. She is survived by her loving husband, Stanly Krahn; daugh-

ters, Debbie (Bob) Gilmore and Jeannie (Rod) Cockle, her son Timothy, daughter-in-law Dee Graham, son-in-law Gary Whitaker. Also by Stan’s children: David Krahn, Dottie (Dan) Burton, Dean (Shirree) Krahn, Laurie (Dennis) Loeber and Denise (Chris) Krout. She had 18 grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Many happy days were spent at Molson, Wash. since 1971. She was very well loved and will be greatly missed by family as well as many friends worldwide.

You can upload your own community events.

Try our new calendar at...

www.gazette-tribune.com

Leota McMillan

LEOTA MCMILLAN Leota McMillan, age 91, died peacefully surrounded by family on Monday, December 21, 2015

Andrew “Andy” Brownlee

ANDREW ‘ANDY’ MORRIS BROWNLEE Andrew

(Andy)

Morris

DENTISTRY

at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket, Washington. She was born August 2, 1924 at National, Washington. Leota was the fourth of eleven children born to Edgar and Cynthia Michels. The family moved to the Pine Creek area and later to the Loomis area. Leota graduated from Tonasket High School in 1943. She married Larry McMillan on November 9, 1944. They had four children. Larry and Leota lived above Spectacle Lake, where they ranched, farmed and later planted an orchard. Leota lived on the ranch until 2007, when she moved to North Valley Assisted Living in Tonasket, Washington. She is survived by her children: Joanne (Dal) Dagnon, Mike McMillan (Gretchen), Pat McMillan, Jeff McMillan (Marva), all of the Tonasket area; siblings Harvey Michels, Gene Michels, Mary Hammons and

Paula Cain; grandchildren Joe Dagnon, Jana Symonds, Larry Dagnon, John McMillan, Mark McMillan, Nicole McMillan, Whitney McMillan, Meagan McMillan and Doug McMillan and several great grandchildren. Leota was preceded in death by husband Larry McMillan in 1970, parents Edgar and Cynthia Michels, her brothers Chuck Michels and Don Michels, and sisters Marion Heitz, Vivian Sutton, Joyce Spence and Erma Swinger. The family is very appreciative of the care and comfort Leota was given while living at North Valley Extended Care. Services will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation, Box 5371, Seattle, WA 98145. Bergh Funeral Service & Crematory in charge of arrangements.

Brownlee, age 81 of Tonasket, died on December 30, 2015 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. He was born on the family ranch up Watson Draw May 7, 1934 in Pateros to parents Robert and Doris Brownlee. He graduated from Pateros High School in 1952 and after graduation joined the U.S. Army. He served in Korea in 1954 as a dog handler guarding the base with his dog, Prince. After the military, he came home and worked for Boeing in Renton in the 1960’s and then for Crown Zellerbach lumber mill in Omak in the early 1970’s. Andy had a love of taking pictures evidenced by his many photo albums and slide collections of his family and time in the military. He also enjoyed parades and could always be found watch-

ing the Founder’s Day Parade in Tonasket. He lived in Tonasket from 1983 until his death. Andy is survived by his children, Dan (Lorena) Brownlee, Patty (Andy) Thompson and Robin (Anna Milewski) Brownlee; his brother Philip (Joan) Brownlee, sisters Lorraine (Bill) Gilden and Jeannie Engfer; grandchildren Mark (Georgie) Brownlee, Stacey (Cody) Conley, Drew and Ashley Thompson and Kelson Milewski and great grandchildren Ava and Aiden Brownlee (Mark), Cooper, Creighton and Channing Conley (Stacey). Andy was preceded in death by his parents, Bob and Doris Brownlee and his nephew Terry Lee Gilden Services will be held at a later date. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements.

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Services • Mental Health • Chemical Dependency • Developmental Disabilities • Psychiatric Services • Therapeutic Housing Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Toll free: 866-826-6191

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

www.wvmedical.com

www.okbhc.org HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Healthcare Services  Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Radiology

Columbia River

 Behavioral

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OPTICAL

YOUR AD HERE

203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151

HEALTH CARE

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Emergency www.nvhospital.org VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program 

 Ophthalmology

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

Profile for Sound Publishing

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 21, 2016  

January 21, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 21, 2016  

January 21, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune