Page 1

SHUSHING THROUGH THE

NW Ice Fishing Festival

SNOW AT SITZMARK

Annual Ice Fishing Festival takes place in Molson on Saturday, January 16

See Page A6

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2016 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Hughes’ Dept. Store not closing Warehouse items to move to main store BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – One of Oroville’s largest retailers, Hughes’ Department Store, will remain open despite nearly closing due to falling sales says owner Jack Hughes. “We think we’re going to make it. We’re not going to be the same store we were before, but while things will change we will still offer almost everything we do now,” said Hughes. In an effort to “right the ship” Hughes’

has been holding an inventory reduction sale with everything marked down 30 percent and with some items reduced by as much as 40 percent. While the shelves are starting to look bare, Hughes said the store still retains much of its inventory. “We’ve restructured and paid down a tremendous amount of debt,” he Jack Hughes said. “We’re still going to buy from Ace, we just won’t be an ‘Ace Hardware’ store. We have a semi load of stuff coming from them right now.”

Oroville Chamber discusses several issues

The Prince family, which owns Prince’s to the main store. Center and leases the department store “We’re going to narrow back on the side of the buildclothes, we ing to Hughes realize we’re a and his wife working man’s “We are not going to be the Mary, has been community and working with will be focusing same store we were before, but... the couple and what we have we will still offer almost every- to offer around made some concessions to make that,” he said. thing we do now.” the deal work, “However, I Jack Hughes, Owner according to want you to let Hughes’ Department Store Hughes. While people know the main store we’ll definitely will remain open, Hughes’ Warehouse be keeping the fabric center, I’ve had sevStore on Ironwood Street will be closing eral concerned calls about that.” and its inventory of appliances, animal While sitting down to an interview last feed, tools and much more will be moved Monday morning Hughes said he didn’t

want to go into everything they would be stocking, but he said in addition to the hardware, some clothing and the fabrics, the store would also be keeping the sporting goods. “The community will see changes in the store as we move things around to make it all fit, but I think it will be a good fit when we are done,” Hughes said. He said the workforce, which currently runs between 40 and 45 employees, will be shrinking somewhat. Some of his longtime employees took retirement or were considering it when the store was looking at closing, something they were informed of in December. He said other

SEE NOT CLOSING| PG A2

SNOW DOUBT ABOUT IT, TIME FOR SLEDDING

Historical Society gets grant to build bicycle service station.

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville Chamber of Commerce met on Thursday, Jan. 7 and discussed several issues, including the local economy. “CBC was planning on doing an interview about the affect of the Canadian dollar on the two towns (Oroville and Osoyoos). It is interesting that she didn’t know that the lower Canadian dollar is actually helping the Gorman Brothers, which has Oroville Reman and Reload

“CBC was planning on doing an interview about the affedt of the Canadian dollar on the two towns.” Clyde Andrews, President, Oroville Chamber of Commerce. Katie Teachout & Gary DeVon/staff photos

here in town,” said Clyde Andrews, president of the Oroville Chamber. School District Superintendent Steve Quick gave a short informational talk about the two-year Maintenance and Operations Levy that will appear on the ballot in February. He said it will replace the $1,479,000 levy approved last time. “We actually are asking for the same amount and the amount we collect never changes during the two year collection period no matter if the property valuation in the district goes up or down. He said the levy pays for extracurricular athletic and academic programs, curriculum adoption and technology improvements. “We are heavily reliant on the levy, it is 20 percent or more of the budget and pays for things the state doesn’t fund,” said Quick, adding the court has ruled that the state fund all basic education, but has yet do to so, despite a $100,000 a day fine. “The idea behind the McCleary Court ruling was that school levies go away,” he said. In the past district voters have usually approved the budget by around 60

SEE CHAMBER| PG A2

Two lucky kids received new sleds after winning the Gazette-Tribunes’s annual Letters to Santa Contest. Above, left, Tonasket’s Kurt Hudson, age eight, is excited to try out his new sled this weekend “on the sled hill at his house.” Hudson said he had a similar sled at home, but it was rusty and had splinters. Hudson is seen here receiving the sled from Stacey Kester of Lee Franks’ ACE Hardware. Above right, Lisbeth Nemecio, age seven, from Oroville, doesn’t know what to think about her new sled, which was awarded by the owner of Hughes’ Department Store, Jack Hughes. She said she had never sledded before but looks forward to sharing the sled with her older sister and younger brother.

Family films at Veterans Park

City will give towards Oroville C.A.R.E.S. Coalition billboard BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Robert Fuchs, a one time candidate for Oroville City Council, pitched his idea for family movies at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park at the council’s Tuesday, Jan. 5 meeting and received unanimous approval.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 112 No. 2

“When I ran in last election it was because there aren’t that many things to do for kids, tourists or locals,” said Fuchs. “I would like to start showing films on Saturday evenings in the park for the locals and the tourists. The films would be free but we’d like a donation.” Fuchs said he is seeking sponsors and working with the Border Patrol Explorers to raise money for a 16 foot by nine foot inflatable movie screen. He said in addition to the cost of the screen, which is about $3500 with shipping, there is also a cost to show the movies of between $275 and $375.

When asked what months the films would be shown he said after dark July through August and the first two weeks of September. The screen would be set up in the grassy area of the day use section near the concession stand. The movies would be appropriate for all ages as there would be no way to control the age of those in the park. “I think it’s a great idea,” said Councilman Tony Koepke. The councilman wasn’t the only one, according to Fuchs, who posted his idea on the Friends of Oroville Facebook page. Fuchs said within three or four hours he had 120 likes and about 40 positive comments, many from people asking how they could help. Clyde Andrews, President of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, recommended the city look into whether the Lodging Tax could be used to help defray some of the costs. Councilman Jon Neal discussed the Oroville C.A.R.E.S. Coalition, an anti-

SEE COUNCIL| PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US

Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com katherine@gazette-tribune.com / ext. 5052 Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

drug organization that is looking to do a billboard in town. The billboard will feature posters from a kid’s poster contest that the group ran (see page A5). The theme of the posters was “Drugs Destroy Families,” said Neal. Creation of the advertisement that will feature the posters on a billboard near Expressions Espresso will cost about $320, while the monthly rent is $250 a month, with three months up front. “I don’t know if the council is aware of the Omak Coalition against underage drinking and drug use,” said Oroville Police Chief Todd Hill, saying they have made a big impact in mid-county. “Oroville is looking for a grant for a full time person to work on this. I think education is one of the best ways to tackle the problem. I think a Coalition billboard would be a good use of what most people feel is an eyesore. The Omak Coalition has made a monumental dif-

Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

A3 A4 A5

Calendar Classifieds Real Estate

A5 A6-7 A7

Sports Obituaries

A8-9 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 14, 2016

LOCAL NEWS COUNCIL | FROM A1

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Jack Hughes in his office at Hughes’ Department Store. The store owner said Hughes’ will remain open although many changes will take place in the next few months as they reorganize.

NOT CLOSING | FROM A1 employees have more than one job so he shouldn’t have to make major layoffs. Several factors combined to make the couple consider closing the store at the end of this

“We will still have the same great prices and the same great selection, what we really need now is for our community to support us. ”

when their dollar goes back up and they shop here it will just be a bonus,” he said. Summing up, he said, “We still have a long way to go and we will be pushing real hard to make it, we are working with Economic Alliance, they were the last linch-

pin and they have come through for us, which we think will really move us along. We will still have the same great prices and the same great selection, what we really need now is for our community to support us.”

changes in the economy. Jennifer wrote a grant in 2014 regarding the fires and as we got that grant up and running then the 2015 fires happened. We will now look at the whole county in applying for the grant, not just a corner of the county,” he said. “The reality of what happens in Omak can affect what happens in Oroville and visa versa.” Guss said he appreciated whatever financial support the council can give to the NCW EDD. “I realize it might be less than what we are asking in the letter as it is a smaller community,” he said. “The silver lining is it can give communities an opportunity to start fresh. The federal government will put significant money into disaster declared counties,” he said. The EDD director said he would like to talk about what the community needs. “It gives you an opportunity to rebuild with the past in mind, while keeping the future in mind,” he said, adding that acting on a regional basis gives an area more attention. Clerk Denney said the city did not have the $3000 being requested in the letter, but she would look into what it might be able to afford and let the council know. Guss said he understood and said Tonasket was also participat-

ing. Chris Branch, Oroville’s director of Community Development, said the next meeting of the Association of Washington Cities will be in Oroville. Marcus Alden asked the city if they had any information about the purchaser of the old U.S. Border Patrol Station. He said it was his understanding that the number one bidder hasn’t completed payment and that is against federal guidelines for selling off government buildings. “The number one bidder hasn’t come forth with all the money, under fairness it should go next to the number two bidder and then to the number three bidder,” he said. “If you bid and don’t pay that’s an illegal sale.” Alden said the building should be used and maintained. “I think they have occupancy, I’ve seen people going in and out there,” said Neal, who was serving as mayor pro tem for the meeting as both the mayor and pro tem were not in attendance. “I’d like to thank the city guys for their snow removal, they are doing a great job,” said Koepke. “This has been like a good ol’ winter from the sixties and seventies.” “Your roads are better than Wenatchee’s,” said Guss.

CHAMBER | FROM A1

Jack Hughes, Owner Hughes’ Department Store

month. A low Canadian dollar made even Hughes’ lower prices harder for cross border shoppers to justify and the fires this summer also slowed traffic heading to Okanogan County. “We’re expecting two more years of bad Canadian exchange, even figuring that into the equation this store will make it, and

ference down there. They’ve had about a 17 percent drop in underage alcohol use and about the same for drugs.” Oroville City Clerk JoAnn Denney said she thought there were some miscellaneous funds available to help make a contribution to the billboard. “I think that’s a great idea,” said Councilman Koepke, “I would have no problem with the city donating $750.” Councilman Neal said he had also approached the Masons to help sponsor the billboard. The chamber’s Andrews suggested that a matching fund account be set up. The council agreed to give $750. “We really appreciate it,” said Neal. Michael Guss, director of the North Central Washington Economic Development District, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Commerce, discussed the EDD’s role in the three counties it serves, Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan. Currently the EDD is doing an economic assessment and plan surrounding the fires from this summer. These will help when the comprehensive plan is updated. “In the last two years there have been some very significant

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The closing banner across the bottom of the Prince’s Center reader board on both sides had read Hughes’ Department Store Closing, 30% off. Now it reads Inventory Reduction up to 40% off. The deep discounts will soon end now that the store is remaining open, according to Hughes.

percent. Kay Sibley, director of the Borderlands Historical Society, said their group had written a grant to place a bicycle service station near the Depot Museum. The station would feature a stand, air compressor, tools and lights to work on bikes. “People for Bikes on the west side gave the grant. They didn’t know how may miles for bikes we have. They funded all $3800 we asked for,” she said. Arnie Marchand, who is also with the society, said that the station should be placed where it can be easily seen by police and not vandalized.

Sibley said the station will include a large color map show-

“People for Bikes on the west side gave the grant. The fuded all $3800 we asked for.” Kay Sibley, Director, Borderlands Historical Society

ing the different types of road and the traffic that uses them. Andrews said Oroville had a large amount of bikes in town last year and suggested the creation of bike racks around town to help

promote tourism. Joseph Enzensperger said the Pacific Northwest Trail Association will be holding their Trail Days in Oroville again next summer. He said it will feature music, food and displays. Chris Branch discussed what work had been done in the passed to connect the Similkameen and Whistler Canyon Trails, which are sections of the PNT. He said they had looked at getting a bridge to go across Driscol Island. Marchand suggested the group look at retired WWII military bridges, which he said can be obtained for free.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Our people make a difference locally “Putting People First” is the most important of Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn’s four top values. This is because the people who work for a place of business are fundamentally what holds it together and makes it successful. Without a doubt, the folks working at Kettle River – Buckhorn are a group to be proud of. They donate to important causes in the area, volunteer time and resources,

When the weather began getting colder in November, we held our annual coat drive to help ensure that youth in the area had warm clothing for the season. Our employees brought in a new record of 84 new and gently-used coats, which were then distributed to those in need. Also this winter, we completed our fifth year of our “Adopt-a-Child or Senior” program, where we worked with Washington Federal and the Okanogan County Community Action Council to help families in the Ferry and Okanogan County areas who were unable to provide Christmas gifts for their children or elderly. This year, between our employees and the site, we raised over $4,000 for the program. A committee of Kinross employees gathered the donations and went shopping locally in order to fill gift requests. Through the program, we were able to help 56 individuals have a joyful Christmas. We were also able to visit the nursing home in Republic, where Santa handed out gifts to each resident. Kinross, Kettle River - Buckhorn would like to thank our employees for their Kinross Environmental Specialist Rick Rose as Santa outpouring of support for the Ferry and Claus brings some Christmas cheer to residents of Okanogan County communities this holiday Ferry County Public Hospital District’s nursing home season. Kinross is honored to have such a facility as part of this year’s “Adopt-a-Child or Senior” fine group of people working here. We are program. proud of our employees, and of the commuand help make the Ferry and Okanogan County nity we live in. Thank you and we hope you have a region a great place to live. safe and enjoyable holiday season.

Kinross employees make a significant inpact on local communities in charitable giving, economic contributions and volunteerism. Pictured here are employees Deana Zakar, Rick Rose and Susan Byington.


JANUARY 14, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTS CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Koleby Christine Smith, 18, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 5 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Smith was sentenced to was 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50 for the July 10, 2015 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge William Albert Janczyk, 50, Oroville, with forgery and third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 22, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Anthony Eisen, 27, Oroville, with first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 22. 2015. The court issued a criminal summons for Jesse Lee Coyne, 31, Omak, for two counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and one count of second-degree unlawful hunting of wild birds. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 12, 2015. DISTRICT COURT Lane Scott Dawson, 20, Omak, had three charges dismissed: third-degree theft, violation of a no-contact order and fourthdegree assault. Dawson was fined $500. Jesus De Aquino Oregon, 38, Oroville, guilty of telephone harassment. De Aquino Oregon was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 356 days suspended, and fined $933. Janice M. Dewar, 56, Osoyoos, B.C., had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Nathaniel James Edenso, 35, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Edenso was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 83 days suspended, and fined $608 Charles Leroy Ellis Jr., 46, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Ellis was sentenced to

364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $808. Oscar Flores Bartolo, 36, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Flores Bartolo was fined $1,475. Kristopher Paul Graber, 38, Omak, had an obstruction charge dismissed. Tamara Marie LaMotte, 55, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. LaMotte was fined $200. Glen W. Lanphear, 66, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Scott Robert MacClain, 41, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Shana Renee Mackie, 22, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Mackie was fined $200. Kyle Allen Magana, 20, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and obstruction. Magana was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,058.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JAN. 4, 2016 Two-vehicle crash on Conconully St. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Littering on N. Fir St. in Omak. Fraud on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Juniper St. in Oroville. Multiple-vehicle crash on Apple Way in Oroville. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Michael Anthony Eisen, 27, booked for third-degree possession of stolen property and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Brennen Michael Quigley, 18, booked for indecent liberties. James Carl Walkier, 47, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI.

TUESDAY, JAN. 5, 2016

listed, 30, court commitment for DUI. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 27, booked for POCS, possession of drug paraphernalia and an OCSO FTA warrant for POCS.

Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Assault on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Pogue Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fraud on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Drugs on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Burglary on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Elias F. Vargas, 25, booked on two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and seconddegree DWLS. Scott Allan Baker, 50, booked on a WDFW FTA warrant for physical control. Maria Gomez Aispuro, 30, DOC detainer. Martin Ray Hoffman, 31, booked for second-degree possession property.

THURSDAY, JAN. 7, 2016 One-vehicle roll-over crash on Gold Rush Ridge Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Search warrant on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Sex offense on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Drugs on Ellemeham Mt. Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Two reports of public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Assault on Pine St. in Omak. Assault on Oak St. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Custodial interference on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Jon Gabriel Devon, 37, booked on an OCSO order of production. DeeDee LouiseTompkins, 29, booked on an OCSO order of production. Martin Antonio Aguilar, 27, booked on an OCSO order of production. Christopher Nicholson, no middle name listed, 29, booked on an OCSO order of protection. Jessica Elizabeth Freiley, 23, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for third-degree theft. David Glenn Ferrell, 33, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6, 2016 One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Automobile theft on Heidi Court in Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on Bogey Dr. near Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Queen St. in Okanogan. Threats on Rehmke Rd near Tonasket. Drugs on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run vehicle crash on Benton St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Antonio Martinez Cuin, 26, DOC detainer. Darla Dee Speiser, 50, booked on an FTA warrant for DUI. Terry Lee Zoller, 64, DOC detainer. Daniel Howard Sebring, 61, court commitment for physical control. Hector Tevalan Lopez, 25, court commitments for DUI and fourth-degree assault (DV). Erin Speiser, no middle name

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Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Littering on Pine St. in Omak. Harassment on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on S. Ash St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Phone reported missing. Fraud on Oak St. in Omak. Assault on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on S. Ash St. in Omak. Norman Bo Sammaripa, 40, booked for DUI, first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Kile William Beeman, 25, booked on an FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Terri Anne Stevens, 31, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV).

Violation of a no-contact order on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Oak St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hanford St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Brisia A. Carrasco, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault and thirddegree malicious mischief. Andrea Lynn Vaughn, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Corrina Shy Starr Plant, 21, booked for disorderly conduct, obstruction and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Danny Joe Smart, 34, court commitment for DUI. Elizabeth Ann Zierlein, 35, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Crystal Sunshine Moore, 30, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Eric Mathew Anguiano, 24, booked for third-degree DWLS. Loren Mitchell Harry, 24, booked on an FTA bench warrant for POCS.

One-vehicle crash on Molson Rd. near Molson. No injuries reported. Sex offense on Sunrise Heights Rd. near Okanogan.

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Two-vehicle crash on Conconully

Public intoxication on Omak Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Kermal Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Weapons offense on S. Fir St. in Omak. Loitering on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on Benton St. in Omak. Connesha Danial Nanamkin, 24, DOC detainer. Donovan Rae Nysti, 22, booked on prosecutor’s warrants for obstruction and resisting arrest.

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JANUARY 14, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

NW Ice Fishing Festival is this Saturday

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

So, who says there’s nothing to do in our area during the winter – with the opening of the Highland’s Sno Park and now Sitzmark Ski Area (see page A9), those that like to shush through the snow on skis or boards have a perfect opportunity close by. For the angler, or those that just like to watch, the Northwest Ice Fishing Festival is this Saturday and I hope everyone gets a chance to participate, whether out on the ice at Sidley Lake or inside the Molson Grange Hall. There is a little bit of everything from fishing to food, arts and crafts and music and is always an enjoyable time. While I haven’t ice fished for several years I enjoy walking around on the lake and talking with the anglers, learning what special techniques they’re trying to tempt the fish onto their line and perhaps partaking in a beverage to keep me warm. It was particularly fun last year when the date was moved up from February for the first time as several fish were caught and it became a real contest to see who would win. This year the ice is thick and there have Out of already been quite a few who are having pre-fest My Mind success out on the lake, reports Marcus Alden, Gary A. DeVon who is working with the Oroville Chamber of Commerce to promote the event. He told the Oroville City Council and the Chamber of Commerce that participation is expected to be larger than normal. After a trip to Osoyoos he said a Canadian film crew might be on hand as those north of us would like to promote their area as a place to come and ice fish in the winter. Alden also said that there are a lot of vendors who will be on hand in the Grange Hall. All the tables had been filled except two, according to Alden. The Pine Wood Derby races will also be back, this time participants can be of any age. It’s a good time to brush off that old derby car and see if it still has what it takes to compete. It’s unfortunate, but the dog sledding demonstration won’t happen this year – it’s a lot of fun to go for a ride with Rev. Gary Forgey, but circumstances won’t allow him to participate this year. I used to ice fish with my friend Greg out on Lake Osoyoos, but when the wind started to blow and it got cold I headed back to shore. I guess you’d say I’m a fair weather ice fisher. However, one year we made a portable ice hut out of three sheets of plywood, some hinges, a large dowel, a blue tarp and an old pair of skis. We’d pull it out on the lake, jam the dowel between the two plywood walls and fish through a couple of holes cut through the plywood floor. We had two five gallon plastic buckets to sit on and even an old Coleman stove to keep us warm. That’s my idea of ice fishing. The fishing festival is more than just a good time, money raised each year helps to keep Oroville’s Visitor Information Center going. The festival was the idea of Robin Stice who has Eden Valley Guest Ranch. She felt it would be a good fundraiser back when the chamber ran the VIC. Now that the Borderlands Historical Society has taken over operation of the center, the chamber still sponsors the festival as a way of supporting this important link between the community and visitors to our area. Come on out and register to fish at 7 a.m. Saturday morning or come out for breakfast and to cheer on the anglers.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Voice your opinion on primitive road closures

Dear Editor, Notice to all residents of Okanogan County who like to fish, hunt, picnic, or use your recreational vehicles in any manner. Your right to access Public Lands are being eliminated one road at a time. In fact, right now in the South County, there is approximately 6 to 10,000 acres of public access lost due to road closures. Currently, every Tuesday, the Okanogan County Commissioners have on their agenda to eliminate (primitive) roads that the County seldom maintains, if ever. They now want them ‘off the books’ so they can budget monies in another direction. Monies that were rarely, if ever, used for maintenance on the same said roads. There are laws governing vacations of roads. However, our Commissioners have been voting to vacate public roads for the benefit of large private landowners/corporation in spite of public input. Existing roads are important to all of us, and never more so since the Carlton Complex in 2014 and Okanogan Complex fire of 2015. Roads are most importantly used for fire suppression for firemen and residents living within the area. Most primitive roads are mostly maintained by the people who use them. Wind storms put down trees, heavy rainfalls create rocks and debris in roadways. It is not usually the County that is there to clear the roads, but the users are in these instances. Now the County Commissioners want to eliminate them they feel they are not of any use anymore. They indeed have short memories or they have their priorities confused by putting their highest priority on Money, instead of the people of Okanogan County they were elected to represent. Don’t think for a moment this will not affect you. Maybe not today, next month, or next year. Once the roads are closed, your opportunity for usage is gone. As a Chiliwist Valley resident for over 34 years, I have witnessed – first hand – where closures of our roads exclude us from two different small lakes, alternate routes to Methow Valley and forest lands. Most important for my family, friends, and neighbors right now, is the Three Devils Road. If closed, it would severely cut our safety net for fire evacuation. Residents of Methow Valley, Okanogan Valley, and Tonasket areas need to voice their opinion now or give up that right to access your favorite areas as you have been doing for years and had hoped to pass that privilege on to our future generations. The Chiliwist road in question – Three Devils Road, is now in litigation and we are awaiting the process of the Supreme Court. If you would like help, please contact us at nrappe@wildblue,net Help keep our Public Roads Public. Sincerely, Nora L Rappe Malott

Medical Lake. Martin Hall is operated by a Montana corporation. If this proposed move is news to you, you aren’t alone. The BOCC discussed the move during an open session on October 27, 2015; however, the issue was not included on the agenda and there were no notes of the discussion in the BOCC’s board minutes. The Juvenile Court Administration was not advised the Detention Center would be discussed. After learning about the October BOCC meeting, the Superior Court Presiding Judge and Juvenile Administrator contacted the BOCC’s office and requested to be informed before further discussions took place on the topic. However, the Juvenile Court Administration was not informed by the Commissioners prior to the next two meetings that discussed this proposed move. The BOCC is conducting a cost/benefit analysis of the proposal. The analysis will examine four considerations: authority, capital facility cost, personnel cost and collateral impacts. Authority: is it legal for the BOCC to outsource the facility? The RCW is clear on this “juvenile court shall be administered by the superior court.” Capital facility cost: the commissioners will consider operating and maintenance costs of maintaining the current facility or outsourcing to a Montana corporation. Personnel Costs: The move would result in the loss of approximately eight full-time jobs in our county. Collateral Impacts: the county law enforcement agencies that use the juvenile facility will be required to transport youth to Medical Lake for processing, court appearances, etc.; increasing costs to these agencies. The impact on the youth and their families must also be taken into consideration. Families of these youth will not be as likely to visit their children or work with the court system on ways to reduce recidivism because of the time and cost to travel to Medical Lake. Research shows that juvenile offenders whose families participate in the rehabilitation of their children while incarcerated have reduced recidivism rates. I encourage the BOCC to retain our juvenile facility in our county. Sincerely, Denise Varner Okanogan

U.S. v. Hammond and Commissioners may close Juvenile Detention government overreach Dear Editor, The Board of County Commissioner’s (BOCC’s) is considering the closure of our local Juvenile Detention Center and subsequent move of these youth to Martin Hall in

Dear Editor, Once again, we are seeing a government agency use its powers to increase its landholdings, in this case the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. When private landholders whose property abutted the

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

Refuge refused to sell, the government diverted water causing lakes to flood homes, corrals, barns and grazing land. It then swooped in to buy the ranches whose owners were now going broke. The Hammond family land was one of the few ranches left. The government began to barricade roads and revoke grazing permits. In 2010, in a final act of ultimate legal pressure, the government filed suit against the Hammonds charging them based upon two “arsons” in 2001 and 2006 which began on the Hammond’s land but spread to the Refuge. The trial judges found that the 2001 fire damaged juniper trees and sagebrush whose value might total $100, and the 2006 fire burned about an acre of public land. The Hammonds were charged using the Federal Anti-terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (just a little over the top, don’t you think?) which requires a five year prison term. The Hammonds entered into a plea agreement with the government which accepted the jury’s verdict and waived their appeal rights believing the plea agreement would end the case. The trial court refused to apply the mandatory five year sentence finding it did not fit the crime and violated the eighth amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. The Hammonds (son and father) then served their terms of one year and three months, respectively. Here comes the stinky part: The U.S. Attorney appealed the trial judge’s decision, and the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals agreed to order the Hammonds back to prison to serve the five year term. At this same time, the Hammonds were struggling to pay a $400,000 federal government civil settlement, the terms of which gave the government the right of first refusal to purchase the Hammond property if they couldn’t pay the money. Ranchers and farmers are some of the hardest working folks in our society. It’s a difficult life: long hours, low wages, physically draining, tied to the whims of nature—you have to love the lifestyle to keep doing it year after year. They are becoming an ever increasing minority who are financially incapable of fighting against an oppressive legal system funded by the federal government. That is why it is so important that they not be forgotten. Yes, the Hammonds did a foolish thing regarding the fires. But the ultimate price of the damage done to federal land in no way equates to what the federal government has demanded as its revenge on the Hammonds. And by the way, how many federal employees have gone to jail for fires on government land that have been allowed to spread to private property? We in the Methow Valley over the last two years are all too familiar with that “act of terrorism.” Chrystal Perrow Winthrop, WA

paid to the enrollee at the end of his service. In addition, each enrollee receives $8.00 in cash each month and sends $15.00 to the father or mother if they need it. GROCERY PRICES: 4 lbs. raisins, $.21; 2 lbs fig bars, $.19; 16 oz. can oysters, $.15; 2 lbs. walnuts, $.45; M.D. toilet tissue, 3 rolls, $.25; 2 lb. pkg crackers, $.17; 2 doze Sunkist Oranges, $.35.

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY

The Oroville Gazette

FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

50 Years Ago:

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, January 3 – 10, 1941: Writer’s comment. I felt this item from Jan. 3, 1941, called for a repeat and is still appropriate today! Some call it “Old Glory” or “Stars & Stripes” but the correct name is” The Flag of the United States.” In these times of stress and turmoil at home and particularly abroad, every good citizen looks with pride on the Flag of our Republic – The Flag of Freedom. One of the finest tributes of our flag ever written or spoken is the following by our former President Calvin Coolidge: “It pictures the vision of a people whose eyes were turned to the rising dawn. It represents the hope of a father for his prosperity. It was never flaunted for the glory of royalty; but to be born under it is to be the child of a king and to establish a home under it is to be the founder of a royal house. Alone of all flags, it expresses the sovereignty of a people which ensures when all else passes, he who lived under it and is loyal to it, is loyal to truth and justice everywhere. He who lives under it and is disloyal to it is a traitor to the human race everywhere.” At a fair board meeting held Monday night, Phillip Bloom, Assistant County Agent, made a report on the findings of the committee. One of the questions earlier was the possibility of the County Granges taking over the fair. After his presentation, it was apparent that the fair in Oroville, after a year of rest, that again Oroville will host the fair this year. While men are daily called up for compulsory military service and are volunteering one to four years service in some branch of military service, the Civilian Conservation Corps continues to offer $30 per month, without military training, to unemployed young men in Okanogan County. Every boy should also know that after Jan. 1, 1941, the CCC will save $7.00 per month from the $30.00 pay which will be

January 6 – 13, 1966: Vern Ritter, Assistant Manager and Chief Engineer of the Okanogan County PUD has resigned from the local utility to accept a similar position with a Mason County PUD. Ritter will be succeeded in his engineering job at Okanogan, by Dennis L. Wilson from Billings, Mont. Ritter came from Spokane to the Okanogan PUD in 1959. The snow continues to fall. At least this was the situation on Wednesday as snow began falling about 9 a.m. and continued throughout the day. By 6 p.m., a total of four inches had fallen to make the total on the ground as of Wednesday night at 22 inches. The Oroville Police Department has set aside a street for sleigh riding in Oroville. The department has blocked off the old High School hill for all to enjoy the age-old sport. Police Chief, Delvin Gates, warned that the high school hill is the only street to be used for the sport. Lottie Alcorn (Osborne), a familiar face at Ben Prince Department Store, will be missed by residents of Oroville. As of Jan. 1, 1966, Lottie has retired from her clerking duties. Lottie had worked in that store for 18 years and his witnessed the growth of the store and the town. “We will get growth in the Pacific Northwest whether we want it not,” were the words spoken by Sam Boddy, Manager of the Chelan County development Council and guest speaker at the annual Chamber of Commerce Installation banquet. The new officers for 1966 are: Clayton Emry, President; Dan Webber, Vice President; Mary Thayer, Treasurer and Rev. J. W. Kiser, Secretary. Oroville Lodge No. 255 and Ellivoro Rebekahs No. 234, will have a joint installation on Saturday, Jan. 15 at the Oroville Grange Hall at 8 p.m. The Sitzmark Ski Area got into full operation last weekend with a good crowd on hand both Saturday and Sunday. The Oroville Schools are running a bus each Saturday, leaving the school at 9: a.m. and returning at 5 p.m. Grocery Prices: 1 Qt. Orange Juice, $.39; 44 oz Sunny Boy Peanut Butter, $1.09; 4 10 oz. boxes of Strawberries, $.98; Ground Beef, 3 lbs. $1.14; Bananas, $.10

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JANUARY 14, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Good days for big pot of soup and bread How can it be the middle of the month already​​? Wasn’t just last week New Year’s? I guess I lost a week. Well, that is what happens when you get old. Tomorrow is my birthday, again. We joined about 16 other folks from Oroville and went to Laughlin, Nevada, for four days. I guess that is what happened to my lost week. It was rainy and windy and not warm like I would liked it to have been. But I had fun shopping at the Outlet Mall. I have a long list of mundane things that have to be done, now that I’m home, like clean and defrost the freezer, and

sign, under oath, that I will not put things back in, helter-skelter and without marking and dating stuff. Then the next thing is to go through the clothes closet and throw out anything that wasn’t worn last year. And by then it should be time to tackle the storage shed and really clean house there. Oh! Fun! And I guess first of all, the Christmas decorations in the house must be packed away. Having bronchitis is no fun at all... take my word for it. Sunday came and went and I didn’t go to church, but I heard that our good friend, Pat Robbins, took a tumble and

ended up in the hospital. We extend wishes for a speedy recovery. Jack Lorz is now home from the hospital and slowly recovering, with speech still affected from his recent stroke. Remember Memorial services for Mike Buckmiller are Saturday, Jan. 16 at the Bergh Funeral Chapel at 2 p.m. On that same day, services for Gerald Thompson will be held at 11 a.m. at Bergh’s Chapel. Jerry passed away in Oregon. Condolences to both families, who have many friends and relatives in the area, after having lived here many years. For the outdoor minded folks is the NCW Fishing Festival, Molson, this coming Saturday where avid fisherman meet to try and catch the “whopper” that got away last year. Not enjoying the cold, I’ll read about it next week. Congratulations to Brax and Dee Cleman who recently reached their 62 wedding anniversary, Jan. 9.

Are you getting any of the bargains It surely is good days for a big pot of from Hughes Department Store, as they hot soup and bread. Slather a lot of butkeep lowering the prices to get the inven- ter on French bread slices, place it under tory down? It is so sad that this situation the broiler (and stay there and watch it has happened. It will effect brown) for just a few seconds so many, in so many ways. I and dip it in your favorite have lived in Oroville since soup and forget your trou1943 and I don’t believe I have bles... for a while anyway! seen so many vacant buildThen, when you want a ings in those 73 years. I know treat, try a root beer float! many folks are searching for They’re good any time. ideas to turn “things” around Are you tired of plain ole’ but so far it is a bleak pictoast for breakfast? Mix some ture. It would seem that out cinnamon, a few sprinkles of there somewhere, in the big nutmeg with some sugar and cities, where overhead costs sprinkle your toast, after butare so high that someone in THIS & THAT tering it and placing it under the manufacturing business Joyce Emry the broiler, again watching it of something, would say, carefully. Because if you walk “maybe we should try a more away, you’re liable to find remote area and try and keep our costs that your smoke detectors do work and down.” We have so many big, empty you have a smelly house to air out. Does warehouses just waiting to be used for that sound like experience talking? something. ‘Til next week.

NW Ice Fishing Fest this weekend SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Just to remind you all of this weekends activities revolving around the Northwest Ice Fishing Festival. Starting with the Pancake Breakfast and registration for the Ice Fishing Festival at 7 a.m. at the Grange Hall in Molson. Fishing actually starts at 8 a.m. and all fish must be to the judges by 3 p.m. The lake is

Submitted photo

Winners of the Oroville C.A.R.E.S. Coalition Art Contest are (l-r) Yudany Padilla, third place; Natalie Rodriguez, second place and Reese Noel, first place. The theme of the contest was “Drugs Destroy Families.”

Student Art Contest winners chosen

OROVILLE C.A.R.E.S. COALITION

SUBMITTED BY CORI HILDERBRAND OROVILLE C.A.R.E.S COALITION

The Oroville C.A.R.E.S Coalition is pleased to announce winners in the first annual art contest opened to elementary students during the month of December. Winning entries were judged on originality, clarity of the theme message “Drugs Destroy Families”, and artistic merit. Participants used creative and diverse mediums and scenarios to express this message. Isolating three winners from dozens of excellent entries was not easy! Okanogan Community Coalition staff from Omak assist-

ed in the final selection. First place was awarded to Reese Noel, a second grader at Oroville Elementary. His artwork incorporated a broken heart and tears, clearly portraying how drug abuse affects both families and individuals. Reese’s masterpiece will soon be displayed on a billboard at Oroville’s city entrance. Natalie Rodriguez, grade six, claimed second place with her rendition of a loving family hiking in the woods. Third place winner, Yudany Padilla, grade three, portrays a family posing happily in their yard near a fruit laden apple tree.

Come watch the Seahawks SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

January is chugging along and has brought some snow and slush. Make sure you drive safe out on those roads when traveling. I hope all those resolutions you have made for the New Year are still intact and going strong. The Seahawks snuck through the first game, so make sure you come on down this Sunday and cheer them on with others as they play the Panthers. Tuesday will be our weekly taco Tuesday from 5 to 7 p.m. So get on down here and enjoy some crisp or soft tacos. Bev Montanye

TONASKET EAGLES will be here to make sure you get the most delicious tacos around. Wednesday the pool league will be playing at 7 p.m. so come in and show your support for our teams and cheer a team on to victory. Bingo is back in full swing this Friday at 7 p.m. and will be a grand time as always. Get those daubers ready and come try for your chance at the large jackpot. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. on Friday to supply you with those scrumptious hamburgers and fries and other delights we all enjoy. The Joker Poker drawing will

Oroville C.A.R.E.S Coalition is a newly formed non-profit organization comprised of concerned citizens synergizing to create a healthy, drug free environment for youth and families of the Oroville community. Oroville High School library serves as a gathering place for meetings, held the second Thursday of each month from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Caring local citizens who wish to join this effort are encouraged to attend. O.C.C. extends a very grateful “Thank You“ for generous donations from the City of Oroville and Masonic Lodge for helping fund the billboard. Oroville businesses contributing prize money to art contest winners include Chuck Spieth Insurance, Camaray Motel and Neal’s Auto Body and Glass. be at 7 p.m. on Saturday and the pot is growing, so come see if you will be the next winner. Linda will be here Saturday also at 8 p.m. for karaoke and playing some tunes to get your feet in a dancing mood. Come enjoy some good music and singing and enjoy a wonderful Saturday night out. Sunday breakfast is back and will be cooking up that great food from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m.. Pinochle will be at 1 p.m. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows. Ken Cook took home first place and second place went to Wanda Sutherland. Neil Fifer grabbed the last pinochle of the day. Leonard Paulsen had low score of the day. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

ITEMS FROM THE PAST | FROM A5 per lb.; Round Steak, $.79 per lb. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: Jan. 5th, 18 degrees, maximum and 11 degrees minimum; Jan. 6th, 27 and 12; Jan. 7th 38 and 10; Jan. 8th, 44 and 35; Jan. 9th, 40 and 19; Jan. 10th, 31 and 25 and Jan. 11th, 37 and 30. Total precipitation for the period, .48” and snow from 11”- 13” inches total.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: January 3 -10, 1991: A Loomis man was arrested and over 570 marijuana plants with an approximate vale of $37,000 were seized by the Drug Task Force last Thursday afternoon. The marijuana was found growing in the basement of a house near Spectacle Lake. The amazing Oroville Hornets maintained their number one status in the Caribou Trail League boys basketball standings by taking last Saturday’s game from Chelan Goats 79 – 73. The scorers for the Hornets were; Stan Rohn, 9; Jeff Miller, 12; Jason Williams 9; Steve Jenkins, 24 and Ryan Frey, 25, The previous night, the Hornets bested the Chelan Bulldogs by a score of 52 – 48. Nathan Scott Gard is the name of the first baby born at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket at 3:30 p.m., Jan. 2, 1991. The proud parents are Kristin and Rick Gard of Oroville. Battle Mountain Gold Company has decided in favor of exercising its $5 million option and continues to pursue gold exploration on Buckhorn Mountain

five miles east of Chesaw. In mid-December, it was announced that deposits of gold had been found at deeper levels. These adjacent reserves were estimated to contain 8.3 million tons, bearing 842,000 ounces of gold. North County basketball fans got to witness their favorite sport played with an international flavor this week when a visiting team from “down under” came all of the way to Tonasket and Oroville to play the JV and Varsity basketball teams from each high school. The Aussies, who range in age from 16 to 19 years, are all residents of Keillor and Essendon, suburbs of Melbourne. The boys all play ball in various clubs affiliated with the Keillor Stadium. Real Estate Bargains: Over 8 acres, with at least 3 building sites, overlooking Curlew Lake, 165’ well would service more than one home, hook-ups for two mobile homes, $48,500; 4 bedroom, 2 bath on large lot, walking distance to business district, well maintained, $65,000; 2 bedroom home on 2 ½ acres, 3 miles from Tonasket, lots of fruit trees and possible pasture for beef or horses, $39,500.on Oct. 4, voted to give $500 to the Ambulance Associated drive for a defibrillator. They are also challenging other organizations to get behind this effort also. The official crowning of Miss Jo Meiers as Oroville’s Homecoming Queen at Oroville High School along with Princesses Brandy Beanblossom and Jenifer Gee. Real Estate Bargains in the area: 4 bedroom house, 1 ½ baths, like new condition, wood and electric heat, backyard privacy, $75,000; 10 + acres, 6 miles south of Oroville, with creek, well, electric power and irrigation water, $35,000.

HILLTOP COMMENTS ready and waiting. In the Hall all day there will be craft and sales tables for your enjoyment. You can purchase baked goods, crafts and raffle tickets. Come and enjoy the day. There will be lots of fishing prizes. On Friday night Jan. 15, there will be Bingo at 7 p.m. You can play Bingo on Saturday, Jan. 16 also in the Hall. It is always fun to watch the

Great turnout for pancake fundraiser

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY RALEIGH CHINN PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

The weather was with us and we had a good turnout for our January Pancake Breakfast fundraiser this past Saturday. Thanks go to a group who came all the way from Omak and to all those who volunteered to cook and clean up afterwards. The Lunch Menu: Thursday,

Jan. 14th - salisbury steak; Friday, Jan. 15th - swedish meatballs and Tuesday, Jan. 19th - baked fish. Don’t forget to pay your dues for 2016. Just $10 per senior age 60 and older. Canadians welcome. The Tuesday program for next week is our regular Business Meeting.

Looking for May Festival Royalty

OROVILLE MAY FESTIVAL

SUBMITTED BY DANA MCCOY OROVILLE MAY DAY COMMITTEE

Selection Night for the 2016 May Day Queen is Feb. 15. Any girl who is a junior in high school (Oroville or Tonasket), resides in Oroville, and meets the contract requirements may apply to run for May Day Queen. Applications

are available at Umpqua Bank or Oroville High School. We would like some input as to who our community feels would serve well as Grand Marshal’s for this year’s parade. A suggestion box is set up at Umpqua Bank.

kids and their dad’s run the Pine Wood Derby. We have been lucky and not had any more snow this past week. However, the weather people are saying there might be a bit for the festival. Come and enjoy the day. Did you know that the Sitzmark Ski area opened this past Saturday? Well it did. Linda Darrow is the chief cook and bottle washer and ready to serve up a burger or a dog and a homemade cinnamon roll. Come to our Hill Top and enjoy the weekend festivities. We wish the Seahawks the best. Go Hawks. Pinochle scores for Jan. 2 Most - Bev Holden, High Man - Ted Paris, High Woman Nellie Paulsen, Door Prize - Ken Ripley; Jan. 9 - 15 played. Most pinochles - Ken Ripley, High man - Ed Craig, High woman Judy Ripley and Door prize - Ken Ripley. Thought for the week: The man without a purpose is like a ship without a rudder–a waif, a nothing, a no man. Have a purpose in life, and, having it, throw such strength of mind and muscle into your work as God has given you. - Carlyle Come in and nominate any person, persons, or couple you feel should represent Oroville. The next May Day Committee meeting will be held on Jan. 25. at 6 p.m. at Umpqua Bank. The meeting is open to anyone wanting to be involved in any aspect of the May Day Festival. Parents of girls wishing to run for Queen are encouraged to attend. If you have any questions please contact Shelly Roberts at 509-560-3509 or Dana Kernan-McCoy at 509560-3864.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Tonasket Gun Club Trapshooting TONASKET - Tonasket Gun Club trapshooting this Sunday Jan. 10 at 10 a.m. and runs weekly through February. There will be practice each Wednesday at 1 p.m. Club members will help new shooters. Our annual meeting will be Jan. 17 at 1 p.m.

Oroville Gun Club Trapshooting OROVILLE - Inland NW Trapshooting at the Oroville Gun Club this Sunday, Jan. 17 at 1 p.m. and runs weekly to Feb. 28. Practice shooting is every Saturday at 1 p.m. The Oroville Gun Club will again raffle off a Henry Rifle or cash equivalent for first prize. Second is “the Family Gourmet Banquet from Omaha Steaks. Get raffle tickets from a club member or stop by

SEE CALENDAR | PG A10

Paul’s Service.

4-H Leaders Council OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County 4-H Leaders Council willmeet Thursday, Jan. 14 at 6 p.m. the WSU Okanogan County Extension Office, Rm. 101 at the county courthouse. The meeting is for all 4-H Adult volunteers, youth members, families and those interested in the county’s 4-H program. Pizza provided. More info 509-422-7245.

OROVILLE C.A.R.E.S. Coalition

OROVILLE - The Oroville C.A.R.E.S Coalition is a newly formed non-profit organization comprised of concerned citizens synergizing to create a healthy, drug-free environment for youth and families of the Oroville com-

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 REGULAR SHOWTIMES Oliver, B.C. Sun.–Mon.–Tues.–Thurs.....7:30p.m. Fri.–Sat....7:00 &9:00p.m. (unless otherwise stated)

ALVIN & THE CHIPMUNKS: ROAD CHIP THURS. - FRI. - SAT JAN. 14 - 15 - 16 SPOTLIGHT SUN. - MON.–TUES. JAN. 17 - 18 -19 IN THE HEART OF THE SEA G

PG

THURS - FRI. JAN 21-22 SHOWS 7 & 9:20PM

DADDY’S HOME SAT. - SUN. – MON. – TUES. JAN. 23 - 24 - 25 - 26 OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

Gift Cards Available!

Schedule for Fri Jan 15 - Thurs Jan 21 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

STAR WARS EPISODE VII: THE FORCE AWAKENS

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

10X TRIPLET LOUPES FULLY CORRECTED — Comes with leather snap case!

$32.99!

We’ve Got You Covered Go Statewide YOUorNEED HELP – They need work. Target a Region Reach over 2 million readers with many skills readers throughout Washington by advertising Coastal: 597,646 your job in 106 Community Newspapers! Eastern: 601,631 readers

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509-476-3602

PG13

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

RIDE ALONG 2

102 min

PG13

ACTION/COMEDY - ICE CUBE, KEVIN HART. FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT-SUN. *2:30, 6:00, 9:30 MON. *2:45, 6:15. TUE-THURS. 6:15.

THE REVENANT DRAMA.156 min R

LEONARDO DICAPRIO, TOM HARDY FRI. 6:00, 9:30. SAT.-SUN. 2:30, 6:00, 9:30 MON.2:45, 6:15. TUES-THURS. 6:15. JOY COMEDY/DRAMA 124 min JENNIFER LAWRENCE, ROBERT DE NIRO. FRI.-SUN. 6:15, 9:15. MON-THURS: 6:30. THE GOOD DINOSAUR ANIM PIXAR. SAT-MON *3:00 PG13

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HARRISON FORD, CARRIE FISHER. FRI. 7:00. SAT.- MON. *3:45, 7:15. TUES.-THURS. 6:45.

Average cost less than

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per paper

509.476.3602

PG

Adult $9.00

*Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


PAGE A6 6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 14, 2016 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 14, 2016

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

For Rent

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Subscribe to the...

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

AVAILABLE RENTALS; 3 BR Home $850. 2 BR, 2 BA home $700. 2 BR apt $650. 3 BR, 2 BA Apt $650. Sonora Shores $695. SUN LAKE REALTY 509-476-2121

Oroville Senior Living, Henderson Apartments, on Lake, N. Oroville, 3 miles on Boundary Point rd, 2 bdrm, in good shape, no smoking, no pets. Taking applications, $675/month, first and last. (509)476-2449 3 8 2

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Crosswords

Announcements

3

1

2

We have the following opportunities available:

4

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers Puzzle 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

PROMOTE YOUR REGION- The Tonasket School District AL EVENT for only pennies. is now accepting applications for a Reach 2.7 million readers in PAYROLL/PERSONNEL/ newspapers statewide for HR OFFICER $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper 8 hours per day, Monday – or (360) 515-0974 for details. Friday, 260 days per year. Must be proficient in Excel, Say it in the classifieds! Word, and FileMaker Pro, *Special deal* thorough understanding of *HAPPY BIRTHDAY payroll processes, FMLA, *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY FLSA, Family Care Leave *CONGRATULATIONS!! and Labor and Industries *WILL YOU MARRY ME? laws; familiarity with the MUST BE PREPAID WESPaC and Skyward pay$6.00 for the first 15 words roll programs and the Washadditional words $1.00 ington State Department of each. Bold words, special Retirement Systems plans. font or borders extra. AA degree or higher preAdd a picture ferred. Position closes Janufor only $1.50 more. ary 22, 2016. To apply, appliCall to place ad cants must complete an onOkanogan Valley line application and submit Gazette-Tribune materials through the online 800-388-2527 system. Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Job descriptions are available DID YOU FIND AN ITEM on the online system also. AND WANT TO FIND Please call the district office THE OWNER? at 509-486-2126 for help if Found items can be placed needed. in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 An Equal Opportunity words, or prepay for words Employer over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays. 4. Modify again

25. Chuck ___, Am. actor and martial artist

5. Cap

27. Type of one-celled algae

7. K follower

29. Hard to pin down

8. Antares, for one

31. Balaam’s mount

9. “Ain’t ___ Sweet”

32. Former Portuguese territory in S China

10. Colleague

38. Government income derived from taxes (2 wds) 41. Leaf opening 42. Baby grand, e.g. 43. In favor of 44. Hung around 46. Adjust 48. Couch 51. Attack ad, maybe 52. “Hold it!” 53. Care for 56. Apteryx australis 59. Cardiac prosthesis (2 wds) 62. 747, e.g. 63. Gun, as an engine

ANSWERS

64. Heirloom location 65. “The Playboy of the Western World” author

1. 1960s abstractionism (2 wds)

66. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir.

6. Dash lengths

67. “A merry heart ___ good like a medicine”: Proverbs

9. Lilac, e.g. 14. Skin problem

6. Balances

11. Arab leader 12. Japanese-American 13. Exams 18. Coal mine worker 19. Chinese dynasty 24. Friend 26. Beat, in a way 27. Honoree’s spot 28. “___ It Romantic?” (contraction) 29. Bona fide 30. Halo, e.g. 33. Supergarb 35. Enrage 36. Atomic particle 37. Arid 39. Giving off (energy) 40. Canine’s coat

16. Male friend from one’s neighborhood (slang)

Down

17. Consumption of alcohol

1. “The Adventures of Milo and ___,” film

Health General

North Valley Hospital Family Birthing Center is currently taking applications for an experienced

OB Nurse We have beautiful LDRP suites, a jetted labor tub, nitrous oxide pain management, child birth education classes and extensive breastfeeding assistance. Apply online at www.nvhospital.org or submit application to North Valley Hospital at 203 South Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509)486-3185. hr@nvhospital.org

45. Dolly ___ of “Hello, Dolly!” 47. Start liking (2 wds) 48. Trades 49. Before the due date 50. Hyperion, for one 51. Debonair

15. Big wine holder

20. ___ row

Found

23. Early inhabitants of Scotland

34. Cuts back

Across

Health General

DRIVER Okanogan County Transportation seeks relief driver immediately in the Tonasket and Oroville areas, CDL with passenger endorsement preferred but not required. Must be 25 years of age; pass background check, pre-employment and random drug testing and DOT physical. CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Apply in person at Your Family, Your Health, Your 431 5th Avenue W., Choice Omak, Wa or find the OCTN application We are looking for YOU to and background check online join our team! at www.octn.org under employment options. We are dedicated to our EOE employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, comwww.gazette-tribune.com munication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

5

Sudoku

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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54. “God’s Little ___” 55. Bank claim 57. Habeas corpus, e.g. 58. Allergic reaction

21. Foreword, for short

2. Alecia Moore’s stage name

60. Charge

22. Pedal pushers

3. Italian appetizer

61. “We’ve been ___!”

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

OKANOGAN ADMIN: CFO Full time Certified Medical Coding Specialist Full time HR Generalist Full time WIC Registered Dietician/Nutritionist Full time Roomer Full time. Bilingual required. Clinic Custodian Full time, 32 hrs/week MA-C Full time OMAK MEDICAL: Roomer Full time. Bilingual required. Clinic Custodian Full time, 32 hrs/week MA-C Full time BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Roomer Full time, Bilingual required MA-Certified Full time RN Case Manager Full time Dentist Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

Twisp/Okanogan Dental: Dental Assistant Full time. Travel between clinics is required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Public Notices Notice of Public Hearing CUP 2015-8 “Morgan Septic Lagoon” An application has been submitted by A.C. & Laurie Morgan for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) to construct

Public Notices three septage waste lagoons successively over a 5-year period. The lagoons will be adjacent to one another. Each lagoon will be 80’ x 300’ x 10’ built into the ground and covered with protective polyurethane liners. Sewage will be brought to the lagoon by licensed pumpers from Okanogan and other counties and transferred to the lagoon(s). Septage from the lagoons will be land applied on the property at agronomic rates to grow agricultural feed crops approved by the Department of Ecology. The project site is located at 222 Hubbard Rd, Riverside off of Highway 97 on parcel numbers 3526020009 and 3526020011. The public hearing for this project is scheduled for January 28, 2016 at 10:00 am in the Commissioners Hearing Room. Project comments can be submitted up to the hearing date and testimony may be given at the hearing. Failure to comment by this date denies a party standing to appeal the final decision. Direct questions and comments to: Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, Anna Randall, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7117. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 2016. #OVG677452 OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT SMALL WORKS ROSTER The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District maintains a Small Works Roster for the completion of public works projects in accordance with RCW 39.04.155 and OTID Resolution 2010-02. The maximum cost for any project cannot exceed $300,000.00 including costs of labor, material, equipment and sales and/or use taxes as applicable. All interested contractors not currently on the Small Works Roster are encouraged to submit an application at this time. OTID Small Works Roster application forms are available at the Districts office - 516 11th Ave. Oroville. Applications may be submitted in person or mailed to: Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District PO Box 1729 Oroville, WA 98844 Please direct inquiries and requests for applications to the Districts manager at 509-476-3696. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 2016. #OVG677155 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 1/22/16 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2006 Kawasaki VN2000A Lic# 43159C Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 2016. #OVG677471 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 1/22/16 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2003 Suzuki DR-Z4 Lic# 54294C Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 2016. #OVG677473 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 1/22/16 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2014 Utility Trailer 6X12 Lic# RF3699E Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 2016. #OVG677470 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-15-673648-SW APN No.: 3322170314 Title Order No.: 150152613-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): JOHN E. CRAMER, CARRIE L. CRAMER Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3132488 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 2/12/2016 , at 10:00 AM at the main entrance to the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd N, Okanogan, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL A THAT POR-

Continued on next page

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WOW’s in town

JANUARY 14, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The North American Wool Co-op (NAWC) has opened a Fiber Arts Studio in Tonasket, located in the former Hook, Bell and Spindle storefront at 315 N Whitcomb Ave. The Wide World of Wool (WOW) will be open to fiber artists during the week, and open to the general public Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m, or by appointment. Here people can find supplies for weaving, spinning, dyeing, knitting and crocheting projects including natural, exotic and synthetic “bling” or “glitz” fibers. Upcoming workshops at WOW include a weaving class taught by Priya Shellenberger in February; and River Jones will be teaching how to make a lace

A spinning wheel is displayed in WOW’s window, along with hats and purses by River Jones. January 14, 2016 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Continued from previous page

Public Notices TION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 33 NORTH, RANGE 22 E.W.M., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE AT THE WEST END OF THE TWISP BRIDGE ON STATE HIGHWAY 20; THENCE SOUTH 19 DEG. 05’71” WEST 212.20 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 66 DEG. 27’11” WEST 104.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEG. 17’52” WEST 83.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEG. 21’43” WEST 69.38 FEET THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 35’17” WEST 34.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 4 DEG. 00’05” EAST 568.89 FEET THENCE SOUTH 88 DEG. 38’05” EAST 26.49 FEET TO POINT A, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEG. 38’05” EAST TO THE ORDINARY HIGH WATER MARK ON THE WEST BANK OF THE METHOW RIVER; THENCE FOLLOWING SAID ORDINARY HIGH WATER MARK NORTHERLY TO A POINT LYING SOUTH 66 DEG. 27’11” EAST OF THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. (SAID POINT OF BEGINNING BEING NORTH 19 DEG. 05’21” EAST 450.15 FEET FROM POINT A); THENCE NORTH 66 DEG. 27’11” WEST TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. PARCEL B A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY AND UTILITY LINES AS DESCRIBED IN EASEMENTS RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NOS. 752318 AND 752321. More commonly known as: 621 METHOW VALLEY HWY E, TWISP, WA 98856-9829 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/9/2008, recorded 5/14/2008, under 3132488 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from JOHN E CRAMER, AND CARRIE L CRAMER, HUSBAND AND WIFE , as Grantor(s), to LS TITLE OF WASHINGTON , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the

scarf in April. “We are building a repertoire of different teachers, and seeing what people are interested in,” said NAWC president Vickie Eberhart. Once a person attends a workshop to learn a skill, they are welcome to use the studio space along with their fellow fiber artists. The workshop is also used for grading and sorting wool. The workshop will be hosting the 4-H group Tonasket Textilers every second week of the month. “We have a loom we are refurbishing for the kids to use,” said Eberhart, “and I just ordered a brand new, big loom for the studio.” The Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will take place at the Fairgrounds May 6-7, with a Wine and Wool kick-off event scheduled for May 5.

PAGE A7

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Supplies available for purchase at WOW include colored rovings, felting kit jars, bats of artistic and natural fibers, bamboo silk, raw wool, exotic fibers and a host of other goodies for the fiber artist. 7

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follo wing amounts which are now in arrears: $109,332.27 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $237,987.98 , together with interest as provided in the Note from 3/1/2011 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/12/2016 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 2/1/2016 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 2/1/2016 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 2/1/2016 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOHN E CRAMER, AND CARRIE L CRAMER, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 621 METHOW VALLEY HWY E, TWISP, WA 98856-9829 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 5/31/2013 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this

sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/ consumers/homeownership/post_ purchase_counselors_foreclosure. htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further re-

course against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/12/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Lauren Esquivel, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-15-673648-SW IDSPub#0093035 1/14/2016 2/4/2016 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, and February 2, 2016. #OVG665003

(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. lf the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 14, 2016 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Ryan Y. Rehberg, Ryan Y Rehberg, WSBA 32374 18000 International Blvd, Suite 550, SeaTac, WA 98188, Telephone (206) 246-8772 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 21, and 28, 2016. #OVG677562

Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 14, 21, 28, 2016. #OVG677165

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of DAVID R. VERBOIS, Deceased. Case No.: 15-4-07269-0 KNT PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1) www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY Estate of MAXWELL A. HARRISON, Deceased. NO. 15-4 00070-3 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against Decedent must present the claim: Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: By filing with the foregoing Court the original of the signed Creditor’s Claim, and By serving upon or mailing by first class mail to us at the address provided below a copy of the signed Creditor’s Claim. The Creditor’s Claim must be presented by the later to occur of: Thirty (30) days after we served or mailed this Notice to you as provided in RCW 11.40.020(3), or Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the Creditor’s Claim is not presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: January 14, 2016. Signed: Vonna L. Harrison, Personal Representative Address for Mailing of Service: Joshua F. Grant, P.S. Attorney at Law P.O. Box 619 Wilbur, WA 99185

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, a limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN, a deceased individual; Julian Castro, solely in his capacity as Secretary for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NINE MILE RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; DOES 1 through 10, inclusive, and ROES 1 through 10, inclusive. Defendants. NO. 15-2-00443-5 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION (60 DAYS) THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID DEFENDANTS ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 31st day of December, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, and serve a copy of your answer upon the uudersigned attorneys for plaintiff, LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE, at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. This is a Complaint for Judicial Foreclosure of Deed of Trust. DATED: December 17, 2015 LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE By: /s/ Benjamin D Petiprin Benjamin D. Petiprin, WSBA# 46071 Attorneys for Plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette - Tribune on December 31, 2015, January 7, 14, 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. OVG675143

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 14, 2016

SPORTS

Lady Hornets sting Tigers in nail-biter

Katie Teachout/staff photo

North County neighbors Tonasket and Oroville frequently grappled over ownership of the ball in Saturday’s game. Above, Tiger Jenna Valentine and Hornets Katherine Egerton and Pie Todd struggle for possession in the third. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

A closer game of hoops than Saturday’s (January 9) game between the Lady Tigers and the Lady Hornets isn’t often played; the score rarely separated by more than three points. Spectators from both ends of the North Okanogan sat at the edge of their seats as the clock wound down but the score stayed close. “It was really fun to watch. It came down to the wire and the

crowd was going pretty crazy at the end,” said Oroville Assistant Coach Bill Cottrell. The teams were tied at 9-9 at the end of the first quarter, and the Hornets ahead 19-18 at the end of the first half. Oroville entered the fourth quarter ahead 26-24, but with five minutes left the teams were tied 28-28. With just over a minute left in the game, the Tigers were behind 31-33 when Ashlynn Willis was awarded a free throw, bringing the Tigers to just one point behind. Tonasket

fouled two more times, giving Faith Martin a free throw to bring the score to 34-32 with just under ten seconds left; and Mikayla Scott’s free throw at two and a half seconds remaining ended the game 35-32. “It was a tight game all the way through. Every quarter of play was strongly contested,” said Cottrell. “The game was very well attended by a lively and very loud crowd in the Tonasket gym.” Hannah Hilderbrand led the Lady Hornets with 17 points, 10

rebounds, two blocks and two steals while having to sit with three fouls for half of the ballgame. Mikayla Scott scored 13 points, including four threepointers. Pie Todd added four points to the Hornets winning score and Faith Martin one. Scoring for Tonasket were Kayla Willis (8), Ashlynn Willis (6), Jenna Valentine (6), Johnna Terris (4), Madyson Clark (3), Kasey Nelson (3) and Ellie Alberts (2). The Lady Hornets are now 4-2 in league play and were scheduled to host Brewster Tuesday, Jan. 12. Last Tuesday (Jan. 5), the Lady Hornets “got back in the win column” with a strong defensive game at Manson, according to Cottrell. “Oroville dominated the first quarter 18-4 and never looked back,” Cottrell said. Leading scorer was Hilderbrand with 15 points and seven rebounds. “Jordyn Smith had a very good night with 14 points, shooting 50 percent from the field along with five rebounds, three steals and one blocked shot,” reported Cottrell. Martin came in with five points, three assists and four steals; Katherine Egerton scored four, Scott two and Havannah Worrell two. The JV girls also had a solid win against Manson, 44-24. “Sheridan Blasey had another excellent game, leading the Lady Hornets’ JV with 25 points, 11 rebounds and 13 steals,” said Cottrell.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville’s Faith Martin works her way to the basket past Madyson Clark. Katie Rawley scored 11, Liv Mathews six and Gwen Hankins two. “Jayden Mieirs and Christina

Herrick played another strong game on defense. It was a great team effort,” said Cottrell.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Ethan Smith, flanked by Hornets Andrew Mieirs, Nathan Hugus and Bryce Glover makes his way to the Tigers’ end of the court Saturday, Jan. 9 during the third quarter. The teams remained within points of one another from the beginning of the game through the end of the third. “Tonasket played really hard. We were able to catch fire in the fourth quarter to pull out the win,” said Oroville Coach Jay Thacker. The victory put the Hornets at 3-3 in league games before they were scheduled to host Brewster Tuesday, Jan. 12. The next home game for North County teams is Tuesday, Jan. 19 when the Tigers host Liberty Bell. The girls play at 6 p.m. and the boys at 7:30.

Oroville’s Juan Lopez looks for a teammate to pass the ball to during a first quarter that ended with the Hornets ahead 10-5. The Tigers were behind just 17-16 after the first half and trailing the Hornets 32-28 at the end of the third quarter before Oroville forged ahead for a 60-36 victory. Jesse Ramon led in points for Tonasket with 14, followed by Brydon Hires with eight. Ryker Ayers and Kyle Huber each scored four, Jordan Thrasher hit a threepointer, Seth Smith made two and Sam Nelson had one. Oroville’s Andrew Mieirs and Spencer Martin each scored 15, Bryce Glover 13, Nathan Hugus 10, Juan Lopez six, and Sage Sarmiento one.

Hartvig racks up first-round pins good, Bronze medal performance by pinning an opponent he had lost earlier to in the day for the consolation final,” said Ricevuto. Ocampo (126) “just missed the medal round” with a 2-2 performance. “First-year wrestler Ryan Scott (sophomore, 145) collected his first win with a first round pin but was eliminated from the tournament,” Ricevuto said, “and Scotty Hartvig (195) started off the day with a first-period win and was injured and out of the tournament during his semifinal bout.” Also wrestling for the Hornets were Castillo (138), Kacey Dewitte (160) and Clase (170). The Hornets will host their final “Senior Night” Mixer against Eastmont and Liberty Bell Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 6 p.m.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Oroville wrestlers hosted Davenport, Omak and Okanogan for a mixer Thursday, Jan. 7, where senior Scotty Hartvig led the Hornet cause with two first period pins. Hartvig, wrestling at 195, took down Okanogan’s Joe Mintzer in the first round and Omak’s Brandon Cate in the third round. “It was two hours of great wrestling with valley teams and a very tough and well coached crew from Davenport,” said Oroville Coach Chuck Ricevuto. “Bailey Hunton did a really good job tonight. His brother Ian is the stud that everyone was watching. We weren’t wrestling our best tonight. We wrestled yesterday and it was a three-hour bus ride up here, but that’s no excuse,” said Davenport Coach Raleigh Fisk, adding, “Chuck’s a great guy; he and I go way back, so we like coming up.” Brigido Ocampo, a freshman wrestling at 126 for Oroville, won his matches with major and regular decisions. Ocampo beat Okanogan’s Leithan Gillespe 4-3 in the first round, and Okanogan’s Jaric Cook in the second round. Sophomores Drake Fox, David Iniquez and Nick Clase added three more wins by major decisions and a tech fall by Iniquez. Iniquez, wrestling Omak’s Deon’dre Ives at 152, was ahead 10-1 at the end of the first round before taking the major decision win. Also wrestling for the Hornets

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Coach Chuck Ricevuto gives freshman Brigido Ocampo some extra pointers after Ocampo won two matches against Okanogan.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville’s Drake Fox won a long, hard-fought match against Omak’s Leonel Cruz by major decision during last Thursday’s (Jan. 7) Mixer in Oroville. was sophomore Johnny Castillo. Perhaps the quickest match was between Davenport’s Trevor Morris and Omak’s Walker Osborne, with Morris pinning Osborne in 15 seconds. “It was there and he just took it,” said Coach Fisk. Morris said he didn’t make it to State last year, but he did go to Regionals. Another visiting wrestler familiar with Regionals was Susan Bevan-Church (152), a junior from Omak who won her first match by a pin before defeating Okanogan’s Montanna Guerrette

(140) by two points in the second round. “She got the first two points, then two escapes, so she won the match. But that’s okay,” said Guerrette with a shrug and a smile. Each of the girls have been wrestling since middle school. “I had a tough year last season but I did good my freshman year and made it to Regionals,” said BevanChurch. Okanogan’s Skyler Rumbolz, wrestling at 138, had lots to say about the Bulldogs. “Most of our team is stacked with football players and I’m one

of them,” said Rumbolz, who won his match by a pin. “We both kept time in the match; I just kept trying to win that match. Never go to your belly, and if you do get right back up on your knees. “Dwight Belgarde got pinned,” Rumbolz said about his teammate, “but he just fights hard and hard and hard. I’ve never seen him quit. It’s nice to have people on our team with that attitude.” The Hornets traveled to Springdale Saturday, Jan. 9 for the Charger Invitational. “Louie Vazquez (sophomore, 106) had a

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Okanogan’s Montanna Guerrette (140), left, and Omak’s Susan BevanChurch (152) face off before Bevan-Church won by a pin.


JANUARY 14, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

OUTDOORS

Sitzmark opens to skiers, boarders

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Sitzmark General Manager Jonathan Keener enjoys running the chairlift while two of his operators take their lunch breaks. Keener said the smiles on the faces of people loading up for repeat runs brought smiles to his own face.

Connor Bocook glides down the hill on his snowboard. “It’s a nice local ski area, and it’s not super busy, so you know everyone. And the cinnamon rolls are dank!” said Bocook.

the food is good here,” agreed Justine Salazar was also havRise, who his friends described ing fun on the hill, with her sixas the fastest among them on year-old son Truett. This was Truett’s first day HAVILLAH – Sitzmark Ski the hill. The on a snowboard. Area opened to delighted skiers students said “I’m doing good and boarders Saturday, Jan. 9. they were lookso far!” Truett The skies may have been over- ing forward returnannounced hapcast, but the smiles were bright on to pily. “He starts skithe faces of young and old alike ing the next ing next week; he gliding down the hill and heading Thursday with told me ‘I want to back over to the rope tow or chair their school, Oroville High do both, like you, lift for a repeat adventure. Mom!’” laughed “We’re really glad to be open for School. “This is a Salazar, who was everybody. I see lots of smiles and better to begin instructpeople coming in with snow on way ing snowboardtheir helmets and loading up to place to come ing at Sitzmark go again,” said Sitzmark General with kids than Loup,” the following Manager Jonathan Keener, run- the Lacey day. Salazar, who ning the chair lift while employ- said “grew up skiees took their lunch breaks. “It C h a m b e r l i n , who grew up ing in Molson,” makes me smile, too.” Havillah taught at Sitzmark Ecstatic shouts rang out from in before moving on the hill. “The hooping and holler- and now lives Katie Teachout/staff photo Omak. to instructing at ing makes me smile also,” laughed in Chamberlin’s Wynn Chamberlin gives his sis- Steven’s Pass. She Keener. Wynn ter Scarlet a kiss on the cheek and Truett were “There’s actually snow this son year!” exclaimed Oroville’s Blaine pulled his sister before pulling her around on the spotted resting Weaver, enjoying “shredding all Scarlett around sled during Sitzmark’s opening day in the snow later in the day, a seriday” with classmates Connor on a sled in Saturday, Jan. 9. ous look on her son’s face. “Truett just tried out the chairlift for the first time,” explained Salazar. “I told him that it takes lots of people a little while to get used to it.” She turned to her son and said, “There’s nothing a hot cup of cocoa won’t fix! But first, I’m going to teach you something else I learned at Steven’s Pass. Here’s how you hold your snowboard, and then you walk like this.” Her son followed her lead as she swaggered over to the warming hut, looking back at him and exclaiming, “There! Now you’re a real snowboarder!” Also on a snowboard for the first time was Paul Jensen. “First I Katie Teachout/staff photo Chase McDaniel enjoys the ride up on the chairlift with a buddy before did the rope tow. It’s easy because it goes slow and you can get a feel skiing back down again. for it. Plus, it doesn’t take you up very high,” said Jensen. “But after going up it five times, I said Bocook, Blake Rise and Charlie between ski runs. “I’m four, but ‘Screw it,’ and headed for the big Arigonni. “It’s a nice, local ski area; she’s zero,” announced Wynn hill.” Later in the day he was seen it’s not super busy, so you know about his younger sister, a good everyone here and the cinnamon sport who didn’t mind the cold or up the hill, flat on his back and deep in snow. He picked himself rolls are dank!” said Bocook. “All the occasional snow in her face. up and headed back down to his friends, laughing, “Maybe I shouldn’t have chosen the powder.” “It’s great skiing here!” said Gregg Bafundo of Tonasket. “Nice and close to home.” “Did you see what I just did? I just made it through ten feet of powder! I’m the Powder Queen!” ” his friend Kristi excitedly exclaimed as she glided over; adding, “I’m usually a terrible skier,” as they headed over to the chairlift for another run. Ginger Corum, calling from California, said she remembered Sitzmark’s early days when her father, James McIntosh and his friend Jick Fancher first got the ski hill going. “They had a rope you hung onto from the bottom tractor that went to the top and pulled you up that way. No chairs, or lifts. Same with the one for the beginners,” recalled Corum. “It went quite fast and you had to be ready when you grabbed it or you would bite the snow!” Sandy Sutton, owner of the Sitzmark Ski Shop, said she had a “pretty good opening day.” “It was definitely a good opening day,” said Sitzmark Ski Club President Brock Sutton. Located just 20 minutes northeast of Tonasket and 20 minutes east of Oroville on Havillah Road, Sitzmark is open Saturdays, Sundays and Thursdays from 10 Katie Teachout/staff photo Justine Salazar guides her six-year old son, Truett, on his first day of snow- a.m. to 4 p.m. Lessons begin January 16. boarding. Salazar will teach snowboarding at Sitzmark this season. Above, For more information, go to right, Salazar offers encouraging words after Truett’s first chairlift ride. www.sitzmark.org. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 14, 2016

OBITUARIES

Michael Stuart Greene

MICHAEL STUART GREENE In his 61 years, Michael Stuart Greene proved that the sum of a life is so much greater than one. He leaves a legacy of communities aided by his work as a fire chief and visionary creator of emergency medical services systems, people aided by his work as a paramedic, his family, and a universe of lifelong friends. In the words of his son, he was “the unofficial mayor of wherever he lived.” His greatest joys were his wife Barbara, his sons Collin and Gavin, and his new daughter-inlaw, Collin’s wife Caity, followed closely by his love for his life’s work in fire and emergency management, his passion for selling, buying and trading cars, and his devotion to root beer. He is mourned as a friend, a mentor, a teacher, a leader, a comedian, a chief, a well-loved boss, an EMS pioneer, as one of the most caring and compassionate people around, as an inspiring, funny and generous friend, as someone who always knew how to make everyone smile and ease any tension, as someone who made us laugh and think, and as a good man and a huge part of the communities in which he lived. A longtime friend said that he “made a difference to every community he lived in, and

MABEL SPRY Mabel Spry, age 96 of Tonasket, died Saturday, January 9, 2016 at Golden Years Adult Family Home in Riverside. She was born November 3, 1919 in Wauconda

OROVILLE GUN CLUB SUBMITTED BY LINDA SCHWILKE

Small turn out for first Sunday for 2016 brought only four shooters. Scores were: 22 – Logan Farris 21 – Vern Cole 16 – Lisa Pickering 12 – Paul Schwilke

Chili and apple pie was available for lunch and to warm up. At a time when people are concerned about personal safety, why not consider learning to

saved countless lives in his many years as a firefighter, paramedic and fire chief. It is so very hard to imagine a world without his friendship, his corny sense of humor, his compassion, and his common sense.” Michael began life as the adored youngest child of three. From babyhood, he was loving, joyful, energetic, dedicated and so sweetly stubborn. His mother described him as an “adorable implacable.” Michael graduated from Carson High School in 1972, and after attending college in San Diego, became one of the first paramedics in northern Nevada. In 1981, he was the sole survivor of an air ambulance crash, and crawled miles through a snowstorm with a broken back and ribs to get help. He moved to Olympia, Wash. in 1983 and became a paramedic with the Olympia Fire Department. Early on, he was paired with a paramedic named Barbara — and that partnership become lifelong. Michael and Barbara were married on Sept. 15, 1984, and sons Collin and Gavin soon followed. From 1984-1994, Michael owned an EMS consulting and training company. He worked as a paramedic with the Tumwater Fire Department from 1985 until he left in 1991 to become assistant fire chief and then fire chief in Washington’s Mason County Fire District 2. During his tenure as chief, the department won six state management excellence awards and one national award for management excellence. In 200 7 he became fire chief in Sierra Fire Protection District in Reno, Nevada. In 2011, he retired and he and Barbara settled in Tonasket that November. When the community needed him, he answered the call and came out of retirement to serve as the Tonasket EMS director. He also continued to serve as a consultant and mentor to many. Michael had a big and loving heart, and he gave so much of it away that in the end, it was exhausted. In the spring of 2014, Michael suffered a serious heart

to parents Fred and Bertha Fox. Surviving relatives are her two sons, Fred Maple and Bill Maple both of Tonasket, brother Vernon Fox of Tonasket, six grandchildren, 13 great grandchildren and three great great grandchildren.

TRAPSHOOTING shoot a shot gun. Also, sharpen your hunting skills if you already shoot. Trapshooting is a fun, safe way to improve your skills while having a fun time with some good people. We welcome all shooters, young or old. Practice is Saturdays at 1 p.m. and Inland Empire Shoot is Sunday at 1 p.m.

TONASKET GUN CLUB SUBMITTED BY ROBERT MCDANIEL

16 yd 23 – Rick Lind, Lloyd Caton Jr.

event and underwent extensive surgery. When he emerged from that experience, he made it his mission to connect with friends and family he loved, near and far — and he did. At his son Collin’s wedding in September, he spent the entire weekend beaming with an ear-to-ear grin. He leaves behind friends and family that are mourning far and wide, a groan-worthy history of punny stories and corny jokes, and a record of thousands of well-researched and energetically negotiated car purchases. Car dealers across the country may be surprised in years to come when Michael’s friends and family members walk into a showroom to buy a car and burst into tears at the prospect of facing their first car purchase without Michael. (And he’d be the first to tell you if you’re starting in the showroom, you’re starting in the wrong place.) Michael was preceded in death by his father, Bernard F. Greene and leaves behind his mother Muriel Margolin Keehn, wife Barbara, son and daughter-inlaw Collin and Caity Greene, son Gavin Greene, sister and brotherin-law Andrea and Scott Rutledge, brother and sister-in-law Jonathan and Marion Greene, sister-in-law and husband Yvonne and George Short-Blakey, two nieces, three nephews, one great-niece, and his beloved dog Tommy. The family is planning a memorial service in Tonasket, Wash. at Tonasket High School on Saturday, January 23, 2016 at 2 p.m. In the coming months, the family will host a celebration of Michael’s life in Belfair, Wash, and another in his hometown of Carson City, Nevada. To honor Michael, please install an additional smoke detector for yourself or a neighbor, toast his memory with root beer, and tell your friends and family that you love them. Donations in his memory can be made to Tonasket EMS District (P.O. Box 1356, Tonasket, WA 98855) or Okanogan County Fire District #4 (P.O. Box 79, Tonasket, WA 98855).

She was preceded in death by her parents, one brother and her husband, Leonard Memorial Services will be held at a later date. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

CCC Talent Show

The Community Cultural Center is seeking local entertainers for the upcoming Talent Show on Sat. Feb. 6th. We would like children as well as adults and are looking for any kind of talent. The acts must be no longer than 10 minutes or the equivalent of two songs, dance routines, etc. Call Rick Braman at 509-4762131 or the CCC at 509-486-1328 if you would like to sign up. OCTC Membership Meeting

OMAK - The Okanogan County Tourism Council invites people to join their colleagues in celebrating tourism in Okanogan Country on Wednesday, Feb. 3, at the 12 Tribes Resort & Casino in Omak, at 9:30 a.m. RSVP to Carolyn Davis at the office 509 826-5107 or cdavis@economicalliance.com by Jan. 29. This annual membership meeting helps to creates opportunities to

get to know others in the tourism industry and will increase your knowledge about how tourism is flourishing in the county and how, partnering and working together, can keep it growing. American Legion Crab Feed

OROVILLE - The Oroville American Legion, Hodges Post #84, will be having their annual Crab Feed on Saturday, Feb. 13 starting at 5 p.m. in the Legion Hall. Tickets are available from R.L. “Louie” Wilson at 509476-3438 or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique or the American Legion at the bar. Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978

James C. Rounds joined friends and family in heaven on December 25, 2015. He leaves behind his wife of 52 years, Donna Rounds; children, Scott, Russell, Pat, Jeff and Tammy, as well as Tuffy his family pet, several siblings and numerous family members. JC will always be remembered for having a story to tell or a joke to make anyone have a good laugh. He looked forward to the family reunion each year, elk camp with his boys and the

James C. “JC” Rounds

JEANNE KRAHN Jeanne Lorrain (Ingertila) Krahn passed away peacefully at home in Mount Lake Terrace, Washington. She was 88 years old. Jeanne was born February 16, 1927 to Wiljo and Gertrue (Erickson) Ingertila. She was born and raised on a farm in Kent, Wash. She is survived by her loving husband, Stanly Krahn; daugh-

ters, Debbie (Bob) Gilmore and Jeannie (Rod) Cockle, her son Timothy, daughter-in-law Dee Graham, son-in-law Gary Whitaker. Also by Stan’s children: David Krahn, Dottie (Dan) Burton, Dean (Shirree) Krahn, Laurie (Dennis) Loeber and Denise (Chris) Krout. She had 18 grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She was very well loved and will be greatly missed by family as well as many friends worldwide.

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Trinity Episcopal

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day or days it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Only items that are listed for the day/s and time period of occurrence will be approved. Do not list your item to appear every day of the week or month if it is only on one or two days, it will be rejected. Do not list it as an all day event if it takes place between set hours, i.e 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Once submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com or at GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

CEMETERY MARKERS

CHURCH GUIDE

Our club meeting will be Jan. 17 at 1 pm.

Listing Your Item

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Okanogan Valley

Oroville United Methodist

or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

occasional donation to the local casino. JC was an active member of the Riverside Fire Department and proudly served on the Omak and Oroville Police departments, later he enjoyed driving truck. He was a dedicated member of the Eagles for over 25 years. A benefit celebration of life will be held in the beginning of March to open your hearts and say your goodbyes, further details will follow.

Monuments & Bronze

22 – Robert McDaniel 21 – Jeff Taylor 20 – Craig Jordan 19 – Brenden Asmussan 18 – George Miklos 17 – Jerry Asmussan 15 – Jeff McMillan 14 – Randy Cline Handicap 21 – Jeff Taylor 18 – Craig Jordan, Randy Cline, Lloyd Caton Jr. 17 – Jerry Asmussan 16 – Brenden Asmussan 8 – George Miklos

CALENDAR | FROM A5 munity. Oroville High School library serves as a gathering place for meetings, held the second Thursday of each month from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The next meeting is Thursday, Jan. 14. Caring local citizens who wish to join this effort are encouraged to attend.

JAMES C. ROUNDS

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming diversity and welcoming to all

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 14, 2016  

January 14, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 14, 2016  

January 14, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune