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OROVILLE KIDS PRESENT

Community Bazaar

BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE

Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar is Friday and Saturday at Oroville Elementary

See B1

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Comancheros crown Queen Trinity Dejong

QUEEN SARAH HANDS OVER HER REIGN

you’re going to need one; or a friend to travel with.” If Parsons jokingly made the year TONASKET - The Tonasket seem like a long one, Quinlan dispersed Comancheros crowned a new queen those fears. Saturday (Nov. 14) evening at their “It seems like just yesterday I was in annual Rodeo Queen and Sponsor Trinity’s shoes,” Quinlan reflected. “I Appreciation dinner. made a lot of good friends and great 2015 Queen Sarah Quinlan turned memories. But I have a little sister now over her crown to that’s a princess, so I Trinity Dejong, statget to stay involved.” ing Dejong would Erin Quinlan be “meeting a lot “Ever since the age of is this year’s of nice people and Okanogan County 16, I thought I’d like to Junior making a lot of good Rodeo friends” during her represent my community A s s o c i a t i o n year-long tenure as (OCJRA) Princess. this way. ” queen. The junior rodeo Dejong, a junior Trinity Dejong, Miss Tonasket Rodeo queen, Michaela 2016 Founders Day Rodeo at Tonasket High Allen of Okanogan, School, said she was also in attenmoved to Tonasket dance at the event. in 2012 and immediately got involved The dinner was held in the Tonasket in sports, including the Tigers’ softball High School Commons, which had team. She said she rode her first horse at been magically transformed into an the age of eight, and has long dreamed elegant setting by decorator Roslyn Ray. of becoming a Rodeo Queen. Oroville’s Cory Pellegrini played guitar “I think it will allow me to put in a lot of time in the community and rodeo. and sang, and dinner was served by Ever since the age of 16, I thought I Kimberly Gasho and Gina Inlow. “Let this day be the start of the greatwould like to represent my commuest year in this young lady’s life,” said nity this way,” said Dejong. “Thank you, Parsons as he blessed the food. Sarah, for inspiring me.” An event recently added to the Time in the community will include presiding over both the Tonasket Tonasket Rodeo Grounds’ calendar is Rodeo and Founders Day events and Roger Sawyer’s New Year’s Eve Party. “We used to have a private party at representing the Comancheros at their home, but last year we decided to make Demolition Derby, Tractor Pulls and auctions; as well as traveling around the it a community event, and filled up an state with the Omak Stampede Queen ice rink in the arena,” said Mrs. Sawyer. “We had a bonfire and people brought and the Methow Valley Rodeo Queen. “I hope you know what you’ve got- food for a big potluck. Everyone is ten yourself into,” said commentator Al invited.” If you haven’t met her by then, be Parsons of Molson. “There’s going to be a lot of hitching up the trailer and trav- sure and say hello to the new Rodeo eling. I hope you’ve got a dog, because Queen. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Above, 2015 Miss Tonasket Rodeo Queen Sarah Quinlan (left) smiles alongside the newly crowned 2016 Miss Tonasket Rodeo Queen Trinity Dejong. Right, Dejong and Quinlan with the Okanogan County Junior Rodeo Queen Micaela Allen of Okanogan, and Okanogan County Junior Rodeo Princess Erin Quinlan of Tonasket, Sarah’s younger sister. Bottom right, Dejong greets well-wishers attending her coronation dinner. Below left, Sarah Quinlan gives a heartfelt hug of thanks for a wonderful year as Rodeo Queen to former Comancheros President Roger Sawyer.

Oroville Police get better connected

Katie Teachout/ staff photos

BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Oroville Police Chief Todd Hill requested a change in cell phone service and equipment at the Nov. 3 council meeting that will help his officer’s stay better connected when out on patrol.

Hill requested a switch to Verizon from AT&T Mobile and while the switch marks an increase of $60 to $210 a month for service it comes with more connectivity, according to Chief Hill. “That gets us five flip phones and three mobile hot spots for the patrol

CONNECTED | PG A3

Tonasket Council hears water woes City airport runway in need of repairs BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tonasket City Council’s Nov. 10 meeting was advertised as the Final Budget Hearing for the 2016 Budget, but had just a few more loose ends to tie up before putting the final stamp of approval on it; including final decisions on how to distribute Hotel/Motel Tax funds. The council Mayor Pat Plumb approved raising the water rates five percent rather than two percent.

“We had two wells break down and Plumb went on to say the well breakspent much of our water reserve on tak- ing down was an unanticipated disaster. ing care of this, so I need some money “As a municipal business, we are getcoming in to rebuild that reserve,” Mayor ting into danger land,” stated Plumb. Patrick Plumb said. “We could not have “Other municipalities have waited for anticipated our main, things to blow up, and good well breaking in and when they did the middle of the sumtheir rates went up “We could not have mer. I am very cogmore than five pernizant this increase I apologize for anticipated our good cent. affects low income the water rates havwell breaking down in ing to go up, but as a people, but I can’t propose not being smart as a busithe middle of summer.” municipality with this money. We ness, we are in danger.” Patrick Plumb, Mayor are playing on the edge The final budCity of Tonasket of the knife with this. get hearing was then This was our secondclosed. newest well that broke, “We made some and our best producer. I don’t know if good progress on the budget,” said you want to play Russian Roulette on the Plumb afterward. “I’m glad they (council infrastructure failing. We need to make members) finally listened to me on a flatthis small, ongoing sacrifice rather than rate increase for employees. It won’t cost a huge sacrifice all at once.” the city any more, but it will re-distribute

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 47

the wage increase to avoid catching up in the future.” The council had been asked to consider either a one percent COLA (Cost of Living Allowance) for each employee or a flat increase of the same amount of the percent increase equally among employees. Plumb was also happy to report the city’s health insurance contribution had “stayed flat for the first time in my history as mayor.” Lee Orr of the Tonasket Airport Improvement Association approached the council to say he would like to see some more money budgeted towards the airport. “We have a lot of needs that have been put off for quite a few years,” said Orr, adding they would soon be needing a new septic system as the one in place is at least 50 years old. “It’s pretty important, because when

SEE AIRPORT | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

pilots fly in, that is the first thing on their minds,” Orr said. Council member Scott Olson pointed out that for visitors flying in, the airport provided the first impression of Tonasket, as it was the first thing they saw. Orr said a ‘big draw’ of the Tonasket Airport was having a pilots lounge and courtesy car. “Any time you see the courtesy car in town, someone is there spending money,” Orr said. The next priority for the airport, Orr pointed out, was to repair the cracks in the runway. Olson suggested other agencies using the airport could chip in on costs. “MedStar is charging thousands and thousands of dollars to come in and get people, on the backs of the city. We also need to look at talking to the Forest

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Obituaries Schools

A6-A7 A8 B1-B6

Classifieds Real Estate Sports

B4-B5 B5 B5


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19, 2015

NEWS

North Cascades Highway closes for the winter

AN ORNAMENTAL CHANGE

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Members of Oroville Streetscape and other volunteers have been changing the color of the lightbulbs on the Oroville Community Christmas decorations to make the lighted poinsettias more recognizable this holiday season. While in the past some say they readily recognized the decorations for what they were – pointed flower petals with leaves and a stem, many have had trouble figuring out what the large decorations lit with all white bulbs, are supposed to be. On FaceBook, there has been much discussion and a few wild guesses, ranging from stars to ducks. This year Streetscape has purchased several boxes of red and green bulbs, at cost, from Hughes Department Store, to make the flowers red and the leaves and stems green. The change costs about $25 per poinsettia and Streetscape is asking the community to help by donating money to purchase additional lightbulbs. “We didn’t have the funds to do all the decorations in red this year, so we will have some red and some white flowers, all with green stems,” said Lynn Chapman, president of Streetscape. Above, Hilary Blackler, Joyce Forrester, Joan Cool, Shelly Roberts Lynn Chapman and Meredith Moultrie with one of the completed poinsettia decorations. Left, Chapman and Forrester replace white bulbs with green for the leaves. Donations can be made to Streetscape, P.O. Box 299, Oroville, WA 98844. For those that want to donate to purchase the more costly LED bulbs, donations can be made at Oroville City Hall where a fund has been started. Gary DeVon/staff photos

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OROVILLE – A pedestrian was struck and fatally wounded Monday evening, Nov. 9 around 7:30 p.m. when he walked into the highway and was struck by a southbound car. According to the Washington State Patrol, a 48-year-old man was struck by a vehicle about five miles south of Oroville, near Milepost 326. The man entered the highway and was hit by Garfield S. Sandoval, 51, Okanogan, who was traveling

southbound on SR97 in a 2002 Kia Sedona. The man was dead at the scene, according to WSP Trooper T. House, who responded to the accident. Trooper House said the cause of the accident was the pedestrian’s “failure to yield the right of way.” No charges are being filed in the incident. Sandoval was not injured, but his vehicle was damaged and towed by Thompson Bees. The name of the dead man was being held pending notification of next of kin.

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TWISP – The weekend blast of wintery weather on State Route 20, the North Cascades Highway, will keep it closed until next spring. The Washington State Department of Transportation temporarily closed the highway at 10 a.m. Thursday morning Nov. 12, due to heavy snowfall and a forecast for heavy rain, providing a rising potential for avalanches. After Monday’s assessment by maintenance and avalanche technicians WSDOT determined it could not safely keep the North Cascades Highway open. “Avalanche chutes are full and icy, and we’d be putting the public and our crews at risk if we tried to keep the road open any longer,” said Twisp Maintenance Supervisor Don Becker. On Monday WSDOT avalanche and maintenance technicians needed a plow truck to

reach Washington Pass. They encountered four avalanches that blocked lanes, two feet of new snow with a layer of ice on top in the chutes and at the summit. The forecast calls for up to four feet of new snow by Wednesday. The determination to make the closure permanent was made as those conditions create an environment which is unsafe for travelers and our crews. Last year, WSDOT closed the North Cascades Highway for the season on Nov. 24. The 37-milelong winter closure zone begins 14 miles east of Newhalem at milepost 134 on the west side of Rainy Pass (4,855 feet) and ends 22 miles west of Winthrop at milepost 171 below Washington Pass. Avalanches usually close the highway between Thanksgiving and the second week of December. The earliest closure recorded was Nov. 2, 2005. Due to drought and little snow, the highway never closed in 1976.

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Words cannot even express the heartfelt thanks we felt from the outpouring of love, support, prayers and offers of help we received during the loss of Bob. We would also like to thank everyone for the cards, food, gifts and donations for the auction. A special thank you to those that came to the hospital – Bob Jewett – to support us, D&D Auction, the crew that is working the rock yard to keep Bob’s passion going and a very special thank you to Wynn Schell. It means a lot to us to know how many great friends Bob and our family have.

Thank You, Denise & Brittany Jewett


NOVEMBER 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS AIRPORT | FROM A1 Service; they need to come to the table too, as we are providing a service for them,” Olson said. Orr said it would be good to have another designated helicopter pad or two, as “those heavy helicopters did sink into our asphalt. It would be good to have a concrete pad or tow. MedStar is a real asset when time is of the essence. They are much faster than an ambulance,” said Orr. “We would like to get some of the extra money that came to the city from the airport being used to fight the fires.” Council member and Forest Service Employee Jill Vugteveen pointed out the Forest Service paid for those services, and council member Claire Jeffko said the council had discussed using some of that money to meet some of the airport’s needs. “I remember way back when all of us were picking rocks so the runway could go in,” said Jeffko. “The airport is a very important thing, and if we lose that we are going to lose the quality of life.” “This council still strongly feels the airport is important,” said Plumb afterward. “We would like to see if we can get the County Commissioners to allow spending of some of the economic development money that has been set aside.” Plumb was referring to money accumulating from one tenth of one percent of sales taxes that would normally go to the State

OROVILLE VETERANS

being allowed to be kept by economically depressed counties. “The counties hold the money and determine a split,” said Plumb. “It’s hard to estimate the amount they collect yearly, other than to say somewhere between zero and one million dollars. In the past, Tonasket has been able to use it for the Third Street stormwater project, and to purchase the TVBRC (Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center). We could use that money to leverage other opportunities, for example an electric car charging station.” City Planner Kurt Danison said he thought repairs to the runway hadn’t been made since 2010. Plumb asked if the state would consider financing another 1,000 feet of runway. “No, they are not going to buy roads or anything like it,” Danison said, adding that the airport was not eligible for any federal funds. “If we extend the runway, it extends the area that needs to be protected under land use laws, and there is a lot of opposition to it at the county commissioner level.” Danison said he didn’t know if the county commissioners would release any of the sales tax funds yet. “It has been two or three years since they have given any away. There is a bond being paid off; a three million dollar bond sold 15 years ago, and all that money was

distributed,” said Danison. “They keep two years worth of bond payments and some other payments, but there is still a million dollars left after that.” Danison was referring to Oroville’s Veranda Beach project. The criteria for scoring projects submitted to the Economic Alliance “looks at what you have in hand; if you have matching funds,” said Danison. In other city council news, Plumb said he continues going to Okanogan County Council of Governments (OCOG) meetings and to Okanogan County Transportation Authority meetings (TranGo) to represent the interests of Tonasket. Plumb said TranGo was planning to house some of the buses in Tonasket in order to provide better service to North County residents. Plumb said one plan was to run a bus up Highway 7, and down Highway 97. “Brent Timm is the Operations Manager, and I am really pleased with his work ethics. He will just jump in and sub for drivers, so I see him as a working manager,” said Plumb. The contract for Moreno and Nelson as contractors on the Pedestrian Bridge Project near the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park was approved. Work is expected to begin in the early spring.

CONNECTED | FROM A1 cars,” said Hill, who added that the hot spots will allow the officers to use laptop computers in the patrol cars to search police data basis. Hill said the hot spots will be combined with the Panasonic Tough Books with touch screens that the department recently purchased from the Bellingham Police Department. Hill said the used laptops were purchased at a deep discount and have military grade protection for durability.

OTHER BUSINESS The council adopted both a resolution setting the 2016 property tax levy for the city, as well as the 2016 property tax levy for the EMS District. Mayor Chuck Spieth appointed Santo Gutierrez to the Oroville Housing Authority and the council approved of the appointment. Gutierrez will take the position recently held by Linda Schwilke, who stepped down from the OHA board. “I spoke with him tonight and he is quite enthused about it. I think he’d be a good appointment,” said Mayor Spieth. The council also had no issues with a request from the

Gary De Von/staff photo

A few of the local veterans honored last Friday at a special Veterans Day Assembly hosted by the Oroville Senior Class in Coulton Auditorium. The assembly featured speeches, video presentations, patriotic songs performed by the Oroville High School band and by students at Oroville Elementary, like “Proud to Be America” which was sung by the K-3 Students. “Today is a special day to honor our veterans, but it can’t be just one day a year we have to thank them 365 days a year. We have lots of veterans that are homeless, jobless. We need to do something for them. We don’t see much of that around here, but if you go to the cities you do,” said teacher Tam Hutchinson, the Senior Class advisor.

Tonasket man takes life after 11-hour standoff 9 a.m. Nov. 13 from a neighbor who had been shot at by Thomas. When the deputies arrived, the neighbor, who had recently purchased property off Lemansky Road, reported having driven to his property on an easement road with the intent of posting it ‘No Hunting’ and ‘No Trespassing.’ When he heard someone yell out to him, he stopped his vehicle and rolled down his window. He heard one gun shot, and a bullet came through his passenger side door and lodged into the dash near his stereo. The neighbor immediately left the area and put in the call to the Sheriff ’s office. When the two deputies arrived,

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board regarding the renewal of the liquor license applications for Frontier Foods and Quick Mart. Lastly, Councilwoman Neysa Roley had a request. “I’d like to see what it takes to be able to get a drop-off box for ballots in Oroville like they have in Tonasket,” she said. “Are you volunteering to take them down?” asked Spieth,

explaining that a drop box requires someone to deliver the ballots down to the county courthouse on election day. He said the city itself would not want that responsibility. The meeting was nearly another record breaker, taking just nine minutes to complete the council’s business. It was, however, over twice as long as the previous council meeting which lasted for only four minutes.

TONASKET Edward John Thomas, 52, of Tonasket is dead after a self-inflicted gunshot wound that ended an 11-hour standoff with Okanogan County Sheriff ’s deputies Friday, Nov. 13. Chief Criminal Deputy Steve Brown said Thomas told Brown and another deputy on scene to go away and that he “was not coming out unless it was in a body bag.” Brown and the other deputy went to Thomas’s trailer on Lemansky Road, west of Tonasket, in response to a call the Sheriff ’s Office received at

they attempted to contact Thomas inside the trailer. When Thomas made the comment about not coming out unless it was in a body bag, the deputies backed away from the trailer and called for back up. The Sheriff ’s Office then received a call from one of Thomas’s family members who said Thomas had indicated to them that not only was he not coming out, but he “did not know how many law enforcement officers he was going to take with him, but that it was going to be a blood bath,” according to Brown. Okanogan County Sheriff ’s

SEE STANDOFF | PG A4

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Officer Frank Kouteliers demonstrates one of the Panasonic Tough Books installed in an Oroville Patrol Car. Officers can now do data searches online using one of three wifi hotspots recently purchased by the OPD.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Ernesto Eduardo Mendez Leon, 21, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Nov. 10 to residential burglary, third-degree malicious mischief and thirddegree theft. Mendez Leon was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50 for the May 28 crimes. Jeffrey Lynn Vaughn, 45, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Nov. 12 to second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and fourth-degree assault. The court dismissed a DUI charge. Vaughn was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 244 days suspended, and fined $1,260.50 for the Aug. 21 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Anastasia M. King, 22, Tonasket, with two counts of second-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 3. The court found probable cause to charge Jennifer Lynn Valdez, 21, Omak, with second-degree burglary, fourth-degree assault and attempted third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 8. The court found probable cause to charge Cara Ann Campbell, 28, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 15. The court found probable cause to charge Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 38, Spokane, with three counts of POCS (one each for methamphetamine, oxycodone and useable marijuana) and one count each of use of drug paraphernalia and thirddegree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 8 near Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Lance Victor Paul, 21, Omak, with residential burglary, second-degree burglary, third-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 4. The court found probable cause to charge Shelby Joreen George, 26, Nespelem, with residential burglary, second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 4 near River-

side. The court found probable cause to charge Gabriel J. Saenz, 42, Riverside, with POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 5. Juvenile A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Oct. 21 to residential burglary and thirddegree malicious mischief. She was sentenced Nov. 11 to 34 days in detention with credit for 34 days served for the Sept. 25 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Jan. 27, 2016. DISTRICT COURT Nichole A. Boyce, 20, Omak, guilty of DUI and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of fourth-degree assault and third-degree malicious mischief. The court dismissed a charge: possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams). Boyce was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined a total of $3,094. Cara Ann Campbell, 28, Omak, guilty on two counts of thirddegree theft. Campbell was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,576. Brandon Scott Cardenas, 30, Okanogan, guilty of obstruction. Cardenas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $658. Robert Grant Christman, 76, Tonasket, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Samuel Diaz Lupian, 54, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: second-degree recreational fishing without a license or a catch card. Wendy Marlene Hamm, 42, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Richard Lavern Harris, 54, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Adrian Dewayne Harry, 18, Omak, guilty on three counts of second-degree DWLS. Harry was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 360 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,269. Marcos Pino Hernandez, 44, Omak, guilty of DUI. Hernandez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Kristina R. Hudson, 38, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault and third-degree

malicious mischief. Hudson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $898. Clifford Stephen McCauley, 41, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Christy Lynn Merritt, 42, Conconully, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Merritt was fined $500. Tommy Eugene Moore, 49, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Moore was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $858. Nichole Briane Martin Porras, 25, Omak, guilty of thirddegree theft. Porras was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 360 days suspended, and fined $808. Aaron Michael Randall, 32, Okanogan, guilty of DUI. Randall was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,381. Dylan James Rise, 22, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Rise was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,268. Cleyber Ernesto Ruiz Magdaleno, 33, Loomis, guilty of reckless driving. Ruiz Magdaleno was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,008. Cassie Marie Sanders, 31, Tonasket, had a fourthdegree assault charge dismissed. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Harassment on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Tacoma St. in Okanogan. Theft on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Theft on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Found property on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Purse recovered. Lost property on S. Janis Rd. near Tonasket. Boat reported missing. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Fatality reported. Threats on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan.

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Tonasket council hears budget requests

ALL DRESSED UP

RR crossing, sidewalks and pedestrian bridge also discussed

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Above, Aaden McNaer, six, chugs down the street dressed as a locomotive and Ava Ozo, three, as Queen Elsa (from the Disney movie “Frozen”) for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce’s annual business Trick or Treat event, held last Friday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oroville businesses reported giving away hundreds of treats to the many kids who dressed up for Halloween and participated. Left, Gru (Supt. Steve Quick) and his Minions, Shay Shaw, Betty Cole and Erin McKinney, from the movie “Despicable Me,” were the winners of Best Costume in the Business Halloween Costume and Decorations contest. The group at the Oroville School District Office have earned the title several times over the years

concerns is that in the event of an emergency along Railroad Avenue or within the industrial area which contains several buildings with atmospheres controlled by ammonia and other toxic chemicals, people using the park would be unable to evacuate. BY KATIE TEACHOUT The city gained permission from the KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Okanogan County Commissioners for Tonasket City Council met Thursday, the new access, then received permisOct. 29 and further discussed the bud- sion from Genesee & Wyoming Inc. (G&W), the CSCD’s parent company, get. At a budget workshop held Oct. 14, department heads submitted requests for for a new crossing. Mayor Patrick Plumb then asked the UTC in January 2015 needed items. for approval of a new Police Chief crossing. After meetDarren Curtis asked ing with the UTC in for Surface tab“More than ten people Tonasket along with let computers, new county maintenance chairs for the police they told me intend to personnel and one station, stop stick vote for the Tonasket county commisstrips and $7,000 to sioner, the decision $10,000 for a new car. Parks and Recreation was made to upgrade Superintendent Hugh a temporary crossJensen needs a paint District. ” ing constructed by striper, a vehicle and Clair Jeffko, Council Member the federal Bureau of Candidates Forum a new mower. Mayor SEEN AT THE OKANOGANCity of Tonasket Reclamation in the Patrick Plumb said he early 1990s, finding would FAMILY like to increase Oroville FAIR this option to be the Chamber Hosts rates for water by five most cost effective and least damaging Candidates Forum Oct. 15 at percent and sewer by two percent in railroad 2016. CitySee ClerkA3 and Treasurer Alice to the wetland areas west of the Vicki’s Backdoor Club Attwood requested to have medical cov- tracks. G&W approved a basic crossing, ratherage continue, a new phone system for city hall, a maintenance agreement for er than a fully signalized crossing, due computer hardware, new front doors for to infrequency of trains on the track and expected limited, seasonal use of city hall and a cost of living increase. In the ongoing attempt to secure a new the crossing to be located at the southcrossing of the Cascade and Columbia ern boundary of the county’s shop land. River Railroad (CSCD), to provide sec- The UTC then informed the city that new crossings require fully signalized ondary access into Chief Tonasket Park, facilities. With further explanation of the the council discussed a traffic study of planned use of the crossing, UTC staff the area prepared by City Planner Kurt agreed to consider the option after being Danison at the request of the Washington provided the traffic study which details State Utilities and Transportation the Average Daily Trips expected to use Commission (UTC). the crossing. Chief Tonasket Park is located on In other city business, Councilwoman city-owned property adjoining the city’s Claire Jeffko asked who’s responsibilwastewater treatment plant, with the ity it was to fix a heaving sidewalk near Okanogan River as the opposing bound- the railroad tracks. Attwood said the ary. The park is accessed from Railroad abutting property owner is responsible. Avenue, so visitors to the park must Plumb said because the property was travel through a busy industrial area to located on the railroad it was probably access the baseball fields, soccer fields, the city’s responsibility, so Jensen said he skate park, Water Ranch, boat launch would look at it the next day. and other amenities. Jeffko also reported more than ten The city has been attempting to develop a second point of access into the park since the late 1980’s. One of the city’s SEE COUNCIL| PG A2

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Main St., OEA1422 says demands on teachers’ time too high P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

and as an administrator, she said. At one pay the costs to renew certifications, but time she was the Oroville Elementary the salaries continue to decrease.” School principal. The information she Johnson said the school hours have presented came from UniServe and increased for students as well. the Washington Education Association “There are longer student days and (WEA), according to Johnson. teachers have lost up to 15 minutes of Johnson said there was a long list preparation time each day, added up over of requirements for a school year they’ve teachers in Washington lost over six days of State, including the time to prepare and “The bottom line is we get ready for school,” Washington State Te a c h e r / P r i n c i p a l have to attract teachers Johnson said. Evaluation Project. She then addressed to our district and we the online planner. (TPEP). “TPEP is time conare already remote. I’m “It’s great for adminsuming, for princiistrators and teachers asking you to keep that like it, but it takes more pals and teachers and teachers are not proin mind when you are time than a planner on vided additional time a desk. The concern is negotiating” or pay for all of this an unreasonable workwork. There are 53 difload continues to grow Dr. Lynn Johnson, President ferent items that have without pay,” she said. Oroville Education Association to be observed or the Like many of the teacher has to pronew state requirevide evidence of,” said ments of teachers Johnson. Johnson said, “Again, it’s not that it is a Then there are changes to teacher bad thing, in just takes more time.” certification requirements, according to Johnson said altogether teachers were

Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 www.gazette-tribune.com OROVILLE – Dr. Lynn Johnson, president of the Oroville Education Association, says more is being asked of Oroville teachers, while time to accomplish tasks and compensation remain the same or less. Johnson made a presentation to the Oroville School Board at their Monday, Oct. 26 meeting. “I’m here as a representative of the OEA to let you know about legislative actions that have impacted the Oroville School District. I know you are aware that teachers all over the state have walked out or gone on strike,” said Johnson, assuring the board that wasn’t her group’s intention, but that they should be aware of how these new demands and their impact on the district.

SINCE 1905

teachers can’t/won’t do it all. Students are feeling the pressure,” Johnson said. She warned that there is a shortage of teachers in the state and fewer people are choosing to go into teaching as a career. She said if Oroville doesn’t compensate for the extra time being asked of teachers like other districts in the state are having to do, then the few teachers that are looking for jobs will look elsewhere. “College students are not choosing teaching, there are less and less that are interested. The bottom line is we have to attract teachers to our district and we are already remote. I’m asking you to keep that in mind when you are negotiating,” she said. For the teachers here I am not saying things are all bad, we just have to take care of our people.” To make the district more attractive to teachers she suggested providing an attractive contract that is comparable or better than other districts. She said there were disparities between the Oroville and Tonasket school districts. “One teacher was approached (by Tonasket) and said that they’ve got a better contract. We want to be profession-

the president of the school board. “Rocky you were one of my students and I think you know we took the time to personalize our instruction to students... that time to do that is gone,” said Ricevuto. “I want to compliment you for the time you took to personalize what you taught,” said DeVon. “It has been a big message that the school directors and myself have been taking to the state, no more programs without the money to pay for them.” DeVon said he was also worried about the closure of the Buckhorn Gold Mine, which is about 25 percent of the district’s property evaluation. He said he appreciated what teachers do, but he had to see a way to make it all balance out. “I appreciate the comparison you gave us between Oroville and Tonasket,” added School Director Todd Hill. “I’m not against Mr. Quick, but look at the number of administrators we have Gary DeVon/staff photos and only 550 students. He was hired as a part time superintendent and you moved him to full time. Do we really need a

IT on the doorstep at North Valley Hospital District ics to get the specifics. It is taking a lot of man hours.” KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Fries said it costs the hospital a lot TONASKET - Payge Fries, Health of money to re-bill after a claim has Information Manager, reported on been denied, and it’s unknown upfront implementation of the new ICD-10 at if something will be reimbursed when the Oct. 8 North Valley Hospital Board it’s re-billed. She said additional employees are of Commissioners meeting. The ICD-10 is the tenth revision of the needed who have experience and trainInternational Statistical Classification of ing in billing and coding. “It’s not something that’s easily taught,” Diseases and Related Health Problems. said Fries, adding, “It’s pretty difficult ICD codes have been required for reimbursement of Medicare and Medicaid right now, but we will get through it.” “Payge Fries has championed this claims since 1979. The ICD-9 had 13,000 project to prepare codes but the ICDour organization for 10 has around 68,000; this time of change providing greater “Doctors have been reimbursement,” said specificity in reportNVH CEO Mike ing diagnoses. trained to take care of Zwicker, adding that “The ninth revision patients first, and they the hospital might has been out since the effects of the 1970s, so there will have to transition to see decreased Days Cash are lots of changes taking care of the elec- on Hand over the and lots more codes,” few weeks due said Fries. “The govtronic records. We have next to the conversion. ernment mandated Chief Information to change from being it be put in place Officer Kelly Carriker by October, so we clinical to being techno- and Lori Sawyer, started a group back logical, because that is a former NVH RN in March to get it in who works in Health place.” BY KATIE TEACHOUT

One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Injuries reported. Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on Elmway in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Trespassing on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on Central Ave. in Oroville. Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 One-vehicle crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Burglary on Pratts Rd. near Oroville. Found property on Cobey Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Tires reported missing. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Soda reported missing. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Theft on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Central Ave. in Oroville. Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 Violation of a no-contact order on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Pornography on Airport Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Oak St. in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-pedestrian crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Injuries reported. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Tablet computer reported

Friday, Nov. 13, 2015 Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Wolfdance Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Fletcher Rd. near Oroville. Threats on N. Lemanasky Rd. near Tonasket. Custodial interference on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Child abuse on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Hwy. 97 near Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Granite Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Joseph Alex Martinez, 37, DOC detainer. Brian Curtis Dove, 34, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Eva Lilly McKinney, 26, booked for a drug court violation. Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015 Domestic dispute on Copple Rd. near Omak. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. DWLS on Oak St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Columbia River Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Threats on Koala Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Wildwood Dr. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Threats on E. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. No injuries reported. Ramon Ismael Lozano Larios, 18, booked for reckless

driving and second-degree DWLS. Jess Martin Shadle, 31, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree DWLS. Frederick David Batson Jr., 31, booked for DUI. Lisa Lynn Oliver, 43, booked on two counts of second-degree theft and one count each of POCS (methamphetamine) and introduction of contraband. Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015 Drugs on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. DWLS on Omak Mountain Rd. near Omak. Theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Malicious mischief on Maple St. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Threats on Yarnell Rd. near Tonsket. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Hwy. 155 near Omak. Injuries reported. Weapons offense on Engh Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. DWLS on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. DWLS on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Kevin Bert Priest, 50, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for first-degree DWLS. Donald Bryce Sylvester, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV), harassment (DV) and POCS. Jacob Scott Sutton, 18, booked on five counts of seconddegree theft and one count of possession of another person’s ID.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

STANDOFF | FROM A3 Special Response Team (SRT), along with a crisis negotiator, were then called to the scene. Several attempts made over the phone to contact Thomas and get him to come out and surrender were not successful. SRT members next approached the trailer intending to use a less lethal gas method to evict Thomas, but before they were able to insert the gas, Thomas fired several rounds at the depu-

ties through the trailer. The SRT members then backed away and the crisis negotiator again attempted to get Thomas to come out. Thomas responded by saying he was not coming out, and that he was going to take his own life; and inquired if he had shot any deputies. The Chelan County SWAT arrived to assist Okanogan County’s SRT team, and a special

response vehicle was driven to the trailer. Gas was successfully inserted into the trailer through the trailer windows. Thomas still refused to come out and continued to fire rounds from inside. After several more attempts were made to elicit Thomas without success, the standoff was ended when Thomas ended his own life with a self-inflicted gunshot.

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Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015

missing. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Brian Kristopher Boyd, 34, court commitments for firstdegree negligent driving and third-degree DWLS. Billy Dale Anderson, 46, DOC detainer. Sherilynn Nielsen, no middle name listed, 47, booked for violation of a no-contact order, first-degree criminal trespassing and making a false or misleading statement. Dylan James Rise, 22, court commitments for operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and thirddegree DWLS. Dustin Dewayne Gallas, 20, booked for no valid operator’s license without ID.

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Drugs on Jasmine St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Theft on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Medication reported missing. Theft on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 38, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a legend drug, thirddegree DWLS and a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS. Robert Eugene Bass, 61, booked for third-degree DWLS and two counts each of unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful hunting bear with dogs and unlawful hunting of big game. Delitha Gail Hahn, 37, DOC detainer. Conneasha Danial Nanamkin, 24, DOC detainer. Eduardo Cruz Orozco, 24, booked on a State Patrol probable cause warrant for DUI. Jared Nathanael Fudge, 25, booked for first-degree negligent driving and reckless driving.

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NOVEMBER 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

It’s never too late to thank a veteran

OPINION BY WILLIAM SHAW THE BELLEVUE REPORTER

At the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918, the guns finally fell silent across France. Peace broke out that day, and soon ‘Johnnie came marching home’ back to the US. For many years, November 11 was recognized as Armistice Day - a day we gave recognition and thanks to our World War I veterans. A second World War, a U.N. ‘Police Action’ in Korea, and thirty-five years later, the November 11 observance was renamed as Veterans Day. Since then, we as a grateful nation gave thanks and honor to every veteran that served at home or abroad – be it in France, the Pacific, the cold hills of Korea or a military base stateside. On November 11, we also gave thanks to the veterans that fought in the sand and deserts of Kuwait, Afghanistan and Iraq. On every other day, I hope we give thanks to the active uniformed servicemen and women that are serving in harm’s way. No matWilliam Shaw ter how complex the mission, how difficult the task or terrain, our uniformed service members and military families have continually answered our nation’s call. But we as a nation have let a group of veterans down. From the early 1950’s to the mid- 1960’s, we were fighting a very real Cold War. Back then, the Domino Theory was fact. From the White House and Pentagon down to our family dinner tables, it shaped our foreign policy and our national opinion. All of America felt that we were the Bulwark of Freedom, and that the U.S. must take a stand against communism. And in 1965 we did – in Viet Nam. Fifty years after the beginning and forty years after the ending of that war, many Americans fail to go beyond lingering disagreement of the policies that led to that war and the complex issues that escalated and ended it. Back then, many of us never really properly thanked and welcomed home the thousands of men and women who returned home from answering our nation’s call to put their boots on the ground and their lives on the line in the humid jungles, rivers and fire bases of that divided country. Today, we all have family members, friend or acquaintances that served in Viet Nam. It is never too late for us to undo the disservice done to many veterans who returned home and were disdained or ignored 40 years ago. Now is the time to thank a Viet Nam veteran for their service. Now is the time to listen to their story. Sound Publishing recognizes and thanks all our uniformed service members, veterans and military families. During the 50th and 40th anniversary of the Viet Nam war, we give special recognition, thanks and honor to our Viet Nam veterans and their families. Local event recognizing and supporting our Veterans or those who served: March 30, 2016 Washington State ‘Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day’: A perfect day to thank a Viet Nam Veteran for their service, and welcome them home. http://www.dva.wa.gov/welcomehome-vietnam-veterans-day-march-30th.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Changes to Medical Cannabis Laws SUBMITTED BY JOHN NOVAK AND GINA GARCIA

Patients in Washington State are confused as to what all the changes in our state Medical Cannabis laws are and how it effects them. Not only do patients have to be concerned about what their state legislators do, but now two state agencies have been put in charge of deciding rules on everything from new authorization forms, mandatory reporting, patient registries and a vast reduction of personal limits and cultivation rights. To help patients understand, we have taken the key points from the Washington State Department of Health’s website. EFFECTIVE APRIL 24, 2015: The department must begin work to establish the database. No person under the age of 21 may participate in a collective garden or receive marijuana that is produced, processed, transported or delivered through a collective garden. A valid designated provider age 21 or older may participate in a collective garden on behalf of the patient. The WSLCB (Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board) may conduct controlled purchases from licensed retailers and collective gardens to ensure they’re not providing marijuana to people under the age of 21. EFFECTIVE JULY 24, 2015: Post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury are added as qualifying conditions. A qualifying condition must be severe enough to significantly interfere with the patient’s activities of daily living and ability to function, which can be objectively assessed and evaluated. All new authorizations must be written on a form developed by the department and printed on tamper-resistant paper. Patient examinations and re-examinations must be performed in person at the healthcare

practitioner’s permanent business location. Healthcare practitioners who write more than 30 authorizations per month must report the number to the department. Healthcare practitioners cannot have a practice that consists primarily of authorizing the medical use of marijuana. No more than 15 plants may be grown in a single housing unit even if multiple patients or designated providers reside there. Butane extraction is prohibited unless the person is a processor licensed by the WSLCB. EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2016: All marijuana producers, processors and retail stores must be licensed by the WSLCB. All marijuana and marijuana products must be tested for safety and THC/CBD levels, accurately labeled, and sold in child-resistant packaging. Licensed retail stores may apply for and get a medical marijuana endorsement. All authorizations must be written on a form developed by the department and printed on tamper-resistant paper. All other forms of documentation are no longer valid. Patients under 18 years of age must have permission from a parent or guardian, and must participate in treatment. The database becomes operational. Patients and designated providers may be entered into the database by presenting their authorization to a licensed retail store with a medical marijuana endorsement. Possession amounts change depending on whether the patient or designated provider is entered into the database: Entered: May purchase up to three times the current limits at licensed retail store with a medical marijuana endorsement and may possess six plants and eight ounces of useable marijuana; healthcare practitioner may authorize additional plants to a maximum of 15; purchases at retail stores with a medical marijuana endorsement are not subject to

Viva la France OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIO-POLITICAL COLUMNIST

I’m confident that the president and his cabinet avidly read this column every two weeks, so, memo guys. Pay attention: Viva la France. The sad thing is we can only secondarily blame Muslim wind-up thugs for the Paris atrocities (there may be more killfor-Allah antics elsewhere before this makes print). The sick truth is the Muslim perps can’t help it. The Islamorads are psycho-zombies mentally child-abused from infancy to believe they must kill off any culture not their Bill Slusher own that they may ingratiate themselves with their god in the hereafter. They are the fanatic, unthinking robots of Islamic power players older and much smarter. Ever see an... elderly... suicide bomber? They’re almost all teen-early-twenties kids who like many that age will quickly tell you they know everything, ergo there is no need to question anything. They are exclusively hammered throughout their impressionable childhoods by their parents, and soul-rotted imams and mullahs, that they are the helpless servants of Allah. Independent thinkers need not apply. They are, thus, simply brain-damaged forever. Virtually all the rads are testosterone pumped, psycho-manipulable, gang-mentality young men (few women). They’ll... never... be able to make any judgement whatever not virulently poisoned by Islamic religious bigotry. It has been quite beyond their control to think free of their mercilessly didactic religious programming since they were toddlers. The rads are, effectively, the equivalent of rabies stricken animals. They are quite beyond any intelligent discussion, and will remain dangerously pathological until they

are killed. Muslim militant religious bigots (not climate change, however real or contrived it may someday prove to be) are the dominant and immediate world threat to freedom, free speech and freedom of or from religion, as we define same in the west. A nuclear North Korea is in the running here, but the Norkies are vastly outnumbered and few worldwide, compared to militant Islamics and their ‘holy’ quest for nuclear and other WMD schemes, far the greater danger. But... they can’t help it. The conscious, responsible enablers of the Muslim massacres in Paris are European and North American liberals. For decades they have bleated that Islam is just another church because there are many ‘peaceful’ Muslims, ergo any and all effective measures necessary to counter the worldwide Islamic assault on Western culture are somehow odious. Yes, there are ‘peaceful’ Muslims in and out of America. Some don’t want to kill ‘infidels’ themselves but are quite happy for the killer Muslims to do it for them. There are other ‘peaceful’ Muslims in and out of America who quietly fund and support Islamic religious murder while keeping a low profile so as not to be held accountable, that they may continue to thrive on the benefits of American or European life. There are yet other ‘peaceful’ Muslims all over the world (though precious few in the middle-east it seems) who indeed just want to ingratiate themselves with their god but deplore killing anyone to do it. So, metaphorically, because not all dogs are rabid, liberals strive feverishly to demonize all sensible, effective measures to protect society from those who are. The Obama administration has carried this appeasement fetishism to unparalleled heights of absurdity. A Muslim screams “Allah Achbar!” while gunning down Americans at Fort Hood, for but one instance, and the stunningly thick Obama insists on calling it a ‘workplace

sales tax; provides arrest protection. Not entered: Patient or designated provider can be arrested but has an affirmative defense to criminal prosecution for possession of up to four plants and six ounces of useable marijuana; may not participate in cooperatives; purchases at retail stores limited to amounts for all adults and are subject to sales tax. Up to four patients and designated providers may form a cooperative at the residence of one of the members and may grow the total authorized amount for the four members. Cooperatives must be registered with the WSLCB. A healthcare practitioner may sell or donate to patients topical products that have less than 0.3 percent THC. Collective gardens under the old law are no longer allowed. New language allows for cooperatives with specific restrictions. How this all plays out remains to be seen as new rules are implemented by the two agencies now in charge. There is also a full legislative session between now and when the final provisions of the new changes come into effect. Patients and supporters have meetings in Tonasket on a regular basis to keep people updated. We host guest speakers, go over new session laws, teach people how to go through the legislative website, etc. The following websites are places people can go to keep updated on the new changes to medical cannabis. We do not talk much about the recreational market, that is already in place. We concentrate these meeting on the medical side. • www.meetup.com/Tonasket-MedicalCannabis-Meetup/events/226445017/ • www.thepeopleformedicalcannabis. com/ • www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/ Marijuana/MedicalMarijuana • www.liq.wa.gov/mj2015/cppa-impactlcb

violence incident’ rather than the Muslim terrorist mass-assass it utterly and undeniably identified... itself... as. It is largely to this sap-headed, Chamberlainian mania, domestic and foreign, that one may fairly assign culpability for the recent Paris terrorism tragedies. What to do? Our ersatz president evidently has no clue. Worse, he suffers the vacuous illusion that it’s about “winning the hearts and minds” of middle-eastern Muslims; so saith he in a speech after the Paris hits. Astonishing. Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon tried ‘winning hearts and minds’ in Vietnam. BushII and Obama-0 have tried it in Iraq and Afghanistan for 14 years. So much for winning hearts and minds as a lame substitute for victory. Thankfully, Harry Truman didn’t try to win Japanese hearts and minds in 1945. We don’t, it should go without saying, want or need to nuke Muslim psycho-zombies. Overkill, and there’s all that, you know, radiation stuff, not to mention international opprobrium. We do need to get real, instantly. We must beef up intel, ruthlessly kill and harm by any workable means all anti-American terrorists we can find to an unprecedented scale survivors will never forget, drastically intensify oversight of domestic Muslims for anti-American funders and sympathizers, and massively revamp our immigration security and quality to choke out those here and coming here to do us harm. We can worry our little hearts out about ‘peaceful’ Muslims after we have the deadly Islamic rads under control. The reckless intellectual indulgence of any other course has sailed. William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Trying to be two places at once Last Saturday was a very busy day with needing to be at two places at the same time. The memorial services for Norene Harnasch and Dolly Christensen were happening at the same hour. We tried to pay our respects by showing up at both of them. Both ladies had been long time residents in Oroville for many years. We went to a potluck at the American Legion last Friday evening. The two Marilyn’s that do hamburgers there on Wednesday night told me that the attendance had been down. I think people are like me, and forget to go. A night that we

don’t have to think about what to cook, nor do the dishes afterward. Remember each Wednesday night at 5 p.m. Good prices and good food for a good cause. I was told that the old Border Patrol building had been sold, but no one seems to know who bought it. Anyone out there know? The date for the Oroville Seniors bazaar is Saturday, Dec. 12. Outside vendors are welcomed for a small fee. I have been asked to put a reminder in the paper for folks who are driving a gray car, on a gray day, on a gray highway, to

put their lights on to show people that dispose of all the excess water that was you are out there. (or any other color flowing and the water was over the sidecar or truck) walks in some places last Sunday, due to A family member tells me the heavy rainfall. that Neoma Vandiver, who Being a Gonzaga basketnow resides in Ellensburg, ball fan is such fun. And last near her daughter, is doing Friday evening was a first... as well as can be expected. game canceled at half time, Besides growing older, like the due to excessive humidrest of us, she has a blood ity, while playing in Okinawa, disorder that requires moniJapan. The floor was so slick toring. She is missed by many from moisture, it was dangerin Oroville. ous and was wise to cancel Always check with your the game before a player was insurance agency to find out badly hurt from a fall. THIS & THAT just how sick you are! A card of cheer would be Luis Perez was kept very Joyce Emry in order for Dave and Betty busy last Sunday morning tryDietrich who are having ing to keep their customers health issues. dry, by holding an umbrella over them Stan Law brought his mom, Ardith, as they came and went into America’s to church last Sunday, She reported that restaurant and he appeared to be having her husband, Noble, who is in a Veteran’s such fun doing it. Care Center in Port Orchard, Wash, is The storm gutters were not able to not as well as she’d like to see him. She

Pancake Breakfast was successful

ROYALLY ROASTED

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT

said she always feels so welcome at the United Methodist Church, where she and Noble, for many years were very active and she was the organist. A grand lot of friends and family gathered at the Extended Care facility to honor and wish Bob Hirst a most happy 90th birthday. There is never a dull moment when Bob is around and he gets a royal treatment from the caregivers. Delicious cake, ice cream and punch were served by family members. Red Skelton says you know you’re getting older when your broad mind exchanges places with your narrow waist. Those over 65 may only be 20 percent of the population – but sometimes I think we have 95 percent of the common sense. Last Saturday while driving to the Senior Center I was amazed at how many city street lights need bulb replacement. Or do you suppose they just haven’t paid their power bill?

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Friends and family packed the Oroville Eagles last Saturday, Nov. 14, to good-naturedly roast Don King and enjoy a spaghetti dinner. The evening served as a benefit to help defray medical bills for the Oroville native who recently went through cancer treatment.

Come and enjoy North Half band

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

On Saturday, Nov. 21 the band North Half will be at the Oroville Eagles. This will be a special event open house and the public is invited to join us. North Half is a very popular band that we don’t get to see nearly often enough. This is a great opportunity to get all our friends together and enjoy some of the best music in the county. The Auxiliary Ladies have the new raffle basket on display and will be happy to sell you tickets for it. It’s a coffee theme, and it’s packed with goodies. Come in, take a look, and buy a ticket or two. All monies will go toward the ladies charities. Drawing for

this raffle will be Sunday, Nov. 29. Our ladies are serving Burgers and More every Wednesday night at 6 p.m. Come in and enjoy while you play pool or watch your favorite team. The Oroville Eagles will be closed all day on Thanksgiving, Nov. 26. On Friday, Nov. 27 Steak Night will be suspended for the one time only but Nate and Renegade Productions will be here for a Karaoke/DJ Mingle. He’ll start at 8 p.m. and rock on until closing. At 5 p.m. every Thursday the ladies of the Auxiliary serve

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Burgers and More so we can all be ready to play Bingo at 6 p.m.. Bingo at the Aerie is great fun and all your friends are there so come join us! Special thoughts and prayers are going out to our sister Susie Wisener, who is dealing with health issues. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Queen of Hearts will be drawn at 6:30 every Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We open early on Sundays when the ‘Hawks play at 10 a.m. We have free pool every Sunday. We are People Helping People!

for Children’s Christmas Party SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Progress is being made in getting the Highland Children’s Christmas Party organized for this year. If you are interested in volunteering please call Michelle at 509-485-3606. There will be a free Thanksgiving Dinner In Chesaw at the Community Building on Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. Come and enjoy an afternoon of good food and friendship. The

meal will include turkey or ham and all of the trimmings. The next Bingo night will be on Friday, Nov 20. The winners for pinochle: Harold Harper and Myrtle Wood were High, Don Field and Sally Eder were Low. Traveling went to Judy Ripley and Mary Lou Barnette took the five week High. There were 31 players for Nov. 9. Winter begins on Monday, Dec. 21, however, if you were out and about Sunday you got an early dose of the snow. Happy Thanksgiving to all.

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the ingredients. Thanksgiving Day Potluck is on Thursday, Nov. 26, at 1 p.m. We will provide the turkey, dressing, potatoes, and gravy. Bring a dessert, salad, or special dish and a friend. See you there. (Please correct the date in your Senior Newsletter.) The Lunch Menu for next week is: Tuesday, turkey and stuffing; for seniors 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8. It’s time to think about paying dues for 2016. See Marge Finley,

Encouraging new membership, use of the Grange Hall

OROVILLE GRANGE NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER OROVILLE GRANGE

The Oroville Grange held its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 18. The meeting took place at the Grange Hall, 622 Fir St. on the corner of Fir St. and 7th St. with a potluck shared meal fol-

Kester, Carlquist and Ramsey win Chili Cook Off SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Winter is approaching, the mornings are cold and windy (stay warm). We would like to thank all the volunteers that have done such a great job. You have no idea how much we appreciate your help. The fifth annual Chili Cook Off went well lots of taste buds flying. Winner for the Mild category was Dave Kester; Hot went to Dora Carlquist from the American Legion in Oroville and People’s Choice went to Jeannie Ramsey. Great job to all that entered the cook off. The Propane Benefit was also good. Thanks to everyone that brought desserts and purchased them. Time to get out your dabbers for Friday Night Bingo – Nov. 20 it will be our Turkey Bingo. You don’t want to miss a chance to

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

lowed by the monthly business meeting. The agenda included “North Country-opoly, bulk buying of organic fruits and vegetables through the non-growing season, building improvements, winter market, food bank support and

TONASKET EAGLES win a turkey. Cards start selling at 6:30 p.m. and bingo starts at 7 p.m. Our kitchen also opens at 5:30 p.m. On Saturday, Nov, 21 we will be having a Dessert Auction for the Washington DC Trip. The School tries to do this every year. The auction starts at 7 p.m. Karaoke to follow. Thanksgiving day we are having our annual Dinner from: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Free or by Donation. Don’t feel like cooking, not a lot of family, come on in for a great meal and chat with friends. The bar will be closing at 6 p.m. so the bartenders can have

Did you know? We use...

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the winter music and dance calendar. Our next Flea Market will be a “bag and box” sale on Saturday, Nov. 21 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. A fun place to find some very affordable Christmas shopping. We are welcoming new members and encourage the use of our Grange Building in the service of the Oroville community. Come to our next meeting and help us make good things happen. Your ideas and energy are welcome. For information contact: Joseph Enzensperger 509-476-4072

Thanksgiving with their family. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Wanda Sutherland, second place to Nellie Paulsen, low score to Neil Fifer and last pinochle was Wanda Sutherland and Carol Ross. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

We served 42 at our pancake breakfast last Saturday. It was a great time for the crew, consisting of 14 plus people, and, we hope it was a great time, for the customers. A special thanks to Alex and Sandra, who came all the way from Oliver to help, and to our cleanup crew consisting of Mary Lou, Kevin, Marilyn and myself. Double thanks to those who donated extra for their meal. We received $80 more than the numbers would indicate. Or, is it possible Roberta miss – tallied? It’s all a mystery. Thanks to Harvest Foods for discounting

our membership chairwoman. Our election is coming up in December. Consider who you want to nominate for officer positions. See Ruth LaFrance, Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or Penny Cole, our nominating committee. Next month, on Saturday, Dec. 12 we will be hosting a bazaar bonanza. See Penny Cole to reserve a spot. The quilt prizes went to Tom Maage, and the other winner was Joyce Evans. She lives in the Kootenai vicinity, Canada. Thank you, also, Roberta and Howard Cole, for your excellence in sales. Also thanks to Karen Quayle for hersuperb quilt crafting. What significant event occurred in 170 BC, 400 AD, 810 AD, 1310 AD and 1700AD? Hint: the event in 1700 AD was recorded in Japan, but, mysteriously, did not occur there. Answer next week.

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NOVEMBER 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

INDOOR FLEA MARKET

Christmas Concert 2015 Friday, December 4th at 7:00 p.m.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

FREE

The second Indoor Flea Market and Crafts Fair was held last Friday and Saturday at Appleway, 1300 Main Street. Vendors were selling everything from clothing, jewelry, hand made items, fresh baked bread and more. The next Indoor Flea Market will be held in December. Contact Vivian Taylor at 509-4763900 for more information.

Admission

Sponsored by: Community Presbyterian Church 9 South Birch St., Omak, WA For more information, please call

509-486-8888 Followed by a reception of soup, bread, and Christmas goodies!

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR OROVILLE - The Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar, hosted by the OHS Future Business Leaders of America, will be held on Friday, Nov. 20 and Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Oroville Elementary School gym. The bazaar offers a wide variety of handmade arts and crafts, as well as other items, for the early Christmas shopper. Those that would like to reserve a booth ($20) should contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427.

Stroke Support Group

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group meets Friday, Nov. 20 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street, Oroville. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments. Friday Nights at Vicki’s

OROVILLE - Friday Night at Vicki’s Backdoor Club, 1415 Main Street (enter from alley), Oroville, this Friday, Nov. 20 will feature the Wilder Band for great dancing and listening. The Wilders play a variety of music from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. This is a familyfriendly venue. Call 509-5609479 on Thursday to confirm. Okanogan County Democrats

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Democrats will be preparing for March 2016 caucuses at the Saturday, Nov. 21 meeting, 12 p.m. at Caribou Inn Restaurant in downtown Okanogan. Youth Soccer Playoff Game

OROVILLE - Oroville Youth Soccer Club will present the playoffs On Saturday, Nov. 21 starting at 1:30 p.m. for the state recreational soccer tournament. Oroville hosts the Pasco

Gladiators from Tri-Cities Youth Soccer. This game is the second in the series leading up to the quarter finals. The Oroville Racers, a co-ed under 12 soccer team is comprised of boys and girls from Oroville and Tonasket. Country Music & Dance

OROVILLE - There will be a country dance on Saturday, Nov. 21 with Brock Hires performing at Vicki’s Backdoor Club, 1415 Main Street (enter from alley), Oroville. Potluck at 6 p.m., music at 7 p.m. There is a $6 cover charge. For more information call 509-560-9479. Lindsay Street Band at CCC

TONASKET - The Lindsay Street Band” from Bellingham will be playing and singing their foot stomping, hand clapping music at the CCC this coming Saturday, Nov. 21. Their blend of accordion, violin, hand drums and flutes remind you of a trip to the Irish Pubs and Scottish street corners. Dinner will be catered by La Ultima at 6 p.m., concert begins at 7 p.m. Admission charged at door. Call 509-4861328 for more information. Oroville Library Storytime

OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next sto-

rytime will be Wednesday, Nov. 25. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com. Chesaw Thanksgiving Dinner

CHESAW - There will be a Free Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. The menu includes: turkey or ham, stuffing, potatoes and gravy, yams, corn, green bean casserole, salad, pickles, olives, cranberries, rolls and butter and dessert (pie), coffee, tea, hot cocoa and cider. Continuing Ed Scholarships

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation would like to remind former OHS graduates that Friday, Dec. 4 is the deadline to apply for their Continuing Education Scholarships. This local financial aid program offers aid to those OHS grads that have completed at least one year of vo-tec school or college. Aid will be awarded for the winter term. Access to applications and information is online at orovillescholarshipfoundation.org Food Banks

The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386. Listing Your Item

The Calendar allows listing your event up to two weeks before the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included before the two week limit. Our online calendar at www. gazette-tribune.com allows events to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info contact. Place events online by clicking “Add an Event” on the homepage. List your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once submitted, it can take up to 48 hours to appear on the calendar. To list your invent in the newspaper submit them us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Entertainment & DINING Out on the Town...

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

1307 Main Street, Oroville 509.476.3007

HOURS:

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

Restaurant

Bar

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close NEW 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close HOURS 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close ——— CLOSED ———

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church?

MONDAY STEAK NIGHT w/ 8 oz. Ball Tip $13.50 THURSDAY SMOKED RIBEYE SPECIAL $17.50 Served from 6 p.m. until gone PASTIME to go call 476-3007

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19, 2015

OBITUARIES LINDA LEE GREGG COREY ABELLERA

Linda Lee Gregg Corey Abellera

The Lord is both giving and accepting! Monday, November 9, He accepted one of his lost angels home. Linda Lee Gregg Corey Abellera, born April 27, 1949 no longer has to fight the pain and several illnesses caused to her body. Linda was born in Seattle, Wash, and moved to Molson, Wash, in 1999. Over her years she was “Mom” to many, opening her home to those who needed somewhere to stay. Be it a day or months, she was there.

ROGER PETERSON

Roger Peterson

JAMES KENNETH HILDERBRAND James Kenneth (Keni) Hilderbrand passed away at his home on October 28, 2015. He was born June 1 2· 1940 in Rogersville, Missouri. In 1943 the family moved to Oroville, Wash. where he attended school until he graduated in 1958 from OHS. While there, he loved all sports and excelled in basketball, receiving scholarship offers from WSU and CWU. Following graduation, he worked in the orchards until moving to Kennewick, where he enjoyed a 20 year career working for the United Parcel Service. In 1982, he moved to Seattle and opened a successful air freight

MARRIAGE LICENSES (Applied for at the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office) NOV. 2, 2015 Karenia Melynda Simpson, 27, Okanogan and Shawn Edward Townsend, 32, Okanogan Claudia Giovanna Ruffo, 54, Oroville and Richard Lee White, Oroville, 64 NOV. 3, 2015 Leah Alexandra Skole, 22, Omak and Noe Garcia Ponce, 28, Omak. NOV. 6, 2015 Alyssa Eileen Warner, 18, Omak and Garrett Lee Hansen, 24, Omak NOV. 9, 2015 Alicia Pamatz Valencia, 29 Bridgeport and Jorge Alberto

Our beloved husband, father, grandfather and friend, Roger Peterson, passed away November 12, 2015, at Yakima, WA. Roger was born November 21, 1962, in Tonasket, Wash. He lived the last 20-plus years in Yakima. People lovingly referred to Roger as “Rog” , “Dodge” or “Rog Buddy.” Roger was an orchardist by heart, a mechanic by trade, and his passions were motorcycling, music and the Seahawks. Roger loved his family and friends equally, almost as much as he loved apple pie. Roger was preceded in death by his mother Margaret Peterson.

Linda is survived by her beloved mother Blanche Gregg, three children Jeana (Dan) McDonald, Chrissy Fletcher (Dan) and Daniel Corey, her three grandchildren Brian Thompson, Connor Thompson and her love Ryan Fletcher. Two ex-husbands, Danny Corey and Nick Abellera. “Mom, may you be well now free of your pain. May you accept yourself and be at peace, knowing you were loved more than you thought!” At her request, no formal services will be held. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements. He was survived by his parents Bill and Nina Peterson; wife Patricia Peterson; children Andrew Peterson, Milissa Farley, Kristie, Lucy and Eric (Jessica) Wade and 25 grandchildren; brothers Greg (Ayako) Peterson and Jeff (Adrienne) Peterson, several nephews and nieces, aunts, uncles and cousins and several brothers-in-law and sisters-inlaw. Viewing will be offered Wednesday, November 18, 2015 from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Shaw & Sons Funeral Directors, 201 N. 2nd Street, Yakima WA 98901. Celebration of Life will follow immediately at 5:30 p.m., also at the funeral home. Memories may be shared at www.shawandsons.com.

business, eventually retiring from Del’s Truck Rentals in 1992. He was a man with an insatiable sense of humor, a love for his kids, Seahawks, and the number one lady in his life, his Shih Tzu Suzie. Ken also enjoyed telling and retelling stories of his hunting trips, life growing up in Oroville, and stories of his friends and family. There were so many important people in Ken’s life. He will be greatly missed by all of them and all of those that lived for his laughter and waited for him to take his camera out of his pocket. He was one of the most loyal individuals you could ever meet. Heaven is lucky to have such a kind, caring, positive, and ever so happy man. He is survived by his sister Pat (Gary) Nelson, brothers Bob (Sandy) and Bill and their fami-

lies; his children, Mark (Michele) of Gig Harbor, Michele (Willy) Boehnke of Kennewick, Clare (CJ) Bantog of Olympia and Tony of Centralia, stepchildren Kim (Rob) Sanafrek of Bozeman, Mont., Todd (Shannon) Antepenko of Gilroy, Calif. and Brad Antepenko of Bremerton, 14 grandchildren and one great grandchild. He was preceded in death by his parents Arlie and Josephine, brother Jerry Lee (Zeke), and wife, Norma. In keeping with his wishes, there will be no funeral service; private inurnment will take place at a later date at the Oroville Riverview Cemetery. The family invites you to share your thoughts, fond memories and condolences online at Cedar Lawn Funeral Home Redmond.

Villatoro Portillo, 25, Bridgeport. Stephanie Ann Hordyk, 23, Oroville and Jacob Edward Barker, 26, Oroville.

at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. She weighed seven pounds, seven ounces at birth and was 20 inches long. She joins siblings Vivian Elizabeth Verbeck, 10 and Duncan Josiah Verbeck, two. Her grandparents are Nancy Gain of Vancouver, Wash. and Ron and Pat Verbeck of Tonasket.

BIRTHS Maci Grace Reyes was born to Erika Maldonado and Fidel Reyes of Oroville, Wash. at 11:22 a.m. on Nov. 12, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. She weighed six pounds, nine ounces at birth and was 20 inches long. Her grandparents are Shannon Rounds, Oroville and Evelio and Melita Reyes, Oroville. Violet Isabelle Verbeck was born to Victoria Lynne Verbeck and Blair Josiah Verbeck at 7:16 a.m. on Nov. 14, 2015

Surayah Dawn Holcomb was born to Kylie Holcomb of Tonasket, Wash. at 7:16 p.m. on Nov. 15, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She weighed seven pounds, 15 ounces at birth and was 20 inches long. She joins her big sister Hazey Holcomb, age three. Her grandparents are Trisha Lynn Young of Renton, Wash. and James David Holcomb of Oroville, Wash.

and Forest Stackhouse. His father died when Phil was 5, and he was adopted by his mother’s second husband, Bruce Baker. Phil graduated from Wilson High School in 1961, served four years in the Navy and went on to college at Everett Junior College, Central Washington University, and graduated with a degree in Special Education from Western Washington State College. Phil spent time between schooling traveling the world, including a trip across the Sahara in a Volkswagen van. He was happy to share the stories of his adventures. His appreciation for the diversity in the world was always evident. Phil and Kris met at Western in January, 1973, fell in love, and married in November of that same year. They moved to the Okanogan Highlands the following June and camped out that summer while building their first home, fondly known as “the

barn.” Phil started Havillah Shake Company in the late 1970’s and the business still continues in operation. He is survived by his wife Kris, daughter Amanda, son Jesse, brother Daniel Baker, grandchildren Cody Burse, Eleanor Burse, Katherine Thompson, and one great granddaughter, Zaida Rogers. He was preceded in death by his parents and his older brother, David Murphy. A memorial for Phil was held at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket on Sunday, November 15. Interment was in the Havillah Cemetery. Phil was a wonderful husband, father, grandfather, and friend to many. He will be dearly missed by all acquaintances, friends and family, as well as everyone who appreciates a solid recycled timber. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements.

cousins Makayla and Timmy and many more.

On a cool night on October 29, 1982 Wade was born to Albert and Alice Hudson, both of Tonasket, Washington. He graduated from the Tonasket Alternative High School in 2002. Wade had a great sense of humor, was funny and enjoyed making people laugh. He was a caring son, father, cousin and friend to many. He very much loved his family and friends. He loved his beautiful daughter Lavada Kay Hudson more than life. Wade enjoyed reading books about traveling. He also enjoyed traveling. He had a love for music

(listening to it and making his own). Wade also loved summer, a good rain storm, and spending time with his family and friends. Wade Russel Hudson was preceded in death by his grandmother and grandfather, LaVada Mae Snyder and Tom Hudson, great-grandparents Gus and Therise Snyder and great-aunt Judy Walker. He leaves behind and will forever be missed by his family as follows: Albert Hudson (father); Alice Odella (mother); Sharon Alumbaugh (aunt), with his cousins Lance, Joseph, John, and Leroy; Terry Cates (aunt) with his cousins Angel, Jeff, Richard, Stacie, Dorothy, and Kenneth; Kurt Hudson (uncle) with cousins Jennifer, Kurt, Larry and Misty; Doyle Miricle (uncle) with

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NOVEMBER 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SCHOOLS

Oroville students perform in Blackbeard the Pirate

The Cast of Characters included The pirates: Blackbeard, Max Turner; Bluebeard, Gwen Hankins; Redbeard, Christina Herrick; Greybeard, Jamen Griffen and Yellowbeard, Cody Renfroe and Peachfuzz, Bailee Allen. Beach Bums: Melinda Clark, Kensie Hugus, Emily Grunert, Seraphina Marie and Sami Turner. Lt. Maynard: Reagan Whiteaker. Sailors: Isaac Gomez, Sierra Moser, Roberto Sanchez Crabs: Kylar Anderson, Darbey Carleton, Savannah Berg, Kaitlyn Maynard, Kylie Acord, Kayla Clark Mermaids: Cintia Morales, Cevina Morales, Jezebel Cline, Baylee Taber. Seaweed Creatures: Kane Booker, Aiden Sheldon, Della Mae Hankins, Deana Lohnes. Parrots: Sydney Lewis, Stormy Knight, Payton Lewis, Avree Howe, James Sutton, Kya Freese, Marisol Gomez-Pina, Rayan Sarmiento, Mylee Taber, Sandra Minigell, Isabelle Elias-Rothell, Shiloh Willis, Elizabeth Cline, Ariana Nelson, Landon Howe, Dylan Herrick. Sam the Clam: Gordon McCauley Assistant Directors: Natalia Carrillo Accompanist: Susie Harnasch Jolly Rodger-Tour Actor/Director: Ari Lucius. Director-Tour Actor/Director: Caitlin Secrest.

The Missoula Children’s Theater presented Blackbeard the Pirate, a play conceived, written and with music by Michael McGill and acted by students from Oroville High School and Elementary School. The students performed the play twice last Saturday for an audience made up of family and friends. Sponsors of the play included The National Endowment for the Arts, The Montana Arts Council and The Oroville Booster Club. The booster club has sponsored the MCT coming to Oroville for several years.

Gary De Von/staff photos

Above, The mermaids, beach bums and crabs do a musical number with Tour Actor/Director Caitlin Secrest. Left, Max Turner tears up the stage in the lead role of Blackbeard the Pirate. The play revolves around the hidden treasure, and in this case, X doesn’t mark the spot.

Tonasket Students participate in Legacy Contest surely brightened their day,” said Roberta Scholz, whose family members are on the Veteran’s remembrance wall at the Legacy Park. Marine Veteran and Legacy Member Tommy Even presented participation and winning certificates at the school’s Veteran’s Day assembly. Coming in second place was Mrs. (Julie) Conkle’s class with a poster called Hometown Soldier: Honoring Veterans Near and Far placed in the Lee Franks window, and third place was taken by Mrs. (Fay) Aicheson’s students for a collage of stars and soldiers placed in the It’s Still Good storefront. “Tonasket Elementary School and Tonasket stores did a respect-

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Mrs. (Patricia) Dagnon’s third grade students took first place in a contest put on by the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park challenging children to decorate local storefronts with tributes to Veterans. Dagnon’s students chose to make a flag with their own handprints, and included pages of words to describe soldiers and veterans. The students further honored Veterans when they chose to contribute their prize winnings to a veteran in need. “The store windows were exceptionally well decorated, honoring our veterans. It warmed the hearts of many Veterans and

ful and wonderful job participating in the contest,” said Even. “Thank you to the third and fourth grade classrooms and the stores that participated.” Other classrooms and business participants were Ms. (Jolly) Evans/Bob’s Barber Shop, Mrs. (Jennifer) Willson/Two Rebel Techs, Mr. (Scott) Olson/ OK Chevrolet, Mrs. (Meghan) Grillo/Hair Designs, and Mrs. (Catherine) Bailey/Castelda Law Offices. This was the first year the Legacy Park held the contest, and they plan to continue it as an annual event. “Once again, a heartfelt tribute in Honoring Our Veterans,” said Scholz.

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Mrs. Dagnon’s class took first place when they decorated Highlandia’s window with a tribute to veterans of a flag made up of their own handprints, and words describing soldiers and veterans.

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PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19 2015

HONORING VETERANS

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Anita Asmussen, ASB and Enrichment Advisor with the Veterans Assembly Planning Committee, hands out flowers to Veterans during Tuesday’s (November 10) Veterans Day Assembly at Tonasket High School.

Korean War Veteran Duane Luhn signs the guestbook amidst a collection of memorabilia and photographs honoring service members past and present, including items borrowed from the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy.

THS honors Veterans, educates all BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Melanie Christensen sang ‘Traveling Soldier’ by the Dixie Chicks. Other musical selections included performances by the THS Choir and the THS Band. ‘Taps’ was performed by Thomas Kennedy while Jordan Hughes read ‘Freedom Isn’t Free,’ by Kelly Strong. ‘Untitled,’ written by Melody Wolen was read by Lexee Howell, and Kyra Whiting and Kasey Nelson read ‘Final Inspection,’ by an unknown author. Annie Wilkinson presented a slideshow and discussion of her travels across the country as ‘Annie Amerika.’ The ceremony was opened and closed by the Border Patrol Explorers, commanded by John Tofolla, Border Patrol Agent. Refreshments were provided by Mrs. Moore’s FCCLA class, and flowers were made by Ms. Wommack’s class.

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Jordan Hughes reads an essay by Kelly Strong entitled ‘Freedom Isn’t Free.’

Tonasket High School’s Veterans Day Assembly treated Veterans and visitors to a presentation replete with offerings for eyes, ears, minds and emotions. The event included a flag presentation that received a standing ovation from Veterans in the audience. “They put a lot of effort into this and did a good job,” said Don Pridmore, a Korean War Veteran who served in the Army from 1951-1954. “The gal that sang was my favorite part,” said Bill Knorr, who served with the U.S. Air Force from 1954 to 1957. Knorr was referring to Melanie Christensen, who braved a solo piece to sing ‘Traveling Soldier’ by the Dixie Chicks. “This is the sixth year I’ve been to this ceremony. Every year is different, and I love it,” said Veteran William Gomez. “I love what they do, and the way they do it. I hope the school continues doing this, and I wish more Vets would come.” A video created by Mr. Riley’s Enrichment class presented heartfelt interviews with local Veterans whose stories included historically significant details. Veterans Dale White, Roger Castelda, Jeff Bergh, William Gomez, Leonard Paulson, Michael Stewart, Hugh Maycumber, Paul Diener and George Rippee were interviewed by students. “It’s hard to talk about,” said Gomez, who was a combat soldier in Vietnam in 1967 and 1968, “when all hell broke loose. There were 100s of soldiers dying every day. I still wake up from nightmares.”

Gomez said he “got home and had to fight against the Americans fighting the Veterans coming home. We were getting hit with tomatoes.” “At the time, I did not understand. I was just fighting what I was told was the enemy,” said Michael Stewart, who did a tour of Vietnam that landed him in the hospital for six months. “He arrived at the hospital in a body bag; they thought he was dead,” said Karen Schimpf, a First Lieutenant who served in Vietnam as a nurse, receiving the National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal and Army Commendation Medal. Stewart signed on for a second tour lasting nine months in Vietnam, returning home with three Purple Hearts, a Silver Star and the Soldier’s Medal. Veteran Jeff Bergh said he went into farming upon returning home from Vietnam. “There were more than a few years you were a little crazy,” Bergh recalled. “The military will teach you discipline, necessary in any job,” said Bergh. “If you start something, finish it. In farming, it had it’s ups and downs but I stuck it out.”

Sharing history “I’m going to ask them for a copy of the program, and take it to share with my family in Spokane at Thanksgiving,” Paulson said of the video. The Quartermaster of an Army transport ship called the Cape San Juan, Paulson and his crew were on their way to Australia in 1944 when they were torpedoed and the ship sank in the Pacific. “Over 1,000 men died,” said Paulson. “The sharks got a lot of

THS Band member Thomas Kennedy plays ‘Taps’ after Jordan Hughes read about the price of Freedom.

them.” Paulson said they were rescued by an American ship that evening, and climbed back aboard the sinking Cape San Juan “just long enough to pick up some whiskey and some ham.” “The Captain of the ship wouldn’t feed us. He went to prison when we got done,” said Paulson. “We called ashore and said he wouldn’t feed us, and they said, ‘take over the ship and lock

“They came through and cleaned out the schools. My brother didn’t finish his sophomore year. They took 17 of us out of the Omak School. ” Leonard Paulson, World War II Veteran

him up.’ So we did, and his crew got up and fixed us food.” “In the military, the Chain of Command tells you, ‘Yours is not to reason why, yours is but to do or die,’” said Vietnam Veteran Roger Castelda in his own interview with THS students. “The command comes down and you might not like it, but you gotta do it. In certain circumstances during wartime, you have to make quick decisions outside the chain of command.” Paulson said the ship he was running was hauling oil. “When we were in the water the oil was burning all around us and it was really hot,” Paulson recalled. Paulson said he would have

graduated from Omak High School in 1945, but was drafted in 1943. “They came through and cleaned out the schools,” Paulson said. “They came into class and said, ‘You, you and you are going in the service.’ My brother didn’t finish his sophomore year. He was drafted at the age of 17. They took 17 of us out of the Omak School.” “They took 21 kids out of Loomis, including four Judds, four Cooks and four Holbrocks,” said Paulson’s wife Nellie. “They all came home.” Paulson said his brother Fred, who had to be able to swim five miles to qualify to work in underwater demolition, came home after getting atomic radiation at Bikini Island. “Another man, Paul Stevens of Tonasket, got radiation at Bikini also. They let him out of the Navy because of the atomic radiation, so he went down the street and joined the Air Force,” said Paulson. Mrs. Paulson said her first husband was one of the few survivors of the Battle of the Bulge. “He used to watch that movie, and I’d ask him why he watched it. He said, ‘Because I didn’t have time to watch it when it was happening,’” she recalled. Paulson and his classmates may not have had time to graduate high school before going off to war, but Paulson recently received his diploma. “If someone is a Vet, they can automatically get their high school diploma,” Paulson said. “They just have to present their honorable discharge papers. I got mine five years ago. Four or five of us walked down the aisle, right with the high school kids.”

Kasey Nelson (left) and Kyra Whiting read a poem called ‘Final Inspection’ written by an unknown author.


o

NOVEMBER 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

HONORING VETERANS

PAGE B3

Vets honored with parade and feast who are not in school, to see those folks supporting us.” After the parade, Veterans and anyone else who wanted to attend were treated to a magnificent feast at the American Legion Post #82. The meal was prepared by Ginger Heath, June Brown and Mary Karrer, with Commander Bergh cutting the turkey and slicing the ham. After bellies were filled, Veterans shared stories of their time in the service. “I was proud to serve my brothers. I’d do it again in a chance,” said Marine Corps Veteran Kenny Hovland, who returned from Vietnam with a Purple Heart, a Bronze Star and “as a survivor.” “I shouldn’t have made it home, but I did,” said Hovland. “God bless our country. We could be talking Japanese or German right now.” Hovland, who was involved in helping to set up the VA center at NVH, said he wanted to “thank the nurses and doctors for their service to us as Vets.” “I was going to college and quit; I wanted to serve my country,” said Hovland. “I got home and got spit on at the LAX airport. That hurt worse than my wounds.” Katie Teachout/staff photo

Kerrington Johansen proudly rode in the Veterans Day Parade alongside her father, Army and Navy Veteran Robert Johansen. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket celebrated Veterans Day with a parade that wound through town starting at North Valley Hospital’s (NVH) Extended Care, where the Color Guard presented a flag formation at the window to the delight of residents watching from inside; and ended at the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy. There, spectators gathered in front of the walls of plaques honoring Veterans to watch as the Color Guard fired a salute, an invocation was said, and Annie Wilkison raised a bugle with ‘Taps’ ringing through the air. One addition to the parade this year was the Samaritan Riders, a motorcycle-riding charitable

organization. “I was very pleased to have them come in, that was unique,” said Vietnam Veteran Jeff Bergh. Also riding a motorcycle in the parade was six-year-old Kerrington Johansen, whose father, Robert, rode beside her and whose mother, Korie, rode in the Good Samaritan Rider float following behind. “I want to thank the police for directing traffic for the parade. But I would like to make a plea to the EMS folks,” said Robert Johansen, a Veteran of both the Army and Navy. “A lot of attention is given to Founders’ Day, and we would like to see the public safety agencies---the Fire Department and EMS people--supporting our Vets. It would be a good example for our kids,

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Eleanor Johnson, viewing the parade from outside of North Valley Hospital Extended Care, claps as the Color Guard displays for residents inside. Johnson said her brother served in the Army and her father in the National Guard.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

This Samaritan Riders float was created on a trailer owned by Justin Hubbard, who served six years in the Air Force. Hubbard said he would like to include a float in the parade for the public safety employees, “to get them involved and understand what this is all about.” Hovland said when he got spit on, “I went nuts. I beat the man nearly to death. An airport security guard came over and saved the man’s life. He pulled me off of him. They locked me up in a room, and I thought, ‘Now what?’ They came in and told me they didn’t know if the man was going to live. I thought, ‘Great. I get back home and now I’m going to prison.’” Fortunately, the man lived. When asked if Veterans were forewarned before returning home about the attitude against the war here in the States, Hovland replied, “No. We didn’t know a thing. Our debriefing was two questions: ‘Do you have VD?’ and ‘Have you had thoughts of killing yourself?’ When you answered ‘no’ to both, you were handed your discharge papers. That was our debriefing.” Hovland said his sister wrote his story as her Master’s thesis. “My sister got the story of my history as a combat Marine published in Readers Digest. A lot of guys who read it said, ‘That was me.’ I was a tunnel rat, a real suicide mission. I was only 19 years old. It’s hard for me to read the story myself,” Hovland said. Recalling her experience as an Army nurse at a field hospital in Saigon in 1971, Karen Schimpf painted an illustration of the nation’s youth. “The war in Vietnam had been going on for a long time before I arrived. At that time it was not a popular subject at home, back in the World,” said Schimpf. “I was a naive little girl, but at the age of 23, I was four years older than the average GI age of 19 years.” Vietnam Veteran William Gomez also recalled the cold welcome home. “The treatment is better now, but still there are places you go and when you admit you’re a Vietnam Vet, they stare at you with a hard look.” Gomez said he’s treated well in

Tonasket. “In this community I feel great. I get to participate in Color Guard, to participate in ceremo-

“People ask me, ‘Haven’t you done enough? Haven’t you served your country enough?’ I tell them, ‘There is no such thing as enough.’” William Gomez, Vietnam Veteran, Color Guard Volunteer

nies for Vets who pass away, and I get to march in the Veterans’ Day and Founders’ Day parades,” said Gomez, adding that of the original 12 Color Guard members he signed up with, there are only four left that keep marching. “People ask me, ‘Haven’t you

done enough? Haven’t you served your country enough?’ I tell them, ‘There is no such thing as enough. I am glad to do it.’” Like many Veterans, Schimpf turned to a life in Tonasket after returning from the war. “While in the Army and in Vietnam I became used to a close community, a community that knew and helped each other when help was needed,” said Schimpf. “I was lost in the city after I came back and found that I needed a small, close community as well as a place I could afford to be. So here I still am.” Schimpf worked as a nurse at NVH before becoming a charge nurse at Extended Care, where she began a nursing assistant training program. Now retired, Schimpf continues to volunteer at NVH, as well as the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy. Apparently for her, too, there is no such thing as ‘enough’ when it comes to service to her fellow man.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Bo and Sarah Silverthorn point to their Great Grandfather Gerald E. Scholz’s plaque on the Veterans’ wall. “He was my grandfather,” said Mary Scholz with tears swimming in her eyes, “and he just passed away from cancer. He was always so dedicated to the military, so we came out for this event every year.” Gerald Scholz, born and raised here, was a rancher up South Pine Creek. “He was my best friend,” George Frank, one of the founders of the Legacy Park, said of the man he had gone to school with all 12 grades. “We were friends for over 80 years.” Scholz served in the U.S. Army from 1950 to 1954.

Katie Teachout/staff photo Katie Teachout/staff photo

These colors don’t run. Or starve.

Tonasket’s Whitcomb Ave was lined with people of all ages holding their hands over their hearts or waving a flag as the Veterans paraded through town November 11.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

World War II Veteran Al Robinson talks with Vietnam Veteran Roger Castelda inside the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy after the parade. Also pictured are Vietnam Veterans Michael Stewart (left) and Karen Schimpf . “This is one of the nicest memorials I’ve seen,” said Robinson. Behind him is part of a library of almost 800 books Castelda called the “pride of the Legacy.” “Check out a book, and read some of their stories,” said Veteran Jeff Bergh in his interview with THS students. To read Al Robinson’s story of 28 months serving in the Pacific Theatre, including fighting in the Marshall Islands, check out next week’s November 26 issue of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Veterans and family and friends dig into a feast at the Tonasket American Legion Post #82--A feast fit for a king. “I’ve got more food than I can possibly eat,” said one Veteran with an overflowing plate.


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 19, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Found

Help Wanted

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

CALL FOR BIDS Janitorial Service

www.gazette-tribune.com

Health General

Houses For Sale Black Bear & War Eagle Patented Claims on Palmer Mountain near Loomis, 35.5 acres. Black Bear was a gold producing mine in 1890’s and 1940’s. Reports available. $75,000 for both. Contact Teri at blackbearclaim@ gmail.com for further information.

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121.

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 Orovile Senior Living, Henderson Apartments, on Lake, on Boundary Point rd, 2 bdrm, in good condition, no smoking, no pets. Taking applications, $675/month, first and last. (509)476-2449 Oroville. Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no inside smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303. Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

The janitorial service will be for the City Hall/Library Complex, TVBRC Public Restroom (Seasonal) and occasionally the Tonasket Youth Center. Bidders must be bonded and provide at least three letters of reference from local citizens or businesses who have used their service.

Help Wanted Professional

OKANOGAN We are dedicated to our WANTED COUNTY CIVIAL RIGHTS employees’ job satisfaction ATTORNEY to sue DNR, and take pride in providing a write PO 285, Tonasket. place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of Blue Grass Straw for sale. ability to pay. EVERYONE is $90 per ton plus delivery. welcome. 3’x4’ bales. Call Gary at 509531-0546 for more informaWe have the following tion. opportunities available:

Feed Hay & Grain

OKANOGAN ADMIN Certified Medical Coding Specialist Full time HR Generalist Full time OKANOGAN DENTAL: Dental Assistant 2 Full time and 3 Part time, on an as needed basis OMAK MEDICAL RN-Nurse Case Manager Full time Behavioral Health Specialist Full time OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant 1 Full time and 1 Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER, INDIAN AVE: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual required.

Announcements

The City of Tonasket will accept sealed bids for Janitorial Service at the City Clerk’s office until 7:00 p.m., Dec. 8, 2015 at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any informalities.

We are looking for YOU to join our team!

BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

TONASKET: MA-P or MA-C (lab) Part time, 32 hrs/week See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Public Notices

Public Restroom (Seasonal) and occasionally the Tonasket Youth Center. Bidders must be bonded and provide at least three letters of reference from local citizens or businesses who have used their service. Contracts and bid forms are available at the City Clerk’s office. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any informalities. Alice J. Attwood City Clerk/Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 19, 2015. #OVG669020

tact Jay O’Brien at 509-476-3696. Bid items are available for inspection at the District’s office and yard located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, WA 98844, from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00P.M., Monday through Friday. No warranty is implied or expressed as to the condition of the equipment and materials. All bid items are on an “as is” condition. Should a bid be accepted, no refunds will be made. All bids are to be accompanied by cash, certified check or personal check issued on a bank in the State of Washington. All equipment and materials are to be removed by the successful bidder within 5 working days after notice of acceptance of bid. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive any informalities in the bidding. BID ITEMS Road Grader 1969 Backhoe Air Compressor 2- Pallets Copper Lead Wire Pallet of Surplus Pump Bowls SME Motor (serial # 1210dp2619) SMP Pump (serial #0397071511) SMP Pump (serial #c647011731) Miscellaneous Office Machines DATED this 2nd day of November, 2015. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Jay W. O’Brien Secretary/Manager Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, and 19, 2015. #OVG666780

(800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil

Contracts and bid forms are available at the City Clerk’s office.

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

Public Notices

Statewides

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF NOVEMBER 16, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

HELP WANTED HIRING NOW! Clean Harbors is hiring Environmental Technicians in moses Lake, Spokane and Kent. Interested in career opportunity? Apply NOW! Get more info at: www.CleanHarbors.com/careers ADOPTION Super Fun Family Vacations, NYC Executive, Financial Security, Lots of LOVE awaits 1st baby.*Expenses paid*1-800-243-1658*

Public Notices A 2016 budget for Okanogan FD 16 was presented and adopted by the Commissioners at a public hearing on November 9th, 2015 at 20 Bench Creek Road in Aeneas Valley. Revenue 2016 Beginning Fund Balance 171,500 General Property Taxes 47,554 Grants 85,000 State Entitlements 1,000 Intergovernmental Service Revenues 56,000 Interest and Other Earnings 1,000 Contributions & Donations Private 10,000 Interfund Loan Receipts 500 Other Non-Revenues 1,000 Total Revenue $373,554 Expenditures 2016 Ending balance 4,000 Administration and other services 26,800 Salaries and other wages 46,000* Personnel benefits 7,054 Supplies 61,000 Other services and charges 13,000 Capital outlays 145,700 Total Expenditures $373,554 * - The Salaries amount is a “pass through” payment from the US Forest Service for services provided by FD 16 firefighters during the North Star fire. They pay the contractors (in this case our fire district) one lump sum amount that covers both firefighter pay and fire district equipment rental costs. The fire district then issues checks out to the firefighters who earned it. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 19, 2015. #OVG668248 CLOSURE NOTICE The Oroville City Hall will be closed Wednesday, November 25th @ 12:00, Thursday, November 26th & Friday, November 27th in observance of Thanksgiving. Customers with a Wednesday, Thursday or Friday collection will be picked up on Wednesday, November 25th. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 19, 25, 2015 #OVG669515

In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for the County of Okanogan Petitioner Mandie R. Miller Vs. Respondent Rahmier D. Harley No. 15-3-00137-5 The State of Washington to the said Rahmier D. Harley: You are hereby summoned to appear within ninety days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within ninety days after the 29th day of October, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the petitioner Mandie R. Miller, and serve a copy of your answer upon the Okanogan Superior County Court at the address below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgement will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. Petitioner, Mandie R. Miller, requesting dissolution of marriage. Okanogan County Superior Court 149 3rd Avenue North - 3rd Floor PO Box 112 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 29, November 5, 12, 19, 26 and December 3, 2015. #OVG664507 CALL FOR BIDS Sealed bids for surplus equipment and materials will be received at the office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, P.O. Box 1729, 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, WA 98844, until 10:00 A.M. local time on November 30, 2015, and then will be publicly opened and read. Bid forms are available at the office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. For information concerning the bids, con-

Think Green!

Continued on next page

Did you know?

We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper recycled for

gardens, fire starter & more!

CALL FOR BIDS Janitorial Service The City of Tonasket will accept sealed bids for Janitorial Service at the City Clerk’s office until 7:00 p.m., Dec. 8, 2015 at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. The janitorial service will be for the City Hall/Library Complex, TVBRC

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

Crosswords

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

25. Clear, as a disk

6. Commendation

26. “I had no ___!”

7. Trigger, for one

27. Chips in

8. Charge

29. “... ___ he drove out of sight”

9. Absorbed, as a cost

30. Artificial leg?

10. Without fixing a future meeting date (2 wds)

31. Precedent setter (2 wds)

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

33. Pressed milk curd 34. A little night music 35. Fly high 36. Easy 39. Break

LEGAL SERVICES

43. Bullying, e.g.

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

44. Car accessory 45. Aromatic solvent 46. Bills, e.g. 47. Couples 49. Cork’s country 50. Death on the Nile cause, perhaps

HELP WANTED-GOVERNMENT

51. Kneecap

NAVY RESERVE Serve part-time. No military exp needed. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE. training with U.S. Navy. Good medical/dental, vacation, great reer. HS grads ages 17-34. Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, jobs_seattle@navy.mil

PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 846 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington increasing the regular property tax levy authorized to be collected in the 2016 tax year. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the November 3, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 19, 2015. #OVG669085

Paid pay, caCall or

53. Parenthesis, essentially 54. Anne Morrow Lindbergh, e.g., type of writer

ANSWERS

Across 1. ___-ski 6. “Wheel of Fortune” category 12. Set beforehand 16. Slips of paper with gummed backs

NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. % for school. Call Mon-Fri

22. Australian runner

18. Magazine 19. A pint, maybe 20. Peevish 23. 100 dinars

13. Certain surgeon’s “patient” 15. Solution of solvent and dissolved matter 17. Beat 21. Container weight 24. Pertaining to Latvians 26. Stress, in a way 28. Bathroom item 30. Cut 32. “Tarzan” extra 33. Bunk 35. Boxers’ warnings 36. Pretense 37. Degrading 38. Having a pointed end

56. A distinct component of something larger

39. Ashtabula’s lake

58. Accord

41. Jack Russell, for one

59. Person of mixed ancestry

42. Built

60. He’s a real go-___.

44. One up

61. Scottish landowner

47. Adhesive

40. Dry, red table wine

48. Squalid section of a city

14. Unvarying procedure

THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days’ vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil

11. Paints that dry to a hard, glossy finish

51. Four gills Down

52. Biblical shepherd 55. Abbr. after a name

1. Power structure 2. Nutty confection 3. Repairs a broken chair 4. “C’___ la vie!” 5. Escape, in a way

57. ___ Today, daily newspaper


NOVEMBER 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

SPORTS

Athletes named to ‘All-League’ Oroville Youth Soccer to host state tourney Nov. 21

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Sudoku

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BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory 5

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This is Hartvig 808 3rd St. Please see if you have a bigger pixel picture from Joan.

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Check them out today!

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Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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FIRE SALE BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT HOME Hardwood & Tile Floors, Granite Counters, 4 Bedrooms/4 1/2 Baths, Indoor Pool, 8.39 Acres Motivated Seller $289,900

413 ACRES m/l. Approx 1 mile out of Curlew on Boulder Creek Road. Merchantable Timber. Access. Excellent Long-term Investment. $516,000.00

Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

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TIMBERLAND

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HILLTOP REALTY

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

SUN 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 LAKES Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker REALTY

You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

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NWML#868506 $105,000

Missed out on that dream home?

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Spectacular cedar home on just over 11 acres! Spacious 3 bedroom/2.5 bath home with loft. Updates inside and out including new roof and recently stained exterior. Attached garage, hay shed, chicken coop, fully fenced and wrap around deck! Get away and enjoy the privacy of this property! MLS#823134 $235,000

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Corner lot with large front yard. 2 Bedrooms with 1 Bath and 2 small extra rooms in attic area. Lots of potential for this cute home. Fresh paint and new floor coverings inside. This is a HomePath property.

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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509/476-3378

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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ANSWERS

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PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 847 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington increasing the special EMS levy authorized to be collected in the 2016 tax year. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the November 3, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 19, 2015. #OVG669092

PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council has set their schedule for the 2016 Budget Workshops. All Budget Workshops will be held in the City Council Chambers. Budget Workshop dates and times are: -Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 8:30 am (all day workshop) -Tuesday, October 13, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 6:30 pm The public has a right to attend any workshop and make comments. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, October 8, 22, November 5, 19, 2015 #OVG655239

OROVILLE – The Oroville Youth Soccer Club proudly presents the playoffs for the Washington State Recreational Soccer tournament on Saturday, Nov. 21, starting at 1 p.m. Oroville is hosting the Pasco Gladiators from Tri-Cities Youth Soccer Club. This game is the second in the series leading up to the quarter finals. The Oroville Racers, a co-ed under 12 soccer

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19, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2015. #OVG667599

OROVILLE YOUTH SOCCER CLUB

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DALE EDWARD McGOWAN, a single individual; Plaintiff, vs . LORNA GAIL McGOWAN, her heirs and assigns; any and all other persons appearing on title and JOHN DOE and JANE DOES I - X, Defendants. NO. 15-2-00440-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

Public Notices

SUBMITTED BY ERIN JOHNSON

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NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION OF ASSESSMENT ROLL OF THE OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Assessment Roll for the year 2016 has been prepared by the Secretary and that the Directors of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District will meet as a Board of Equalization at the district office located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, Washington, on December 10, 2015, at 1:30 P.M. for the purpose of equalizing said District’s 2016 Assessment Roll. Said Assessment Roll is available for review at the District Office until equalized by the Board of Directors on December 10, 2015. Jay W. O’Brien, Secretary/Manager Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 19, 2015. #OVG668981

The State of Washington to the said Lorna Gail McGowan, presumed to be a single individual, her heirs and assigns, any and all other persons appearing on title or claiming any right, title or interest herein, in the property of the Plaintiffs. You, and each of you, are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after November 12, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court and answer the complaint of the plaintiffs and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for the plaintiff, at his office below stated; and, in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demands of the complaint in this action which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiffs to real estate in Okanogan County, Washington, described as: Okanogan County Parcel Number: 6421058000 Tract 1058 Okanogan River Ranches Division NO. 5 as recorded in Volume H, Section 1 of Plats, pages 12 and 13 , Auditor’s File No. 574397, Records of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 27 day of October, 2015. /s/Roger A. Castelda Roger A. Castelda, WSBA #5571 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket , WA 98855 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 12,

Public Notices

team is comprised of boys and girls from Oroville and Tonasket. The team is undefeated in their league, and recently won first place in the River Valley Youth Soccer tournament held in Omak on Oct. 31. The team, coached by Jim Elias, is ready to win this! Coach Jim thinks they can go all the way to the finals, to be held in Tukwila Dec. 12-13. The Racers are: Noah Johnson, Aidan Nelson, Hadley Blasey, Cici Cervantes, Tyson Rounds, Wyatt Sherrer, Samantha Sherrer, Rebekah Martin, Kolo Moser, Alexis Sanchez, Obed Garcia, Trace Scott, Tommy Spikes, Kyra Koepke, Logan Sutton and Alex DelRosario.

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Continued from previous page

Public Notices

Racers to take on Gladiators

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Public Notices

Hugus, Oroville, Defensive Back, Junior. Honorable Mention: Caleb Mills, Oroville, Linebacker, Sophomore; Blake Rise, Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Senior; Jaxon Blackler, Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Junior; Ethan Smith, Tonasket, Defensive Lineman, Freshman; Rycki Cruz, Tonasket, Defensive Back, Sophomore. Team Sportsmanship Award: Oroville CROSS COUNTRY First Team: Johnna Terris, Tonasket; Hunter Swanson, Tonasket. Second Team: Jenna Valentine, Tonasket. Honorable Mention: Bryden Hires, Tonasket. GIRLS SOCCER First Team: Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, Offense, Junior; Ashlynn Willis, Tonasket, Offense, Junior; Kayla Willis, Tonasket, Offense, Junior; Myra Gaytan, Tonasket, Defense, Senior. Second Team: Mandi Wilson, Tonasket, Defense, Sophomore; Rose Walts, Tonasket, Offense, Senior. Honorable Mention: Alexia Garcia, Oroville, Offense, Sophomore; Morgyne Hjaltason, Tonasket, Offense, Sophomore. Team Sportsmanship Award: Oroville.

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Oroville’s girls’ soccer team, coached by Tony Kindred, also won the All-League Sportsmanship Award. “One of the great priveleges of coaching Top-performing athletes and coaches have been named to the Central Washington this team is seeing great sportsmanship,” B League ‘All-League’ teams, with the said Kindred. “The Lady Hornets have repOroville Football Team winning the league resented Oroville as a class act, and it is an honor to receive the sportsmanship award for Sportsmanship Award. “To me and my staff effort, sportsman- the 2015 season.” North County athletes named ‘All-League’: ship and attitude are more important than X’s and O’s. Yes, we want FOOTBALL the players to play good First Team Offense: Andrew Mieirs, football, to be competitive Oroville, Wide Receiver, Junior; Blake Rise, and step out on the field Oroville, Offensive Lineman, Senior. with winning as a goal,” Second Team Offensive: Nathan Hugus, said Football Head Coach Oroville, Quarterback, Junior; Logan Mills, Tam Hutchinson. “But to Oroville, Running Back, Senior; Charlie win with poor character or Arrigoni, Oroville, Offensive Lineman, poor behavior is unaccept- Senior; Zane Scott, Oroville, Offensive Coach Hutchinson able. We try to instill in Lineman, Sophomore. our players to ‘Win with Honorable Mention: Caleb Mills, Oroville, Pride,’ and to ‘Lose with Pride.’ As coaches, Running Back, Sophomore; Jesse Ramon, our job is to set the tone and lead by example Tonasket, Running Back, Sophomore. in the way we treat each other as well as how First Team Defense: Logan Mills, Oroville, we treat our opponent. I have been fortunate Defensive Lineman, Senior. over the years here at Oroville to have had Second Team Defense: Stetson Spears, players whose families support and reinforce Oroville, Linebacker, Junior; Charlie Arrigoni, these concepts.” Oroville, Defensive Lineman, Senior; Nathan November 19, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 19, 2015

SCHOOLS

Steffi Fuchs/submitted photos

Junior high team building their robot (L-R) Brayden Thompson, Xavier McCoy, Ethan Godinez, Michael Oaks.

Steffi Fuchs/submitted photos

The middle school team working to finish up their robot (L-R) Trevor Miller, Leo Chen and Paul Fuchs

Building and using robots Oroville Robotics Club attends first competition at CWU

SUBMITTED BY STEFFI FUCHS OROVILLE ROBOTICS CLUB PARENT

Middle school Team Driver Paul Fuchs and Sean Glover ready to start the competition.

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ELLENSBURG - At 4.45 a.m., while most people were still asleep last Saturday, eight devoted members of the Oroville Robotics Club and their coach hit the road to participate in the first scrimmage of the year. The club, which is part of the Gear Up Program, traveled down to Central Washington University in Ellensburg. There they participated in their first friendly competition. About 13 teams from schools all over the valley came together to get their first experience in a robotics competition. Before the scrimmage began, all the teams had time to finish building their robots or fix broken parts. Some young future engineers simply enjoyed brainstorming their ideas with other teams.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 19, 2015  

November 19, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 19, 2015  

November 19, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune