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It’s the gift that keeps on swimming and dancing

LIVENING UP WESTERN AVE

“The minimum donation is $10, so anyone can be a philanthropist,” said Tonasket Pool Committee member The Community Foundation of Karen Stangland. “Let’s all help the non profits this holiday North Central season, so they can Washington is startcontinue to make our ing a ‘Give NCW’ fundraising cam“The minimum donation communities a great place to live.” paign that launches is $10, so anyone can be Stangland said the Thanksgiving Day Foundation handles and runs through a philanthropist. ” all the credit card fees, Dec. 31. Karen Stangland, member so the entire donation The Tonasket Pool Tonasket Pool Committee goes to the organizaand Community tion the giver chooses. Cultural Center “One can also make were both awarded the donation as a gift $10,000 grants from the Foundation and are part of the five- to, or in memory of, another person,” week crowdfunding campaign, along Stangland said. Donations are tax-deductible. with 23 other NCW non profits. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Bellingham’s Lindsay Street Band delighted audience members Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket with original tunes and covers ranging from Ireland, England, Quebec, Scandinavia and France. Above, Elizabeth Elton played violin and sang; Robin Elwood played the button accordion and regular accordion along with guitar and vocals; and Jean Rogers played guitar and penny whistle, along with singing in both French and English. Left, Patty Chambers played percussion, banjo, tin whistle and sang. A dinner prior to the show was available through Tonasket’s La Ultima. For more see page A2

Green Okanogan aims for ownership

Turning shipping containers into housing BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The GO Recycle and ReStore will be closed Thursday, Nov. 26 and Saturday, Nov. 28 to allow volunteers to spend the Thanksgiving holiday “recycling delicious edibles.” The center has been running three days a week since July, and has moved into their winter hours of Tuesdays noon to 4 p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The change allows the recycle center and GO ReStore to close earlier during the dark of winter, as the yard is not lit for night recycling. GO was happy to report in their November newsletter their cardboard buyer in Wenatchee turns the material into apple packing trays. The GO ReStore building supply exchange which opened in September gathers lumber, plumbing and electrical

fixtures, pipe, wire and wood and metal furnishings to resell at affordable prices. The GO yard helps fire relief groups by offering the Recovery Shed Program a staging area, and providing firewood space for Fire Relief and Recovery Network. GO will partner with Okanogan Community Action Council when they begin a program turning shipping containers into living spaces for homeless vets. Other future plans are to develop a system to re-use glass locally by producing a gravel product. GO organizers are pleased with their new space at 3 Rodeo Road, which meets their current needs and will allow for expansion. Their lease is up in May, at which time the owner intends to sell the property. GO volunteers are intent on raising $149,000 to purchase the site. GO will apply for grants and possibly loans, but would like to emphasize the importance of community support. The current drive to raise funds will funnel all money collected toward the purchase of the facilities.

Oroville looking at $7.9 million budget Budget is slight increase over this year’s BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The City of Oroville is looking at approving a 2016 budget of $7,878,862, about $46,000 higher than in 2015, according to JoAnn Denney, City Clerk/Treasurer. “We did pretty good about not increasing it much over this year’s,” Denney told the city council at their Tuesday, Nov. 17 meeting. She said the budget includes repairs to city Well No. 1 and improvements to the public library. “We also have a TIB application in for 16th Avenue the budget reflects that project as well,” said Rod Noel, city superintendent, adding that the fund is for cities with populations under 5000. “It’s questionable if it will be funded, this is the third time it has been submitted,” Noel said. Chris Branch, the director of community development presented another draft animal ordinance. In fact he presented two, one with an exemption for

animals used for vegetation control and one without. “It would be hard to enforce an ordinance with the vegetation control exemption,” said Branch. Councilman Ed Naillon, who has voiced concerns about the exemption at previous meetings, as well as Councilman Jon Noel, indicated they were against the ordinance in that form. “I would prefer the exemption be out of there. If it remains you could get in to a situation where a potentially dangerous animal was being transported,” Naillon said, adding that saying the animals could only be allowed during daylight ours would also be hard to enforce. “That might be an irritant,” Naillon said. Violation of the ordinance, in whatever form it is formally adopted, would be an infraction rather than a misdemeanor, according to Branch. Police Chief Todd Hill said the civil service has tested eight people for potential officers, including one lateral officer. He said they got three entry level applicants. Councilman Naillon, who is stepping down from the council at the end of his term, will also lose his position on the Okanogan County Transportation

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 48

Board. He emphasized that Oroville should chose someone from the city government to take his place. “It is important work, especially for this end of the valley, we tend to get shorted,” he said. “Since I am vacating my seat it is important to find a council member to serve. We have approved our five year plan and I have pushed hard for our end,” said Naillon, adding that Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb has also been vocal for improved service for the north end of the county. “Patrick does a great job representing the north half, he really looks out for us,” said Naillon. The transportation system has hired bus drivers, a CEO and bought new buses. It is also funding the Okanogan Senior Transportation and Nutrition buses. The system has started by expanding the service in the Omak/Okanogan area, according to Naillon. “There is really a lot of good work to be done with our tax dollars. We need to expand ridership appeal. We need to get nice comfortable places for people to stand. We have purchase four or five shelters and we are looking for some park and ride locations,” he said, adding, “We have a functioning organization

Gary DeVon/staff photo

One of the Okanogan County Transportation busses waits outside the main bus stop in Oroville at the Oroville Quick Mart, 76 station. now.” Naillon said the CEO they hired has experience. The Oroville bus has multiple spots where it stops, more like a shuttle.

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“If you call ahead they will even pick you up anywhere if you are disabled or have a hardship. “We appreciate Ed’s work on the board,” said Mayor Spieth.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 26, 2015

NEWS

Quilters warm hearts and souls BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – The Bitterroot Quilters Guild sent over Hugs from the Heart of the Bitterroot Valley, Montana, in the form of quilts donated to survivors of this past summer’s Okanogan Complex Wildfires. The quilters turned their attention to this area when Paula Nelson, a childhood friend of Tonasket’s Karen Stangland, felt compelled to help. “When my friends in Tonasket were evacuated and the fires there kept getting larger, those of us in the group familiar with the area made the pitch to our group to focus on north-central Washington,” said Nelson. Okanogan County was hit by wildfire so hard last year, and it was difficult to believe you had to face so much more hardship this year.” Nelson said the Bitterroot Valley had been overwhelmed by wildfires in 2000, and quilters from around Montana and Idaho made quilts for those who had lost their homes. “It just felt right to reach out to others facing such adversity. We began when our valley was full of ash laden smoke from the tre-

mendous wildfires raging west of us. We knew the smoke equated to homes, businesses and special places,” said Nelson. “Quilts are very personal in their individual design, color and fabrics and our hope is they comfort and bring joy to the recipients. After the terror of the wildfires, the tremendous loss of security and personal possessions, may the quilts be a hug of caring and joy and serve to provide a unique and bright beginning.” Nelson said their guild is made up of 18 active members, and everyone was involved. “Many made at least one quilt, but those unable to sew an entire quilt volunteered to sew on labels, helped with the hand stitched binding, and offered ideas,” Nelson said. In attempting to estimate the amount of time spent, Nelson said the fastest quilter working on the most basic design must have invested at least 15 to 20 hours on each quilt, if they could work uninterrupted. Many of the quilts had complex designs. The quilters purchased the materials themselves, with cotton fabrics costing between nine and 12 dollars per yard, with the larger quilts needing about six yards of fabric for the front and back,

Submitted photo

Quilters of the Bitterroot Quilters Guild sent over 25 handmade quilts to comfort survivors of this past summer’s Okanogan Complex Wildfires. plus the inner layer of batting that gives the quilt loft and warmth. “We were so fortunate to be able to buy the batting on a special sale and then had generous

people step forward to donate funds for that purpose,” Nelson said. Stangland made the trip over to Montana to bring the quilts back

herself, handing them over to the Tonasket Distribution Center the following day, November 15. “I had a great day with the quilters,” said Stangland, who

brought home 25 quilts. Each quilt includes a label reading, ‘A Hug from the Heart of the Bitterroot Valley, Montana, 2015.’

Lindsay Street livens up Western Ave BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Lindsay Street Band brought their eclectic mix of new

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and old roots music from Ireland, England, Quebec, Scandinavia and France to Tonasket when they returned to the Community Cultural Center for the second year in a row Saturday, Nov. 21. Not only does their music span continents and countries, but the members themselves spread their talents over a broad range of instruments with Elizabeth Elton on violin and vocals; Robin Elwood on two styles of accordions as well as guitar and vocals; Jean Rogers on guitar, penny whistle and vocals sung in both English and French; and Patty Chambers on percussion, banjo, tin whistle and vocals. “The button accordion is a lot like a harmonica, and it’s portable and great for dance tunes,” said Elwood, whose musical traditions hearken back to playing music with his father while growing up in the ghost town of Elberton on the north fork of the Palouse River. The group also plays original tunes, written by Rogers and arranged by the whole group, who have been playing together almost a dozen years. Newest to the group is Chambers, who came in after the loss of Bryan Early, who passed away from cancer two years ago. Early can be heard on the band’s CD ‘Heavy Bug,’ playing bodhran, bones, shakers and snare. The band is excited to be heading in to the recording studio for a follow-up to their first CD. Elwood and his father, John Elwood can be heard on a CD

of their own, titled ‘John Elwood and Robin Elwood’ with John on mountain dulcimers, a woodheaded banjo and vocals; and Robin on guitar, harmonica, accordion and vocals.

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Left, Elizabeth Elton and Robin Elwood; above, Patty Chambers and right, Jean Rogers make up the Lindsay Street Band.

Thank You

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There isn’t a deep enough level of thank you that can explain the love and gratitude I have for my friends and hometown! But I have to at least say that....Thanks to all local businesses and the Oroville Fire Department for their work and contributions. Annette Rounds & Sharron Richardson and all the behind the scenes people that were involved in getting the benefit together, baking and participating.

Thank You for Your kindness, The King Family

WINTER SPORTS Our WINTER Sports Section will be coming out in December!

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SCHOOLS

iPads and one-to-one computing at Oroville School District SUBMITTED BY BY ED NAILLON OSD TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER COORDINATOR

OROVILLE - In 2013, Oroville School district started an initiative to outfit students with internet capable devices in the classroom. We started with rolling mobile labs available for classroom checkout in both buildings, and as we progressed, we set our sights on a hybrid distribution model, with rolling carts at the elementary and JH level, and units for assignment to individu-

al students at the ninth through 12th grade level. With continued support from the District Office, the school board and community, I have been able to configure and equip Oroville School District with 612 internet capable iPad devices. Currently we have 340 units in rolling carts and cases, 54 units assigned to specific programs and classrooms out of special budgets, 147 iPads assigned to individual students, with the remainder being staff and administration units. It has been rewarding for me to be a part of such an exten-

Haney works on one the iPads for the one on one computing program.

sive project. These units give us capabilities in the classroom only dreamed less than 5 years ago. Not only can the student access the internet for research and curriculum, but they can write reports, create presentations, record data and much more. We have integrated the use of our iPads with Google Apps, an online platform that allows students and instructors to create and share documents, collaborate, communicate and store assignments and documents securely in the cloud where they can be accessed by any internet capable device, No longer does a student or staff member run the risk of losing an electronic document or assignment if they take advantage of the Google Apps account that Oroville School District offers them. It is a big responsibility for a student to care for an iPad, and it can be intimidating to be responsible for an expensive piece of equipment. Recently I have started a process where our iPads can be repaired in house by myself or by students that have been trained. I am currently training a student to repair broken screens, and it is going well, with several units repaired and ready for reassignment. It would cost over $100 to send a unit out for screen replacement, but now we can do it for the price of parts, with the potential to save parents and guardians, as well as the district a substantial amount of money in the event that a unit is cracked and not protected by a damage protection fee Thank you for letting me be a part of education in Oroville!

STUDENT RECITAL Submitted photo

Piano and string performers in the Teachers of the Okanogan County Music Teachers Association (OKMTA) public music recital, held Sunday, Nov. 15 at Tonasket High School. Those who stayed for the photo are (not in order): Charles Flanagan; Joshua, Mark, Sarah and Teresa Fast; Maia Deebach; Ciara Danielson; Simone Ervine; Leo Chen; Ellie Porter; Joshua Maeda; Ronan Tafolla; Maddox Bain; David Huffstetler; Megan Heinlen; Eliza Sylvester; Carly Haeger; Tiahnna McAllister; Julie Bello; Emily Williams; Olivia Nguyen and Faith Lofthus. Tonasket music teachers are Roz Nau and Lois Rhoads.

submitted photos

Oroville senior Dakota Haney is being trained by Oroville School District’s Technology Computer Coordinator Ed Naillon to repair the iPads and other computers that are being used by students in the school district.

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Tonasket council hears budget requests

ALL DRESSED UP

RR crossing, sidewalks and pedestrian bridge also discussed

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Above, Aaden McNaer, six, chugs down the street dressed as a locomotive and Ava Ozo, three, as Queen Elsa (from the Disney movie “Frozen”) for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce’s annual business Trick or Treat event, held last Friday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oroville businesses reported giving away hundreds of treats to the many kids who dressed up for Halloween and participated. Left, Gru (Supt. Steve Quick) and his Minions, Shay Shaw, Betty Cole and Erin McKinney, from the movie “Despicable Me,” were the winners of Best Costume in the Business Halloween Costume and Decorations contest. The group at the Oroville School District Office have earned the title several times over the years

concerns is that in the event of an emergency along Railroad Avenue or within the industrial area which contains several buildings with atmospheres controlled by ammonia and other toxic chemicals, people using the park would be unable to evacuate. BY KATIE TEACHOUT The city gained permission from the KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Okanogan County Commissioners for Tonasket City Council met Thursday, the new access, then received permisOct. 29 and further discussed the bud- sion from Genesee & Wyoming Inc. (G&W), the CSCD’s parent company, get. At a budget workshop held Oct. 14, department heads submitted requests for for a new crossing. Mayor Patrick Plumb then asked the UTC in January 2015 needed items. for approval of a new Police Chief crossing. After meetDarren Curtis asked ing with the UTC in for Surface tab“More than ten people Tonasket along with let computers, new county maintenance chairs for the police told me they intend to personnel and one station, stop stick vote for the Tonasket county commisstrips and $7,000 to sioner, the decision $10,000 for a new car. Parks and Recreation was made to upgrade Superintendent Hugh a temporary crossJensen needs a paint District. ” ing constructed by striper, a vehicle and Clair Jeffko, Council Member the federal Bureau of Candidates Forum a new mower. Mayor SEEN AT THE OKANOGANCity of Tonasket Reclamation in the Patrick Plumb said he early 1990s, finding would FAMILY like to increase Oroville FAIR this option to be the Chamber Hosts rates for water by five most cost effective and least damaging Candidates Forum Oct. 15 at percent and sewer by two percent in railroad 2016. CitySee ClerkA3 and Treasurer Alice to the wetland areas west of the Vicki’s Backdoor Club Attwood requested to have medical cov- tracks. G&W approved a basic crossing, ratherage continue, a new phone system for city hall, a maintenance agreement for er than a fully signalized crossing, due computer hardware, new front doors for to infrequency of trains on the track and expected limited, seasonal use of city hall and a cost of living increase. In the ongoing attempt to secure a new the crossing to be located at the southcrossing of the Cascade and Columbia ern boundary of the county’s shop land. River Railroad (CSCD), to provide sec- The UTC then informed the city that new crossings require fully signalized ondary access into Chief Tonasket Park, facilities. With further explanation of the the council discussed a traffic study of planned use of the crossing, UTC staff the area prepared by City Planner Kurt agreed to consider the option after being Danison at the request of the Washington provided the traffic study which details State Utilities and Transportation the Average Daily Trips expected to use Commission (UTC). the crossing. Chief Tonasket Park is located on In other city business, Councilwoman city-owned property adjoining the city’s Claire Jeffko asked who’s responsibilwastewater treatment plant, with the ity it was to fix a heaving sidewalk near Okanogan River as the opposing bound- the railroad tracks. Attwood said the ary. The park is accessed from Railroad abutting property owner is responsible. Avenue, so visitors to the park must Plumb said because the property was travel through a busy industrial area to located on the railroad it was probably access the baseball fields, soccer fields, the city’s responsibility, so Jensen said he skate park, Water Ranch, boat launch would look at it the next day. and other amenities. Jeffko also reported more than ten The city has been attempting to develop a second point of access into the park since the late 1980’s. One of the city’s SEE COUNCIL| PG A2

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RUNG THE BELL

Main St., OEA1422 says demands on teachers’ time too high P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

and as an administrator, she said. At one pay the costs to renew certifications, but time she was the Oroville Elementary the salaries continue to decrease.” School principal. The information she Johnson said the school hours have presented came from UniServe and increased for students as well. the Washington Education Association “There are longer student days and (WEA), according to Johnson. teachers have lost up to 15 minutes of Johnson said there was a long list preparation time each day, added up over of requirements for a school year they’ve teachers in Washington lost over six days of State, including the time to prepare and “The bottom line is we get ready for school,” Washington State Te a c h e r / P r i n c i p a l have to attract teachers Johnson said. Evaluation Project. She then addressed to our district and we the online planner. (TPEP). “TPEP is time conare already remote. I’m “It’s great for adminsuming, for princiistrators and teachers asking you to keep that like it, but it takes more pals and teachers and teachers are not proin mind when you are time than a planner on vided additional time a desk. The concern is negotiating” or pay for all of this an unreasonable workwork. There are 53 difload continues to grow Dr. Lynn Johnson, President ferent items that have without pay,” she said. Oroville Education Association to be observed or the Like many of the teacher has to pronew state requirevide evidence of,” said ments of teachers Johnson. Johnson said, “Again, it’s not that it is a Then there are changes to teacher bad thing, in just takes more time.” certification requirements, according to Johnson said altogether teachers were

Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 www.gazette-tribune.com OROVILLE – Dr. Lynn Johnson, president of the Oroville Education Association, says more is being asked of Oroville teachers, while time to accomplish tasks and compensation remain the same or less. Johnson made a presentation to the Oroville School Board at their Monday, Oct. 26 meeting. “I’m here as a representative of the OEA to let you know about legislative actions that have impacted the Oroville School District. I know you are aware that teachers all over the state have walked out or gone on strike,” said Johnson, assuring the board that wasn’t her group’s intention, but that they should be aware of how these new demands and their impact on the district.

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teachers can’t/won’t do it all. Students are feeling the pressure,” Johnson said. She warned that there is a shortage of teachers in the state and fewer people are choosing to go into teaching as a career. She said if Oroville doesn’t compensate for the extra time being asked of teachers like other districts in the state are having to do, then the few teachers that are looking for jobs will look elsewhere. “College students are not choosing teaching, there are less and less that are interested. The bottom line is we have to attract teachers to our district and we are already remote. I’m asking you to keep that in mind when you are negotiating,” she said. For the teachers here I am not saying things are all bad, we just have to take care of our people.” To make the district more attractive to teachers she suggested providing an attractive contract that is comparable or better than other districts. She said there were disparities between the Oroville and Tonasket school districts. “One teacher was approached (by Tonasket) and said that they’ve got a better contract. We want to be profession-

the president of the school board. “Rocky you were one of my students and I think you know we took the time to personalize our instruction to students... that time to do that is gone,” said Ricevuto. “I want to compliment you for the time you took to personalize what you taught,” said DeVon. “It has been a big message that the school directors and myself have been taking to the state, no more programs without the money to pay for them.” DeVon said he was also worried about the closure of the Buckhorn Gold Mine, which is about 25 percent of the district’s property evaluation. He said he appreciated what teachers do, but he had to see a way to make it all balance out. “I appreciate the comparison you gave us between Oroville and Tonasket,” added School Director Todd Hill. “I’m not against Mr. Quick, but look at the number of administrators we have Gary DeVon/staff photos and only 550 students. He was hired as a part time superintendent and you moved him to full time. Do we really need a

IT on the doorstep at North Valley Hospital District BY KATIE TEACHOUT ics to get the specifics. It is taking a lot of man hours.” KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Fries said it costs the hospital a lot TONASKET - Payge Fries, Health of money to re-bill after a claim has Information Manager, reported on been denied, and it’s unknown upfront implementation of the new ICD-10 at if something will be reimbursed when the Oct. 8 North Valley Hospital Board it’s re-billed. She said additional employees are of Commissioners meeting. The ICD-10 is the tenth revision of the needed who have experience and trainInternational Statistical Classification of ing in billing and coding. “It’s not something that’s easily taught,” Diseases and Related Health Problems. said Fries, adding, “It’s pretty difficult ICD codes have been required for reimbursement of Medicare and Medicaid right now, but we will get through it.” “Payge Fries has championed this claims since 1979. The ICD-9 had 13,000 project to prepare codes but the ICDour organization for 10 has around 68,000; this time of change providing greater “Doctors have been reimbursement,” said specificity in reportNVH CEO Mike ing diagnoses. trained to take care of Zwicker, adding that “The ninth revision patients first, and they the hospital might has been out since the effects of the 1970s, so there will have to transition to see decreased Days Cash are lots of changes taking care of the elec- on Hand over the and lots more codes,” few weeks due said Fries. “The govtronic records. We have next to the conversion. ernment mandated Chief Information to change from being it be put in place Officer Kelly Carriker by October, so we clinical to being techno- and Lori Sawyer, started a group back logical, because that is a former NVH RN in March to get it in who works in Health place.”


PAGE A4

THE TOWN CRIER

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 26, 2015

Our American history reminds us why we should be thankful

Thanksgiving often conjures up images of Pilgrim men in their mostly black get ups with big buckles on their shoes and even bigger ones on their tall hats and maybe a musket of the blunderbuss type in their arms. And the women, also dressed in black with white mother Hubbard type bonnets. Or maybe the Pilgrims all gathered around a table laden with food from the new world, sitting down with the native peoples who were here before them and who, as the story goes, rendered them aid so they could survive. There are many reasons people have come to America – to explore or to seek their fortune, but just as many in the early days came to find a place to freely practice their religion – people like the Pilgrims and the Puritans. They came because in the 1500s England broke from the Roman Catholic Church and created a new church called the Church of England. And if Out of you lived in England, you didn’t have a choice– My Mind everyone had to belong to the church. Some of Gary A. DeVon those who didn’t want to practice as the C of E told them to formed a group called Separatists. They wanted to separate from the Church of England, which was illegal and dangerous. The Separatists, under the leadership of William Bradford, decided to leave England and start a settlement where they could practice their religion freely. Bradford went to the Virginia Company and asked them for permission to establish a new colony. The Virginia Company agreed, so the Pilgrims set sail on the Mayflower in September 1620 towards the New World. That first Thanksgiving, the one we often think of when we sit down to our Turkey dinner, is because of these Separatists who came to the New World seeking religious freedom and shared a meal with the people that helped them survive there. This Thanksgiving we need to step back and remind ourselves what we are grateful for. Are we grateful to still live in a country that recognizes the right to practice our religion, no matter what it is, as long as it does not infringe on other people’s rights to practice, or not practice their own beliefs? Or are we going to turn into a country of intolerance and led by fear where we make people, our own citizens, register if they don’t believe as we do because someone else – like ISIS, is spreading terror? If we do that the terrorists have won a huge battle over the American way of life and American values. Not only will they have succeeded in making us infringe on our Constitutionally guaranteed practice of Freedom of Religion, we will have become like them, or the old time Church of England, which tried to force the Pilgrims to worship their way. The terrorists attacks in Paris, Beirut and elsewhere were horrific and while nobody of any influence has suggested all American Muslims be forced to change their religion, registering them sounds like the first step towards taking away their freedom of religion. Are internment camps next? There have been radical domestic terrorists who identified with White Supremacist “Christians” – like Timothy McVay, who blew up the Murrow Federal Building. After that bombing no one suggested all Christians be registered, radical or otherwise. Radical talk, especially like that of the Republican frontrunner for the presidency, is dangerous – to do so just to takes advantage of a tragedy for an increase in the polls. It is shameful. I won’t mention his name, but is there anything this media hound won’t do? This Thanksgiving let’s be thankful for our family and friends, for good health, enough food and a warm place to live and for a country where we can worship and speak freely, even if we don’t agree.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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Guest Opinion

Terror attacks demand response that keeps America safe OPINION BY REP. DAN NEWHOUSE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, WA-4TH DISTRICT

The world was horrified by the cowardly terror attacks in Paris that killed numerous innocent people and left many wounded at entertainment venues and restaurants, in what many now regard as France’s “September 11th.” France is the United States’ oldest ally—the first nation to support our fight for independence. As France has been there when we Rep. Dan Newhouse have faced challenges, we must now be there for the French people. While we mourn together now, we must also unite and stand against global terrorism. Sadly, the incidents of terrorism only continue to grow. In Beirut, suicide bomber attacks took the lives of more than 40 people, injuring hundreds more. In Mali, terrorist held a hotel hostage and killed dozens of individuals. Together with our allies, we must defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and al Qaeda. Terrorists must be denied a safe haven, whether in Syria, Iraq, or other parts of the globe from

which to plot attacks. The terrorists responsible for these recent attacks must be brought to justice for these horrendous acts, ensuring we remain defenders of liberty. On the home front, there are additional ways to ensure the security of Americans that are also consistent with our values as a compassionate nation. Last week, in an overwhelming bipartisan vote last week of 289137, the House of Representatives passed the American Security Against Foreign Enemies (SAFE) Act of 2015, despite a veto threat by President Obama. I am encouraged by the bipartisan, veto-proof majority, support for this measure, which shows that the House is willing to take common sense steps to protect Americans. This legislation requires that potential refugees from Syria and Iraq are given the highest level of scrutiny before they can enter the U.S. The bill pauses the admission of Syrian and Iraqi refugees until nation’s top security officials take responsibility to certify they have no ties to terrorism and pose no threat to Americans. The Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper has raised concerns about the prospect that ISIL plans to take advantage of asylum policies to infiltrate the West. He

stated, “We don’t obviously put it past the likes of ISIL to infiltrate operatives among these refugees…That is a huge concern of ours.” The Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Counterterrorism Center, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security have also raised similar concerns about the ability to screen refugees. In light of recent attacks that show ISIL’s determination and capacity to strike so-called “soft targets” abroad, lawmakers have the duty and obligation to act in the interests of our national security and protect Americans. The President’s comments just before the attacks, that ISIL was geographically “contained” appear to show a tragic misunderstanding and attempt to downplay of the threat we face by ISIL and radical Islamic terrorism. Thus far, the Obama Administration has clearly failed to develop a viable strategy to defeat ISIL. America has long been a welcoming nation. Washington alone has taken in more than 130,000 refugees from more than 70 nations since 1975. While the U.S. allows a safe harbor for the most vulnerable, we must ensure the safety of Americans remains our top priority.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR What if we cleaned up the National Forest?

Dear Editor, What if instead of funding aggression in the Middle East we used those billions of dollars to clean up our National Forests? Ray Rab Tonasket

Rightfully wrong or wrongfully right? Dear Editor, Where are we going? I sense a moral ambiguity. It was eighty years ago. I remember mama warning me to not breathe deeply coming up the marble to our New York apartment on the fifth floor. Reefer smokers could safely produce the easily discernible unpleasant characteristics of burning hemp. Eighty years ago, the reefer was smoked guardedly in subterranean places know as hideaways and speakeasies. Herbal engineering has now been groomed to be so respected as to have been allowed to grow openly and develop in community farms then openly harvested. Enthymematic to state my amazement when I saw photos in our community paper of the harvest. It is heartening to learn that some have been benefited. It will be five years before we learn of WSU research findings. There will be much work ahead before we learn more from the FDA as well. Identifying the different “strains” of plants and which will be identified for specific disabilities will take time. Studies will differentiate the actions of different “species.” There will be questions as to dosages as well as safety and controls. I trust that Washington state will prove to be responsible in establishing safeguards to protect our young. An informed public is a strong society. Please note: are we now much closer to the “Brave New Worlds” of Aldous Huxley?? Could he have seen where we are now and where he progressed from where we are now?

Where Huxley paints a startling and hallucinatory picture of a civilization that imagines itself free, but that in reality is mindlessly (and happily) captive to the ruling class. Respectfully submitted, Marya Silverthorn Chesaw

Help for Alzheimers sufferers and their families

Dear Editor, With so much attention being given to the growing number of people with Alzheimer’s disease in Washington State, I’m grateful that our Congressman, Dan Newhouse, has cosponsored a bill that will help them and their families. The HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act is a bill designed to provide better care-coordination planning after Medicare beneficiaries receive an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Too often we hear that after the testing and

diagnosis is done, physicians give the patients and families no guidance for what’s next. In fact, the Alzheimer’s Association in March released a report showing that only 45 percent of the people diagnosed with the disease are actually told of that diagnosis versus over 90 for the four most common cancer diagnoses. One reason is that physicians are not properly reimbursed for taking the time to sit down with the patient and family to help them through this difficult news of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. This bill would cover that time, and also launch an effort to educate physicians about the new coverage. Congressman Newhouse wisely recognizes this is a problem and that Congress needs to respond. I hope that Senator Maria Cantwell too joins him and Senator Patty Murray in cosponsoring this needed legislation. Bill Baker Pasco, Washington

More opinion, next page


NOVEMBER 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette 75 Years Ago: Friday, November 22 - 29, 1940: The play, “The Old Candlemaker of Saint John’s,” written by Robert Moulton Galke and directed by Rev. Peters, Pastor of the Methodist Church, will be presented to the public in the First Methodist Church on Sunday evening by the following players:Wesley Rogers, as the Candlemaker, Pauline and Gene DeVore, Marjorie Thomsen, Mfrs. Ellen Roberts, Mrs. Paul DeVore, Mrs. Ive Byrd and Mr. Lester Roberts. Costuming is in charge of Marian Thomsen. The Oroville Town Council held their mid-month meeting at the City Hall Monday night. Outside of naming the election board for the city election on December 3 and instructing the Health Committee to investigate the sanitation of the sewer system at the Ramsey Tourist Cabins. The balance of the meeting was spent with the reading and discussing new ordinations being drawn up by John Hancock, City Attorney. Farmers and Stockmen of Okanogan, Douglas and Chelan Counties, who are members of the North Washington Production Credit Association, took over a larger share of the ownership of their association this month when it repaid $25,000 of its capital to the Production Corporation of Spokane. The Oroville Business Club held their regular meeting Monday night at the Peerless Hotel. As the turnout was not very large, discussion of re-organization of the fair was postponed in order to get it started and report at the next meeting, and at that next meeting, the committee reported that they had decided to name 15 businessmen and farmers and when that group first met, they could elect the officers. Another matter of decorating with the Christmas lights, it was reported that they would be contacting the Legion and Firemen to help with the installation. The PTA wishes to serve soup again or some other hot dish at lunch time to each pupil. (NOTE: this was the hot lunch program when I was in school and if we wanted a sandwich, we brought it from home). Donations were requested as follows: Cash, to buy Flamo, 20 cases of tomatoes, 8 gallons of milk each Monday and Tuesday, 20 sacks of potatoes, 1 sack carrots, 100 pounds of cabbage, 36 celery stalks, split peas, 50 pounds, boiling pieces, 10 pounds, bacon or ham 20 pounds, 6 sacks of onions, 45 bars of soap and 3 dozen tea towels. Grocery Prices: Peas, #2 can, 2 for $.11; Bulk soap powder, 5 lb. $.49; Grange pancake flour, No. 10 bag, $.39; 2 lb. $.49; 49 lb. bag flour, $1.09;2 cans Cove Oysters, $.23.

The Oroville Gazette 50 Years Ago: November 18 - 25, 1965: Actual construction on the Lutheran Church began recently. A picture on the front page shows the skeleton a frame partially up. The fork-lift was being operated by Ken Gausman and working inside were Al Steinbach and Walt Heddon, who will be assisted as needed by volunteers from the church. A dedication has not been set but is expected to be in the late spring of next year with a cost of around $38,000. Nancy Rader, a senior, was chosen Queen of Oroville High School’s first annual homecoming, during the half time ceremonies of the Oroville-Tonasket game. Her two attendants were juniors, Patty Irwin and Anita Edens. They were brought on to the field by Jim Northcott in his convertible. The Oroville Hornet football team ended a very successful season last week. Although the Hornets were

unable to overcome the Cariboo Trail League champions, the Tonasket Tigers, they played what was considered their strongest performance of the year. Everyone interested in skiing is invited to the annual kickoff dinner to be held Saturday, Nov. 27 at D’Amico’s Restaurant in Tonasket. There will be discussion of the plans for the coming year as well as information on the proposed improvements to the tow located on the hill. Oroville School enrollment soared to an all time high on October 1, 1965 with 988 pupils enrolled from Kindergarten thru grade 12. This is an increase of 75 since May, 1965, however on November 1, 1965 enrollment had dropped to 943. With added pupils comes need for more teachers. The Bureau of Reclamation will move forward on more than $13,000,000 in construction to reclamation works in Central and Eastern Washington in 1966. Approximately $950,000 will be under way on the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation Division of the Chief Joseph project in upper Okanogan County. Grocery Prices: Hen Turkeys, $.39 per lb; celery, $.09 per lb; 46 oz tins of Tomato juice, 4 for $1.00; Oranges, 2 lb. for $.29; Dry onions, 3 lb. for $.19;4 ½ lb. can shrimp, $.49;Sweet potatoes, $.08 per lb; ground beef$3 lb. for $1.17. Weather Wise by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: Nov. 10, 46 degrees maximum and 28 degrees minimum; Nov. 11, 50 and 39; Nov. 12, 42 and 29; Nov. 13, 38 and 28; Nov. 14, 40 and 36; Nov. 15, 42 and 38 and Nov. 16, 41 and 37. Total precipitation for the week, .48.”

The Gazette-Tribune 25 Years Ago: November 22 - 29, 1990: The Oroville Chamber of Commerce encourages everyone to have their stores and homes decorated in time for the 4th Annual Christmas Lighting Ceremony on Dec. 7 and warmly invites everyone to attend the parade at 6:30 p.m. and continues to the tree lighting at the Town Square. Jesse Clark, long time area resident, has opened Flying Colors Aviation at the Oroville Airport. Clark spent this past summer converting the oldest building at the site, (a hanger built in the mid-thirties when the runway was just a dirt strip) into a comfortable and well equipped shop. The Christensen family of Oroville has maintained a strong positive attitude while dealing with son Dustin’s disease. Dustin has cystic fibrosis and was not expected to live past his 13th birthday, which is this Saturday. Medical research has pushed the life expectancy for people with the disease to 26 and recent breakthroughs in gene therapy show great promise towards a cure within a few years. (Dustin is now 38 years old and has his own business in Wenatchee.) The Oroville City Council approved a preliminary budget for 1991 for $1,800,953 at a special budget hearing on Nov. 27. Included in the budget are marked increases for the police department, a five percent increase in pay for most city employees and $32,200 set aside to form a City Municipal Court with jury trial capabilities. Since the recent Tonasket school bond failed by 66 votes, the board decided to run the bond issue again as soon as possible. The next scheduled board meeting is Dec. 17 and it will deal mostly with that issue. Everyone is encouraged to bring any questions they may have or modifications to the plans. The election is tentatively scheduled for Feb. 5, 1961. The future indeed looks bright for the Oroville Hornet Girls basketball season as four of last year’s starters are back. Remember, this was the team that went to District for the very first time ever in the Oroville Girls Basketball history. Pictured in this issue was some 225 marijuana plants found in the growing operation near Chesaw. The grow was busted by the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department after they received a tip from a local rancher. Real Estate Bargains: Tonasket view property, quality cedar home large enough for Santa and his elves!! 4 bdrm, 2 bath with extra storage, spacious living room view of the valley with a deck off the kitchen. $89,500; Home on nearly two acres, 3 big bdrms, utility room, frame house on concrete foundation, metal roof, one car garage, 40x60’ shop with 220 power and 1 acre family orchard, $48,500.

State House Speaker may lose the gavel BY JERRY CORNFIELD

EVERETT HERALD COLUMNIST

There’s never been a figure in Washington politics quite like Frank Chopp. Since 2002, the Seattle Democrat has served as speaker of the House of Representatives; a 13-year reign that stands as the longest anyone’s ever held the job in state history. If you add in the sessions he shared the gavel in a co-speakership with Republican Clyde Ballard – 1999, 2000 and 2001 - it means Chopp has had his hands on the levers of the legislating process in the Legislature since last century. It’s made him one of the most influential elected officials in Washington, at times seemingly more powerful than governors. That power is on display daily in Olympia at legislative sessions where lobbyists and lawmakers gauge a bill’s chances on “how Frank feels about it.” But it can’t last forever. Insiders in both parties are chattering louder-than-usual that just maybe by this time next year Chopp will be out and Republican leader Dan Kristiansen of Snohomish in as speaker. “It’s Frank’s to lose and he just might do it,” theorized a veteran GOP insider. “He’s a smart cookie. Never count him out.” Chopp could be handing over the gavel and the Democratic Party ceding its majority in the House because Republicans keep adding to their numbers. They’ve picked up seats in each election cycle since 2008 plus a couple special elections, the latest coming Nov. 3 in a district that straddles King and Pierce counties. Republican Teri Hickel’s defeat of appointed Democratic Rep. Carol Gregory reduced the Democrats’ advantage to 50-48, down from the 63-35 margin it enjoyed in 2008. Several factors are fueling the Republican revival, starting with the recruiting of candidates. Of late, Republicans are doing a better job finding people to run who fit the political philosophy

and temperament of their district. They’ve wound up increasing their ranks with younger, moderate and less doctrinaire members, many of whom are women. Democrats meanwhile are losing seats with candidates whose inclinations are more closely aligned with the liberal theology of Seattle politics than the district in which they’re competing. Campaign strategy is another area Democratic Party leaders are deliberating in their post-election soul-searching. There’s not been a shortage of money. There are those who think too much is spent on mailers and television commercials, and not enough on contacting voters directly. This can be a big deal. Republicans’ pro-business, anti-tax message lends itself to such forms of communication. Democrats’ talk of creating economic equality, strengthening the safety net and combating climate change don’t translate as well on a mailer. Another challenge facing Chopp and the House Democratic Campaign Committee is a sense of entitlement or complacency among a few members, a product of 13 years of uninterrupted rule. If the Republican takeover in the state Senate didn’t awaken them to the evolving political balance of power, the very real threat of becoming the minority in the House might do the trick. Still, there are those in the caucus who rationalized Gregory’s loss as the result of a low turnout which favored Republicans. They point out 2016 will bring a presidential election. Participation of Democratic voters will soar and enough victories, they figure, will be racked up to preserve the party’s majority once again. The future of Frank Chopp’s reign as speaker depends on it. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360352-8623;  jcornfield@heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos.

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COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

DISTRICT COURT

Michael Silvestre Santana, 23, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Santana was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,218. Kenworth Rodney Silverthorn, 21, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Silverthorn was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Wesley Steven Smith, 27, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree theft. Smith was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $468. Donna Louise Swensrud, 43, Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID and third-degree DWLS. Trent Thomas Tatshama, 18, Omak, guilty of seconddegree DWLS and DUI. Tatshama was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,084. Ryan Patrick Taylor, 36, Oroville, had three charges dismissed: third-degree DWLS, reckless driving and reckless endangerment. Brandon Scott Thomas, 23, Omak, had a charge dismissed: violation of a nocontact order. Thomas was fined $500. Kallie Louann Thomas, 26, Omak, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI. Thomas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,240. Johnny Rae Timentwa, 20, Omak, guilty of first-degree negligent driving and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of MIP/C. Timentwa was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,300. Cassandra J. Vandeveer, 23, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree theft. Vandeveer was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $836. Rodolfo B. Verdugo Palacios, 44, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree theft. Verdugo Palacios was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $633. James Dale Watkins, 53, Oroville, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Watkins was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $658. Carroll Reed Weber Jr., 58, Tonasket, had a thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Xu Wei, no middle name listed, Oroville, had a fourthdegree assault charge dismissed. Rory Allen Westmoreland, 53, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Westmoreland was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,963. Lavelle Leon Williams, 38, Omak, had a third-degree charge dismissed. Eric Joseph Wisdom, 26, Tonasket, had a thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Henrietta Alice Wynne, 43, Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree theft. Wynne was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $851. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS

Monday, Nov. 16, 2015 Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Tamarack Trail near Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Burglary on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Credit card

reported missing. Warrant arrest on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Weapons offense on Crofoot Lane near Riverside. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. DUI on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Shawn Oliver Crane, 54, booked for second-degree burglary, third-degree malicious mischief and thirddegree theft. Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015

Sex offense on Sunrise Heights Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Yard art reported missing. Drugs on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Burglary on Benton St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Columbia St. in Omak. Assault on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Engh Rd. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Assault on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Roger Joe Duncan, 41, booked for DUI and no valid operator’s license without ID. Randy Lee Rosenburgh, 28, court commitment for DUI. Anastasia Marie King, 22, booked on three OCSO warrants: two for seconddegree theft and one for third-degree theft. Michael Joseph Hernandez, 32, DOC detainer. Matthew Douglas Jacobs, 28, booked for third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015

Burglary on F.S. 3010 Rd. near Tonasket. Weapons offense on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on N. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Wallet recovered. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Burton Ave. in Okanogan. Chainsaw reported missing. Warrant arrest on S. Van Duyn Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Asotin St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Asotin St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. Assault on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Fraud on Main St. in Oroville. Dusty Lynn Simpson, 36, booked on Tribal warrants for first-degree criminal trespassing and thirddegree malicious mischief. Alfonso Cardenas Jr., no middle name listed, 58, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: DUI and fourth-degree assault. Laural Angelina Anthony, 20, booked on an OCSO FTA bench warrant for mail theft and a Tribal FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Sandra Moses, no middle name listed, 28, court commitments for DUI and second-degree DWLS. Joshua Caleb Palagi, 33, DOC hold. Darcy Kim Edwards, 43, booked on a DOC warrant.

Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015

Burglary on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Ponderosa Dr. near Tonasket. Criminal mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Eighme Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Fraud on N. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Richelle Lynn Geddes-George, 41, booked for disorderly conduct. Jason Leroy George, 50, booked for disorderly conduct. Michael Utigard, 62, court commitments for fourthdegree assault and physical control. Eric Nathaniel Lawson, 39, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. James Simpson, no middle name listed, 35, court commitment for DUI. Friday, Nov. 20, 2015

Fraud on Cooper Rd. near Riverside. Vehicle prowl on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Bighorn Dr. near Loomis. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Hwy. 97 in Okanogan. Harassment on Crowder Rd. near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Burglary on Benton St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on Dayton St. in Omak. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Threats on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Sonsaray Ellen Raen Wynne, 21, DOC detainer. Hernan Ochoa Penunuri, 73, booked for second-degree attempted murder. Brandon William Cate, 29, booked on an OCSO probable cause warrant for first-degree criminal trespassing. Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015

DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Omak Airport Rd. near Omak. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Michael Shane Snell, 36, booked for attempting to elude, POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Brandon Matthew Herz, 29, booked for second-degree theft, violation of a protection order and fourthdegree assault (DV). Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015

SEE COPS | PG B6


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 26, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Thanksgiving wishes to all Another Thanksgiving! Our house used to be the designated place for family dinners because we had the most room. It didn’t bother me, in the least, that there were about 35, if all were on hand. I could still do it, BUT, I’d have to start a week early, and when a granddaughter offers her home, I don’t stutter my words, and yes is the answer. That’s what she gets for having a big dining room table. We usually go to Molson on Monday night, to play pinochle. When we drive by Vivian Emry’s house and it is totally dark, it is lonely. At cards, I know she isn’t gonna be there, but I still find myself glancing around for her. Remember when the “Molson House” was in their home and folks came from miles around to eat the great meals that were served there. She now resides with daughter Joanie, on Vashon Island. She will have her 93rd birthday Christmas Eve.

I finally remembered that Wednesday evening is hamburger night at the American Legion hall and a lot of other folks remembered, as there was quite a crowd on hand. And I got home early enough to see the Gonzaga/Northern Arizona basketball game. Once again we escaped the extreme high winds and power outages that were prevalent in the northwest last Tuesday night. The total double-wide building at the Free Methodist Church property (where the YAC Youth Center was located) has been removed. Now it is clean-up time and then on with the new construction. Have you gotten your flu shot? Another bit of health advice... be sure and drink plenty of water. Being dehydrated can cause a lot of unpleasant side effects, and people (especially elderly) tend to forget to drink enough water,

especially in the winter months. bring the sad news to the senior center Do you know how many cookies a last Thursday, that Darlene had passed pound of butter plus two cups of short- away. She just had too many strikes ening and nine cups of flour against her to fight any more. make? I don’t know either but Services will be held at a later it’s a “bunch” and who has date. Condolences go to their time to count them (when family and friends. I frosted the cookies, I did A super crowd was on hand count them. There were 13 last Friday evening for the dozen, plus a few that got community bazaar. Lots of eaten before being frosted. vendors offering a nice variety Remember there will be of merchandise with a cheery Thanksgiving dinner at the Santa Claus on hand for picOroville Senior Center for tures. Some of the little ones you folks who don’t have were so scared and could be family near. They will be fur- THIS & THAT heard loudly objecting to getnishing the turkey, stuffing, Joyce Emry ting close enough for a photo. mashed potatoes, gravy and The only down side was the “you all” bring the rest. Sure fact that it was so cold when I beats being alone. The only down-side is returned to the car. there are no left-overs. Lance and Vicki Haney returned from If you notice, there is a lot of big equip- Hawaii after a two weeks stay, a gift from ment at Thompson Bee’s and they are their children. It seemed especially cold moving dirt hither and yon and expand- to them and now they can begin burning ing the work space of the garage/repair up some of the big wood pile they have shop. on hand. Hank and Darlene Allen have been Steve Retasket is once again in regular members, joining with the lunch Wenatchee hospital. They had their bunch for quite a while. Darlene has had Thanksgiving gathering last Saturday at cancer come and go, over the years, but daughter Sharon’s in Wenatchee and that has been able to keep it under control will have made Steve happy to have his with different treatments and medica- family around him. tion. We are so sorry that Hank had to The Christmas Bazaar at the Oroville

Come share Thanksgiving at the Center SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUDSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Thanksgiving Day Potluck is on Thursday, Nov 26, at 1 p.m. (We will provide the turkey, dressing, potatoes, and gravy.) See you there. (Please correct the date in your Senior Newsletter.) The Lunch Menu for next week is: Tuesday, beef and tomato pasta casserole; Thursday, Swedish meatballs; Friday, pork chop suey. It’s time to think about paying dues for 2016. See Marge Finley, our membership chair, or a board member. Our election is coming up on Dec. 15. Consider who you want

Senior Center is coming up Saturday, Dec. 12. A goodly number of vendors have signed up for the day. Saturday night was another of those times when I wanted to do more than one of the things that were happening. We chose to go and listen to Brock Hires sing for a sizable crowd of folks happily dancing to his music. Our thoughts went back to when Brock was a little boy with a big hat and guitar... has he come a long ways or what? I’ve said this many times before, but it’s worth repeating. How proud his beginning music teacher, Audrey Kelly Curtis would be if she were around today to see the fine young man he has become. Brrrr! Baby it’s cold outside! Time to hunt up your ear muffs and gloves and bring out the winter top coat. I don’t like getting all bundled up in heavy coats, but the time has come. Someone, on reading of the news of Neoma Vandiver, last week, tells me that her sister Louise (Vermillion) Fisher passed away last October, after a lingering illness. Condolences go out to Blanche Gregg, Molson, for the loss of her daughter, Linda Aballera. Wishing each of my readers a Happy Thanksgiving! ‘Till Next week

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS to nominate for officer positions. See Ruth LaFrance, Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or Penny Cole, our nominating committee. Next month, on Dec. 12 we will be hosting a bazaar bonanza. See Penny Cole to reserve a spot. What significant event occurred in 170 BC, 400 AD, 810 AD, 1310 AD, and 1700 AD? Hint: the event in 1700 AD was recorded in Japan, but, mysteriously, did not occur there. I asked this question in last week’s Gazette-Tribune. Answer: In January of the year 1700 AD a tsunami was recorded in Japan. Its origin was from an earthquake in the Cascadia subduction zone

off of the coast of Washington State. “Recent findings conclude that the Cascadia subduction zone is more complex and volatile than previously believed. In 2010 geologists predicted a 37 percent chance of an M8.2+ event within 50 years, and a 10 to 15 percent chance that the entire Cascadia subduction zone will rupture with an M9+ event within the same time frame. Geologists have also determined the Pacific Northwest is not prepared for such a colossal quake. The tsunami produced could reach heights of 80 to 100 feet (24 to 30 m).” Wikipedia. I guess it’s time to head for the hills. Golly, gee, by gosh, that’s where I’m at; Living on future waterfront property. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Bev Holden; Pinochle, Dave K.; High Woman, Darlene Firpo; High Man, Leonard Paulsen. 24 people were in attendance. Enjoy Pinochle every Saturday at 7 p.m.

Submitted photo

In the 1922, Howard Carter discovered the entrance to King Tut’s tomb. The craze for everything “King Tut” would begin across the world. Among the Blackler’s display are handmade hangings from the 1920’s.

BORDERLANDS HISTORICAL SOCIETY of Jean Lucas will also artists and artisans to let them Art in the Attic beWorks on display and for sale. Lucas know about this upcoming event SUBMITTED BY KAY SIBLEY BORDERLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The Old Oroville Depot Museum will be transformed into an art museum for a brief exhibit in December. On loan from the Blackler family is an interesting collection of prints, paintings and photographs from the late 1800s and early 1900s. Many of these pieces traveled west with the family as they moved across the country, eventually settling here in Oroville.

Come in for a Thanksgiving Dinner SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Brrrrrr!, Well winter is upon us and Mother Nature has been giving us a taste of that chilly weather. Make sure to bundle up if going outside. We would like to say thanks to all that help and those that attended the dessert auction to benefit the Tonasket Schools DC trip. Well over $1800 was raised to help those students.

painted with Charles Russell in Montana until he was thrown from his horse and lost the ability to speak or hear. He was well known throughout the West for his painting. Drawing with both hands at the same time was a unique talent he possessed The Borderlands Historical Society decided that as long as we were going to have a bit of an art display, we would open it up to local artists as well and give them a chance to show and sell their work. We have contacted many local

and are looking forward to having a good turnout of our talented locals. These artists can choose to simply show their work, or offer it for sale. A percentage of the sales will go to OBHS to support our local history projects and our preservation efforts on the Okanogan Smith home. These works will be displayed at the Depot on the evening of Friday, Dec. 4 from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. and again on Saturday, Dec. 5 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Light refreshments will be available.

TONASKET EAGLES

Friday kitchen this week due to the holiday. On Saturday the state president Jack Anderson will be visiting our fine establishment. If you would like to meet him come on down. Linda will be doing karaoke also on Saturday at 8 pm. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows. Jo Porter took home first place and second place went to Nellie Paulsen. Jo Porter and Nellie Paulsen grabbed the last pinochle of the day while Lee Bennett had low score. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

Thanksgiving is this week and do not forget to come by the Eagles and enjoy a fantastic dinner with us from 1 to 3 p.m. There will be all the usual fixings and also some wonderful company. Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. will be our taco Tuesday so get on down here and get a few for yourself. If you wish to support one of our pool league teams you can come in at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and root on the home team. There will be no bingo or

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VETERAN

Veterans and Community members: As was mentioned at the Tonasket Veterans Day assembly, the contract for our Rural Health Care clinic [RHC] located in the North Valley Hospital is up for renewal. The clinic could use extra letters of support. Our RHC is asking for more procedures to be authorized by the VAMC of Spokane, which could be offered to our veteran population. So, if you appreciate having this resource close to home, please take the short time to put that on paper as a statement in support of the contract being reissued to

NVH and why! Send these in to the NVH Veterans clinic, drop them off at the clinic with Tasha or Deb, or you can leave them with the Service Officer, Eric Fritts, at the USAF legacy building. ‘Please‘ take the time to do this! A firm date is not yet set, but sometime in January, with the cooperation of other interested parties and those others we will enlist, a class will be offered to any who wish to be better informed about the formalities of our country’s flag. Examples being, how to fold the flag, the written meaning for each fold of the flag, when it should be raised and lowered, as it is a showing of respect when doing so and how

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to care for our flag. I hope to be able to work with individuals and business owners of Tonasket that have and use their flagpoles to create an easier method to lower and raise our flags. This truly is difficult for at least five of our flagpoles in town. Some have questioned my reasons for pursuing this issue as I do! The most important reason to give our flag the respect asked, is that it drapes the coffins of our service members that have given their lives! Please set your politics aside if you want to fly the flag. We don’t mind if you don’t fly the flag but there can be issues when it is not flown properly! We would like to assist you.

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OROVILLE - The Oroville Woman’s Club will again be accepting donations for the annual Gifts for Kids Program. Unwrapped gifts or monetary donations can be dropped off at the Oroville branch of Umpqua Bank, 822 Central Ave. Volunteers for gift wrapping are also needed and appreciated. For more information contact Kally at 509-476-3416.

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NOVEMBER 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OROVILLE COMMUNITY BAZAAR

Christmas Concert 2015 Friday, December 4th at 7:00 p.m. FREE

Admission

Sponsored by: Community Presbyterian Church 9 South Birch St., Omak, WA For more information, please call

509-486-8888 Followed by a reception of soup, bread, and Christmas goodies!

Gary DeVon/staff photos

The Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar took place last Friday evening and Saturday morning and afternoon. Attendance was up with good crowds each day. Vendors also reported brisk sales of home made and other items that they had for sale. This year’s bazaar was sponsored by the Oroville High School Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), which had a booth of their own selling holiday wreaths and Community Calendars.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Free Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Chesaw Community Bible is sponsoring the free Thanksgiving Dinner being held at the Community Building in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 26.

HILLTOP COMMENTS The meal will include turkey or ham, potatoes and gravy, green bean salad, and all of the trimmings. Join us from noon to 3 p.m. for a delicious meal and good company. Dessert will also be served. The winners for last weeks

Pinochle were Men, Lo, George Penner. Men High, Dal Wilder, Ladies Hi Betty Hall, Ladies Lo, Danny Wietrick. The Traveling went to Becky Cross. There were 25 players present. We are suppose to have another day of snow for Thanksgiving. I hope it is not a big snow. Tony, please come and have dinner with us. Ask Mike what time the “Free for All” starts. Happy Thanksgiving to every one.

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Chesaw Thanksgiving Dinner

CHESAW - There will be a Free Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. The menu includes: turkey or ham, stuffing, potatoes and gravy, yams, corn, green bean casserole, salad, pickles, olives, cranberries, rolls and butter and dessert (pie), coffee, tea, hot cocoa and cider. Tonasket Library Book Sale

TONASKET - The Tonasket Library Board is holding their semi annual book sale during the Tonasket Winterfest celebration. The sale dates and times are as follows: Thursday, Dec. 3 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday, Dec. 4 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 5, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. There will be a large variety of books, all reasonably priced. On Saturday, Dec. 5 between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. all regular paperback books will be $1 a bag. All proceeds will go to benefit the Tonasket Library. Art in the Attic

OROVILLE - Art in the Attic event featuring the Blackler Collection will be held at the Depot Museum Friday, Dec. 4 from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. and again on Saturday, Dec. 5 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Light refreshments will be available. Oroville Library Storytime

OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Dec. 2. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com. Noxious Weed Recertification

OKANOGAN - There will be a noxious weed recertification class

8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 3 at the 12 Tribes Resort Casino, 28968 US-97, Omak Washington. Class size is limited to around 100 people, so please pre-register. Topics included: The Noxious Weed Invasion Process, “Why, When, Where, and How Weeds Become an Issue;” The Fire Took Care of All My Weed Problems, Right?; Surfactants and Water Conditioners; Aquatic Weed ID and Control; Aquatic Weed and Algae Control in Ponds; Aquatic Weed Control Activities in Washington State; Weed Control on the Columbia, Aquatic Weed Control and Where We’re Going. There will be no charge for the class and eight pesticide license credits will be available. For more information please call the Okanogan County Noxious Weed Office at 422-7165 or stop by the office. Continuing Ed Scholarships

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation would like to remind former OHS graduates that Friday, Dec. 4 is the deadline to apply for their Continuing Education Scholarships. This local financial aid program offers aid to those OHS grads that have completed at least one year of vo-tec school or college. Aid will be awarded for the winter term. Access to applications and information is online at orovillescholarshipfoundation.org. Indoor Flea Market

OROVILLE - The next Indoor Flea Market and Craft Bizarre will be held at Appleway, 1300 Main Street, on Friday Dec. 4 and Saturday Dec. 5. For more information or to sign up come to Appleway or call 509-476-3900. Food Banks

The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386. Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church?

Subscribe to the... www.gazette-tribune.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 26, 2015

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT Growing Healthcare Close to Home 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151

Meet Mike Zwicker

FALL / WINTER

www.nvhospital.org

2015

It’s hard to believe that it has been six months since our new CEO, Mike Zwicker joined us. Mike has been in the healthcare field throughout his career. He was a clinician in respiratory therapy prior to furthering his education to become an administrator. Mike is enjoying getting to know our community and learning what is important to the people that live here. Mike encourages the public to stop by and visit our facility and see “what’s new.” We have defined a service culture that we believe will set aside from other hospitals. Mike grew up on a ranch in Montana and truly understands “doing what makes sense.” He is aware of the things we need to do to stay in business and how to sustain ourselves in the future. We will provide service “the best it can be done.”

From our Family to Yours...

Happy Thanksgiving

Adam Tibbs has a vested interest in our Community As Adam Tibbs was sworn in as a Commissioner for North Valley Hospital, in June, many of us were happy to see a familiar face on the board and in our community. Adam grew up in Tonasket, as have several generations of his family. Welcome, Adam!!! We are happy to have you and thank you for joining our team.

Because they served, we serve... What is a Swing Bed? Don’t feel bad if you’ve never heard of the term Swing Bed, you’re not alone! But, it’s never too late to do a little research and discover a recovery option that has a variety of benefits. Swing bed is a level of care, not actually a bed that swings. This is a care option after three days of inpatient care at a hospital. Swing Bed programs are found in small rural hospitals, many times closer to home which makes recovering easier! The information below will help you to determine if Swing Bed care would be a good fit for you or your loved one: What is a Swing Bed?  Medicare permits certain small rural hospitals to use its beds as needed, either for acute care or skilled care, hence the term “Swing Bed,” as physicians may “swing” patients from one level of care to another while staying in the same facility. Be aware that Swing Bed programs differ from one facility to another.  If you find yourself needing time to recover from a surgery, illness or injury, a Swing Bed program would allow you to recover in a hospital setting, versus a nursing home. In the hospital, you would have easy access to nursing care and therapies. The goal of a Swing Bed program is to assist you or your loved one in becoming as

independent as possible before discharge. How long can I stay in a Swing Bed program? Generally, you can stay in a Swing Bed program as long as you are making measurable progress as determined by rehabilitation services, nursing, and the physician. You could be in the program for as little as three days, or up to 100 days. After you have reached your goals, Medicare will no longer fund your stay in a Swing Bed program.   Medicare Part A will generally pay for Swing Bed if the patient meets the following Medicare criteria:   Your Swing Bed care must be related to an acute hospital stay. (qualifying stay)  You must need skilled nursing or skilled rehabilitative services on a daily basis, and must be complex enough that services must be performed by or under the supervision of professional or technical personnel.   You must have had a three night qualifying stay in an acute care setting in the past 30 days.  Please contact our Care Coordinator, Moira Hirst at 486-3169 to guide you through your options of receiving your post inpatient care locally. We are here to serve you and we want to!

This year has been a year of marked growth for the VA Clinic. The clinic is proudly serving 794 veterans. It is our privilege to provide local care to so many deserving veterans. The Tonasket Clinic is the only clinic within a 90 mile radius that provides direct care for our Veterans. Open Monday - Friday, 8:00AM to 4:00PM. Located inside North Valley Hospital at203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket WA 98855 PH: 509-486-3107

October was Breast Cancer Awareness month Again in 2015, North Valley Hospital partnered with Omak Stampede, Inc. The partnership raised funding and awareness alike. The funds raised totaled $2,117.00. However, that isn’t all, a match to those funds will be provided through the Hospital Foundation to bring that total to $4,234.00. The funds can be utilized to pay for co-pays and or underinsured patient mammograms. Please don’t let the cost of a mammogram screening be the reason you choose not to put your health first. The radiology department did a terrific job raising additional dollars through fundraising projects within our facility. In December we will have a brand new 3D mammography unit. This new unit will allow us to provide you with greater accuracy, fewer callbacks, clearer images and reduced false positives. Call today to schedule your mammogram.

Patient Billing

Did you know that as a landowner within the boundaries of North Valley Hospital District No. 4, you may be eligible for a tax discount of $500.00?

You can now pay your bill online at www.nvhospital.org. If you prefer to speak to one of our billing specialists, they can be reached at 509-486-2151. We offer discounts to those who pay with cash and in a timely manner. Sometimes unforeseen events make it impossible for you to pay your balance and we do offer help in those situations. Communication is always the best way to keep your account in good standing . We are YOUR hospital and we enjoy being able to provide quality care to you. Prompt payments allow us to continue to provide advanced healthcare to our communities.

BOX TOPS FOR EDUCATION During the months of November and December the staff at North Valley will be collecting Box Tops to donate to the Tonasket Grade School. Please feel free to help in our quest by dropping your box tops off at the admitting desk. Flu season is upon us. It is important that

those in a high-risk category, as well as children, get their flu shots. Please contact your physician to take care of your needs. We are very happy to be coordinating efforts with the Tonasket Grade School to promote a higher level of learning at an early age!!

Looking for GREAT Christmas Ideas?

We would like to say thank you to our patients, staff and community for being the reason our facility was successful in 2015. As we look forward to 2016, our promise is to continue to be the best facility for our patients and our staff!!! We wish you a very Merry Christmas!

A gift for that person or persons who have everything... With a NW MedStar membership, you get peace of mind knowing that your flight will not create extra financial hardship should you or your family ever become critically ill or injured. Your ENTIRE family is covered for an annual cost of $59.00. Please visit the MedStar website @ www.nwmedstar.org or call 1-855856-4687 for additional information. In an emergency the last thing you want to think about is the bill.

Located within North Valley Hospital has an AMAZING Physical therapy department! Why not give the gift of a massage? Whether it is wrapped and under the tree or in a stocking, that is definitely a heart felt gift. You don’t need a referral from a physician, simply call today to schedule an appointment at 509-486-2784


NOVEMBER 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

BUSINESS

Hydemade heads north

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.

Quill Hyde has moved his business, Hydemade, up to Ellisforde. “I’m really excited, the move was long overdue,” said Hyde.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Quill Hyde and his daughter JoJo captivate Tonasket Trick or Treaters by lighting the Mer Pony’s head on fire when ghouls and goblins, Scoobie Doos and princesses approach the walkway October 31.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Quill Hyde moved his shop from Tonasket to Ellisforde, where he hopes to fulfill dreams yet to come. “Like most things, it had to wait for the right moment to come along. I really like Tonasket and wanted to stay there, but all the shops there are paralyzed. This was the only place that came close to meeting the requirements.” He said although his new shop is about the same size as his last one, “it’s much more flexible and

“I don’t know what the future holds, but I hope it holds a barista,” laughed Hyde. With a passion for inspiring kids and sharing his talents by teaching others, Hyde’s vision includes the ability to do residencies for young artists. “My biggest dream is to get kids to use their hands to make stuff,” said Hyde. For now, Hyde will continue to do what he has worked hard to be able to sustainably do: to have a shop where he can employ people, pay them a realistic wage, and be creative. “The way I make money is I use the shop to have access to do my art,” said Hyde. “Art is a really important part of what I do.

owned by Hyde’s sister, Prairie Rose Hyde and her husband. “Most of the production we do is pretty cool in its own right,” said Hyde’s office manager Jerushah Ramos. “Alaffia is a fair trade company, and they’re really taking off. The Co-op in Tonasket carries some of their stuff. We make a unique product for them with a really sturdy steel frame and beautiful wood shelves; very real components made into a very real display shelf.” “Alaffia is amazing, the company is all about empowerment and giving back to the community. They use ingredients from West Africa, and employ women in those communities; women who don’t have family and are lost in

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Ephraim Brown (above) describes the new plasma cutter as “the most fun piece of equipment here,” as he cuts out metal signage for retail display cases that he called the shop’s “bread and butter.” Brown expressed great appreciation for his employer’s willingness to let employees use shop equipment for their own art projects.

has a lot more potential.” Part of the potential Hyde envisions is eventually owning the place and turning it into a sculpture art park, complete with a picnic area and possibly an espresso stand.

To do art, I need a shop; and to make art I need someone paying the bills.” Hyde has met those demands by producing furniture, along with retail displays for Alaffia, a beauty and health care company

the system—-prostitutes or whatever,” said Hyde. “They employ hundreds and hundreds of people, and are getting to a point where they are a 20 million dollar a year company. It’s so good she is sending work my way.”

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Foreman Salem Straub (above, left) assists Antonio Sanchez in fashioning a solid air intake for the plasma cutter “so these guys don’t freeze out there” when cutting metals. The work helps keep Hyde’s five employees on the payroll. “My dream is to have a shop producing a product that if not doing good for the world, at least it is not hurting anything,” said Hyde, adding, “to be able to hire five people in Tonasket is like hiring 40 in New York.” That’s where Hyde’s last business was, but it took a turn for the worse when the economy collapsed and suddenly the luxury products he was producing were no longer considered necessities. Hyde grew up “on a ranch on the side of the hill in Molson,” and after graduating from Oroville High School in 1990, he attended Reed College in Oregon. Then he went on to Columbia University in New York for his mechanical engineering degree, and worked for 13 years engineering for Broadway shows. “I’m not willing to invest in a fantasy anymore, and I don’t have a vision so grand I can’t hold it in my hands,” said Hyde. “ I think we can be competitive; the overhead is low and my employees are talented,” he said of Ephraim Brown, Willie Harrell, Antonio Sanchez and foreman Salem Straub. “I have a very responsible and motivated crew.” “Quill can pretty much make whatever he wants with his design products,” said Ramos. “He got a plasma cutter, which is a pretty sweet tool that can cut out pretty much any design in metal.” “I like the freedom to do whatever you want. Like go ahead and set the pony’s head on fire,” Hyde said of his Mer Pony. “Taking the flaming pony to the Okanogan County Fair was one of the most satisfying projects I’ve done. I went there as a kid, and to bring art there that was really unusual was great; to inspire kids to think outside the box.” “When he came back from the fair, he said he had learned his lesson about letting little boys

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Jerushah Ramos displays the bottom of a retail display case for health and beauty products. “I researched to see if anyone was making anything similar, but stuff is marketed to be cheap and light,” said Ramos, “so we differ a lot from that, as everything we use is solid, real world materials.” use the flame controller,” laughed Ramos. His employees appreciate Hyde’s open hand with his equipment. “Quill gives us access to the equipment for our personal projects, so working here has been a big step up for a lot of people,” said Brown. “Quill is awesome.”

“I just tell them don’t hurt yourself, and be as creative as you can be,” said Hyde. “I am really happy with what I am doing. It’s nice to feel like there is a future in it; that is the thing I have been looking for. I’m not trying to extract money from this community by taking jobs, I am trying to bring money into the community.”

Custom Canvas available locally BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Carey DeWitt is happy to be back home in Washington State after several years away, and offering a unique service with an enterprise she created herself.

Carey’s Custom Canvas is a business that designs and manufactures custom made canvas or vinyl products. She can make custom tarps and wall tents; and covers for anything from boats to bbq’s to air conditioners to motor and engine covers.

“I also repair these types of items, as well as zippers for tents, sleeping bags, duffel bags or backpacks,” said DeWitt. “I can repair most anything that can be sewn on a heavy duty machine.” DeWitt is not doing upholstery projects right now.

Submitted photo

Carey DeWitt enjoys manufacturing new items as well as repairing old goods on her heavy duty sewing machine. “I can repair most anything that can be sewn on a heavy duty machine,” said DeWitt.

DeWitt said she learned to sew in the Navy, which she joined after growing up in Washington. “As a low ranked airman, I learned to make custom sized tool pouches for my squadron,” said DeWitt. “Tool pouches were a necessity, as it would be a disaster if a tool was lost in a jet engine or a cockpit.” After being discharged from the Navy in 1995, DeWitt moved to Colorado, where she worked for Pueblo Tent & Awning for over 14 years; managing it the last ten. “My parents moved to this area about five years ago. I was interested in moving back home to Washington. I love this state, as it was home, and I wanted to be closer to my parents as they got older,” said DeWitt. “After visiting the area a few times in the summers, I got to wondering if the business I had in mind would be viable. Turns out, there really isn’t anyone who does this type of work; at least, not that I could find easily. I put my plan for a business in action after moving here last year.” DeWitt said she got help putting her business plan together from a SCORE counselor. SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education and mentorship.

Submitted photo

DeWitt’s skills include designing covers for anything from boats to BBQ’s, air conditioners and motor or engine covers. She can also produce smaller items such as pouches and carry-alls. “I felt like I was finally ready, after acquiring a sewing machine, business licenses and some inventory, to get my name out,” said DeWitt. “I think I have a viable skill, in that I can make or repair almost any item that comes my way. I can also offer great customer service.” DeWitt works out of her home in Riverside, so she’s able to go to customers instead of them coming to her. “During the winter it will be more difficult to work on larger projects that might need to be worked on outside, but I will still be able to work on smaller projects and repairs that can eas-

ily be managed in a small space,” said DeWitt. “I hope to someday get a large shop that has enough space inside to make the bigger projects without being subject to the weather as I am now.” DeWitt will be putting her skills in Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts to use up at the Loup this winter, but available for her Custom Canvas jobs Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. DeWitt can be reached at (509) 322-5144 or by email at careysmail@hotmail.com. To see a wide variety of her work, check out www.facebook. com/CareysCustomCanvas/.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 26, 2015

Oroville Football Team Wins the League Sportsmanship Award

North County All-League Athletes

FOOTBALL First Team Offense: Andrew Mieirs, Oroville, Wide Receiver, Junior; Blake Rise, Oroville, Offensive Lineman, Senior. Second Team Offensive: Nathan Hugus, Oroville, Quarterback, Junior; Logan Mills, Oroville, Running Back, Senior; Charlie Arrigoni, Oroville, Offensive Lineman, Senior; Zane Scott, Oroville, Offensive Lineman, Sophomore. Honorable Mention: Caleb Mills, Oroville, Running Back, Sophomore; Jesse Ramon, Tonasket, Running Back, Sophomore. First Team Defense: Logan Mills, Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Senior. Second Team Defense: Stetson Spears, Oroville, Linebacker, Junior; Charlie Arrigoni, Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Senior; Nathan Hugus, Oroville, Defensive Back, Junior. Honorable Mention: Caleb Mills, Oroville, Linebacker, Sophomore; Blake Rise, Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Senior; Jaxon Blackler, Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Junior; Ethan Smith, Tonasket, Defensive Lineman, Freshman; Rycki Cruz, Tonasket, Defensive Back, Sophomore. Team Sportsmanship Award: Oroville CROSS COUNTRY First Team: Johnna Terris, Tonasket; Hunter Swanson, Tonasket. Second Team: Jenna Valentine, Tonasket. Honorable Mention: Bryden Hires, Tonasket. GIRLS SOCCER First Team: Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, Offense, Junior; Ashlynn Willis, Tonasket, Offense, Junior; Kayla Willis, Tonasket, Offense, Junior; Myra Gaytan, Tonasket, Defense, Senior. Second Team: Mandi Wilson, Tonasket, Defense, Sophomore; Rose Walts, Tonasket, Offense, Senior. Honorable Mention: Alexia Garcia, Oroville, Offense, Sophomore; Morgyne Hjaltason, Tonasket, Offense, Sophomore. Team Sportsmanship Award: Oroville. VOLLEYBALL Second Team: Taylon Pilkinton, Tonasket, Sophomore. Honorable Mention: Alexa Sutton, Tonasket, Junior. Olivia Sutton, Tonasket, Sophomore. Faith Lofthus, Tonasket, Sophomore. Mikayla Scott, Oroville, Senior.

Pictured top to bottom, left to right: Coach Tam Hutchinson, Oroville Football Team, Faith Lofthus, Jesse Ramon, Myra Gaytan, Morgyne Hjaltason, Rose Walts, Jaden Vugteveen, Jaxon Blackler, Mandi Wilson, Charlie Arrigoni, Nathan Hugus, Zane Scott, Logan Mills and Stetson Spears. Photos by Katie Teachout, Gary DeVon and Melissa Mills

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NOVEMBER 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Oroville and Tonasket 2015 All League Honors / CW B League

PAGE B3

Pictured top to bottom, left to right: Johnna Terris and Jenna Valentine, Andrew Mieirs, Caleb Mills, Hunter Swanson, Ethan Smith, Rycki Cruz, Taylon Pilkinton, Mikayla Scott, Ashlynn and Kayla Willis, Bryden Hires, Alexa and Olivia Sutton, the Oroville Soccer Team and Coach Tony Kindred. Photos by Katie Teachout, Gary DeVon and Melissa Mills

Oroville Soccer Team Wins the League Sportsmanship Award

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Congratulations! HAIR DESIGNZ

DOUBLE “A” LOGGING

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476-3679 Oroville Auto Parts Center Located: Hwy. 97, Oroville

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Tonasket Athletic Booster Club

Supporting Tiger Athletes!

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509-486-8201 9 W. 4th St., Tonasket

Pizza, Subs, Salad Bar, Calzones, Lasagna, Wraps & More!

TONASKET PIZZA COMPANY 15 West 4th St., Tonasket 509-486-4808

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Phone: 509-476-2390

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INSURANCE

OROVILLE: 815 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

PAUL’S SERVICE Your one stop for complete auto repairs!

Ph. 476-2241 Hwy. 97, S., Oroville

Oroville Dental Center Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Tel: 509-826-1930

DISCOUNT FIREWORKS

Good Luck To all The Athletes!


PAGE 4 B4

OKANOGAN NOVEMBER26, 26,2015 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY VALLEYGAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE|• November

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Announcements

Announcements

Notifications

WANTED OKANOGAN COUNTY CIVIAL RIGHTS ATTORNEY to sue DNR, write PO 285, Tonasket.

A poll-site election for a board seat on the Okanogan Conservation District will be held on February 9, 2016 at 1251 2nd Ave. S., Okanogan, WA. Polls will open at 10:00 AM and close at 2:00 PM. Registered voters who reside within the Conservation District boundary are eligible to vote. Candidates must be registered voters residing in the conservation district, and may be required to own land or operate a farm. The candidate filing deadline is January 12, 2016 at 3:30 PM. Election procedures are available at the district office. Absentee ballots are available upon request for eligible voters, but must be rewww.gazette-tribune.com quested on or before 3:00 PM on January 19, 2016. Please contact the District office at (509) 422-0855 or at the District office at 1251 2nd AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, Ave. S., Okanogan, WA 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR 98840 for absentee ballots or Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Wa- if you have any questions. terfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sono- A board seat on the Okanora Shores $695. Sun Lakes gan Conservation District is Realty 509-476-2121. available for appointment by the Washington State Conservation Commission. ConOrovile Senior Living, Henderson servation district board superApartments, on Lake, on visors are public officials who Boundary Point rd, 2 bdrm, in serve without compensation good condition, no smoking, and set policy and direction no pets. Taking applications, for the conservation district. $675/month, first and last. An applicant must be a registered voter in Washington (509)476-2449 State, and may be required to own land or operate a farm. Applicants for appointed positions do not have to live withWe use... in the district to apply. For more information, or to obtain l Soy Ink an application form, please l Recycled Paper contact the Okanogan Conl Excess paper servation District or visit the recycled for gardens, Conservation Commission fire starter & more! website at http://www.scc.wa.gov/. Applications and supporting materials must be received by the Commission no later than March 31, 2016.

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DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

We’re more than just print!

Visit our website.

www.gazette-tribune.com

26. Doozie

11. “Yadda, yadda, yadda”

30. ___ de deux

12. Diffident

32. Bill and ___

13. Song and dance, e.g.

33. Absurd

14. “Don’t go!”

37. One who fails to carry out a promise

19. Crime boss

40. Neophyte

24. Grimace

41. Door-to-door (hyphenated)

25. Ask

43. Armageddon

27. “Planet of the ___”

44. Clod chopper

28. Advocate

45. Donnybrook

29. Choppers, so to speak

48. Association of Southeast Asian Nations (acronym)

31. Play, in a way

55. Pass allowing one to get on a ship (2 wds) 60. Like some triangles 63. Major neck artery 64. Cornmeal concoction 65. Hard, colored minerals composed of metal oxides 66. Passed out 67. File

Down 1. Air pollution (pl.) 6. Immeasurably deep chasms

1. Sacred beetle of ancient Egypt

13. Keen insights

2. Undergo change

15. Stone Age artifact

3. Arab League member

16. Knocking sound (hyphenated)

4. Catches on

17. Occupancy by title, lease or rent

5. Become unhinged

18. Extending from the U.S. to Japan

6. Italian appetizer

22. Cut corners

23. Clickable image

34. Work on a galley 35. “___ on Down the Road” 36. Cambodian currency 37. Perlman of “Cheers” 38. A long, long time 39. Art subject 42. Principal

LEGAL SERVICES

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BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

Fun, fast-paced, patient focused dental office in Tonasket looking to hire their next Rockstar Front Office Coordinator. Position requires a desire to work with a great team and amazing patients. We are looking for a dedicated self-starter excited about learning and growing with our team. Please submit resume to godwinorganics@yahoo.com or come and meet us in person at Stephanie’s Smiles Family Dentistry.

Feed Hay & Grain Blue Grass Straw for sale. $90 per ton plus delivery. 3’x4’ bales. Call Gary at 509531-0546 for more information.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF NOVEMBER 23, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

Public Notices In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for the County of Okanogan Petitioner Mandie R. Miller Vs. Respondent Rahmier D. Harley No. 15-3-00137-5 The State of Washington to the said Rahmier D. Harley: You are hereby summoned to appear within ninety days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within ninety days after the 29th day of October, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the petitioner Mandie R. Miller, and serve a copy of your answer upon the Okanogan Superior County Court at the address below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgement will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. Petitioner, Mandie R. Miller, requesting dissolution of marriage. Okanogan County Superior Court 149 3rd Avenue North - 3rd Floor PO Box 112 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 29, November 5, 12, 19, 26 and December 3, 2015. #OVG664507 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DALE EDWARD McGOWAN, a single individual; Plaintiff, vs . LORNA GAIL McGOWAN, her heirs and assigns; any and all other persons appearing on title and JOHN DOE and JANE DOES I - X, Defendants. NO. 15-2-00440-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The State of Washington to the said Lorna Gail McGowan, presumed to be a single individual, her heirs and assigns, any and all other persons appearing on title or claiming any right, title or interest herein, in the property of the Plaintiffs. You, and each of you, are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after November 12, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court and answer the complaint of the plaintiffs and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for the plaintiff, at his office below stated; and, in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demands of the complaint in this action which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiffs to real estate in Okanogan County, Washington, described as:

Continued on next page

We’re more than just print!

Visit our website.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

46. Click beetle 47. In a spooky manner 49. Less inept 50. A great deal (2 wds)

www.gazette-tribune.com

52. Nervous twitches 54. Annexes

Across

21. Big, fat mouth

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53. Grassland

20. Last day of the week (abbrev.)

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Statewides DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, comHelp munication and positive Wanted employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit CALL FOR BIDS Community Health Center Janitorial Service dedicated to providing quality The City of Tonasket will ac- health care regardless of cept sealed bids for Janitorial ability to pay. EVERYONE is Service at the City Clerk’s of- welcome. fice until 7:00 p.m., Dec. 8, We have the following 2015 at which time the bids opportunities available: will be publicly opened and read aloud. OKANOGAN ADMIN Certified Medical Coding The janitorial service will be Specialist for the City Hall/Library ComFull time plex, TVBRC Public RestHR Generalist room (Seasonal) and occaFull time sionally the Tonasket Youth Center. Bidders must be OKANOGAN DENTAL: bonded and provide at least Dental Assistant three letters of reference from 2 Full time and 3 Part time, local citizens or businesses on an as needed basis who have used their service. OMAK MEDICAL Contracts and bid forms are Medical Scheduler available at the City Clerk’s Full time office. MA-C Full time The City reserves the right to RN-Nurse Case Manager reject any and all bids and to Full time waive any informalities.

51. ___ Tuesday (Mardi Gras)

ANSWERS

Health General

Found

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Crosswords

Health General

56. A chip, maybe 57. Back of the neck 58. Dismal 59. A type of geometric solid 60. Marienbad, for one 61. Bully

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

62. ___ mode (2 wds)

7. Strengthen, with “up” 8. Symbols representing Shakti 9. Remiss 10. Anger, e.g.

www.gazette-tribune.com


NOVEMBER 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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November 26, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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509-476-3602

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Sponsored by

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.50

ANSWERS

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Visit our website.

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We’re more than just print!

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107 Sawtells Rd. Oroville, WA 98844 (509)476-3874 Gwen Clear SEPA Official 15W Yakima Ave Ste 200 Yakima, WA 98902 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 26, 2015. (OVG670403)

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Tibbs Septic Service retains the option of transferring it’s septage for further treatment to any facility permitted to accept it or to have it’s septage managed by any permitted septage management facility. Any persons wishing to comment on this application or desiring to present their views regarding this application to the Department of Ecology or it’s delegated representative must do so, in writing, within thirty days of date of publication of this notice. Comments should be addressed to Bob Stevens at the address below. Any person wishing to request a public hearing or meeting regarding this proposal must direct a written request to Wendy Neet and Bob Stevens at the address below by the close of the comment period. If you wish to be included on an interested parties list to receive notification of activities relating to this project, please notify, in writing, Mike Tibbs at the address below. Tibbs Septic Service will provide written confirmation by certified mail, return receipt requested, to each interested person or organization that their name has been placed on the list. Contact persons to receive question, comments, and requests are: Wendy Neet Central Regional Office 15 W Yakima Ave Ste 200 Yakima, WA 98902 (509) 454-7872 Bob Stevens Okanogan County Health 1234 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, WA 98841 (509) 422-7395 Mike Tibbs Tibbs Septic Service

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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are available from Gwen Clear at the address below. Persons wishing to comment on the DNS should direct written comments to Gwen Clear at the address below no later than thirty days after the date of publication of this notice. You may appeal this determination no later than thirty days after the date of publication of this notice. Your written appeal must be dfirected to Gwen Clear at the address below. Tibbs Septic Service pumps, screens and land applies domestic septage to sites managed for the production of feed crops. The operation seeks to improve site soils with the addition of septag-derived nutrients and organic matter. The current application site and any future proposed application sites are or will be contained within Water Resource Inventory 49 in Okanogan County near the city of Oroville. Tibbs Setic Service’s Site Specific Land Application Plan addresses the management of the material at this site, and a General Land Application Plan addresses how future land application sites will be identified and managed. Presently, no new land application sites are anticipated. However, future proposals for additional sites will be consistent with an approved General Land Application Plan. Additonal environmental review will be completed if needed, and public notice will be provided consistent with Chapter 173-308 WAc; Biosolids Management; including posting of the potential land applicaton site for at least 30 days. At this time, Tibbs Septic Service does not provide septage to any other facility, however in its permit application,

Sudoku

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NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF NONSIGNIFICANCE AND MODIFICATION OF COVERAGE UNDER THE GENERAL PERMIT FOR BIOSOLIDS MANAGEMENT Notice is hereby given that Tibbs Septic Service & Portable Toilet Rentals is modifiying coverage under the General Permit for Biosolids Management. The Department of Ecology issued a Determination of Nonsignificance (DNS) on _ for the proposal described in this notice. After review of completed Enviromental Checklist and other information on file with the agency, the Department of Ecology has determined this proposal will not have a probable significant adverse impact on the enviorment. Copies of the DNS and the completed Enviromental Checklist

Public Notices

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Okanogan County Parcel Number: 6421058000 Tract 1058 Okanogan River Ranches Division NO. 5 as recorded in Volume H, Section 1 of Plats, pages 12 and 13 , Auditor’s File No. 574397, Records of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 27 day of October, 2015. /s/Roger A. Castelda Roger A. Castelda, WSBA #5571 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket , WA 98855 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 12, 19, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2015. #OVG667599

Public Notices

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Continued from previous page

Public Notices

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Public Notices

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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n Family

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Looking for something?

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County

Attorney at Law

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

“The Water Professionals”

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To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

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RYAN W. GUNN Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

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Well Drilling

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

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BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory

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Check them out today!

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Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

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You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

This is Hartvig 808 3rd St. Please see if you have a bigger pixel picture from Joan.

Attorney

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

This is a share-hold property, includes part of 21 lots, gated community that has 500 ft. of waterfront, common area, dock, boat launch, picnic area, vineyard, BBQ, gathering area, shower/bath house all in great condition. The subject includes 2 lots that connect for extra room & are located next to the community fence. There is a 14X36 sq.ft. garage built in 2008 with a concrete floor, Both lots have RV hook ups and ae ready to go. NWML#870807 $84,900

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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SUN 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 LAKES REALTY Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

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Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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TIMBERLAND

413 ACRES m/l. Approx 1 mile out of Curlew on Boulder Creek Road. Merchantable Timber. Access. Excellent Long-term Investment. $516,000.00

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Cute 2bd/2ba home on .73 acre on desirable Eastlake Rd! MLS#852674 $137,000

HILLTOP REALTY

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Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

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HOME

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 26, 2015

SCHOOLS

Oroville sixth graders answer the question, ‘Why study history?’

Submitted photos

Preparing for the future by studying the past. Oroville sixth graders in Ila Hall’s class were asked the question, “Why do we study history? The class (above and right) works on projects that reflect different points in history. SUBMITTED BY ILA HALL TEACHER, OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

OROVILLE Interesting things are going on at Oroville Elementary School. Ila Hall’s sixth grade class is preparing for the future by studying the past. Every year, each student must complete a Classroom Based Assessment or CBA to complete his or her portfolio for sixth grade. This year the topic is, “Why do We Study History?” Her students provided some reasons they think history is important. According to Leo

Chen it is an excellent way to study different cultures. Elisha Taylor agreed and stated it is important we understand how others lived to seek to understand why things happened they way they did. The Classroom Based Assessment involves each student in discovering History and using their computer skills to present a PowerPoint Presentation on the topic chosen for the year. Students are using their math skills to make a to scale replica of the Great Wall of China. They have used rates and ratios to determine the size and the

supplies needed for the project. During the project the students will learn to synergize to complete the Wall. The Great Wall will be on display during Leadership Day in the spring. Kolo Moser Jr. stated he likes studying the past to learn how to govern well currently and in the future. It is important for students to understand by studying other people groups to learn from their mistakes according to Cacey Allen. Currently Hall’s class studies World History beginning with Mesopotamia and traveling around the globe to Egypt, Asia,

China, India, Greece, Rome, and the Americas. Odin Finsen said he likes learning about the inventions of the past and how we use many of them today and how we can improve on others. Katie Maynard agreed and added we can take their living techniques to improve our lives today. The students each learn what is involved in a civilization. A civilization must have a form of government, religion, writing,

and learning taking place. Natalia Carrillo understands the importance of knowing the religions of a people group and how this influences their decisions. Makenzie Fogg discussed how differences in cultures effects how people work with one another. Hall offers opportunities for her students to openly discuss how studying the past affects what happens in the present and the future. Hadley Blasey believes this helps her to understand how

we can learn from the mistakes of the past and improve the future. Natalie Rodriquez chimes in with the past has both good and bad people we can learn from to improve our lives. Students are actively using leadership skills to improve education goals by putting first things first. Students are participating by making goals for school and proactively work to accomplish these goals.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

COPS | FROM A5 Burglary on Copple Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Littering on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Custodial interference on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Tracie Lynn Condon, 43, court commitment for DUI. Shawne Dee Peters, 41, booked for felon in possession of a firearm and unlawful loaded firearm in a vehicle. Raymond Neil Hobbs, 33, booked for third-degree theft. Aaron Lee Marchand, 50, booked on an FTA bench warrant for delivery of a controlled substance. Bradley James Verstagen, 28, booked on three counts of third-degree theft. Sheri Lynn Smith, 39, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Koleby Christine Smith, 18, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Heather Dee Anne Day, 52, booked for residential burglary, two counts of seconddegree burglary, one count each of third-degree theft, third-degree possession of stolen property and littering; and a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mis-

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Services • Mental Health • Chemical Dependency • Developmental Disorders • Psychiatric Services • Therapeutic Housing Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Toll free: 866-826-6191

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

www.wvmedical.com

www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

chief.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission

DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of

Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Healthcare Services  Anti

Coagulation Clinic

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

In this time of Thankfulness-

OPTICAL

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

MASSAGE

YOUR AD HERE

Licensed Massage Practitioner

TONASKET FOOD BANK In helping to provide for our fire victims and all others in need of food help in our community.

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

(WE CANNOT ACCEPT ITEMS OF CLOTHING)

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com

509-486-1219

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Su Ianniello

Please remember to aid your:

Cash donations may be mailed to 101 Hwy 97 N.,Tonasket,and non-perishable canned food items may be left at the food bank on Thursdays, 8 to 11 AM

 Radiology

 Behavioral

Emergency www.nvhospital.org VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program 

 Ophthalmology

WA Lic#MA21586

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151

HEALTH CARE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 26, 2015  

November 26, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 26, 2015  

November 26, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune