Page 1

LOOKING BACK AT 2015

Economic Future

YEAR IN SPORTS

Roundtable discussion at Oroville Grange, Saturday, Jan. 30

See Page A6

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 2016 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

NCW Ice Fishing Festival, Jan. 16

BABY NEW YEAR 2016

State Aquatics Grant benefits Sidley Lake THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

MOLSON – Just in time for the Northwest Ice Fishing Festival which is planned for Saturday, Jan. 16, the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife has awarded the Molson Grange a $3,344 grant for Aquatic Lands Enhancement (ALEA) for Sidley Lake. The ALEA grant is for a two year period. The Molson Grange Team will be led by Patrick Stice to operate and maintain the aerator at Sidley Lake to keep part of the lake ice-free in the winter, to provide life-sustaining oxygen to the fish and other aquatic wildlife. Team members include Patrick Myrick and Robin Stice. Marcus Alden has agreed to assist with this project and is the newest team member. All are volunteers. “The lake is already frozen over and the aerator has been running for a few weeks. Local neighbors estimated the ice is coming along nicely and enjoyed

watching a moose this morning,” said Robin Stice, who coordinates the annual ice fishing festival for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. “The aerator team checks the aerator and the lake in general approximately every nine or ten days.” In the January 2015 tournament, 19 fish were caught with a total weight of just under 33 pounds. “The lake is doing fine so far and the Ice Fishing Committee is expecting good fishing at the 2016 event. Again, Grand Prize will be based on the weight of two fish. All other places based on only one fish. A prize winning fish may only be used in one prize place,” she said. The festival, which benefits the Oroville Visitor Information Center, starts at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast and registration for the anglers. There’s food, and entertainment in the Grange Hall and the popular Pine Wood Derby races will also be held again this year.

submitted photos

2016 started with a bang for Erika Guadalupe Mendez Garcia and Jose Antonio Garcia Arreola when their son Matteo Garcia Mendez made his appearance in this world at 2:08 p.m. on January 2, the first baby of 2016 to be born at North Valley Hospital’s Family Birthing Center in Tonasket, Wash. Matteo’s birth was assisted by Jackie Chambers, CNM of Family Health Centers. This makes baby number six for the Garcia family, who were presented with three baskets full of gifts donated by staff members of North Valley Hospital and Extended Care, and an arrangement by Wild Rose Floral Design. “I couldn’t believe how many people donated things.” said NVH OB Coordinator Eroca Crofoot. “My office was plumb full of stuff.” There were 106 babies born in 2015 at NVH.

Submitterd photo

Patrick Stice and Marc Alden check the Sidley Lake Aerator and observe the bubble pattern in the open water in mid-December.

Looking Back: 2015, the year that was JULY Rich Fewkes Chesaw Grand Marshal – Fewkes has been active with community service on many boards and announcing at several types of events including the Chesaw Rodeo. Water Ranch turned over to Tonasket – Bathing-suit clad revelers and ladies in waterproof skirts turned out for a trial run of the Tonasket Water Ranch, a new spray park. Should Oroville teachers be armed?The Oroville School Board is considering training school staff in ways to respond to threats in the school, as well as allowing a select number to receive training to carry concealed weapons on school grounds. Fate of PUD’s Enloe Dam still on hold – NOAA won’t serve as lead agency on removal; PUD seeks another electrification option. Lightning sparks Wildhorse fire on Mt. Hull – Tonasket Ranger District firefighters continue to respond to fires caused by lightning, including the Wildhorse Fire on Mt. Hull which grew to 185 acres. New Tonasket Police Chief sworn in – Interim Police Chief Darren Curtis was sworn in as Police Chief at the

July 14 Tonasket Council meeting, he has been filling in since Robert Burks retirement earlier this year. Oroville EMTs resign, form own nonprofit servicer – Oroville’s EMTs say they will resign from their positions Aug. 23 claiming frustration with the city, especially Mayor Spieth. School board says Gap ‘yes,’ guns no – The majority of the Oroville School Board seems less than ready to approve staff members carrying guns, but the district will forge ahead with Gap training to learn how to respond to a threat, like an armed intruder.

es for the district as of Aug. 7. Mayor Spieth accepts the volunteer crew’s resignation and says the action was the result of being “backed into a corner.” Fire blazes in North County – Nine Mile fires burn more than 4600 acres. Fatal plane crash leaves two men dead, but not the cause of devastating fires. Largest fire in state history – Okanogan Complex burns 258,399 acres, Tonasket evacuated as fire burns on two sides of the city.

AUGUST

Okanogan and Chelan Complexes merged under one management team – The Okanogan Complex has consumed 304,782 acres as of Aug. 30 and is considered 40 percent contained, and the Chelan Complex, which is currently 92,516 acres is currently at 92,516 acres is considered to be 50 percent contained. The two fires have been merged for management purposes under the command of the California Interagency Incident Management Team 5. Firefighters making good progress on Okanogan and Chelan

More water held in Osoyoos Lake due to drought – The International Joint Commission, a group of Americans and Canadians, will allow water to be stored to support river flows this fall. BLM says PUD responsible for dam removal – Agency wants to remain actively involved in the event that Enloe Dam is decommissioned. County and Oroville hire Lifeline Ambulance – Oroville rural and city EMS have hired Lifeline Ambulance Service to provide emergency servic-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 112 No. 1

SEPTEMBER

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Fire broke out the evening of Tuesday, Nov. 24 destroying the lumber storage building at Oroville Building Supply south of Oroville. Oroville firefighters were quickly on the scene and were aided by Tonasket Fire Dept. “With the high winds within just a few minutes flames were shooting out both ends of the building,” said Oroville Fire Chief Rod Noel. Complexes – The fires continue towards containment with work completed in many areas to increase the fire perimeter on both complexes.

SEE LOOKING | PG A7

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US

Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com katherine@gazette-tribune.com / ext. 5052 Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Okanogan County Fair delayed to Sept. 24 – The Okanogan County fair

Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

A3 A4 A5

Calendar Classifieds Real Estate

A5 A6-7 A7

Sports Obituaries

A8-9 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 7, 2016

LOCAL NEWS

Celebrating New Years Eve

2016

Photos by Katie Teachout, Party by Roger and Lori Sawyer

Correction

In last week’s issue of the G-T a quote was misattributed to Oroville School Board Chairman Mike Egerton about litigation involving newly seated Director Ryan Frazier and his litigation with the Oroville School District and its superintendent. The quote should have been attributed to the chairman’s brother Marc Egerton, a concerned parent who was in attendance at the last board meeting of 2015. The Gazette-Tribune strives for accuracy and regrets the error.

Okanogan Land Trust protects 97 acres near Bolster THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CHESAW – The Okanogan Land Trust accepted a conservation easement from Crown Resources Corporation on 97 acres north of Bolster, or what used to be Bolster. Bolster, now a Washington ghost town, was platted in 1899 and at one time had 30 families, several stores, a post office and three saloons. The post office closed in 1909, followed by the school in 1910, which only operated for one year. The closest town now is Chesaw, three miles to the south. From the windswept ridge of the property, the view is Canada to the north, Strawberry Mountain and Porphyry Peak westerly, Granite Mountain to the east, and the Myers Creek Valley to the south. Below the ridge, Myers Creek flows northerly into Canada. The conservation easement will assure the property remains undeveloped and primarily wildlife habitat, but can still be used as historically, for grazing and forestry management. The property includes a three-quarter mile section of Myers Creek, a fish-bearing creek with significant riparian habitats and associated floodplains. This is the fifth conservation easement conveyed since 2012 by Crown Resources to the Trust, totaling

524 acres in Okanogan County. The conservation easements are mitigation requirements to compensate for potential impacts of the Buckhorn Mine. “Protecting this natural landscape and valuable aquatic and wetland habitat property will become a treasure to the Chesaw area and it is Okanogan Land Trust’s pleasure to continue to work in cooperation with Crown Resources in protecting the area.” said Thom Woodruff, Executive Director of the Trust. “We are pleased to be able to contribute this easement to Okanogan Land Trust, where it can remain protected as open land for beneficial use by wildlife and the good people of our region. Supporting the environment and providing for local communities is critically important to Crown. We appreciate the partnership we’ve been able to cultivate with the Trust over the past years,” said Mark Ioli, Vice President and General Manager, Crown Resources Corporation. Okanogan Land Trust, now located in Okanogan, works with property owners in Okanogan and Ferry Counties to preserve the agricultural traditions of the area and preserve natural resources for today and future generations. Their phone number is 509-846-2765.

Oroville Booster Club says...

THANK YOU

to all of our Sponsors, Volunteers and Community! Thank you for making our auctions a success! Auction proceeds benefit our local youth!

You’re the greatest!

Property in wildfire area can have tax classification changed Involves properties under designated forest land or open space classification THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Assessor, Scott D. Furman, would like to remind landowners whose land is located within the boundary of the

Okanogan Complex Wildfire, including the Twisp River Fire and the Nine Mile Fire/that they are eligible to remove their property from either the Designated Forestland property tax classification as described in RCW 84.33 or the Open Space property tax classification as described in RCW t\4.34 without paying the additional tax, interest and penalty, if applicable. RCW 84.34.108(6) (c) states in part ‘the additional tax, appli-

cable interest and penalty specified in subsection ( 4) of this section may not be imposed if the removal solely results from (c) a natural! disaster such as a flood, windstorm, earthquake or other such calamity rather than by virtue of the act of the landowner changing the use of the land.’ That being said, if property owners want to remain in their respective property tax classification, they may. “The fire has impacted the use

of the land in varying degrees depending on the severity of the fire in that particular area. This office understand that it will take several years, if not more, for the land to recover and be able to sustain commercial agriculture. It will also take years for the timberland to recover as well,” said Furman. “No land within the fire zone will be removed due to inactivity at this time unless the landowner requests it.” If anyone has questions please call 509-422-7190.

E S U O H E R A &W

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JANUARY 7, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTS CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

The court found probable cause to charge Nickolas Jay Mieirs, 37, Oroville, with residential burglary (DV), third-degree malicious mischief and disorderly conduct. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 27, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Wayne Anthony Seymour, 38, Omak, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 23, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Jonathan Brent McKinney, 42, Tonasket, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle, attempted eluding a pursuing police vehicle, third-degree DWLS, thirddegree malicious mischief and two counts of hit-and-run (unattended). The court found probable cause to charge Randy Lynn Gunn, 55, Okanogan, with two counts each of possession of a stolen firearm and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 17, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Morningstar St. Peter, no middle name listed, 18, Omak, with POCS (morphine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 26, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Daggon Andrew Devoy Chaska, 23, Tonasket, with second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, reckless driving, hit-and-run (attended vehicle), obstruction and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 13, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Aaron Lee Dick, 27, Okanogan, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 11, 2105. The court found probable cause to charge Jesse Ray Manring, 19, Tonasket, with POCS (marijuana).

The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 12, 2105. The court found probable cause to charge Patrick Blaine Stevens, 21, Okanogan, with two counts of harassment (threats to kill) and one count each of unlawful display of a weapon and unlawfully carrying a loaded pistol in a vehicle. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 11, 2105. The court fount probable cause to charge Donny James St. Peter, 23, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 12, 2105. The court found probable cause to charge William Luquin Xhurape, 25, Brewster, with second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 13, 2015 near Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Audrey Lynn Vieira, 33, Tonasket, with seconddegree theft. The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 12, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Bradley James Verstegen, 28, Omak, with POCS (acetaminophen/hydrocodone bitartrate) and unlawful possession of a legend drug. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 10, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Ashley Jean Pearl, 29, Okanogan, with two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin), and one count each of POCS (with intent) (heroin) and POCS (with intent) (suboxone). The crimes allegedly occurred March 20, Nov. 23 and Dec. 15, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Victor Manual Rodriguez, 49, Oroville, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred between Nov. 10 and Dec. 19, 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Erik De Jesus Martinez, 27, Hemet, Calif.; with seconddegree theft, third-degree theft and unlawful possession of a legend drug. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 22, 2015, in Omak.

DISTRICT COURT

Stacy Lavon Adrian, 47, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Adrian was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 356 days suspended, and fined $808. Mauricio Aguilar Casarez, 25, Omak, guilty of DUI and resisting arrest. Aguilar Casarez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,186. Troy Allen Ammons Cohen, 18, Omak, guilty of DUI. Ammons Cohen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,281. Tamantha Autumn Anderson, 37, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Anderson was fined $200. Tenea Shantel Aragon, 23, Omak, guilty (other deferred revoked) of third-degree DWLS. Aragon received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $393. John George Bourcier, 65, Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: DUI and hit-and-run (unattended). Bourcier was fined $1,125. Kendall Ray Boyd, 58, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Boyd was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Roxanne Leona Boyer, 67, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Boyer received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $418. Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 24, Oroville, guilty on two counts of violation of a no-contact order. The court dismissed three additional charges of violation of a no-contact order. Carpenter was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 182 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,846. Ezra Thomas Chapman, 34, Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: DUI and first-degree DWLS. Chapman was fined $1,425.

911 CALLS/JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, DEC. 28, 2015

Burglary on Greenacres Rd. near Omak. Marijuana reported missing. Search and rescue on Second Rd.

near Oroville. Burglary on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Checks missing. Theft on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Mail and watch reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. No injuries. Three-vehicle crash on N. Ash St. in Omak. Injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Jasmine St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Video game system reported missing. Threats on Jasmine St. in Omak. Burglary on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Burglary on Central Ave. in Oroville. Drugs on S. Tonasket St. in Tonasket. Nathan Jerred Cawston, 24, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Camille C. McClintock-Coggins, 43, booked on an OCSO warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Joseph Alexander Felix, 20, DOC detainer.

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Warrant arrest on Garfield St. in Omak. DUI on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Panorama Point in Omak. Assault on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Koala Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Omak Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Structure fire on Main St. in Oroville.

Assault on Pine St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket.

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Warrant arrest on Jackson St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Elmway in Okanogan. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. No injuries. Public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. William Albert Janczyk, 60, booked for forgery and second-degree possession of stolen property. William Keaton Jr., no middle name listed, 66, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for DUI. Daniel Rae Lightly, 49, booked for making a false or misleading statement and on an OCSO FTA warrant for first-degree DWLS.

Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Theft on Cape Labelle Rd. near Tonasket. Computer and tools reported missing. DWLS on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Assault on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Oak St. in Omak. Two warrant arrests on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Malicious mischief on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jason Alvie Woodland, 41, booked for first-degree rape of a child, three counts of first-degree incest, two counts of seconddegree rape of a child and one count each of first-degree child molestation and second-degree incest.

Disorderly conduct on Hwy. 97 near Oroville DWLS on Cape Labelle Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Threats on Cobey Canyon Spur near Tonasket. Theft on Hope Springs Trail near Okanogan. Mail missing. Harassment on Warwick Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Fraud on Koala Ave. in Omak. Criminal impersonation on Cherry St. in Oroville. Harassment on Golden St. in Oroville. Falina Dawn Storm, 29, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order (DV). Kenneth Wesley Clark, 36, DOC detainer. Raelena Marie St. Peter, 20, booked for third-degree DWLS and a DOC detainer. Michael Benjamin Nims, 30, booked on an Oroville Police Dept. FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Chase Wayne Nicholson, 31, court commitment for DUI. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in

FAMILY PRACTICE

SATURDAY, JAN. 2, 2016

THURSDAY, DEC. 31, 2015

TUESDAY, DEC. 29, 2015

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30, 2015

DENTISTRY

Domestic dispute on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-pedestrian crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Injuries reported. Fire on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. One-vehicle crash on 16th Ave. in Oroville. No injuries reported. Gene Charles Olson, 43, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Ann Alisha Hover, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault. Tyler Alexander Peasley, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault and resisting arrest. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 21, booked for third-degree malicious mischief and violation of a no-contact order (DV). Lee Andrew Kukuk, 19, booked for second-degree DWLS.

Okanogan. Assault on Copple Rd. near Omak. Theft on Bannon Springs Rd. near Tonasket. Checks reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on S. Birch St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Oak St. in Omak. Loitering on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Engh Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Theft on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Robert Edward Rose, 45, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants: fourth-degree assault (DV), interfering with reporting and third-degree malicious mischief. Dallas James Rowe, 32, court commitment for second-degree DWLS. Bradley William Hack, 18, booked on three FTA warrants: seconddegree DWLS, third-degree theft and obstruction.

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JANUARY 7, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Past time to start the conversation about what to do without Canadians While 2015 was the year of the fire for many of us in the county as this summer’s fires led to great property losses, 2016 has already got many of us wondering what kind of economic losses the year might bring. That goes doubly true for those living in the north end of the county, especially Oroville. Oroville has come to rely on our Canadian neighbors for a great deal of its income, even though it isn’t your typical tourist town. We’ve tried to enhance our area to attract more tourists – our lake is great, as is the natural beauty of our area, but we benefit more from proximity than attraction. Proximity to the Canadian border, that is. With the Canadian dollar in a doldrum, most of our businesses are suffering – our prices may be cheaper here, but a Canadian dollar only worth about 70 cents American is going to wipe out any savings that our northern brethren have come to rely on. A low Canadian dollar also makes the goods they sell more desirable on the world market. We usually just try and ride it out and wait for things to get back closer to par, but those in the know Out of say the Canadians will continue to keep their My Mind dollar low as long as the price of oil, one of their Gary A. DeVon most valuable resources, is low. Who would have thought we’d need oil (and gas) to go back up so Canada would revalue their dollar. Sure low gas prices makes it cheaper for us to buy gas here, the Canadians too, but we want to sell them a lot more – services, goods and meals. What to do in the short term – probably ride it out, but Oroville has always been boom and bust – and not from gold mining, despite our town’s name. Most of our local businesses live and breath for the profits living next to the border can bring. But maybe it’s time we diversify more and become a town that lives for more than selling stuff to our neighbors. Tonasket, at the crossroads of Hwy. 97 and Hwy. 20, seems to be more resilient. It’s hard to make jokes about them rolling up the sidewalks at 8 p.m. any more, especially when you look around at Oroville at night. While I’m sure they appreciate Canadian tourists and the money they bring, Tonasket doesn’t seem to have put all their eggs in one basket. Sure, it doesn’t hurt to have lots of good paying jobs through the hospital, Forest Service and the school, but the town seems to roll with the punches. Who would have thought that when their two biggest fruit operations closed down they would just keep on chugging along? Oroville still has Gold Digger, Zosels and Reman and Reload, all employing lots of people, but we’re losing Hughes’ at the end of the month. The new wool mill will help, but hopefully its longevity will be greater than the canola oil plant was. We’re glad to see that people are starting to have the conversation about what Oroville’s economic future is going to be like without Canadians. The roundtable scheduled for the Oroville Grange on Saturday, Jan. 30 is a good start. We’re glad to see that the chamber of commerce, several economic groups and the town are involved in the discussion. And, despite our high school rivalries, we should try and promote North County as a whole and with luck Tonasket will come up and join in the conversation as well.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Government Transparency Keeping an eye on the commissioners Dear Editor, A recent survey by ROC (Representing Okanogan County) shows that the public’s chief concern in regard to Okanogan County government is the need for more transparency. The current Board of County Commissioners is responsible for all aspects of county life, from levying taxes, administering the budget, regulating roads, transportation, public health, land use, hiring of county employees and contractors, and administering grant money, to name only a few. They are also legally bound to keep the public informed of their actions in a timely manner. Up to now, this precept has been basically ignored and the minutes of commissioners’ meetings have lagged several months behind posting on the county website. Recently they have been updated and hopefully this practice of publishing the minutes in a timely manner will continue. Some important issues are now before the commissioners – the comprehensive plan is being challenged in court, they are continuing to work on the zoning ordinance, and the 2016 budget is being approved.To keep up to date on these activities, ROC is sending volunteer witnesses to the Board meetings and posting their reports on their website ROCON2016.org.These reports are more current and informative than the county minutes and should prove helpful to those who are possibly interested in filing for the two upcoming commissioners’ positions in 2016, or just would like to know how well our county govt. is being run.If you have the time and interest, you might also like to be a part of this ROC “witnessing” project.

Jessica McNamara Tonasket

Commissioner need to be responsive to citizens Dear Editor, A program by King 5 News recently raised the question of whether the Gebbers family business received “special treatment” by DNR in receiving $1.9 million for use of their untrained employees and equipment to fight fire during the Carlton Complex fires. Our state auditor found that normally expected information wasn’t included in this contract with DNR. Even in the heat of the moment, why would apparently untrained Gebbers’ employees be paid good wages for firefighting when even experienced citizen firefighters were told to stand down? When the Board of County Commissioners discussed the King 5 program on 12/21/15, the BOCC stated that they thought Gebbers Farms had a cooperative agreement placing them on priority status for fighting fires. Is there really such an agreement? Do other companies have the same opportunity? Who proposed the contract we are hearing about, and who wrote it?

Gebbers are the world’s largest grower of cherries, apples, and pears. Does this mean they receive special treatment from our state government, or is there another explanation for such apparent privilege? Do the family’s corporations have undue influence at the County level regarding vacation and paving of roads and county land use decisions? How could this affect citizens such as Chiliwist residents who barely escaped with their lives during the Carlton Complex fires? Last year another newspaper wrote in support of promoting governmental transparency. It seems that our local press could research and publish some accurate information on these important questions, especially as the 2016 Commissioners’ elections approach. As citizens of this county we need to be more involved and become knowledgeable about how our county government makes decisions. Do our Commissioners make decisions that are in our best interest? Or, are decisions made in the best interest of Gebbers businesses leading to the loss of our voices? Our democracy requires citizens to be informed and to participate. Let’s have Commissioners who are transparent and responsive to our Okanogan citizens. Gay Northrup Winthrop

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A very tough job OPINION BY LEE H. HAMILTON

You know who I feel sorry for? Today’s politicians. You’ll laugh at this, but hear me out. This is a very tough time to be a politician — whether running for office or trying to lead while holding office. The women and men who’ve undertaken to represent us face circumstances that make campaigning and governing unusually challenging right now. Not that they’ve ever been easy, at least in my lifetime. Our size, diversity, and multi-layered Lee Hamilton government structure; the number and complexity of the problems our political leaders face daily; and the divided politics of our time, which make settling on coherent policies especially challenging — all these combine to make being a politician in a representative democracy one of the most demanding jobs around. Several features of the current political landscape, however, give politics a sharper edge and make it far more difficult to navigate. For starters, our political discourse, from city councils to state legislatures to Congress, is less forgiving than it was a generation ago. Political opponents are no longer just people with whom we happen to disagree — they’re people who need to be shamed into silence. They can’t be trusted, they can’t be negotiated with, they’re self-serving and unpatriotic, and when they’re not incompetent, they’re schem-

ing, ill-informed and ill-intentioned. This rhetoric is not just calculated demonization. The extent to which politicians today genuinely distrust the other side is something new in our politics. It makes progress on the issues of the day extremely complicated. This is exacerbated by politicians’ awareness that voters have lost confidence in our traditional political leadership and are searching hard for alternatives. You see this in the rise of candidates like Donald Trump on the right and Bernie Sanders on the left, who speak to voters who are looking for someone to express their anger and frustration. Why are Americans upset, and more willing than usual to rally to outlying candidates? I don’t think there’s any great mystery. For starters, we have a society that is deeply concerned about economic insecurity; as the Pew Research Center reported recently, the American middle class — for decades the stable anchor of economy and society — is in trouble and no longer in the majority. People are moving up, but most are not, and some are moving down. Small wonder that immigration causes so much concern. You can add to this the fear of terrorism and a deeply unsettled view of the major changes taking place in American society: the rise of big data and its attendant loss of privacy; the migration flows that whittle away at some communities while causing others to change unrecognizably from month to month; the tensions that diversity, arguments over gender, and racial conflict all produce; the fluid and ever-changing patterns of religious belief and identity that have shaken many com-

munities loose from the institutions that once moored them; the decline of the traditional, objective media. America today is an uneasy place, and we see this reflected in voters’ frustration and pessimism. With next year’s elections still almost a year away, voters are mostly just looking around. They like candidates who express their anger and resentment, but that’s in part because they’re not measuring candidates by whether they seem fit for the presidency or Congress or the governor’s mansion. Voters are just now starting to hold candidates up to the standards of the offices they seek; as they do, the unsettled political environment in which we find ourselves will grow a bit less uncertain. But the long-term issues — the fears and uncertainty and the forces driving them — won’t have gone away. Which is why I feel great sympathy for politicians at the moment. The skills we need in our political leaders, like the ability to approach those with whom they disagree with a measure of good will and an openness to negotiation and compromise, are not held in high esteem by the voters or by the loudest voices in their own parties. It’s easy for a politician to pander to anger and frustration. It’s much harder to face a roomful of disparate opinions and forge a consensus behind a solution. Yet that is precisely what many politicians recognize our country needs. Lee Hamilton is a Distinguished Scholar, Indiana University School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.


JANUARY 7, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Celebrating our 69th Anniversary So here we go off into the wild blue yonder of 2016. There will be changes in our country and hopefully for the better. So many promises, ideas, changes, threats and down deep we probably believe everything will be the same. So many untruths are told, and many ignored and the millions of dollars literally wasted, in my opinion. This Saturday, Jan. 9th, will mark the 69th wedding anniversary for me and my partner. It’s been a good trip with a few bumps, along the way, but by far smoother than we anticipated. Actually I doubt that we were even thinking very far down the road or we’d never have gotten married in the first place. At twenty we think we know everything, don’t we? Or, like me, can you remember that long ago? Will Rogers said, “There are two theo-

ries to arguing with a woman, and neither one of them work”. And he also said, “Never miss a good chance to shut up”. Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them! The above are just a few words to the wise... and may have been used by one or both of us, through the years. Sad news for the family of Mike Buckmiller. Yes, he had been ill for a lengthy time, battling cancer, but we can always hope, that just maybe it can be conquered and he had put up the good fight, but passed away just past midnight, last Monday night. Services will be held on Jan. 16 at 2 p.m. at the Bergh Funeral Home, as told to me by his mother, Beverly, who just happens to be my cousin. Hazel Dezellem, still a patient in North

Valley Hospital, seems to be able to see some light at the end of the tunnel. She’s pleased with the care she is receiving and is “lookin’ good” A new year always bring new diets and new exercise equipment and such good intentions of getting in shape, starting, oh! maybe next week. Remember when the Harlem Globetrotters traveling basketball team were so popular? They even came to little ole’ Oroville a few times back in the forties. “Meadowlark” Lemon was the head clown and just recently passed away at 83. They could truly work magic with basketballs. The bright sunshine last week was really a great change from the falling snow, but did it ever bring your attention to the dirty windows and made me find the duster and hit the high spots. We usually combine Christmas and New Year’s, making several days of not knowing what day of the week it is. Seems like a lot of Saturdays and Sundays, sometimes. Our Wenatchee daughter has three daughters in Seattle, so she goes that direction for Christmas and comes here for N-Y’s. She makes the BEST French onion soup so we taper

EAGLES CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS PARTY

off on soup to end the Christmas week out why so many folks feel that they of ‘round the clock eating and begin the have to get excessively drunk and not new “cutting back”. remember what they did and said, have a Another surprise phone call came vicious headache the next morning and from Missouri, from a cousin that, after then are dumb enough to do the same graduating from high school, came to thing again the next year. But then that visit two weeks and stayed is just my opinion and I am two years. Needless to say in the minority, I’m sure. But we grew very attached to her I’ve said this before and I’ll and she became like a third say it again, until this coundaughter to us. Her name was try gets the drug and alcohol Lisa Constable and she was a problem under control we sportswriter for the G-T back are going to continue to have when Bob Davis was at the the breakdown of the family, helm. The years have slipped and that is where a lot of the by and changes have happroblems stem from, in my pened but we are so pleased opinion. And, instead, we to be in touch again. are having the availability of THIS & THAT All’s quiet at our house, the marijuana on every corner, family all gone home. Even Joyce Emry with people trying to conthe visiting dogs had fun vince the public that “it isn’t times chasing each other. It addictive or harmful”... try seems kinda dull, at first, then we soon asking a teacher that is trying to teach fall back into the same routine. There’s a little child of parents that were and a bunch of leftovers but I think I’ll call are users and see what you learn. Yes, it the grandson and get rid of the remains. needs to be available for medicinal purEnough is enough. poses, but it doesn’t take acres and acres We had a very quiet New Year’s, to meet that demand. enjoyed a few games and catching up Have a good New Year. with the visiting. I’ve never quite figured ‘Til next week.

Senior Breakfast fundraiser SUBMITTED BY RALEIGH CHINN

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our January Pancake Breakfast fundraiser is Saturday, Jan. 9, between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All are invited. Don’t miss a delicious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice and milk; all for $8. The lunch menu for next week: Thursday, Jan. 7 is pork chops, Friday, Jan. 8 is spaghetti and meat sauce and Tuesday, Jan. 12

Economic Futures Roundtable Jan. 30 SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER

Submitted photos

OROVILLE GRANGE

The Children’s Christmas party at the Oroville Eagles on Dec 20 went really well. All the kids and even the adults had a great time. The Eagles thanked Santa Claus (Ernie Filbeck) and the Christmas Elf (Debra Shanks) for coming to help. “They did a wonderful job.” they also thanked Gold Digger Apples for donating the apples and Akins Harvest Foods for donating the oranges for the kids’ stockings. “Thanks to everyone who helped with the snacks and the Ladies Auxiliary for all their help. Everyone had a great time and it was a huge success.” they said.

White Christmas and New Years SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

2016 – Wow! Could you imagine looking back to say 1980 and wondering what our world would be like now. If you look outside today you may see nothing but white, white, white and more white. That is right snow, snow, and more snow. We had a white Christmas and New Year’s Eve and Day and now into the first week in January and the Seahawks won yesterday 36 to 6 against the Arizona Cardinals. Yeah! Hawks. The next time they play it will be the first game of the Play offs and they MUST win in order to go to the Super Bowl. Go Hawks! Before I get too carried away with the Hawks I need to catch up with the pinochle winners for Dec. 21 with 15 players in atten-

HILLTOP COMMENTS dance. The High went to George Penner and Loni Thompson with the Low going to Harold Harper and Ina Visser and Traveling to Bev Holden. Now for Dec. 28: there were 36 players in attendance. I think that is the most players for the season, so far. The Low winners were Larry Smith and Dolly Engelbretson and the High winners were Dale Deveraux and Berdie Nelson. The Traveling went to Dolly Engelbretson. The big event for this month is the Ice Fishing Festival, that will be held on Saturday, Jan. 16. The Festival will start at 7 a.m. with a Pancake Breakfast and registration. From the way it looks today, we should have plenty of snow and if it stays cold the lake will be frozen. Of course we will need fish. Last year was good for the fishermen or women. The

Hope New Year is off to a great start SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

A very happy New Year to all and we hope that the New Year has started great for you. The snow is falling, so make sure to clear off the driveways and to drive safe while out on your errands. The Seahawks made it to the playoffs and you can come on down Sunday and watch with others to see if they advance further. Tuesday will be our weekly

TONASKET EAGLES Taco Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. So get on down here and enjoy some crisp or soft tacos. Bev Montanye will be cooking up a storm and supplying you with those delicious tacos. Wednesday the pool league will be playing at 7 p.m. so come in and show your support for our teams. Bingo is back in full swing this Friday at 7 p.m. and will be a grand time as always. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m. on Friday to supply you with

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day will be full of activities at the Grange Hall with venders and visitors. There may be music and raffles. Come and bring the family and your friends. Come to the lake just to watch. The Knob Hill Club of Chesaw will be there with baked goods and raffle tickets. The Ladies Auxiliary will have their sales table stocked with home made items. There will be Bingo games to play in the Grange Hall and a Pine wood Derby , call Robert Fuchs at 509429-8742. For Sponsor information call Robin Stice at 485 4002. For information on sales tables call Mary Lou at 509-486-4436 or 509-486-4496. The folks from Sitzmark will be in charge of Lunch Time and will be serving Sloppy Joes from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. For info call Irene Coleman at 485 3343. News Flash as of Noon on Monday, Jan. 4. The ice is good and ready for the fishermen and women. Join us for a fun day of fishing and lots of prizes.

those scrumptious hamburgers and fries and other delights we all enjoy. Linda will be here Saturday at 8 p.m. for karaoke and playing some tunes to get your feet in a dancing mood. Sunday breakfast is back and will be cooking up that great food at 9 a.m. Pinochle will be at 1 p.m. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows: Jo Porter took home first place and second place was a tie for Gene Michels and Neil Fifer. Leonard Paulsen grabbed the last pinochle of the day. Wanda Sutherland had low score of the day. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

312 S. Whitcomb

The proposed Jan. 31 closure of the Department Store and Ace Hardware at Prince’s Center puts an exclamation point on what we have all been feeling, our local economy is collapsing. This change of circumstances requires new solutions to our common need for employment and livelihoods. We need a series brainstorming sessions where ideas and people can meet. People coming together can create new businesses, services and enterprises. We need to learn from successful business examples in our area and get inspired by ideas working well in other places. We

chicken parmesan. Feel free to check our website at: http://orovillewaseniorcntr for the latest update. Lunch is normally served Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; except holidays. For seniors 60 and over the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. Remember: Friends, Fun, and Food. See you there. It’s time to think about paying

OROVILLE GRANGE NEWS need to take stock of our available resources and come up with creative ways to make a living from those resources. The Oroville Grange is hosting a round table and brainstorming session on Saturday, Jan. 30 beginning at 10 a.m. to facilitate our response to change. The Grange will be inviting major employers in our area, US Forest Service, DNR, Reman and Reload, Gold Digger and Zosel’s Mill to participate in a morning panel discussion on employment in 2016, followed by a questions and discussion from the

dues for 2016. See Marge Finley, our membership chairwoman or a board member. I want to thank all those who contributed to the success of the Oroville Senior Center this past year. Our success was because of all the effort our members put into being involved, which keeps us young at heart and healthier. Having friends and meeting new ones also adds to the positive results. We have programs open to the public each Tuesday at the Center at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 5 – Installation of new officers. On Jan. 12 we will get the update on the Oroville School Bond request. And pinochle scores will be available when they play. Happy New Year. audience. Another panel of local contractors, food producers, and businesses, will convene at 1 p.m. to share their views of 2016 and employment in the local economy. A discussion will follow the panel presentations. Also in discussion will be the creation of worker owned businesses and cooperatives in all sectors of the local economy. The Oroville Grange, 622 Fir St, will provide the public space for this discussion as well as coffee, tea and sandwiches to keep the brainstorm sessions going. Mother Jones famously said. ”Don’t mourn, Organize!” Call Joseph Enzensperger, 509-4764972 or email: jgenz4@gmail. com, with your ideas, suggestions and willing participation in this important local issue.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Tonasket Blood Drive

Tonasket Gun Club Trapshooting

TONASKET - The Tonasket Community Blood Drive will be held at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket on Thursday, Jan. 7 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. On the day of donation, complete a RapidPass to save time at redcrossblood.org/RapidPass. To schedule an appointment or for more information, contact 1-800-RED-CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

TONASKET - Tonasket Gun Club will start trapshooting each Sunday beginning Jan. 3 at 10 a.m. and runs weekly through February. There will be practice each Wednesday at 1 p.m. Club members will help new shooters. Our annual meeting will be Jan. 17 at 1 p.m.

Grouse and Spouse TONASKET - On Friday, Jan. 8 come and learn about the world of grouse breeding behavior, with an inside perspective on grouse mating systems from a couple who have worked in this field both together and independently. This talk will explore a variety of mating systems, ranging from monogamy to extreme polygamy, and some of the breeding behavior of grouse species in Washington. Leslie and Mike have conducted research on several species of grouse in North America. Dr. Schroeder (aka grouse) is a Certified Wildlife Biologist who has pursued research and management of grouse since 1981. Leslie Robb (aka spouse) received her Bachelor of Science degree from Acadia University in Nova Scotia and her Master of Science degree in Zoology from the University of Alberta. For more see www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

VERA WOLF

STERLING & GEMSTONE

EARRINGS - HIGH QUALITY

Lots of choices!

Oroville Senior Breakfast OROVILLE - The Oroville Seniors are providing a Pancake Breakfast Saturday, Jan. 9, between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. at the Senior Center 1521 Golden St. All are invited. Don’t miss a delicious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, and milk; all for $8.

families and those interested in the county’s 4-H program. Pizza provided. More info 509-422-7245.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 REGULAR SHOWTIMES Oliver, B.C. Sun.–Mon.–Tues.–Thurs.....7:30p.m. Fri.–Sat....7:00 &9:00p.m. (unless otherwise stated) 14A

KRAMPUS THURS. - FRI. JAN. 7 – 8 SISTERS SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. 14A

JAN 9-10-11-12. SHOWS ON SAT. @ 7&9:15PM

ALVIN & THE CHIPMUNKS: ROAD CHIP THURS. - FRI. - SAT JAN. 14 - 15 - 16 SPOTLIGHT SUN. - MON.–TUES. JAN. 17 - 18 -19 OMAK THEATER G

Oroville Gun Club Trapshooting OROVILLE - The Inland Northwest Trapshooting at the Oroville Gun Club starts Sunday, Jan. 10 at 1 p.m. and runs weekly to Feb. 28. Practice shooting is every Saturday at 1 p.m. The Oroville Gun Club will again raffle off a Henry Rifle or cash equivalent for first prize. Second is “the Family Gourmet Banquet from Omaha Steaks. Get raffle tickets from a club member or stop by Paul’s Service.

Transportation Board to Meet OMAK - TranGO will hold a Public Board Meeting on Monday, Jan. 11, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. The location will be in the Council Chambers of Omak City Hall, 2 N. Ash St., Omak, WA 98841. Please call 509557-6177 or visit www.okanogantransit.com for any questions.

4-H Leaders Council OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County 4-H Leaders Council willmeet Thursday, Jan. 14 at 6 p.m. the WSU Okanogan County Extension Office, Rm. 101 at the county courthouse. The meeting is for all 4-H Adult volunteers, youth members,

OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

Gift Cards Available!

Schedule for Fri Jan 8 - Thurs Jan 14 509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

STAR WARS EPISODE VII: THE FORCE AWAKENS

136 min

HARRISON FORD, CARRIE FISHER. FRI. 6:00, 9:45. SAT. *2:00, 6:00, 9:45. SUN. *2:45, 6:45. MON-THURS. 6:45.

PG13

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

THE REVENANT

158 min

R

ADVENTURE,THRILLER. LEONARDO DICAPRIO, TOM HARDY. FRI. 6:45. SAT *3:30, 7:15. SUN. *2:45, 6:45. MON-THURS. 6:45.

THE HATEFUL EIGHT168 min R

WESTERN STARRING SAMUEL L JACKSON, KURT RUSSEL. FRI. 6:30. SAT *3:15, 7:00. SUN. *2:30, 6:30. MON-THURS. 6:30.

DADDY’S HOME

96 min

PG13

COMEDY. WILL FERRELL, MARK WAHLBERG. FRI. 6:15, 9:15. SAT. *3:00, 6:15, 9:15. SUN. *3:00, 6:15. MON-THURS: 6:15 Adult $9.00

*Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 7, 2016 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 7, 2016

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS; 2 BR, 2 BA house $700. Nice 1 BR Apt $450. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront 3 BR, 2 BA Apt $700. 2 BR 2 BA Apt $650. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-4762121. Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JANUARY 4, 2016 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

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The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Found

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

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DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

OWN YOUR OWN Dollar, big box, mail/ship, party, or womens clothing/accessory/boutique store, 100% Financing, OAC from $59,000 100% turnkey, 1-877-500-7606, dollarstoreservices.com/start/WA

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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Crosswords

PAYROLL/PERSONNEL/ HR OFFICER

8 hours per day, Monday – Friday, 260 days per year. Must be proficient in Excel, Word, and FileMaker Pro, thorough understanding of payroll processes, FMLA, FLSA, Family Care Leave and Labor and Industries laws; familiarity with the WESPaC and Skyward payroll programs and the Washington State Department of Retirement Systems plans. AA degree or higher preferred. Position closes January 22, 2016. To apply, applicants must complete an online application and submit materials through the online system. Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

23. “From Here to Eternity” wife

8. Employment terminations

24. Strategy board game

9. Betting game

25. Big blowout

10. Simple sugar

29. Horizontal trellis on posts

11. Gown fabric

31. Unlawful

12. Bailiwicks

33. Something outstandingly difficult (British)

13. Talks raucously

37. Snoopy, for one

24. Rodeo sight

38. Not straight

25. Kind of lettuce

39. Cause oneself to consider

26. On the safe side, at sea

41. Large, brightly colored handkerchief

27. Bed board 28. Type of gas that reduces knock (hyph.)

44. “-zoic” things

30. Smallest of the Great Lakes

45. Young bird 48. Pie cuts, essentially

32. Press and release a mouse button

50. Advanced

34. Boris Godunov, for one

51. Rectories 56. Arm bone

35. “Empedocles on ___” (Matthew Arnold poem)

57. The “A” of ABM

36. Scandinavian shag rugs

58. Italian dry white wine

40. Pertaining to the sacred texts of Islam

60. ___ Piper 61. “Come in!” Across 1. Goes (for)

62. Arid 63. “God’s Little ___” 64. Aquarium fish

6. Take into custody 10. “Don’t go!” 14. Kind of skeleton 15. ___ Minor 16. Halo, e.g. 17. Asian plant’s flaxlike fiber 18. Vice president under Jefferson 19. Ball of yarn 20. Director of an opera 22. Applaud

21. Discerning

42. Tenth month

59. 20-20, e.g.

ANSWERS

Health General

DRIVER Okanogan County Transportation seeks relief driver immediately in the Tonasket and Oroville areas, CDL with passenger endorsement preferred but not required. Must be 25 years of age; pass background check, pre-employment and random drug testing and DOT physical. CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Apply in person at Your Family, Your Health, Your 431 5th Avenue W., Choice Omak, Wa or find the OCTN application We are looking for YOU to and background check online join our team! at www.octn.org under employment options. We are dedicated to our EOE employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, comPost your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard. munication and positive www.gazette-tribune.com employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality www.gazette-tribune.com health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

LEGAL SERVICES

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Announcements

Help Wanted

Announcements

41. Kind of manner

We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN ADMIN CFO Full time Certified Medical Coding Specialist Full time HR Generalist Full time WIC Registered Dietician/Nutritionist Full time OKANOGAN DENTAL: Dental Assistant 2 Full time and 3 Part time, on an as needed basis OMAK MEDICAL Medical Scheduler Full time MA-C Full time OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant 1 Full time and 1 Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: RN Case Manager Full time Dentist Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Health General

Public Notices

North Valley Hospital Family Birthing Center

from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 3, SEE-VIEW HEIGHTS, A RECORDED PLAT ACCORDING TO THE FILES AND RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. ALSO, THAT PORTION OF THE UNNUMBERED AREA OF BLOCK 3, PLAT OF THE SEE-VIEW HEIGHTS, A RECORDED PLAT ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID AREA, BEING ALSO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PLAT; THENCE RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 229.9 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 2 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 20.3 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 4, IN BLOCK 3 IN SAID PLAT; THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 229.9 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID PLAT; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 2 MINUTES WEST TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. More commonly known as: 61 BOUNDARY POINT ROAD, OROVILLE, WA 98844 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/9/2008, recorded 10/16/2008, under 3138198 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from STEFANIE S. FOGG AND GEOFFREY M. FOGG, WIFE AND HUSBAND , as Grantor(s), to BAINES TITLE & ESCROW , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AXIA FINANCIAL, LLC, A WASHINGTON LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AXIA FINANCIAL, LLC, A WASHINGTON LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follo wing amounts which are now in arrears: $61,025.60 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $134,249.42 , together with interest as provided in the Note from 11/1/2011 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/15/2016 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/4/2016 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/4/2016 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1/4/2016 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME STEFANIE S. FOGG AND GEOFFREY M. FOGG, WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 61 BOUNDARY POINT ROAD, OROVILLE, WA 98844 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written

is currently taking applications for an experienced

OB Nurse We have beautiful LDRP suites, a jetted labor tub, nitrous oxide pain management, child birth education classes and extensive breastfeeding assistance. Apply online at www.nvhospital.org or submit application to North Valley Hospital at 203 South Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509)486-3185. hr@nvhospital.org

Public Notices SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, a limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN, a deceased individual; Julian Castro, solely in his capacity as Secretary for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NINE MILE RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; DOES 1 through 10, inclusive, and ROES 1 through 10, inclusive. Defendants. NO. 15-2-00443-5 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION (60 DAYS) THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID DEFENDANTS ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF HAROLD R. CHRISTIAN: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 31st day of December, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, and serve a copy of your answer upon the uudersigned attorneys for plaintiff, LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE, at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. This is a Complaint for Judicial Foreclosure of Deed of Trust. DATED: December 17, 2015 LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVE By: /s/ Benjamin D Petiprin Benjamin D. Petiprin, WSBA# 46071 Attorneys for Plaintiff NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC dba CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette - Tribune on December 31, 2015, January 7, 14, 21, 28, and February 4, 2016. OVG675143 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-15-673887-SW APN No.: 7300030401 Title Order No.: 150154038-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): STEFANIE S FOGG, GEOFFREY M FOGG Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AXIA FINANCIAL, LLC, A WASHINGTON LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3138198 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 1/15/2016 , at 10:00 AM at the main entrance to the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd N, Okanogan, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks

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43. Trade goods or services without money 45. Hints 46. Axe handle 47. ___ tube 49. Atlas enlargement

Down 1. Delhi dress

51. Perry Como’s “___ Loves Mambo” 52. Bang-up (hyphenated)

2. Final, e.g.

53. General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (acronym)

3. Walk lamely

54. “... happily ___ after”

4. Wild animal’s den

55. “Buona ___” (Italian greeting)

5. Aerodynamic 6. 1972 Liza Minnelli musical film 7. Money lender

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JANUARY 7, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

LOOKING BACK | FROM A1

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More photos from 2015 coming soon to www.gazette-tribune. com

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Sudoku 3

7 1

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8 2 6 3 9

4 6 8 1 5

3 5 7 2 4

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 1

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Puzzle 10 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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Puzzle 7 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.48)

8 2

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Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

ANSWERS

Medium, difficulty rating 0.51

2 8

Sponsored by

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509-476-3602

1 7 9 5

5 9 1 7

6 2 8 4 3

3 4 7 8

9 5 2 1 6

8 6 3 1 2

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9 5 4 6 8

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4 3 9 2 7 8 5 6 1

Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

3

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1

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2 7 1

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5

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3 4 9 6 1

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6 4 7

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Puzzle 9 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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Puzzle 12 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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Puzzle 8 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

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Puzzle 11 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 9/14/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Lauren Esquivel, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-15-673887-SW IDSPub #0091444 12/17/2015 1/7/2016 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 17, 2015 and January 7, 2016. #OVG657912

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the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the

Public Notices

3

Puzzle 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 7/27/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW

61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at

Public Notices

High winds whip flames - Fire broke out Nov. 24 destroying the lumber storage building behind Oroville Building Supply south of Oroville. Firefighters were quickly at the scene and were aided by the Tonasket Fire District. High

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Public Notices

DECEMBER

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Public Notices

OEA says demands on teachers’ time too high – Oroville Education Association president Lynn Johnson tells school board that demands on teachers’ time has increased, while time to accomplish tasks and compensation remain the same or less. Parks & Rec District gets nod from voters – The new Tonasket area Parks and Recreation District wins voter approval by nearly two to one, while Ryan Frazier and

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January 7, 2016 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER

Hughes Department Store decided it better call it quits at the end of January. Summer fires and the low Canadian dollar, as well as competition from online businesses have combined to lead to this hard decision. Wool mill wants to locate at Oroville’s Industrial Park – Oroville is offering a free lease at the Skyview Industrial Park for Eco Fiber Mill Inc., which plans to build their mill on property owned by the city. What to do about flooding – Trying to avoid a occurrence of the flooding that occurred when Tonasket Creek overran it’s banks in February of 2015, the Oroville City Council hears plans to deepen the creek’s channel and remove debris. It is looking at short and long term solutions.

winds and cold temperatures made the fire especially hard to fight. The storage building was lost but the main store survived. Father and son guilty of murder – A man and his son were found guilty in the premeditated murder of a Hoquium, Wash. man shot while grouse hunting near the pair’s Chesaw area residence. Each man was sentenced to 32 years in prison. Three cougar kittens in Oroville area – In a story to be featured on Animal Planet’s Rugged Justice, three motherless cougar kittens were darted on three separate days by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. Unfortunately, one kitten doesn’t survive injuries. The other two are relocated to the Wildcat Sanctuary in Minnesota. Hughes Department Store closing at end of January – After trying to “right the ship” 8

Conservation District offers free services – Craig Nelson, District Manager of the Okanogan Conservation District appeared before the Tonasket Council to offer assistance in helping landowners recover from this summers wildfires. Rung the Bell – Pictured are the Oroville Hornets football team who won the Victory Bell game against north county rivals the Tonasket Tigers. The game was not only the “Bell” game, but also Oroville’s homecoming game. Oroville candidates come together at forum – Several of the candidates for Oroville

Joyce Fancher lead in race for school board in Oroville and Tonasket, respectively. Comancheros crown Queen Trinity Dejong – The Tonasket Comancheros crowned a new queen at their annual Rodeo Queen and Sponsor Appreciation dinner. Dejong is passed the crown by 2015 Queen Sarah Quinlan. Oroville looking at $7.9 million 2016 budget – The City of Oroville is looking at approving the budget which is about $46,000 higher than in 2015. The budget includes repairs to city well #1, according to Clerk JoAnn Denney.

3

OCTOBER

City Council and School Board met with the public in a candidate’s forum sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. General election ballots must be in by Nov. 3 – Voters are asked to decide contested races for Oroville City Council and Tonasket and Oroville School Boards, as well as a Tonasket Parks & Rec. District.

4

off on running bond – The school board voted to postpone going to voters for another try at passing a school improvement bond. Concern about recent wildfires are part of board’s reasoning.

5

has been delayed as the County Commissioners moved to postpone the fair based on a recommendation from the fair advisory committee. Oroville and County looking at longterm private sector ambulance service contract – Rather than going back to an all volunteer ambulance crew, it looks like the county commissioners and city council will be choosing a long term service provider. North Star asks to be considered but city says Lifeline more qualified due to their track record. Ambulance: Oroville hears concerns about ‘level of care’ from community – While no one could point to a situation where level of care was less now that the EMS District was being served by Lifeline, concerned citizen Mark Bordwell tells the city council “The entire community will suffer if we go to a private service.” Tonasket schools to hold

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 7, 2016

SPORTS Oroville boys win first game of the New Year BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Oroville hosted Republic January 2, with the boys’ team coming away with a solid win and the girls a tough loss. The boys won their game 56-41, and the girls lost 52-24. The Oroville boys currently have two league wins and two league losses, and are four and two overall. They are ranked fourth in league; with Brewster in the lead with three league wins and zero losses and eight wins and zero losses overall; followed by Lake Roosevelt 3-0 in league and 4-1 overall and Liberty Bell 2-1 in league and 5-3 overall. The Lady Hornets played Adna at the Chelan Holiday Tournament, losing that game 67-27 December 28. They lost to Connell the following day 64-32.

“It’s been a tough stretch for the Lady Hornets. Our current record is three wins and six losses,” said Oroville assistant coach Bill Cottrell. “We’re hoping to get back into the win column tomorrow (January 5) at Manson.” Manson is currently ranked seventh in the league with zero wins and three losses and 2-4 overall. The Hornets are ranked fourth with two league wins and two losses; 3-4 overall (not including holiday tournament). The Lady Tigers, like the Lady Hornets, are currently 2-2 in league and 3-4 overall. They competed in the Lakeside tournament in West Valley December 28-29, taking on Colville and Priest River. They lost 55-34 to Colville after being behind by just one point at the end of the first quarter and five points at the half. They

scored nine points to Colville’s ten in the third quarter, but the Indians polished off the Tigers in the fourth, earning 21 points to Tonasket’s six. The Lady Tigers lost another close one to Priest River, 43-39. The Tigers were ahead 21-16 at the end of the first quarter, but Priest River held Tonasket to just two points in the second quarter while scoring 12 themselves. Both teams scored five more points in the third quarter, and they each scored ten in the fourth. The Tigers were scheduled to play in Lake Roosevelt January 5. The Hornets play in Tonasket Saturday, Jan. 9 and host Brewster Tuesday, Jan. 12. “The Lady Hornets really need to beat Tonasket,” said Cottrell. “It should be a good game.” The girls’ games start at 6 p.m. and the boys’ at 7:30 p.m.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Nathan Hugus leaps up to send the ball to the net during Oroville’s home game against Republic Saturday, Jan.2. Photo submitted by Terry Mills

Jorge Juarez, seen here turning a Schmunck Classic competitor on his head, brought home a championship in the 152-pound division from Warden along with Rade Pilkinton (138) and Zach Lofthus (170).

Tonasket takes second at Scmunck Classic BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket’s wrestling team took second place among 14 teams at the Schmunck Classic in Warden January 2. Warden took first with 212 points, followed by Tonasket (153), Kittitas (127), Concrete (123), Brewster (71), Colfax (70), Okanogan (66.5), Lake Roosevelt (66), Mt. Baker (65), Connell (30), Pateros (24), Riverview (18), Garfield-Palouse (11) and Columbia-Burbank (11). Individuals bringing home championships were Rade Pilkinton at 138 pounds, Jorge Juarez (152) and Zach Lofthus (170). Tigers taking second were Dawson Bretz (113) and Trevor Peterson (132). Devin Walton (120) and Isaac Gomez (195) finished in third place, and Austin Rimestad (138) finished in

fourth. Austin Wood (138) took fifth place, and Tim Freese (126), Garret Wilson (132), Zion Butler (145) and Garrett Thomas (220) all placed sixth. All of Tonasket’s wrestlers got in the tournament, including Chris Freese (126) who won a couple of matches but didn’t place in the top six. “It was a great day for our younger wrestlers to get some valuable experience and they looked good,” said Coach Dave Mitchell. “Meanwhile, our ‘veteran’ wrestlers all stepped up and wrestled tough as well.” The team also did really well at the Royal City Classic December 29, with all 10 Tigers who competed in the 18-team tournament placing in the top six of their weight class. Juarez (152) took first place. “Depending on when a wrestler lost a match, he could have

three wins and one loss and finish in second, third or fourth,” said Mitchell. “We had seven guys finish with three wins and one loss; that is outstanding.” Going 3-1 on the day were Bretz (106), Walton (113), Freese (126), Peterson (132), Pilkinton (138), Lofthus (170) and Gomez (195). Butler (145) and Vance Frazier (126) were both 2-2 on the day. “We had a total of 12 pins, which gained us some bonus points that helped with our team score,” said Mitchell. The team was scheduled to compete in Chelan January 6 and the Cascade Invitational January 9. They face Omak and Liberty Bell in Omak January 12, and host the Apple Pie Jamboree Saturday, January 16, beginning at 10 a.m.

Highlands Sno-Park glistening in the cold SUBMITTED BY PATTI BAUMGARDNER SECRETARY, HIGHLANDS NORDIC SKI CLUB

Skiers, Skiing remains excellent. I started on Whitetail this afternoon with the sun shining through the crystals in the trees and lighting sparkling orbs; diamonds in the sky, my friend calls them. I went down Hej Bue, now open, keeping my mittened hands close to my thighs for warmth, and skied happily around Straight Edge. The cover is good on the meadow but for a few baby fir trees poking through on the west side, and if the trail to it is still a little rough it didn’t interfere with snow plowing down or skating back up the hill. My hands were plenty warm by the time I got to the junction and I skated in the sunshine over

sparkling snow to Sunshine Loop and back up Pomme du Pin. The grooming for skating was good all the way and the classic track looked perfect. The sun had slipped behind the ridge when I got to Whitetail, and though there were no clouds to lend a bit of color to the dusk, the sky glowed with cold and with purity. The other skiers I saw moving gracefully down the trail seemed to be enjoying the afternoon as much as I was. I learned that the snowmobile trespass that churned up the 150 has been fixed, and the trails are in amazing shape everywhere. Don’t we have a great grooming crew? Embrace your New Year. Come ski! To receive grooming reports by email, contact Baumgardner at highlandsnordicsnopark.com.

Photo submitted by Terry Mills

Austin Wood, a freshman wrestling at 138, placed fifth at the Schmunck Classic, held January 2 in Warden.

Hornets grab two second-place finishes BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Signs along the trails in Washington Sno-Parks are easily visible, with trails marked with different colored signs depending on level of difficulty.

Oroville’s Drake Fox and Scotty Hartvig both brought home second-place finishes when they wrestled in Chelan December 29. Fox, a sophomore, was wrestling at 132 pounds and Hartvig, a senior, at 195. Sophomore Louis Vazquez came in third at 106. Taking fourth place finishes were sophomores Jeff Rounds (132), David Iniquez (152) and Nick Clase (170).

Also wrestling were sophomores Johnny Castillo (138) and Ryan Scott (152); and senior Kacey DeWitte (160). Oroville finished in fifth place with 82.5 team points. Okanogan took first with 148.5 points, followed by Omak (142), Rainier (94.5) and Lake Roosevelt (86.5). Republic-Curlew came in sixth with 74, and Wilbur Creston-Kellog scored 73. Brewster had 70.5 and Almira Coulee Hartline had 16.5. The team hosts Omak and Davenport for a TriMeet Thursday, January 7 at 5 p.m.


JANUARY 7, 2016 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

SPORTS

Looking back at sports in 2015 WINTER SPORTS

Oroville grappler Jordan Smith won his third straight tournament at Banks Lake Brawl January 3, and Zane Scott won his first gold of the season. Smith dominated his first two matches, then edged secondranked Tristan Chantry of Selkirk 7-6 for the 126-pound title. Scott won the 195 class with a technical fall and a decision.

rebounds to bring their team from behind for a 60-50 victory over the Bears. The Hornets enjoyed a 50-31 victory over Tonasket February 3.

Trevor Peterson and Jorge Juarez became the first Tonasket State Champions—in any sport---since Keegan McCormick’s 2010 title as they swept through three matches at the Class B Mat Classic XXVII tournament in Tacoma February

while eighth grade teammates Eric Owsley and Caleb Hardesty each battled sophomores in singles matches when the Tigers hosted Omak March 28. Owsley beat Philip Law 6-2, 6-3 and Hardesty took Craig Conway to a tie-breaker that Conway won 8-6. “It was a big comeback for me, because I was down 5-2 in the third set,” said Hardesty. The team is coached by Mark Milner and Arcelia Carroll. The Tonasket Lady Tigers placed first among 2B schools and the boys team third among 29 schools at the Ezra Gordon Invitational Track Meet March 28, where THS junior Rose Walts took first in the 100 hurdles. Among Oroville athletes, Katie Egerton placed sixth in both high jump and pole vault, Tori Kindred took sixth in shot put and Tylynne Watkins took eighth in pole vault. Mikaela McCoy, Emili Divine, Havannah Worrell and Yessica Nemcio placed seventh in the 400 relay. Tonasket’s Ethan Bensing took fourth in both Triple Jump and Long Jump; and Alissa Young took fifth in javelin.

Tonasket’s softball team won both games in a non-league double header in Republic March 28. The Tonasket Tigers won the first game 11-1 before Republic’s Tigers woke up and made Tonasket fight a little harder for their second win, 10-9. Vanessa Pershing pitched the first game, and Samantha Keller hit a home run, bringing two players in with her. Keller hit another homer in the second game, as did Pershing. The team is coached by Emily Rimestad, assisted by Breanna Hanson.

Photo by Bent Baker

Bryce Glover ran into foul trouble on this drive to the basket against Tonasket, but led the Hornets with 21 points in their rough and tumble 63-48 loss to the Tigers Friday, January 2, 2015. North County neighbors Oroville and Tonasket battled a physical game on the courts with the Hornets racking up 31 fouls and the Tigers 18 in a match that saw the Tigers trailing 12-6 before taking a 30-22 halftime lead. Tonasket’s Colton Leep hit a career high of 33 points, and Oroville’s Bryce Glover led the Hornets with 21 points. “You can throw the records out the window when it came to tonight,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. The Lady Tigers beat Warden January 24 after three losses on the road when Ashlynn Willis hit a pair of 3-pointers and Johnna Terris added one to key a 16-5 Tonasket run in the second quarter that gave the Tigers a 19-14 halftime lead. The non-league victory improved the Tigers to 3-13 overall. Tonasket came within a point of Liberty Bell earlier in the week when they scored nearly as many points in the final six minutes of a game that saw the Mountain Lions ahead 30-18 at the start of the fourth quarter. Liberty Bell won 33-32. The Tigers earned their first post-season victory since 2007 when they took down Soap Lake 78-69 in the District 5/6 play-in at Brewster February 7. “It wasn’t always pretty, but we made some big plays when we had to,” said Coach Mike Larson. The Tigers went into the second half with a 43-36 lead, but when they committed seven fouls in the first three minutes of the third quarter the Eagles gained a 49-48 lead on the free throw line. The Tigers face league co-champion Brewster (182) to open league play February 11. Pretty impressive for a team with an 8-12 record whose coach (Larson) wasn’t even hired until October. “When I started I had no idea what we were going to run, or how this team could play,” said Larson. “We had guys come out who hadn’t played before....Now it’s a new season and anything can happen.” The Tigers earned the CWL North’s fifth and final playoff spot with a 61-50 victory over Oroville February 3. Oroville’s Lily Hilderbrand hit four free throws in the final 28 seconds for a 41-39 victory over Waterville in East Wenatchee February 15, keeping the Hornets in the playing for a chance to repeat last year’s first round state appearance. Oroville hosted Brewster earlier in the week for the last home game of the season and the fight for the third and fourth seeds, with Lily and Hannah Hilderbrand each scoring 13 points and grabbling 13

21. Each of the Tigers’ six qualifiers won at least one match, with the team tying Liberty Bell for third place and Chad Edwards earning state runner-up. This was Peterson’s first state finals trip and Juarez’s third after placing sixth as a freshman at 126 pounds and second as a sophomore at 132 pounds. Also competing at state for the Tigers were Zach Lofthus at 160, Austin Knowlton at 170 and Frank Holfeltz at 195. The Lady Hornets faced defending state champion Colfax in a loser-out Class 2B state regional game in Cheney February 28, taking a hard loss of 61-19 with Colfax taking Oroville out of its comfort zone when they bottled up Lily Hilderbrand by double and triple teaming her. “Lily had the crap beat out of her in the paint, then reaches in to tie the ball up and gets called for a foul,” said Coach Mike Bourn “But they were just very good, period. They were quick enough to recover when they double-teamed Lily and she’d pass it out. You’d throw a skip pass over and they’d be right there.” The Hornets finish their season 15-10. This is the second year in a row they have made it to the “Sweet 16;” the first times Oroville’s girls’ basketball team has advanced this far in the school’s history. Bourn credited Hilderbrand’s leadership on the floor, off the floor and during the summer as a key part of the team’s success.

SPRING SPORTS The Tigers shut out Omak 5-0 on the soccer fields March 28. “We played a much tighter game than the score showed,” said Omak Coach Chris Werner. “Isaiah Albright torched us in the jamboree, but we were able to shut him down today, thanks to efforts by Tim Vincent and Jag Bains.” Apparently Coach Werner should have told his boys to shut down the entire team. They did shut down one other player; Austrian foreign exchange student Andreas Rosenkranz had to be driven to the hospital by a member of his host family, the Laceys, when he took a kick to the foot late in the game. Earlier in the week the Tigers took Manson into two five-minute golden goal overtimes after finishing the home match 1-0. No-one scored in OT, so the match defaulted to penalty kicks which the Tigers won 4-3. New to the team this year is Head Coach Darren Collins, assisted by nine-year Tiger veteran coach Tod Mathews. Tonasket senior Morgan O’Brien credited winning a singles’ match 6-0, 6-1 to experience on the court,

The Tonasket Tigers traveled to Omak March 13, beating the Pioneers 12-9 with Cade Hockett pitching three innings and Andrian McCarthy pitching four. The Tigers next hosted Liberty Bell, taking a 2-4 defeat. Coleman pitched all seven innings, throwing only 87 pitches, with five strikeouts and no walks. Before being

Photo by Brent Baker

Oroville’s Katie Egerton makes the winning jump in the pole vault at Oroville’s Draggoo Financial invitational Saturday, May 2. Egerton took first at the 1B/2B District 5/6 Meet in in Ephrata May 23. Teammate Tylynne Watkins finished in second place. nicest kid on the team.” Riding his KTM 250 XC on the dirt tracks, 2014 Tonasket High School graduate Dyllan Gage took first place in the Sportsman Light Class in the Eastern Washington Dirt Riders Association Spring Hare Scrambles March 1, after taking second place in the Desert Raiders Oreana 100 Race February 28. Back to back races in the Northwest Motorcycle Association March 28-29 saw Gage finishing third both days in the Open A Class of the Stumpjumpers Frostbite Hare Scramble. “My dad bought me a dirt bike when I was five years old, and I’ve been riding ever since,” said Gage, who is working for Ty Olson Construction while completing prerequisites at Wenatchee Valley College North in Omak for a radiology program. Tonasket FFA Trap Shooter

Fifth Place High Female. Deebach also competed at the state competition, taking fourth place in the adult shoot. The Tigers Track and Field team took sixteen first-place finishes when they hosted Omak, Lake Roosevelt and Waterville March 31. Placing first on the girls’ team were freshmen Alicia Tibbs (100 Meters) and Alina Vlahovich (200 Meters); Shyane Lewis in both the 400 and 800 Meters; Jenna Valentine (1600 Meters); Rose Walts (100 Meter Hurdles); Vlahovich, Walts, Katie Henneman and Jaden Vugteveen (4x100 Relay); Vugteveen, Madyson Clark, Camille Wilson and Morgan Tyus (4x200 Relay); Vugteveen, Valentine, Lewis and Mary Naylor (4x400); Valentine (Javelin) and Vlahovich (Long Jump). For the boys, Hunter Swanson took first in both the 1600 Meters and 800

league win under our belts for the first time in eight years,” said pitcher Vanessa Pershing. Oroville’s softball team came home victors in a double-header against Lake Roosevelt April 21, leaving the team ranked fourth in the NC2B league. The Hornets won the first game 9-8, pitched by Courtney Kallstrom; with Pie Todd leading in hitting with a home run and three RBIs. Michelle Nutt hit a single and stole eight bases to lead the team in stolen bases against the Raiders. The Hornets won the second game 18-16, pitched by Hannah Hilderbrand after coming back from a nine run deficit in the first inning. Oroville’s Track and Field Team hosted the Draggoo Financial Invite, where Hornet Katie Egerton won the Pole Vault, Tonasket’s Ethan Bensing took first in the Long Jump and Triple Jump and Tonasket’s Rose Walts took first in the 100-Meter Hurdles, posting a 2B League Best time of 15.53. The Cougar Boys’ and Girls’ teams both won 4-1 when Tonasket hosted White Swan on the tennis courts May 2, but not without the Tigers putting up a good fight. Tonasket’s First Girls Doubles team of Mandi Wilson and Johnna Terris took out the previously unbeaten-in-the-league Cougar team of Calista Spoonhunter and Luz Guitterres. Wilson and Terris, both in their first year of playing tennis, won the first set 6-5 and a tie-breaker after going 6-6 in the second. In First Boys Singles, Tim Frazier beat Jose Suarez 7-5 in the first and the second set by forfeit. “To be honest, that was the best match I’ve ever played this year, but he put up a good fight. He’s pretty good,” Suarez said of his loss.

Photo by Brent Baker

Rose Walts, a junior at Tonasket High School brought home four medals from the WIAA State Track and Field Championships, winning the titles in both the 100 Meter Hurdles and the Long Jump; and taking third in Triple Jump. Walts and her teammates Katie Henneman, Jaden Vugteveen and Alina Vlahovich, competing in the relay, brought home a fourth-place finish; just a tenth of a second from second place .

This Special Looking Back Section compiled by Katie Teachout. ejected from the game, Mountain Lion Derek Alumbaugh pitched a one-hit, ten-strikeout five innings. “About ten feet from home plate, Derek ran Adrian (McCarthy) over. Adrian held onto the ball for the out,” said Tonasket Coach Dan Vassar. “Derek was ejected for lowering his shoulder rather than sliding.” Liberty Bell Coach Don Calvert called Alumbaugh “the

Brendan Asmussen took first place and the state championship at the Wenatchee Gun Club April 17, and teammate Jenna Valentine took second in a game called ‘Missing Out.’ Asmussen also finished fourth in an event called ‘Annie Oakley.’ Advisor Matt Deebach said the following day the longest event of the season was held, a 100Bird Shoot, where Valentine took

Meters; David Curtis (300 Meter Hurdles); Dallas Tyus (High Jump); and Ethan Bensing (Triple Jump). Tonasket won their first league softball game in eight years as well as their second when they beat Manson in a double-header 17-0 and 14-3. “They are a pretty good team, so it feels good to have a

Oroville ended their softball season May 16 at the 2B District 5/6 tournament in Ephrata with a 28-1 loss to Brewster and a 10-5 loss to Liberty Bell. The final game was the ninth in a week for the Hornets, who played a doubleheader against Okanogan May 1, a must-win double-header sweep of Bridgeport May 5, a tie-break loss to Tonasket May 6, a district play-in defeat of White Swan in Ephrata May 7, and two games in the double-elimination tournament May 16. Oroville finished the season 9-14. Dane Forrester has been coaching the team the last seven years, assisted this year by Brian Martin. Tiger softball players ended their season at the quarter finals in Yakima May 23, finishing in sixth place and just one spot shy of going on to State. Tonasket lost to Brewster 0-22 before taking on Liberty Bell for the fifth and final state spot. The teams were tied 2-2 after the third inning, leading 4-2 after the fourth and behind by only one at the top of the fifth before the Mountain Lions won 13-8.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville’s Casey Martin slides safely into second just as a Tonasket Tiger clinches the ball in his mitt for the hopedfor out. The Hornets hosted Tonasket May 2 for a double-header, with the Tigers winning both games. This was Martin’s first game of the season after being out for surgery following an injury. Casey pitched the first five innings.

Headed to the State Golf Tournament at Columbia Point Golf Course in Richland are Cayden Field of Tonasket and Jordyn Smith and Bryce Glover of Oroville. This is Smith and Glover’s third trip to State; Smith finished in 10th place last year. “Oroville Golf Course is a great place to come and prepare; there’s a lot of ups and downs for set up and stances. When you go to flat courses it makes them seem like nothing,” said Coach DeHaven Hill.


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 7, 2016

OBITUARIES

Michael Patrick Buckmiller

MICHAEL PATRICK BUCKMILLER Michael Patrick Buckmiller, 58, of Oroville, Washington was born August 31, 1957 in Tonasket, Washington to Beverly and Forrest Boyer. He passed away on December 29, 2015 after a courageous battle with cancer. At the age of two Mike was legally adopted by David Buckmiller and became a permanent part of their family. He was raised with younger siblings Jeff, Lori and Scott. He graduated from Oroville High School in 1975 and soon after began his career in the agricultural industry. Throughout his career he worked as a packing boss, field and refrigeration man, produc-

GERALD H. THOMPSON Gerald H. Thompson, age 90, formerly of Oroville and East Wenatchee, Washington passed away on January 2, 2016 at his daughter’s home in Gresham, Oregon. He was born in Cranbrook, BC, Canada on May 30, 1925 to Tony and Francis (Fannie McIntyre) Thompson and lived in Wardner, BC until age eight when the family moved to Oroville, Washington in 1933 where Tony found work with the Zosel Lumber Company. He was a member of a nondenominational group of

RITA EVELYN CAMPBELL Rita Evelyn Campbell, age 93, passed away on December 18, 2015 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket, Washington, after a brief illness. She was born on November 2, 1922 to James and Theresa Chapman of

tion manager, commercial consultant and award winning wine maker for Gold Digger Apples. During his tenure at Gold Digger Apples his network of growers and colleagues became his family. From 1993-2007 Mike was an instrumental part in developing Oroville’s Emergency Medical Services while volunteering as an EMT and EMS coordinator. Throughout his life Mike had many close friends with whom he shared cherished memories and countless stories. There was never a person he met who wouldn’t have considered him a friend. As a young adult Mike, Jack Gould and close friends spent many days exploring the woods on mountain bikes, horses, snowmobiles and quads. Later they establish a hide-away camp south of the Toats Coulee drainage, where they could be found most weekends enjoying life. Mike was the go-to person for many people but most importantly his two children Kyle and Kadi Buckmiller whom he raised with Diane Buckmiller. As a family they had yearly vacations, weekly camping trips and endless family celebrations. Mike was known to be an avid camper and snowmobiler, where he was always known as the camp cook and everyone ate well at camp with Mike around. He was also a longtime member of Oroville Golf Club. Summer nights that weren’t spent camping or fishing Mike was up golfing with brother Tim and on occasion was known to get a hole in one.

In 2010 Mike married Brenda Calico, when they built a life of love and support. Mike and Brenda loved to travel to Mexico, Canada and around the county visiting family. At home they looked forward to the visits from out of town family such as Tammy, Lori and Scott. Together they loved and spoiled their grandchildren Addison, Calista and Blake. Mike was dedicated to succeeding in everything he did from making wine to painting landscapes. He enjoyed cruising the back roads on his motorcycle or in his truck with the ones he loved, stopping by and shooting the breeze in Chesaw and hanging out on the lake. Mike was a loving and devoted father, husband, brother and son, capable of anything and personable to everyone. Mike is survived by wife Brenda Buckmiller; parents David and Beverly Buckmiller; children Kyle (Mattie) Buckmiller, Kadi Buckmiller and Kevin Fray; siblings, Jeff Buckmiller, Lori (David) Trump, Scott Buckmiller, Tim (Cindy) Boyer, Tammy (Larry) Boyer-Eneix; grandchildren Addison Calico, Calista Fray and Blake Buckmiller. He is preceded in death by his grandparents, nephew Collin Cross and Forrest Boyer. Memorial Services to be held on January 16, 2016 at 2 p.m. at Bergh Funeral Home in Oroville. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is entrusted with arrangements.

Christians and made his choice to love and serve God at the age of twelve. After high school, Gerald served from 1944-1946 in the US Navy serving in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans during World War II. On May 24, 1948, he was married to Hazel V. Moznik and they lived in Oroville until her death in 1994. He worked as a young man in apple warehouses until purchasing his own orchards which became his career until retirement. On Feb. 2, 1995 he married Marilyn Cotter and spent their lives together in Chelan and East Wenatchee, Wash. until her death in January of 2010. He continued to live in East Wenatchee until 2014 when he moved to

Gresham, Ore. to live with his daughter. Survivors include his brother Ron (Ruth) Thompson in Oroville and his three children: Linda (Larry) Butler of East Wenatchee; Patty Kamrau of Gresham and Robert (Teresa) Thompson of East Wenatchee. His grandchildren: Brandon (Corrina) Butler, Larinda (Aaron) Cutright, Tim Kamrau, Brad Kamrau, Ashley Chambers, and Renee (Steve) Slaven. He is also survived by six great-grandsons. He was preceded in death by his wife Hazel in 1994, his sister Vivian DeWitz, and his parents. Services will be held on Saturday, January 16, 2016 at 11 a.m. at Bergh Funeral Service in Oroville.

Louisville, Kentucky. She married Elton (Jack) Campbell in 1946 and moved to Washington State in 1953. They owned Thornbrue Electric first in Cashmere from 1961 to 1968 and then in Tonasket from 1968 to 1983. Survivors include daughter Linda Montgomery, stepson David Campbell, sister Kaye

I.V. Joe Rickel

I.V. JOE RICKEL I.V. Joe Rickel left his earthly trappings and passed over to heaven on Dec. 28, 2015. He was born on November, 17, 1933 in Omak, Washington to Agnes “Cate” and George W. Rickel. His early childhood was spent on the family ranch in Joe Rickel Synerup, Wash. where his grandparents owned the general store. At seven his family moved and built a home

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Zuro, four grandchildren and five great grandchildren. She was proceeded in death by her husband Elton (Jack) Campbell, son James Ormon Ellis and two brothers and two sisters. Rita was a longtime member of the Eagles, a loving wife, mother stepmother, grandmother and great grandmother and will be greatly missed.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

(on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Trinity Episcopal

2016 NW Ice Fishing Festival Sponsored by Oroville Chamber of Commerce and Hosted by Molson Grange

2016 Northwest

Saturday January 16, 2016

Adults $25 Youth $10

ICE FISHING Fishing Tournament FESTIVAL

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Adult & Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Youth Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Prizes Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist $500 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Grand Prize

Registration 7 am in Grange Hall 500 Registration at$the Lake 8:00 am d Gran rize P Fish: 8:00 am to 3:00 pm

tying flies and building fishing poles, there was always venison in the freezer and smoked fish to eat. He was an enrolled member of the Colville Confederated Tribes. Joe was preceded in death by his parents, a baby sister Anna Gene, wife Roberta Rickel, and granddaughter Theresa Fancher. He is survived by his sister Sally Sherwood of Tonasket, three children Pamela Fancher of Tonasket, Tenise Kessler (husband Mike) of Connell, Kenneth Rickel (wife Shawn) of Cheney; grandchildren Corrinn Fletcher (husband Cory), Erin Nielsen (wife Jennifer), Shelby Kessler, Jordan Rickel and Isaiah Rickel; six great-grandchildren, stepdaughter Debra Jones and her family, and step-son Bill Sluys. Services for I.V. Joe Rickel will be Saturday, January 9 at 2 p.m., at the Community Church in Tonasket. Join us for dinner following at the church. Military Graveside Services will be at the Tunk Valley Cemetery in Synerup on January 10 at 1 p.m. In remembrance of I.V. Joe Rickel memorials may be made to the Armed Forces Legacy, 1 Tonasket Shop Rd, Tonasket, WA 98855. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is entrusted with arrangements.

Okanogan Valley

COPS & COURTS | FROM A3 Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 32, DOC hold. Margie Ruth Gourley, 34, booked for theft of a motor vehicle. Theresa Maria Nimmo, 23, booked for DUI. Joseph Darwin Cormier, 25, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV). Alan Ryne Stanger, 28, booked on warrants for physical control, reckless driving, DUI, seconddegree DWLS and attempted to elude.

on the ranch at Aeneas Valley, where in later years he would build and make his final home. His first job as a kid was working in the saw mill his parents owned. He graduated from Tonasket High School in 1952. He went into the army in 1953 at the end of the Korean War. The peace treaty was signed as his ship crossed the International Date Line and he spent two years in Korea assigned to the Medic Unit. In 1952 he married JoAnn Turpen and they had three children Pam, Tenise and Kenneth. They moved to Spokane for a few years where he went to Trade School as a Diesel Mechanic during the days and worked at Hi-grade meats nights. They moved back to Tonasket in 1962 where he ran a cattle ranch for Ken Clarkson. His long contracting career started out working with Carman Bliss, and later his own construction company Joe Rickel Building. His partners over the years included his brother-in-law Jack Sherwood and his son-in-law Scott Fancher. He built and remodeled many homes in Okanogan County. In 1988 he met and married Roberta Johnson, they built and made their home on the ranch at Aeneas Valley. He was an avid hunter and fisherman, he enjoyed

Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist Sponsored by Oroville Chamber of Commerce and Hosted by Molson Grange Event

At Festival the Grange Hall 20162016 NW Ice Fishing NWBenefits Ice Fishing Festival Booths available Saturday January 16, 2016 Pancake Breakfast

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

7am-10:30am Visitor Call 509 486-4496 Arts Crafts FairCommerce Sponsored by Oroville Chamber of&Commerce Sponsored by Oroville Chamber of Adults $25 Youth $10 Information Car Derby! Center. and Hosted by Molson Grange and Hosted by Pine Molson Grange Bingo & Baked Goods NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Raffle7am Prizes in Grange Hall Fishing Tournament Registration Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Adult & Adult & Service Fish 8:00am Coloring Contest Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. Registration at the Lake 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Booths Available Food by Sitzmark 11-3Youth pm Youth Adults $25 Mark Fast, Pastor Adults $25 Fish: 8:00am to 3:00pm

Saturday January 16, 2016 Saturday January 16, 2016

Call Marylou’s Hidden Prizes Prizes Adul Youth $10 t Youth $10 At The Grange Hall Treasures at 509-486-4496 Yout & h History of 2015

www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

P

rizes Pancake Breakfast 7am - 10:30am Event: 19 Fish Event benefits Visitor To place information in the Arts & Crafts Fair Pine Car Derby! at nearly 33 $500 $500 Information Center pounds! Baked Goods Raffle Prizes Grand Prize Church Guide Grand Prize Registration 7 Bingo am in&7Grange Hall Registration am in Grange Hall Fish Coloring Contest Food by Sitzmark 11am-3pm call Charlene 509- 476-3602

Fishing Tournament Fishing Tournament

Registration at the Lake 8:00 am8:00 am Registration at the Lake For information call Robin at Fish:Guest 8:00 am8:00 to 3:00 pm3:00 pm Eden Valley Ranch 509-485-4002 Fish: am to

For Information Call Robin at Eden Valley Guest Ranch 509-485-4002

ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming diversity and welcoming to all

Profile for Sound Publishing

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 07, 2016  

January 07, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 07, 2016  

January 07, 2016 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune