Page 1

Griffey makes history

99.32%

HALL OF FAMER

KEN GRIFFEY JR.

PAGE C1; POSTER C3

Top 10 Hall of Fame PLAYER

Vote Percentage

YEAR BALLOTS VOTES PERCENT

Ken Griffey Jr. 2016 Tom Seaver 1992 Nolan Ryan 1999 Cal Ripken Jr. 2007 Ty Cobb 1936 George Brett 1999 Hank Aaron 1982 Tony Gwynn 2007 Randy Johnson 2015 Greg Maddux 2014

440

430

437

425

99.32 98.84

497

491

545

98.79

537

98.53

222

98.23

226 497

488

415 545

406 532

98.19 97.83 97.61

549

534

571

97.27

555

97.20

Ken Griffey Jr.’s caree r stats

BATTING AVERAGE: .284 AT-BATS: 9,801 HITS: 2,781 RUNS: 1,662 HOME RUNS: 630 (sixth all-time) RBI: 1,836 (15th all-tim e)

EVERETT, WASHINGTON

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

75¢ (HIGHER IN OUTLYING AREAS)

’02 murder charge refiled Western State Hospital officials say the suspect in the stabbing is no longer a danger to himself or the community. By Diana Hefley Herald Writer

MARYSVILLE — It’s been nearly 14 years since Brady Sheary’s body was discovered in the parking lot at Cedarcrest

Middle School in Marysville. The 18-year-old was stabbed and beaten to death, likely out of jealousy over a girl. Twice prosecutors have been forced to dismiss the seconddegree murder charge against

the suspect, Todd Lee Brodahl, because state doctors concluded that Brodahl was too mentally ill to assist with his own defense. Prosecutors on Wednesday refiled the murder charge against the Marysville man, now 32. Western State Hospital staff late last month notified Snohomish County prosecutors

that they intended to release Brodahl to a less-restrictive alternative because under the law he no longer meets the criteria for civil commitment. Doctors don’t believe Brodahl is a danger to himself or to the community. See CHARGE, back page, this section

Clams are off the table Restarting public digging at Kayak Point Park not logical for now

Your trusted source for local deals brings you...

o Up T

50% OFF

ucts, Prod ment ocal in On L, Enterta es! Food nd Servic a

Go to HeraldNetDailyDeal.com to see today’s deal.

the buzz

KAYAK POINT — Researchers found that restarting public clam digging at the popular Kayak Point Park beach isn’t a realistic option right now. Seeding the beach with young clams to bolster the population could allow for digging in the future, but getting the tiny clams

and managing what would likely be a short, busy season could prove tricky. The Pacific Shellfish Institute and Stillaguamish River Clean Water District joined forces over the summer to study clam populations at Kayak Point. Biologists wanted to learn if the beach could be reopened for public digging, or seeded with clam larvae and reopened in the future.

VOL. 115, NO. 329 © 2016 THE DAILY HERALD CO.

INSIDE

Business . . . . .A9 Classified . . . . B2

Comics . . . . . .D4 Crossword . . .D4

The water district, supported by annual fees from homeowners, provided about $9,000 for the study. Biologists Aimee Christy and Mary Middleton finished a report in December and submitted it to Snohomish County Surface Water Management. Recreational clam digging along Port Susan is limited to private tidelands between

‘Seinfeld’ for all Netflix and chill the champagne: Netflix more than tripled the countries it reaches by adding 130 on Wednesday to the 60 existing it serves. The only countries Netflix is avoiding are China, North Korea, Syria and Crimea (Page A9). Negotiations with China Dear Abby. . . .D5 Horoscope . . . B4

A woman and two men are accused of breaking into an elderly couple’s home, hitting the man in the head and stealing from them. By Eric Stevick Herald Writer

See CLAMS, back page, this section

See ARREST, back page, this section

are difficult. And U.S. businesses can’t do business with Crimea. But in North Korea and Syria the TV subscription service doesn’t want its popular pastime there to be known as “Netflix and kill.” Speaking of which: North Korea claims to have successfully tested its “H-bomb of justice” (Page A8).

Lottery . . . . . .A2 Northwest. . . . B1

Arrest made in assault, robbery

Warm Beach and Kayak Point. There’s no public beach nearby that allows for harvesting clams. Kayak Point used to be a popular location for digging, but clam seasons were closed there in 2002 after the shellfish population plummeted.

DAN BATES / HERALD FILE

Herald Writer

2009

LAKE STEVENS — An arrest has been made in the New Year’s Eve home invasion robbery of a Lake Stevens couple in their 70s. A Bonney Lake woman was booked into the Snohomish County Jail on Wednesday for investigation of first-degree robbery. Crystal Atter, 27, later appeared in Everett District Court, where her bail was set at $50,000. Atter and two men are accused of breaking into the home in a senior housing community in the 11100 block of 20th Street NE. Two other suspects are not in custody. Atter alleged they were collecting a debt from the couple, according to a police report. The robbery was reported around 5:30 a.m. Dec. 31. The couple reported that their doorbell rang. When the wife answered the door, three people barged in wearing masks and gloves. One of the men allegedly forced the wife to the ground and held her there by the hair while the others confronted her husband, 76, in a bedroom. The husband has Parkinson’s disease and is unable to walk, according to a police report. He reported that he was struck in the head several times with a hard object. His wife watched the trio drive off in a large white vehicle, reportedly taking jewelry and a computer tablet. A neighbor later reported seeing a white Cadillac with a black bag over the license plate swerve and hit a median. The impact left a dent in the trunk and caused the vehicle to lose a hubcap. At that point, one of the suspects got out and removed the bag from the rear plate, the witness told police.

Volunteer Jennifer Matheson (left), of Warm Beach, sorts through sand and rock for clams of all sizes and varieties this summer, while fellow volunteer Mike Larkin, of Everett, rinses off a nice sized clam he found for a study of the clam population at Kayak Point Park by the Pacific Shellfish Institute.

By Kari Bray

JENNIFER BUCHANA N / THE HERALD,

2016

Obituaries. . . .A6 Opinion. . . . .A11

While condemning the nuclear test, other countries doubted the H-bomb claim and believe the test was of the less impressive “A-bomb of Starving Citizens.” A long time ago, in a star cluster far, far away: An astrophysicist’s new theory posits that star clusters on the fringes of our galaxy are Short Takes . . .D6 Sports . . . . . . . C1

the most likely home for intelligent life because they are older, stable and dense enough to allow advanced civilizations to hop from planet to planet (Page A2). Having reached the point in life where we’re also older, stable and dense, we’d have to agree with her on our intelligence.

—Jon Bauer, Herald staff

Nubilous 42/33, C6

DAILY

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

6

42963 33333

9


A2 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

Strongest El Nino storm so far this winter hits By Christopher Weber Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The hillside above the California home of Wayne Socha had held firm against thunderstorms over the past three decades. But after a wildfire two years ago stripped away vegetation and loosened soil, he feared the strong El Nino storms pounding the state could bring it all down. So the 61-year-old corporate auditor grabbed a sledgehammer and waded through the muck in his

Monrovia back yard to knock a hole in a cement wall and let a mud flow skirt his house and run into a street. “It looked like Niagara Falls,” Socha said. “It was quickly building up behind the house and I knew it could come right inside.” Socha is among uncounted Californians trying to protect their property after the first El Nino storms descended this week and brought wet, windy weather to an area stretching all the way to the Gulf Coast. Those storms dumped nearly 3 inches of rain

Tuesday on Southern California, turning Socha’s terraced backyard into a raging torrent of mud and debris. He kept his sledgehammer and shovels close Wednesday as the winter’s most powerful El Nino storm so far pushed into the state. Driving rain inundated the San Francisco Bay Area during the morning commute, causing nearly two dozen crashes, toppling trees and flooding streets and streams. Officials shut down the city’s iconic cable cars, and buses were used

to serve riders. The system pushed south toward Los Angeles, stirring high waves in the ocean and causing extensive flooding in the San Fernando Valley that swamped cars in deep water. It packed colder temperatures, stronger winds and heavier rainfall than the previous storms that have lined up since the weekend and brought much-needed rain to the drought-stricken state. In all, the current storm was expected to dump as much as 3 more inches of

LOTTERY

rain in coastal and valley areas and up to 4 inches at higher elevations, National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan said. Another less-powerful El Nino storm was right behind and expected to hit land Thursday. Los Angeles authorities spent days getting homeless people from low-lying areas along the Los Angeles River and other waterways prone to flooding. Shuttles were available to shelters that had room for as many as 6,000 beds, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

“We’re not going to charge them with things,” Garcetti said. “But we will use the force of law — there is law on the books that they can’t be there.” Motorists in mountain areas were warned that blizzard conditions with wind gusts reaching 60 mph were possible above 4,000 feet. The National Weather Service said a record 1.42 inches of rain fell Tuesday at Los Angeles International Airport as a previous storm passed through the region.

Star clusters might host intelligent civilizations

POWERBALL: Wednesday’s drawing was for $500 million. Saturday’s numbers: 2-11-47-6263, Powerball 17. The next drawing is Saturday. MEGA MILLIONS: Tuesday’s drawing was for $145 million. Tuesday’s numbers: 1-4-36-4857, Mega Ball: 13. The next drawing is Friday for $165 million. LOTTO: Wednesday’s drawing was for $4.6 million. Wednesday’s numbers: 3-4-8-42-4448. The next drawing is Saturday for $4.7 million. HIT 5: Wednesday’s drawing was for $130,000. Wednesday’s numbers: 11-18-27-3537. The next drawing is Saturday for $170,000. MATCH 4: Wednesday’s numbers: 6-10-15-19. DAILY GAME: Wednesday’s numbers: 1-7-9. KENO: Wednesday’s numbers: 3-5-8-21-2634-39-42-44-49-52-5356-60-68-70-74-7779-80.

By Marcia Dunn Associated Press

KISSIMMEE, Fla. — Clusters of stars on the fringes of our Milky Way galaxy may be home to intelligent life. That’s that word from an astrophysicist who’s new to probing extraterrestrial territory. Rosanne DiStefano of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts, presented her theory Wednesday at the

CHRIS URSO / THE TAMPA TRIBUNE

The end of Christmas

American Astronomical Society’s annual meeting in Kissimmee Florida. DiStefano said the approximately 150 globular clusters in our galaxy are old and stable, a plus for any civilization. In addition, so many stars are clumped together it would be easy to hop from one planet to another, keeping an advanced society going. She says the first step is to locate more planets in these clusters. So far, only one has been found.

Anderson Combs, 17, of Hudson, Florida, retrieves the cross from the bayou during the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral’s 110th annual Epiphany celebration Wednesday in Tarpon Springs, Florida. Epiphany is a major holiday in much of Christianity celebrating the birth and baptism of Jesus. Religious services are held as well as Blessing of Water ceremonies at lakes, rivers and seafronts. The holiday celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings and is the last of the 12 days of Christmas.

OFFICIAL SUPERMARKET OF THE SEAHAWKS

10OFF

$

COUPON valid thru 1/10/2016

Your grocery purchase of $ 50 or more with coupon and Safeway Club Card

WE ARE 12

Get $10 off your transaction when you spend $50 or more in qualified purchases in a single transaction with your card (calculated after deduction of card savings and all other discounts and savings). Some exclusions apply. Limit one (1) coupon per transaction. Coupon cannot be combined with any other discount or offer. Coupon has no cash value. Coupon cannot be doubled. Void where prohibited by law. See store for details.

Wild Caught Fresh Whole Dungeness Crab

699

USDA CHOICE

lb Club Price

Boneless Beef New York Steak

Deli Counter Salads

Hillshire Farm Lit’l Smokies

2 - 3 lb., selected varieties

5

assorted varieties

$

ea Club Price

Eat The Ball

4-pk., football & soccer ball

3

99

ea Club Price

refreshe Soda or Mixers

selected varieties

5

for

lb Club Price Fresh Baked Cupcakes

10 ct., selected varieties

6

$

ea

5

3$ for

Limit 3

Club Price

Signature™ Kitchens Hot Dog or Hamburger Buns

8 ct., selected varieties

99

1500495

¢

Club Price

ea

Lucerne® Sour Cream 16 oz. regular or light

99 Club Price

6 - 8 oz., selected varieties

24 oz., selected varieties

ea Club Price

ea Club Price

99

1899

1399

ea

Club Price

ea

1.8 - 2.17 oz., selected varieti es

2$

1

Club Price

4

$

or Michelob Ultra

18-pk., 12 oz., cans or btls., selected varieties

for

5

$

Signature™ Farms Veggie Tray

12-pk., 11.2 - 12 oz. cans or btls., selected varieties

ea

Club Price

Seahawks Apparel

Skittles Bite Size Ca ndy

¢

40 oz., selected varieties

Pacifico, Modelo, Heineken or Stella Artois

Herdez Salsa

ea Club Price

Bar S Smoked Sausages

POM Wonderful Pistachios

24-pk., 12 oz.

188

lb Club Price

ea Club Price

Bud Light, Coors Light or Miller Light

16 oz., selected varieties

599

Club Price

4

EVERY DAY

®

12-pk., 12 oz. cans, selected varieties

5

2$

$ Chicken Wings

weather permitting

selected sizes and varieties

GO HAWKS!

25% Club Price

off

Prices in ad valid JANUARY 8 thru JANUARY 10, 2016 UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED FRI

SAT

SUN

8

9

10

Selection varies by store.

Prices on this page are effective with your Club Card (unless otherwise noted). ALL LIMITS ARE PER HOUSEHOLD, PER DAY.

010816_SSEA_ROP_EVH


Local News A3

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/LOCAL

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

Third term for Mill Creek Mayor Pruitt By Amy Nile Herald Writer

MILL CREEK — Mayor Pam Pruitt gets to keep the gavel as she presides at City Council meetings for the next two years. The seven-member council elected Pruitt to the helm with a 5-to-2 vote Tuesday evening. Longtime Councilmembers

Mike Todd and Donna Michelson opposed Pruitt’s selection to a third term as mayor. They cast ballots for Todd, who has held the position twice. “I’ve seen Mike as mayor and he does a great job,” said Michelson, also a former mayor. “He does so many things for the city.” Pruitt has been mayor since she was elected to the council in

2014. She previously served as a councilwoman from 1988 to 1995, including a two-year stint as mayor in 1992 and 1993. Now, Pruitt said, she wants to help the council set a vision and stay out of the way while City Manager Rebecca Polizzotto carries it out. Mill Creek is among five Snohomish County cities that have a

strong city manager or councilmanager government. Generally, that means the city manager handles business as the chief executive officer, while the council sets policy as its board of directors. Polizzotto was hired in April after the council forced former City Manager Ken Armstrong to resign. The move continued a

pattern of Mill Creek ousting half of its city managers since incorporation in 1983. Now, Pruitt said, the council and the city manager are making progress. “We’re actually working well together,” she said. “There was a time where that was less so.” See MAYOR, Page A4

View finders in Edmonds JERRY CORNFIELD

Challenges on the horizon for Inslee

G

has to be done to fix the tide gate. The rest of the preserve’s future is up for discussion, Clark said. The county is looking for the best options to manage drainage in the neighborhood; prepare for storms or flooding and help homeowners do the same; preserve the park for the public; and restore habitats for native species, particularly chinook salmon. A pocket estuary is a shallow, sheltered place where freshwater

ov. Jay Inslee is beginning the last year of his first term with every expectation of winning re-election in November. But challenges stacking up for his administration will test his executive mettle and political skills as he pursues a second term. ■■The Department of Corrections is trying to pinpoint why a software error allowing convicted criminals to be released too soon went Inslee follows unfixed Obama’s lead since its on guns, A6 discovery in late 2012. A fix, delayed 17 times, is supposed to be completed Jan. 13. Meanwhile, officials have tied the deaths of two people with criminals mistakenly released early. ■■The Department of Social and Health Services is struggling to comply with a federal court order requiring the state’s psychiatric hospital reduce wait times for mentally ill inmates held in county jails. The agency leader — who announced his resignation Tuesday — is due in a Snohomish County Superior Court on Thursday where a judge wants to hear when the hospital intends to be in compliance. ■■The Department of Transportation is endeavoring to iron out wrinkles in the operation of the new express toll lanes on I-405. The most recent involved an error in toll collections that resulted in readjustments and credits on bills sent to thousands of drivers. ■■The Department of Ecology is continuing to draft clean water rules predicated in part on fish consumption that will meet federal mandates. The Environmental Protection Agency, tired of waiting, wrote its own rules last year and is advancing to impose them if the state fails to act. Then there are a couple of matters involving education: The state is still in contempt of a state Supreme Court directive in the McCleary school funding case and getting fined $100,000 a day. The threat of closure looms for several charter schools and parents are appealing for help from the state. Although Inslee’s authority

See PARK, Page A6

See CORNFIELD, Page A6

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Million Seyoum looks through a viewing scope with his wife, Hana Woldeamanuel, while another family takes a photo by the water Wednesday at Brackett’s Landing near the Edmonds ferry terminal. The couple normally makes the trip down from their home in Everett to enjoy a walk along Edmonds’ waterfront during the summer, Woldeamanuel said, but Wednesday’s sunshine offered a nice respite from recent rain and clouds.

PUD won’t pursue tidal-energy project By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

EVERETT — Snohomish County Public Utility District is closing the book on its mulitmillion-dollar experiment to draw electricity from ocean tides. The PUD has asked federal regulators to cancel its license for the project, which the district stopped working on in September 2014. The project “is no longer

economically feasible,” the district said in its application to give up its license with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The plan had been to put two turbines on the sea floor off Whidbey Island. Tidal currents would turn the turbines, generating local, clean energy. The work never got past the developmental stage, though, and nothing was ever built. Getting that far cost nearly $8 million, took seven years, and involved

working with local, state and federal agencies, the University of Washington, research labs, and others. The PUD pursued the work as part of its policy to expand renewable energy resources in and near Snohomish County. Work seemed to be progressing when the PUD pulled the plug on the tidal energy project. Six months earlier, FERC gave it a green light to install the turbines. The district had asked

contractors to bid on that work. Behind the scenes, though, the U.S. Department of Energy and the PUD disagreed about how to split the project’s costs. The department had agreed in 2010 to pay for half the total cost. But it declined to chip in more when the pricetag ballooned from $20 million to at least $38 million in the following years. Energy Department officials See PUD, Page A4

Meeting planned on future of Camano park By Kari Bray Herald Writer

front porch

CAMANO ISLAND — As Island County officials work toward fixing a tide gate and dealing with drainage problems at Iverson Preserve, they want to kindle talks with neighbors and park-goers about the area’s future. A public meeting is scheduled for Saturday afternoon to kick off a year-long planning and outreach effort. It starts at 1 p.m. at Four Springs House, 585 Lewis

Lane on Camano Island. People can learn more about Iverson Preserve and weigh in with concerns or ideas for the stretch of shoreline. Island County also is looking for volunteers to serve on a team of neighbors, park users and county staff to lead more in-depth talks about Iverson. Iverson Preserve is a popular destination for hiking, bird watching and dog walking bordered by hay fields, marsh and a residential neighborhood. It includes trails and public

Aid workshops Everett Community College will host College Goal Washington, a free financial aid workshop for students and parents. Participants will fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid for 2016-2017, required for all students applying for federal financial aid for college. The first workshop will be

beach access on the east side of Camano Island. There is a pocket estuary there that once spanned about 120 acres, including 3,200 feet of shoreline. A hundred of the acres were diked and drained in the 1940s for hay farming. Island County now owns that land and leases it to a farmer. Some of the trails and clearings at the public park have been flooding because the tide gate there is failing, project manager Lori Clark said. That’s the only for-sure change coming to the preserve, she said: Something

held at 6 p.m. Jan. 27 at EvCC’s East County Campus, 14090 Fryelands Blvd. SE, Suite 283 in Monroe. Participants are asked to arrive promptly because FAFSA filing will begin immediately. The second workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 30 at Shuksan Hall, Room 141 on the school’s main campus, 2000 Tower St., Everett. For undocumented students,

help is available with filling out the Washington Application for State Financial Aid. Noncitizens can apply for the Washington State Need Grant and College Bound Scholarship. A Spanish-language interpreter will be available at both events. Students need to bring financial records (recent tax forms and/or pay stubs), their Social Security number and

driver’s license (if any). Even if students do not have all of their paperwork they are still encouraged to attend the event to get the process started. More info: EverettCC.edu/CollegeGoal Art sought for library: The Camano Island Library Art Committee is looking for three new art pieces. They are seeking proposals from art-

>>

ists. General guidelines are: a wall-mounted or hanging piece for the children’s area with a soap box derby theme; a wood, glass or metal chandelier that reflects “movement, energy and joy” for the community room; and a painting or mosaic with a chemistry, biology or medicine theme for the reading room. More info: sno-isle.org/ locations/camano/call-to-artists


A4 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

Vehicular homicide charges possible in crash Herald Writer

LYNNWOOD — A 20-year-old man was driving recklessly before a fatal crash in Lynnwood in August, detectives have concluded.

Josh O’Connor, Publisher Neal Pattison, Executive Editor Jon Bauer, Editorial Page Editor Pilar Linares, Advertising Director (USPS-181-740) The Daily Herald is published daily by Sound Publishing Inc., 1800 41st Street, S-300, Everett, WA 98203. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Herald, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206 Periodicals Postage Paid at Everett, WA and at additional mailing offices. Member of the Associated Press The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for republication of all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches. The Daily Herald Information 425-339-3000 Circulation 425-339-3200 (Out Of Area: 1-800-422-6018) Hours: Monday-Friday 6:00 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday, and Holidays 7:30 am - 11:30 am Classified Advertising 425-339-3100 (Out of Area: 1-800-854-4411) Retail Advertising 425-339-3030 News Department 425-339-3426 Sports 425-339-3470

Delivery Times: Papers are due to homes by 6:00 a.m. Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m. Saturdays, Sundays and major holidays. Deadlines are one hour later on Whidbey Island and other outlying areas. Suggested Home Delivery Rates: 7-day delivery: $17.50 monthly billing, $51.00 for 3 months billing, $100.50 for 6 months billing, $195.00 for 12 months billing, $15.75 per month for Easy Pay. 5-day delivery: (Monday-Friday): $15.75 monthly billing, $47.25 for 3 months billing, $94.50 for 6 months billing, $189.00 for 12 months billing, $15.25 per month for Easy Pay. 3-day delivery: (Friday-Sunday): $13.50 monthly billing, $39.75 for 3 months billing, $78.00 for 6 months billing, $153.00 for 12 months billing, $12.25 per month for Easy Pay. Sunday Only delivery: $8.67 monthly billing, $26.00 for 3 months billing, $52.00 for 6 months billing, $104.00 for 12 months billing, $9.25 per month for Easy Pay. Mail Rates: 7-day delivery: Snohomish, Island and King counties: $36.25/month, $435.00/year. Balance of Washington state, U.S., territories and possessions: $37.00/month, $444.00/year. Active military personnel are entitled to Snohomish Co. rate. Sunday Only delivery: Snohomish, Island and King counties: $14.50/month, $174.00/year. Balance of Washington state, U.S., territories and possessions: $16.75/month, $201.00/year. Prepayment required. Mail subscriptions do not contain advertising inserts. Mail service may not be available to some areas outside the USA. 1253988

Lynnwood police recently forwarded the case to Snohomish County prosecutors for review. They investigated the driver on suspicion of vehicular homicide, a felony. He allegedly was driving 51 mph in a 35 mph zone. Court records show the Shoreline man was ticketed for speeding in Lynnwood twice in the year before the crash. He was cited in September 2014 for speeding in a school zone, and again in June for going 18 mph over the speed limit.

PUD From Page A3

at the time said that their agency had not committed to more than $10 million. The district couldn’t cover the rest alone, PUD officials said. By that point, about $8 million had been spent on the project, including $3.5 million from the Energy Department. That really was the end of the project, but there was “remote hope” that some

1492382

By Rikki King

Open every day! Visit us for breakfast, lunch, high tea, or make a reservation for your special event. 4229 76th St. NE Marysville Reservations: 360-659-7305

Both fines were unpaid and went to collections, records show. The man is described in a police report as an Edmonds Community College student. He was enrolled last summer but no longer attends the college, EdCC officials said. The crash happened just before 4:30 p.m. Aug. 22 along 36th Avenue W. The man was southbound in a silver Mitsubishi Eclipse when he passed another vehicle. A woman was

other partner would step in, said Craig Collar, the PUD’s current general manager and CEO. He oversaw the tidal energy project from 2006 to 2012. Since then, “it became clear that potential wasn’t just small, it was zero,” he said. If the PUD keeps the license, which expires next decade, it would have to file annual progress reports with FERC, even though no work is taking place. So, giving up the license is easier. That process can take anywhere from two weeks to two months, according to FERC. The district and its partners contributed a lot to tidal energy research, and they produced a huge amount of data about Puget Sound’s marine ecosystem, which they openly shared, he said. “We came within a whisker of pulling this thing off,” but the PUD will not pursue tidal energy again, Collar said. Dan Catchpole: 425339-3454; dcatchpole@ heraldnet.com; Twitter: @dcatchpole.

northbound in a green car. Her passenger, Zhi Ping Guan, 47, was wearing the shoulder portion of her seat belt, but not the bottom piece, according to the police report. The driver of the green car slowed to make a left turn into an apartment complex when she was T-boned by the Eclipse. The impact caused Guan’s passenger door to unlatch and swing open. She was thrown from the car. She suffered fatal head injuries and died at the

scene. No one else was seriously hurt. The driver of the green car told police she never saw the Eclipse coming. The Shoreline man told police he was headed to the grocery store after a church event. He said he had tried to brake but could not avoid the collision. He likely could have stopped in time had he been going the speed limit, detectives determined. The Herald is not naming the man, as he has not been charged with a crime.

Alcohol and drugs weren’t believed to be factors in the crash. A vehicular homicide charge is most often filed in connection with people killed in drunken-driving collisions. The state law also can apply if a driver was reckless or disregarded others’ safety. Investigators wrote that they believe the man’s “excessive speed rises to the level of recklessness in such a populated area.” A service for Guan was held in Edmonds in August.

Hearings set for next week on proposed development Herald staff EVERETT — Hearings are scheduled Monday through Friday next week on a 112-home subdivision known as Frognal Estates proposed for a hillside near Mukilteo in unincorporated Snohomish County. Hearing examiner Peter Camp will consider whether the 22-acre project meets code requirements.

Mayor From Page A3

Pruitt commended Polizzotto for finding ways to solve problems that have long faced Mill Creek. In September, the council gave her the green light to move forward with plans to find space for a senior center and city departments, and to make Mill Creek run

County planners on Dec. 30 recommended it for approval, if special conditions are met. The proposed building site is on 60th Avenue West, north of 136th Place West, near Picnic Point Elementary School. Everett-based Integral Northwest is proposing the development, which is named after a well-todo area of north London,

England. A neighborhood group fears the project’s potential to increase storm runoff, landslide risks and traffic. Expert testimony will consume most of next week’s hearings, but time has been set aside for public comments starting at 6 p.m. Jan. 14. The location is the first-floor hearing room of the county’s Robert Drewel Building, 3000 Rockefeller Ave., Everett.

more efficiently by reorganizing staff. In the next two years, the council plans to work on balancing the budget, providing more services, fostering economic development, building ballfields and negotiating a new contract for fire protection beyond 2016, Pruitt said. Councilman Brian Holtzclaw will continue to lead alongside Pruitt. The council unanimously

elected him to a two-year term as mayor pro-tem Tuesday. He was appointed to the position last year after former Councilman Mark Harmsworth resigned to serve in the state House of Representatives. Three returning councilmen, Vincent Cavaleri, Mark Bond and Todd, were sworn in Tuesday for fouryear terms that end in 2019. Pruitt, Holtzclaw, Michelson and Sean Kelly’s terms expire in 2017.

OFFICIAL SUPERMARKET OF THE SEAHAWKS

10OFF

$

Your grocery purchase of $50 or more with coupon

WE ARE 12

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER PER TRANSACTION. Coupon cannot be doubled, tripled, quadrupled, or exchanged for cash or combined with any other offer. Minimum purchase requirement excludes prescription products, alcohol, tobacco or dairy (where prohibited by law), money orders,postage stamps, lottery tickets, wire transfer services, gift cards, purchases made at fuel centers, bill pay service, or products and services provided as a convenience for our customers. Void if copied or transferred, in the event of a return, coupon savings may be deducted from refund. Not valid toward previous purchase. Not valid for online purchases.

Wild Caught Fresh Whole Dungeness Crab

weather permitting

699

Steakhouse Choice Beef New York Steak bone-in

Chicken Wings

ea

179

ea when you buy 2

refreshe Soda or Mixers 12-pk., 12 oz. cans, selected varieties

5

3$

Limit 3

for

Signature Kitchens Hot Dog or Hamburger Buns

8 ct., selected varieties

99

¢

1500475

selected varieties

ea

699

5

5

ea

ea

lb

Fresh Made Bean Dip Trays

12 ct., selected varieties

6

20 - 24 oz., selected varieties

$

$

Fresh Baked Cupcakes

Fresh Baked French Bread

Foster Farms Chicken Selections

19 oz., selected varieties

2 - 3 lb., selected varieties

5

lb

Johnsonville Sausage

Deli Counter Salads

$

599

lb

55 oz., selected varieties

9

99 ea

BUY ONE Fresh Made Guacamole 12 oz.

5

99 $ ea

Bud Light, Coors Light or Miller Light

ea.

24-pk., 12 oz.

or Michelob Ultra

Herdez Salsa

18-pk., 12 oz., cans or btls., selected varieties

16 oz., selected varieties

1899

188

ea

ea

16 oz. regular or light

1.8 - 2.17 oz., selected varieties

99

¢ ea

2$

for

1

12 oz.

FREE Pacifico, Modelo, Heineken or Stella Artois

12-pk., 11.2 - 12 oz. cans or btls., selected varieties

1499 ea

Seahawks Apparel

Skittles Bite Size Ca ndy

Lucerne Sour Cream

GET ONE Fresh Made Salsa

selected sizes and varieties

GO HAWKS!

25% off

Prices in ad valid JANUARY 8 thru JANUARY 10, 2016 UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED FRI

SAT

SUN

8

9 10

Selection varies by store. 010816_ASEA_ROP_EVH


The Daily Herald Thursday, 01.07.2016 A5 SPECIAL PAID ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

2016

UNITED STATES DISTRIBUTION NOTICE:

■ TRYING TO KEEP UP: Rapid shipments of heavy packages containing Vault Bricks loaded with valuable .999 solid U.S. State Silver Bars are flowing around the clock from the private vaults of the Lincoln Treasury to U.S. State residents who call 1-888-873-7302 to beat the 48-hour deadline.

U.S. State Silver Bars go to residents in 3 states

U.S. residents who find their state listed below in bold get first dibs at just $57 state minimum while all other state residents must pay $134, if any silver bars remain AL GA ME NV OREGON VA

AK HI MD NH PA WASHINGTON

NATIONWIDE – The phone lines are ringing off the hook. That’s because U.S. State Silver Bars sealed away in State Vault Bricks are being handed over to WA, OR and ID residents at just the state minimum for the next 2 days. This is not a misprint. For the next 2 days residents who find their state on the Distribution List above in bold are getting individual State Silver Bars at just the state minimum of $57 set by the Lincoln Treasury. That’s why nearly everyone is taking full Vault Bricks loaded with five U.S. State Silver Bars before they’re all gone. And here’s the best part. Every WA, OR and ID resident who gets at least two Vault Bricks is also getting free shipping and free handling. That’s a real steal because all other state residents must pay over six hundred dollars for each State Vault Brick. Just a few weeks ago, nobody knew that the only U.S. State Silver Bars locked away in the private vaults of the Lincoln Treasury would be allocated to the U.S. Commemorative Gallery for a limited release to residents in 3 states. Every single one of the 50 U.S. State Silver Bars are date numbered in the order they ratified the Constitution and were admitted into the Union beginning in the late 1700s. “As Executive Advisor to the Lincoln Treasury I get paid to deliver breaking news. So, for anyone who hasn’t heard yet, highly collectable U.S. State Silver Bars are now being handed over at just the state minimum to residents in 3 states who beat the offer deadline, which is why I pushed for this announcement to be widely advertised,” said Mary Ellen Withrow, the emeritus 40th Treasurer of the United States of America. “These bars are solid .999 pure fine silver and will always be a valuable precious metal which is why everyone is snapping up as many as they can before they’re all gone,” Withrow said. There’s one thing Withrow wants to make very clear. State residents only have two days to call the Toll Free Order Hotlines to get the U.S. State Silver Bars. “These valuable U.S. State Silver Bars are impossible to get at banks, credit unions or the

AZ IDAHO MA NJ RI WV

CA IN MN NY SD WY

AR IL MI NM SC WI

CO IA MS NC TN

CT KS MO ND TX

FL LA NE OK VT

DE KY MT OH UT

DATE NUMBERED IN WHICH THE STATE RATIFIED THE CONSTITUTION AND WAS ADMITTED INTO UNION

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES FULL TROY OUNCE SOLID .999 FINE SILVER

BACK

FRONT

CERTIFIED SOLID SILVER PRECIOUS METAL

DOUBLE FORGED STATE PROCLAMATION COURTESY: LINCOLN TREASURY

PHOTO ENLARGEMENT SHOWS ENGRAVING DETAIL

U.S. Mint. In fact, they’re only being handed over at state minimum to WA, OR and ID residents who call the Toll Free Hotline before the deadline ends two days from today’s publication date”, said Timothy J. Shissler, Executive Director of Vault Operations at the private Lincoln Treasury. To make it fair, special Toll Free Overflow Hotlines have been set up to ensure all residents have an equal chance to get them. Rapid shipments to state residents are scheduled to begin with the first calls being accepted at precisely 8:30am today. “We’re bracing for all the calls and doing everything we can to make sure no one gets left out, but the U.S. State Silver Bars are only being handed over at just the state resident minimum for the next two days or until they’re all gone, whichever comes first. For now, residents can get the U.S. State Silver Bars at just the state minimum as long as they call before the order deadline ends,” confirmed Shissler. “With so many state residents trying to get these U.S. State Silver Bars, lines are busy so keep trying. All calls will be answered,” Shissler said. ■

WA, OR AND ID: COVER JUST $57 STATE MINIMUM call

1-888-873-7302 Ext.RNF622 beginning at 8:30am

1.

If all lines are busy call this special toll free overflow hotline: 1-888-873-7314 Ext.RNF622

2.

residents who find their state on the Distribution List above in bold and beat the deadline are authorized to get individual State Silver Bars at just state minimum of $57 set by the Lincoln Treasury. That’s why nearly everyone is taking full Vault Bricks loaded with five State Silver Bars before they’re all gone. And here’s the best part. Every WA, OR and ID resident who gets at least two Vault Bricks is also getting free shipping and free handling. that's a real steal because all other state residents must pay over six hundred dollars for each State Vault Brick.

ALL OTHER STATE RESIDENTS: MUST REMIT $134 PER STATE SILVER BAR 1. No State Silver Bars will be issued to any resident living outside of WA, OR or ID at state resident minimum.

2. Call the Non-Resident Toll Free Hotline beginning at 11:00am at: 1-888-873-7312 Ext.RNF622

3. If you are a u.s. resident living outside of the states of WA, OR or ID you are required to pay $134 for each State Silver Bar for a total of six hundred seventy dollars plus shipping and handling for each sealed State Vault Brick loaded with five u.s. State Silver Bars. This same offer may be made at a later date or in a different geographic location. UNITED STATES COMMEMORATIVE GALLERY INC. AND LINCOLN TREASURY, LLC ARE NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, A BANK OR ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM SHIPMENT YOU ARE DISSATISFIED, RETURN THE PRODUCT FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND RETURN POSTAGE. DUE TO THE FLUCTUATING PRICE IN THE WORLD GOLD AND SILVER TRADES, PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. U.S. COMMEMOS0493 P6998A RATIVE GALLERY 7800 WHIPPLE AVE. N. CANTON OH 44720 ©2016 LINCOLN TREASURY

■ A SNEAK PEAK INSIDE SILVER VAULT BRICKS: Pictured left reveals for the very first time the valuable .999 pure fine silver bars inside each State Silver Vault Brick. Pictured right are the State Silver Vault Bricks containing the only existing U.S. State Silver Bars. WA, OR and ID residents are authorized to get individual State Silver Bars at just $57 state resident minimum. That’s why nearly everyone is taking full Vault Bricks loaded with five State Silver Bars before they’re all gone. And here’s the best part. Every resident who gets at least two Vault Bricks is also getting free shipping and free handling. That’s a real steal because all other state residents must pay over six hundred dollars for each State Vault Brick. 1500215


A6 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

Inslee takes action on guns after Obama move By Donna Gordon Blankinship Associated Press

BURIEN — Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Wednesday aimed at curbing gun violence by improving data-sharing among government agencies and starting a new public health campaign on suicide prevention. “We are not afraid to take action here in Washington state,” Inslee said after criticizing inaction by Congress on gun violence. Inslee appears to be the first governor in the nation to take action on the issue after an announcement earlier this week by President Barack Obama regarding an executive order. Inslee praised Obama’s plan to create a more sweeping definition of gun dealers as a way to increase the number of sales requiring background checks. Both leaders are Democrats. As the result of a successful 2014 ballot measure, Washington state already has expanded background checks to include online sales and purchases at gun shows The initiative came the same year the state saw two deadly campus shootings. In Marysville, a high

school student killed three 14-year-old girls and a 15-year-old boy after inviting them to lunch in the cafeteria, authorities said. Earlier, a 19-year-old student was killed and two others wounded in a shooting at Seattle Pacific University. Legislative Democrats in California also applauded the president’s action and are planning a package of gun control measures, but they have yet to introduce the proposals. The effort was launched after the San Bernardino attack that killed 14 in December. California Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, said in an interview last month that the bills will include ways to address so-called ghost guns that can be built from parts at home and do not have a serial number. States, however, are limited in what gun laws legislators can enact. Still, much of what the president has proposed is already in effect in Washington, California and a handful of other states. In his executive order, Inslee said firearm deaths now exceed motor vehicle crash fatalities in the state and that 80 percent of firearm deaths are suicides.

Inslee, who is seeking re-election later this year, outlined his plans with representatives of the University of Washington School of Social Work and the director of the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center. It calls for better data analysis of the effectiveness of current gun safety efforts; looking for failures in the state’s current methods of sharing information among law enforcement and social service agencies; and eyeing gaps in the state’s firearm purchasing laws. Inslee wants to look into better adolescent depression screening, initiate a campaign focused on suicide prevention and develop culturally appropriate crisis-prevention and treatment services for Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. “This will be a datadriven approach that helps us identify the people and places most susceptible to gun crime and suicide,” Inslee said. “Gun crime is a scourge that has scarred thousands of families in every corner of our state. It’s a scourge we can, should and will help prevent.” King County Sheriff John Urquhart said the governor’s actions will help law

ELAINE THOMPSON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gov. Jay Inslee embraces Suicide Prevention Resource Center retiree Peggy West following Wednesday’s news conference in Burien. Inslee announced a statewide initiative to reduce and prevent firearm-related injuries and death.

enforcement get a better handle on where street guns are coming from and may help them follow-up on the people who try to buy guns but fail to do so because of the background check system. Urquhart and other speakers said Inslee’s proposals carefully skirt some of the most divisive issues involving guns and focus on things gun owners and gun haters can agree on. “When you have bullies

yelling, you can’t have any progress,” Urquhart said. “There’s common ground there and we need to shame both sides into sitting down together.” Gun safety advocate Cheryl Stumbo, who was in the audience at Inslee’s news conference, said she was pleased the governor is working to link mental health issues and gun violence. Stumbo survived a 2006 shooting at the

Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle. Steven Nielson, chairman of the Libertarian Party of Washington State, criticized Inslee’s action saying it was another step away from the guidelines of both the state and U.S. constitutions. “I think that mental health issues need to be addressed, especially as it relates to veterans and at risk individuals and teens. But that is not a gun control issue,” Nielson said.

State acts on carbon pollution from largest facilities

OBITUARIES AND MEMO OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS

By Phuong Le Associated Press

SEATTLE — The state’s largest industrial emitters would be required to reduce carbon emissions by 5 percent every three years, under a proposed rule released Wednesday by state regulators. The Department of Ecology’s proposed Clean Air Rule would initially apply to about two dozen manufacturing plants, refineries, power plants, natural gas distributors and others that release at least 100,000 metric tons of carbon a year. Many more facilities would likely be covered by the rule as that threshold is lowered over time. State officials say the rule is needed to protect human health and the environment from climate change.

“It’s important that we act now to protect our water supplies, infrastructure and economy for future generations,” Ecology Director Maia Bellon said in a prepared statement. Environmental and other groups applauded the draft rule as a crucial step in addressing climate change. But business groups and others have worried the efforts could hurt the state’s ability to attract and retain industries. The draft rule comes after Gov. Jay Inslee failed last year to get legislation passed on his ambitious cap-and-trade plan that would have charged industrial facilities a fee for carbon emissions. In July, Inslee directed Ecology to limit carbon pollution using its existing authority under the state’s Clean Air Act.

Meanwhile, two competing efforts are trying to limit carbon pollution through statewide initiatives. In one effort, backers of Initiative 732 have turned over 350,000 signatures on a proposal to tax carbon pollution at $25 a metric ton while lowering other state taxes. If verified, I-732 would go before the Legislature. If lawmakers don’t act, the measure would go on the 2016 ballot. A coalition of environmental, labor and social justice groups, the Alliance for Jobs and Clean Energy, is also planning a statewide ballot initiative. That measure hasn’t been finalized, but it could impose new fees on carbon pollution and direct the money for clean-energy projects, lowincome communities and other projects.

Officials say its Clean Air Rule would capture about 60 percent of the state’s overall carbon emissions, but it would not get the state all the way toward its mandate to limit emissions of greenhouse gases to the 1990 level. The rule would initially apply to facilities releasing at least 100,000 metric tons. As that threshold drops by 5,000 metric tons every three years, it would apply to more entities. Ecology identified nearly four dozen facilities such as Joint Base Lewis-McChord and the University of Washington that could eventually be covered by the rule as the threshold is lowered over time. The University of Washington, for example, last reported over 90,000 metric tons of emissions, Ecology said.

“There are elements that are concerning to us,” said Brandon Houskeeper, government affairs director with the Association of Washington Business, which represents most of those who would be covered by the proposed rule. “Lowering the threshold means more entities would be covered by this rule. What signal does that send to businesses hoping to relocate to Washington?” he asked. Facilities would have different ways to comply with the rule, including buying credits from another carbon market system such as California’s or sponsoring projects that permanently reduce carbon pollution. The agency has scheduled four public hearings. It expects to finalize a rule by summer.

be concerned. An Elway Poll released Wednesday shows Inslee leading Republican challenger Bill Bryant 39 percent to 30 percent with the rest undecided. The survey of 500 voters was conducted at the end of December. Bryant is widely unknown around the state

and the survey makes clear he’s got an uphill battle to find enough votes to win. Inslee isn’t sailing along either. His job performance rating dipped since the last Elway Poll in July and has declined a little every six months since January 2014. There are other findings that hint at Inslee’s potential vulnerability and need to shore up his support. To that end, Inslee has started directing the conversation away from

the challenges engulfing his administration to the changes he’s looking to bring to Washington. On Wednesday, for example, he announced the launch of a statewide initiative to reduce gunrelated deaths and injuries. On the same day, he put out the draft of new clean air rules that could force the state’s largest polluters to eventually reduce emissions. And last month he

proposed closing some tax breaks and using the money to give public school teachers a pay hike. Those are among the policy pursuits he’ll put in bold on his resume for the coming campaign. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet. com. Contact him at 360352-8623; jcornfield@ heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos.

purchased the property in 1999. A study in 2001 came up with four possibilities. They included leaving the preserve as is, removing dikes to restore the estuary and two partial restoration options that fall in between. Researchers ultimately determined that more information was needed, particularly about the potential for flooding and saltwater intrusion in the area. “We’re trying to see where different solutions might overlap for habitat, the community and the drainage issues we’re having out there,” Clark said. “There are a lot of issues that are important to people. We’re basically just going to ask them.” During the meeting, attendants will be asked to suggest specific goals for the project, possible partnerships, opportunities for park users and neighbors

to help, and the best timing and frequency for future meetings. “We’re hoping to swing something that helps homeowners and helps the wildlife,” Pucci said. “We want to mine the great ideas out there that we haven’t heard yet.” A lot of factors need to be considered, she said. Iverson Spit is changing on its own, with sediment piling up in Port Susan from the Stillaguamish River, more intense storms rolling in and a rising sea level. The needs of nearby homeowners or regular park-goers also may change, which is why public meetings like the one on Saturday are important, she said. More information about the project is online at islandcountyeh.org/ Projects/1312. Kari Bray: 425-339-3439; kbray@heraldnet.com.

Cornfield From Page A3

in these is limited, he can influence the outcome as chief executive. Overall, this is not the kind of list on which a strong resume for reelection is built. At the same time, it’s too soon to calculate their potential effect but not too soon to

Park From Page A3

and saltwater meet. It provides a haven for juvenile salmon where they have food, protection from predators and time to grow and adjust to ocean water in the fresh-saltwater mix, said Dawn Pucci, salmon recovery coordinator with Island County. Iverson Preserve is in the path of young salmon migrating from the Stillaguamish and Snohomish rivers. “It’s very valuable habitat because of its proximity to the rivers, so if we can add more habitat, we’d definitely like to,” Clark said. “But we’re not going to prioritize salmon habitat over homes or a park.” Changes at Iverson Preserve have been discussed off and on since the county

Green Beret killed in Afghanistan Associated Press SEATTLE — The Defense Department says a veteran Green Beret in the Washington National Guard has been killed in action in Afghanistan. Staff Sgt. Matthew McClintock, of Des Moines, was on his third combat tour when he was killed Tuesday in southern Afghanistan’s Helmand Province. McClintock, 30, joined the Washington National Guard in 2014 after several years as an active duty soldier. He deployed

with the Washington National Guard’s A Company 19th Special Forces Group in July 2015. Maj. Gen. Bret Daugherty, commander of the Washington National Guard, said McClintock was “one of the best of the best.” He said the Guard will provide ongoing support to McClintock’s family during the grieving and healing process. Gov. Jay Inslee called McClintock “a true American hero who stood up to protect his state and nation.”

Stephen H. Good Sr. A son, Stephen H. Good Sr., born to Margaret and John Good in Butte, Montana on September 10, 1941, left his earthly home on December 30, 2015, to dwell in the house of the Lord. He transitioned from this life into eternal life with grace and joy in the presence of several of his children. H e w a s a s o n , b ro t h e r, b r o t h e r- i n - l a w, h u s b a n d , fa t h e r, fa t h e r- i n - l aw, grandfather, greatg r a n d fa t h e r, a n d fa i t h f u l friend. He was instrumental in helping create Archbishop Murphy High School as well as Pregnancy Aid of Snohomish County. He had a passion for golf. He loved playing with his family and with his childhood friends, “the Butte boys”. He leaves Sandra, his s o u l m a te a n d w i fe o f 5 5 years; his sister, Carlin; ten children; 19 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Ser vices will be held at Immaculate Conception C h u rc h , 2 5 01 H oy t Ave . , E v e r e t t , W A , o n F r i d a y, January 8, 2016. The Rosary will begin at 11:30 a.m., f o l l o w e d b y t h e Fu n e r a l Mass at 12:15 p.m. A reception will follow in the school gym, Mattie Hall. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Pregnancy Aid of Snohomish C o u n t y a t P O B o x 1 317 , Everett, WA 98201 or Archbishop Murphy High School at 12911 39th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208.

Obituaries continued on Page A7

“Please sign the Guest Book at www.heraldnet.com/ obituaries” indicates that an online Guest Book has been established under the name of the deceased. This will allow friends and family to express condolences and share memories. All entries are at no cost.


The Daily Herald Thursday, 01.07.2016 A7

Obituaries continued from Page A6

David Raymond Lindberg David Raymond Lindberg was born to Lillian Hoplin Lindberg and Raymond Lindberg on July 4, 1943, in Pequot Lakes, Minnesota. D ave d i e d a t P rov i d e n c e Hospital in Everett, Wash. on November 9, 2015, with his family by his side. He was 72 years old. In 1961 after receiving his GED, Dave was called into the military where he served in the US Air Force for three years. He received an honorable Veteran’s discharge in 1964. On November 5, 1972, he married Marie Gage. To g e t h e r t h e y h a d f o u r children: Mike, Tim, Jason and Crystal. Dave loved music - playing the piano, singing and dancing. He loved helping at various school music programs. Dave also coached and assisted in the local Special Olympics. He helped with track and field, soccer, volleyball, basketball a n d b ow l i n g . H e e n j oye d going to field day and other tournaments, as well as going to Ft. Lewis and dancing at the victory dance. In his later years, as a grandfather, he found his life even more satisfying and complete by helping others. He had many friends in the Philippines which he a s s i s t e d a n d c a r e d f o r. When his son Tim suffered kidney failure, he became Tim’s full-time caregiver. In the last few years, he took on the challenge of helping the disabled and working as a director of SEIU 775. Dave l i ve d a l i fe f u l l o f s o c i a l service. At the end of his life he accepted Christ Jesus as his Savior and passed peacefully into God’s presence. He was preceded in death by h i s p a r e n t s , R ay m o n d Lindberg and Lillian Crossman and two brothers Robert and Lowell. He is survived by his four children: Mike, Tim, Jason (Tess) and Cr ystal (Terr y); his four siblings - Linda Suby ( Wa l t e r ) , J a c k C r o s s m a n (Cindy), Dan Crossman (Mag) and Dianne Koshelnik ( D av e ) a n d s i s te r- i n - l aw, Vicki Lindberg. He is also sur vived by his ex-wife, Marie; his six grandchildren, A l i s h a , Ty l e r, T h o m a s , Teddy, Lillian, and Keiwei Lindberg; and many nieces and nephews. Dave’s Memorial Ser vice will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday January 9, 2016, in Everett at Trinity Episcopal Church, 2301 Hoyt. Please join us for a potluck af ter the service.

Gladys Marie Green

Georgia Ruth Robertson Georgia lost her two year battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) on Saturday, January 2, 2016. She joined the Lord af ter passing away peacefully at her home in Mount Vernon, Wash. at the age of 72. Georgia was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania on Au g u s t 1 8 , 19 4 3 , to h e r parents, Jim and Ruth Corl. Her family later moved to Phoenix, Arizona. Most of Georgia’s childhood was spent in the hot dry desert. All of Georgia’s school years were spent in Arizona, including graduating from Arizona State University with a degree in Home Economics. At the age of seventeen, Georgia met her future husband, Phillip Robertson as both became very involved with Christian leadership, which proved of great value through her struggles with ALS. When Georgia was 21, she and Phil married. They had two children, Matthew and Amy, who were both born in Arizona. Twelve years later t h ey m ove d to S a n J o s e , Calif. The urban area of San Jose became overpopulated for raising their children, so af ter 12 years the family sold their home and moved to E d m o n d s , Wa s h . T h ey found a home that caught their daughter’s attention because she could have a horse. As their children went off to college they moved to the wet turf of Mount Vernon where they lived for the last twenty-five years. When they became empty-nesters, Georgia realized it would be a good time to build on her Home Economics degree and went back to college, obtaining her Dietary Te c h n i c i a n d e g r e e i n a condensed time due to her previous education. Georgia worked for 20 years as a D i e t a r y Te c h n i c i a n a t Providence Hospital in Everett, Skagit Valley Hospital and Kidney Dialysis C e n te r i n M o u n t Ve r n o n . Throughout her life Georgia was passionate about her faith in the Lord which helped guide her through her battle with ALS. Georgia was active in Christian leadership and cherished the friendships she established over the years through Bible Study Fellowship programs and her involvement at Bethany Covenant Church. Georgia also loved traveling, gardening, anything aqua colored and most of all her cats. Georgia is survived by her loving husband of 52 years, P h i l ; t h e i r s o n , M a t t h ew (Judy) Robertson, daughter, Amy (Charles) Sletten; sister, Susan Benzer; and grandchildren, Julian, Melaina, Ashton, Bing and Tyler. A m e m o r i a l s e r v i c e honoring Georgia will be held at Bethany Covenant Church, 1318 S. 18th Street in Mount Vernon, WA , Saturday, January 9, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. A graveside service will follow at Evergreen Cemetery, 4504 Broadway in Everett, WA at 2:30 p.m. A viewing will be held on Friday, January 8th from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at Evergreen Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family ask donations be made to the Faith House in care of Bethany Covenant Church.

Gladys “Marie” Green returned to her Heavenly Fa t h e r a n d S av i o r J e s u s Christ on January 1, 2016, at the age of 95. She passed away peacefully with her family by her side. Marie was born October 31, 1920, in Hanson, Okla. She was married to Harr y Green who preceded her in death in 1983. She leaves her daughter, Joyce (Dean) Pittman, son, David Green; sister, Virgie Wood of Ariz.; grandchildren: Te r r y, T i m , To m , A m a n d a and Sam; several great grandchildren and greatgreat grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews and friends as well as her beloved dog, “Coco.” Marie was a special lady that touched many hear ts and will be greatly missed. A Graveside service will be In Loving Memory held at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, Tom Callaghan Sr. J a n u a r y 8 , 2 016 , a t t h e Marysville Cemetery. Born April 7, 1927, passed away January 7 2015, with his loved ones including Joan Syme by his side. We miss you every day. Love, your entire family

Richard E. Sanford

Benito M. Gonzalez

R i c h a rd E . S a n ford, 94 , died in his sleep on January 2, 2016. He was born on March 17, 1921, and lived his entire long, active life in Everett, Washington. He is sur vived by Helen, his loving wife of 72 years; and by five children: Judy, Sandy, Ed, Karen, and Karol; 13 grandchildren, and 20 great grandchildren. Dick graduated from Everett High School in 1939 where he was a good student and athlete. During WWII he served as a Merchant Marine in the Pacific. He loved his career as an Everett fireman and retired as a Battalion Chief i n 1 976 . A c t i v i t i e s h e enjoyed are fishing, hunting, bowling, playing softball and cards, extensive traveling, and spending time at his cabin in Conconully, Wash. Service to the Everett community included coaching Little League baseball for ten years, campaigning for Democratic candidates, ser ving on various city boards, delivering pet food for needy seniors, and volunteering at the Union Gospel Mission. Along with his quick smile he was honest, caring, intelligent, determined, and witty. A celebration of his life will be on Saturday, January 9, a t 1 1 a . m . a t Tr i n i t y Lutheran Church at 2324 Lombard St. in Everett. In lieu of flowers please donate to the Everett Gospel Mission, 3711 Smith Ave, Everett, WA 98201.

Benito M. Gonzalez, 64, of B r e n h a m , Te x a s p a s s e d away on Januar y 3, 2016, surrounded by his family in Mar ysville, Wash. He was born August 14, 1951, to Antonio and Ersela Gonzalez in Robstown, Texas. Benito is survived by his wife of 42 years, Josefina “Josie” Gonzalez; his three daughters: Sarah Mejia (Lupe) of Mar ysville, Lisa O’Connor (Doug) of Arlington, Wash., Johanna Hall (Ben) of San Diego, Calif. He was very proud of his nine grandchildren: Lupe Mejia Jr. (18), Jacob Mejia (15), Andres Hall (13), Jolee O’Connor (12), Benny Mejia (10), Noah Hall (10), Leo O’Connor (9), Jackson Hall (7), Sofia Hall (5). His four sisters: Adelita Torres (Nick) of Houston, Texas, Elizabeth Hinojosa (Frank) of Robstown, Texas, Magdalena Olmeda also of Robstown, Martha Meneses (Benjamin) of Anchorage, Alaska; three brothers: Ismael Gonzalez (Flora) of Robstown, Texas, Fidencio Gonzalez (Susie) of LaPorte, Texas, Raymundo Gonzalez (Yolanda) of South Houston, Texas; his extended family many loving nieces, nephews; and friends that loved their Tio Ben dearly. Ben began working at the young age of 14. He would pump gas at his Dad’s service station after school and also work with his Tio Adam learning carpentry. By the time he graduated from Ro b s tow n H i g h S c h o o l i n 1971, he was working as a carpenter full-time with his Tio and big brother Ismael. Ben married his one and only, Josie in November of 1 97 3 . S o o n a f t e r, t h e y moved to Washington State to begin their lives as husband and wife and started their family. He was a very hard worker and did whatever it took to provide for his family. For five years, he worked as an Assembler at US Marine Bayliner where he was able to utilize the carpentry skills he learned as a young boy. In 1979 he began employment with The Boeing Company in Everett, WA . During his 23 year service at Boeing, he per formed as a flight line mechanic, front line supervisor and a Quality Inspector. B e n h a d a u n i q u e p e r s o n a l i t y a n d l ove d to entertain. Some would say he was always the center of attention. He loved to tell jokes and make people laugh. He had a special connection with each person who spoke to him. He had his own way of making ever yone feel special. He loved walking through old antique shops, eating out, taking a drive to visit family and the Dallas Cowboys. He had a special talent of playing his acoustic guitar and singing the gospel with his wife by his side. He was a great example of how family should love one another. He will be greatly missed and never forgotten. He is preceded in death by his parents and his two brothers, Ezekiel and Antonio Gonzalez Jr. Viewing and service will be held on January 8, 2016, at Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home, 804 State Ave., M a r y s v i l l e , WA 9 8 27 0 a t 1:00 p.m.

Philomene (Tiny) Boeser Philomene (Tiny) Boeser passed away peacefully on January 2, 2016, at the age of 94. She was born September 7, 1921, on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota to Clara and Alex St. Clair. She was preceded in death by husband, Richard; daughter, Catherine; son, Jerry; grandson, Steve; her two brothers, Fred and Alvin, and sister Martha. She is sur vived by her daughters, Clara Jean (Tyke), Yvonne (Joe), and Martha Ann (Larry); 12 grandchildren: Kim, Michelle, Lisa, Greg, Todd, J u s t i n , C h a d , J ay, J o e , Steve, Andy, and Noah, 15 great-grandchildren; best friend, Barb; and numerous nieces and nephews. Tiny worked at the local nursing home and at Valley General Hospital in the kitchen. After retirement she spent her time knitting and making towels for family and friends. She loved to work her word search puzzles. She spent her last four years at Bethany at Silver Crest Assisted Living. A celebration of Tiny’s life will be held on Saturday, January 9, 2015, at 3 p.m. at Purdy & Kerr with Dawson Funeral Home, 409 W. Main St., Monroe, 360-794-7049.

Dennis James Reece Dennis James Reece, was born October 8, 1958, in Everett, Washington to Jim and Vivian Reece. He p a s s e d a w ay J a n u a r y 5 , 2016, at home surrounded by the love of his friends and family. Dennis worked many years for Summit Timber and G & D Logging and spent the remaining years of his career working for Stanwood Redi-Mix. He will be remembered for his big smile, the mischievous twinkle in his eye and his zest for life with friends and family. He loved his time on the water fishing, crabbing and his annual hunting trips. Many will remember Dennis a n d l i fe - l o n g f r i e n d , L e s , making whatever they were doing a bit more comical for ever yone involved. Dennis loved to have fun. Dennis is survived by his f a t h e r, J i m R e e c e ; h i s brother, Jim and wife, Cindy, and his nephews. He was preceded in death by his mother, Vivian. The family would like to thank his numerous friends for their support during his illness. Also, the kind p ro fe s s i o n a l p e o p l e f ro m Providence Hospice. A celebration of his life will be held, Saturday, January 16, 2016, from 1-4 at Loyal Heights Hall, located at 6521 210th St NE, Arlington. (Proceed West on Stanwood Br yant rd., from H w y 9 , a p p rox . 3 / 4 m i l e mile. Turn Nor th on 39th and East at the T. Hall is on left at end of road)

Sally Chaney S a l l y C h a n ey, 6 8 , o f Stanwood, died December 29, 2015. Sally graduated from West Seattle High School in 1965. She is sur vived by her husband of 43 years, M i c h a e l C h a n ey ; h e r s o n and his wife, Gary and Holly Chaney; her daughter and her husband, Karin and D a r i n N e l s o n ; h e r s i s te r, Judy Johnson; her brother, Bruce Kelly; her three grandchildren, Nicole, Eli and Brock; three great g randchi ldren, Andrew, Caiden and Amiah. Sally worked for the Boeing Company for 27 years and retired in 2004. Her grandchildren and great grandchildren were the light of her life. S h e wa s s o f u l l o f l i fe , love, wisdom and grace. We know she is organizing heaven right now. She will be forever missed...

Elizabeth Duncan Taylor Elizabeth Duncan Taylor of Lake Stevens, Wash. passed away peacefully on January 3, 2016. She was born to John and Hannah Linton in Fife, Scotland on May 28, 1934. She shared more than 50 years with her beloved husband John who passed away in 2014. Elizabeth’s extraordinar y capacity for peace and joy touched the lives of all who knew her. A memorial service is planned for Januar y 9, 2016, at 3 p.m. at Evergreen Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Marysville, Washington. In lieu of flowers donation can be made to Goodwill Industries International Incorporated.

To Place an In Memoriam or Obituary, please call

425-339-3023

Office hours: 8am-5pm Monday-Friday Phone availability: 8am-5pm Monday-Friday and until noon Saturday Deadlines: 2pm day prior for Tues.-Sat. Pub. By email until noon Sat. for Sun/Mon. Pub. Email: obits@heraldnet.com

Christine M. Forbes Aug. 25, 1920 - Jan. 2, 2016

Our dear sweet little old mother went to be with her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on January 2, 2016, at 2:30 p.m. surrounded by her l ov i n g f a m i l y i n M o n ro e , Washington. Mom was born August 25, 1920, in Bar ton, Nor th D a ko t a to L aw r e n c e a n d Clara Haman, she was the first of seven children. Mom married our Dad, Henry Weideman on December 26, 1940, they had eight children. Mom worked many jobs; she taught school, worked in a restaurant and a clothing store before moving to Washington in 1967. She continued to work and volunteer countless hours at the Monroe Food Bank for over 22 years until she was 9 2 ye a r s o l d . M o m l a te r married again in 1979 to Al Fo r b e s , t h e y m a d e t h e i r home in Monroe. I n J a n u a r y 2 013 M o m moved into Brookdale Retirement Home where she lived until she passed. Mom is survived by seven of her children, Shirley (Arnie) Huck, Dwaine Weideman, Polly Jelvik, Vera Tu p p e r, L a u r e e n ( R a y ) Carlson, Larry (Janine) Weideman, and Dallas (Carrie) Weideman. She also leaves two brothers and four sisters. Mom is survived by 100 plus grandchildren and seven great great grandchildren. Preceding her in death is her son, Vernon Weideman; her husbands, Al Forbes and Henry Weideman and many other loved ones. Mom said her children were the pride of her life and she loved spending her time with her family, she also loved to garden and play Bingo. Mom loved the dice game 10,000 and almost any game that was played at her annual bir thday par ty. Mom never forgot a loved ones bir thday, if you ever needed to know when a bir thday was you asked Mom. S o m a ny p e o p l e i n t h e community know Christine, whether it be from bingo, church, the senior center or the food bank and they all have stories to tell about her kindness, most recently an employee at Brookdale remembered Christine making sure her and her children were given plenty of food at the food bank over 20 years ago and shared their stories with Christine and her daughter. Every one of us has special memories of her, we will hold her dear to us and cherish. A Celebration of Mom’s extraordinary life will be held at the St. Mary of the Valley Catholic Church in Monroe, WA on Saturday, January 9, a t 1 2 n o o n , r e c e p t i o n to follow. Thank You Mom for giving s o m u c h o f yo u r s e l f a n d always putting your children before yourself. We all Love you. We will all miss you.

Everett’s only family owned funeral home 1492337

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS

3301 Colby Ave.

425-252-5159

www.SolieFuneralHomeandCrematory.com


Nation & World A8

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

Congress repeals health law Bill dismantling key elements sent to Obama, who has promised a veto By Erica Werner Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The GOPled Congress sent legislation to President Barack Obama Wednesday repealing his signature health law, fulfilling a promise to Republican voters in a presidential election year but inviting a certain veto. The nearly party-line vote in the House was 240-181. The legislation already passed the Senate last year under special rules protecting it from Democratic obstruction, so it goes straight to the White House. Republicans boasted of a signal achievement, saying they were forcing Obama to face up to the failures of his law while illustrating the stark political choices voters face. “We are confronting the president with the hard, honest truth,” said Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin. “Obamacare doesn’t work.” Democrats called it pointless political theater that will have the same ultimate outcome as the 61 previous repeal votes that were blocked in the Senate, since Obama will veto the legislation. “A bill that is going to the White House, that will get the fastest veto we’ve ever seen happen in this country, is a monumental vote?” said Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass. “This is just a waste of everyone’s time.” Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton has decried the repeal legislation while leading GOP candidates applauded it. GOP leaders acknowledged it will take a Republican president to get rid of the law. But they said that is the point. “It is our opportunity as

Gun buyer in San Bernardino attack pleads not guilty RIVERSIDE, Calif. — The man who bought the rifles used in the San Bernardino attack pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges in a federal indictment accusing him of conspiring with one of the shooters and to provide material support to terrorists. A jury trial was scheduled for Feb. 23. Enrique Marquez Jr., 24, could be sent to prison for as long as 50 years if he’s convicted. The Dec. 30 indictment superseded charges he originally faced when arrested two weeks after the Dec. 2 shootings carried out by his friend Syed Rizwan Farook and Farook’s wife, Tashfeen Malik. The couple killed 14 people and wounded 22 others before being killed hours later by with police. Authorities said Marquez’s failure to warn authorities about Farook and his purchase of the guns had deadly consequences.

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., smiles as he departs the chamber just after the GOP-controlled House voted to eliminate key parts of President Barack Obama’s health care law and to stop taxpayer funds from going to Planned Parenthood.

Republicans to lay out the choice for the American people,” said Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, of Washington. Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, of California, predicted that a Republican president will be in the White House next year and Congress will pass the repeal legislation again, “but we won’t have to worry about a veto from the White House.” For maximum visibility Republican leaders made the legislation, which also cuts federal funding for Planned Parenthood, their first major vote of 2016. Although they don’t command sufficient votes to override a presidential veto, they hope to schedule the override vote to coincide with the

Jan. 22 March for Life in Washington commemorating the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion. Yet Ryan hedged when asked whether the House will ever vote on a GOP replacement to Obamacare. Ryan has pledged that the House will come up with its own plan this year. But he said details such as whether the plan will actually come to a vote have not been determined. “Nothing’s been decided yet,” Ryan said. “Just wait.” Three Republicans joined Democrats in voting against the repeal bill: Reps. Robert Dold of Illinois, and Richard Hanna and John Katko of New York. One Democrat vo ted for it: Rep. Collin Peterson

of Minnesota. The bill would dismantle the health law’s key pillars, including requirements that most people obtain coverage and larger employers offer it to workers. It would eliminate the expansion of Medicaid coverage to additional lower-income people and government subsidies for many who buy policies on newly created insurance marketplaces. And it would end taxes the law imposed to cover its costs. The bill also would terminate the roughly $450 million yearly in federal dollars that go to Planned Parenthood, about a third of its budget. The group came under intensified GOP pressure last year over providing fetal tissue for research.

H-bomb claim draws tough response By Foster Klug and Hyung-Jin Kim Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — The United States, South Korea and Japan agreed to launch a “united and strong” international response to North Korea’s claim of a successful hydrogen bomb test, as experts scrambled Thursday to find more details about the detonation that drew worldwide skepticism and condemnation. It may take weeks or longer to confirm or contradict the North’s claim, but a successful test would mark a major and unanticipated advance for its still-limited nuclear arsenal and push its scientists and engineers closer to their goal of building a warhead small enough to place on a missile that can reach the U.S. mainland. Separate statements from the White House said President Barack Obama had spoken to South Korean President Park Geun-Hye and to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan. The statements said the countries “agreed to work together to forge a united and strong international response to North Korea’s latest reckless behavior.” Obama also reaffirmed the “unshakeable U.S. commitment” to the security of South Korea and Japan. The North’s bomb test drew worldwide condemnation, with the U.N. Security Council holding an emergency session and pledging to swiftly pursue new sanctions against North Korea, saying its test was a “clear violation” of previous U.N. resolutions. Four rounds of U.N. sanctions have aimed at reining in the North’s nuclear and missile development programs, but Pyongyang has ignored them and moved ahead with programs to modernize its

ACROSS THE U.S.

SETH WENIG / ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks to reporters before a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters on Wednesday.

ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons. South Korean officials said they were considering a variety of punitive measures. The options include restarting border propaganda broadcasts that Seoul halted after it agreed with Pyongyang in late August on a package of measures aimed at easing animosities, Defense Minister Han Min-koo told lawmakers Thursday. On Wednesday, there was a burst of jubilation and pride in North Korea’s capital of Pyongyang, where a TV anchor said the test of a “miniaturized” hydrogen bomb had been a “perfect success” that elevated the country’s “nuclear might to the next level.” But an early analysis by the U.S. government was “not consistent with the claims that the regime has made of a successful hydrogen bomb test,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest said. He added that nothing had happened in the past 24 hours to change Washington’s assessment of Pyongyang’s technical or military capabilities. South Korea’s spy agency told lawmakers that it thought the estimated explosive yield from the blast was much

smaller than what even a failed hydrogen bomb detonation would produce. Other analysts agreed with that assessment. “I’m pretty skeptical,” said Melissa Hanham, senior researcher at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute for International Studies in Monterey, California. “The seismic data indicates it would be very small for a hydrogen test. While also noting the quake was likely too small for an H-bomb test, Jaiki Lee, a professor of nuclear engineering at Seoul’s Hanyang University, said the North could have experimented with a “boosted” hybrid bomb that uses some nuclear fusion fuel along with more conventional uranium or plutonium fuel. Fusion is the main principle behind the hydrogen bomb, which can be hundreds of times more powerful than atomic bombs that use fission. In a hydrogen bomb, a nuclear fission explosion sets off a fusion reaction responsible for a powerful blast and radioactivity. Washington and nuclear experts have been skeptical

of past North Korean claims about hydrogen bombs, which are much more powerful and much more difficult to make than atomic bombs. North Korea’s state media called the test a self-defense measure against a potential U.S. attack. “The (country’s) access to H-bomb of justice, standing against the U.S., the chieftain of aggression ... is the legitimate right of a sovereign state for self-defense and a very just step no one can slander.” The hydrogen bomb already is the global standard for the five nations with the greatest nuclear capabilities: the U.S., Russia, France, the U.K. and China. Other nations may also either have it or are working on it, despite a worldwide effort to contain such proliferation. Just how big a threat North Korea’s nuclear program poses is a mystery. North Korea is thought to have a handful of rudimentary nuclear bombs and has spent decades trying to perfect a multistage, long-range missile to carry smaller versions of those bombs. Some analysts say the North probably hasn’t achieved the technology needed to make a miniaturized warhead that could fit on a long-range missile capable of hitting the U.S. mainland. To build its nuclear program, the North must explode new and more advanced devices so scientists can improve their designs and technology. It could be weeks before the true nature of the test is confirmed by outside experts, if they are able to do so at all. U.S. aircraft designed to detect evidence of a nuclear test, such as radioactive particulate matter, could be deployed from a U.S. base on the Japanese island of Okinawa. Japanese media said Tokyo mobilized its own reconnaissance aircraft over the Sea of Japan to try to collect atmospheric data.

Licenses for immigrants California issued more than a halfmillion driver’s licenses under a new law granting the identifying documents to immigrants who may be in the country illegally. The Department of Motor Vehicles said Wednesday that 605,000 licenses were issued since AB60 took effect last January. AB60 allows people who can’t prove they’re in the country legally to obtain driver’s licenses using identification from their home countries. They must prove state residency and pass written and driving tests.

Gas leak state of emergency Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency Wednesday over a massive natural-gas leak that has been spewing fumes into a Los Angeles neighborhood for months. Brown said he acted based on the requests of residents of Porter Ranch and the “prolonged and continuing” nature of the gas blowout at the underground storage facility. The well has been gushing up to 1,200 tons of methane daily. The leak was first reported in October. The utility is paying to relocate thousands of households after residents complained that the gases were making them sick.

Texas: Trooper indicted, fired A state trooper who arrested Sandra Bland after a contentious traffic stop last summer was fired Wednesday after being charged with perjury for allegedly lying about his confrontation with the black woman who died three days later in jail. Trooper Brian Encinia claimed in an affidavit that Bland was “combative and uncooperative” after he pulled her over and ordered her out of her car. The grand jury identified that affidavit in charging Encinia with perjury, special prosecutor Shawn McDonald said Wednesday. Hours after the indictment, the Texas Department of Public Safety said it would “begin termination proceedings” against Encinia. Bland’s death was ruled a suicide.

AROUND THE WORLD Ghana: Gitmo detainees Ghana’s foreign ministry says two former Guantanamo detainees of Yemeni origin will be settling for two years in the West African nation at the request of the United States. The ministry also said Wednesday that two people from Rwanda who were tried by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda also will be allowed to settle in Ghana. It said the humanitarian crisis in the Middle East means it will also provide refuge for some displaced Syrians with relatives in Ghana. The government said that all those coming in will be monitored.

Syria: Assad timeline The Obama administration has a vision for Syrian leader Bashar Assad’s departure. Even if it works, President Barack Obama won’t be around to see the plan through. An internal U.S. timeline for a best-case Syrian political transition, obtained by The Associated Press, sets a date of March 2017 for Assad to “relinquish” his position as president and for his “inner circle” to depart. That is two months after Obama leaves office and more than five years after Obama first called for Assad to leave. The State Department said Wednesday the timeline was prepared as a guide for Secretary of State John Kerry and other U.S. diplomats working on a political transition for Syria. From Herald news services


Herald Business Journal A9

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

Netflix in 130 more countries The surprise expansion is the “birth of a global TV network,” CEO Reed Hastings says. By Michael Liedtke Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix has already crossed off the biggest item on its New Year’s list of resolutions. The Internet video service debuted in 130 countries Wednesday in a surprise move likely to reel in millions of new subscribers. CEO Reed Hastings revealed the scope of Netflix’s expansion at the end of a presentation in Las

Vegas at CES, one of the technology industry’s marquee events. “You are witnessing the birth of a global TV network,” Hastings crowed on stage. The news caught almost everyone off guard because Netflix had previously set a goal of being available in most of the world by the end of this year. It looked like the Los Gatos, California, company had plenty of work ahead it because it ended December in 60 countries.

Now, Netflix is available in 21 different languages and streaming in just about every market that it had in its sights, with the notable exception of China, the world’s most populous country. Entering China may be a formidable challenge requiring potentially prickly negotiations with a government that blocks its citizenry from seeing material it considers objectionable or incendiary. Netflix currently has no plans to push into North Korea, Syria or Crimea because of restrictions on U.S. companies operating in those countries.

Investors were delighted with Netflix’s quantum leap across the globe. Its stock climbed $8.78, or 8 percent, $116.44 on a grim day in the rest of the market. The uptick in the shares reflects a belief that Netflix is now in a position to sign up more subscribers this year than analysts had previously anticipated, generating additional revenue that the company can spend on TV series and movies as it bids against rivals such as HBO, Amazon.com, YouTube and Hulu for licensing rights. See NETFLIX, Page A10

iPhone worries deflating Apple

GREGORY BULL / ASSOCIATED PRESS

A new X93D series BRAVIA 4K LCD TV sits on display at the CES International show Wednesday in Las Vegas.

Not-so-clever TVs Streaming devices are leaving the smart sets behind By Anick Jesdanun and Ryan Nakashima Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Turns out that smart TVs can be, well, pretty dumb. Even moderately priced sets can now connect to the Internet and run Netflix and other apps — that’s the “smart” part. Yet many people are ignoring the built-in features and turning to Apple TV, Roku and other stand-alone streaming devices that often do a better job. In an August report, the NPD Group estimates that roughly a third of smart TVs in the U.S. weren’t actually connected to the Internet. That’s down from about half two years earlier, but still not good. Researchers at Parks Associates found that even as more Americans are using smart TV functions, streaming device usage has grown even faster. “If you’re a streaming media

box (maker), you’ve got much more ability to push new features out into the market at an affordable price,” says Barbara Kraus, Parks Associates’ director of research. “They’re very stiff competition for smart TVs.” None of that is slowing down TV manufacturers like Samsung, though, as they continue to tout their newest and smartest models at this week’s CES gadget show in Las Vegas. In a way, putting brains in a device that most people replace only every five to seven years isn’t the brightest idea. Chips get faster every year, so by the time you’re ready to buy a new set, its brains will be really, really old, at least in technology terms. The software, though, can present an even bigger problem. Smart TVs are frequently plagued with confusing interfaces, buggy functions and inconsistent updates. They are sometimes mysteriously unable to run new

streaming services and may never be updated to add new features to the ones they do run. Worse, some TV makers focus on bringing new features only to their latest models in an effort to persuade people to buy new sets. Samsung’s 2016 models, for instance, implicitly inform anyone who bought last year’s sets that they’ve already been left behind. Those earlier customers won’t be able to use their Samsung TVs to set mood lighting or check security cameras in a connected home. Among the new features in LG’s 2016 models: Magic Zoom, which will let viewers zoom in on video while it’s playing — using a digital magnifying glass — to make out small text and other details. But LG won’t say when, if ever, older TVs will get that. The divide between smart TVs and streaming devices could See SMART, Page A10

Feds probe norovirus outbreak at Chipotle By Candice Choi Associated Press

NEW YORK — Chipotle reported a sales plunge of 30 percent for December after a series of food scares at its restaurants and disclosed that a federal criminal investigation tied to the sickening of customers has begun. The company said in a regulatory filing that it was asked to produce a broad range of documents tied to a norovirus outbreak this summer at its restaurant in Simi Valley, California,

but declined to provide further details. It said the investigation does not involve a more recent E. coli outbreak tied to its restaurants that sickened people in nine states, or a separate norovirus outbreak in Boston. The investigation is being conducted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California in conjunction with the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Criminal Investigations, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange

Commission Wednesday. A representative for the U.S. Attorney’s office declined to comment. Representatives for the FDA did not respond to a request for comment. The emergence of a criminal investigation after a norovirus outbreak is unusual, said Bill Marler, a food safety lawyer representing Chipotle customers who were sickened in Simi Valley. Outbreaks at restaurants are typically caused by an infected employee. Marler couldn’t think of a

reason for a federal investigation, other than employment violations. The disclosure of the investigation comes as Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. reels from E. coli outbreaks in late October and November, which were followed by the sickened customers at a restaurant in Boston in December. Those cases received far more national media attention than the California incident, and the company’s sales have See CHIPOTLE, Page A10

No cupholder? Human-carrying drone launched Chinese drone maker Ehang Inc. has unveiled what it calls the world’s first drone capable of carrying a human passenger. Ehang’s booth at the consumer electronics extravaganza in Las Vegas features a prototype of the Ehang 184. It looks like a small helicopter but with

HONG KONG — Chinese stock trading was been temporarily suspended for the second time this week after “circuit breakers” kicked in following a steep plunge. The official Xinhua news agency said Thursday that trading on the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges was frozen for the day after shares tumbled more than 7 percent. The emergency measures, which were introduced in December, also kicked in on Monday to halt stock trading.

Despite the Federal Reserve’s unanimous vote to raise a key interest rate last month, some policymakers viewed their decision as a “close call” because of stubbornly low inflation. Going forward, officials believed economic conditions would likely justify “only gradual increases” in its benchmark rate, minutes of the Fed’s December meeting released Wednesday showed. The Fed boosted the rate by a quarter point to a new range of 0.25 percent to 0.5 percent in December. It had been at a record low near zero for the past seven years.

Associated Press

See APPLE, Page A10

Chinese trading halted

Some saw Fed rate hike as ‘close call’

By Brandon Bailey SAN FRANCISCO — Apple fans keep buying iPhones, but Wall Street keeps worrying the company won’t be able to match last year’s blistering sales pace. Shares in the world’s most valuable company have fallen more than 15 percent over the last month, amid a drumbeat of news reports that some Asian parts suppliers are expecting Apple to trim orders for its signature smartphone this winter. Those fears were compounded Wednesday when the Wall Street Journal said one of Apple’s most important contractors is sending some workers home on “early holiday” before the Chinese New Year in February. Even an upbeat report from Apple announcing that its online App Store set a sales record last week failed to boost the stock. Its shares fell more than 2 percent Wednesday and were trading just above $100. Apple Inc. declined to comment Wednesday. But top executives at the Cupertino, California, company said last fall they expected to sell more iPhones during the past three months of 2015 than they did a year earlier, when the company sold a record 74.5 million. As evidence for his optimism, CEO Tim Cook said in October that a growing number of consumers

BRIEFLY

four doubled propellers spinning parallel to the ground like other drones. According to the company, the electric-powered drone can carry up to 220 pounds and fly for 23 minutes at sea level. With propellers folded up, it’s designed to fit in a single

parking spot. The cabin fits one person and a small backpack and even has air conditioning and a reading light, Ehang said. Some of the company’s claims border on the heroic. The company said the drone can be fully charged in 2 hours, adding that after setting a flight

plan, passengers only need to give two commands, “take off” and “land,” each controlled by a single click. U.S. authorities are just starting to lay out guidelines for drone use, and a humanpassenger drone seems certain to face strict scrutiny. Associated Press

Global economic forecast downgraded The World Bank has cut its forecast for global growth this year given weakness in the developing world. The aid agency said Wednesday that it expects the world economy to expand 2.9 percent in 2016, down from the forecast of 3.3 percent it made in June. The global economy grew 2.4 percent in 2015.

Macy’s cuts 4,800 jobs Macy’s is cutting up to 4,800 jobs after disappointing holiday sales. The Cincinnatibased department store chain said sales fell 5.2 percent in November and December at existing stores. Warm weather and lower spending by international tourists hurt sales.

Cook gets $1M raise Apple CEO Tim Cook got a raise of more than $1 million last year, though he didn’t make as much as his top lieutenants. The tech company says in a filing that Cook’s total pay was nearly $10.3 million, including $2 million salary, an $8 million bonus and $209,000 for private security. Apple paid five senior vice presidents more than $25 million apiece, including stock grants worth $20 million.

Hawaii’s last harvest at last sugar plantation Hawaii’s last sugar plantation is getting out of the sugar-growing business. Alexander & Baldwin Inc. said Wednesday that it will phase out sugar by the end of this year at its 36,000-acre Maui plantation. The land will be divided into smaller farms to grow biofuels and food crops. Alexander & Baldwin was founded by sugar-growing descendants of Protestant missionaries 145 years ago. From Herald news services

Amazon . . . . . 632.65 -1.14 Boeing . . . . . . 138.81 -2.25 Costco . . . . . . . 158.45 -1.48 Crane . . . . . . . . 46.81 -0.70 FrontierCom . . . . 4.76 0.04 HeritageFin . . . 18.66 -0.02 HomeStBnk . . . 21.67 -0.14 Microsoft . . . . . 54.05 -1.00 Nordstrom . . . . 48.50 -1.47 Paccar . . . . . . . . 47.18 0.01 Starbucks . . . . . 58.13 -0.52 T-Mobile . . . . . . 40.05 -0.17 WshFederal . . . 23.05 -0.18 Zillow . . . . . . . . 21.96 -0.03 Zumiez . . . . . . . 15.08 -0.23 Market report, A10


Market Report THE DAILY HERALD MAJOR INDEXES Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transp. NYSE Composite (DJ) Dow Jones Utilities Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 S&P MidCap Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000 NORTHWEST STOCKS Alaska Air Amazon Avista Ballard Power Barrett Business Services Boeing Columbia Banking Columbia Sportswear Costco Craft Brew Alliance Cray Data I/O Da Vita Healthcare Esterline Technologies Expedia Expeditors International FEI FLIR Systems Heritage Financial Home Street Bank Itron Key Technology Key Tronic Lattice Semiconductor Lithia Motors Inc. Mentor Graphics Micron Technologies Microsoft Microvision Nautilus Nike Nordstrom Northwest Natural Gas Northwest Pipe Outerwall Paccar Plum Creek Pope Resources Precision Castparts RadiSys RealNetworks Rentrak Sarepta Therapeutics Seattle Genetics Starbucks TTM Technologies Timberland Bancorp T-Mobile US Bancorp Washington Federal Weyerhaeuser Zillow Zumiez

Smart From Page A9

become even more pronounced as the devices adopt the types of app stores common on phones and tablets. The new Apple TV offers shopping, travel and food-delivery apps, while Nvidia’s Shield Android TV device runs sophisticated games once limited to game consoles and personal computers. A smart TV is fine if all you’re doing is watching video, says Ali Kani, general manager for the Shield

Netflix From Page A9

Netflix Inc. began the year with more than 70 million subscribers and management had already vowed to spend about $5 billion this year licensing video from studios around the world. Increasingly, Netflix has been buying material that only can be seen on its service, with more than 600 hours of original programming lined up for this year.

Chipotle From Page A9

since plunged. Sales fell 14.6 percent in the fourth quarter, marking the first decline for the company since it went public in 2006. Last month, Chipotle also said it could no longer reasonably predict sales trends given the food scares and retracted its forecast for 2016. In its regulatory filing Wednesday, the company

Symbol Close .dji 16,906.51 .djt 7,217.05 NYA 9,868.26 dju 580.50 .IXIC 4,835.77 .inx 1,990.26 mid 1,360.83 W5000 20,593.40 rut 1,094.37 Symbol Close ALK 78.20 AMZN 632.65 AVA 35.59 BLDP 1.39 BBSI 41.34 BA 138.81 COLB 31.60 COLM 49.92 COST 158.45 BREW 8.07 CRAY 29.79 DAIO 2.58 DVA 68.39 ESL 78.92 EXPE 119.04 EXPD 43.64 FEIC 75.17 FLIR 30.45 HFWA 18.66 HMST 21.67 ITRI 34.40 KTEC 9.48 KTCC 7.54 LSCC 6.21 LAD 89.06 MENT 17.75 MU 14.22 MSFT 54.05 MVIS 2.79 NLS 21.04 NKE 61.51 JWN 48.50 NWN 50.85 NWPX 10.97 OUTR 35.65 PCAR 47.18 PCL 46.73 POPE 64.50 PCP 232.78 RSYS 2.55 RNWK 3.98 RENT 45.21 SRPT 36.72 SGEN 40.33 SBUX 58.13 TTMI 6.11 TSBK 12.71 TMUS 40.05 USB 41.05 WAFD 23.05 WY 29.24 Z 21.96 ZUMZ 15.08

Change -252.15 -146.90 -159.80 -0.47 -55.67 -26.45 -19.48 -286.54 -16.07 Change 1.11 -1.14 0.17 -0.07 0.49 -2.26 -0.21 -0.76 -1.48 -0.18 -1.62 -0.19 -0.73 -2.29 -0.89 -0.91 -1.21 0.14 -0.02 -0.14 -2.06 -0.14 -0.03 0.06 -9.78 -0.61 -0.60 -1.00 -0.08 0.69 -0.87 -1.47 0.43 -0.21 0.05 0.01 -0.87 0.26 0.48 -0.08 -0.05 -0.88 -0.88 -2.21 -0.52 -0.04 0.31 -0.17 -0.63 -0.18 -0.66 -0.03 -0.23

|

52-week high 18,351.36 9,214.77 11,254.87 657.17 5,231.94 2,134.72 1,551.28 22,537.15 1,296.00 52-week high 87.17 696.44 38.34 3.10 53.00 158.83 36.27 74.72 169.73 14.32 35.93 3.80 85.17 120.45 140.51 51.80 89.07 34.46 19.80 24.43 41.72 13.41 12.49 7.66 126.56 28.09 34.23 56.85 4.23 22.95 68.19 83.16 52.25 27.22 85.26 68.44 51.63 70.50 234.98 3.00 7.24 84.23 41.97 52.33 64.00 10.93 13.86 43.43 46.26 26.34 37.04 33.62 41.81

WWW.HERALDNET.COM 52-week low 15,370.33 7,183.06 9,509.59 539.96 4,292.14 1,867.01 1,344.80 19,619.26 1,078.63 52-week low 57.71 285.25 29.77 1.07 25.21 115.14 24.60 41.11 117.03 6.80 18.00 2.26 67.34 69.77 76.34 42.17 64.93 25.12 15.44 16.70 27.93 8.08 7.50 3.25 79.84 17.12 13.50 39.72 1.80 13.82 45.35 47.71 42.00 9.87 34.53 45.04 36.95 58.15 186.17 1.79 3.75 42.03 11.33 30.05 39.28 5.93 9.02 26.46 38.81 19.72 26.73 21.35 11.53

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

|

A10

STOCK MARKET SUMMARY

U.S. stocks tumbled to two-month lows Wednesday as fears about the health of China's economy again led to widespread selling. The price of oil plunged to its lowest level since 2008 on the prospect that global demand could fall further. Associated Press

MOST ACTIVE VelocityShares 3x Long Crude SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (SPY) Bank of America (BAC) Apple (AAPL) Barclays Bank iPath S&P 500 iShares MSCI Emerging Mkts Financial Select Sector SPDR General Electric (GE) Ford Motor (F)

Volume 137,056,842 88,927,711 83,325,545 67,766,966 65,810,710 63,845,856 62,014,736 61,698,999 61,008,183

GAINERS American Independence (AMIC) Auris Medical Holding (EARS) Direxion Daily Natural Gas Rel Direxion Daily S&P Oil&Gas Exp Heat Biologics (HTBX)

Chg 42.04 31.14 26.24 20.71 18.03

LOSERS HHGregg (HGG) General Steel Holdings (GSI) Direxion Daily Natural Gas Rel Epizyme (EPZM) Lucas Energy (LEI)

Chg -34.03 -31.83 -25.69 -23.68 -23.19

of use, experience and content aggregation. It’s a different kind of business.” Some TV makers, including Hisense, Sharp and TCL, have turned to Roku’s smart TV system for that reason. Because the interface shares technology with Roku’s stand-alone streaming devices, app makers can design once for many devices. Plus, Roku smart TVs get software updates about the same time standalone devices do. But Roku isn’t bringing streaming video with sharper 4K resolution to those smart TVs until this spring, even though the Roku 4 streaming device

had that capability when it came out in October — yet another way buying a smart TV can make you feel like a dunce. So why do TV makers bother making smart TVs? Call it the business equivalent of FOMO — Fear Of Missing Out. “What they don’t want to be is just a piece of glass,” says Jim Denney, TiVo’s vice president of product marketing. Start with competition. It’s very difficult for a manufacturer to make a dumb TV, particularly one larger than about 40 inches, when competitors are all throwing smarts in. Hardware manufacturers

That slate encompasses more than 50 exclusive TV shows and movies, including award-winning series such as “House of Cards” and “Orange Is the New Black.” Although Netflix is now virtually worldwide, not of all its entertainment will be available everywhere. For instance, a prized licensing contract that gives Netflix the rights to Walt Disney films after their theatrical release will be limited to the U.S. and Canada as part of a deal negotiated several years ago.

Hastings told reporters Wednesday that Netflix is hoping to expand those rights into other countries. Netflix has come up with a formula that has proven addictive as its service has transformed the entertainment industry by allowing people to watch video anytime they want on an Internet-connected device. Hastings revealed Wednesday that Netflix subscribers watched 42.5 billion hours of programming last year, including 12 billion hours in the October-December

fourth quarter. The fourth-quarter viewership volume represented a nearly 50 percent increase from 8.25 billion hours the previous year. Put another way, Netflix subscribers are now watching a weekly average of 13 hours of programming, up from 12 hours the previous year. In remarks to reporters, Hastings likened the nearcompletion of Netflix’s worldwide expansion to a parent having a baby. “It’s a big deal, but the real work is the next 20 years,” Hastings, 55, said.

said it could not determine or predict the amount of any “fines, penalties or further liabilities” it might face in connection with the federal investigation. A Chipotle spokesman, Chris Arnold, wrote in an email the company does not discuss pending litigation, but that it intends to cooperate fully with the investigation. Doug Beach, a manager of the food program at Ventura County’s Environmental Health Division, said the U.S. Attorney’s office requested records from the his office

regarding the Chipotle case about a month ago. “That was a first for us,” Beach said in a phone interview. Beach said Chipotle had been cooperative with the county’s investigation, which uncovered issues such as unclean equipment and employees without the necessary food handling permits. He also noted that Chipotle started getting complaints about illnesses on Tuesday, Aug. 18, and shut down its restaurant the following Friday. Yet the company did not alert the county of the matter

until Saturday — after it had already reopened the restaurant, Beach said. To rehabilitate its image, Chipotle has taken out full-page ads apologizing to customers in dozens of newspapers around the country. It also vowed changes to step up food safety at its restaurants, in part by tweaking its cooking methods and increasing testing of meat and produce. Co-CEO Steve Ells has said the company will likely never know what ingredient was to blame for the E. coli cases.

CURRENCIES Euro Australian dollar British pound Canadian dollar Chinese yuan Japanese yen Mexican peso New Zealand dollar Philippine Peso Russian rouble Swedish krona Swiss franc

USD $1.08 $0.71 $1.46 $0.71 $0.15 $0.01 $0.06 $0.66 $0.02 $0.01 $0.12 $0.99

buys 0.93 1.41 0.68 1.41 6.51 118.58 17.55 1.50 47.09 74.76 8.59 1.01

INTEREST RATES 30-yr jumbo 30-yr fixed 15-yr fixed 30-yr refi 15-yr refi Prime Discount Federal Funds Treasuries 3-month 5-year 10-year

Today 4.53% 3.89% 3.10% 3.93% 3.12% 3.5 1 0.5 last 0.20% 1.65% 2.94%

1 Month 4.50% 3.88% 3.04% 3.96% 3.11% 3.25 0.75 0.25 previous 0.20% 1.72% 3.01%

Close 34.14 2.28 1.16 1,093.80 14.02 877 2.09 119.7 165.25 136.7 62

Change +0.50% +0.62% +0.18% +0.17% +0.28% +0.23% +0.10% -0.21% -0.12% +0.13% 0.00%

COMMODITIES Crude oil Natural gas Unleaded gas Gold Silver Platinum Copper Coffee Wheat Soybean Cotton

TOP MUTUAL FUNDS Symbol Vanguard 500 Index VFIAX Vanguard TSM Index Investor VTSMX Vanguard TSM Index Admiral VTSAX Vanguard Dividend Growth VDIGX Vanguard Institutional Index VINIX Davenport Equity Opportunities DEOPX PIMCO Total Return PTTRX Vanguard TSM Index Inst. Shares VITSX Vanguard Inst. Plus Shares VIIIX Fidelity Contrafund FCNTX Growth Fund of America AGTHX Income Fund of America AMECX American Capital Inc. Builder CAIBX Dodge & Cox Intl Stock DODFX Vanguard Wellington Admiral VWENX Homestead Small-Company HSCSX Dodge & Cox Stock Fund DODGX American Funds Investment AIVSX Am. Cap. World Growth/Income CWGIX Baron Partners Fund BPTRX Franklin Income FKINX Vanguard Target 2025 VTTVX

business. But he believes “the living room is going to be revolutionized by apps. It’s not any more just about Netflix or Hulu.” There’s also something to be said about letting TV makers and tech companies focus on what each does best. In other words, when you put your living room in the hands of software created by a hardware company, you may live to regret it. “There are some TV companies that do a fantastic job of creating beautiful sets with fantastic picture quality,” says Lloyd Klarke, Roku’s director of product management. “Our focus is on ease

Heraldnet.com/financials

■ Form your own portfolio ■ Stock updates throughout the day ■ The latest news on your favorite companies

YTD (%) -1.38 -1.38 -1.54 -0.98 -1.31 -1.13 0.21 -1.56 -1.51 -2.09 -1.96 -0.64 -0.72 -2.49 -0.88 -1.92 -1.55 -1.32 -1.59 -4.04 -0.48 -0.96

1 yr -0.14 0.75 -1.1 3.36 1.92 -5.31 0.28 -1.11 -0.11 6.37 5.22 -0.92 -2.26 -11.18 -0.77 -4.87 -3.92 -2.63 -1.79 -4.27 -7.09 -0.66

also want to avoid being marginalized the way they were in smartphones. In adopting Google’s Android system, companies like Samsung and LG effectively ceded revenue from apps, movies and search ads to Google. On TVs, seen as one of the next frontiers, they want to retain control — and the cash. To be sure, smart TVs do offer a few economic benefits. If you’ve got several TVs in your house, it might be cheaper not to buy streaming devices for each set, and instead to rely on built-in features in some rooms. Some smart TVs also

Apple From Page A9

were switching from rival Android phones to iPhones, while many current iPhone owners had not yet upgraded to newer models. Cook has also cautioned against drawing conclusions based on reports from individual contractors, since the company has an extensive supply and production network. The iPhone is crucial for Apple, since it provides almost two-thirds of its revenue. The latest iPhone 6S and 6S Plus models, introduced last fall, have several new features, but analysts say they aren’t dramatically different from previous 6 and 6 Plus phones that went on sale in late 2014. Experts also say the global smartphone market isn’t growing as fast as it did a few years ago, because many people already own one. Sales of the 6S phones appear to have slowed during the recent holiday season, Rosenblatt Securities analyst Jun Zhang wrote in a note to

5 yr 11.97 11.40 11.62 12.40 11.91 12.02 3.66 11.62 12.00 11.97 11.36 8.10 6.28 2.07 8.72 10.34 10.84 10.22 6.50 10.44 4.78 6.88

Exp ratio 0.05 0.17 0.05 0.32 0.04 0.98 0.46 0.04 0.02 0.64 0.65 0.55 0.59 0.64 0.18 0.91 0.52 0.59 0.77 1.32 0.64 0.17

offer seamless switching between regular TV and streaming. Samsung will do this for the first time on 2016 models. A single remote will control both the set and set-top boxes from Dish and Time Warner Cable — and even the Apple TV. Won-Jin Lee, Samsung’s executive vice president of its visual display business, says consumers get frustrated with too many connected devices plugged into their TVs and a jumble of remote controls. “We wanted this to be a solution that actually fixes the problems that consumers are dealing with,” he says.

clients Wednesday, adding that two of Apple’s Asian contractors have reduced their production forecasts. Apple has introduced other new products in recent months, including the Apple Watch, iPad Pro and a new Apple TV control box. But they “have not become meaningful revenue resources to offset slowing iPhone sales in 2016,” Zhang wrote. Those worries have dogged Apple’s stock for months. After peaking at $134.54 in April, the stock ended the year at $105.26. Still, many analysts are still bullish. Daniel Ives of FBR Capital Markets called the reports from China “worrisome.” But he added in an email that he believes the next iPhone models, expected in September, will offer more significant improvements and produce another “mega” sales cycle. Apple, meanwhile, said Wednesday that its App Store set a record for sales over the holidays, with sales of apps and in-app purchases totaling more than $20 billion in the full year 2015. Apple generally keeps 30 percent of App Store revenue,.


Opinion A11

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

Charter school accountability to shut down. One school in Seattle has begun the process to revert to a private school. The eight other schools, including schools in Spokane, Tacoma and Highline, are considering a contract with a small 500-student public school district near Spokane. Two schools might also apply for state funding to serve as home-school centers. The Legislature begins its session Monday, focused chiefly on correcting the school funding issue for more than a million other of the state’s K-12 students, but two Spokane-area senators, Democrat Andy Billig and Republican Michael Baumgartner, have proposed legislation, Senate Bill 6136, that would allow the schools to stay open and provide for the opening of more schools but would make the charter schools accountable to local school district boards. The move would keep the charter schools as an alternative but would satisfy the court’s concern about

public accountability. Charter schools would lose the autonomy they now enjoy, but the legislation would give the charter schools more flexibility than allowed alternative schools in most school districts, said Billig in an Associated Press story this week. Charter school boards would negotiate with their local school district board regarding length of school day, school year and instructional hours, professional development and staffing levels, hiring and firing of charter school staff, curriculum and budgeting decisions. Funding from levies, on a perstudent basis, also would be negotiated between the charter school board and school district board. Charter school proponents may chafe at having to submit to local school district oversight, but the legislation would keep existing schools running and allow more to open. And it would add to school district management duties, but the students in charter schools would be the districts’

in history from the end of World War II until now and the CIA, corporations and the neocons’ involvement in overthrowing elected governments and training hit squads to kill civilians who didn’t support the governments they installed. Imagine they might resent that and fight back. Reagan had al-Qaida to the White House and supported them in a proxy war with Russia. They later flew planes into the Twin Towers. The writer cries out about the innocents who die. Where was he when the Bush administration lied us into war that killed 4,500 of our soldiers, not counting millions of Iraqis. Obama inherited this from previous sins of our CIA, corporate involvement and the neocon beliefs of world economic domination. We now have the Republic-con party calling for more killing, more war. Wanting to ban Muslims refugees, which we created with our wars. So it isn’t Obama who created the

terrorist, it is the ignorance of people like the writer.

responsibility with or without the charter schools. The legislation also honors the voters’ will to create the charter school system, albeit with 51 percent approval. The debate continues as to whether charter schools are as effective in educating students as their supporters claim. In a Herald guest commentary in November, Lew Moore, president of the Washington Research Council, pointed to national research in 2009 that found that for most students, a charter school education was not a significant improvement over a traditional public school education. The exception was for charter schools in urban areas where a majority of students from low-income families, minority students and English-language learners did benefit. The Senate legislation allows the charter school laboratories of learning to continue and seems to satisfy the constitutional requirement for public oversight of state and local funding.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ■■SNOHOMISH

Reserve parking for shoppers In the town of Snohomish, First Street is always packed with traffic and parking. Mostly the bicyclists from King County. We have ample parking all the way west of Avenue D to Highway 9 for parking. Leave First Street open for shoppers or to those who browse through the stores to buy antiques. Rodney H. Zabell Snohomish

■■TERRORISM

Seeds planted in Reagan era Regarding the letter, “Blame belongs to our president”: It’s disappointing that the Herald editorial board would print a letter blaming the president for terrorism. Obviously the writer has no knowledge of history, just hatred. He points out the world order, and the academic elite and multinational corporations as Obama’s vision — far from the truth. He, like the Republic-con party who love the world order, as long as we rule it, do not want people to be educated, unless they can profit from it, and bow down to multinational corporations by letting them ship our manufacturing jobs overseas and gild them with tax cuts and off-shore tax breaks. These are the true terrorists and unpatriotic to our country. As to where terrorists came from you have to look back

Stuart Clift Everett

■■MASS SHOOTINGS

Graphic games may play part When I was growing up people owned guns, gun shops sold guns and I don’t remember any mass shootings at schools, malls, movie theaters or anywhere. So why now? With what generation did this start and why? Could it be the graphic video games the kids play hour after hour? Kill as many people as you can then reload. Or is it that parents can’t discipline their kids like ours did without risking doing time on a chain gang. Maybe we all need to get back to basics more so then worrying about liberal mindset.

Have your say Feel strongly about something? Share it with the community by writing a letter to the editor. You’ll need to include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) If your letter is published, please wait 30 days before submitting another. Send it to: Email: letters@heraldnet.com Mail: Letters section The Daily Herald P.O. Box 930 Everett, WA 98206 Have a question about letters? Call Carol MacPherson at 425-339-3472 or send an e-mail to letters@heraldnet. com.

John Cherney Snohomish

OTHER VOICES | Affordable Care Act

States have 3 reasons to expand Medicaid By Bloomberg editors

S

ome 3 million Americans who lack health insurance could gain coverage, if only their states would accept the Medicaid funding that the Affordable Care Act provides. Two years into Obamacare, the arguments in favor of extending this coverage have only grown stronger. Opponents have warned, for example, that giving health benefits to able-bodied adults will discourage them from

working. But a comparison of states that have expanded Medicaid and those that haven’t — part of a collection of new Obamacare studies published Tuesday — found that expansion had no significant effect on employment levels among the newly eligible. What Medicaid expansion has changed, however, is the number of uninsured who are treated in hospitals. In states that went along with the program — Washington state

inclued — the share of uninsured patients in hospitals fell from 12 percent to 6 percent; other states saw no change. Fewer uninsured patients means hospitals have more money to spend on things like research, improved care and worker salaries. Some conservative states have tried an alternative to the expansion: Rather than add qualified people to Medicaid rolls, they have used the federal money to enroll them in private insurance plans. And

Josh O’Connor, Publisher Jon Bauer, Editorial Page Editor Neal Pattison, Executive Editor Carol MacPherson, Editorial Writer

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

IN OUR VIEW | Legislature 2016

Since the start of the school year, the estimated 1,300 students enrolled in nine K-12 charter schools across the state have lived with the uncertainty of where they will attend school after this year. As schools prepared to open in September, the state Supreme Court, in a 6-3 decision, ruled that the citizen’s initiative that created the state’s charter school system was unconstitutional because the schools were receiving state funds but weren’t subject to the oversight of voters. The court cited a 1909 precedent that found that only the voters, through those they elect locally to school boards, had the authority to administer publicly supported “common schools.” Supporters protested that the approval of the initiative ought to serve as adequate voter oversight, but the court denied a request to reconsider its decision in November. Since then, the statewide Charter School Commission has begun preparations

Editorial Board

this strategy seems to improve access to medical care just as well, another study shows. A handful of states — including Louisiana, South Dakota and Virginia — now appear closer to reversing their earlier opposition to expanding Medicaid. The new data show there are still economic, and humanitarian, reasons to go ahead. The above editorial appears on Bloomberg View at www. bloomberg.com/view.

No honor for intransigence on gun safety

I

t is axiomatic that congressional Republicans will oppose anything smacking of “gun control,” which may as well be read as “Your mama.” Thus, it comes as no surprise that President Obama’s announcement of executive actions to clarify and enhance federal gun laws prompted KATHLEEN PARKER reflexive, hyperbolic responses from the right. Marco Rubio said Obama is “obsessed with undermining the Second Amendment,” while Ted Cruz averred, “We don’t beat the bad guys by taking away our guns; we beat the bad guys by using our guns.” Spoken like a true, Canadian-born Texan who has been busy burnishing his “outsider” Outdoor Guy image. House Speaker Paul Ryan criticized the president for a “dangerous level of executive overreach” and for circumventing congressional opposition — as though Congress has been working feverishly to reduce gun violence. Rather, Republicans focus their laser beams on Obama’s and the Democratic Party’s political motivations, shocking to none, and remind us that we already have enough gun laws. This may well be true, but couldn’t we stand to tweak them a bit? Or, perhaps, enforce them? And, isn’t it possible to reduce the number of guns in the wrong hands without surrendering our Second Amendment rights or invoking the slippery slope of government confiscation? Of course it is — and we can. Obama made an artful and poignant counterargument to the usual objections Tuesday during a news conference from the White House. He reminded those gathered, including many who have lost family members to gun violence, that other people also have rights — the right to free assembly or the right to practice their religion without being shot. In fairness to the gun lobby, which may not deserve such charity, one can understand reservations about limiting access to guns. What is less easily understood is the refusal of Republicans to take the reins of any given issue and do something constructive rather than invariably waiting to be forced into the ignoble position of “no.” It is one thing to be in the pocket of the National Rifle Association. It is another to do nothing and then assume a superior posture of purposeful neglect, as though do-nothingness were a policy and smug intransigence a philosophy. The steps Obama is trying to take won’t save every life, but they seem minimally intrusive and could have significant effects. Summarizing briefly, he’s clarifying existing law and more tightly defining “gun dealer” in order to impose broader background checks; upgrading technology for improved information-sharing and safer guns; increasing relevant workforces to speed up background checks; and closing loopholes that have allowed criminals to buy guns online and elsewhere with a separate set of rules. Or no rules. Giving the FBI more resources to modernize its system will help. So will giving $500 million to mental health services aimed at keeping guns away from people determined to hurt themselves or others. Requiring shippers to report stolen guns will also be helpful — and investing in smart technology could be a game changer. As Obama said, tearing up at mention of the Sandy Hook shooting that took the lives of 20 first-graders, if we can keep children from opening aspirin bottles, surely we can prevent their pulling the trigger on a gun. As to expanding background checks, only the criminal or the suicidal object to waiting a day or two before taking home a gun. What concerns most people, meanwhile, are those weapons, especially semi-automatics with large magazines, whose only purpose is to kill people. Many argue that no current law could have prevented any of the mass shootings in recent years, but is this sufficient justification for doing nothing when doing something could make a difference we may never know about — the child who didn’t die because new technology prevented him from firing a pistol? The Islamic State-inspired terrorist who didn’t murder holiday revelers because he failed an online background check? Obama’s actions won’t go unchallenged. And much political hay will be threshed, bundled and sold to Republican primary voters in the meantime. But GOP voters should be as skeptical of those ringing the gong of doom as they have been of Obama. In a civilized society, more guns can’t be better than fewer. Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.


A12 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

Charge: First step in a long process From Page A1

Snohomish County deputy prosecutor Chris Dickinson on Wednesday asked for a $500,000 arrest warrant to move Brodahl to the county jail. He’s been housed at the state psychiatric hospital for more than a dozen years. A new charge doesn’t mean Brodahl is headed to

trial anytime soon for the April 23, 2002, killing. Prosecutors must restart the competency-evaluation process. They were told that in order for a new evaluation to be done they had to refile the murder charge. A state forensic psychologist will need to determine if Brodahl can assist his lawyers and if he fully understands the

charge against him. If he doesn’t, he can be sent back to Western for restoration treatment in the hospital’s forensic ward. That hasn’t worked in the past. In 2004, doctors determined that Brodahl wasn’t competent to stand trial. Doctors found that Brodahl suffered from a mental disease but couldn’t pinpoint the problem. His heavy methamphetamine use prior to his arrest was considered a contributor to his mental illness, court papers said. Prosecutors were forced to drop the murder charge

but refiled in 2008 after learning that Western planned to release Brodahl. The charge was dismissed a year later when efforts to restore Brodahl’s competency failed. He was civilly committed to the hospital and has remained there. It’s a process Tammy Sheary can recite by heart. “I don’t believe he’s no longer a danger to the community. I believe he will always be a danger,” Sheary said. “My biggest fear is that he’ll be released and will be walking the streets in my neighborhood.” Sheary heard a few

months ago that Brodahl could be freed. She is concerned that Brodahl is being released because of the ongoing problems at Western State Hospital. The hospital has come under fire for long wait times for treatment of criminal defendants who aren’t competent to stand trial. Western is under federal monitoring to improve those wait times after losing a lawsuit in U.S. District Court. Federal inspectors in November also warned the hospital it was at risk of losing Medicare and Medicaid funding if it didn’t improve

patient safety. “I want to know this case isn’t caught up in that mess,” Sheary said. She was relieved when prosecutors told her that they were going to refile the murder charge. So much time has passed and she was worried that prosecutors would decide against reopening the case. “I can’t bring Brady back but I want justice served. He needs to go to trial for what he did to my son,” Sheary said. Diana Hefley: 425339-3463; hefley@ heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ dianahefley.

Clams: Not enough to sustain a minimum season Arrest From Page A1

The minimum length for a clam season is two weeks. There aren’t enough clams to support that long of a season at Kayak Point, according to the study. Seasons are determined by the population of Manila and native littleneck clams. At Kayak Point, where the Tulalip Tribes have fishing rights, it would be based on how many clams could be sustainably collected, divided between tribal and public harvests. The allowable harvest of clams likely would be depleted in seven or eight days, the study found. In July, 16 volunteers spent a total of 108 hours helping biologists with a population survey. They dug 104 holes along the beach and collected 368 clams that were identified, measured, weighed and then returned to their holes. Nearly 70 percent were purple varnish clams, a nonnative species. About 10 percent each were cockles or butters, 6 percent were pointed macomas and

DAN BATES / HERALD FILE

Mary Middleton (left) and Aimee Christy from Pacific Shellfish Institute, take a look at clam samples placed in coolers earlier. They directed a team of volunteers in an operation this past summer to assess the status of clam species populations at Kayak Point’s beaches.

4 percent were littlenecks, a declining native species. Manila and horse clams each made up 1 percent of the total clams collected. The littleneck population remains low while butters and cockles are more common now than in the past. For every littleneck on the beach, there are at least 15 varnish clams, based on

population estimates from the survey. The beach drew roughly 2,500 clam diggers each season in the early 1990s. They collected mostly littlenecks, butter clams, horse clams and cockles. Manila and softshell clams were not as numerous and varnish clams hadn’t established themselves yet. In the late 1990s, seasons

were shortened because of strain on the clam population. In 2001, the population dropped dramatically after a die-off attributed to freezing temperatures during extremely low tides. It’s called “winter kill.” The littleneck population especially hasn’t bounced back. Researchers suggested that strategically seeding the beach could help stabilize clam populations. One possibility would be to introduce Manila clam larvae north of the pier and some native littlenecks near the park’s southern boundary. Seeding the beach is a decision that would have to be supported by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tulalip Tribes. Its estimated cost is about $10,000 for less than one acre. It would take a couple of years for those clams to mature, and seeding would need to be done annually to keep population numbers up. “If reopened, the park is expected to attract a large number of harvesters, which will place pressure

From Page A1

on not just the enhanced portion, but also the remaining native littleneck population,” according to the report. Kayak Point Park has 3,300 feet of shoreline along Port Susan with a fishing pier, nearby campsites, a playground, picnic shelters and boat launch. It’s the most visited Snohomish County park, according to the report. The Department of Fish and Wildlife has recommended that officials work on acquiring more tidelands with healthy clam populations. The Tulalip Tribes suggested introducing littleneck clam larvae at Kayak Point and other locations along Port Susan to see where the species could thrive again. Biologists want population surveys to be done periodically. The report is a guide and doesn’t change how the beach is managed. Decisions on studying, seeding or restarting clam digging would fall to the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tulalip Tribes. Kari Bray: 425-339-3439; kbray@heraldnet.com.

On Tuesday, the husband called police to say he remembered the woman’s voice from the break-in. He said he had met with her at a Snohomish supermarket and that she had called him the night before the robbery. He provided police with her cellphone number. Police tracked the number to escort ads and later identified Atter through social media. A Snohomish County sheriff’s deputy located the Cadillac in Arlington and contacted Lake Stevens police, who took Atter into custody. Atter said she believes the man got her name from her online ad. The investigation is continuing, Lake Stevens police said Wednesday. Anyone with information is asked to call 425-334-9537 or 425-377-3214. Eric Stevick: 425339-3446; stevick@ heraldnet.com.

“For 16 years I’ ve worked to k eep Snohomish Co unty roadways safe. County emplo yees took cuts in pay and benefits to we ather the rece ssion. But we’ve now bee n without a co ntract for a year, wages are falling further behind, and health care co sts are at risk o f escalating. Our patience is running thin. We are comm itted to provid ing excellent services for yo u and your fam ily. The County needs to honor that c ommitment with a fair con tract.” – Melanie Arm

strong, Local 10

Honor Hard Work with a Fair Contract, not Excuses!

Learn more and offer your support at www.Council2.com 1512334

9

FACTS ABOUT THE 2016 SNOHOMISH COUNTY BUDGET: After claiming that County Employees may face layoffs, the County Council passed a budget that increased spending by $3.2 million. Including: • $300,000 for 2 new positions in the Executive office. • $100,000 for “Professional Services” in the Executive office. • $35,000 for an Executive “Transition Team”


Northwest Extra SECTION B

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/LOCAL

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

Tribe: Group ‘desecrating’ land By Terrence Petty and Manuel Valdes Associated Press

BURNS, Ore. — The leader of an American Indian tribe that regards an Oregon nature preserve as sacred issued a rebuke Wednesday to the armed men who are occupying the property, saying they are not welcome at the snowy bird sanctuary and must leave. The Burns Paiute tribe was the latest group to speak out against the men, who have taken several buildings at the preserve to protest policies governing the use of federal land in the West. “The protesters have no right to this land. It belongs to the native people who live here,” tribal leader Charlotte Rodrique said. She spoke at a news conference at the tribe’s cultural center, about half-hour drive from Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, which is being occupied by some 20 men led by Ammon Bundy, whose father Cliven was at the center of a standoff in Nevada with federal officials in 2014 over use of public lands. Ammon Bundy is demanding that the refuge be handed over to locals. Rodrique said she “had to laugh” at the demand, because she knew Bundy was not talking about giving the land to the tribe. The 13,700-acre Burns Paiute Reservation is north of this

It is frustrating when I hear the demand that we return the land to the people, because it is in the people’s hand — the people own it. — Randy Eardley, Bureau of Land Management spokesman

remote town in Oregon sagebrush country. The reservation is separate from the wildlife refuge, but tribal members consider it part of their ancestral land. As with other tribes, the Burns’ Paiute’s link to the land is marked by a history of conflict with white settlers and the U.S. government. In the late 1800s, they were forced off a sprawling reservation created by an 1872 treaty that was never ratified. Some later returned and purchased property in the Burns area, where about 200 tribal members now live. Bundy’s group seized buildings Saturday at the nature preserve in eastern Oregon’s high desert country. Authorities have made no attempt to remove them. The standoff in rural Oregon is a continuation of a long-running dispute over federal policies covering the use of public lands, including grazing. The federal government controls about half

of all land in the West. For example, it owns 53 percent of Oregon, 85 percent of Nevada and 66 percent of Utah, according to the Congressional Research Service. The Bundy family is among many people in the West who contend local officials could do a better job of managing public lands than federal officials. “It is our goal to get the logger back to logging, the rancher back to ranching,” Ammon Bundy said Tuesday. The argument is rejected by those who say the U.S. government is better equipped to manage public lands for all those who want to make use of them. Among those groups are Native Americans. The Burns Paiute tribe has guaranteed access to the refuge for activities that are important to their culture, including gathering a plant used for making traditional baskets and seeds that are

used for making bread. The tribe also hunts and fishes there. Rodrique said the armed occupiers are “desecrating one of our sacred sites” with their presence at refuge. Jarvis Kennedy, a tribal council member, said: “We don’t need these guys here. They need to go home and get out of here.” Randy Eardley, a Bureau of Land Management spokesman, said Bundy’s call for control of the land to be transferred makes no sense. “It is frustrating when I hear the demand that we return the land to the people, because it is in the people’s hand — the people own it,” he said. “Everybody in the United States owns that land. ... We manage it the best we can for its owners, the people, and whether it’s for recreating, for grazing, for energy and mineral development.” Bundy’s group, calling itself Citizens for Constitutional Freedom, says it wants an inquiry into whether the government is forcing ranchers off their land after Dwight Hammond and his son, Steven, reported back to prison Monday. The Hammonds, who have distanced themselves from the group, were convicted of arson three years ago and served no more than a year. A judge later ruled that the terms fell short of minimum sentences requiring them to serve about four more years.

Cancer not stopping piano man By C.R. Roberts The News Tribune

TACOMA — Fired in 2013 after 27 years playing piano for customers at the Tacoma Mall Nordstrom, Juan Perez began to worry. “I thought that was the end of my career playing piano,” he said in December at his home in University Place. He did not worry long, and his career has blossomed as never before. Two days after telling a News Tribune reporter that it was his dream to play at Tacoma’s upscale El Gaucho steakhouse, El Gaucho called. A week later, the Space Needle called. Perez has been playing at both venues, and at several others, ever since. He has been playing piano ever since, and even since, the cancer returned. It’s called synovial sarcoma. It’s rare, touching maybe two people in a million. Perez has said he would willingly surrender to the will of God, but he will not go quietly where this cancer would lead him. And now he doesn’t know what to do with all that money.

Co-workers respond Nordstrom had decided it would “refresh the experience,” according to a company spokeswoman in 2013. Stores, said Tara Darrow, were “moving to recorded music. It’s more modern.” The Baldwin baby grand that Perez and other pianists played would not be a part of “the evolving experience in the stores.” On that last Sunday in the store, Perez ended with “Piano Man” and “How Great Thou Art.” And “Unforgettable” was the first song he played following a five-surgeon, 10-hour surgery last July to remove a tumor tangled near his heart. A round of radiation followed surgery, and Perez has continued playing at El Gaucho, and at the Space Needle, Bellevue Square, the Bellevue Hyatt Regency, the Tacoma Yacht Club, Tacoma Golf & Country Club, the Old Cannery in Sumner and the Weatherly Inn and Narrows Glen retirement homes in Tacoma. Recently, the management and co-workers at El Gaucho decided to help Perez with medical bills and other

NORTHWEST BRIEFLY

Whidbey NAS house fires investigated SEATTLE — Police are investigating at least three fires set at military housing units north of Seattle. KINGTV reported that authorities are offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to a conviction for the arsons near Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. One of the burned housing units belonged to Naval Airman Ryan Sharland, 19, who shared it with his new wife, Shannon. They were out of town for Christmas when they learned their house was on fire. They lost nearly everything, including their two kittens. Five families were displaced in that fire, the latest in a string of arsons in the area’s military housing units. Police said they are looking into several leads and the base is increasing security. It’s unclear whether Navy families are being specifically targeted.

Settlement reached in dash-cam suit Seattle has agreed to pay more than $174,000 to KOMOTV to settle a lawsuit that claimed the Seattle Police Department violated publicrecords law by withholding dashboard-camera video requests by the station. The Seattle Times reported that the settlement, reached last month, comes after the state Supreme Court ruled in 2014 that police videos cannot be withheld unless they relate to pending litigation. That decision overturned a 2012 King County Superior Court ruling that said the video could be withheld for three years. As part of the settlement, the city will pay KOMO’s attorney fees and the case will be sent back to the lower court. The payment is not an admission of liability on the city’s part.

Vancouver: Oil terminal hearings

Juan Perez plays the piano in El Gaucho in downtown Tacoma on Nov. 23.

expenses. Management would donate half the house receipts one Sunday night, and the servers and other staff would offer all their tips. Total raised: $31,000. A co-worker established an online funding request. Total raised: Nearly $12,000 at the time this story was written. “He’s great. There’s been so much support,” said Joe Vego, El Gaucho general manager. “He’s an inspiring guy,” Vego said. “He’s great at picking music that people can connect with. He always finds a way to convey that emotion.” On that recent Sunday evening, he said, the restaurant was “standing room only. His whole family was there. The first thing Juan said was, ‘I have to go to work.’ It wasn’t about him enjoying the event — it was about him being an entertainer for others. Not himself, but for others. He’ll always be family here. Always, beyond his piano playing.” “I was shocked,” Perez said. “I did not ask for help. I did not know what to say. There were so many people.” Again he played “How Great Thou Art,” along with “Love Will Keep Us Together.” “All of a sudden, people started clapping,” he said. “It was very overwhelming,” said Susan Perez, Juan’s wife. “I really don’t know what to do with the money,” said Juan.

The mission “We’re OK. My children have good jobs,” he said. That’s 10 children, seven sons, three daughters, all graduates of Bellarmine Preparatory School. Add 11 grandchildren, with one on the way. Earlier in December, weeks after he finished that one-month course of radiation therapy, Perez turned 67. “They cannot do surgery again,” he said. “I don’t know what to plan. I cannot plan for the future. I would like to do something. You don’t know what to expect. I don’t know what we’re doing, celebrating my life. I’m confused.” The family, Susan said, regularly meets for potluck taco night and pizza night get-togethers. “They want to make time for memories,” she said. “They want him to slow down.” “My life is in God’s hands,” Perez said. “I know God has a purpose for me. My doctor doesn’t believe that I’ll live long. This is not an ordinary cancer. I keep asking him, ‘What do you think? How long will I live?’ He cannot tell me. “I believe that there is still a mission for me. I believe that I will live at least two more years. I want to use this talent that God gave me, until he calls me.” Perez intends to use the money he has been given to benefit

PETER HALEY / THE NEWS TRIBUNE

the higher mission, whatever it might be. “I already thought about buying maybe 50 blankets for the homeless and other families,” Perez said. “I called the Rescue Mission. I called other churches. What I would like to do is help high school kids, to keep young kids out of trouble. If we can start one new project for the community, I will be happy to spend this money.” Until then, the mission is the music. “Playing the piano is like therapy to me,” Perez said. “I forget that I am sick. When I play, I give my heart to the music. I offer it to God. Before I play, I practice for one hour at home. I ask the Lord what songs to play. I feel I’m trying to give a little hope if people are having are having a bad time. I think that is my duty, to entertain people. It is my duty to God and my employer. “El Gaucho, the Space Needle, they trusted me,” he said. “I give my whole best — that I can take care of the customers. My duty to God is to entertain, not to get the money. I want everybody to be happy with the music.” But for one son who is deployed with the U.S. Navy, the Perez family planned to gather together for the holiday. “I want to pass along to my children the joy I felt when I was young, especially around Christmas,” Perez said.

Nearly 400 people signed up to testify about a plan to create the nation’s largest oil transfer terminal in southwest Washington. The Columbian reported that the first of several public hearings was held Tuesday in Vancouver and lasted more than eight hours. Vancouver Energy wants to build a terminal along the Columbia River that can handle an average 360,000 barrels of crude per day. The oil would be shipped to refineries on the West Coast. Terminal opponents outnumbered supporters Tuesday. They argued that the terminal would risk life, ecology and property. Proponents of the project said it can be built safely and will provide jobs in the region. The evaluation council will make a recommendation to Gov. Jay Inslee, who has final say on the project.

Hoquiam: Proposed terminal not for crude The owner of a Grays Harbor biodiesel facility says it won’t handle crude oil as it pursues an expansion project on Washington’s coast. The project was one of three terminals proposed at the Port of Grays Harbor to bring crude oil by train from the Bakken region of North Dakota and Montana. Iowa-based Renewable Energy Group told local and state regulators it wants to expand capacity to handle bulk liquids but crude oil won’t be in the mix. REG spokesman Anthony Hulen said in an email Wednesday that the company is looking forward to producing lower carbon, renewable fuel at Grays Harbor. From Herald news services


B2 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

7 DAYS! 10 Lines + Photo

95

$

To advertise, call 425.339.3100 | www.Heraldnet.com/Homes

To advertise, call 425.339.3203

Gorgeous 2013 home in 55+ gated park.1545 sf, 2 Br., 2 ba, ofďŹ ce, kitchen/breakfast bar. LR, private deck, hot tub. Carpor t, shed, clubhouse, A m a z i n g va l u e ! M u s t see! MLS#843330. Contact Ken 918-282-0041 or Leann 253-205-9818.

Cabinet Maker, exp’d FT, 7-3:30 425-355-8003

Arlington Small 1 bd cottage 2 blocks from downtown. W/D, Window AC, Off street prking. 10x12 strg shed. W/S incl. $700 + damage dep. NS/NP. 360-435-3130

Randy McMillan

Affordable housing for independent low income seniors 55+ 1 & 2 br apts Full size W/D, Elevator, Controlled Access, Fireplace. Pets welcome (restrictions). Call today Holly Village 425-355-0646

Manufactured/Mobile Home Specialist FOR BUYERS AND SELLERS

Everett:

Listed And/Or Sold Over 500 Manufactured/Mobile Homes Put my Experience to Work for You!

2 & 3 bd Apt, 2 bd Dplx

Lynnwood: 2 bd Dplx

The Rental Connection Inc

mobilehomesrus@ $15,500 outlook.com Located in senior park in Marysville, vacant, 2 Br., 425-327-9015 1 ba, older dbl wide 820 s f, c a r p o r t , h a n d i c a p RealityOne Group, Preview ra m p, u p gra d e d r o o f, fur nace. Appliances s t ay. N e a r s h o p p i n g , medical and busline. Financing Available (OAC) Others Available We Specialize Call Randy McMillan Smokey Point 425-327-9015 Like new 2003 Redman RealityOne Group, Preview mfg. hm. 1,100 sf. 3 Br., 2 ba, new flooring and SMOKEY POINT AREA paint thru-out. Lg. front All ages park, 1998 mfg deck, cement patio in home, 1,680 sf, 3 Br., 1.75 ba, more remodel- semi private backyard next to club house and ing needed. $12,900. p o o l . H o m e fe a t u r e s Midway Realty walk-in shower, up grad(360)659-3644 ed appliances and lighting. Located in Active Senior park. $57,500. Financing available (OAC) Call Randy (424)3279015 for appointment.

rentalconnectioninc.com

425-339-6200

Adult Community

1 & 2 bd apt homes. W/D, Pool, controlled Access. We Pay W/S/G. Vintage at Everett

Ask about our

Special!

SS appliances, Hrdwd oors, Secure Bldg, Social Rms, Ourdoor Social areas, Elevator, DW, built-in Microwaves. Pets Okay.

425-259-5659

206-595-8852

Contact Us Today!

NOW LEASING Spacious 1

(starting at $880) & 2 bds

Washer/Dryer Elevator access Pet Friendly (restrictions) Private Dining Rm Movie Theater Garden area Controlled access Vintage at Lakewood 844-879-4908 2131 172nd St NE Marysville, 98271

BRAND NEW! Affordable Studio, 1 & 2 Bd apt homes for SENIORS 55+

W/D, micro. On site Yoga Studio, Beauty Shop, Theater Rm, Entertainment Lounge, Fitness Center, Controlled Access, Reserved Cvrd Prkg. Pet friendly. Exc location! MUST SEE! The Reserve at Everett 8920 Evergreen Way

Studios: $695 1 bd: $745 Lrg 1 bd: $895 (SOLD OUT!) 2 bd: $950 (SOLD OUT!)

Park Place Apts 3515 Hoyt Ave Everett, 98201

425-339-3203

BRAND NEW 55+ apartment community

AFFORDABLE Senior Housing 55+

Call today for a FREE, no obligation tour

Newspaper advertising is still one of the most effective ways to market your home.

leasing@reserveateverett.com

425-353-3479

homes@heraldnet.com

7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_ZZZ+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV

Collections, gold, silver.

425-252-0500

FLORAL HILLS, Camellia Garden, two plots, LOT-15, 1 & 2. Retail value $12,000. Both $5,995 OBO. 425-7459086 or 425-760-1053

to ďż˝ Callplaceus today ďż˝ an ad. Come Visit Everett’s 1st Recreational Marijuana Store! High Society “Where the Grass is always Greenerâ€? 1824 Broadway Everett, 98201

9506 19th Ave SE, off I-5 Exit # 189, S. Everett

CYPRESS LAWN 4 plots Rhododendron Garden, (worth $8000/ea) Sell $3,500/ea obo 360.675.7411

425-379-8888 MJPOTSHOP.COM

Sun-Thur, 10am-9pm, Fri-Sat, 10am-10pm

221 inc. Premier 21+ Rec. Marijuana

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the inuence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children

highsociety502.com 425-374-3772

FIREWOOD

360-445-6221 221inc.com

Dry & CustomSplit Alder, Maple & Douglas Fir Speedy Delivery & Best Prices!

18729 Fir Isl. Rd, Ste C Mt Vernon, 98273

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the inuence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children

425-312-5489 DRY Firewood, $250 per cord, delivered. Call us at our new Number: 360793-0460 Dr y seasoned mix 16� split, ready to burn, $250 per cord. Delivered local. Text/call 425-348-8665

Getting New Furniture?

Recycle your old furniture – place a classified ad. Call us today 339-3100

Washington’s Best 502 Retail Marijuana Open to the public 21+

$10 Grams Daily

Offering a service and don’t see a classification that fits? Call us, we will happily find a suitable one.

425-339-3100

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the inuence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

Come see about our

Weekly Specials

Great Selection of Premium Cannabis at the Best Prices Specials 7 days a week. 425-353-1449

and contribute to our neighborhood food drive

PURPLE HAZE

Recreational Cannabis Retail 4218 Rucker Ave Everett Open daily

11603 Hwy 99 Everett www.budhut.net

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the inuence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

425-258-3054 purplehazellc.com

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the inuence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

Recycle your old furniture Call us today 425.339.3100

Detail Window Tint Paint Protection Wraps

Autos, Boats & RV’s

17545 Aurora Ave. N. Shoreline, 98133 (inside Doug’s NW Cadillac)

425-640-8468

Gregco Excavating 25 Years Experience Residential or Commercial *Site Prep *Clearing *Demo *Grading *Utilities *Drainage Solutions

1-888-818-9703

euphorium502.com

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the inuence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children

No Job Too Small

Ask About Our Special Packages! 7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_ZZZ+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV

Flea Market Lake City

Community Center 12531 - 28th Ave NE

Sat..Jan.9th 9am-3pm

For Information Call

(206)639-8813

FREE ADMISSION

MONROE Year Round Indoor Swap Meet Celebrating 19 Years! Evergreen Fairgrounds Every Saturday & Sunday OPEN:10/17 to 6/26 9am-4pm Free parking & admission; Family Friendly For info: 425-876-1888

A&E

LOTS OF STUFF?

SELL IT! Time to sell your stuff so you can get new stuff! Bye-bye junk, hello CA$H!

Call Today! www.heraldnet.com

See our Freshly Renovated Apartments

Ask about our 7 days a week Daystay program

MARYSVILLE: Fur n. rm, pvt hm, incl all utils, cable, wi-fi. $495/$200 dep, ns, np. Clean/Sober house. Avail 1/1/16. 425-501-5677

Assisted Living & Memory Care Everett Plaza 2504 12th St Everett, 98201 425-258-6408 carepartnersliving.com

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS: Washington State law (RCW 18.27.100) requires that all advertisements for construction - related services include the contractor’s current Department of Labor & Industries registration number in the advertisement. Failure to obtain a certificate of registration from L & I or show the registration number in all advertising will result in a fine up to $5000 against the unregistered contractor. For more information, call Labor & Industries Specialty Compliance Services Division at 1-800-647-0982 or check out L & I’s internet site at www.wa.gov/Ini.

Need Extra Cash? Place your classified ad today!

425.339.3100

SIDEJOB Bob decks2ďŹ x@gmail.com

•Decks • Siding • Fences • Custom Sheds • Carports • Creative Outbuildings • Handrails • Stairs • Steps • Rebuilds & New Construction Call 425-870-4084 Lic/Bond/Ins #SIDEJB*94505

All Types of *Home Repairs *Installations *Carpentry *Hauling *Cleanup *Pressure Washing *Painting *Drywall *Tile

No Job Too Small

425-244-6943 425-334-8028 bonded/insured lic# COVERAP897DH

728 Edmonds Way Edmonds, 98020 425-673-2875

Vineyard Park at Mountlake Terrace assisted living & Memory Care. 23008 56th Ave W. Mtlk. Terrace, 98043 Call today! 425-678-6008 carepartnersliving.com

Quality work Reasonable rates No job too small I do it all !! 360-436-1787 425-231-0249 Lic. GEORGHS951MR

R&D

Handyman Sevice

•PAINTING •ELECTRICAL •REMODELS •PLUMBING •CARPENTRY Small Jobs “OKâ€?

Call Rod

425-773-5906 Lic.# CCPREUSPP918DL

SUBSCRIBE & NEVER MISS AN ISSUE! HeraldNet.com/subscribe Something for everyone. www.heraldnet.com

ENGINEERING SERVICES MANAGER C o m m u n i t y D eve l o p ment Dpt. Manages the Engineering Services Land Development Division. Requires: Bachelor’s in civil engineering or a related engineering specialty; 5 yrs profess i o n a l ex p ; o r e q u i v c o m b i n a t i o n . P. E . l i cense required. $7462 $9751 mth + benefits. Apply online at http://marysvillewa.gov. Open unt i l f i l l e d . F i r s t r ev i ew 1/19/16. EOE/AA. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

for Carpenters and Concrete Finishers Minimum, 3 yrs of EXP. in construction and valid WA DL and transportation. References requested, Excellent Compensation. Medical benefits, including dental and vision, 401(k) Retirement Plan. Fax your resume to: (360) 6793740. Equal Employment Opportunity. Now accepting applications for PT/FT Meal Program Assistants. Will provide paid training. We are a family owned and operated facility that offers a relaxed atmosphere and a flexible schedule. If interested, please apply in person at: Delta Rehab. 1705 Terrace Ave. Snohomish, WA 98290 ~ 360-568-2168 RN MDS Coordinator Wanted MDS Coordinator position available. Long term care facility/nursing home is creating a new position. The job duties would involve t h e ove r s i g h t o f a l l MDS forms for accuracy. We are a privately owned and operated facility with a philosophy of living life. If interested, please apply in person at: Delta Rehab. Center 1705 Terrace Ave. Snohomish, WA 98290 360-568-2168

DON’R Construction Painting, Tilework Interior/Exterior Commercial & Residential. Detail Work before Sale of House. Pressure Washing

CAB DRIVERS Make up to $200 cash per day! • •

Fun job! Lots of money! We need Help!

Call Today:

(425) 609-7777

Earn While You Learn! Have you thought about becoming a NAC and wasn’t sure how? If you are interested in becoming a Nursing Assistant, we are now accepting applications for the next class. If hired to work here, we will have you attend our next class which is done inhouse. We are also offering a $750 hire-on bonus which you will receive on your sixth month of continuous employment. If interested, please apply in person at: Delta Reh a b. , 1 7 0 5 Te r r a c e Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290 Housekeeping Position Full time housekeeping position open, day shift, with every other weekend off. If interested, please apply in person at: Delta Rehab., 1705 Terrace Ave. Snohomish, 98290 360-568-2168 Living Life and Having Fun! Now accepting applications for RNs/LPNs, in long t e r m c a r e f a c i l i t y. Benefits. Please apply in person at Delta Reh a b. , 1 7 0 5 Te r r a c e Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290 - 360-568-2168 Start work immediately for RTS and enhance the lives of people with developmental needs. Must be: 18yrs+, have WDL, insured car . Variety of shifts, $10.60 /hr after training. BeneďŹ ts vac/med/dent. Contact Cindy 360-659-9656 or email rtscindyz@outlook.com

30 years Exp No Job Too Small

Lic# DONRC**994QW

WHISPERING Pines Custom Landscapes, LLC For all your landscape needs

•Retaining walls/paverpatios •Flagstone patio/paths •Yard renovations/design •Sod/Planting Installations •Irrigation systems/repair •Water features •Low voltage outdoor lighting •Yard clean-ups

425-353-5417

Lic # WHISPPC937KP

GEORGE’S HANDYMAN SERVICE

425-339-3100

Section inside The Daily Herald on Fridays featuring dining, theater, MUSIC, movies, dance and events to plan for your weekend.

Rosewood Courte Caring for the Memory Impaired

COVER-ALL HANDYMAN

lic#GREGCEL949CB

20925 Cypress Way, Lynnwood 21127Hwy 9 SE, Woodinville

Assisted Living & Memory Care The Cottages at Mill Creek 13200 10th Dr. SE Mill Creek, 98012 425-379-8276 The Cottages at Marysville 1216 Grove St. Marysville, 98271 360-322-7561 carepartnersliving.com

(425)508-6251

Call for Estimate 425-320-6283

LION’S

S. Everett, Apartment for rent. Nice neighborhood. Valley VIEW. 3 bdrms, 2 baths, Garage, $1250/mo. Close to Everett Mall. Church member landlord. Call & leave number. 425-513-6010

M - Th: 10:30am - 8pm Fri - Sat: 10:30am 9pm. Sun: Noon - 7pm

North Snohomish County’s Premier 21+ Cannabis Shop. 100’s of products available! Daily specials! Knowledgeable staff. Come see us today!

A+ SEASONED

Marysville Senior Living Live Life on Your Terms. Up-Scale 1 & 2 bd apts for adults 55 years of age or older. Windsor Square Independent Living Apts 360-653-1717 windsorliving.com

To advertise, call 425.339.3100

Use this directory to grow your business.

2 Plush c h o c . b r n l t h r Loveseats w/console & cupholders; exc cond. $2200/ea new Basset Fur n, Selling both for $850. 425.337.8539

BUYING OLD COINS

To advertise, call 425.339.3074

PLUMBING

1-800-972-2937

“FROM Small to All Give Us A Call� Lic. PACWEWS955PK, Bonded, Insured Eastside: 425-273-1050 King Co: 206-326-9277 Sno Co: 425-374-3624 www.pacwestservices.net

South County Plumbing, Inc. RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Service, Repair, Remodeling, 24 Hr Emergency Service In Business since 1970. 3 Generations of Plumbers! Ask about our Coupon

425-775-7377 425-778-6092 1-800-481-7733

To advertise, call 425.339.3089

NO. 13-4-00193-0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH In the Matter of the Estate of DORATHY MAE DUBORKO Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the person indicated below previously administered this Estate as Guardian, and, pursuant to the death of Dorathy Mae Duborko and the subsequent conversion of the guardianship to probate proceedings, will continue to act in the capacity of Pe r s o n a l R e p r e s e n t a t i ve (“PRâ€?) of the above-entitled probate estate. Each person or entity having claims against the Decedent must, prior to the time when same would be b a r r e d by a ny o t h e r w i s e applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the PR or the attorney for the PR at the address stated below a copy of the claim, and ďŹ ling of the original claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the P R s e r ve d o r m a i l e d t h e notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 1 1 . 4 0 . 0 2 0 ( 3 ) ; o r ( 2 ) fo u r months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the probate assets and non-probate assets of the decedent. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 31, 2015 PR: TERESA OLLIS-IDEKER PR ADDRESS: c/o Donald F. Nelson, Atty 4320-196th St SW, #B-311 Lynnwood, Washington 98036 ATTORNEYS FOR PR: DONALD F. NELSON Law OfďŹ ces of Donald F. Nelson, Inc PS 4320-196th St SW, #B-311 Lynnwood, Washington 98036 (425) 742-0996 Presented by: LAW OFFICES OF DONALD F. NELSON, INC. P.S. BY: DONALD F. NELSON WSBA#19005 Attorney for Petitioner/PR EDH675654 Published: December 31, 2015; January 7, 14, 2016.

Need Extra Cash? Call us at 425.339.3100

ABANDONED VEHICLE AUCTION SNO-ISLE TOWING LLC. 3005 300th ST NW Stanwood, WA 98292 (425) 870-7527 Sunday, January 10, 2016 Preview noon - 1 p.m. Auction 1 PM CASH ONLY ‘99 Ford Expedition AUU2538 ‘98 Honda Civic AUC9836 ‘95 Jeep Grand Cherokee ADB9131 ‘92 Chev Blazer AXX5119 ‘90 Subaru Legacy ASW1478 05 Chev Colorado C51584A All vehicles are sold As is, Where is and are subject to release to owner pr ior to auction. Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676385

Auction by Tillmon & Daughter at ABC Self Storage 511 Pine Ave., Snohomish Friday, January 8, 2015 12:30 pm 360-568-4300 Published: January 6, 7, 8, 2016. EDH676371

Notice of Public Auction Friday, January 8, 2016 1:30 p.m. at: Marysville Clock Tower Self Storage 8119 State Ave Marysville, WA 360-651-7500 Tillmon and Daughter Auction Service P u bl i s h e d : Ja nu a r y 7 , 8 , 2015. EDH


The Daily Herald Thursday, 01.07.2016 B3

1VCMJD/PUJDFT

'PSFDMPTVSFT

'PSFDMPTVSFT

'PSFDMPTVSFT

AMENDED ORDINANCE 706 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF DARRINGTON ADOPTING THE 2015-2035 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE, AMENDING ORDINANCE 602, AS AMENDED. A complete copy of the ordinance is available at Darrington Town Hall. 1005 Cascade St. Darrington, WA 98241. Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676639

the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5, 2016. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a state or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of tile obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Jon Iseman 3612 Hoyt Avenue EVERETT, WA 98201 Occupant 3612 Hoyt Avenue EVERETT, WA 98201 Wendy Iseman 3612 Hoyt Avenue EVERETT, WA 98201 by both first-class and certified mail on June 8, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was .posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under tile deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. Dated: September 23, 2015 to access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line at: 888-988-6736. North Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Veronica Abraham, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104 Telephone 1-855-676-9686 TAC: 985481 PUB: 1/07/16, 1/28/16 Published: January 7, 28, 2016. EDH676605

signment recorded on December 17, 2014 under Auditor’s File 201412170345 in the official records in the Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments $5,534.06 Late Charges $836.62 Escrow Advances $181 .43 Suspense Balance $-34. 12 Title Search $1,086.22 Interest Due $23,060.52 Escrow Payment $6,420.96 Property Inspection $40.00 Property Inspection Fee $174.75 BPO $150.00 Property Maintenance $ 2,343.30 Grand Total $39,612.31 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of’ Trust is: Principal $267,903.68, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5, 2016, The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a state or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Unknown Spouse of Cameron Mays 9321 Goblin LN Everett, WA 98208 Cameron Mays 9321 Goblin LN Everett, WA 98208 Occupant 9321 Goblin LN Everett, WA 98208 by both first-class and certified mail on July31, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. To access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line at: 888-988-6736. Dated: September 28, 2015 North Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Trevor Brown, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104 Telephone 1-855-676-9686 TAC: 985482 PUB: 1/07/16, 1/28/16 Published: January 7, 28, 2016. EDH676609

site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance. 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS OF KLA-HA-YA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 31 OF PLATS AT PAGE(s) 41, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. APN: 00422700000800 More commonly known as: 12104 58TH PLACE SE, SNOHOMISH, WA 98290 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated April 16, 2009, recorded April 24, 2009, under Auditor’s File No, 200904240588, records of Snohomish County, Washington, from VALERIE L. BAKER AND TAMES S. BAKER, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor, to PACFIC NORTHWEST TTTLE COMPANY OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, INC., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP. as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC under an Assignment r e c o r d e d o n D e c e m b e r 1 2 , 2 0 1 4 u n d e r Au d i t o r ’s F i l e 201412120188 in the official records in the Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments $14,831.93 Late Charges $49.50 Suspense Balance $-42.61 Uncollected Fees $75.00 Grand Total $14,913.82 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $166,997.66, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as arc provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5, 2016. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a state or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: JAMES S BAKER 12104 58TH PLACE SE SNOHOMISH, WA 98290 JAMES S BAKER 12104 SE 58TH PL SNOHOMISH, WA 98290-5529 JAMES S BAKER 1417 NORTH MAGNOLIA AVE OCALA, FL 34475 VALERIE L. BAKER AKA VALERIE L. THOREEN A/K/A VALERIE I.. WHITESIDE 12104 58TH PLACE SE SNOHOMISH, WA 98290 VALERIE L. BAKER AKA VALERIE L. THOREEN AKA VALERIE L. WHITESIDE 12104 SE 58TH PL SNOHOMISH, WA 98290-5529 VALERIE L. BAKER AKA VALERIE L THOREEN A/K/A VALERIE L. WHITESIDE 1417 NORTH MAGNOLIA AVE OCALA, FL 34475 OCCUPANT 12104 SE 58th PL SNOHOMISH, WA 98290-5529 by both first-class and certified mail on August 6, 201 5, proof of which is in the possession of’ the Trustee: and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.60. To access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line at: 888-988-6736 Dated: September 24, 2015 North Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Ryan Watkins, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104 Telephone 1-855-676-9686 Tac#985484 Pub Dates: 01/07/16, 01/28/16 Published: January 7, 28, 2016. EDH676623

Everett Housing Authority Public Housing Agency Plan The Everett Housing Authority is required by Federal regulations to prepare a five-year Public Housing Agency Plan for its Public Housing and Section 8 Tenant Based Assistance programs, with subsequent annual updates. A draft of the second annual update of the five-year plan (effective July 1, 2016) has been prepared, and the Housing Authority invites review and comment on it. The Plans and other supporting material are available for public review at the Housing Authority’s office at 3107 Colby, Everett during regular business hours. (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, except Wednesday, when the office closes at 1 p.m.) Written comments may be submitted at the front desk or mailed to Everett Housing Authority: P.O Box 1547, Everett, WA 98206-1547. All questions and comments should be directed to the attention of Chris Neblett, who may be reached at (425) 303-1186, or via email at chrisn@evha.org. The Board of Commissioners of the Housing Authority will conduct a public hearing to receive formal comments on the draft annual plan. All interested persons are invited to attend the public hearing to make public comments. The public hearing is scheduled for: Monday, February 22, 2016 Everett Housing Authority Main Office 3107 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 12:30 p.m Disabled persons who need assistance or accommodations should contact Chris Neblett prior to the hearing at (425) 303-1186, or via email at chrisn@evha.org. Ashley Lommers-Johnson Executive Director January 7, 2016 Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676593 TS #60128-24063-NJ-WA APN #00571500000600 Reference Number: 200608310502 Abbreviated Legal: S 41 FT OF LOT 6 AND N 23 FT OF LOT 7, SHIREYADDITON, VOL 14, PG 97 Grantor: Bruce A Buchanan and Leslie C Buchanan, Husband arid Wife Grantee: Nor th Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Original Beneficiary: WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET, SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-87-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694 2 8 7 . W e b S i t e : http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction =search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: THE SOUTH 41 FEET OF LOT 6 AND THE NORTH 23 FEET OF LOT 7 OF SHIREY ADDITION, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 14 OFPLATS, PAGE 97, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY AUDITOR, SITUATE IN THE CITY OF EDMONDS, COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 00571500000600 More commonly known as: 23319 97th Ave W, Edmonds, WA 98020 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated August 25, 2006, recorded August 31, 2006, under Auditor’s F i l e N o. 2 0 0 6 0 8 3 1 0 5 0 2 , r e c o r d s o f S n o h o m i s h C o u n t y, Washington, from Bruce A Buchanan and Leslie C Buchanan, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to COMMONWEALTH LAND TITLE CO, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC under an Assignment recorded on October 30, 2014 under Auditor’s File 201310300406 in the official records in the Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments 516,586.93 Late Charges $119.73 Property Inspection Fees $635.75 Interest Due $18,536.51 Escrow Payment $14,694.73 Legal Filing Service $98.76 Posting of NOD $75.00 Appt. of Substitute Trustee $20.00 Grand Total $50,767.41 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $260,774.48, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5, 2016. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a state or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Buchanan A Bruce 23319 97th Ave W Edmonds, WA 98020 Occupant 23319 97th Ave W Edmonds, WA 98020 Leslie C Buchanan 23319 97th Ave W Edmonds, WA 98020 by both first-class and certified mail on May 29, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all Costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. To access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line at: 888-988-6736. Dated: September 25, 2015 North Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Veronica Abraham, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104 Telephone 1-855-676-9686 Tac#985483 Pub Dates: 01/07/16, 01/27/16 Published: January 7, 27, 2016. EDH676597 TS #60128-24302-NJ-WA APN #00451401202600 Reference Number: 200611011046 Abbreviated Legal: LTS. 26, 27 AND 28, BLK. 12, FRIDAY’ S FIRST ADD, TO EVT V3/PG34 Grantor: Jon Iseman and Wendy Iseman, Husband and Wife Grantee: North Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR WMC MORTGAGE CORP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home, See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consum e r s / h o m e w o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web Site: http://www.hud.gove/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web Site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 26, 27 AND 28, BLOCK 12K FRIDAY’S FIRST ADDITION TO EVERETT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 3 OF PLATS, PAGE 34, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 00451401202600 More commonly known as: 3612 Hoyt Avenue, EVERETT, WA 98201 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated October 30, 2006, rec o r d e d N o v e m b e r 1 , 2 0 0 6 , u n d e r A u d i t o r ’s F i l e N o . 200611011046, records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Jon Iseman and Wendy Iseman, Husband and Wife as Grantor, to BISHOP & LYNCH OF KING COUNTY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR WMC MORTGAGE CORP as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to US. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the registered holders of MASTR Asset Backed Securities Trust 2007-WMCiMortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-WMC1 under an Assignment recorded on Apr il 21, 2011 under Auditor’s File 201104210280 in the official records in the Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments $11,194.59 Title Search $12,267.81 Interest Due $6,747.28 Grand Total $30,209.68 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $277,823.67, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, arid as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy

TS #60128-24609-NJ-WA APN #01067900003000 Reference Number: 201103290580 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 30, ALPINE RIDGE, REC. 200703085004 Grantor: Brett Michael Robbins and Elizabeth Elaine Robbins, Husband and Wife Grantee: North Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR STERLING SAVINGS BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your borne, Sec below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-87-894-HOME (18 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694 2 8 7 . W e b S i t e : http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction =search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 30, A L P I N E R I D G E , AC C O R D I N G TO T H E P L AT T H E R E O F R E C O R D E D M A R C H 8 , 2 0 0 7 U N D E R R E C O R D I N G N O. 2 0 0 7 0 3 0 8 5 0 0 4 , R E C O R D S O F S N O H O M I S H C O U N T Y, WASHINGTON. APN: 01067900003000 More commonly known as: 6604 101st Pl Ne, Marysville, WA 98270 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 25, 2011, recorded March 29, 2011, under Auditors File No. 201103290580, records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Brett Michael Robbins and Elizabeth Elaine Robbins, F:Iusbal]cl and Wife, as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLE LY AS NOMINEE FOR STERLING SAVINGS BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC under an Assignment recorded on August 20, 2014 under Auditor’s File 201408200001 in the official records in tile Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. No action commenced by the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments $7,160.59 Interest Due $12,679.73 Escrow Payment $8,079.66 Grand Total $27,919.98 IV. The sum owing on tile obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $221,492.65, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by state. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5,2016. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 25,2016(11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before January 25, 2016(11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a state or federally char tered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Current Occupant 6604 101 st Pl Ne Marysville, WA 98270 Brett Michael Robbins 6604 101 st Pl Ne Marysville, WA 98270 Brett Michael Robbins C/O Brian K. Hammer, Attorney At Law P.O. Box 5156 3015 Colby Ave., Suite 300 Everett, WA 98206 Brett Michael Robbins C/O Hillary Roberts, Goldberg Jones 1200 Westlake Ave N Ste. 700 Seattle, WA 98109-3529 Elizabeth Elaine Robbins 6604 101st Pl Ne Marysville, WA 98270 Elizabeth Elaine Robbins C/O Brian K. Hammer, Attorney At Law P.O. Box 5156 3015 Colby Ave., Suite 300 Everett, WA 98206-5156 Elizabeth Elaine Robbins C/O Gregory L. Davies 3721 Colby Ave Everett, WA 98201-4910 by both first-class and certified mail on August 10, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the said pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. To access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line at: 888-9886736. Dated: September 22, 2015 Nor th Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Veronica Abraham, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 S e a t t l e , Wa s h i n g t o n 9 8 1 0 4 Te l e p h o n e 1 - 8 5 5 - 6 7 6 - 9 6 8 6 Tac#985485 Pub Dates: 01/07/16, 01/28/16 Published: January 7, 28, 2016. EDH676628 TS #60128-25475-NJ-WA APN #004320-000-04300 Reference Number: 200712200196 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 43, THE PLAT OF EASTMONT DIVISION NO. 3, VOLUME 17, PAGE 42 Grantor: Cameron Mays, a married man, as his separate estate Grantee: North Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Original Beneficiary: WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homewownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web Site: http://www.hud.gove/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web Site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 43, THE PLAT OF EASTMONT DIVISION NO.3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 17 OF PLATS, PAGE 42, RECORDS OF SHOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. TAX PARCEL: 00432000004300 APN: 004320-000-043-00 More commonly known as: 9321 Goblin LN, Everett, WA 98208 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 12, 2007, recorded December 20, 2007, under Auditors File No. 200712200196, records of Snohomish County, Washington, Cameron Mays, a married man, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE COMPANY OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC under an As-

TS#60128-25539-NJ-WA APN #00773110400300 Reference Number: 200703120522 Abbreviated Legal: UNIT C, BLDG. 8104, CASCADE VILLA TOWNHOUSES, A CONDO C49/110. Grantor: Ali Mirza and Anna P. Mirza, Husband and Wife Grantee: North Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR BANNER BANK, ITS SUCCESORS AND/OR ASSIGNS NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homewownership/post_purchase _counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694 2 8 7 . W e b S i t e : http://www.hud.gove/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListActio n=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web Site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: UNIT C, BUILDING 8104, CASCADE VILLA TOWNHOUSES CONDOMINIUM, SURVEY MAP AND PLANS RECORDED IN VOLUME 49 OF CONDOMINIUMS, PAGES 110 THROUGH 111, INCLUSIVE; CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER(S) 8906010041, REECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 00773110400300 More commonly known as: 8104 238th St SW C, Edmonds, WA 98026 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 2, 2007, recorded March 12, 2007, under Auditor’s File No. 200703120522, record of Snohomish County, Washington, from Ali Mirza and Anna P. Mirza, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR BANNER BANK, ITS SUCCESORS AND/OR ASSIGNS as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC under an Assignment recorded on January 13, 2014 under Auditor’s File 201401130006 in the official records in the Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments $12,845.28 Late Charges $379.82 Proper ty Inspection Fees $805.00 Suspense Balance $-l38.81 Interest Due $43,585.64 Escrow Payment $9,015.29 Legal Filing Service $3,028.76 Grand Total $69,520.98 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $166,941.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5, 2016. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 2 5 , 2 0 1 6 ( 1 1 c l ay s b e fo r e t h e s a l e d a t e ) , t o c a u s e a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a state or federally char tered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Ali Mirza 8104 238th St SW #C Edmonds, WA 98026 Ali Mirza P.O. Box 816 Edmonds, WA 98020 Occupant 8104 238th St SW #C Edmonds, WA 98026 Anna P. Mirza 8104 238th St SW #C Edmonds, WA 98026 Anna P. Mirza P.O. Box 8l6 Edmonds, WA 98020 by both first-class and certified mail on August 10, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the wr itten Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24. 060. To access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line at: 888-9886736. Dated: September 22, 2015 Nor th Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Veronica Abraham, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104 Telephone I -855-676-9686 TAC: 985479 PUB: 1/07/16, 1/28/16 Published: January 7, 28, 2016. EDH676613 TS #60267-03114-NJ-WA APN #00422700000800 Reference Number: 200904240588 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 8, KLA-HA-YA, VOL. 31, P. 41, SNOHOMISH COUNTY Grantor: JAMES S BAKER and VALERIE L. BAKER Grantee: North Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR TAYLOR. BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-87-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telep h o n e : To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 5 6 9 - 4 2 8 7 . W e b S i t e : http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web

4VNNPOT IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH JUVENILE COURT SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TERMINATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, AND TO: 1. Pedro Perez-Garcia, father of Citlaly Guadalupe Perez, d.o.b.04/09/02, Termination Petition 15-7-00450-2 filed 05/04/15. 2. Pedro Perez-Garcia, father of Pedro Perez, d.o.b.10/25/99, Termination Petition 15-7-00449-9 filed 05/04/15. 3. Nicole Amber Merz, mother of Elijah Merz, d.o.b.01/21/15, Termination Petition 15-7-00873-7 filed 12/11/15. 4. Jared Thomas Merz, Sr., father of Elijah Merz, d.o.b.01/21/15, Termination Petition 15-7-00873-7 filed 12/11/15. 5. Amanda Eileen Jergensen, mother of Tianna Marie Berger, d.o.b.02/02/15, Termination Petition 15-7-00809-5 filed 11/12/15. 6. Unknown biological father of Jose de Jesus Aidrete-Torue, d.o.b.09/05/14, Termination Petition 15-7-00733-1 filed 10/08/15. 7. J u l i e M a y Pe t e r s o n , m o t h e r o f C i a r a J o y c e E v a n s , d.o.b.09/24/00, Termination Petition 15-7-00797-8 filed 11/06/15. 8. Ju l i e M ay Pe t e r s o n , m o t h e r o f Ko r by n Wa r r e n L ove l l , d.o.b.10/06/08, Termination Petition 15-7-00798-6 filed 11/06/05. 9. Julie May Peterson, mother of Landon Woodrow Lovell, d.o.b.10/06/08, Termination Petition 15-7-00799-4 filed 11/06/15. 10. Ju s t i n J o s e p h E va n s, fa t h e r o f C i a r a J oy c e E va n s, d.o.b.09/24/00, Termination Petition 15-7-00797-8 filed 11/06/15. 11. Olegario Pinedo-Valdivia, father of Lexilynn Marie Preslar, d.o.b.10/29/08, Termination Petition 15-7-00764-1 filed 10/21/15. A Termination Hearing will be held on Monday, March 21, 2016 at 9:00 a.m. at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, AND TO: 1. Delaney Raichelle St Germaine, mother of Iker Alexander Barahona, d.o.b.01/26/14, Termination Petition 15-7-00558-4 filed 07/09/15. 2. Bairon Alexander Barahona Cruz, father of Iker Alexander Barahona, d.o.b.01/26/14, Termination Petition 15-7-00558-4 filed 07/09/15. 3. Gerald Jason Ross, father of Alixzandrea Debie Fisher-Carefoot, d.o.b.06/29/00, Dependency Petition 15-7-00828-1 filed 11/18/15. 4. U n k n o w n b i o l o g i c a l f a t h e r o f J o e l J a v v e a t a J o n e s , d.o.b.04/12/14, Termination Petition 15-7-00808-7 filed 11/10/15. 5. Unknown biological father of Baby Boy Dewyer, d.o.b.04/19/14, Termination Petition 15-7-00763-3 filed 10/21/15. A Termination Hearing will be held on Monday, March 28, 2016 at 9:00 a.m. at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. You are notified that a petition has been filed in this matter requesting that your parental rights to the above-named child be terminated. You have important legal rights and you must take steps to protect your interests. This petition could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. THE ABOVE NAMED INDIVIDUALS ARE SUMMONED TO APPEAR at said hearing regarding your child. If you fail to appear at the hearing, the court may take evidence against you, make findings of fact, and order that your parental rights be terminated without further notice to you. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, and/or to view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/TRM SONYA KRASKI, Cler k of the Super ior Cour t; DEBBIE J HORNER, Deputy Clerk Published: January 7, 14, 21, 2016. EDH676672

4VNNPOT No. 15-2-06612-7 SUMMONS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH EDMONDS TOWNHOMES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, v. ANNA RESICH; Defendant. THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: ANNA RESICH 1177 Queen St. Apt. 908 Honolulu, HI 96814 TO THE DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 10th day of December, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled cour t, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff, Edmonds Townhomes Owners Association, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff, Western Washington Law Group, PLLC, at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of the action is (1) foreclosure of lien for unpaid condominium assessments; and (2) preliminary injunction and specific enforcement of Edmonds Townhomes Rules and Regulations. Robert Cadranell, WSBA No. 41773 Dennis J. McGlothin, WSBA No. 28177 Attorneys for Plaintiff WESTERN WASHINGTON LAW GROUP, PLLC 7500 212th St SW, Suite 207 Edmonds, WA 98026 EDH673063 Published: December 10, 17, 24, 31, 2015; January 7, 14, 2016.

LOTS OF STUFF?

SELL IT! Time to sell your stuff so you can get new stuff! Bye-bye junk, hello CA$H! Call Today! www.heraldnet.com

425-339-3100


B4 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

Super Seller!

32

$

4 Lines Text Free Photo 30 Days!

To Advertise call 425.339.3100

OTHER PACKAGES AVAILABLE!

7 DAYS

7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_0RQ)UL$030_+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV

AKC German Shepherd Puppies, 2 9 Ye a r M e m b e r GSDCA, Home raised, OFA Hips, Guarantee. $950. stormgategsd.com 425-531-9627

AKC ML Dachshunds All Shots, Vet Checked, $700 425-328-9524

AKC Male Golden Retriever Pups, 3mo, 2nd shots, wormed. $1000. Pair of Live Std bronze turkeys, 5 mo, $95/pr. 425-418-6819

Some of best bargains in town are advertised in the classified columns!

ASCA Australian Shepherd Pups, 3/m, 4/f. a rainbow of aussie colors. Blues reds and m e r l e s. D N A va r i f i e d parents on site. $8501500. australianshepherdsbycinnamon.com Merry Christmas and a happy new year

CHOCOLATE LABRADOODLE PUPPIES FOR SALE Born 12/5. 3 Males left. $ 3 0 0 N o n r e f u n d d e p. Ready Jan 30. 360-9256225. Fa c e b o o k Pa g e “Labradoodle Acres�

Ginger’s Pet Rescue, specializing in death row dogs CONTACT US

360-793-6698 8am - 8pm

Hay & Grain Bales or Truckloads. Bark, Gravel & Topsoil. You Haul or We Deliver It!

*Royal Hearts Rottweilers* AKC registered & pedigreed Rottweiler Puppies. OFA cert. parents. puppies raised like family. Males (4)/Females (3) available Jan. 21, 2016. $1200-$1500 360-653-7942 lindyhart12@gmail.com

7 Days/wk. Call Sundays!

Nella 360-435-3765 John 425-418-7482 Come to Scarsella Ranch For Great Prices & Service!

www.gingers petrescue.org

AKC Smooth Standard Dachshund Puppies. Dam GCH, Sire Bronze GCH. Come from long line of show dogs. $1500 360 654 0625

MINI Australian shepherd Purebred Puppy’s, r a i s e d w i t h f a m i l y, smart, loving. 1st shots, wor med. Many colors. $ 5 5 0 & u p . 360.907.7410

The Classifieds have the largest selection in Snohomish County!

Only

FREE FOUND ADS

gingerluke@comcast.net

Looking for a good buy on an appliance?

4 Lines

Getting New Furniture?

D AY V I L L E H AY a n d G R A I N . To p Q u a l i t y H ay . W e g u a r a n t e e our feed! Many varieties and deliver y available......

Recycle your old furniture – place a classified ad Call us today 339-3100

www.dayvillesupply.com

(360)568-5077

Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM

LOST: Diamond Engagement ring & wedding bands;on 1/4/16. In the Ross parking Lot in Marysville. Reward 360.659.9682

18

$

Holiday Stress? Call the Pain Experts!

Missing: “Smokey� Big Gray Male Cat w/white patch on tummy, since 12/24/15; Silvan Crest area (over by Valley View) in Everett 98203 425.353.2171

90 min De-Stress Deep Tissue Massage

$89

reg. $125. Be Well Massage Therapy Call or book online 425-381-3866 BeWellMassage.net

Anita, Marry Me? Vern

Mukilteo

Mike H. Please call me. Karen (360)659-9437 NEED CASH? My Family has Private Money to Lend! We loan money with your real estate as collateral. Cred- FOUND: Canoe & Motor it/Income, No Problem! found in Edmonds mariMatt: 425-221-8660 na Call: 425-771-0273 to identify.

SPECIAL OFFER! 30 Days, 4 Lines + Photo

To advertise, call 425.339.3100 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Autos

ROY ROBINSON

4 STUDDED ALL SEASON TIRES. Used briefly one season. Dean Wintercat 205/60/R16,AR rims fit many cars. $300. 425-315-2405

ROY ROBINSON

2004 Buick Rendezvous CX Stk 14532A $3,571 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

ROY ROBINSON 2000 Buick Century Custom Stk 360137B $6,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2000 Chevrolet Malibu Base Stk 16222A $5,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718 ROY ROBINSON 2011 Chevrolet Aveo Stk 351742A $8,945

2001 Ford Taurus SES Stk 253529C $2,993 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241 2007 Ford Mustang GT Convertable 1 OWNER! Stk 9594 $23,942

2014 Hyundai Accent Auto, Gas Saver, BAL of Fact Warr. Stk 29001PD $11,888

2014 Mazda5 Sport Stk P3184 $17,957 MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

ROY ROBINSON

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575 ROY ROBINSON 2005 Audi A4 2.0T Stk 360661A $9,999

2012 Ford Focus Auto, Gas Saver Stk 29105TJ $9,988

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

ROY ROBINSON

2012 Chevrolet Malibu LTZ LTZ, Roof, LEA Stk 29115PA $15,988 2004 BMW 325ci Stk 9397a $9,555 MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2012 Chevy Cruze Stk 9316A $14,291

Call Classifieds today!

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

425-339-3100

Bean Edition

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2002 Mitsubishi Lancer ES Stk 254034A $2,999 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

2002 Ford Focus ZX5

2011 Toyota Tacoma 4x4, TRD Sport, Long Box, Boards, Tow, Certified Stk 28936PD $27,988

Stk 16305A $5,999

2011 Chevrolet Avalanche LS Stk TP16579 $26,602

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2014 Hyundai Sonata Stk P3122 $14,375

2006 Mazda6 Stk 9636a $6,995

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2003 Nissan Altima SE Stk 260956A $3,491 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2001 Ford Explorer Limited Stk 13856A $4,791 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241 2009 Toyota Camry Hybrid LEA, NAV, Roof, 46k, Gas Saver Stk 29104TD $14,988

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

HOROSCOPE Happy Birthday: Make a difference by getting involved in a cause that will benefit the environment. Your ability to convince others to follow your lead and take part in whatever you organize will give your reputation a boost. Using your past experience as your guide and sticking to a budget will bring the results you are looking for. Your numbers are 8, 11, 22, 24, 34, 38, 43. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Let go of the past. Don’t dwell on what others are doing. Put greater importance on yourself and what you want to accomplish, and doors will open and gains will be made. Love is in the stars. ★★★★★ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Put an end to any problems you have with peers or relatives. Speak up, but don’t argue or force your opinion on others. Clearing the air so that you can move forward is what counts, not what others think. ★★★ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Sharing your feelings can be painful, especially if you or someone else is likely to get hurt. Try to keep your life simple and your conversations real. Overreacting will lead to greater problems and an uncertain future. ★★★ CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you want something, find a way to make it happen. Be creative and use your imagination to turn a thought into a reality. A partnership will undergo some uncertainty or unexpected changes, but in the end, you’ll come out a winner. ★★★ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Make plans with friends or your lover, or plan a day of rest, relaxation and pampering. Don’t let the little things get to you when you should be focusing on your personal and professional dreams. Romance is encouraged. ★★★★★

Universal Uclick

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575 2004 Saab 9-5 Linear Stk 360455A $5,899

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777 2012 Honda CRV AWD, NAV, LEA, Roof Stk 29090TD $22,988

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

ROY ROBINSON

2013 Mazda CX-5 Touring Stk 8981A $21,863

2013 Toyota Camry LE Certified, pwr seat, prem. wheels, 20k mi Stk 29090TD $22,988

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2003 Saturn Ion 2 Stk 160431A $3,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2008 Scion tc Stk 9113A $9,996 MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

Looking for a car?

425.339.3100

2002 Volkswagen Jetta GLS Stk 14200A $4,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

Getting a new car?

2001 Honda Odyssey EX Stk 251309A $3,981 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

2000 Honda Passport Stk T360412A $5,999

2013 MazdaSpeed3 Stk 9143A $22,848 MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2003 Dodge Grand Caravan Sport Stk 14068A $1,792 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

2014 Ford E250 Cargo Vano Stk P3170 $24,786

2009 Toyota Venza AWD, NAV, Roof, LEA, 1 Owner Stk 29124TD $19,488 2006 MX5 Miata Stk 1961 $12,454

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2005 Ford Explorer Stk 253779B $3,491 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

ROY ROBINSON VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ll face problems at home if you get involved in emotional conversations. Turn the focus to changes you can make to your work space or living quarters. Avoid distractions. You’ll feel better if you are busy. ★★ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Make personal changes that will boost your happiness. Booking a pleasure trip or getting together with someone you find inspiring will give you the incentive to stop procrastinating and start doing. Love is on the rise. ★★★★ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You can lend a helping hand, but don’t offer to pay for someone else’s mistakes or let anyone take advantage of your kindness. Your effort should be spent making alterations that are conducive to launching a new project or pursuit. ★★★ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Surprise everyone instead of waiting to see who is going to oppose your decision. Don’t share what you are doing until after the fact. Personal changes will not please everyone, but it’s more important to please yourself. ★★★ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Generosity will be your downfall. Don’t fall victim to a scam or someone’s hard-luck story. You’ll be disappointed if you make an impulsive move. Put your money and your skills to good use by doing something that will benefit others. ★★★ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A change in direction or vocation will turn out well. Set up interviews or send out your resume. Taking on a challenge that will help you expand your qualifications is encouraged. ★★★★ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Deal with past problems before moving forward. Make amends or rethink what’s happened in the past and learn from the mistakes you’ve made. Secrets are likely to be revealed. Problems with institutions and government agencies are likely. ★★

2013 Toyota RAV4 LE Trim, 4x4, Premium wheels, Certified, Alloys Stk 28953PD $20,888

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718 2006 Mazda3 Stk 160521A $7,981 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

2003 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer Stk 13915A $3,851 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

ROY ROBINSON

2007 Toyota Avalon Sunroof, Leather, Pwr Seat, New Tires, Low 68k mi. Stk 28947PD $11,988

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

ROY ROBINSON

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2001 Subaru Outback Stk 360367B $5,999

2000 Lexus ES300 Platinum, Roof, LEA, Low miles Stk 29123TD $6,988

1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Stk 13954A $4,514 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Stk T360674B $4,999

1997 Mercedes Benz S-Class Stk 260245A $6,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

2015 Kia Soul Stk P3094 $14,235 MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2007 Jaguar X-Type Stk 151380A $7,891 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Stk T351342A $4,574

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2003 Chevrolet Tahoe Stk T353123B $5,276

2014 Mazda Mazda6 i Grand Touring Stk 8565A $25,454

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2009 Cadillac CTS AWD, Low 50k miles Loaded Stk 29111TD $18,988

2014 Subaru Impreza AWD, Low 22k, BAL of Fact Warr. Stk 29076PA $17,488

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

ROY ROBINSON

32

$

ROY ROBINSON

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

1994 Acura Legend L W/Leather Stk 360266C $4,999

Only

ROY ROBINSON

1999 Mercury Villager Stk T350653B $2,885

2011 Hyundai Tucson Stk P3162 $15,696

Recycle your old car! Place a classified with us today!

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

425.339.3100

Getting a new car?

425.339.3100

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718


Sports SECTION C

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/SPORTS

|

Good news for diggers The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife has approved additional razor clam digs this month, C2

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

‘The Kid’ in the Hall M’s great Ken Griffey Jr. elected to Hall of Fame with highest voting percentage in history By Bob Dutton The News Tribune

SEATTLE — The Kid’s in the Hall. Outfielder Ken Griffey Jr., the most iconic player in Mariners history, was elected Wednesday to the National Baseball Hall of Fame by a record margin in balloting by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. “Happy and shocked,” he said. “Happy that I get to be in such an elite club. ... Shocked because anytime somebody else does something for you, it means a lot.” Griffey, 46, received 99.3 percent of the 440 votes cast and will be formally inducted into the game’s shrine along with catcher Mike Piazza on July 24 in a ceremony in Cooperstown, N.Y. “He was the best player in baseball,” former manager Lou Piniella recalled. “There is nothing he couldn’t do on a baseball field. And he did it so gracefully.” Tributes rolled in immediately.

MICHAEL O’LEARY / THE HERALD

Mariners outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. watches a grand slam he hit against the Tigers in 1999 at the Kingdome in Seattle. Griffey was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Wednesday.

“What I remember the most,” former teammate Edgar Martinez said, “is his talent, his great sense of humor, his personality and his love for the game. He wanted to play the game and he did it the right way, hard daily.” The balloting also provided encouragement for Martinez, another of the franchise’s cornerstones, when he jumped to 43.4 percent in his seventh year on the ballot. Martinez, 53, has three more years to reach the 75-percent threshold required for election. He tallied just 27 percent a year ago and had topped out previously at 36.5 percent in 2012. “For me, I am really encouraged, and thankful, in the increase of votes,” Martinez said. “I certainly didn’t expect to be elected today, but it is always a little disappointing when it becomes official. “Although, I’m so happy for Ken that makes it a little easier.” See GRIFFEY, Page C5

Top-10 vote-getters

EXTRA >> WEB www. heraldnet.com

440 votes cast, 330 needed Player Votes Pct.

✔ Visit us online for a photo gallery of Ken Griffey Jr.’s career

Ken Griffey Jr. 437 Mike Piazza 365 Jeff Bagwell 315 Tim Raines 307 Trevor Hoffman 296 Curt Schilling 230 Roger Clemens 199 Barry Bonds 195 Edgar Martinez 191 Mike Mussina 189

99.3 83.0 71.6 69.8 67.3 52.3 45.2 44.3 43.4 43.0

.2015

The Daily

ld

Hera

C3

day, 01.07

Thurs

% 99.32 ER F FAMY JR. O L L HA IFFE

GR KEN

es centag e Per T e Vot PERCEN

Fam ES S VOT 99.32 Hall of BALLOT 437 98.84 YEAR 440 425 98.79 2016 430 491 fey Jr. 98.53 1992 Ken Grif 497 537 er 98.23 1999 Tom Seav 545 222 Ryan 98.19 2007 Nolan 226 488 en Jr. 97.83 1936 Cal Ripk 497 406 97.61 1999 Ty Cobb 415 t 532 Bret 97.27 ge 1982 Geor 545 534 Aaron 97.20 2007 Hank 549 555 Gwynn 2015 Tony 571 son y John 2014 Rand ts Maddux sta Greg eer

Top 10

ER PLAY

Look inside for a commemorative Ken Griffey Jr. poster, C3 Jr.’s car 22 ffey S: Ken Gri GUE SEASON

LEA .284 MAJOR AVERAGE: BATTING 9,801 : AT-BATS 1 ) 2,78 HITS: all-time 1,662 (sixth RUNS: S: 630 ime) E RUN h all-t HOM 6 (15t RBI: 1,83

IFER

JENN

ANAN

/ THE

LD, 2009

HERA

BUCH

2016 He was the best player in baseball. There is nothing he couldn’t do on a baseball field.

— Lou Piniella Former Mariners manager

Bantam pick Onyebuchi Seahawks, Vikings expect different game this time around spending week with Tips The 6-foot-2, 190-pound 15-year-old was Everett’s third-round pick in the 2015 bantam draft as a defender.

By Nick Patterson Herald Writer

RENTON — There’s one thing the Seattle Seahawks and Minnesota Vikings agree upon in advance of their wild-card playoff game Sunday in Minneapolis: Don’t expect another 38-7. Seattle had its way with the Vikings when the teams met during the regular season. However, the Seahawks don’t expect Sunday’s game to go quite so smoothly. “We were fortunate the day we played them,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “That’s not how they play. I don’t know that it could be like that, it’s going to be much different than that, I think.” It was only one month earlier that Seattle went into TCF Stadium in Minneapolis, the home of the University of Minnesota and temporary home of the Vikings, and treated Minnesota like it was an NCAA team. Seattle dominated in all facets of the game, outgaining the Vikings 433-125 and allowing no points to Minnesota’s offense — the Vikings’ lone score came on a kickoff return after the Seahawks were already leading 35-0.

By Jesse Geleynse Herald Writer

ANN HEISENFELT / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vikings running back Adrian Peterson (28) is stopped by Seahawks defenders including Bobby Wagner (54) and Kam Chancellor (31) during a game Dec. 6 in Minneapolis. Seattle won 38-7.

still optimistic Lynch >> Seahawks will be able to play Sunday, C6 It was the type of whooping any team, especially one that finished 11-5 and won a division title, won’t forget — and will do anything to prevent from happening again. “We look at (the video) and see things, how they hurt us, the

INSIDE: Preps, C4

|

things they did against us,” Minnesota coach Mike Zimmer said. “They played very well in every phase against us in that game. Defensively, they got after us, offensively they got after us. It was a pretty good bout with them.” Sunday’s game is back at the scene of the carnage, and there See SEAHAWKS, Page C6

Scoreboard, C4

|

EVERETT — One of the fascinating, yet maddening facts of the WHL bantam draft is that it is based almost entirely on potential. Players are selected at age 14 or 15, but they are at least a year — and in many cases more than one — away from making a meaningful impact on the teams that select them. Teams help expedite that developmental process for their young prospects by inviting them to training camp or to join the team for brief stretches during their 15-year-old seasons, and that is exactly what defenseman Montana Onyebuchi is experiencing this week in Everett. “Every single time you can participate or witness what’s going on with the team — see a game live, practice in an

NFL, C4

|

Weather, C6

environment like this, be in on some of the meetings — it speeds your development and is really helpful,” Silvertips head coach Kevin Constantine said. “Every one of those is going to make your ability to get into this league and be effective earlier than later. Every one is a growth experience.” Onyebuchi was the Silvertips’ third-round bantam pick and the 63rd player taken overall in the 2015 bantam draft. The Manitoba native is spending this week practicing with the Tips for his first extended time with the organization since the end of training camp. Onyebuchi is playing this season with the Eastman Selects of the Manitoba Midget AAA League. The Selects competed at the prestigious Mac’s Tournament last week in Calgary, and Onyebuchi met up with the Silvertips in Kamloops following the tournament to spend the week in Everett. “The guys are great, the coaches are good. The practices are good and I’m having a good time,” Onyebuchi said. “The See SILVERTIPS, Page C2


Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

CALENDAR JANUARY

THU 7

OUTDOOR OUTLOOK

FRI 8

Next game: at Minnesota 10:05 a.m., Sun., Jan. 10

Additional razor clam digs approved

Next game: at WSU noon, Sat., Jan. 9 UW MEN UW MEN

Arizona St. 7 p.m. PAC12

UWWOMEN WOMEN UW

UMKC 5:05 p.m.

UMKC 7 p.m.

Next game: Washington noon, Sat., Jan. 9 WSU MEN

Next game: Portland 5 p.m., Sat., Jan. 9 GONZAGA MEN

Home

Away

TELEVISION TODAY

BASKETBALL ESPN Cincinnati at SMU ESPN2 Louisville at N.C. State ROOT Notre Dame at Boston College 5 p.m. TNT Boston at Chicago 6 p.m. ESPN Illinois at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN2 Arizona at UCLA 7 p.m. ROOT San Francisco at San Diego 7:30 p.m. TNT Los Angeles Lakers at Sacramento 11 p.m. ROOT Louisiana Tech at Old Dominion (w) GOLF 9 a.m. GOLF South African Open 3 p.m. GOLF Tournament of Champs 8 p.m. GOLF Tournament of Champs 2 a.m. GOLF South African Open 4 a.m. GOLF South African Open HOCKEY 5 p.m. NBCS Philadelphia at Minnesota 4 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m.

TODAY

RADIO

BASKETBALL 5:05 p.m. 770 Seattle at UM-Kan. City

TODAY

PREPS

BOYS BASKETBALL Wesco 4A—Cascade at Jackson, Kamiak at Mariner, Mount Vernon at Snohomish, all 7:15 p.m. Northwest 1B—Grace Academy at Orcas Christian, 5:30 p.m. BOYS SWIMMING Wesco—Stanwood vs. Jackson at West Coast Aquatics, 2:30 p.m.; Lake Stevens vs. Everett at Forest Park Pool, 2:30 p.m.; Mariner vs. Mount Vernon at Skagit Valley Family YMCA, 2:30 p.m.; Snohomish, Glacier Peak at Kamiak, 3:15 p.m.; Monroe, Marysville Getchell at Marysville Pilchuck H.S., 3:15 p.m.; Shorewood vs. Shorecrest at Shoreline Pool, 3:30 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL Northwest 1B—Grace Academy at Orcas Christian, 3:30 p.m. Non-League—South Whidbey at Bellevue Christian, 7 p.m. WRESTLING Wesco—Arlington at Everett, Oak Harbor at Marysville Pilchuck, Marysville Getchell at Stanwood, Glacier Peak at Meadowdale, all 7 p.m. Non-League—Shorewood, Mount Vernon, Cedarcrest at Monroe, 5:45 p.m.; Shorecrest, Granite Falls at Archbishop Murphy, 6:30 p.m.

Outdoor calendar

PICK OF THE WEEK | Elk viewing

Kelowna 7:05 p.m.

WAYNE KRUSE

A

release Monday from the state Department of Fish and Wildlife read: “State shellfish managers have approved razor clam digs starting later this week at Long Beach and Copalis Beach. WDFW confirmed the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those two beaches are safe to eat. All other beaches remain closed to recreational razor clam digging. Digs at both beaches are on evening tides and include a two-day opening, Jan. 8-9 at Copalis and an eight-day dig, Jan. 7-14 at Long Beach.” Ho hum. Another razor clam opening. Does it matter? Yeah, it sure does. Just look at the numbers. The 2014-15 winter season was a very good one, except that an increasing level of domoic acid in the clams forced closure in late April and the loss of digging days planned for May, the last month of the season. An estimated 399,700 digger trips took place during the abbreviated series of digs, and if you add 90,000 for the 10 days of digging that didn’t take place in May, you find that the four Pacific beaches (Kalaloch remained closed) hosted just under a halfmillion digger trips on their 58 miles of prime clam habitat. A half-million. That’s a bunch of folks, and there aren’t many outdoor activities in the state that pull a larger crowd over a five-month period. The popular New Year’s Eve dig alone drew more than 45,000 digger trips. Razor clam diggers form about the only economic factor keeping alive a number of small beach communities during the winter months. It’s an activity that draws a lot of family groups (the beach is a natural for kids and dogs), and that can only be a good thing. Cold? Windy? Sure, a lot of the time, but if you prepare properly, the ocean in winter has its own unique attraction. And, hey — it’s a good alternative when the steelhead rivers are out, the blackmouth have lockjaw and the ducks

Silvertips From Page C1

speed is a factor. It’s so much faster. There are bigger guys and the coaches expect more.” At 6-foot-2 and 190 pounds Onyebuchi doesn’t look out of place in the slightest while skating with the Silvertips. Perhaps

With heavy snow pushing and alfalfa hay pulling, hundreds of elk and big-horn sheep are coming down from the high country to dine at the Oak Creek Wildlife Area and other Department of Fish and Wildlife winter feeding operations on the east slope of the Cascades. “Storms are moving the animals down a lot earlier than last year,” wildlife area manager Ross Huffman said. “People, including whole families, come back year after year to see our winter spectacle.” Truck tours will begin shortly, Huffman said, but visitors can get a good view of the elk from the parking lot. Binoculars are recom-

aren’t flying. Last season featured more digging days than most years, especially at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which saw the largest number of open days in 25 years. Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager in Montesano, said Long Beach produced the most clams per person during the 2014-15 dig, at 14.8 (15 is the daily limit), followed by Twin Harbors at 14.4, Mocrocks at 14.2, and Copalis at 13.7. Ayres said Copalis was the most popular beach, perhaps because of easier access to a larger range of food and accommodations. Copalis Beach runs from the Grays Harbor north jetty at Ocean Shores, north about 9 miles to the mouth of the Copalis River. Ayres said this winter’s first dig, over the Christmas holiday at Copalis Beach only, “was a huge success, with most diggers filling their limits.” The clams weren’t particularly large, averaging about 4.5 inches, but Ayres said there was a pretty good percentage of bigger clams. The largest clams on the upcoming dig likely will be found on the north half of Long Beach. “In the past, the only decent digging on Long Beach was up toward the north end,” Ayres said, “but clams now are well scattered over the entire beach.” Tides for the upcoming dig are as follows: today, low at 4:57 p.m., plus 0.1 feet; Friday, 5:37 p.m., minus 0.4 feet; Saturday, 6:16 p.m., minus 0.8 feet; Sunday, 6:55 p.m., minus 1.0 feet; Monday, 7:34 p.m., minus 1.0 feet; Tuesday, 8:14 p.m., minus 0.8 feet; Jan. 13, 8:56 p.m., minus 0.4 feet, and Jan 14, 9:40 p.m.,

the only giveaway is the full cage enclosure attached to his helmet that guards his face. The Silvertips remain enamored with Onyebuchi’s physical stature that complements his skill set. “We saw a big body that skates pretty well and uses his size,” Constantine said. “We just don’t have a lot of that. We don’t have a lot of big-bodied players. I think you can play the game well with any size, but if you can do things skill-wise well, the bigger your body the better.” Onyebuchi says he isn’t scared to use his size, and didn’t show any qualms about mixing it up along the boards with his older teammates during Tuesday’s ice session. “I throw my body around a

mended, but not critical. Persons planning to visit Oak Creek should call 509-653-2390 for a recorded message with updates on feeding and elk-viewing tours. Tour reservations must be made at least 48 hours in advance by calling 509-698-5106. Driving instructions and other facts are available on the Department of Fish and Wildlife website. Visitors should be aware that a state Discover Pass or Access Pass is required to park at all Department of Fish and Wildlife areas. Purchase a Discover Pass at the area headquarters or on the department’s website. — Wayne Kruse

plus 0.2 feet. All diggers 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw. wa.gov, and from license vendors around the state. For more information, including updates on digs, info on digging and cooking clams, and more, go to http://wdfw.wa.gov/ fishing/shellfish/razorclams/ current.html.

Local blackmouth “Local chinook fishing picked up any?” was the question. And the succinct answer from All Star Charters skipper/owner Gary Krein, was “No.” That about says it all for Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2, except that Krein’s other skipper, Nick Kester, took a just-legal blackmouth off Columbia Beach on Monday, his only legal fish in three trips. A 16-pounder also was reported from Elger Bay on Saturday. The San Juan Islands continue to produce at least fair fishing, probably the place to be if you’re serious about catching winter blackmouth right now. Marine Area 9, including Possession Bar, may open on Jan. 16, but not necessarily. “The state has a phone conference set up for the 12th, Krein said, “and we should find out then whether it’s a go or not.” If state salmon managers decide not to open area 9, it would probably be because of incidental mortality on sublegal wild-stock fish, or other unacceptable impacts on endangered wild chinook, “I think it will probably open,” Krein, a long-time local salmon activist, said, “because their test boats aren’t catching any fish in the area. Isn’t that a ridiculous system? It used to be we would go where the fish were; now we have to go where they aren’t.”

SILVERTIPS PHOTO

The Silvertips’ Montana Onyebuchi skates with the team on Sept. 5.

lot and that’s part of my game,” he said. “I’ve always been a bigger guy so I use that to my advantage.” Onyebuchi has seven goals and nine assists in 28 games with Eastman prior to the Mac’s Tournament and he added a goal at the Calgary event. The Selects have a league record of 28-0-1-1 and their 58 points lead the league. Fifteen-year-olds are eligible

Make Your Winter Days

Brighter!

129

$

New Patient Special: & X-rays Exam EXPIRE S 12/ 31/15

n The North Snohomish County chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) meets at 7 p.m. on Jan. 12 at Bayside Marine in Everett (1111 Craftsman Way). The guest speaker will be Tom Nelson from “The Outdoor Line” on 710 ESPN radio. The public is welcome. For more information, call Ralph at 360653-3894. Items for the Outdoor Calendar can be submitted by e-mail (sports@heraldnet. com), by fax (425-3393435) or by mail (P.O. Box 930, Everett, Wash.). The deadline is noon Monday. State creel checks for Saturday included the Bellingham ramp, where 37 fishermen had 18 blackmouth; the Camano State Park ramp, where 33 anglers had three fish; Washington Park ramp in Anacortes, 76 with 11; Cornet Bay ramp, 26 with six; and the Port of Everett ramp, 27 fishermen with one blackmouth.

Ice fishing Neither of two popular ice fishing lakes, Potholes Reservoir or Fish Lake near Lake Wenatchee, have enough ice to support a safe fishery. Four fishermen in fact got wet and cold, but not worse, when they went through the ice on Fish Lake last week, according to a local resident. Call MarDon Resort on the reservoir for current information (800-416-2736).

Short brant season The state announced Tuesday a short season for brant, a small seagoose, after counts of the birds in Skagit County indicated their numbers were below the level needed for a full season. The hunt takes place Jan. 9, 13 and 16. “The number of hunting days depends on how many brant are counted during aerial surveys,” said Don Kraege, the state’s waterfowl manager. “Two surveys of Padilla, Samish and Fidalgo bays each had counts of less than 6,000 birds, the number needed for a full season.” In recent years, a full season meant eight hunting days, although bird counts haven’t supported that many days in the field since 2013, Kraege said. Last year, a low count of about 3,600 brant resulted in cancellation of the hunt in Skagit County. Kraege said brant hunts have been restricted since the 1970s to conserve the limited population of Western High Arctic brant that winter in the area.

For more outdoor news, read Wayne Kruse’s blog at www.heraldnet.com/huntingandfishing.

to play in up to five games with their WHL teams prior to their midget seasons ending. There is precedent for the Silvertips playing 15-year-olds when the situation warrants it. Former Tip Janzten Leslie played in six games during the team’s Eastern Division swing as a 15-year-old last season and also appeared in six playoff games. Current Tips Noah Juulsen, Matt Fonteyne and Kevin Davis saw time on the ice as 15-year-olds three seasons ago. However, due to Everett’s relatively healthy defensive corps, Constantine doesn’t expect Onyebuchi to play this weekend before he heads back to Manitoba. But Onyebuchi could potentially return later in the regular season or if the Tips make an extended playoff run. “For only being 15 at this time I think what he does is pretty darn good,” Constantine said. “We have high hopes where he might end up with us over the course of time with us.” For the latest Silvertips news follow Jesse Geleynse on Twitter @jessegeleynse.

d General Dentistry d Safe Mercury Filling Removal d Ozone Therapy d No Drill Fillings d Non-Surgical Gum Disease Treatment d Invisalign d Sleep Apnea Appliances

Call us today at 425-776-3352 1492891

A Holistic Office

www.GreenCityDental.com

Schedule your Schedule appointment your today to learn appointment more about today to our holistic dental learn more! practice!

8405 196th St. SW Edmonds

1493186

C2


The Daily Herald

Thursday, 01.07.2015 C3

99.32%

HALL OF FAMER

KEN GRIFFEY JR.

Top 10 Hall of Fame Vote Percentages PLAYER

YEAR BALLOTS VOTES PERCENT

Ken Griffey Jr. Tom Seaver Nolan Ryan Cal Ripken Jr. Ty Cobb George Brett Hank Aaron Tony Gwynn Randy Johnson Greg Maddux

2016 1992 1999 2007 1936 1999 1982 2007 2015 2014

440 430 497 545 226 497 415 545 549 571

437 425 491 537 222 488 406 532 534 555

99.32 98.84 98.79 98.53 98.23 98.19 97.83 97.61 97.27 97.20

Ken Griffey Jr.’s career stats MAJOR LEAGUE SEASONS: 22 BATTING AVERAGE: .284 AT-BATS: 9,801 HITS: 2,781 RUNS: 1,662 HOME RUNS: 630 (sixth all-time) RBI: 1,836 (15th all-time)

JENNIFER BUCHANAN / THE HERALD, 2009

2016


C4

Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

BASKETBALL NBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 25 11 .694 — Utah 15 19 .441 9 Portland 15 23 .395 11 Denver 13 23 .361 12 Minnesota 12 24 .333 13 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Golden State 33 2 .943 — L.A. Clippers 23 13 .639 10½ Sacramento 14 21 .400 19 Phoenix 13 25 .342 21½ L.A. Lakers 8 28 .222 25½ Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 31 6 .838 — Dallas 21 15 .583 9½ Memphis 19 18 .514 12 Houston 17 19 .472 13½ New Orleans 11 23 .324 18½ EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 22 15 .595 — Boston 19 16 .543 2 New York 18 19 .486 4 Brooklyn 10 25 .286 11 Philadelphia 4 33 .108 18 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 21 14 .600 — Atlanta 21 15 .583 ½ Orlando 19 17 .528 2½ Charlotte 17 18 .486 4 Washington 15 18 .455 5 Central Division W L Pct GB Cleveland 24 9 .727 — Chicago 21 12 .636 3 Indiana 20 15 .571 5 Detroit 20 16 .556 5½ Milwaukee 14 23 .378 12 Wednesday’s games New York 98, Miami 90 Indiana 95, Orlando 86 Cleveland 121, Washington 115 Toronto 91, Brooklyn 74 Detroit 99, Boston 94 Denver 78, Minnesota 74 Dallas 100, New Orleans 91 San Antonio 123, Utah 98 Phoenix 111, Charlotte 102 Oklahoma City 112, Memphis 94 L.A. Clippers 109, Portland 98 Thursday’s Games Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Boston at Chicago, 5 p.m. Utah at Houston, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 7:30 p.m.

Men’s College scores Top 25 No. 3 Maryland 88, Rutgers 63 No. 10 Xavier 74 St. John’s 66 No. 11 Villanova 72, Seton Hall 63 No. 13 Iowa State 76, Texas Tech 69 No. 14 Duke 91, Wake Forest 75 No. 21 Texas A&M 61, Mississippi State 60 No. 24 Pittsburgh 89, Georgia Tech 84 No. 25 Dayton 93, UMass 63 Pac-12 Oregon 68, California 65

Women’s College scores Top 25 No. 1 UConn 93, Tulsa 35 No. 4 Texas 75, Iowa State 54 No. 6 Baylor 58, Kansas 40 No. 17 Oklahoma 78, TCU 65

FOOTBALL NFL Playoff Schedule Wild-card Playoffs Saturday’s games Kansas City (11-5) at Houston (9-7), 1:35 p.m. (ABC/ESPN) Pitt. (10-6) at Cincinnati (12-4), 5:15 p.m. (CBS) Sunday’s games Seattle (10-6) at Minnesota (11-5), 10 a.m. (NBC) G.B. (10-6) at Washington (9-7), 1:30 p.m. (FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 16 Cincinnati, Houston or Kansas City at New England (12-4), 1:30 (CBS) Minnesota, Washington or Green Bay at Arizona (13-3), 5:15 p.m. (NBC) Sunday, Jan. 17 Seattle, Green Bay or Washington at Carolina (15-1), 10:05 a.m. (FOX) Pittsburgh, Kansas City or Houston at Denver (12-4), 1:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 24 TBD Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 7 At Santa Clara, Calif. TBD, 3:30 p.m. (CBS)

HOCKEY NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA 39 25 12 2 52 105 87 39 19 16 4 42 110 124 41 16 16 9 41 100 115 39 19 18 2 40 104 122 39 16 16 7 39 73 94 37 18 17 2 38 101 106 41 17 21 3 37 102 122 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 42 28 10 4 60 146 113 Chicago 42 25 13 4 54 117 100 St. Louis 43 23 14 6 52 106 107 Minnesota 39 21 11 7 49 105 92 Nashville 40 19 14 7 45 104 106 Colorado 41 20 18 3 43 117 114 Winnipeg 40 19 19 2 40 108 115 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida 40 24 12 4 52 111 86 Montreal 42 23 16 3 49 121 104 Detroit 40 20 13 7 47 101 106 Boston 38 20 14 4 44 118 105 Ottawa 40 19 15 6 44 114 120 Tampa Bay 40 19 17 4 42 101 98 Toronto 38 16 15 7 39 103 103 Buffalo 40 15 21 4 34 92 110 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 39 29 7 3 61 124 85 N.Y. Islanders 40 22 13 5 49 113 99 N.Y. Rangers 40 22 14 4 48 118 105 New Jersey 41 20 16 5 45 94 97 Pittsburgh 40 19 16 5 43 94 99 Philadelphia 38 16 15 7 39 83 105 Carolina 41 16 18 7 39 94 114 Columbus 41 15 23 3 33 105 131 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s games Montreal 2, New Jersey 1 Chicago 3, Pittsburgh 1 Colorado 4, St. Louis 3, OT Vancouver 3, Carolina 2 Toronto 4, Anaheim 0 Thursday’s games Washington at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Florida at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Winnipeg at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Arizona at Calgary, 6 p.m. Toronto at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles Arizona Vancouver Calgary Anaheim San Jose Edmonton

WHL U.S. DIVISION GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Pt Everett 36 22 12 0 2 100 79 46 Seattle 37 20 14 3 0 118 111 43 Spokane 39 19 15 3 2 129 132 43

Portland 38 20 17 1 0 134 124 41 Tri-City 40 17 21 2 0 126 152 36 B.C. DIVISION GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Pt Kelowna 40 28 10 2 0 145 113 58 Victoria 42 24 14 1 3 142 107 52 Prince George 40 24 14 1 1 137 118 50 Kamloops 38 18 14 4 2 132 118 42 Vancouver 41 15 21 3 2 119 142 35 EASTERN CONFERENCE EAST DIVISION GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Pt Brandon 40 24 12 2 2 150 122 52 Prince Albert 40 23 13 3 1 133 125 50 Moose Jaw 40 20 15 4 1 139 130 45 Regina 40 17 17 3 3 125 144 40 Saskatoon 39 15 21 3 0 121 162 33 Swift Current 40 12 23 4 1 93 131 29 CENTRAL DIVISION GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Pt Lethbridge 40 28 12 0 0 171 122 56 Red Deer 41 28 13 0 0 158 118 56 Calgary 42 25 15 1 1 140 129 52 Edmonton 41 17 20 4 0 115 133 38 Medicine Hat 39 14 21 3 1 127 152 32 Kootenay 41 7 31 3 0 82 172 17 Wednesday’s games Red Deer 5 Saskatoon 0 Edmonton 3 Vancouver 1 Lethbridge 5 Swift Current 2 Prince George 4 Kamloops 3 (SO) Victoria 6 Tri-City 2 Thursday’s games No games scheduled

LINE College Football FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG National Championship Game Championship Game At Glendale, Arizona Jan. 11 Alabama 7 Clemson NFL FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG Saturday Playoffs Kansas City 3½ HOUSTON Pittsburgh 3 CINCINNATI Sunday Playoffs Seattle 5 MINNESOTA at WASHINGTON 1 Green Bay

DEALS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Designated RHP Kirby Yates for assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with 1B Chris Carter on a one-year contract. Named Chris Holt pitching coach of Quad Cities (MWL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with OF Alex Gordon on a four-year contract. National League LOS ANGLES DODGERS — Designated LHP Tyler Olson for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Brandon Beachy on a oneyear contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Designated C Tony Sanchez for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Neftali Perez on a one-year contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Designated RHPs Erik Davis and Taylor Hill for assignment. Agreed to terms with 2B Daniel Murphy on a three-year contract and INF Stephen Drew on a one-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL PLAYERS ASSOCIATION — Fined agent Ben Dogra $200,000 and revoked his license. ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed WRs C.J. Goodwin and Jordan Leslie, RB Gus Johnson, OL Collin Rahrig and QB Matt Simms to reserve/future contracts. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Placed CB Charles Tillman on injured reserve. Signed DB Lou Young from the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Placed DT Brandon Thompson on injured reserve. Signed DT DeShawn Williams from the practice squad. HOUSTON TEXANS — Signed DE Devon Still to a reserve/future contract. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed RB Jahwan Edwards, WR Robert Herron, LB Terrell Manning, CB Dax Swanson, Gs Vinston Painter and Anthony Steen and DEs Julius Warmsley and Jordan Williams to reserve/future contracts. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed TE Rhett Ellison on injured reserve. Signed DE B.J. DuBose from the practice squad and DT Toby Johnson to the practice squad. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Announced the contracts of offensive assistant coach Jeff Garcia, wide receivers coach Ray Sherman, running backs coach Ben Sirmans, assistant strength and conditioning coach Adam Bailey and assistant special teams coach Paul Boudreau will not be renewed. Arena Football League ORLANDO PREDATORS — Agreed to terms with DB De’Mon Glanton. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Washington F Zach Sill two games for boarding Boston D Adam McQuaid. ARIZONA COYOTES — Assigned F Laurent Dauphin to Springfield (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Traded D Seth Jones to Columbus for C Ryan Johansen. NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled G Cedrick Desjardins from Manchester (ECHL) to Hartford (AHL). PHILADELPHIA FLYERS — Traded D Luke Schenn and C Vincent Lecavalier to the L.A. Kings for F Jordan Weal and a 2016 thirdround draft pick. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Assigned F Brian Hart from Syracuse (AHL) to Greenville (ECHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Agreed to terms with C Mike Richards on a one-year contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHICAGO FIRE — Traded W Patrick Nyarko from D.C. United for a 2016 second-round draft pick. COLUMBUS CREW — Agreed to terms with sporting director and coach Gregg Berhalter on a multi-year contract extension. LA GALAXY — Signed M Jeff Larentowicz. Named Peter Vagenas vice president of soccer operations. NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION — Signed M Diego Fagundez to a multi-year contract. NEW YORK CITY FC — Named Jon Patricof president. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Waived F Ngozi Sonia Okobi. COLLEGE AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Named Bernadette Cafarelli associate commissioner for communications. FLORIDA — S Keanu Neal announced he will enter the NFL draft. FLORIDA STATE — Announced PK Roberto Aguayo will enter the NFL draft. GEORGIA — Named Scott Sinclair director of strength and conditioning for football and Ed Ellis senior associate director of strength and conditioning for football. MICHIGAN STATE — Announced OT Jack Conklin will enter the NFL draft. NEW JERSEY CITY — Announced the resignation of softball coach Jaci Timko to take the same position at Rider. Promoted assistant softball coach Veronica Grant to head coach. N.C. STATE — Announced TE David Grinnage will enter the NFL draft. OKLAHOMA STATE — DE Emmanuel Ogbah announced he will enter the NFL draft. RUTGERS — Named Rick Mantz director of high school football relations and Nick Quartaro director of player development. TENNESSEE — Announced defensive coordinator John Jancek will not return next season. UTAH — Named Guy Holliday receivers coach. Reassigned tight ends coach Lewis Powell to defensive line coach and director of player personnel Fred Whittingham Jr. to tight ends coach.

NFL | Notebook

Payton says he’ll remain Saints’ coach Associated Press METAIRIE, La. — Saints coach Sean Payton smiled often and answered questions for a full hour while Saints owner Tom Benson and general manager Mickey Loomis looked on from a few feet away. More introspective, laid back and talkative than usual, Payton appeared refreshed and eager to begin a second decade in New Orleans. Seeking to end speculation that he could be on the move after

consecutive 7-9 seasons, Payton asserted on Wednesday that he doesn’t envision himself “ever coaching for any other clubs.”

Buccaneers fire Smith TAMPA, Fla. — The Tampa Bay Buccaneers fired coach Lovie Smith on Wednesday night. Smith went 6-10 this season and 8-24 over two years in charge of the team. Smith led the Chicago Bears to the NFC title in 2006, when they lost to Indianapolis in the Super Bowl. He was 84-66 in nine seasons with Chicago.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Edmonds-Woodway’s Mady Burdett is surrounded by four Arlington defenders during Wednesday night’s game.

Arlington tops Edmonds-Woodway By Aaron Lommers

throughout the contest. She finished with a game-high 16 points and had several steals on defense that led to easy points for Arlington. “She’s just fearless,” Marsh said of Balderas. “She’s a warrior. She comes out every night. She hits that three and you know when she hits one early I’m like ‘OK, here we go. Let’s see what happens.’ She’s not afraid to shoot it and she plays great defense and she just has a great attitude. She’s kind of representative of what we do. She’s all over the floor. She’s the smallest kid on the floor and she’s been that way her whole life, but she doesn’t care. She just goes out and fights. She had a great game tonight and just really sparked are energy.” Balderas is listed on the roster as exactly 5-feet tall, which is at least three inches shorter than any other player on the Arlington or the Edmonds-Woodway roster. Balderas and her teammates have embraced the defense-first philosophy Marsh has instilled over the past several seasons. “We have a lot of short people on our team, so we try to use it to our advantage,” Balderas said. “We just try to get up in people and make

Herald Writer

EDMONDS — The Arlington Eagles shook off a sluggish start in Wednesday’s game against EdmondsWoodway to prove why they earned the No. 3 ranking in the state’s first 3A Associated Press girls basketball poll of the season, which was released earlier in the day. The Eagles fell behind 6-0 early, but answered with a 12-0 run and never trailed again in a 58-44 victory over the Warriors. “That happens sometimes,” Arlington head coach Joe Marsh said of the slow start. “I wasn’t really worried about it. It’s early in the game. We came right back and got a couple of buckets and then it’s a ball game. ... They came out quick and they hit some shots. The reality is, that’s going to happen to you sometimes.” The Eagles scored their first points of the game on a 3-pointer by senior Serafina Balderas with 4 minutes, 55 seconds remaining in the first quarter. Less than a minute later, Arlington took the lead for good. Balderas was the spark for the Eagles on both ends of the floor

them uncomfortable. Once we get those steals we’re looking down the court and getting those into offensive points for us.” The Warriors had scored 60 or more in five of their first 10 games and hadn’t scored less than 48 so far this season until the Eagles held them to 44 on Wednesday. “If I can hold that team with all of those weapons to 44 points, we’re really happy with that,” Marsh said. “We had great effort. We’ve had great effort from kids all year. Kids are coming off the bench and playing the same kind of defense (as the starters), it’s been nice. It was a good one tonight.” The Eagles led 29-17 at the half, but used a 23-10 run to open the fourth quarter to put the game away. “In the locker room we said the first four minutes of the (second) half were really important,” Marsh said. “Last year, in two games, we were up 10 on them coming out of halftime and they came right back at us and we didn’t want that to happen this year, so were really put an emphasis on playing great defense and getting some stops early and we did that. We got some stops and buckets and we stretched it out.”

WEDNESDAY | Prep Scoreboard BOYS BASKETBALL SEATTLE — How a state panel of sports writers rates Washington high school basketball teams in the weekly Associated Press poll of 2016, by WIAA divisions, with won-lost record and total points (first-place votes in parentheses): Division 4A School Record Points 1. Federal Way (9) 12-0 90 2. Curtis 12-1 81 3. Cascade (Everett) 10-0 65 4. Gonzaga Prep 9-1 61 5. Lewis and Clark 8-2 47 6. Union 8-2 41 7. Issaquah 9-2 32 8. Bellarmine Prep 8-3 28 9. Todd Beamer 10-2 19 10. Puyallup 10-2 12 Others receiving votes: Olympia 5. Central Valley 5. Chiawana 4. Kentwood 3. Richland 1. Division 3A School Record Points 1. Garfield (6) 9-1 94 2. Rainier Beach (2) 7-1 87 3. Bellevue (1) 9-1 81 4. Peninsula (1) 10-0 68 5. Wilson, Woodrow 8-1 55 6. Auburn Mountainview 10-0 50 7. O’Dea 9-1 28 8. Shadle Park 7-3 23 9. West Seattle 9-1 19 10. Kamiakin 9-0 14 Others receiving votes: Cleveland 13. Lincoln 9. Mercer Island 5. Franklin 2. Columbia River 1. Edmonds-Woodway 1. Division 2A School Record Points 1. Clarkston (10) 8-0 109 2. Lynden 9-1 87 3. Pullman (1) 9-0 84 4. River Ridge 9-1 78 5. Squalicum 9-2 70 6. Wapato 9-1 51 7. Anacortes 7-4 25 8. West Valley (Spokane) 7-3 23 9. Selah 7-2 22 10. Mark Morris 7-3 18 Others receiving votes: Liberty (Renton) 15. Shorecrest 9. Tumwater 5. White River 4. Woodland 3. Aberdeen 1. Clover Park 1. Division 1A School Record Points 1. Lynden Christian (11) 11-0 119 2. Zillah (1) 7-1 106 3. King’s 7-2 96 4. King’s Way Christian School 7-2 80 5. Mount Baker 8-3 60 6. University Prep 8-1 52 7. Vashon Island 9-2 43 8. Medical Lake 6-2 34 9. Overlake School 6-1 28 (tie)Seattle Academy 7-3 28 Others receiving votes: Hoquiam 6. Freeman 4. Montesano 3. Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 1. Division 2B School Record Points 1. Brewster (10) 9-0 118 2. Morton-White Pass (1) 8-1 102 3. Liberty (Spangle) (1) 11-0 93 4. Life Christian Academy 9-2 77 5. Northwest Christian (Colbert) 8-2 70 6. Ocosta 9-1 52 7. Kittitas 7-1 37 8. Friday Harbor 8-2 24 8. Mossyrock 7-1 24 10. Warden 7-1 20 Others receiving votes: Napavine 16. Toledo 14. Asotin 8. Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 3. St. George’s 2. Division B School Record Points 1. Almira Coulee-Hartline (9 8-0 90 2. Garfield-Palouse (1) 9-0 89 3. Seattle Lutheran 8-0 78 4. Selkirk 8-2 56 5. Republic 8-2 41 6. Evergreen Lutheran 6-1 37 7. Shorewood Christian 6-2 36 8. Yakama Tribal 4-3 21 9. Neah Bay 5-2 13 10. Pomeroy 7-3 12 Others receiving votes: Sunnyside Christian 11. Wellpinit 10. Cusick 10. Lummi 7. Entiat 5. Curlew 5. Orcas Island 4. Puget Sound Adventist 2. Riverside Christian 1. Three Rivers Christian School 1.

Darrington 53, Highland Christian 26 At Cascade Christian Reform Church Darrington (JV) 19 13 12 9 —53 Highland Christian 2 4 6 14 —26 Darrington (JV)—Ike Green 8, Andrew Soloman 8, Cooper Young 7, Alex Maconnouhy 4, Devin Ross 16, Robert Smith 4, Paul Franke 2, Justin Draper 2, Aden Ruqua 2. Higland Christian—Quinton Pelligrini 0, Matteo Pelligrini 7, Bryan Matthews 0, Sawyer Lawhon 16, Daniel Vess 3, Carter Degrope 0. Records—Darrington (JV) 3-7 overall. Highland Christian not reported.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

SEATTLE — How a state panel of sports writers rates Washington high school basketball teams in the weekly Associated Press poll of 2016, by WIAA divisions, with won-lost record and total points (first-place votes in parentheses): Division 4A School Record Points 1. Central Valley (8) 10-0 89 2. Bothell (1) 11-0 77 3. Moses Lake 11-0 72 4. Todd Beamer 8-1 61 5. Sunnyside 9-0 54 6. Inglemoor 8-2 37 7. Lewis and Clark 7-3 28 8. Camas 8-1 23 (tie)Kentridge 9-2 23 10. Woodinville 8-2 14 Others receiving votes: Skyview 6. Bellarmine Prep 4. Kentlake 3. Tahoma 3. Division 3A School Record Points 1. Bellevue (5) 8-0 94 2. Lynnwood (4) 9-0 84 3. Arlington 9-0 72 4. West Seattle 9-0 68 5. Blanchet 8-0 62 6. Mercer Island 9-0 46 7. Auburn Riverside (1) 11-0 39 8. Lincoln 8-1 27 9. Wilson, Woodrow 7-2 16 10. Glacier Peak 9-2 15 Others receiving votes: Rainier Beach 6. Prairie 5. Hazen 5. Garfield 4. Mt. Spokane 4. Capital 2. Edmonds-Woodway 1. Division 2A School Record Points 1. Burlington-Edison (8) 11-0 98 2. East Valley (Spokane) (3) 9-2 93 3. Ellensburg 8-1 84 4. Lynden 8-1 63 5. W. F. West 8-2 53 6. Black Hills 9-1 47 7. Anacortes 6-3 45 8. Archbishop Murphy 5-1 42 9. White River 7-3 40 10. Port Angeles 9-1 18 Others receiving votes: Selah 11. Franklin Pierce 9. Washougal 2. Division 1A School Record Points 1. Lynden Christian (10) 10-1 118 2. Mount Baker 10-1 87 3. Granger (1) 10-0 81 4. Montesano 8-2 70 5. King’s (1) 7-3 69 6. LaCenter 9-1 61 7. Elma 8-1 49 8. La Salle 8-1 41 9. Kalama 8-3 33 10. Bellevue Christian 9-1 32 Others receiving votes: Zillah 7. Chewelah (Jenkins) 7. Nooksack Valley 3. Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 2. Division 2B School Record Points 1. Okanogan (11) 8-0 119 2. Toutle Lake (1) 8-0 106 3. Davenport 9-2 88 4. Mabton 7-1 73 5. Ilwaco 9-2 65 6. Napavine 5-1 52 7. Wahkiakum 6-2 38 8. Warden 6-0 31 9. St. George’s 9-3 24 10. Raymond 7-3 18 Others receiving votes: LaConner 17. Adna 9. Waterville 7. Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 5. Friday Harbor 4. Northwest Christian (Colbert) 3. Colfax 1. Division B School Record Points 1. Colton (8) 9-1 88 2. Republic (1) 9-0 81 3. Sunnyside Christian 4-0 55 (tie)Tulalip Heritage 6-0 55 5. Evergreen Lutheran 6-0 35 6. Almira Coulee-Hartline 7-1 33 7. Clallam Bay 9-1 24 8. Touchet 7-1 21 9. Pateros 5-1 20 10. Mt. Rainier Lutheran 8-2 14 Others receiving votes: Neah Bay 8. Selkirk 6. Pomeroy 5. Mary Knight 4. Moses Lake Christian Academy 3. Entiat 2. Tekoa-Oakesdale 2. St. John-Endicott 1. Valley Christian 1. Yakama Tribal 1.

Lynnwood 69, Shorewood 33 At Lynnwood H.S. Shorewood 4 10 12 7 —33 Lynnwood 17 17 23 12 —69 Shorewood—Jalyn Hizey 4, Danica Bernabe, Danica Bernale 2, Abby Gustafson 3, Dakota Laut 0, Kaitlyn Amundsen 7, Lily Gustafson 6, Katie Taylor 4, Taryn Shelley 2, Jasmine Pollard 5. Lynnwood—Abigail Yemane 2, Reilly Walsh 9, Rachel Walsh 4, Jordyn Edwards 7, Mikayla Pivec 23, Kelsey Rogers 12, Kaprice Boston 8, Taylor Fahey 2, Abby Douglas 0, Kaui Piilani 2, Kia Crawford 0. Records—Shorewood 1-3 league, 6-6 overall. Lynnwood 4-0, 10-0.

Darrington 43, Highland Christian 37

At Cascade Christian Reform Church Darrington 18 9 6 10 —43 H. Christian 9 11 10 7 —37 Darrington—Lexsy Ford 4, Summer Bryson 0, Breanna Valencia 10, Mel Benson 0, Autumn Miller 8, Lily Ross 9, Tatum Wright 8, Bailee Green 2, Maddie Miller 0, Shelby Stafford 0, Brooke Monteith 2. Highland Christian—Hannah Yu 0, Cynthia Koester 0, Chloe Brown 23, Katie Costley 11, Sophia Geddis 1, Naomi Nuss 0, Alaina Hayward 2. Records—Darrington 5-3 overall. Highland Christian not reported.

Shorecrest 51, Meadwodale 48 At Meadowdale H.S. Shorecrest Meadowdale

4 15 21 11 —51 15 6 11 16 —48

Shorecrest—Laura Hoover, Audrey Dietz, Indira Ensign, Wurrie Njadoe 12, Ari Rantz 0, Jazlyn Owens, Julia Strand 21, Ronna Iverson 0, Shelby Gresch 4, Sheridan Stephenson 4, Uju Chibuogwu 10. Meadowdale—Adriana Valadez 8, Eva Taylor 6, Lauren Hunnewell 6, Kassidi Dotter 0, Emily Carroll 5, Selina Tekle 13, Ngozi Ezeokeke 0, Emma Helm 4, Grace Wilson 5, Kaeli McKinley 1. Records—Shorecrest 1-2 league, 6-5 overall. Meadowdale 0-4, 3-8.

Monroe 55, Jackson 52 At Monroe H.S. Jackson Monroe

8 15

9 1

17 11

18 —52 18 —55

Jackson—Alyssa Mannetti 0, Jaelen Williams 0, Emily Brown 15, Imari Clinton 13, Megan Mattison 0, Olivia Skibiel 8, Drew Locknane 14, Kassaundra Jackson 0, Caitlin Monten 2. Monroe—Kat Ragusa 2, Corrina Roppo 6, Kittra Evenson 0, Jadynn Alexander 18, Emily Donnelly 7, Katie Piland 2, Abby Hunt 0, Hannah Drivstuen 13, Monique Fierke 7. Records—Jackson 1-3 league, 3-7 overall. Monroe 4-0, 6-3.

Glacier Peak 59, Mountlake Terrace 14 7 2

9 —59 8 —14

Glacier Peak—Addison Sande 3, Paisley Johnson 14, Samantha Fatkin 12, Lauren Iredale 2, Charlie Sevenants 0, Natalie Rasmussen 5, Maya McFadden 14, Sierra Nash 0, Nicole Jensen 2, Abbie Juozapaitis 7. Mountlake Terrace— Jorie Lambert 2, Nohea Morrison 6, Claire Zucker 0, Trinity Prout 0, Eliza Sandoval 0, Torry DeAlba 0, Jazmine Zenk 4, Aynika Nuckles 2. Records— Glacier Peak 4-0 league, 10-2 overall. Mountlake Terrace 0-3, 3-8.

Keilor (Australia) 67, King’s 35 At King’s H.S. Keilor King’s

Lakewood—Natalie Neer 0, Emily Senyitko 7, Taylor Storms 0, Hayley Senyitko 14, Bailey Dixon 0, Marissa Blair 23, Jelly Perry 6, Jenna Langdon 0. Marysville Getchell—Mylanie Cabrera 1, Gabrielle Grandbois 8, Kiarra Green 7, Mikail Montez 20, Jadyn Noriega 0, Maguire Rossnagle 6, Oshinaye Taylor 4, Carley Wika 10. Records—Lakewood 6-4 overall. Marysville Getchell 6-4.

Mariner 42, Mount Vernon 39 At Mariner H.S. Mount Vernon 10 10 3 16 —39 Mariner 6 16 11 9 —42 Mount Vernon—Rebekah Jenson 2, Renee Larson 4, Blakely Doerge 0, Angelina Fast 0, Paulette Walser 8, Miranda Johnson 9, Sam Silver 5, Joscelynn Evans 10, Abigail Brown 1. Mariner—Denisa Grebovic 5, Carlita Vilchez 0, Tanya Kochergina 0, Makayah Harrell 2, Hannah Hezekiah 20, Zaira Rubio 2, Rachael Hendrickson 2, Zaria Smith 11. Records—Mount Vernon 1-3 league, 4-6 overall. Mariner 1-3, 4-5.

Arlington 58, Edmonds-Woodway 44 At Edmonds-Woodway H.S. Arlington Ed-Woodway

12 17 23 6 —58 8 9 13 14 —44

Arlington — Gracie Castaneda 12, Serafina Balderas 16, Sarah Shortt 5, Sevi Bielser 6, Peyton Brown 6, Selena Gutierrez 0, Olivia Larson 2, Emma Janousek 7, Emmi Modahl 0, Abby Anderson 0, Jayla Russ 4. Edmonds-Woodway — Isabel Callen 2, Ally Burdett 0, Mady Burdett 5, Marivel Ortega 6, Ingred Fusberg 0, Maddie Tudor 7, Adrienne Poling 7, Emma Dickenson 0, Ellie Schull 2, Courtney Simpson 3, Missy Peterson 12. Records — Arlington 10-0. EdmondsWoodway 8-3.

GIRLS BOWLING

At Mountlake Terrace H.S. Glacier Peak 25 18 Mountlake Terrace 4 0

Lakewood 9 12 9 20 —50 M. Getchell 12 13 13 18 —56

21 15 15 16 — 67 8 8 10 9 — 35

Keilor—Not reported. King’s—Dominique Kirton 0, Casey Kispert 5, Maddie Nielsen 3, Kenzie Schwab 3, Hannah Echelbarger 7, Daylee Hanson 0, Anna Parker 5, Abbi Echelbarger 2, Claire Diede 0, Audrey Friedline 8, Callie Wright 2. Records—Keilor Not reported. King’s 7-4.

Lake Stevens 66, Cascade 15 At Lake Stevens H.S. Cascade 3 6 1 5 —15 Lake Stevens 15 20 14 17 —66 Cascade—Katie Valenzuela 1, Caitlynn Daniel 0, Vy Nguyen 4, Jessica Welch 2, Anneka Hilde 3, Lexi Strike 1, Casey Lauritsen 0, Brooke Alcayaga 4, Sabina Colon 0, Megan Thomas 0. Lake Stevens—Laycie Taylor 0, Emma Smith 4, Kristen Glick 0, Anna Dominick 7, Ashley Richardson 0, Marissa Walton 4, Katie Saylor 3, Kylee Griffen 11, Hailey Wilson 26, Taylor Smith 5, Katelyn Smith 6. Records—Cascade 0-4 league, 1-8 overall. Lake Stevens 3-1, 7-4.

Snohomish 49, Kamiak 44 At Kamiak H.S. Snohomish 9 15 10 15 —49 Kamiak 12 10 4 18 —44 Snohomish—Katie Brandvold 3, Maya DuChesne 6, Emily Preach 3, Shaylee Harwood 2, Madison Pollock 20, Madeline Smith 11, Kyra Beckman 4, Ellie Flitsch 0. Kamiak—Hunter Beirne 0, Alex Gallaher 0, Sarah Payne 15, Tylor Adcock 11, Kate Huguenin 9, Jamie Beirne 4, Aliea Marrero 5, Erin Dahl 0. Records—Snohomish 4-0 league, 7-3 overall. Kamiak 2-2, 5-5.

Marysville Getchell 56, Lakewood 50 At Marysville Getchell H.S.

Jackson 3, Burlington-Edison 0

At Glacier Lanes Highlights—Burlington-Edison: Makena Wall 143 game 318 series. Jackson: Samantha Mutolo 183 game, 453 series. Records—Burlington-Edison 0-4 league, 1-9 overall. Jackson 2-1, 5-3.

Squalicum 2, Cascade 1 At Glacier Lanes Highlights—Squalicum:Shaye Fowler 143 game, 383 series. Cascade:Savanna Williams 146 game, 418 series. Records—Squalicum 2-2 league, 4-6 overall. Cascade 1-1, 6-2.

Everett 3, Ferndale 0 At Glacier Lanes Highlights—Ferndale:Kylie Nyenheus 189 game, 504 series player stats. Everett:Amanda Burton 182 game, 503 series; Candice Goldfinch 196 game, 568 series. Records—Ferndale 2-2 league, 5-5 overall. Everett 4-0, 10-0.

WRESTLING Sultan 63, Archbishop Murphy 15 At Sultan H.S. 106—Colin Howell (AM) dec. Luke Weaver 11-5; 113—David Woo (S) won by forfeit; 120—Nate Ostrye (S) won by forfeit; 126—Caleb Webb (S) won by forfeit; 132—Dalton Miller (S) pinned Shota Takei 1:52; 138—Jakob Weaver (S) pinned Sam Skranak 1:32; 145—Hunter Sather (S) won by forfeit; 152—Jamell Carroll (S) won by forfeit; 160—Nicholas Sorgen (S) pinned Barrett Fooyb 1:49; 170—Kaleb Dennis (S) pinned Kyle Malone 3:11; 182—Cory Martinez (S) pinned Matt Keck :59; 195—David Kimsy (AM) pinned Vernon Johnson 5:56; 220—Cliff Shaffer (AM) pinned Carson West :57; 285—Morgan Yates (S) dec. Evi Jeong 4-2.

Lake Stevens 53, Snohomish 18 At Snohomish H.S. 106—Jake Bennett (LS) beat Josh Ren 11-1; 113—Dyllan Meyer (S) beat Sean Barnes 8-7; 120— Nathan Scilley (LS) beat Matt Doran 10-0; 126—Gino Loera (LS) pinned Josue Barajas 1:40; 132—Conner Snow (S) beat Talon Tate 15-6; 138— Cody Lacoursier (LS) won by injury default Daniel Rojas; 145—Jake Douglas (LS) pinned Preston Smith 0:39 seconds; 152—Tristan Peraleis (LS) pinned Ben Kloes 1:23; 160—Wyatt Butler (S) won by technical fall over Angelo Loera; 170—Malachai Lawrence (LS) pinned Tanner Sweeney 1:14; 182—Michael Soler (LS) pinned Mark Currier 1:27; 195—Mitch Firth (LS) beat Frank Daniel 8-6; 220—Ryne Pearson (LS) pinned Matt Currier 3:47; 285—Wyatt Gardner (S) pinned Seth Reyna 0:45.


The Daily Herald Thursday, 01.07.2016

Griffey From Page C1

The day certainly belonged to Griffey, who broke the record for the highest percentage received in BBWAA balloting. Pitcher Tom Seaver held the previous record at 98.84 percent in 1992. Piazza won election by garnering 83.0 percent of the votes in his fourth year on the ballot. First baseman Jeff Bagwell (71.6 percent) and Tim Raines (69.6 percent) were the nearest-misses. Griffey dismissed any suggestion of disappointment in failing to be a unanimous selection. “I can’t be upset,” he said. “It’s truly an honor to be elected. To have the highest percentage is definitely a shock. The big thing is to get into the Hall of Fame. As long as you get in, that’s what it is.”

Griffey also became the first player elected primarily for his achievements while playing for the Mariners. He spent 13 of his 22 seasons in Seattle before retiring in June 2010. “Whenever we needed something done on the field to win a ballgame,” former teammate Dan Wilson said, “Junior was the guy to do it. “Whether it was a game-winning home run or a game-saving circus catch in the outfield, Junior always delivered. He is undoubtedly the most influential player in Mariners history.” Long-time Mariners ace Randy Johnson was elected last season, but his plaque at the Hall depicts him in an Arizona cap. While Griffey spent eight-plus seasons in Cincinnati and part of one season with the Chicago White Sox, there seems little doubt the cap on his plaque will have a Mariners logo. The only real question is

whether that cap, in typical Griffey exuberance, will be worn backward. “He’s a superstar,” former teammate Ichiro Suzuki said, “and not just because of his numbers and his stats, but because of his personality. He was about caring for each other. “It’s something we all need to learn from him, and it’s what makes him better than a superstar.” Griffey achieved that status in Seattle. It was here that he hit 417 of his 630 career home runs and won all four of his league homerun titles. His time with the Mariners included his only Most Valuable Player award, 10 of his 13 All-Star selections, all 10 of his Gold Glove awards and all seven of his Silver Slugger awards. “We love Ken Griffey Jr. because he is everything we would like to be,” Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson once said. “He’s

Public Notices

Public Notices

M& H Contracting, LLC, Dan Mitzel, PO Box 188 Mount Vernon, WA 98273, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Mill Creek Park Vista, is located on the east side of 9th Avenue SE, approximately 900 feet south of the intersection of 9th Ave. SE and 164th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA. in Mill Creek, Snohomish County. This project involves 2.41 acres of soil disturbance for Commercial construction activities. The receiving waterbody for a portion of the stormwater runoff is an existing wetland. The majority of onsite stormwater runoff will infiltrate into the native soils. Any persons desiring to present their views to the Washington State Depar tment of Ecology regarding this application, or interested in Ecology’s action on this application, may notify Ecology in writing no later than 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater P.O. Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: January 7, 14, 2016. EDH676664

NO. 14 2 03039 6 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, ITS SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNS, PLAINTIFF, V. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ROBERT O. WEST; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CECELIA WEST; INIS RAE WEST; LESLIE THOMPSON; GERMAINE SAVOIE; MARGOT BUCKLEY; GEORGE WEST; DUANE WEST; STATE OF WASHINGTON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, DEFENDANTS. TO: ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ROBERT O. WEST; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CECELIA WEST; LESLIE THOMPSON, GERMAIN S AVO I E , M A R G OT BU C K L E Y, D UA N E W E S T, S TAT E O F WASHINGTON, OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES AND ANY PARTIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPTERY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT, THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE SHERIFF OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY TO SELL T H E P R O P E RT Y D E S C R I B E D B E L OW TO S AT I S F Y A J U D G M E N T I N T H E A B OV E E N T I T L E D AC T I O N . I F DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 2404 PINE STREET, EVERETT, WA 98201. THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 2/12/2016, IN THE FRONT DOOR LOBBY AREA OF THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, EVERETT, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $346,017.21, TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED 1/6/2016 TY TRENARY, SHERIFF SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE T. MURPHY, CIVIL DEPUTY EVERETT, WASHINGTON, 98201 (425) 388-3522 DOCKET # 15006689 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE EAST 76 FEET OF LOTS 31 AND 3 2 , B L O C K 5 4 1 , C U R R I E ’ S A D D I T I O N TO E V E R E T T, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 7 OF PLATS, PAGE 51, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. A S S E S S O R ’ S P RO P E RT Y TA X PA R C E L O R AC C O U N T NUMBER: 00414754103101. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2404 PINE STREET, EVERETT, WA 98201. Published: January 7, 14, 21, 28, 2016. EDH676762

MITIGATED DETERMINATION OF NON-SIGNIFICANCE PARK PLACE MIDDLE SCHOOL MODERNIZATION DESCIPTION OF PROPOSAL: The proposed action is to replace the current Park Place Middle School with a new two-story structure. The existing 109,912 sf school will be demolished with the exception of the gymnasium and Building F. The existing gym will be renovated and incorporated into the new school. Building F will be used to house students and staff during construction, but will be removed from educational use at the end of the project. The new school will be approximately 128,000 SF and sized to serve 850 students in grades 6 through 8. Other site improvements include re-designed vehicular access/circulation, parking areas and landscaping. Student drop-off/pick-up area will be relocated to the west side of the school and bus access will be moved to the north side of the school. The existing sports fields will be refurbished and lighted, including synthetic turf soccer field, allweather track, and synthetic turf multi-purpose field. Construction will begin June 2016 and will be completed in phases until final completion in September 2018. The school will be occupied during construction. The proposed action will require approval of a Project Design Review from the City of Monroe, along with associated building, grading and other permits as required for construction. PROPONENT: Monroe Public Schools LOCATION OF PROPOSAL: The project will modernize the existing school at 1408 W. Main Street, Monroe, WA 98272; on Snoh o m i s h C o u n t y Ta x P a r c e l s 2 7 0 6 0 1 0 0 3 0 6 5 0 0 a n d 27060200409400. LEAD AGENCY: Monroe Public Schools The lead agency for this proposal, with the mitigation measures listed in the November 2015 SEPA Checklist, has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030 (2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. This Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance (MDNS) is issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 14 days from the date of issuance. Only written comments will be accepted and must be submitted by 4:00pm on January 20, 2016 to the Responsible Official named below. The Responsible official will reconsider the MDNS based on timely comments and may retain, modify, or, if significant adverse impacts are likely, withdraw the MDNS. If the MDNS is retained, it will be final after the expiration of the comment deadline. REPONSIBLE OFFICIAL: Heidi Hansen, Director of Capital Projects, Monroe Public Schools, 200 E. Fremont Street, Monroe, WA 98272. (360) 804-2677 Signature: Heidi Hansen Date: January 6, 2016 Published: January 7, 2016 EDH676669 NO. 14 2 03039 6 SHERIFF’S NOTICE TO JUDGMENT DEBTOR FOR SALE OF REAL PROPERTY IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, ITS SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNS, PLAINTIFF, V. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ROBERT O. WEST; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CECELIA WEST; INIS RAE WEST; LESLIE THOMPSON; GERMAINE SAVOIE; MARGOT BUCKLEY; GEORGE WEST; DUANE WEST; STATE OF WASHINGTON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, DEFENDANTS. TO: ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ROBERT O. WEST; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CECELIA WEST; INIS RAE WEST; LESLIE T H O M P S O N ; G E R M A I N E S AVO I E ; M A R G OT B U C K L E Y; GEORGE WEST; DUANE WEST; STATE OF WASHINGTON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE SHERIFF OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY TO SELL T H E P R O P E RT Y D E S C R I B E D B E L OW TO S AT I S F Y A J U D G M E N T I N T H E A B OV E E N T I T L E D AC T I O N . T H E PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS DESCRIBED ON THIS NOTICE. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 2404 PINE STREET, EVERETT, WA 98201. THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 2/12/2016, IN THE FRONT DOOR LOBBY AREA OF THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, EVERETT, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $346,017.21, TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES, BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. THIS PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO: (CHECK ONE) ( ) 1. NO REDEMPTION RIGHTS AFTER SALE. (X) 2. A REDEMPTION PERIOD OF EIGHT MONTHS WHICH WILL EXPIRE AT 4:30 P.M. ON 10/12/2016 ( ) 3. A REDEMPTION PERIOD OF ONE YEAR WHICH WILL EXPIRE AT 4:30 P.M. ON _________. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS OR ANY OF THEM MAY REDEEM THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY AT ANY TIME UP TO THE END OF THE REDEMPTION PERIOD BY PAYING THE AMOUNT BID AT THE SHERIFF’S SALE PLUS ADDITIONAL COSTS, TAXES, ASSESSMENTS, CERTAIN OTHER AMOUNTS, FEES, AND INTEREST. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN REDEEMING THE PROPERTY CONTACT THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW TO DETERMINE THE EXACT AMOUNT NECESSARY TO REDEEM. \IMPORTANT NOTICE: IF THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS DO NOT REDEEM THE PROPERTY BY 4:30 P.M. ON 10/12/2016, THE END OF THE REDEMPTION PERIOD, THE PURCHASER AT THE SHERIFF’S SALE WILL BECOME THE OW N E R A N D M AY E V I C T T H E O C C U PA N T F RO M T H E PROPERTY UNLESS THE OCCUPANT IS A TENANT HOLDING UNDER AN UNEXPIRED LEASE. IF THE PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS OCCUPIED AS A PRINCIPAL RESIDENCE BY THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS AT THE TIME OF SALE, HE, SHE, THEY, OR ANY OF THEM MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO RETAIN POSSESSION DURING THE REDEMPTION PERIOD, IF ANY, WITHOUT PAYMENT OF ANY RENT OR OCCUPANCY FEE. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR MAY ALSO HAVE A RIGHT TO RETAIN POSSESSION DURING ANY REDEMPTION PERIOD IF T H E P R O P E RT Y I S U S E D F O R FA R M I N G O R I F T H E PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD UNDER A MORTGAGE THAT SO PROVIDES. DATED THIS 1/6/2016 TY TRENARY, SHERIFF SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE T. MURPHY, CIVIL DEPUTY EVERETT, WASHINGTON, 98201 (425) 388-3522 DOCKET # 15006689 NOTE: IF THE SALE IS NOT PURSUANT TO A JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE OF A MORTGAGE OR A STATUTORY LIEN, THE SHERIFF HAS BEEN INFORMED THAT THERE IS NOT S U F F I C I E N T P E R S O N A L P RO P E RT Y TO S AT I S F Y T H E JUDGMENT, AND IF THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS DO HAVE SUFFICIENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TO SATISFY THE JUDGMENT, THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS SHOULD CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE EAST 76 FEET OF LOTS 31 AND 3 2 , B L O C K 5 4 1 , C U R R I E ’ S A D D I T I O N TO E V E R E T T, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 7 OF PLATS, PAGE 51, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. A S S E S S O R ’ S P RO P E RT Y TA X PA R C E L O R AC C O U N T NUMBER: 00414754103101. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2404 PINE STREET, EVERETT, WA 98201. EDH676775 Published: January 7, 14, 21, 28; February 4, 11, 2016.

NO. 14 2 05985 8 SHERIFF’S NOTICE TO JUDGMENT DEBTOR FOR SALE OF REAL PROPERTY IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES, INC., MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-OA4, PLAINTIFF, V. THE ESTATE OF GEORGE PELLS, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GEORGE PELLS, DECEASED; SHARON A. HARDWICK; DANIEL B. PELLS; AND PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN, DEFENDANTS. TO: ESTATE OF GEORGE PELLS, DECEASED, THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE SHERIFF OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY TO SELL T H E P R O P E RT Y D E S C R I B E D B E L OW TO S AT I S F Y A J U D G M E N T I N T H E A B OV E E N T I T L E D AC T I O N . T H E PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS DESCRIBED ON THIS NOTICE. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 36901 MANN RD, SULTAN, WA 98294. THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 1/29/2016, IN THE FRONT DOOR LOBBY AREA OF THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, EVERETT, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $975,691.75, TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES, BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. THIS PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO: (CHECK ONE) (X) 1. NO REDEMPTION RIGHTS AFTER SALE. ( ) 2. A REDEMPTION PERIOD OF EIGHT MONTHS WHICH WILL EXPIRE AT 4:30 P.M. ON ______. ( ) 3. A REDEMPTION PERIOD OF ONE YEAR WHICH WILL EXPIRE AT 4:30 P.M. ON _________. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS OR ANY OF THEM MAY REDEEM THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY AT ANY TIME UP TO THE END OF THE REDEMPTION PERIOD BY PAYING THE AMOUNT BID AT THE SHERIFF’S SALE PLUS ADDITIONAL COSTS, TAXES, ASSESSMENTS, CERTAIN OTHER AMOUNTS, FEES, AND INTEREST. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN REDEEMING THE PROPERTY CONTACT THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW TO DETERMINE THE EXACT AMOUNT NECESSARY TO REDEEM. IMPORTANT NOTICE: IF THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS DO NOT REDEEM THE PROPERTY BY 4:30 P.M. O N , T H E E N D O F T H E R E D E M P T I O N P E R I O D, T H E PURCHASER AT THE SHERIFF’S SALE WILL BECOME THE OW N E R A N D M AY E V I C T T H E O C C U PA N T F RO M T H E PROPERTY UNLESS THE OCCUPANT IS A TENANT HOLDING UNDER AN UNEXPIRED LEASE. IF THE PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS OCCUPIED AS A PRINCIPAL RESIDENCE BY THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS AT THE TIME OF SALE, HE, SHE, THEY, OR ANY OF THEM MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO RETAIN POSSESSION DURING THE REDEMPTION PERIOD, IF ANY, WITHOUT PAYMENT OF ANY RENT OR OCCUPANCY FEE. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR MAY ALSO HAVE A RIGHT TO RETAIN POSSESSION DURING ANY REDEMPTION PERIOD IF T H E P R O P E RT Y I S U S E D F O R FA R M I N G O R I F T H E PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD UNDER A MORTGAGE THAT SO PROVIDES. DATED THIS 12/18/2015 TY TRENARY, SHERIFF SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE T. MURPHY, CIVIL DEPUTY EVERETT, WASHINGTON, 98201 (425) 388-3522 DOCKET # 15006688 NOTE: IF THE SALE IS NOT PURSUANT TO A JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE OF A MORTGAGE OR A STATUTORY LIEN, THE SHERIFF HAS BEEN INFORMED THAT THERE IS NOT S U F F I C I E N T P E R S O N A L P RO P E RT Y TO S AT I S F Y T H E JUDGMENT, AND IF THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS DO HAVE SUFFICIENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TO SATISFY THE JUDGMENT, THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR OR DEBTORS SHOULD CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS GUARANTEE IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, C O U N T Y O F S N O H O M I S H , C I T Y O F S U LTA N , A N D I S DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL A LOT 4 OF REVISED SNOHOMISH COUNTY LARGE TRACT SEGREGATION 32 (8-80), REVISED AND RECORDED OCTOBER 24, 1986 IN VOLUME 23 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 92, UNDER SNOHOMISH COUNTY RECORDING NO(S) 8610245001, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON, BEING A PORTION IF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER AND OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER, ALL IN SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 27 NORTH, RANGE 8 E A S T, W. M , R E C O R D S O F S N O H O M I S H C O U N T Y, WA S H I N G TO N . PA R C E L B E A S E M E N T F O R ROA D A N D UTILITIES AS DELINEATED AND DEDICATED ON SNOHOMISH COUNTY LARGE TRACT SEGREGATION 32 (8-80), RECORDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1982 IN VOLUME 16 OF SURVEYS, PAGES 1 7 6 T H RO U G H 1 7 8 , I N C L U S I V E , U N D E R S N O H O M I S H COUNTY RECORDING NO(S) 8209305025 SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. A S S E S S O R ’ S P RO P E RT Y TA X PA R C E L O R AC C O U N T NUMBER: 27080200400600. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 36901 MANN RD, SULTAN, WA 98294. EDH675301 Published: December 24, 31, 2015; January 7, 14, 21, 28, 2016. TOWN OF INDEX An ordinance amending the 2015 budget was passed by the Index Council January 4th. Full text available. 360-793-2488. Published: January 6, 2016. EDH676704

young. He’s good-looking. He’s got the best smile in the world, and he’s a heroic athlete. “He is a shot in the arm for baseball. He is what this game needs right now. He is creating excitement and making headlines just by his presence. There hasn’t been anyone like that since...Reggie Jackson.” Griffey was a prodigy selected by the Mariners as a 17-year-old with the first pick in the 1987 draft. He grew up in the game as the son of outfielder Ken Griffey Sr., who spent 19 years in the big leagues. “My dad would have bopped me on the head when I was a kid,” Griffey once said, “if I came home bragging about what I did on the field. He only wanted to know what the team did.” Griffey’s father closed his career by playing for the Mariners, alongside his son, for 51 games in 1990-91. On Wednesday, Griffey Sr. explained how his

Public Notices

NOTICE OF APPLICATION & PUBLIC MEETING Subdivision Project Name: Final Plat Approval: Dunroven Ranch Plat Project Location: 8332 8th Street SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Project File No.: LUA2015-0123 Applicant: Mr. Chris Hemingson of Hillcrest Contracting Inc. Proposed Project Description: The request is to create an (16) sixteen-lot plat in the Urban Residential Zone. The 2.77 acre site will be developed with (16) sixteen single family detached units. The plat will be accessed from a new public road via 8th Street SE. The applicant will submit necessary financial securities and install all required improvements prior to the recording of the plat. The Lake Steven’s City Council will consider acceptance of the subdivision at a public meeting scheduled for Monday, January 25th at 7 pm at the Lake Stevens School District Educational Service Center. Permits Required: Subdivision Date of Application: December 29, 2015 Completeness Date: December 29, 2015 Notice of Application: January 7, 2015 Notice of City Council Meeting: January 7, 2015 Public Review and Comment Period: Interested parties may view the project file at the City of Lake Stevens Permit Center, 1812 Main Street, Monday-Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm. Please contact Planning and Community Development to receive more information or to submit written comments. Phone number: (425) 377-3219 Email: spratschner@lakestevenswa.gov Mailing address: P.O. Box 257, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Upon publication of the Notice of Application, there is a 14-day period comment period. The deadline for public comments is 5:00 PM, January 21, 2016. It is the City’s goal to comply with the American with Disabilities Act. The City offers its assistance to anyone with special needs, including the provision of TDD services. Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676703

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP Notice is hereby given that the Lake Stevens City Council will conduct a special meeting in accordance with RCW 42.30.080. Purpose of Meeting: Audit Exit Conference Meeting Place: Lake Stevens School District Educational Service Center (Admin. Bldg.) 12309 22nd Street NE, Lake Stevens, WA Meeting Date/Time: Tuesday, January 12, 2016 at 6:15 p.m. Notice Delivered/Mailed To: Lake Stevens City Council The Herald Posted: Lake Stevens City Hall Lake Stevens City Web Site The meeting is an Audit Exit Conference. The public is welcome to observe but will not be allowed to participate. Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676700 NOTICE OF INTENT CONSTRUCTION STORMWATER GENERAL PERMIT Lakewood School District #306, 17110 16th Drive NE, Marysville, Washington 98271, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, New Lakewood High School, is located at 17023 11th Avenue NE, in Arlington, in Snohomish County. This project involves 26.5 acres of soil disturbance for commercial construction activities. The receiving waters are Squalicum Creek and Possession Sound. This is a revision to the previously approved permit (WAR302900). The revision is to allow an increase in the area of soil disturbance, which was 3.3 acres. Any persons desiring to present their views to the Department of Ecology regarding this application may do so in writing within 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Comments shall be submitted to the Depar tment of Ecology. Any persons interested in Ecology’s action on this application may notify the department of their interest within thirty (30) days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater P.O. Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: January 7, 14, 2016. EDH676707 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE PLANNING COMMISSION REGARDING PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO AMC CHAPTER 20.08.010 - DEFINITIONS AND AMC CHAPTER 20.40.010-1 PERMISSIBLE USES Description of Proposed Project: The City of Arlington is proposing text amendments to Arlington Municipal Code (AMC) Chapter 20.08.010 (Definitions) and Chapter 20.40.010-1 (Permissible Uses). The amendments concern the I-502 Marijuana Producer/Processors growing canopy size and the total number of I-502 businesses that are allowed to operate within the City limits. Date of Public Hearing: January 21, 2016 Time of Public Hearing: 7:00PM Location of Public Hearing: City Council Chambers - 110 East 3rd Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Approvals Required: All changes to the Arlington Municipal Code require approval by the City Council. The City Council will take action on this item at a later date. Testimony: All persons have the right to submit written testimony to the appropriate permit-issuing authority and to appear at the public hearing to give testimony orally. Special Accommodations: The City of Arlington strives to provide accessible meetings for people with disabilities. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at 360-403-3441 or 1-800-833-8388 (TDD only) prior to a meeting date if special accommodations are needed. To Appeal a Decision: Only persons who submit written testimony or oral testimony to the permit-issuing authority may appeal the decision made by the City Council. C i t y S t a f f C o n t a c t : A m y R u s ko, A s s o c i a t e P l a n n e r, arusko@arlingtonwa.gov Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676674 OFFICIAL NOTICE OF A NOMINATION MEETING FOR THE PUGET SOUND SALMON COMMISSION Pursuant to chapter 15.65 RCW, notice is given that a public meeting will be held at the Washington State Department of Agriculture, 1111 Washington St. SE, 2nd Floor, Olympia, WA from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. on January 25, 2016 to nominate candidates for positions 2 and 5 on the Washington Puget Sound Salmon Commission. During the meeting, nominations may be made in person or telephonically by calling (360) 902-2043. Notice of this meeting has also been mailed to all affected producers entitled to nominate a candidate. For more information regarding how to submit a nomination by mail or the nomination process/meeting, please contact Teresa Norman at (360) 9022043 or tnorman@agr.wa.gov. Dated at Olympia, Washington this 7th day of January, 2016. Derek I. Sandison, Director Washington State Department of Agriculture Published: January 7, 2016. EDH675954

Port2Business Network and learn about doing business with the Port The Port of Everett invites you to join us for an evening of business networking. Get face-to-face time with Port staff, hear about upcoming business opportunities and gain an understanding of the Port’s long-term goals. Stop by our “doing business with us” table to learn about the rosters we use! When: January 21, 2016 | 4 - 6 P.M. Where: Port of Everett Blue Heron Room 1205 Craftsman Way, Everett, WA 98201 Light appetizers and refreshments will be served | No host bar Published: January 7, 2016. EDH676706

C5

son developed a preference for wearing his cap backward. “When Junior would come into the (Reds’) clubhouse (in the 1970s),” Griffey Sr. recalled, “he would always come and get my hat. “My hat was bigger than his head, so it would fall down over (his eyes) and he could never see when he was catching or throwing. “So he just decided to turn it around and put it on backwards. He got used to doing that. He would turn it around backwards to play catch.” Junior reached the big leagues in 1989 at age 19 and quickly became a fan favorite far beyond the Pacific Northwest. His fivetool skills came spiced with a sweet left-handed swing and a killer smile wrapped in youthful joy. “As long as I have fun playing,” Griffey once said, “the stats will take care of themselves.”

Public Notices Re: S15-86 Notice of Summons by Publication Glendon Nelson versus Kenworth Northwest Inc. Glendon Nelson, of Monroe, WA, is hereby notified by publication that he is summoned to appear at the Snohomish County District Court, Evergreen Division at 14414 179th Ave SE, Monroe, WA on January 29, 2016, at 9:30 a.m. EDH675103 Published: December 24, 31, 2015; January 7, 14, 21, 28, 2016.

Bids, RFQ’s, RFP’s CITY OF MILL CREEK INVITATION TO BID Sealed bids will be received by City of Mill Creek at 15728 Main Street, Mill Creek, Washington, until: Thursday, January 21, 2016 Time: 2:00 p.m. Project: 2016 City Hall Annex Building Tenant Improvement Project Engineers estimate is : $90,000-$110,000 The project involves office space remodel construction, with the scope including selective demolition and renovation to a 2600 sf office space. The work includes wall demolition and construction, carpet and pad removal, lighting replacement, door and trim installation, HVAC ducting fabrication and installation, fire sprinkler head relocation, counter installation, painting and misc. associated work. Project bid documents (Plans, Specifications, and Bidders List) are available at www.bxwa.com and clicking on “Posted Projects”, “Small Public Works Roster” and “City of Mill Creek”. A copy of the Bid package is available for viewing at the front counter of City Hall at 12728 Main St., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., M-F and project site is available for inspection by request. Call 425-7451891. EDH676657 Published: January 7, 10, 17, 2016. NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION GRANTS The Stillaguamish Tr ibe of Indians hereby announces the availability of funds to organizations, agencies or individuals who have been impacted by the Tribe’s ANGEL OF THE WINDS CASINO. Please download and complete the application in the PDF file at www.stillaguamish.com/news. Completed hardcopy applications are due at 3310 Smokey Point Drive, Arlington, WA or by email in a PDF file to Casey Stevens, Stillaguamish Tribal Planner at cstevens@stillaguamish.com by 1 PM, January 21st 2016. Published: December 31, 2015; January 7, 2016. EDH675575

Foreclosures TS #60128-23914-NJ-WA APN #005120-002-114-00 Reference Number: 200702220751 Abbreviated Legal: LT 114, BLK 2, MAY CREEK MTN VIEW TRACTS, DIV #2, VOL 17/18 Grantor: Tim Bradley, a single person Grantee: North Cascade Trustee Services Inc. Or iginal Beneficiar y: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LIBERTY FINANCIAL GROUP, INC. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE P U R S UA N T TO T H E R E V I S E D C O D E O F WA S H I N G TO N CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT D E L AY. C O N TA C T A H O U S I N G C O U N S E L O R O R A N ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homewownership/post_purchase _counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694 2 8 7 . W e b S i t e : http://www.hud.gove/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListActio n=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web Site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on February 5, 2016, at the hour of 10:00 AM at Snohomish County Courthouse, on the steps in front of the North entrance, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT(S) 1 1 4 , B L O C K 2 M AY C R E E K M O U N TA I N V I E W T R AC T S, DIVISION NUMBER 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 17 OF PLATS, PAGE(S) 18, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON APN: 005120-002-11440 More commonly known as: 41202 Ajer Drive, Gold Bar, WA 98251 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated February 15, 2007, recorded February 22, 2007, under Auditor’s File No. 200702220751, records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Tim Bradley, a single person, as Grantor, to TICOR TITLE COMPANY , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LIBERTY FINANCIAL GROUP, INC. as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2007-1 under an Assignment recorded on January 13, 2014 under Auditors File 201401130010 in the official records in the Office of the Recorder of Snohomish County, Washington. II. No action commenced b the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Payments $15,574.28 Suspense Balance $-18.38 interest Due $ 33,961.03 Escrow Payment $ 6,332.58 Grand Total $ 55,849.51 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $225,662.89, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and us are provided by statute. The above-described real proper ty will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 5, 2016. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by January 25, 2016 (11 day before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any t: me before January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured arid the Trustees fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified check from a stale or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after January 25, 2016 (11 days before the sale date, and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Unknown Spouse of Tim Bradley 41202 Ajer Drive Gold Bar, WA 98251 Tim Bradley 41202 Ajer Drive Gold Bar, WA 98251 Occupant 41202 Ajer Drive Gold Bar, WA 98251 by both first-class and certified mail on May 22, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees sate. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior t: the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. To access sale information, please go to salestrack.tdsf.com or call the automated sales line a: 888-988-6736. Dated: September 25, 2015 North Cascade Trustee Services Inc., Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By Trevor Brown, Authorized Signatory 801 Second Avenue, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104 Telephone 1-855-676-9686 TAC: 985480 PUB: 1/07/16, 1/28/16 EDH676602 Published: January 7, 28, 2016.


C6

Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald TODAY

Western WA Northwest Weather

42°33°

Mostly cloudy today. Partly cloudy tonight. Intervals of clouds and sun tomorrow. Saturday: clouds and sun, but cloudy near the Cascades.

Bellingham 43/31

Cloudy most of the time

TOMORROW

Mountains

43°31°

Oak Harbor 43/35

Intervals of clouds and sunshine

SATURDAY

Arlington Eastern WA 43/30 Granite Variable cloudiness Falls today; patchy fog during Marysvile 42/30 the morning. Low clouds 43/32 tonight; a flurry in the Langley EVERETT Lake Stevens east. Mostly cloudy 42/33 43/36 42/30 tomorrow. Mukilteo Snohomish Gold Bar 44/36 43/32 45/34 Lynnwood Mill Creek Index Monroe Sultan 43/34 43/31 43/34 43/32 45/34 Kirkland Redmond 44/33 44/33 Seattle Bellevue 43/33 44/34

43°32° 42°33° Partly sunny and chilly

MONDAY

Mount Vernon 43/31

Stanwood 43/32

Intervals of clouds and sun

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy today. Freezing level near 2,500 feet. Partly cloudy tonight. Clouds and sun tomorrow. Saturday: clouds and sun.

42°38°

Port Orchard 43/34

Mostly sunny and chilly

Puget Sound

Wind light and variable today. Seas under a foot. Visibility clear. Wind light and variable tonight. Seas 1-2 feet. Partly cloudy.

Everett High Low High Low

Almanac

Time

4:10 a.m. 8:52 a.m. 2:03 p.m. 9:18 p.m.

Feet

10.5 7.3 10.8 -0.6

Port Townsend High Low High Low

Time

Everett

Arlington

Whidbey Island

Air Quality Index

Planets

Sun and Moon

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 50/39 Normal high/low ....................... 45/36 Records (1984/1982) ................. 58/10 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 29.62 F 24 hours ending 5 p.m. .............. Trace Month to date ............................. 0.26” Normal month to date ............... 0.85” Year to date ................................. 0.26” Normal year to date ................... 0.85”

Yesterday’s offender ....... Particulates

Good: 0-50; Moderate: 51-100, Unhealthy (for sensitive groups): 101-150; Unhealthy: 151-200; Very unhealthy: 201300; Hazardous: 301-500 WA Dept. of Environmental Quality

More Information Road Reports:

www.wsdot.wa.gov

Avalanche Reports:

www.nwac.noaa.gov

Burn Ban Information: Puget Sound: 1-800-595-4341 Website: www.pscleanair.org Forecasts and graphics, except the KIRO 5-day forecast, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 48/28 Normal high/low ....................... 45/36 Records (2015/1979) ................... 54/9 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 29.65 F 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.06” Month to date ............................. 0.12” Normal month to date ............... 1.18” Year to date ................................. 0.12” Normal year to date ................... 1.18” Rises Mercury ..... 8:37 a.m. Venus ......... 5:10 a.m. Mars ........... 1:50 a.m. Jupiter ...... 10:19 p.m. Saturn ........ 5:20 a.m. Uranus ..... 11:37 a.m. Neptune ... 10:19 a.m. Pluto ........... 7:41 a.m.

Sets ........ 5:46 p.m. ........ 2:05 p.m. ...... 12:19 p.m. ...... 11:00 a.m. ........ 2:10 p.m. ...... 12:37 a.m. ........ 9:01 p.m. ........ 4:27 p.m.

World Weather City

Today Hi/Lo/W Amsterdam 46/40/r Athens 61/48/sh Baghdad 67/53/pc Bangkok 92/76/pc Beijing 32/15/s Berlin 29/27/pc Buenos Aires 83/64/pc Cairo 71/55/c Dublin 43/36/pc Hong Kong 68/60/pc Jerusalem 62/44/c Johannesburg 99/63/s London 48/38/pc

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 45/39/c 62/48/s 67/48/r 91/77/pc 33/12/s 37/28/s 81/62/pc 66/56/pc 43/36/pc 68/62/s 50/44/sh 90/59/c 49/40/pc

Feet

4:14 a.m. 7:55 a.m. 1:03 p.m. 8:19 p.m.

8.1 6.8 8.4 -0.7

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 51/36 Normal high/low ....................... 46/36 Records (2015/1982) ................... 55/8 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 29.68 F 24 hours ending 5 p.m. .............. Trace Month to date ............................. 0.06” Normal month to date ............... 0.42” Year to date ................................. 0.06” Normal year to date ................... 0.42”

Sunrise today ....................... Sunset tonight ..................... Moonrise today ................... Moonset today .....................

New Jan 9

First Jan 16

Full Jan 23

7:58 a.m. 4:32 p.m. 5:28 a.m. 2:58 p.m.

Last Jan 31

City

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Madrid 58/50/sh 56/45/sh Manila 86/75/s 87/75/s Mexico City 70/42/pc 71/40/s Moscow 11/-1/c 9/3/c Paris 53/36/r 46/39/r Rio de Janeiro 91/73/pc 93/76/sh Riyadh 73/53/s 78/57/pc Rome 57/49/pc 62/52/sh Singapore 89/76/t 88/76/t Stockholm 18/10/c 23/19/sn Sydney 73/64/sh 75/65/s Tokyo 53/39/pc 51/40/pc Toronto 36/22/pc 38/31/r

Washington Bellingham Colville Ellensburg Forks Friday Harbor Moses Lake Ocean Shores Olympia Port Angeles Pullman Spokane Seattle Tacoma Walla Walla Wenatchee Yakima Idaho Boise Coeur d’Alene Sun Valley Oregon Astoria Bend Eugene Klamath Falls Medford Portland

35/27/c 31/20/c 30/10/sf

49/35/c 38/22/pc 45/31/pc 35/15/pc 49/31/pc 43/31/c

50/36/pc 37/22/pc 46/32/pc 32/21/pc 48/34/c 43/33/pc

Today Hi/Lo/W Albany 36/17/s Albuquerque 42/26/c Amarillo 53/29/pc Anchorage 24/19/pc Atlanta 55/45/c Atlantic City 44/36/pc Austin 71/41/pc Baltimore 44/30/pc Baton Rouge 63/54/r Billings 23/14/sf Birmingham 55/47/c Boise 38/28/c Boston 43/29/s Buffalo 38/22/pc Burlington, VT 34/18/pc Charleston, SC 60/47/c Charleston, WV 51/28/pc Charlotte 52/38/c Cheyenne 35/14/sn Chicago 36/34/c Cincinnati 45/34/pc Cleveland 42/27/pc Columbus, OH 43/30/pc Dallas 67/44/pc Denver 33/18/sn Des Moines 38/32/r Detroit 40/27/pc El Paso 57/39/c Evansville 49/42/c Fairbanks 4/-5/s Fargo 34/21/sf Fort Myers 77/61/pc Fresno 53/40/sh Grand Rapids 37/33/c Greensboro 49/33/c Hartford 40/18/pc Honolulu 83/68/s Houston 71/50/pc Indianapolis 43/34/c

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 37/28/pc 38/24/sf 46/25/pc 28/26/c 55/49/pc 48/41/pc 70/41/pc 47/36/r 73/56/pc 16/7/sf 60/50/pc 35/27/c 41/35/pc 40/34/r 36/28/pc 64/51/sh 51/40/r 51/39/r 21/9/sn 42/36/r 51/44/r 42/39/r 44/39/r 68/42/pc 22/11/sn 39/25/sn 41/37/r 50/35/c 54/46/c 6/-4/pc 22/0/sf 76/65/sh 55/42/pc 40/38/r 48/39/r 39/30/pc 83/68/s 70/51/t 47/44/c

Herald Writer

RENTON — Early indications suggest Beast Mode will be back in business Sunday. Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch returned to practice Wednesday, and after getting their first look at Lynch in seven weeks, the Seahawks were optimistic they’ll have him back for Sunday’s NFC wild-card playoff game against the Minnesota Vikings. “He looked good,” Seahawks offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell said of Lynch following Wednesday’s practice at the Virginia Mason Athletic Center. “It’s good to have him back out there. We’ll take it a day at a time and see if he continues to move through the week. We’re looking forward to having him.” Lynch, Seattle’s star ball carrier, missed the previous seven games because of an abdominal injury. He underwent surgery Nov. 27 to repair the problem. Lynch hadn’t practiced since, and the Seahawks

carries in his first seven games. Since then, the Seahawks’ offense has been led by quarterback Russell Wilson, who put up historic numbers while Lynch was out, throwing for 24 touchdowns with just one interception in the seven games Lynch missed. Nevertheless, Seahawks assistant head coach/ offensive line coach Tom Cable, who coordinates Seattle’s run game, said Lynch has eased seamlessly back into the offense. “He’s been fantastic,” Cable said. “Exactly what we said, he’s adapted very well. I think he’s done a great job of recognizing where this team is at and its vibe. He’s come in and went right back to work, and it’s been really great.” Seattle’s running game did not suffer in Lynch’s absence, averaging 148.1 yards per game in the seven contests Lynch missed. Christine Michael led the way among Seattle’s running backs the past three weeks, picking up 192 yards on 39 carries.

Whole flock returns Lynch isn’t the only Se-

As long as they win!

LOCKETT POSTER INSIDE THE DAILY HERALD SATURDAY, JAN. 9

Additional posters can be purchased at your local grocery store or: 1500763

1800 41st St. • Everett, WA 98203

ahawk who returned to practice from injury. In fact a whole slew of players who have been out injured were back on the field Wednesday. Strong safety Kam Chancellor, who missed the previous three games because of a bruised tailbone, practiced in full. Chancellor returned to practice last week and was close to returning, but ended up sitting out Sunday’s 36-6 victory at Arizona. Also back at practice were tackle Russell Okung (calf), guard J.R. Sweezy (concussion) and tight end Luke Willson (concussion), who were unable to practice last week and sat out Sunday. Cornerback Jeremy Lane (oblique), who left Sunday’s game injured, also was back at practice. All four participated in a limited capacity, but Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll said they all should be able to make it back for this week’s game.

Lockett honored Seattle receiver Tyler Lockett was honored by the NFL on Wednesday as the NFC Special Teams Player of the Week for Week 17. Lockett set a Seahawks franchise record for punt-return yardage in a game when he returned four punts for 139 yards Sunday against Arizona. Lockett had returns of 66, 42 and 31 yards as he broke the previous franchise record of 106 yards set by Charlie Rogers in 1999.

3 Rooms Cleaned Cleaning

Got LoveSpill? Your Carpet CallAgain! us!

t Cleaning Carpe

Roseburg Salem Montana Butte Great Falls Missoula Alaska Anchorage

50/34/pc 44/30/c

50/37/pc 44/30/pc

25/0/sf 17/4/sn 29/17/sn

18/6/c 12/-2/sf 24/16/sf

24/19/pc

28/26/c

Today Hi/Lo/W Jackson, MS 56/48/r Kansas City 43/37/r Knoxville 52/37/pc Las Vegas 52/37/sh Little Rock 50/45/r Los Angeles 58/45/t Louisville 50/41/pc Lubbock 56/33/pc Memphis 53/47/r Miami 78/64/pc Milwaukee 37/35/i Minneapolis 35/32/sf Mobile 60/48/r Montgomery 58/48/c Newark 44/33/s New Orleans 67/53/r New York City 43/34/s Norfolk 53/45/c Oakland 56/43/c Oklahoma City 58/32/pc Omaha 37/33/c Orlando 75/59/pc Palm Springs 59/43/sh Philadelphia 43/31/pc Phoenix 57/43/r Pittsburgh 42/22/pc Portland, ME 37/21/pc Portland, OR 43/31/c Providence 43/26/pc

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 69/53/pc 43/30/c 56/40/c 53/36/pc 64/47/pc 59/48/pc 56/48/sh 53/29/pc 63/50/pc 79/68/pc 39/35/r 34/21/sn 70/55/pc 65/51/pc 42/36/pc 71/59/pc 44/38/pc 54/46/c 56/47/pc 53/32/pc 35/22/c 77/61/sh 62/43/pc 45/36/pc 56/42/r 42/36/r 34/27/pc 43/33/pc 44/33/pc

City

Barrow 8/-5/pc Fairbanks 4/-5/s Juneau 32/27/s British Columbia Chilliwack 43/34/pc Kelowna 37/26/i Vancouver 42/30/pc Victoria 42/33/pc City

Today Hi/Lo/W Raleigh 50/37/c Rapid City 23/12/c Reno 38/22/sn Richmond 45/31/c Sacramento 55/40/sh St. Louis 48/43/r St. Petersburg 75/62/pc Salt Lake City 37/27/sn San Antonio 73/45/pc San Diego 60/51/r San Francisco 55/44/c San Jose 57/43/sh Stockton 55/41/sh Syracuse 35/17/pc Tallahassee 65/54/c Tampa 75/64/pc Tempe 56/42/r Topeka 44/36/sh Tucson 53/38/r Tulsa 56/37/r Washington, DC 41/33/pc Wichita 49/35/sh Winston-Salem 49/33/c Yuma 63/43/sh

9/5/pc 6/-4/pc 34/28/pc 43/29/s 32/24/s 42/29/s 41/33/s Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 52/42/r 23/3/sf 37/28/pc 49/37/c 55/45/pc 55/44/sh 77/66/sh 33/27/sf 72/46/pc 60/52/pc 55/48/pc 57/48/pc 55/46/pc 37/29/c 71/56/pc 77/66/sh 54/40/r 43/29/c 50/34/r 55/34/c 47/37/r 44/28/c 46/39/r 61/41/pc

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Enjoy a healthy home with our Environmentally preferred GREEN cleaning system that is Safe for your Family and Whole House Pets

• Dries soft-residue free • No soaking carpet • Fast drying (about 1 hour) • No toxic chemicalschild & pet safe • Guaranteed deep cleaning

Redding 51/39

(for the 48 contiguous states) High: Naples, FL ............................... 77 Low: Berlin, NH ............................... -12

3 Rooms (Up to $ 600 TILE &Cleaning GROUT C$89 LEANING 99Sqft)

1492350

SEAHAWK POSTERS ARE BACK!

Everett 42/33

Calgary 17/1

National Extremes

Seahawks optimistic Lynch will play Sunday weren’t able to monitor Lynch’s rehabilitation as Lynch did his rehab in San Francisco. But Lynch returned to the Seahawks’ facility Monday, and he was a full participant in practice Wednesday, suggesting he may be able not only to return to the field when Seattle plays at Minnesota on Sunday, but also handle a full workload. “If he’s going, that’s what I would expect,” Bevell said when asked if it was realistic for Lynch to carry the ball 20-25 times Sunday. “I expect him to be full-go, full-speed, and just be like we normally are.” What’s normal for the Seahawks’ offense has changed since Lynch went down. Seattle has been a run-first team since Lynch arrived via trade with Buffalo midway through the 2010 season. In his six seasons with the Seahawks, Lynch has rushed for 6,347 yards and 57 touchdowns on 1,457 carries. However, Lynch dealt with nagging injuries early in the season, managing just 417 yards on 111

Port Angeles

Kelowna 37/26

33/26

38/28/c 34/26/c 32/21/c

City

Bellingham

43/31

44/33 43/29/pc Medicine Hat Seattle 16/4 35/24/c 43/33 Spokane Libby Tacoma 34/24/c 35/23 34/25 42/30 46/30/pc Yakima Coeur d’Alene 39/26 42/35/pc Portland 34/26 43/31 Great Falls Walla Walla 34/27/c Newport Lewiston Missoula 17/4 35/30 46/39/pc 50/36 41/34 29/17 Salem 42/27/pc 44/30 Helena Pendleton 43/31/pc 21/4 34/28 33/24/sn Eugene Bend 45/31 Butte 32/22/c 38/22 25/0 Ontario 43/33/pc 37/23 Medford 43/29/pc Boise 49/31 35/27/c 38/28 Klamath Falls 36/26/c Eureka 35/15 Idaho Falls Twin Falls 37/26/c 53/43 32/21

43/31/c 38/27/c 36/23/c 48/32/c 43/35/c 35/28/c 46/39/c 42/30/c 44/33/c 34/28/sf 34/25/c 43/33/c 42/30/c 35/30/c 38/28/c 39/26/c

SEAHAWKS | Notebook

By Nick Patterson

Vancouver

42/30

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

National Weather

Auburn 44/32

Tacoma 42/30

Tides

City

Services include: Pre-spotting, de-odorizing 5andRooms Groomingand (up toHallway 600 sq. ft.) Includes: Cannot (up to combine 1500 sq.coupons ft.)

89

$

179

$ Whole House

Small furniture moving only. Stairs extra. Cannot combine coupons

Cleaning $ Upholstery Cannot combine coupons Cleaning

169

Includes: 5 Rooms and Hallway (up to 1500 sq. ft.) Small furniture moving only. Stairs extra

Upholstery Cleaning Sofa 75 • Love Seat 65 $

$

$ $ $ • Love Seat 65 ReclinerSofa or Chair75 50 • Minimum Charges Apply Recliner or Chair $50 • Minimum Charges apply

Cannot Looseback backcushions cushionsextra extra Cannot combine combine coupons coupons••Loose

oxypowercarpetcleaning.com

OxyPower 360-658-4156 Licensed • Bonded • Insured

See Reviews on Angie’s List

Seahawks From Page C1

are many who expect Sunday’s contest to play out much like the Week 13 meeting did. Just don’t count the Seahawks and Vikings among those numbers. “Obviously every team is different from that point,” Vikings free safety Harrison Smith said. “I think we just kept getting better. We’ve still had games that we didn’t play great in, but we’ve learned from each week, and we’ve gotten a few guys back from getting banged up. We’re excited about where we are and what’s in front of us, but we have a lot of work to do before Sunday.” One of the big differences this time around is Minnesota will be much closer to full strength defensively. In the first meeting, nose tackle Linval Joseph and strong safety Andrew Sendejo sat out because of injuries, while Smith and linebacker Anthony Barr both departed during the first quarter and did not return. Those are four of Minnesota’s best defensive players, and without them the Seahawks eviscerated a Vikings defense that came into the game ranked second in the NFL in fewest points allowed. However, Sendejo, Barr and Smith have all since returned, and Joseph was back at practice Wednesday in a limited capacity and could play Sunday. Having those players back will make the task much more difficult for Seattle’s offense. “When you’re missing three starters, it has an effect on any team,” Seahawks offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell said. “Those are some really solid players for them. They really missed Smith in the back end. He’s really a nice ball hawk, he searches for the ball, he has great ball

skills, plays from sideline to sideline, so he makes a lot of nice plays for them. Barr is really their leader in the linebacking core, so you’re going to miss guys like those guys. It has an impact on their defense.” The other thing that will likely look different this time around is Minnesota’s use of Adrian Peterson. Peterson just won his third NFL rushing title, finishing the season with 1,485 yards on 327 carries. However, against Seattle Peterson managed just 18 yards on eight carries as Minnesota found itself in an early hole and was forced to abandon the running game. The eight carries were Peterson’s fewest in a game this season, and the 18 yards were the third fewest in Peterson’s nine-year career. The Seahawks are certain the Vikings won’t allow Peterson’s presence to be removed from the game so easily in the second go-around. “I expect them to run the ball way more than they did last time,” Seahawks linebacker Bobby Wagner said. “Having a guy like Adrian Peterson touch the ball eight times, I don’t think that’s going to happen twice. They’ll give him the ball more.” “They’re just a really good football team and you better play good on the day you play them or they’re going to get you,” Carroll added. “Last week they played a very conservative game against Green Bay and waited for their opportunities, cashed in on the turnovers, and put together a fantastic championship game. That always concerns me a lot because they’re not giving you a lot of opportunities to do things.” The Seahawks took advantage of every opportunity they had the previous time they played the Vikings. They’ll need to do the same Sunday to come out of Minnesota with another victory.


Home & Garden SECTION D

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/HOME

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

1.

2.

3.

4. PHOTOS BY BILL HENDRICKS / KLYN NURSERIES / TNS

1. Mammillaria hahniana “Old Woman Cactus” gets its name from the white needles. Not all succulents are cacti (a common misconception) but all cacti are a distinct family of succulents and are distinguished by their signature spines. 2. The vivid blooms on Lobivia cinnabarina v. walterspeilii are a bonus on this cactus. 3. When choosing an easy-care aloe, look for a variegated or textured variety for something new. Pictured here is Aloe “Quicksilver.” 4. Crassulas include the familiar jade plants as well as stacked varieties, or the fuschia-colored C. pubescens.

A succulent feast

The high-style, easy-care plants are showing up everywhere By Teresa Woodard Chicago Tribune

Take a look around Bill Hendricks’ collection of 4,000 succulents, and it’s easy to understand the recent craze for these high-style, easy-care plants. Ones with rosette shapes are taking center stage in container designs and bridal bouquets. More architectural forms are becoming the go-to accessory for today’s mantels and tabletops. And still other strappy types are being tucked in living walls, galvanized frames, topiary forms, birch logs, thrift-store stilettos, vintage spice tins, fairy gardens, green rooftops and even doghouse tops. What trendy homeowners are now discovering, the 72-year-old Hendricks

has known for decades. “I’ve always been fascinated with succulents,” he said. “I’m fascinated by their diversity, their color and ‘wow,’ and their stories from different places all over the world.” At age 7, Hendricks says, he bought his first succulent, a thick-leaved aloe plant, at a Cleveland dime store. He credits that still-living aloe plant with spurring his lifelong love of plants and leading him to a successful career in the nursery business. Today, he is president of the 500-acre Klyn Nurseries, a wholesale nursery in Perry, Ohio, and was named 2014 Grower of the Year by Nursery Management magazine. While his nursery grows 1,850 species of landscape plants, Hendricks says, he keeps

the succulents as a hobby. “I’m not into sports; I’m into plants,” Hendricks said. “That led me to an interest in geography and travel. So when I travel, I travel to see plants.” Hendricks explains that all cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are cacti. Succulents are plants that have the ability to store water within their leaves, stems or roots. These adaptations allow the plants to survive long stretches without water. (Cacti, on the other hand, are a distinct family of succulents and are distinguished by their signature spines.) Today, Hendricks grows succulents and cacti in a 100-by-30-foot greenhouse at Klyn Nurseries. All are meticulously labeled and grown

mostly in clay pots packed onto raised tables, with a few hanging from containers.

Growing tips Hendricks, who is president of the Midwest Cactus and Succulent Society and a frequent lecturer on succulents, offers advice on growing succulents. He not only draws lessons from personal experience but also his library of some 2,000 succulent articles and books: ■■Plant succulents in containers with drainage holes. If there are no holes, add some with a drill or use a liner pot with holes. See SUCCULENTS, Page D3

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES | Terry and Kim Kovel

Spindles boost value of Windsor chair T KOVELS

This comb-back Windsor chair was made in Pennsylvania in the late 18th century. It auctioned in 2015 for $1,003 even though it had some breaks in the wood and added metal braces that were used for repairs.

he Windsor chair was first made in the late 17th century in England and about 1730 in America. The chairs are similar, but the English chair legs are less splayed and only the English chair has a splat (a shaped piece of wood) as part of the back. American chairs are made with spindles for the back and to hold the arms. There are many kinds of Windsor chairs with descriptive names like brace back, hoop back, arrow back, fanback, bow back, low back, comb back and scroll back. And some have added parts like rockers or writing arms. Early chairs usually were painted because several types of wood were used. “Brown furniture” from the 18th and 19th centuries

INSIDE: Plant of Merit, 2

|

is selling for low prices today. The best have original paint, but watch out for repaints. The chair with a nine-spindle back probably is older than one with four spindles. The more spindles on an antique Windsor, the earlier and better the chair. Brunk Auctions in Asheville, North Carolina sold a comb-back Windsor with some repairs in 2015 for $1,003. Q: I’m hoping you can shed some light on a floor lamp I have. The base is stamped “Miller Company” and one of the parts is stamped “Miller U-Dezine.” The base and column are made of pot metal or bronze. Can you give me any information about this lamp and its maker? A: Edward Miller founded this

Calendar, 2

|

Puzzles, 4

lamp company in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1844. Candlesticks, lamps and other products were made. A metal rolling mill was built later. A 1930 ad for Miller’s “U-De-Zine” read “You design the lamp you want,” and called it “The Lamp That Is Made In Separate Parts For You To Put Together.” There were several ways to assemble the parts. A table lamp could be changed to a floor lamp, or a floor lamp to a bridge lamp. In 1985, the lighting division was sold. The company was bought by an affiliate of Diehl Metall, a German company in 2000. Q: My Lane cedar chest pictures Molly Pitcher firing her husband’s cannon after he

|

Dear Abby, 5

|

collapsed. The serial number is 2575150. Can you tell me when it was made? A: You can find out when your Lane chest was made by reversing the serial number. Your chest was made on May 15, 1975 (05/15/75) at factory No. 2. Lane cedar chests made before 1987 have the old style locks that can latch shut and trap a child inside. If you haven’t already replaced the lock, you should contact the manufacturer and they will send you a new replacement safety lock. You can find the form to request a replacement at www.lanefurniture.com/about/ product-safety. See KOVEL, Page D3

Short Takes, 6


D2 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

What to do in your garden for January Y

up it’s time again for my monthly checklist. I know what you’re thinking: Can’t this guy just kick back for a month and give us a break? No need to get too worried. January is a pretty laid back month for the garden. Here are some thoughts to ponder: Visit a garden center this month. It always amazes me how fast the nursery fills up with plant material in January. Long before the average northwest gardener gets into gear, garden centers are receiving new stock. By

STEVE SMITH THE WHISTLING GARDENER the middle of January, we have potted more than a thousand new roses as well as hundreds of trees, berry plants and hardy vegetables such as rhubarb and asparagus, all of which can actually be planted in

the garden this month. In our mild maritime climate, we plant nearly all year, as long as it is above freezing and the ground isn’t saturated. Examine your garden for pests. This is a good time to wander through the garden looking for tent caterpillar egg cases. They look like small ½-inch gray globs of Styrofoam attached to the limbs. You can rub a few off with your fingers but if you see lots of them then you will need to apply a dormant spray. Copper and oil mixed together will do a good

keep a journal, which is one of those resolutions that “real gardeners” never quite get to. Do some indoor gardening. If your house still smells like Thanksgiving turkey or Christmas ham then consider bringing in a few house plants. They are the consummate living air freshener. Keep them as close to the windows as possible and don’t overfeed or overwater them until you see signs of new growth in the spring. Get ready to prune. It’s that time of year to tackle the pruning chores.

Consider attending our pruning class at 10 a.m. Jan. 9 at Sunnyside Nursery, 3915 Sunnyside Blvd., Marysville. We will offer this class again Jan. 23. Finally, get excited. This coming season should be a dandy. The drought is over so we can repair any damage from the long hot summer and plant like a maniac. I don’t know about you, but my fingers are already starting to itch. Steve Smith is owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached online at info@ sunnysidenursery.net.

high school students. Sponsored by WSU Extension. Register and learn more at http://ext100.wsu.edu/ skagit/countrylivingexpo.

ies.BrownPaperTickets.com. For more information visit snohomish. wsu.edu/growing-groceries, call Kate Halstead at 425-357-6024 or email khalstead@wsu.edu.

CALENDAR

PLANT OF MERIT

“Soils, Compost and Mulches”: Speaker Ladd Smith, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 8, Mukilteo Presbyterian Church Social Hall, 4514 84th St. SW, Mukilteo. Smith is the first speaker in the WSU Master Gardener Foundation’s Sustainable Gardening Winter Speaker Series. Lectures are Fridays at Mukilteo Presbyterian Church social hall, 4514 84th St. SW, Mukilteo. The entire series of lectures is $85. Single lecture tickets are $20 at the door on a first come/first serve basis. Other speakers: Jan. 22: Richie Steffen, “Perennials for Difficult Sites and Year-Round Beauty.” Feb. 5: Susie Egan, “Shade Gardening: Bringing Beauty to Your Garden With Shade-Loving Plants.” Feb. 12: Sam Benowitz, “Unusual Fruits Proven to Thrive in your Garden.” Feb. 26: Linda Chalker-Scott, “The Landscape Below Ground.” March 11: Ciscoe Morris, “Everything’s Going to Pot!” March 18: Colin McCrate, “Maximizing Your Yield: Increasing Efficiency and Productivity in the Home Vegetable Garden.” April 1: Emily Bishton “WildlifeFriendly Gardening for Beauty and Sustainability.” SANDRA SCHUMACHER

Learn more at www.garden lectures.com.

Lawson False Cypress grows best in full sun.

What: Lawson False Cypress ( Chamaecyparis lawsonia) is an evergreen tree of extraordinary beauty. Its flat blue-green foliage seems to reach upward, creating a tree with a very thick but soft appearance. Some of the blue color appears whitish-gray, which gives the illusion of snow. Its bark is reddish brown and it produces both male and female flowers on the

job of suffocating the eggs and controlling fungus problems without causing collateral damage to the rest of the garden. Plan, plan, plan. This is when seed, bulb and plant catalogs come in the mail by the truckload. When you do visit a nursery, don’t hesitate to bring that “want list,” inspired by the catalogs, with you. We enjoy talking about new stuff just as much as you do. Also, this is a good time to review your journal so you don’t make the same mistakes again. Assuming you actually

Snohomish Garden Club: Talk by Lisa Taylor, garden educator and speaker who works with gardeners of all ages, 7 p.m. Jan. 11, Snohomish Senior Center, 506 Fourth Street. More at www.snohomish gardenclub.com.

same branch, but different branchlets. Size: Approximately 100 feet high and 18 feet wide over time Where: This tree performs best in full sun. See it: WSU Master Gardener Discovery Garden, WSU NW Washington Research & Education Center, 16650 Highway 536, Mount Vernon

Artifact ID Day: 1 to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 9, Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, 4331 Memorial Way NE, Seattle. Have any intriguing objects? Where did they come from and what’s their story? Curators, collections managers, and volunteers from ethnology and archaeology divisions will identify visitors’ natural

— Sandra Schumacher

Share your events To submit an item for the Home & Garden calendar, e-mail abrown@ heraldnet.com. and cultural artifacts. Bring Native American, Asia and Pacific Islands cultural objects, artifacts, rocks, feathers, shells and fossils. No appraisals will be given. Limit of three items per person. Past discoveries include a dinosaur egg and a 5,000-year-old stone tool. Included with museum admission. More at www.burkemuseum.org. Monroe Garden Club: Brian Pierce of The Garden Guy will speak about invasive plants, noon Jan. 11, Monroe United Methodist Church, 342 S. Lewis St. Donations for the Sky Valley Food Bank accepted. For more information, call 360-863-6160. Indoor Gardening with Unusual Houseplants: 11 a.m. Jan. 16, Christianson’s Nursery, 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon. Christianson’s house plant buyer Eric Andrews talks about strange, uncommon and unusual house plants and covers the care and feeding of these interesting plants that are easier to grow than one would think. Reservations required. Cost is $8. More at www. christiansonsnursery.com. Country Living Expo and Cattlemen’s Winterschool: Attend classes on numerous topics (170 to choose from), network with other farmers, and visit with 170 local agricultural business owners. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. for breakfast snacks, classes begin at 9 a.m. Jan. 30, Stanwood High School, 7400 272nd St. NW, Stanwood. Cost is $75 for adults, $40 for middle and

Snohomish Conservation District Plant Sale: Buy native plants 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 27, Evergreen State Fairgrounds, commercial building, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe. Order in advance before 5 p.m. Feb. 17 at www. theplantsale.org. Northwest Flower & Garden Show: Feb. 17-21, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle. Seminars, vendors, 23 display gardens. More at www.gardenshow. com. Everett Garden Show: March 11-13, Xfinity Arena, 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett. More at www. everetthomegardenshow.com. Growing Groceries Education Series: 7 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays, WSU Snohomish County Extension’s Cougar Auditorium, 600 128th St. SE, Everett, inside McCollum Park. Jan. 20: What to Grow in Western Washington. Variety and technique are key to successful harvests. Feb. 3: Small Fruits, Big Harvests. Strawberries, cane berries, blueberries, and other small fruit. Feb. 17: Small Space & Vertical Gardening. No matter how little space you have, you can grow food. March 2: Early Start = Early Harvest. What to plant and how to get a jump on the season. March 16: Good Bugs, Bad Bugs, & Pollinators. Learn who’s who and how to attract the good guys. April 6: Seed Starting & Growing Transplants. Save money and raise the varieties that do best here. April 20: Weeding and Watering. Get smart about weeds and water; save time, harvest more. April 27: Growing the Heat Lovers in the Chilly NW. Learn the tricks to growing ripe tomatoes, peppers and melons. Register online at GrowingGrocer-

NURSERY CLASSES These local nurseries feature classes, guest speakers and special events throughout the year, often for no charge. Check their websites or call for details. Christianson’s Nursery and Greenhouse: 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon; 360-466-3821; www.christiansonsnursery.com. Falling Water Gardens: Free classes in creating and caring for a pond, 17516 Highway 203, Monroe; 360-863-1400, www. fallingwatergardens.com. McAuliffe’s Valley Nursery: 11910 Springhetti Road, Snohomish; 360-862-1323; www. mcauliffesvalleynursery.com. Molbak’s Garden & Home: 13625 NE 175th St., Woodinville; 425-483-5000; molbaks.com. Li’l Sprout Nursery: 17414 Bothell-Everett Highway, Mill Creek; 425-482-5276; www. lilsproutnursery.com. Upcoming topics include hydroponic gardening, houseplant propagation, garden clean-up, cooking with herbs. Pine Creek Nursery: 23225 Sofie Road, Monroe; 360-8638866; www.pinecreeknursery. com. Sky Nursery: 18528 Aurora Ave. N., Shoreline; 206-5464851; www.skynursery.com. Sunnyside Nursery: 3915 Sunnyside Blvd., Marysville; 425334-2002; www.sunnysidenursery.net. Classes are free. Wight’s Home & Garden: 5026 196th St. SW, Lynnwood; 425-775-3636; www.wights.com.

What to do before installing a floating floor

1497338

Practical, esthetic and economical, floating floors are an extremely popular option with many homeowners. You’d like to use this type of flooring in your home? Read on.

JANUARY UPDATE YOUR HOME WITH NEW FLOORS! Choose a good quality-floating floor, especially if you plan on installing it in a busy area.

Quality counts When buying a floating floor, choose a good quality product, especially if you want to put it in a busy area such as a hallway. Damage to a single board could require you to completely remove your floor in order to install just one new plank. Unpack and wait Once you have purchased your flooring, place the boards in the room where they are to be installed. Open the packaging and wait at least three days. The reason? The wood will have time to adapt to the temperature and humidity of the room, making it easier to install. That said, floating floors are not recommended for high humidity areas such as basements.

Flooring

Hardware

Prepare the surface After removing the existing flooring and the baseboards, trim the bottom of the doorframe. Using a saw, remove the equivalent of the thickness of your new floor plus an extra 1/16 inch. Then install the subfloor membrane according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Now you’re ready to install the flooring.

Use a professional renovator if you’re not used to doing this kind of manual work. They have the necessary experience and equipment to install your floating floor properly.

TO ADVERTISE Call Alicia at 425-339-3207 or email ajones@heraldnet.com Landscaping

EAST VALLEY

SAND & GRAVEL CO. DBA Penny Lee Trucking, Inc.

2601 Colby • Downtown Everett

425-259-6088 Mon. – Fri. 8:00-5:30 PM Sat. 10:00-4:00 PM

www.abbeycarpet.com

FREE!

Auto & Door Mats (Limit 2)

1497347

1497345

OVER 35 PRODUCTS

510 2nd St. | Snohomish, WA

360-568-1544

CRUSHED & WASHED ROCKS LANDSCAPE MATERIAL RECYCLED ASPHALT & CONCRETE PIT RUN & SCREENED BARROW GRAVEL CHIPS DISPOSAL SITE FOR CLEAN DIRT/ASPHALT/CONCRETE

Same Day Deliveries

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-7 Sat. 8-6 • Sun. 9-6

mcdanielsdoitcenter.com

FREE 4OZ ZEP QUICK CLEAN DISINFECTANT Expires 1/14/16

29 YEARS

of Outstanding Reputation for Quality Products and Service 1497343

360-403-7520

5802 Cemetery Rd • Arlington, WA 98223 www.eastvalleysandandgravel.com


The Daily Herald

Thursday, 01.07.2016 D3

Steps you can take to save energy costs By Alan J. Heavens

The Philadelphia Inquirer

Where does the time go? Just when you finally get the central air-conditioning working well enough to make the house comfortable, cold weather shows up and settles in to stay. Here are some ideas that might help cut your energy costs this winter, courtesy of Sunnova, the solarpower company:

Hot water: Does your house really need hot water when no one’s home? Probably not. Consider installing a timer on your water heater, to turn it off when you’re not there. Use cold water instead of hot when washing clothes. The EPA’s Energy Star program says almost 90 percent of the energy consumed by washing machines goes to heating the water.

Electronics: Put electronics — your computer, for example — in sleep or hibernation mode when you’re not using them. Unplug certain electronics and appliances to avoid their consuming “phantom power,” which means they’re still sucking in energy from the outlet even though they aren’t in use. Cooking: Cut as much as 50 percent of energy consumed to prepare a meal

by putting a slow cooker and microwave to work, rather than a range and oven. If you are going to use the stovetop, match the pan size to the diameter of the heating element, to eliminate wasted heat. A 6-inch pan on an 8-inch burner can waste more than 40 percent of the energy delivered by the appliance. To improve refrigerator

Kovel From Page D1

BILL HENDRICKS / KLYN NURSERIES / TNS

Bill Hendricks, owner of Klyn Nurseries in Ohio, was named 2014 Grower of the Year by Nursery Management Magazine. He sells hundreds of varieties of plants, but succulents are his real passion. “I’m fascinated by their diversity, their color and ‘wow,’ and their stories from different places all over the world.”

Succulents: Watch water From Page D1

■ Water succulents thoroughly. Try placing a succulent pot in the sink and drenching it until water runs out the bottom. Let the pot thoroughly drain, then return it to its saucer on a windowsill. ■ Allow plants to dry out between waterings. Succulents prefer neglect, and one of the biggest mistakes made by beginners is overwatering them. ■ Choose a well-draining potting mix. Look for a cactus potting mix or create your own mix with equal parts of potting soil, pea gravel and coarse sand. ■ Give succulents as much sunlight as possible since most are sun lovers. A south- or eastern-facing window is ideal. ■ Occasionally trim succulents to maintain a shape, clip away damaged

leaves or clean up dried tips. ■ In northern climates, keep succulents in a dry, indoor environment for the winter, then move outdoors for the summer. In southern climates, many succulents thrive outdoors year-round. ■ Take a class at a garden center or public botanical garden. Many popular classes cover how to use succulents to create wreaths, vertical gardens, and terrariums or dish gardens. ■ Join a local cactus or succulent society. For a listing, see the Cactus & Succulent Society of America’s website, www.cssainc.org.

Succulents ideas ■ You’ll find succulents at garden centers, botanical garden gift shops, big-box stores and succulent society plant sales. Also, many online sites specialize in

Open Mon–Sat 10–5, Sun 11–4 1492362

360-629-3586

10521 SR 532 • Stanwood

succulents. For newbies, Hendricks suggests the following: ■ Aeonium: Enjoy these showy rosettes in green or dark burgundy. ■ Aloe: Find variegated or textured varieties for something new. ■ Crassula: Try jade plants or stacked varieties. ■ Echeveria: Look for ones with fuzzy, ruffled and bordered leaves. ■ Haworthia: Remember these aloelike miniatures for low-light conditions. ■ Lobivia: Marvel at the vivid flowers of this easyto-grow cactus. ■ Mammillaria: Try one of the white-haired pincushion cacti. ■ Notocactus: Never fail with one of these globular cacti. ■ Rebutia: Count on these small, round cacti for their colorful blooms. ■ Schlumbergera truncata: Celebrate the holidays with this Christmas cactus.

Q: I have a Stereo Realist viewer in a green case that’s 14 inches long, 6 inches wide, and 2 inches deep. It has two snaps to keep it closed. What is it worth? A: The Stereo Realist was made from 1947 until 1972. It was designed by Seton Rochwite, who worked for the David White Co. of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The camera originally sold for $160 and the viewer for $20. Stereo Realist viewers sell online today for $40 and more. Q: While going through my 93-year-old mother’s things, I found two teaspoons, one with Gloria Swanson’s picture and signature and another with Norma Talmadge. Both are in good shape. Do they have any value? A: Souvenir spoons were popular collectibles from the 1890s into the 1920s. Your spoons are two of a set of 12 silverplated spoons featuring silent film stars of the day. They were made by Oneida Silversmiths for Hearst Newspapers, and used in a 1925 advertising campaign in Photoplay, one of the first American film fan magazines. Each spoon has a facsimile signature of an actor or actress on the handle and a raised portrait on the tip. Besides your two, other stars represented were Marion Davies, Richard Dix, Douglas Fairbanks, Thomas Meighan, Mae Murray, Pola Negri, Ramon Novarro, Mary Pickford, Norma Shearer and Lois Wilson. Oneida was formed as a utopian community in the mid19th century. In 1879, conflicts caused a split

efficiency, consider one with a bottom freezer, keep the fridge between 36 and 38 degrees Fahrenheit and the freezer between zero and 5 degrees, and be sure to defrost ice build-up thicker than 0.25 inches. Heat smart: Sunnova recommends a home assessment to determine whether your house is properly insulated and to make certain air isn’t

escaping. It’s also important to keep doors closed and to heat only rooms where you need it. Depending on the type, a home’s heating system can use anywhere from 100 kWh to 3,500 kWh each month. Minimize usage by regularly replacing filters, insulating ducts, and considering a programmable thermostat that will help heat only when and where needed.

Current prices Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions. Cup, silver plate, jester handle, monogram, spiral rim, saucer foot, 5 inches, $35. Toy, car, Turbo-Jet, plastic jet car, metal lithograph launch station, Ideal Toy Corp., 1950s, 13½ inches, $70. Architectural lock set, ram’s horns, scrolled penny ends, eyelets, wrought iron, c. 1900, 24 inches, $75. Crock, salt glaze stoneware, cobalt blue leaf, impressed mark, 1800s, 4-gallon, 11 x 12 inches, $180. Art glass, vase, Art Nouveau, green iridescent, white, gray, orange, pewter stylized mounts, 13 x 8 inches, $300. Caster set, five bottles, cut-glass cruets, heraldic design, metal center post, Charles Thomas Fox, 1840, 9 ¾inches, $470. Wig, barrister’s, horsehair, gray hair, mesh foundation, pen and ink label, England, c. 1900, $720. Candelabrum, three-light, silver plate, twisted reeded arms, gadrooned shell bobeches, Sheffield, 1800s, 23 inches, pair, $1,075. Umbrella stand, Piero Fornasetti, stylized face transfer, enameled metal, brass, 1960s, 23 x 10 inches, $1,125. and members voted to form Oneida Community Ltd. in 1880, to be owned and operated by former community members. Oneida still is one of the largest marketers of stainless-steel flatware and tabletop products. Your spoons sell for $5 to $15 each. A complete set may add a little to the value. Q: How can I sell a collection of wooden hangers from different California dry cleaners? There are 247 hangers from the 1920s and ’30s. A: They might sell at an advertising sales as a lot rather than individually. Vintage wooden hangers sell online, but you probably would have better luck at an advertising show or sale. If you’re lucky, you might be able to get $5 apiece for them.

Q: I’d like to know the value of a carved-wood picture of Heidelberg Castle and the old bridge over the Neckar River in Germany. The roofs of the buildings are painted red. On the lower corner it reads “Carved by R. Bergner” and “7964.” I bought it at a garage sale. A: R. Bergner did carved- and burnt-wood pictures in the 1950s. The number on your picture probably indicates that it was part of a “limited edition.” A picture similar to yours, numbered 7955, sold recently for $40. Other burnt-wood pictures by Bergner have sold for $30. Write to Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel at Kovels, The Herald, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Thank you for your support through out the year. We will be back 1/18/2016

1494379

Ace Hardware of Silver Lake 11014 19th Ave SE #100 Everett, WA (425) 224-4273 Ace Hardware Evergreen Way 4835 Evergreen Way Everett, WA (425) 610-4112

1348325

30% off!

  Ace Hardware Lake Stevens 303 91st Ave NE Lake Stevens, WA (425) 334-7630

Family owned & operated for over 20 years! LIFETIME SUPPLY SPOT REMOVER

  Stanwood Ace Hardware 26477 72nd Ave NW Stanwood, WA (360) 926-8711

1275642

• Carpet Cleaning • Pet Odor & Stain Treatment • Spot Removal • Tile & Grout Cleaning • Upholstery Cleaning

Call The Cleaner Who Cares! (425) 350-6762 | www.CarstenCleaning.com

John Carsten, IICRC Certified Master Cleaner • LJ Carsten, Apprentice • Facebook.com/CarstenCleaning

1345615


D4 Thursday, 01.07.2016 The Daily Herald

Put effort into making new friendships

DAILY CROSSWORD

Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn: I’ve been friends with someone since grade school. I’d like to talk to her more except, about half the time I text her, I don’t get a reply. She said she’s too busy for phone calls. We meet occasionally at her convenience. I’d like to ask about clarifying our relationship. I see posts on Facebook about conversations or outings with other people that she never has time for with me. We live about five minutes apart. Last time we talked she said she’d be up for coffee soon (two months ago) and asked me to be patient about her not having time to do stuff. She’s one of the few “friends” I actually have, period. I’m not sure what to do. I find it depressing to have so few people to talk to, and when one of those few ignores me, I’m not sure it’s worth the emotional upheaval. — Friendship Over? Please turn whatever energy you’re putting into this issue toward a patient, planned effort to make new friends. An abbreviated list of ways to do that: adopt a hobby, join a team, volunteer somewhere regularly, take a class, find Meetups, arrange events with old friends and ask them to bring

CAROLYN HAX TELL ME ABOUT IT other friends. Pick activities you enjoy or do well so you have that to fall back on, and can be a relaxed/ entertained version of yourself. The what isn’t as important as the how. Be friendly, be flexible, and be open to these experiences as rewards unto themselves. Not every commitment to (blank) is going to produce a buddy, but each one can be its own blow against loneliness. If it helps: Struggling to make friends when your school years are behind you is one of the problems I hear about most. To: Friendship: Trying to put this gently: Have you examined how you talk to your friends? Do you perhaps spend most of your phone conversations with this friend complaining about your life, or unconsciously monopolizing? If your longtime friend appears to

SUPER QUIZ Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level. Subject: SCIENCE FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. Term for the fixed point on which a lever moves. 2. It states that the square of the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. 3. What claim to fame is made by the Goliath beetle? GRADUATE LEVEL 4. Term for sounds with frequencies above 20,000 hertz. 5. Scientists announced in 2014 that they think Gale Crater on this planet was once a lake. 6. The name of this metamorphic rock is pronounced the

CLASSIC PEANUTS

same as the word “nice.” PH.D. LEVEL 7. On what did Rosetta’s Philae probe successfully land in 2014? 8. What is paleontology? 9. What is the largest object in the Kuiper belt? ANSWERS: 1. Fulcrum. 2. Pythagorean theorem. 3. One of the largest insects in the world. 4. Ultrasonic. 5. Mars. 6. Gneiss. 7. A comet. 8. The study of the history of Earth using fossils. 9. Pluto. SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15-17 points — honors graduate; 1014 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4-9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1-3 points — enroll in remedial courses; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? North America Syndicate Inc.

Author William Peter Blatty is 88. Magazine publisher Jann Wenner is 70. Singer Kenny Loggins is 68. Singer-songwriter Marshall Chapman is 67. Latin pop singer Juan Gabriel is 66. Actress Erin Gray is 66. Actor Sammo Hung is 64. Actor David Caruso is 60. Talk show host Katie Couric is 59. Country singer David Lee Murphy is 57. Rock musician Kathy Valentine is 57. Actor David Marciano is 56. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., is 55. Actress Hallie Todd is 54. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., is 53. Actor Nicolas Cage is 52. Singer-songwriter John Ondrasik (Five for Fighting) is 51. Actor Rex Lee is 47. Actor Doug E. Doug is 46. Actor Kevin Rahm is 45. Actor Jeremy Renner is 45. Country singermusician John Rich is 42. Actor Dustin Diamond is 39. Singer/rapper Aloe Blacc is 37. Actress Lauren Cohan is 34. Actor Brett Dalton (TV: “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”) is 33. Actor Robert Ri’chard is 33. Actress Lyndsy Fonseca is 29. Thought for today: “One cannot and must not try to erase the past merely because it does not fit the present.” — Golda Meir, Israeli prime minister (1898-1978). Associated Press

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

THE BRILLIANT MIND OF EDISON LEE

BABY BLUES

BUCKLES

DILBERT

WUMO

CORNERED

SIX CHIX

Re: Friendship Over? I’m an introvert and I am endlessly puzzled how some people can just walk into a room and walk out with two or three new friends, while I can have enjoyable social interactions that rarely go beyond the occasion. (I’m OK with that because having too many friends and too many social obligations is mentally wearing on me.) I sometimes wonder(ed) if I’m a freak. This made me feel better. — Anonymous 2 Glad to help. If it weren’t for outgoing people, I’d never talk to anyone. Washington Post Writers Group

BIRTHDAYS

TUNDRA

DENNIS THE MENACE

have time for other people, perhaps those conversations are more rewarding for her. — Anonymous It is worth a think, thank you. Complainers often don’t hear themselves. Sometimes it is something we do or say or a way we do or say it, and cultivating good listening skills and a positive attitude is worth the effort even if the effort doesn’t yield a pack of new friends. Often, though, it’s just a story of an outgoing person collecting friends and a quieter person struggling to make connections. This friendship may have run its course. Most childhood ones do.

ZIGGY


The Daily Herald

Husband’s soccer injuries hurt family Dear Abby: My husband, an avid soccer player, injured himself twice last year, which left him unable to work for months at a time. He refuses to hang up his cleats because he says it’s his “one true passion.” I think he’s being selfish because his soccer injuries have caused a financial, emotional and physical strain on our family. I can’t be the only wife/ mom who doesn’t want the additional risk. — Sports Wife In Cleveland Dear Sports Wife: I don’t know how old your husband is, but two serious injuries in one year may be a hint from Father Time that his reflexes aren’t as acute as they once were, and he should channel his passion in another direction. (Coaching, perhaps?) Assuming you have insurance, contact your agent and ask if there is additional coverage your husband can take out in case he is seriously injured again. Of course, it won’t guarantee that he won’t hurt himself, but it might give you some peace of mind in case he does. Dear Abby: I’m 23 and live with my parents — a situation I am working to change. When I come home from work, I occasionally like to have a glass of wine or a beer. Obviously, because I’m an adult, this should not be a problem, but every time I touch alcohol my mom freaks out. There is a history of alcoholism in my family, so I somewhat understand where she’s coming from. But I feel she needs to realize that I can have a glass or two of wine and it doesn’t mean I’m getting drunk or an alcoholic. I am my own person, in control of my body, and I know my limits. RIP HAYWIRE

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS 6 Occasion of

overindulgence

15 Plain and simple 16 ___ Ansari of “Parks

and Recreation”

17 Disney character who

sings “Part of Your World”

Universal Uclick

42 Volunteer’s first word

14

15

16

43 Bit of SWAT garb

17

18

19

brand)

23 Inveigle

playwright of the 1930s

49 Lyre player of

von Weber

32 Time to get a

babysitter, maybe

34

59 Kid

29

30

9

10

11

12

13

25

26

27

57

58

22 24

31

32 35

33

36

37

38

39

40

42

43

44

45

46

47 50

52

63 Medium for Biggie

59

64 First-aid gel 65 “Out! I said out!”

60

53

61

41

48

49

62 “Suicide Blonde”

51

54

55

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

56

PUZZLE BY PATRICK MERRELL, 01.07.2016

67 Travel

1 One of 12 in the

speak

Hemsworths

European Union logo

69 Band director’s

37 Shoreline opening

2 Kind of street,

concern

H A R P A O L M A O N V A A C A P I A

BRIDGE Today’s South was Tom Webb, known to all as “Tangle” because he encounters more blocked suits and entry woes than anyone in my club. Against 3NT, West led a heart, and Tangle captured East’s king and saw 10 probable tricks. He cashed the queen of diamonds and led a second diamond. When West threw a heart, Tangle took dummy’s A-K and lost the fourth diamond. He expected a heart return that would revive his queen, but East didn’t oblige: He led

S P A R E R I B L I R R

O O H

3 It can pull a bit to

S H R E D D O N O R

one side

F I A E M S I G H S L O T A R Y D E L I E A B O V E

T A L X E H O A T V A E R N D

4 Emphatic agreement 5 Expert divers 6 The end

41 Help with making the

22 Food safety subj. 25 Way out

perhaps

27 Equilibrium

48 Certain spirit

28 Microsoft product

50 “Cars” producer

29 Important member of

51 Has a bias

a group

30 String substitute?

Thursday, January 7, 2016

7 D.J.’s play

31 Fix

Daily 32Bridge Club Loco

8 Not looking good 9 Distress call

of the century”

11 Strong arm

33 Doc bloc

Tangled Webb 35 Financial claim

10 Part of the “wedding

bed?

46 Hankered 47 Pitchfork wielders,

26 Craving

informally

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE O T V I E A N P L A E T T I E N N T E S U T A S W

21 Rebuffs

DOWN

68 Antennae, so to

35 One of the acting

M A T Y A I S K O N I A N T D E I A A R I N K

8

66 “That’s not for me”

34 Conform

A J A M L U N A L I G H I C E R S E L E O B I N A N O R A D I G R A N R E D G A P E P E S C E A T I S T E A

7

mythology

Smalls

28 Works of Carl Maria

6

21

band, 1990

24 Group Theatre

5

23

48 Hotel fillers

program, once?

20 Almost out of energy

4

20

28

52 Rather informative

the first-ever Oscar

3

with a whip

a pirouette

18 Jannings who won

2

45 DC Comics character

50 Move often preceding

19 Airhead

Dear Abby: My neighbor often comes over to share some of her home cooking. Unfortunately, it tastes horrible. She invariably asks me the next day how I liked it, and I really don’t enjoy lying. How can I tell her I don’t like her cooking and I don’t want her to bring me any more? — Tender Tummy In Washington Dear Tender Tummy: Use a variation on your signature and say that you appreciate her generosity, but for some time her cooking hasn’t agreed with you — you have a “tender tummy” — so please refrain from bringing over any more food.

1

44 Carlo ___ (wine

14 Many a party has one

My family’s view of alcohol seems to have been skewed. One glass of wine a night does not an alcoholic make, right? — Unwinding In New England Dear Unwinding: Ordinarily, I would say no. But a tendency toward addiction can run in families, and for someone with a predisposition to alcoholism, a glass (or two) of wine every night could escalate and lead to problems. Because you live in your mother’s house, try to be more sensitive to her feelings and respect them. She has experienced firsthand what it’s like to live with someone who has an alcohol problem, and it isn’t pretty. That’s why she is so sensitive about it.

38 Patriotic Clint

Eastwood movie

1 Tie that binds

10 Skater’s leap

DEAR ABBY

Thursday, 01.07.2016 D5

By FRANK STEWART Tribune 36 Content Agencyoften They’re

stuck

53 Clincher 54 Sun worshipers 55 It might get hot

under the collar

56 Town whose exports

are waxed

57 Bit of smoke

58 O.K. in the Today’s South wasI.C.U. Tom Webb, he bids two hearts and you try 2NT. 59 then Partrebids of a 53-Down Partner three hearts. What known to all as “Tangle” because he 39 The origin of species? 13 Last entry in the encounters more blocked suits and do you say? 60 Charge call ANSWER: Partner has a entry woes than anyone in my club. 40 Coen brothers Best Random House Against 3NT, West led a heart, and battleship. His two hearts was a 61 ___ of God Picture nominee Unabridged Dictionary Tangle captured East’s king and saw strength-showing “reverse.” His 10 probable tricks. He cashed the three-heart rebid promised five hearts queen of diamonds and led a second but longer diamonds. Since you have three useful honors, slam is likely. diamond. When West threw a heart, Tangle Jump to five or six hearts. Partner may took dummy’s A-K and lost the have A, K J 10 9 6, A K J 9 5 3, 4. North dealer fourthQUESTION diamond. He expected a heart a club. Tangle took dummy’s DAILY return that ♠would queen, N-S vulnerable ace, cashed two diamonds You hold: 10 8revive 4 3 ♥his AQ but East didn’t oblige: He led a club. and exited with a club. After 7 ◆ Q 4 ♣ Jtook 8 6 2.dummy’s Your partner Tangle ace, cashed NORTH ♠A95 twoone diamonds and exited withrea club. the defenders took two clubs, opens diamond, you After the defenders took two clubs, 10 ♥ they shifted to spades, and spond one spade, he bids two they shifted to spades, and declarer ♦ AK7632 declarer lost two more tricks. hearts you tricks. try 2NT. Part♣A53 lostand two more Could you getthree untangled and make Could you get untangled ner then rebids hearts. WEST EAST and make 3NT? What3NT? do you say? ♠KJ2 ♠Q76 At Trick Two, South must ANSWER: 4-1 Partner BREAKhas a ♥ J96432 ♥ K85 ♦ ♦ 5 J 10 9 8 play a low diamond from battleship. HisTwo, twoSouth hearts was At Trick must play a ♣ K 10 4 ♣Q97 both hands. He guards a strength-showing “reverse. ” low diamond from both hands. He guards against rebid a 4-1 break (a 28 SOUTH against a 4-1 break (a 28 per- His three-heart promchance). ♠ 10 8 4 3 cent chance). ised percent five hearts longer di-takes If East shiftsbut to clubs, South ♥ AQ7 If East shifts to clubs, South amonds. Since you to have the ace, comes his three queen of ♦ Q4 diamonds, cashes the queen of hearts, ♣J862 takes the ace, comes to his useful honors, slam is likely. and reaches dummy with the ace of queen of diamonds, cashes Jumpspades to five or six hearts. for North East to finish the diamonds South West 1♦ Pass 1♠ Pass ninemay tricks.have A, K J 10 9 6, the queen of hearts, and Partner

C E L T

12 Little bird

reaches dummy with the ace of spades to finish the diamonds for nine tricks.

PICKLES

2♦ 3 NT

A K J 9 5 3, DAILY 4. QUESTION

You hold: ♠ 10 8 4 3 ♥ A Q 7 6 2. Your Agency partner opens ♦Tribune Q 4 ♣ J 8Content one diamond, you respond one spade,

Pass 2 NT All Pass

Opening lead — ♥ 4 (C) 2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

POOCH CAFE MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM

LUANN

PHOEBE AND HER UNICORN

JUMBLE

Pass

SUDOKU

ZITS

RED & ROVER ANSWERS TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE


Short Takes |

THE DAILY HERALD

THE CLICKER Thursday’s highlights on TV include: “Angel From Hell” is a new sitcom that has Jane Lynch trying to be the wing woman for a young doctor (Maggie Lawson). But is she really a guardian angel — or just a nut job? 9:30 p.m., CBS. Whether you’re drawn to the new crime drama “Shades of Blue” probably depends on how seriously you take Jennifer Lopez

as a hard-nosed Brooklyn police detective. ... Yeah, that’s what we thought. 10 p.m., NBC. “My Diet Is Better Than Yours”: It better be. 9 p.m., ABC. “The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret”: Tune in and find out how everyone survived the destruction of the planet. 10 p.m., IFC. From Herald news services

TODAY IN HISTORY Today is Thursday, Jan. 7, the seventh day of 2016. There are 359 days left in the year. Today’s highlight: On Jan. 7, 1789, America held its first presidential election as voters chose electors who, a month later, selected George Washington to be the nation’s first chief executive. On this date: In 1610, astronomer Galileo Galilei began observing three of Jupiter’s moons (he spotted a fourth moon almost a week later). In 1800, the 13th president of the United States, Millard Fillmore, was born in Summerhill, New York. In 1904, the Marconi International Marine Communication Company of London announced that the telegraphed letters “CQD” would serve as a maritime distress call (it was later replaced with “SOS”). In 1927, commercial transatlantic telephone service was inaugurated between New York and London. In 1942, the Japanese siege of Bataan began during World War II. (The fall

of Bataan three months later was followed by the notorious Death March.) In 1949, George C. Marshall resigned as U.S. Secretary of State; President Harry S. Truman chose Dean Acheson to succeed him. In 1955, singer Marian Anderson made her debut with the Metropolitan Opera in New York, in Verdi’s “Un Ballo in Maschera.” The opening of the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa was televised for the first time. In 1959, the United States recognized the new government of Cuba, six days after Fidel Castro led the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista. In 1963, the U.S. Post Office raised the cost of a first-class stamp from 4 to 5 cents. In 1979, Vietnamese forces captured the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh, overthrowing the Khmer Rouge government. In 1989, Emperor Hirohito of Japan died in Tokyo at age 87; he was succeeded by his son, Crown Prince Akihito. Associated Press

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

THURSDAY, 01.07.2016

Jazz pianist Paul Bley dies at 83 By Charles J. Gans Associated Press

NEW YORK — Visionary Canadian-born pianist Paul Bley, a pivotal figure in the avant-garde jazz movement known for his innovative trio and solo recordings, has died. He was 83. Bley died Sunday of natural causes at his winter residence in Stuart, Florida, said Tina Pelikan, publicist for the ECM record label, citing family members. Throughout his career, Bley was a musical adventurer determined to find his own voice. “If I come up with a phrase that sounds like somebody else, I don’t play it,” he said in a 2006 interview for the website All About Jazz. He challenged the bebop orthodoxy, adapting the free jazz of saxophonist Ornette Coleman for the piano, offering a quieter, moodier version. He later pioneered experiments with synthesizers.

If I come up with a phrase that sounds like somebody else, I don’t play it. — Paul Bley

His groundbreaking piano trios — notably with bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Paul Motian — liberated rhythm instruments from their traditional supporting roles, making everyone equal as improvisers. Bley also helped introduce promising young musicians such as guitarist Pat Metheny and electric bassist Jaco Pastorius, and influenced many musicians including pianist Keith Jarrett and guitarist Bill Frisell. Born Nov. 10, 1932, in Montreal, Bley began studying music at age 5, starting on violin and switching to piano by age 7. As a teenager, he was already playing gigs

around Montreal, and at age 17 replaced fellow Montreal pianist Oscar Peterson at the Alberta Lounge. Bley moved to New York in 1950 to study at Juilliard, but remained active in his home city, where he formed the Montreal Jazz Workshop, playing with such bebop legends as Charlie Parker and Sonny Rollins. In New York, he participated in pianist Lennie Tristano’s experimental jazz workshops and met bassist Charles Mingus, who produced and played on Bley’s 1953 debut recording, “Introducing Paul Bley.” In 1957, Bley moved to Los Angeles where he performed with trumpeter Chet Baker. In 1958, Bley

invited a then-unknown Ornette Coleman and his quartet with drummer Billy Higgins, trumpeter Don Cherry and bassist Charlie Haden to play with him at the Hillcrest Club. That gig led Bley to be regarded as “the man who headed the palace coup that overthrew bebop” in the Penguin Guide to Jazz. In 1959, Coleman’s quartet appeared at New York’s Five Spot jazz club and released the album “The Shape of Jazz to Come” — a seminal moment in jazz history that ushered in the free jazz movement. Bley “was the one who understood what Ornette was doing and who brought that kind of tonal mobility and melodic freedom to the piano,” the noted critic Stanley Crouch once observed. He married pianist and composer Karen Borg, who changed her name to Carla Bley, and the couple moved back to New York in 1959. His groups featured her compositions.

PEOPLE

Steely Dan founder charged with assault NEW YORK — Steely Dan founder Donald Fagen was charged Tuesday with assaulting his wife at their Manhattan home, according to law enforcement officials and court papers. The 67-year-old former lead singer allegedly shoved Libby Titus into

a marble window frame, knocking her to the ground Monday afternoon at their Upper East Side apartment. The assault caused Titus, 68, to “suffer bruising and swelling to her right arm, as well as substantial pain,” according to the criminal complaint.

The two officials were not authorized to disclose the victim’s name and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Fagen’s publicist had no comment. He launched the band in 1972 with guitarist Walter Becker. The

group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001 is known for such groovy ’70s tunes as “Reelin’ In the Years” and “Rikki Don’t Lose that Number.” Steely Dan has sold more than 40 million albums worldwide. Associated Press

1488901

D6

Everett Daily Herald, January 07, 2016  

January 07, 2016 edition of the Everett Daily Herald

Everett Daily Herald, January 07, 2016  

January 07, 2016 edition of the Everett Daily Herald