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COMIX WATCH AEON FUX TURN INTO AN INSECT PAGE 19 STAGE FESTEN FRUSTRATES AND FASCINATES PAGE 24

Overdevelopment

Homeless Change Affordable Housing

Preservation Karl Marx

Y M O ANAT BY OF A NIM nists want, o ti a rv e s re p orhood What neighb ming from. o c e ’r y e th and where 7 work | Page y a J y e s a C y B

Greater Seattle

Lesser Seattle

Going Deep

A one-man show puts Chicago pizza on the Seattle map. By Nicole Sprinkle Page 13 NOVEMBER 11-17, 2015 | VOLUME 40 | NUMBER 45

Farewell to Folk

With an inventive new album in tow, Bryan John Appleby moves on. By Dusty Henry Page 17 SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM | FREE


SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

BELLEVUE SQUARE

2 SEATTLEWEEKLY-1PG.indd 1

11/2/15 11:57 AM


inside

VOLUME 40 | NUMBER 45

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

November 11-17, 2015

EARSHOT

JAZZ FESTIVAL

Seattle’s Jazz Festival October 9 – November 18

EVENTS THIS WEEK:

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12 ROYAL ROOM, 8PM

Wayne Horvitz @ 60 25

21

news&comment 5

7

TESTING TOTS

BY DANIEL PERSON | Investing in early development now saves public money down the road—and a UW lab has the science to back that up. Plus: We listen in on Brenda and Bertha, and on a cyberhacker and his concerned dad.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

BY CASEY JAYWORK | Yay, growth!

Boo, growth! An overview of the conflict that’s shaped—and riven—Seattle for decades.

food&drink

13 THE PIE PIPER

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | Meet Seattle’s

new evangelist for Chicago-style pizza. 14 | NOODLE TOUR 15 | BEER HUNTING

arts&culture

17 THE APO(P)STATE

BY DUSTY HENRY | Bryan John Appleby steps away from folk music to try something “a little less brooding.” 18 | CONVERSATION | Dancers Tia Kramer and Tamin Totzke talk efficiency. 19 20 21

| COMIX | ELECTRIC EYE | LADIES FIRST

Iranian samizdat cinema; journos on film; daddy issues onstage; PNB goes modern before the snowflakes return.

26 CALENDAR 26 27 27 28 28 29

| | | |

THE PICK LIST PERFORMANCE/EAR SUPPLY BOOKS VISUAL ARTS/THE FUSSY EYE | MUSIC | FILM

odds&ends

4 | CHATTERBOX 30 | HIGHER GROUND 31 | CLASSIFIEDS

cover credits

COLLAGE BY JOSE TRUJILLO ANATOMY ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

EDITORIAL News Editor Daniel Person Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Music Editor Kelton Sears Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Sara Bernard, Ellis E. Conklin, Casey Jaywork Editorial Interns Cassandra Calderon, Scott Johnson, Mara Silvers Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, James Ballinger, Michael Berry, Alyssa Dyksterhouse, Jay Friedman, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Chason Gordon, Dusty Henry, Rhiannon Fionn, Marcus Harrison Green, Robert Horton, Patrick Hutchison, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, Terra Clarke Olsen, Jason Price, Keegan Prosser, Tiffany Ran, Michael A. Stusser, Jacob Uitti

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12 SEATTLE ART MUSEUM, BROTMAN FORUM, 5:30PM

Billy Strayhorn Project

Vocalist Tyrone Brown celebrates Billy Strayhorn, in a free concert at SAM. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13 TOWN HALL SEATTLE, 8PM

Brad Mehldau Trio

One of the greatest modern jazz pianists. (Presented by Earshot Jazz and 88.5 KPLU.) FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13 & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14 TULA’S RESTAURANT AND JAZZ CLUB, 7:30PM

Larry Fuller Trio

The in-demand New York pianist returns to Seattle. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14 TRIPLE DOOR, 7:30PM

Scott Amendola Band w/ Nels Cline & Jenny Scheinman

Powerhouse drummer Scott Amendola, guitar icon Nels Cline, violinist Jenny Scheinman, guitarist Jeff Parker, and bassist John Shifflett. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15 TRIPLE DOOR, 7:30PM

Chris Potter Trio

“One of the most studied (and copied) saxophonists on the planet” (DownBeat). MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16 TRIPLE DOOR, 7:30PM

Sara Gazarek & New West Guitar Group

Seattle-reared vocalist with the New West Guitar Group. (Presented by Triple Door.) TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17 & WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18 TRIPLE DOOR, 7:30PM

Hugh Masekela

The legendary South African trumpeter/flugelhornist/bandleader closes out this year’s festival. (Presented by Triple Door.)

Buy tickets at www.earshot.org & 206-547-6763

PRODUCTION Production Manager Sharon Adjiri Art Director Jose Trujillo Graphic Designers Nate Bullis, Brennan Moring ADVERTISING Marketing/Promotions Coordinator Zsanelle Edelman Senior Multimedia Consultant Krickette Wozniak Multimedia Consultants Julia Cook, Rose Monahan, Matt Silvie DISTRIBUTION Distribution Manager Jay Kraus OPERATIONS Administrative Coordinator Amy Niedrich Publisher Bob Baranski 206-623-0500 COPYRIGHT © 2015 BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 / USPS 306730 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC., 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. PERI ODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 • FOUNDED 1976.

Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra and Northwest Chamber Chorus w/ Special Guest Vocalists Stephen Newby & Nichol Eskridge

DUKE ELLINGTON’S SACRED MUSIC Saturday, December 26, 7:30pm Town Hall Seattle 1119 Eighth Ave, Seattle, WA

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

WWW.EARSHOT.ORG

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

23 REVIEWS

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten

A fascinating triple bill of new solo, trio, and sextet work.

3


chatterbox

BALLARD NOW OPEN

“It is as obvious as day and night ... that we have failed miserably as a society regarding our least able citizens.”

SARA BERNARD

7a – 9p Daily

STATE OF EMERGENCY

Dog Daycare • Dog Boarding Dog Grooming • Dog Shop

Downtown Seattle 206/623-5395

Ballard 206/789-1290

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

citydogclub.com

4

Last week, Casey Jaywork reported on Mayor Ed Murray’s emergency declaration in response to Seattle’s homeless epidemic—a move that will give the mayor wider powers to deal with the problem. Between 2014 and 2015, the number of homeless in Seattle has grown by 21 percent. In addition to the declaration, Murray also announced he will allocate an additional $5 million next year to outreach and services. As usual, readers were not withholding on their thoughts about the homeless.

with $125 Purchase

New and existing Elevated Rewards Members only, sign up in-store today. Offer begins 11/13/15 while supplies last. Limited to promotional stock on hand. Cannot be combined with any other offers. In-store merchandise purchase only. Retail value of the Yeti Colster: $29.99 Mountain Hardwear Seattle | 250 Pine St., Seattle, WA 98101 | 206-441-2639 | mountainhardwear.com

CHARTING A NEW COURSE

Sara Bernard reported on the confused state of affairs at Washington’s charter schools. The schools We host many young travelers from around the were considered all but sunk when the state world through Couchsurfing, and every last one Supreme Court ruled in August that the initiative of these travelers, mostly college students, are that created them was unconstitutional. Howuniversally shocked, not only with the number ever, they are still open, and even talking about of homeless on the streets of expanding. Seattle (in fact all of the AmerSend your thoughts on ica that they have seen and travThat’s right, a lot of parents do this week’s issue to eled to), but they are shocked want school choice, and people letters@seattleweekly.com are willing to fight for it. It also by the sad human conditions

that they see in so many that are obviously unable to care for themselves on those streets. It is as obvious as day and night for those coming here from elsewhere that we have failed miserably as a society regarding our least able citizens. It should seem apparent that in our mad rush to grease the skids of the wealthy few to extend that very wealth of theirs further in front of everyone else, by hook or by crook, all while leaving so many as the economic fall guys to their great successes, these schemes have all caught up with us. It is as vivid as if lit in neon, we see it on every block. Ian McFail, via seattleweekly.com

FREE Yeti Colster

who chose to spend their life inside a needle or a bottle deserve no sympathy, and since they don’t want any help, none should be offered. We should expeditiously help them on their way out of Seattle. Or, if we are going to offer them a place to stay, it should be at [the county detention center]. Davell, via seattleweekly.com

More empty-handed outreach. If you have no resources but the Sharewheel/Nickelsville scam to offer, you are not going to have much luck because [the homeless] are better off where they are. I can tell you Mayor Ed is seeing less homeless already after fencing off the campsites that could be seen from his office. Domenic Feeney, via seattleweekly.com

appears some people are willing to make odd satirical rap music videos about it—not sure if it is the way I would of went, but it works. Roger Mook, via Facebook Why are the students bailing out of these schools, then? 15 percent left in the month of September. In order to obtain public money while the Supreme Court finalizes their opinion, they are required to submit monthly enrollment reports to OSPI. Summit Sierra went from 121 on September 1 to 111 on October 1. Summit Olympus went from 123 to 103 between September 1 and October 1. That works out to a 13 percent drop in 30 calendar days. If SPS lost that many students in a month, it would work out to over 6,800 students and would force the layoffs of over 230 certificated staff. I know charter supporters prefer to deal only in make-believe spin, but those are the objective facts (assuming all the current charter operators are not inflating their reported number, like First Place did last year). Greg, via seattleweekly.com

If this were an original idea or original policy developed by Seattle’s leadership, I would be impressed. That it very belatedly follows on more innovative efforts from Los Angeles and Hawaii reflects shameful grandstanding on Mayor Murray’s part and is a paltry salve to the problems of inequality and homelessness that plague Seattle. Erin Moore, via seattleweekly.com

And just to toot our own horn for a second, readers from across the country tuned into our cover story on a writer’s years-long investigation into the mysterious disappearance of an airplane carrying two U.S. congressmen in Alaska. The piece was highlighted by the New Orleans Times-Picayune, on the website Long Reads, and included in Mike Allen’s “Playbook” column on Politico. E

That $5.3 million would pay for approximately 75,000 one-way bus tickets to L.A. People

Comments have been edited for length, so we could fit in that last bit of self-congratulation.


news&comment SCIENCE

They Ain’t Cheap

How one UW lab is convincing taxpayers to pony up for early child care. BY DANIEL PERSON

I-LABS/ UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

they are getting the care they need to allow their brains to develop. Other money will be devoted to secondary issues that can hamper a kid’s learning, such as homelessness and food insecurity. Critics of the measure said it was too light on specifics to ensure accountable use of the tax dollars, but Kuhl is as enthusiastic about Constantine’s measure as he was about her lab’s work.

W

support, because the evidence leaves no question that this is what we need, and we’re the ones to get it to them.” Along with co-directing I-LABS with her hus-

band, Dr. Andrew Meltzoff, Kuhl could be thought of as the lab’s head evangelist for early learning. In preaching her message, Kuhl has taken to some of the highest pulpits of the land—none higher than the TED stage in 2010. Her talk, “The Linguistic Genius of Babies,” has 2.1 million views. But Kuhl does not work alone getting this information out. The lab also has a team of five Ph.D.s devoted to “outreach”—that is, translating the lab’s findings into easy-to-understand packages. “Andy and I could only do so many talks,” she says. “We needed to create an entire branch. . . . That’s unusual for a lab.” The bottom line of all that outreach is this: While many scientists shy away from too much involvement in politics—where empirical thought more often than not gets plowed aside by gut feelings and cynicism—I-LABS seeks politics out. “I’m in love with the science and love the pure scientific aspect of it,” Kuhl says about her lab. “But you can’t stay on the sidelines. You can’t not get out there and talk about that. “The money you invest in the age range for [children] 0–5 pays off sevenfold to 17-fold in money you save in young adults not being incarcerated, not being in trouble with the law, not raising havoc with drug abuse or other things. “I see it firsthand. I’m not a policy wonk. what I do for a living is look at children’s brains.” In that vein, Best Starts for Kids will devote about $32 million a year toward children ages 0 to 5, with programs like home visits to ensure

Kuhl says I-LABS’s next project will track how different strategies help low-income children achieve better literacy rates in grade school. They will follow two groups of children: one a control, while the others’ parents receive realtime instruction about how their baby’s brains are developing, to “let parents understand what those ‘mama’s and ‘baba’s mean.” “We think this is the catalyst that will make every single child read at an age-appropriate level by grade 3,” she says. “Instead of having parents and teachers throw their hands up saying, ‘Johnny and Susie aren’t reading and it’s grade 3,’ we believe we connect the dots.” As for this latest election victory for early learning, Kuhl didn’t attend any parties in King County; she was in Los Angeles speaking to education leaders from around the world about what their countries could do to improve earlychild development. Stealing glances at her phone to see the results of her last effort, she was already on to her next. E

dperson@seattleweekly.com

She’s the worst to make plans with.

On Friday, Sound Transit’s tunnel-boring machine Brenda completed its subterranean journey from Northgate to the U District—right on schedule. At one-seventh the size, Brenda is a sort of little sister to the Highway 99 behemoth Bertha. The following is a text exchange the two had when trying to meet up for happy hour. Messages

Bertha

Details

Fri, Nov 6, 5:30 PM

Hey Bertha, just finished up at work. You close to being done? Uhhh no What? Where are you? Pioneer Square Pioneer Square?!?! WTF IDK! I just hit a wall! Or, like, a pipe casing or something . . . And they’re keeping you late? FML yes. My boss is a total ass who doesn’t know when to just stop I’d just quit Believe me, I’ve tried that Arg! OK. We could just pig out on CaliBurger when yr done. #Iwannabebiglikebertha FFFFUUU bitch! Anyway, that shit’s Chinese. I’m Japanese Whatever Well, I’m in the U District so just text me when yr done. Like in forever What r you going to do? There’s a new bookstore at U-Village I’m going go chill at A NEW bookstore? What’s it called? Um . . . Amazon. Have you been in a hole or something?  . . .  Bertha? I think I’m just going to stay down here news@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

hen King County Executive Dow Constantine made the case for the Best Starts for Kids Levy this election season, he pointed back to what he said was the inspiration for the six-year, $392 million investment in early child development: a visit to the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Science. It was there, he told The Seattle Times, looking at images of babies’ brains as they looked out at the world around them, that he says he had an a-ha moment: It was incumbent upon policy leaders like him to do all they could to invest in young minds the moment they began to develop. A year later, King County residents have agreed to go along with Constantine’s vision, voting by a 55-45 margin to approve the levy that will aim to give more kids the nutrition and care they need to arrive at school ready to learn. If the big predictions of Best Starts bears out and King County becomes a national leader in early-child development, Constantine’s visit to that UW lab could be seen a lucky encounter between policy and science that changed society for the better. But that would be somewhat incorrect, inasmuch as what Constantine calls an a-ha moment was not so much serendipity but the product of careful work by the UW lab, which puts considerable resources toward packaging its research into easy-to-understand presentations designed for people just like Constantine: politicians who have the power to put money where the science is. “That’s our job, my husband and I who codirect the Institute: to try to bring together the interested parties and make it actionable,” says Dr. Patricia Kuhl. “We don’t know how to create policy; we try not be political advocates. But this should be an agenda that everyone should

What’s going on in there?

Constantine—and through him the taxpayers of King County—are just the latest converts to the message. Last year, Mayor Ed Murray stood on a stage with Kuhl to promote his citywide pre-kindergarten levy, which also passed. Taken together, the two early-learning measures will add a little more than $100 to the annual property-tax bill for a Seattle homeowner with an assessed property of $400,000. Kuhl appeared at a conference in Dallas in which Murray pressed other mayors to sign onto a resolution declaring 2015–2025 a decade to build “an early-learning nation,” and accompanied Constantine, Murray, and City Council president Tim Burgess to the White House for an earlylearning conference with President Obama. In Olympia this year, the legislature passed the $158 million Early Starts Act, which channels money toward early leaning and child care assistance. Lawmakers who oversaw the passage were unequivocal about Kuhl’s influence on the legislation. “Her engaging, informative presentations on her research, and the relationship of early brain development to later success in school, have laid the foundation for many successful legislative efforts,” Rep. Ruth Kagi, D-Shoreline, said in an e-mail from South Africa. “The research has fundamentally driven our early-learning policy in Washington. Without the magic of Pat Kuhl, we would not be where we are today.”

Texting Bertha

5


news&comment

SEATTLELAND

From Russia, With Kisses Strange chats between a father and his accused hacker son. BY RICK ANDERSON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

A

6

Funny money, but no get-out-of-jail-free card.

conversation between a father and his son locked up in prison can be a heartwarming moment. Take the chats between accused international cyberhacker Roman Seleznev and his father, legislator Valery Seleznev, on the phone from Moscow. Each one ends in a Russian version of “Bye, kiss you!” They knew, however, that the feds were listening and suspected they talked in code. That came up during a call in late August, after the son had been locked up at the federal detention center in SeaTac for more than a year. “I called the attorney today,” Roman, 30, says in Russian. “Yes,” his father responds. “She said that the warden says that you and I are discussing some kind of plans, sort of suspicious plans. That’s why they decided you and I are plotting something and they turned the mail off for me and they made the communication access the way it is.” The Americans are unfair, Roman told his father. Having been what the Russian government calls “kidnapped” in July 2014 by the U.S. in the Maldives, Seleznev was flown to Seattle and accused of hacking into computers here and across the U.S. He denied he had pirated data of more than two million credit-card holders. Despite little grasp of English or the law, he has tried to manage his own legal case, firing a number of attorneys and acting as his own counsel in the pretrial stage. He has filed several motions with the assistance of a Minnesota man whose legal experience comes from fighting the suspension of his driver’s license for failure to pay child support. In the August call, Roman’s father appears to believe his son is wrongly accused. Like any loving dad, he wants his boy to be free again. So, continues Valery, a member of Russia’s parliament, “What can we discuss? Your escape plan or what?”

Last month, that line showed up in a brief filed by U.S. prosecutors alleging in part that the two were planning the son’s escape from SeaTac— even though Valery, later in the conversation, said such a plan was “nonsense.” They also claimed the Russian lawmaker had discussed a plot to tamper with a witness and attempted to delay a hearing by staging a medical emergency. Angelo Calfo, one of the attorneys preparing Seleznev’s case for its May trial date, says Valery’s

escape remark was “clearly a facetious reference” lost in translation. He added that, “From the standpoint of the defendant’s right to due process [and a] fair trial,” the phone call transcripts should not be made available to prosecutors. A judge, however, turned down his motion to end the practice, and prosecutors have continued to receive and file transcripts. Here’s more of the father’s advice on how his son should seek justice in a far-off land. Some of it may be code. But I guessed and inserted interpretive headlines to help (all quotation marks from the original): On delaying tactics?

Valery: The second thing is, completely stop the communication with the lawyers . . . Like, “I don’t want to talk.” . . .  Roman: Uh-huh . . .  Valery: But you will have to say the following to them . . . [Have them tell the court they] “are idiots, [they] did not have time to prepare . . . ” [Tell the attorneys] “you guys are able to postpone it! If you are not able to, then fuck off! . . . ” On becoming your own attorney?

Roman: I have been reading lots of books. Valery: Huh? Roman: One should not be defending himself . . . It will turn bad in 100 percent of the cases . . .  Valery: Actually, I have found some “magicians,” kind of. Now their “magic” [skills] are being checked. On faking an illness?

Valery: So now, please listen to me carefully. I understand everything. You are sick. Medicines. It is some cold or who knows what it is. You cannot go to the hearing in the condition that you are in right now . . .  Roman: Yes, I see. Valery: I will being talking to the “doctors.” I will be flying directly from where I am to over there, to the “doctors” . . . and they will be giving me “prescriptions.” On using the hospital to escape?

Valery: Listen, I do understand what your biggest fear is. This word “the life sentence” surely sucks. That’s what it is, correct? Roman: Well, of course it is . . .  Valery: [My friend] is ready to create a miracle. Well, to try to create a miracle called “The patient got into the hospital the wrong way, so he needs to be released from the hospital.” You got it, right? Roman: Right . . .  Valery: So let him visit you and describe in what way he will be achieving this short-term goal . . .  Roman: OK. Is he a lawyer at all? Valery: I would not want to discuss it on the phone . . .  Roman: Bye, kiss you! Valery: Bye, kiss you! E

randerson@seattleweekly.com

Rick Anderson writes about sex, crime, money, and politics, which tend to be the same thing. His latest book is Floating Feet: Irregular Dispatches From the Emerald City.


ANATOMY ILLUSTRATION COURTESY WIKIPEDIA/PHOTO-ILLUSTRATION BY JOSE TRUJILLO

ANATOMY OF A NIMBY Grief over growth is perennial, but it hasn’t always been this bad. How a detente over development failed and fueled the rise of the modern neighborhood preservationist.

T

By Casey Jaywork

he language is apocalyptic; the tone, desperate. “Cancer,”“canyons of darkness,” “anguish, hopelessness, and loss.” • But these aren’t war-zone dispatches, nor recollections of a natural disaster. They’re public comments from a Seattle City Council’s land-use-committee hearing held earlier this year. It was there that aggrieved homeowners walked up to one of two smooth wooden podiums in City Hall’s Council chambers to vent the vexation they felt as they watched their communities “being torn apart” by development, as Capitol Hill resident the Venerable Dhammadinna put it. • “Elderly homeowners, the gay community, older women, and families are no longer welcome,” she told the Council, referring to the city’s mixed-density residential areas. • “Our neighborhoods are shadowed by tall, bulky buildings. Gardens are being cemented, trees cut down. Those who can’t carry their bags of groceries up and down the hills are not invited into this dystopia.”


Building owner Katie Kulczyk choked back sobs as she described the high-density apartment building that had just been built next to her “lovely little two-bedroom townhouse” on Capitol Hill. The traffic congestion those new residents will create, she said, made the townhouse unlivable for her. “It shouldn’t always be about the people that are coming,” she said, prompting raucous applause from the audience. “What about the people that are here?” The testimony was so consistent—or redundant, depending on your position—that a drinking game could have been fashioned from the proceedings: Take one shot whenever someone said “neighborhood character,” two for “transient.” Ravenna homeowner Suzanne Ferris, for example, said she was “emotionally devastated” by the microhousing units that had gone up nearby, which she called “hotels for transient people coming to the U-Dub.

“The only thing slowing development now is that there aren’t enough people to process the permits at City Hall fast enough.”

8

John Fox has been fighting bad development since 1977.

DANIEL BERMAN

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

“My inheritance, my husband’s family’s inheritance, is being ignored as you move forward in this juggernaut to develop,” she later added. Through it all, committee chair Mike O’Brien kept his trademark aw-shucks smile plastered onto his boyish face, occasionally frowning or leaning forward to emphasize his empathy with some especially poignant point. Councilmembers nodding, the crowd politely angry: The whole scene played out as it had so many times before and since in the fight over Seattle’s growth. And though he naturally beams niceness the way the sun shines, O’Brien had additional cause to aim his nuclear-grade affability at the crowd of middle-aged white folks who mostly filled the Council chamber: They were his constituents, and it was an election year. Seattle is suffering an affordable-housing crisis—on this there is no debate. But the causes of and solutions to that crisis remain a well-gnawed bone of contention. On one side is a faction known as “urbanists” by friends and “densinistas” by enemies. Their ideology begins with the premise that housing is a commodity. Like all commodities, its price follows the tug-and-shove of supply and demand. Right now demand is surging, and with supply sitting tight in its snug little single-family bungalow, cost is surging as well. An obvious solution follows from this narrative: Build more housing. Keep building until it catches up with supply, or rents will stay high and poor renters will either pay more than they can afford, move out of the city, or become homeless. As architect David Neiman puts it, “You gotta build as much housing as there is demand . . . [or] the whole housing market stays in a bidding war for scarcity, and poor people lose.” On the other side of the debate are “neighborhood preservationists,” if you want to be polite, or if you don’t, “NIMBYs”—an acronym for Not In My Back Yard. In its most literal sense, “NIMBY” refers to hypocritical homeowners who support some project—a homeless encampment, a utility transfer station, a public-health clinic—as long as it’s located somewhere other than their own neighborhood. That is, it’s pejorative, denoting selfishness and dishonesty. But the

term has evolved—at least among densinistas— to more broadly refer to opponents of development, whether they’re hypocrites or not. The preservationists’ ideology starts with the premise that the capital costs of construction make new housing more expensive than old housing. Property owners with large debts to their investors are constantly squirming under the imperative to charge as much as possible in rents, while landlords of older buildings whose debts are paid off may have more wiggle room to leave rents be. Market-based housing development, they say, is synonymous with gentrification, displacement, and the sacrifice of Seattle’s soul for the sake of developer profits. As recent City Council candidate Bill Bradburd—whose campaign statements seemed to put him in the NIMBY camp—put it, “Market developers can’t build affordable housing—they can’t do it.” This is a high-stakes debate. Seattle rent has increased by an average of about 60 percent since 2000, outpacing inflation by half. During the same period, Seattle’s population grew by about 17 percent. Booming costs have increased the pressure on poor renters as they play the cruel Tetris of Seattle’s bottom-shelf housing market. Take Topher White. A restaurant worker and bike delivery contractor, he spends more than 80 percent of his income on rent, or $785 out of his roughly $900 monthly pay. Because of this, he says, “Really, really stupid things are barriers to me,” like having to choose between laundry and bus fare for a job interview. “It’s fine for six months,” he says, but then “having to pay so much of your money just for rent, it starts to crush your soul.” White’s not alone: He’s one of about 110,000 renters, or roughly one-sixth of the city’s population, that is “cost-burdened”— that is, paying more than 30 percent of their income in rent. Both sides parade the poor in support of their position. If everyone cares about White’s plight, loves both affordable housing and Seattle’s green-urban character, then why do we have such explosive disputes over the minimum squarefootage of an apartment, or how much car (and bicycle!) parking a new residential building needs? Whence the micromanagement of development, and whence the hollering? Looking for answers, I spoke with some key activists in the fight for limited growth, plus some of their critics and a couple of old hands who have been here since time immemorial. The answers I found surprised me. I’ll bet you didn’t know that preservationists are fundamentally informed by a Marxist view of political economy, or that the city’s 1994 Comprehensive Plan was a high point for neighborhood/city relations, which took a nose-dive in the 2000s. Perhaps most important is the insight that our current battle over development has been going on for decades—long before the most recent boom— and is as much about people feeling as if they’ve been heard as it is about substantive questions of growth policy. Growth has long been controversial in Seattle.

By the 1960s—the same decade that the Space Needle signaled a city on the rise—Seattle PostIntelligencer columnist Emmett Watson was leading the “Lesser Seattle” movement against city boosters who wanted the Emerald City to become the New York of the West Coast. He agitated his readers to “keep the bastards out” by spreading rumors of how unpleasant life was here, in hopes that the mossy utopia of old Seattle might avoid what former Seattle Weekly managing editor Fred Moody once called “the demons of ambition” and putative progress.

The city then was a battleground. Efforts to stymie the bisection of the city by the Interstate largely failed. But when developers and downtown business owners attempted to replace Pike Place Market with a giant development under the banner of “urban renewal,” a coalition similar to the current anti-developer alliance emerged and successfully stalled the plan. Then, between 1969 and 1971, massive layoffs at Boeing sucked the region’s economy into a sinkhole from which it wouldn’t emerge for years. Financing for the development project dried up and the preservationists declared victory. The Boeing Bust ushered in a quieter time. Seattle abandoned its riotous growth for a soft slumber in which work was scarce and living cheap, as if Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman had a baby, except that the baby was actually a city, and that city had waddled out of the river of time and up the bank, where it took a 10-year nap. As Moody wrote in his 2003 Seattle and the Demons of Ambition, “A typical Seattleite got by on very little money and had all the time in the world to accomplish whatever it was he or she wanted to do,” which often included nature hikes, arts and crafts, and generally enlightened ne’er-do-welling. “Seattle [was] a city,” writes Moody, “where people chose to cultivate the mind and the soul, disdaining standard American upward mobility and statusseeking for a life in which people were essentially sympathetic with one another . . . ” Think Haight-Ashbury with the volume turned down and expanded to cover an entire urban center. Current City Councilmember Nick Licata lived in a commune; Capitol Hill became gay; artists lived in Fremont. To many it was a golden age. And in many ways, it’s this idyllic decade that older Seattleites are thinking of when they pine for the Seattle that once was: Old Seattle, the Urban Garden before the Fall. Then the ’80s happened. Microsoft started to take off, Boeing bounced back, Starbucks began to metastasize, and the Seahawks started playing like a real football team. Seattle slipped back into the rushing river of time. Moody again: “I looked back over the 1980s and saw them as a decade of gradual conquest of Lesser Seattle by Greater Seattle.” That tech-driven ’80s economy has carried us to where we are today, a generation later: South Lake Union has been transformed into a glittering monument to yuppie hubris, while the Central District’s diversity is being blanched out by a growing affluent, largely white, population. Seattle is competing for prestige with A-list cities like New York and Los Angeles, even as homelessness has escalated into a civil emergency. And our wrestling match with growth shows no sign of ending anytime soon, as Amazon and its ilk continue to drag our economy by the scruff of its neck toward an inferno of prosperity. Neighborhood preservationists are quick to point out that this prosperity is not equally shared by all residents of Seattle. By the ’80s, says activist John Fox, when “we saw the return of investment to Seattle and cities in general . . . the effect of that was the loss of low-income housing.” In other words, as money flowed into Seattle, space for poor people flowed out—precisely the same dynamic that Fox and other preservationists say they see today. When I meet Fox, he’s sitting in his University District office, an old broom closet in a community center, murky with shadow, surrounded by the echoing screams of young children as they bolt down the hallway outside. The impression I take from this meeting is of a man


with a tragic, maybe heroic, propensity to march head-on into an uncaring world. Roger Valdez, development lobbyist and arch-nemesis to Fox, calls him “one of the more principled opponents of growth that I’ve ever seen” based on Fox’s candor and intellectual honesty. A ruddy Irish intensity boils behind his eyes, which fairly bulge between the deepening wrinkles written into his cheeks like the expanding text of some epic novel. His face sparkles with animation as soon as I say the word “NIMBY”: “It’s an insult, and a gross mischaracterization.” Fox co-founded the Seattle Displacement Coalition in 1977 to combat the housing-finance discrimination against black residents that was widespread in Seattle at the time. The University of Washington graduate student found himself gradually pulled more and more into the good fight against bad development—to keep Seattle, as the current slogan goes, “affordable for all.” This quest for equity, he says, made his group a natural ally to neighborhood preservationists. “Poor people’s issues . . . dovetail, overlap with the issues of neighborhoods,” he says, pointing to concerns like access to green space and transit. Underlying all this is the preservationist conviction that market development hurts housing affordability rather than helps it. “Developers are running roughshod over neighborhoods,” says Fox. “The only thing slowing down development now is that there aren’t enough people to process the permits at City Hall fast enough.” The huge permit loads are a reality, says DPD spokesperson Bryan Stevens, though he contends that the city has it under control. “We continue to see some of the highest volumes of permit applications we’ve ever seen. Since working our way out of the recession, we’ve continuously hired to keep pace with the permit

demand . . . [But] record permit volumes mean that in some cases, we might be delayed on our initial reviews by a couple weeks.” “The impact of that,” says Fox, “is to cause massive displacement and loss of low-income housing.”

“We’ve kind of gone back to the way that things were done previously, and lost a lot of the goodwill that was created.” What about the supply-and-demand argument that we need more development to avoid a seller’s market in which rents get bid upward? Fox thinks that market-driven development, even if it increases housing supply, will drive gentrification, replacing older affordable housing with newer expensive housing. He advocates for tough city regulations requiring developers to include guaranteed-affordable housing (essentially a stronger version of what Mayor Ed Murray has recently proposed), and more broadly supports a “poly-centered” approach that directs much of Seattle’s growth into surrounding cities. To many development advocates, this makes him a NIMBY, whether he likes it or not. Fox calls such advocates “neoliberal,” which is a red flag—a Marxist swear word that roughly translates to “evil capitalist.” And indeed Fox goes on to explicitly accuse densinistas of a “trickle-down—a kind of Reaganesque . . . economic analysis.” Failed Council candidate Bradburd uses “neoliberal” as well to describe his district’s victor, M. Lorena González. “I tried to

point out,” he tells me on election night, “that Lorena is on the neoliberal side, perhaps unwittingly, because of identity politics. That’s a tactic of neoliberalism, to use identity politics.” This is worth underscoring: When Bradburd and Fox look at a developer, they don’t see someone working to get the most use out of a property in a way that benefits everyone. Instead they see the One Percent squeezing the most profit out of the land in a way that is primarily self-serving. It’s a continuation, they say, of the deregulation and privatization that largely defined the Reagan era. This is part of why the debate over growth is so polarized: For Bradburd, Fox, and many others, the current wave of development in Seattle is part of a decades-long and international trend that amounts to an economic cleansing of poor people. Fox’s ally, attorney and policy analyst Toby Thaler, puts it this way: “The people with wealth who own the property in the cities, and the lenders and their surrounding architects, lawyers, [etc.], want to increase the value of that asset. And the way you increase the value of that asset is to bring in more people, upzone it, develop it, sell it, flip it. And this goes back to fundamental Marxist theory.” Neighborhood preservationists like Thaler and Fox are concerned that sunlight, smooth traffic, and the social capital of a neighborhood where everyone knows each other—all part of the “use value” of a less-developed Seattle, to use Marxist jargon—will be harvested by developers in the form of “exchange values” (that is, rent). For Fox & co., the process of development inexorably transforms publicly shared use values into privately owned and individually profitable exchange values—that is, revenue-generating rental properties. Thus, development doesn’t

imply production of affordable housing so much as it entails gifting much of Seattle’s shared public wealth to the highest-bidding profiteer. Valdez, the developer lobbyist, scoffs at this idea. “I think [Fox] has a ‘folkanomic’ view— this sort of folkloric view of economics,” he says. “That what happens is, you have seven or eight, or 70 or 80, units of affordable housing, and there’s these sort of salt-of-the-earth old fishermen living in [them]. And then this big, greedy developer from Tulsa, Oklahoma, comes in and buys the land and then throws all those people out and puts up a big fancy Escala-style tower. And it’s like, ‘John, that doesn’t happen. That’s a myth.’ ” The absence of growth in the 1970s didn’t

always translate into civic harmony. A city of hippies needs somewhere to focus its political energy, and it was into this context that Jim Diers entered one sunny day in the mid-’70s when he rode into Seattle in a tarnished orange VW station wagon. As economic activity began to ramp up at the end of the decade, he commenced to make a name for himself as your friendly neighborhood hell-raiser, organizing communities in the Rainier Valley and harassing elected officials who had turned a deaf ear to neighbors’ complaints. “We were pretty proud to be NIMBYs,” he says, “because we were fighting things like putting garbage incinerators in neighborhoods.” Out of that fight came Seattle’s citywide recycling program. By the ‘80s, he says, neighborhood organizers became concerned largely with the effects of growth on Seattle’s soul as development began to speed up. “We were always fighting these developments after the fact,” he says, “and we’d like to be more involved with the front end.”

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

9


Charles Royer, mayor of Seattle from 1978 to 1990, confirms this. “Going back into the late ’70s,” he says, “we started getting an uptick in the economy.” That led to condo development, a housing shortage, and a city mood much like today’s, he says. “There was a lot of unrest in the neighborhoods . . . Vacancy rates were low, rents were going up. Nothing like the scale of what is happening now, but for those times the money impact was just as great.”

10

Roger Valdez says preservationists are practicing folkonomics.

DANIEL BERMAN

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

“In the ’90s you saw neighborhood activists transform from anti-growth to ‘All right, as long as it’s coming, I want new sidewalks.’ ” Given the tension between the city and the neighborhoods, no one was more pleasantly surprised than Diers when, in 1988, Royer appointed him to head the newly minted Department of Neighborhoods. This was the same mayor, after all, whose house he’d picketed and into whose office he’d once thrown a live chicken to protest Royer’s housing policy. “It wasn’t just a chicken,” recalls Royer. “He brought a whole army of old people into the office right after I had built all this housing for the seniors in the city.” As the protesters waved a “Chicken Charlie” sign and the fowl crapped on the receptionist’s desk, the mayor thought to himself, This guy’s got something going. “So I hired him,” says Royer. “I’m sort of surprised that he came to work for me. He was very good at what he did. People trusted him, and he wanted to do more than just criticize or sit on the sideline. He wanted to create stuff.” Royer’s moves toward detente between the neighbors and the city government was continued by his successor Norm Rice, who, with Diers’ help, created the 1994 Comprehensive Plan. A masterpiece of statecraft, the Plan was the Magna Carta of Seattle densification, the road map that guided the city’s astounding growth over two decades. It demarcates 39 semi-autonomous “urban villages” that ultimately absorbed 75 percent of that period’s population growth. These villages were designed to be showroom models for the urbanist ecotopia of tomorrow: walkable mixed-use areas packed with people and amenities, a veritable city-as-buffet. But it also insulated single-family neighborhoods, which cover most of the city, from the biggest surges of development, because it funneled so much growth into urban villages like the University District, Ballard, and Capitol Hill. In this way, the Comp Plan tried and largely succeeded to have it both ways: lots of density in some areas and very little elsewhere. “When we first went through our first round of big growth planning in the ’90s,” says Valdez, who’s written voluminously about city land-use rules, “what the Rice administration did is it said, ‘Hey guys, neighborhoods, here’s the compromise: We’re going to take growth, but we’re only going to put it in urban villages, and we’re going to designate urban villages, draw a line around it, that’s where the growth’s going to go. And guess what? You guys get to decide what that growth looks like, to some degree, and in exchange you get infrastructure investment and amenities and good stuff.’ “And so what happened in the ’90s is you saw neighborhood activism transform from anti-growth, anti-Comp Plan, ‘We don’t want

anything, don’t change it’ to ‘All right, as long as it’s coming and you’re going to put it over there, I want new sidewalks, and I want the school to get better bus parking, and I want street trees, and I want a design-review regimen for whatever happens in the core.’ ” The plan wasn’t universally beloved. Resentment was strong enough to elect neighborhood activist Charlie Chong to the City Council, where he spent a little over a year. “Chong ran, essentially, against Norm Rice’s strategy for having urban villages,” says retiring Councilmember Nick Licata. Chong was a spiritual descendent of Emmett Watson, a devotee of the old Seattle that had worshipped neighborliness over business. Yet even as Chong was rabble-rousing, the 1990s were a decade of relative harmony between the neighborhoods and the city. With Diers in the Dept. of Neighborhoods, its fund to match community contributions to neighborhoodbased projects dollar-for-dollar ballooned from about $287,000 in 1989 to about $6 million in 2001 (in current dollars). Between 1988 and 2002, writes Diers in his book Neighbor Power, “Tens of thousands of [Seattleites] participated in implementing more than two thousand community self-help projects, such as building new parks and playgrounds, renovating community facilities, recording oral histories, and creating public art. Thirty thousand people guided the development on 37 neighborhood plans.” Then, in 2002, the detente collapsed. Mayor Greg Nickels fired Diers on his first day in office and planning edicts from on high became the norm, according to Valdez. “The good thing about Nickels was, if he said it was 85 feet, boom, [a developer is] getting 85 feet. And he’d cram it through the Council and he would make it happen,” he says. “I don’t think [the Nickels administration] took [the Comp Plan] very seriously. They were just, like, ‘We’re going to do South Lake Union.’ ” Neighbors who’d been lured into the sweaty crevices of the city’s planning bureaucracy retreated back into their warrens, alienated. Rice’s plan to concentrate density into urban villages continued, but the more basic project of grafting neighbors into the political process stalled. The emerald ship of Seattle sailed forward into a glittering, high-rise future, dragging a horde of bitter residents behind it. Royers agrees with this assessment, though Nickels himself calls it “simplistic and inaccurate.” Nickels describes his relationship with neighborhoods as an attempt to hear all stakeholders without getting mired in the mud of Seattle Process. “I felt that . . . there had been a political culture that had encouraged people to not necessarily act in good faith when they came to the table,” he says. “We’d gotten to the point where the last person to say ‘No’ effectively had a veto over anything happening. . . . We worked very closely with neighborhoods throughout the city, and I think it was a very positive relationship. Now, there are folks who simply opposed anything happening, that felt that change was threatening and undesirable and unacceptable, and those folks probably don’t have a lot of . . . nice things to say about my time as mayor. But for the most part, we worked very, very well.” Today, says Diers, “we’ve kind of gone back to the way that things that were done previously, and lost a lot of the goodwill that was created . . . The city really returned to more of a top-down way of doing its work, and when that happens, there’s a lot more distrust.” The result is a politics of antagonism, in which only the most dickish survive. Politicians recoil

from contentious public process, and thereby create the grumpy trolls who use public comment as an anger-therapy session. “Big mouths and small constituencies,” Diers calls it. Those constituencies led a number of City Council candidates to run on anti-developer platforms this fall. In the District 4 primary, Tony Provine told voters he’d “Save Our Neighborhoods,” while in the general election, District 6’s Catherine Weatbrook stoked residents’ anger about the placement of a homeless encampment in Ballard and promised to push for lower building height limits. But for many, Bill Bradburd was the new preservationist hope. Running on a campaign that promised to “Take Back Seattle!” from corporate interests, Bradburd initially filed with the intention of running against Sally Clark, who he thinks was too friendly to developers. When Clark left the Council for a job at the University of Washington, Bradburd found himself running against M. Lorena González, whose experience working as legal counsel in the mayor’s office made her, in his eyes, equally unaccountable to neighborhood priorities. Like virtually all preservationists, Bradburd rejects the label of “NIMBY,” saying that he just wants the city to be an impartial arbiter between developers and neighbors. And, to be fair, he doesn’t automatically reject whatever urbanists want: For instance, he supports loosening restrictions on the construction of backyard cottages in single-family neighborhoods. Still, Bradburd fits squarely within the broader definition of NIMBY, with his de facto opposition to development, his Marxist-like politics, and his emphasis on neighborhood sovereignty. During the campaign, he called for Seattle to be “governed as a city of neighborhoods,” and his videotaped voter’s-guide statement begins like this: Seattle is changing, and for many it is not changing for the better. Rapidly rising housing costs, traffic congestion, loss of familiar places and community because of gentrification. City Hall seems oblivious to communities’ concerns, and instead focuses on helping developers and corporations. But all that sound and fury, in Bradburd’s race and elsewhere, failed to translate into election results. Across the city, voters chose more development-friendly candidates to sit on next year’s City Council. Bradburd himself was trounced by a more-than-three-to-one margin by his mainstream progressive opponent. Local media proclaimed the election a victory for densinistas. “The biggest winners in Tuesday’s election appear to be urbanists,” wrote Daniel Beekman of The Seattle Times. Yet on the evening of his defeat, Bradburd was undeterred. At his election party in his Central District home, he wasn’t weeping or snarling into a bottle. His attitude hadn’t changed any more than his trademark gray chin-beard. He was the same as he had been on the campaign trail: wonky, intense, affable, voluble. “Josh [Feit, of PubliCola] is trying to frame [the election results] like, ‘Oh, the neighborhoods are dead,’ ” Bradburd says. “And I don’t think that’s the case.” For Bradburd, this year’s election has just been one more battle in a war that’s far from over. During his campaign’s wake, Bradburd could be heard talking shop with Josh Farris, a kindred radical who ran and lost in the District 2 primary election. As Farris was leaving, he turned and shook Bradburd’s hand. “I’m good at yelling at City Council,” he said. “Let’s work together.” E

cjaywork@seattleweekly.com


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food&drink

Deep-Dish Dude

A young techie from Chicago leaves the biz to make pizzas that Seattleites are swooning over. BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

A

After that, he went to Spain for another study-

David Lichterman of Windy City Pie in Seattle.

own. Even with all the toppings, the crust should be able to support its weight.” He didn’t go the food-truck route, but was making pizzas from his own kitchen. Things were going well, but his big break came two months ago when he read a blog post from one of his alltime favorite food writers: J. Kenji LÓpez-Alt at Serious Eats. In the post, LÓpez-Alt railed against Chicago deep-dish pizza. “He was shit-talking about deep-dish, and I was like, ‘Hey there, buddy, I love your writing, but please don’t do me like that,’ ” Lichterman recalls. “I was, like, ‘Some of it’s good,’ and he was, like, ‘No,’ and then he posted a recipe of him trying to make it using a cast-iron pan. I told him that’s a myth—and other stuff, like how you’re not actually supposed to use cornmeal because it makes the crust bitter.” After “educating” LÓpez-Alt on the many nuances of making good deep-dish pizza, the jaded writer told Lichterman via Twitter that he’d soon be in Seattle on a book tour for The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science and was free on September 27. “So it was, like, am I going to be making my hero pizza? If so, I need to get into a real kitchen, because if he likes it, this is going to blow up.” Lichterman located a commissary kitchen in SoDo where he could make a serious pie and prepared for LÓpez-Alt’s arrival. Though he’d been making pizzas for his pals for so long, he’d never made them for a stranger, particularly one with a pedigreed food background.

“Kenji came out, he tried it, and tweeted that ‘This Chicago-style pizza from @windycitypie proves that Chicago naysayers just haven’t tasted enough. It is amazing.’ I went to my parents and cried.” Lichterman isn’t crying now, though—he doesn’t have time to. After leaving the startup, he now makes about 17 pizzas a day, seven days a week, completely on his own. He makes all the deliveries too, though he just hired his first employee. The commissary kitchen even paid to get him a pizza oven. He’s spent exactly $20 on advertising, to boost LÓpez-Alt’s post about his pizza on Facebook. “People I don’t even know are writing to tell me how much they love my pizza,” he says. “I got an order from Brian Tatman of Tat’s Deli, and he was, like, ‘You’re doing a great job,’ and I’ve been eating Tat’s deli sandwiches forever, so I’m like, ‘It was an honor to cook for you, man. Most of my digestive system is made up of food from you!’ ” So by now you’re likely wondering what exactly makes this pizza so coveted. After having three varieties delivered to Seattle Weekly’s offices—a veggie pie, the “Meatza,” and the “Hot Island”—it’s clear that the caramelized-cheese edge is what really stands out. Lichterman is quick to tell me that he took that from Burt Katz, formerly of Pequod’s pizza in Morton Grove, Ill., but more notably of Burt’s Place—a beloved, but recently closed, deep-dish hole in the wall he later owned

with his wife there. “They had this place where you’d order a day ahead of time, cash only, unlisted number . . . and then Anthony Bourdain ate there.” You can guess the effect that had on the business. “On my Windy City Pie site [windycitypie. com], “I gave a little tribute to Burt when I found out he retired. He developed this thing that I’m clearly taking. One of the things about cooking is that imitation is the best compliment. It’s sort of the same as open-source code . . . that’s a great idea and I’m going to do it too.” There’s also the dough—enriched, spongier, and sweet, which he says he learned from his old college haunt, Papa Del’s. It’s also a rather civil deepdish—not three inches thick and oozing cheese, which makes it less greasy and allows the flavors of the sauce and the toppings, like housemade sausage, to flood your taste buds. “Of the sausage Lichterman says, “It’s more garlicky, not fennelbased.” On the “Hot Island,” it makes a tasty foursome with jalapeños, pineapple, and garlic that’s roasted for five hours in olive oil. “I’m making my own pizza, and taking cues from pizzas I’ve loved throughout my 30 years. I always wanted to do something meaningful. I have no idea what the purpose of life is, but this feels right. Open-source software was really important to me too, but take me back 10 years and I never would have imagined that I’d be making people happy.” E nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

abroad program, and made more pizza there before heading home to finish his degree in computer engineering at the University of Illinois and being recruited by Amazon, which brought him to Seattle in 2007. After a few all-consuming years at Amazon, he went to a startup, started moonlighting as a band photographer for KEXP, and returned to making pies. It wasn’t long before he started feeling antsy at his job and thought about opening his own pizza place. But he was hesitant. “People had been telling me for years to open a restaurant, but I know that’s like throwing all your money in a fire,” Lichterman says now. “But then someone mentioned a pizza truck, and there’s this false perception that that’s easier, and I was like, ‘Oh shit. I can do that.’ So I held these tastetesting parties to find out what variation of crust was best. And then this thing got started. But the job was still paying me to show up, and though I wasn’t happy, I knew about opportunity costs. So I kept it quiet from my work friends.” By this point, Lichterman had read Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice inside and out, and was fed up with the lack of good deep-dish pies in Seattle. “What always bothered me about Seattle [deep-dish] pizza was by the time you get it home, you might as have well have dipped it in oil,” he says. ”It’s falling apart. It should hold its

MORGEN SCHULER

rgentina is hardly known for its pizza. Yet that’s where this story about the best deep-dish pie in Seattle begins. It was in the midst of a 2005 teachers’ strike, and David Lichterman, a Chicago native studying abroad, had some time on his hands in the backwater town of Santa Fe, Argentina. “They told me ‘Don’t go anywhere, this happens all the time,’ ” Lichterman recalls. “But they stayed on strike for a whole month. I was like, ‘Fuck this, so what do I do in this town?’ ” Though he grew up in Chicago, Lichterman says he wasn’t obsessed with deep-dish pizza. He enjoyed a slice as much as the next Chicagoan, but it never crossed his mind to make his own until he was deprived of it. “The pizza was so terrible,” he recalls. “They were using queso cremoso, this cheap, gross mozzarella, and premade doughs.” Inspired in part by the phenomenal pies he’d had at Papa Del’s in Champaign, Ill., as a college student, he went to Walmart to get real mozzarella—“I know, weird, right?”—and started making pizzas for his friends abroad, baking them in a corner convenience store thanks to the kindness of its owners. “I had no idea what I was doing, but it went over well. Bush was coming to Argentina, and I’m like, ‘I hate that guy,’ so I made a pizza and went with the Communist Party to protest him. I didn’t get many college credits that semester, but who cares?” Without anyone there to learn from, Lichterman looked at recipes as a starting point. “A lot of it is reading what people have tried . . . through the magic of Google and some message boards. From there, you make your own changes, and some of my initial changes were terrible, but I was having a blast.”

13


food&drink

Slurping With Significance On the Wing Luke Museum’s new noodle tours. BY JAY FRIEDMAN

JAY FRIEDMAN

One of many bowls on the tour.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

A

14

t the corner of Eighth Avenue South and South King Street, across from the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, sits a nondescript, sparse-looking store that some might call uninviting. But take one of Wing Luke’s latest culinary tours (they’ve previously done Asian sweets) and you’ll learn that inside is the production and sale of one of the ChinatownInternational District’s most essential ingredients. It’s not the fortune cookies. Tsue Chong is the first stop on the Twilight Noodle Slurp tour, which debuted last week. The tours are one way that Wing Luke achieves its mission “to connect everyone to the rich history, dynamic cultures, and art of the Asian Pacific Americans through vivid storytelling and inspiring experiences.” And Tsue Chong has quite a story: It’s a fourth-generation noodle-making business that will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2017. While most sales are to area restaurants, the general public can come in and purchase their fresh or dry Rose Brand noodles as well. After a visit to Tsue Chong whets your noodle appetite, the three-hour tour makes several stops for actual slurping. The chosen restaurants, like the noodles themselves, reflect some of the ID’s diversity. Tour participants gain insight into the area’s history while learning to navigate the streets and getting tips on other places to eat. Tour manager Doan Nguyen said one of the tour’s goals is to make the ID less intimidating, noting, “You can walk down King Street alone and find tons of noodle-eating options.” Even ordering can be overwhelming. Take, for example, the tour’s first stop, Gourmet Noodle Bowl: The menu lists 31 noodle dishes, all with little explanation beyond the name. We tried “N31”—the shrimp spicy fried noodles, with the noodles wide and chewy. But from my experience at Gourmet Noodle Bowl, almost any choice would be a winner. The staff rightly takes pride in their product, taking time to explain noodle choices to encourage me to try something new. The takeaway: Ask for help at these restaurants, and while language might be a barrier, the workers

really want to ensure that you enjoy your meal. Another stop is the new Dong Thap Noodles in Little Saigon for a taste of bún bò Hue, a spicy Vietnamese noodle soup. “Noodles” should be highlighted in the name because they’re actually making their own onsite. Tapping into husband Nick Bui’s noodle-making roots, owner Khanh Van Tran explains, “I don’t like to buy packaged food for my kids . . . I’d rather make things fresh. We make our own noodles here, and I know everything that’s in them.” The noodles are indeed the highlight, soft and slippery yet slightly chewy. Another thing that makes Dong Thap special: You can order pho with a choice of two noodles. Older Vietnamese are very excited to see bánh pho lon, as the wide flat noodles are quite traditional and hard to find locally. More noodles follow, making for a filling evening. The final tour stop is Phnom Penh, another place with a fascinating story. We tried a traditional Chinese-Cambodian dish called mee katang. Sampled here with crispy egg noodles— though even better with chow fun rice noodles— this stir-fry is a popular dish eaten any time of day, quick, easy, and satisfying. We also learned about chef/owner Sam Ung, whose memoir, I Survived the Killing Fields: The True Life Story of a Cambodian Refugee, tells of fleeing the Khmer Rouge and coming to America in 1980. Starting from scratch with a family to raise, Ung worked in area restaurants, saving money to open his own place in 1987. Phnom Penh started by serving just seven types of noodle bowls, laying the foundation for expansion and the success it now enjoys nearly 30 years later. Which brings me back to Tsue Chong. The name means “gather prosperity.” For Asian people, the often-humble noodle is an inexpensive way to satisfy hunger, while also symbolizing longevity. For professionals in the ID, it’s been a way to thrive and flourish—to find fortune. For this, we’re all fortunate. E

food@seattleweekly.com

The remaining Twilight Noodle Slurp tours will be Nov. 20, Dec. 4, and Dec. 18. $25.95–$42.95. Sign up at wingluke.org/tours or 623-5124.


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Jimi Hendrix: I was transported into a warm purple room. Inside, sitting on a black leather sofa, was Jimi Hendrix. “But you’re dead,” I say. He is holding a bottle of Black Raven porter. He pulls another from a six-pack and offers it to me. I sit down. He summons an acoustic guitar from behind the sofa and begins playing the blues, his bottle floating midair. “My baby, oh, she shot me down,” he sings, his voice bending. “Yes, I said, ‘My baby, well, she shot me down’! But I ain’t gone for good, no. You jus’ can’t keep me down!” He finishes his song. I ask him if he misses home. He takes another sip of beer and is quiet. We sit there for what seems like three hours before he speaks again. “I don’t,” he said. “I know exactly where it is.” Ann and Nancy Wilson: “You’re Heart!” I say. The three of us are in the Sorrento Hotel sitting at a table for dinner. At 65 and 61, Ann and Nancy Wilson are still quite beautiful. Their hazel and green eyes stun me, and I don’t know what else to say. Ann smiles and takes a menu. She’s drinking Odin Ruby Ale, which makes my heart beat even faster. Nancy sips a Boundary Bay IPA. Nancy gets to telling the waiter about the time she was lost in Everett trying to meet Lynda Carter for a game of quarters. When he leaves, I ask them if they keep up with local music. “Some,” Ann says. I ask them what they think of it. “We like it,” Nancy says. “There’s a lot to like. Tacocat, La Luz, those ladies are great! Sisters are fabulous.” “Is there anything the city could be doing better?” I ask. “Anything?” “Stop asking questions,” Ann says. “Let’s have another beer.” E

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he best part about drinking beer is drinking it with interesting people. Sometimes you get lucky and are able to have pints with someone like Sir Mix-A-Lot, which I did at a Bellevue steakhouse one evening last year. Other times you have to imagine what it would be like to drink with your heroes . . . here’s how that went down in my own beer-fogged brain. Ken Griffey Jr.: The sun is shining through the roof of King’s Hardware. It’s Monday afternoon and two guys with backwards hats are playing skeeball inside. Ken Griffey Jr. and I have been day-drinking all afternoon, talking about baseball, basketball, and his favorite movie, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. When the waiter brings our fifth round of Georgetown Lucille’s, I finally have the courage to ask him what I’ve always wanted to: if he regrets leaving Seattle for the Cincinnati Reds in 2000. For most of the day, he’s been laughing, smiling, his big, beautiful brown eyes shining. But his eyelids sink a fraction now. He looks at the table, and then leans in and says something I’ll never forget: “You know, Michael Jordan had to leave Chicago and Hemingway had to leave America,” he whispers. “Leaving where you’re most welcome becomes the most important thing in a man’s life.” He leans back; the light comes over his face again. He drinks a third of his beer. “Hey,” he says. “Wanna get outta here? Let’s see who’s playing the Tractor!” Bill Gates and Paul Allen: The funny thing is there’s a bar in Gates’ house. It’s where he and Allen drink when the two are in town and want to have a draught beer. Gates has his own bartender, too. His bartender, it turns out, is tipped very well. Gates drinks Chuckanut Vienna Lagers and Allen drinks Maritime Nightwatch. There’s also a bottle of whiskey. I order a shot and take it, slamming the glass down. I ask them, “What do you think of Jeff Bezos?” They immediately burst out in laughter. “Hack!” Gates laughs. “Lunatic!” Allen says, wiping away a tear. “But,” I continue, “don’t you care he’s ruining Seattle? That he takes no care with his overworked employees and doesn’t give a shit about the living situation of Seattleites? Couldn’t you both do something about it?” Gates’ bartender gives me a look as if to say What are you doing? Allen puts his glass to his lips and finishes his ale. “We’re in this for the long haul,” he says, monotone. “The long haul,” Gates affirms. And both order another round.

15


11/20

ROBERT DELONG

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KARL DENSON’S TINY CHRIS STAPLETON UNIVERSE +NICKI BLUHM with THE WALCOTTS

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

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arts&culture

CONVERSATION18 COMIX19 REVIEWS23 CALENDAR26

F

Appleby (and Seattle n h o a an J pping the acoustic gu t larg Bry is dro e) itar . Y Y DUST HENRY B

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

BRENNAN MORING

our years ago, singer/songwriter Bryan John Appleby released his solo debut Fire on the Vine. It was right at the peak of Seattle’s folk-rock scene, as The Head and the Heart began to dominate airwaves and the Conor Byrne open mic became a hot spot for aspiring acoustic troubadours. After touring relentlessly behind the record, Appleby holed himself away to focus on his much anticipated follow-up, The Narrow Valley, out this Friday. “I kind of put my head in a hole, which I don’t recommend,” Appleby laughs. “It was OK . . . it was part of what I needed to do at the time. I feel like I buried myself. When I came back out I just noticed, ‘Oh, this is a lot different out here.’ ” In Appleby’s eyes, the foot-stomping, strippeddown scene that helped bolster his career had faded away. Instead of being distraught, he saw it as a welcome relief. Folk wasn’t even Appleby’s first musical language. Growing up in Aromas, Calif., his earliest projects leaned more toward punk acts like Jimmy Eat World and Deftones. When he moved to Seattle in 2007, it was to drum for an indie-rock group. When that project didn’t pan out, he decided he wanted to have total control over his next effort. This meant leaving the drums behind and picking up the guitar. Appleby wasn’t exposed to much folk back in California, but in Seattle he found himself surrounded by it. As records by Fleet Foxes, the Shins, Damien Jurado and Sera Cahoone became the new Northwest standard, acoustic guitars suddenly took on new precedence in his mind. He took this time to go back and listen to the classics he’d never delved into deeply—Bob Dylan, Donovan, and Neil Young. These artists informed his styling as he learned guitar. Appleby quickly rose to prominence in this new folk-driven scene, gaining a reputation for his graceful and evocative voice through open mics and living-room shows. It wasn’t long before he was adopted into the scene, thanks in part to its familial culture. Artists of the era would routinely jump onstage during another songwriter’s performance to sing harmonies or stomp along— a loose, collaborative spirit that became a trademark of the Doe Bay Festival, which incubated and nurtured the scene. Soon Appleby found himself touring with The Head and the Heart and attending private parties with Dave Matthews. But despite all the success he and the artists around him were experiencing, something bothered him about the scene. “On the one hand, you have the support of a community that is very tightknit and people are paying attention to each other and supporting each other. But then on the other hand, [you have] some of that insular aspect to a community—especially when it’s built around a certain flavor or genre or sound [that], at times, can flip and feel like a club,” he says. While Appleby appreciated the energy, he felt it could be more inclusive. So when he re-emerged from his semimusical exile this year, he was pleased to see the scene had opened up to new genres. “There’s two ways to go right now,” he explains. “You can either go the way of the expected formula, or you can follow curiosity and be excited about where that may take you. All those bands that I’m into in Seattle right now, I think they’re doing the latter, and I think that’s exciting.”

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 17


conversation

Efficiency Experts The decommissioned old Georgetown Steam Plant becomes a performance venue, as the artists explain.

BY MARA SILVERS

D

ancer/choreographers Tia Kramer and Tamin Totzke have created a site-specific performance series, called connect/reposition , in the historic 1906 Georgetown Steam Plant, part of a broader project titled “The Study of Time and Motion.” This notion is inspired by the early-20th-century engineers and management consultants Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, who identified 18 gestures of efficiency and inefficiency. Following a long-form staging last month in the dormant city-owned plant, Kramer and Totzke will be joined by five other performers in this weekend’s concluding performances.

body moves us forward”?

SW: What’s the significance of the Gilbreths’ 18 gestures? And how do they relate to the steam plant?

What’s the meaning of your motto “How the

Bryan John Appleby The timing couldn’t have worked out better for

Appleby’s re-emergence. The scene’s transition mirrored his own as he started putting aside sparse, folky arrangements in favor of pop guitar hooks and sweeping orchestral suites. “I have a hard time knowing if I happened to be going through changes and the city independently and simultaneously did [too],” he says, questioning whether he was just projecting his own evolution onto the city. Within the scene 18 itself, there’s been a precedent for moves like

GENEVIEVE PIERSON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

» FROM PAGE 17

What have you and your team learned during the creative process?

Totzke: The site becomes a collaborator. We couldn’t make material outside of the steam plant—all the movement material, text, and imagery had to be created during the limited time we had inside the steam plant. [We kept] listening to the work, and to the plant, and it came together.

Totzke: In a world that pushes technical advancement, let’s not lose sight that the body, human beings, move us forward. The human body with its innate intuition, the need to connect to others, gut instinct, and organic intelligence, are really how we move forward. It’s through connecting, conversing, and What exactly are we going working together that the world to see this progresses. The credit is misplaced weekend? 6605 13th Ave. S., to only praise technology in its Kramer: A small studytimeandmotion. advancement. group of audience memcom. $15–$20. 7 p.m. Kramer: We do so much work bers will be led through Fri., 4 & 7 p.m. Sat., that is intellectual, but inherently the plant on a tour. There 1 & 4 p.m. Sun. we’re all bodies. That makes [Frank will be a number of stops and Lillian’s research] very timeless. along the way, describing the history of the plant. The The steam plant closed in the ’70s, performance will be integrated into after 20 years of limited use, though it’s still the tour. open for public tours. How did that bear upon your thinking?

Totzke: The steam plant . . . is where we learned about the nature of task-oriented gestures. We also researched thoughts regarding “body as machine, machine as body,” relating the structural anatomy of the plant to the structural anatomy of the human skeleton. The body also became the translator to converse with the palpable historical presence alive in the plant. Appleby’s. Eric Anderson bolstered Cataldo’s sound from somber finger-picking to big drums and clunky, vibrant piano chords. Campfire OK made a clean break from their folk past, changing their name to The Weather and trading their banjos and hand claps for Telecasters and synthesizers. The Head and the Heart even started implementing electric guitars on its sophomore album, Let’s Be Still. Perhaps most telling of the shift in tone were the icons of Seattle folk themselves: Fleet Foxes. Since they announced an indefinite hiatus in 2012, the band’s members have split in polarizing directions. Bassist Christian Wargo and keyboardist Casey Wescott stayed in their folk ways with Poor Moon. Drummer Josh Tillman, meanwhile, reinvented himself as snarky crooner Father John Misty—rarely performing with an acoustic guitar and instead evoking Tom Jones on stage. Frontman Robin Pecknold has remained fairly quiet over the years, yet in a rare public appearance on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon in 2013, he re-emerged (sans beard) to cover Pearl Jam’s “Corduroy” on a Gibson Les Paul. All this makes Appleby’s own shift seem not like a fluke, but like another piece of evidence for an overall evolution in the Seattle scene. Each act had its own reasons for splitting from the sound that originally got it attention, but often, it came down to the artists’ desires to be truer to their influences and whims. With a multitude of examples to pull from, Appleby singles out Jurado as a particular inspiration for his own evolution. Jurado, who has been performing and releasing music as a solo act since the late ’90s, was a harbinger of this movement-

Have you previously worked in such a big old historical structure?

Totzke: I’ve always been drawn to site-specific work, creating work in warehouse spaces, alleyways, and galleries, but never have had such an amazing opportunity to make work in an epic industrial site, rich with a palpable history. E

arts@seattleweekly.com

from-the-movement. Appleby says he’s been taking cues from Jurado’s career, in particular drawing comparisons to Jurado’s sonic leap from 2010’s Saint Bartlett to 2012’s psych-odyssey Maraqopa. During Jurado’s press tour for the latter record, Appleby recalls hearing his frustrations over being lumped in with contemporary singer/songwriters when he identified more ‘60s garage rockers. “Hearing him say that several years ago was kind of like, ‘Oh, follow the thing you’re curious about, not the thing you happen to be associated with.’ If you try and follow the trend that you’re aligned with, it’ll get really boring really quick,” Appleby recalls. But it wasn’t just the scene and the limitations of fixing to a genre that prompted Appleby to take a turn with his music. Aside from having a wealth of influences to draw on, like Brian Wilson’s landmark SMiLE and Disney’s early cinematic aesthetics, he also needed to take a step away from the brooding tone of Fire on the Vine. While he’s still proud of the songs on that record, playing them every night became a bit emotionally taxing. “I mean, that’s my record where I’m breaking up with the idea of God,” he says. “It’s just a really intense place to be. It’s one thing to say it once and then walk away, and it’s another thing to try and conjure that for years. So I do think I did have a little bit of a, like, ‘Man, it’d be such a relief to do something that was playful and light and fun. A little less brooding.’ ” Appleby started to work on demos in this direction, which have never been in line with the typically sparse solo recordings many artists use to flesh out songs. Most of his work begins on his computer as he builds out arrangements for strings and pianos. For Appleby, it’s all about

Aaron Swartzman performing in connect/reposition.

establishing a larger sonic vision. While relistening to one of the songs from a batch of demos, it struck Appleby as sounding like an earthquake, which inspired the concept of The Narrow Valley. “The whole thing opens up with this earthquake running through a small, coastal California town,” he says. “A small, kind of isolated town and a few different characters that happened to be living in that town and what happened to them. It kind of rewinds, and the bulk of the record after that [are] little episodes before that earthquake hit.” On paper, an earthquake splitting through a small town may not sound any less harrowing than his previous work, but on the record it flourishes brightly and enthusiastically. Producer Sam Anderson, who also plays cello in Hey Marseilles, helped flesh out Appleby’s sketches with horns and strings. The record plays out like a movie, nodding to classics like East of Eden. It’s tonally opposite from the darker Fire on the Vine, and hopeful despite the underlying mass destruction. Acoustic guitars do show up, but they sound nothing like what would’ve been echoing down Ballard Avenue a few years ago. It’s ambitious and imbued with pop revelry; Appleby jokingly refers to it as “Jacuzzi pop.” Though fan response has been mostly positive, Appleby says he was writing the record with only a few friends in mind. Those friends like the album, and so does he. “It’s no longer trying to appease the masses, no matter how supportive they may be,” Appleby says. “In other words, I feel OK if other people hate it because my audience for this was so narrow.” E

music@seattleweekly.com

BRUCE CLAYTON TOM

Kramer: The plant was designed by Frank Gilbreth and built between 1906–1907. The Gilbreths . . . broke down all human motion to 18 gestures. The work that Frank and Lillian did was about the human body. Those gestures are inherently bound—they cannot be taken away from one another. For example, reach and grasp. [All of this] originated with Frank and Lillian—what role does the human body have to efficiency?

Kramer: You sense an emptiness at the plant. It’s a monument to a really fleeting moment in time and in history.


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19


electric eye

Decade of Dance

Karl Kamakahi celebrates 10 years of sweaty rooms.

D

e La Creme Soundsystem got its start with a little serendipity 10 years ago when Karl Kamakahi dropped his demo at Trinity. To test a new sound system at the Pioneer Square club, the staff gave the disc a spin, and the club’s booking manager swooned for Kamakahi’s classic sound. Soon he was playing the main room, and his electronic-music-event production company was born. Since then, DLC has been responsible for parties like Proper and Soft Option—and the one that filled Monkey Loft last Friday. To celebrate the company’s 10th anniversary, Kamakahi assembled all the DLC resident DJs, including Hyasynth, DJ Robby Clark, Mister Smith, Jason Curtis, Xan Lucero, Jai Soleil, Brian Spiker, and the latest addition to the roster, DJ Dave Lowe. Kamakahi, left, even pitched in to rock a sweaty room of loyal fans until the wee hours.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

PHOTOS AND TEXT BY BROOKLYN BENJESTORF

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A curated cold-weather heartbreak jam playlist.

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“Song Cry” Jay Z “Ex-Factor” Lauryn Hill “Heartless” Kanye West I have to give the

crown to Ye for making an entire heartbreak album. The record was brilliant and completely slept on due to the widespread hatred of AutoTune. We love and hate Kanye for his rants, which he refers to as motivational speeches. His ability to capture humanity through music shines bright through this song. “Roses” Outkast “Find Out [of Light]” Shabazz Palaces A very personal song reminiscent of “She’s Out of My Life.” As the bass thumps, it matches the feeling of someone slipping away from you. I remember covering this song back in 2011 being young and not truly knowing the effects of losing the one you love. It now resonates to its fullest potential. “Blue Girl” Q-Tip “U R the One” Mos Def “Bye Baby” Nas Nas and Kelis’ breakup was felt by all the heads. We loved seeing them together, they made a cute kid and some interesting music, and my guy even got a picture of her tattooed on him. All of Life Is Good plays like a long love letter to get her back. “Bye Baby” samples and features Aaron Hall, who is/was the leader of the “Baby, I’m begging” movement of ’90s R&B. I loved the nostalgia, and I loved hearing all the ins and outs of their relationship. A peek into how difficult it is for two artists to be together. “Pills N Potions” Nicki Minaj “Comfortable” Lil Wayne “Pullin’ Me Back” Chingy “Ex Girl to Next Girl” Gang Starr “Compromise” MoRuf A beautiful song dedicated to the balance of his two lovers: music and boo thang. My favorite line on this painfully real tune is “A lot of places that I gots to see/I wanna see you happy even if it’s not with me.” I don’t think I’d ever be able to say that to one of my exes, so I admire Moruf for his huge heart. “Passin’ Me By” The Pharcyde “Ms. Jackson” Outkast E

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he temperature is cascading down to the low 40s, pumpkin spice and eggnog flavors are being integrated, and flaking on your friends on a Friday is high-key likely. Some like to call this time fall and winter, but more important, it’s Cuffin’ Season. When you do find that special person to share blankets with you, keep in mind that there are folks out there who aren’t so lucky. There are people making that lonely drive down Lake Washington Boulevard, wishing bae wasn’t a bag of Tim’s Jalapeño Chips. The uncuffed are scrambling to figure out why it didn’t last. During times of relationship-related grieving, I love to play the saddest music I can find. It usually tends to be R&B or soul jams, but I wanted to challenge myself to find some great sentimental heartbreak hip-hop. Sure, there’s the IDFWYstyle breakup, songs, but I’m more interested in finding something with vulnerability and honesty. In that light, here’s a playlist to help the un-cuffed heal now that it’s colder outside: “Marvin’s Room” Drake The first rapper that comes to mind when I think of fragile emotions is the love warrior, Drake. But let’s dig deeper since we can’t escape the brainwashing catchiness of “Hotline Bling.” Before Drake was worrying about a phone call, there was Ja Rule screaming to the heavens, “WHERE WOULD I BE WITHOUT MY BABY?” Ja often escapes our psyche because of 50 Cent’s successful bullying campaign to destroy him, but I never forgot about my guy and how big his heart was. He even gave us the song “I Cry”, which forced us to kill the notion that thugs don’t have feelings. “I Cry” Ja Rule “One Love” Whodini “Teenage Love” Slick Rick “I Need Love” LL Cool J Teardrops made his eyes burn. This was one of the first hip-hop songs that made me feel like a special little lady. LL sounds super-sentimental, and goes into detail about what he had and how much he misses the feeling. “I Used to Love H.E.R” Common “Fall in Love” J. Dilla

(11/12) Forterra: ‘Ampersand’ Live

21


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reviews

FILM

Opening Friday

This Director for Hire

East Side Sushi Uplift, Thickly Sliced

Forbidden to make movies, Iran’s Jafar Panahi films covertly in a taxi cab. BY BRIAN MILLER

BLUE SUN PICTURES

Torres and Takeuchi share a toast.

East Side Sushi respects restaurant protocols, even while lapsing into sunny montages of Oakland’s multicultural mosaic. Yes, this may be a wonderful and diverse place to live, but it’s screen time that would’ve been better spent on the specifics of kitchen and character. The film actually improves at the end, with Juana on a crass reality TV show, where the most garish and commercial sushi creation naturally wins. East Side Sushi has much more integrity, if not so finely sliced. Note: Lucero will appear with his film Friday at Sundance and Saturday at the Ark Lodge. (Not rated, 107 min.) BRIAN MILLER

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

Each vignette has a satirical or political bite. exists only in secret (and in such samizdat art). Panahi is essentially creating a backseat microThis is the Persian Spring of Panahi’s imaginacosm for the democracy denied Iran; anything tion—and likely millions of others’—where free goes in his cab, where complaint is the dominant speech reigns. form of expression. “So applying Sharia law Eventually Panahi picks up his 11-year-old solves all our problems?” a female schoolteacher niece, Taxi ’s truth-teller. As with The White demands of a boorish fellow passenger. He’s Balloon (and the work of Kiarostami and no devout Muslim with a prayer bump on his Mohsen Makhmalbaf ), children are given forehead; he’s just a run-of-the-mill sexist thug license to speak with candor. Hana is hip to her who finds the Koran a useful means of putting uncle’s career troubles and the charges brought women in their place. Panahi—as actor playing against him. She understands censorship, what’s Panahi, whose cover will soon be blown—doesn’t “un-distributable,” iPhones, and frappuccinos. interject himself into this lively debate. He smiles And implicitly she’s the future of Iran. Later bemusedly like a playwright watching rehearsals, comes a vivacious, red-haired human-rights as his characters gradually come to life. lawyer, a total star turn for Nasrin Sotoudeh Suddenly the taxi is commandeered (essentially playing herself ), who also as an ambulance! The traffic-accident knows what it’s like to be arrested victim demands that his last will and reviled. They laugh about Northwest and testament be videotaped, so Panahi’s new project (everyone’s Film Forum that his wife can inherit his propaware of his cameras). “You’ll be 1515 12th Ave., 267-5380, erty. (Islamic law might dictate accused of ‘sordid realism’!” she nwfilmforum.org. $6–$11. scolds him. Of necessity, Taxi otherwise.) A shy bootleg-video Runs Fri.–Thurs. merchant recognizes Panahi and does become somewhat selfeagerly discusses favorite films and referential to Panahi’s present woes recommendations. (From The Walkand past career. It helps to know his ing Dead to Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Panahi politics and prior movies; there’s even a evinces no snobby disapproval: “I think all mov- goldfish bowl, that symbol of confinement and ies are worth watching.”) Movie-mad Omid, beauty, from The White Balloon. as he’s called, typifies Iran’s secret satellite-dish Both defiant and intimate, Taxi depicts connection to the West. Of the clients for his Panahi less as a brave dissident hero than as pirated DVDs, he says, “Without me, no more a kind of cheerful, humble facilitator—a goWoody Allen.” He geeks out on Panahi the way between. He and his cab become the vehicle for a fanboy would with Tarantino on the sidewalk Iranian self-expression, not his. Although the outside the New Beverly Cinema. abrupt ending suggests how the government is still watching him, Taxi is perhaps the most ingeniously optimistic movie I’ve seen this year. In this safe, private bubble—recognizable to It also reminds me of the current Room, another anyone here who rides via cab, Lyft, or Uber— instance of extreme captivity where the only these ordinary Iranians can say what they response is imagination. Both films make our like, criticize whom they like, without fear of world a bigger place. E censure or arrest. It’s the unfettered world that Panahi and Iranian liberals want, but which bmiller@seattleweekly.com

KINO LORBER

E

very director has complaints. Not enough budget in the indies, trailer too small on Hollywood shoots. And what if the runway at Telluride is too short for your private jet? Mean reviews? Boo-fucking-hoo. Then there’s the case of dissident Iranian director Jafar Panahi, who broke through here with 1995’s charming childhood parable The White Balloon. Later came pictures more pointedly critical of the Iranian regime, like The Circle and Offside, about thwarted women’s rights, and Crimson Gold, about a doomed pair of petty criminals. At a certain point, the government banned his films at home—making him even more the darling on the international festival circuit. Then came jail, passport seizure, and a 2010 order not to make movies for 20 years. Yet courageously, this important film artist has continued his craft on the sly. This Is Not a Film documented his recent legal ordeal. Closed Curtain was more allegorical, though also shot entirely indoors, veiled from official minders. Taxi is a different animal. Panahi is now evidently on a looser government leash, able to drive around Tehran, keeping his cameras hidden. In a manner familiar from HBO’s Taxicab Confessions, he films himself, his passengers, and the surrounding streets. (The driving-and-filming style of past colleague Abbas Kiarostami is also surely an influence.) Because the whole enterprise is illegal, there are no credits for his collaborators. In outline Taxi is a near-random series of encounters between strangers, a structure also employed in The Circle. The scene demarcations are admirably clear: passenger gets in, chats with Panahi, and gets out. Then it’s on to the next fare. Remember, however, that what we’re watching is scripted, not a documentary. And Panahi’s performers are all amateurs (making the movie seem more doc-like in its texture), since any professional participating in the project would risk losing his or her vocation.

Panahi at the wheel.

The culinary quest for perfection, as we see in Burnt, is the enemy of good mental health and sound social behavior. Bradley Cooper’s hotshot London chef struggles for redemption, overcoming all the usual obstacles and addictions before finding inner peace (and a third Michelin star). It’s entirely formulaic, as is the aspirational kitchen melodrama East Side Sushi, which works in the opposite direction. Oakland single mother Juana (Diana Elizabeth Torres) tries to raise herself up from the working poor, trading her mastery of Mexican comfort food for the prep counter in the back of a strict, traditionalist sushi bar. Up front, mingling with the customers and reaping big tips, are the star sushi chefs—led by friendly Aki (Yutaka Takeuchi). Need I even bother pretending we don’t know where Juana will end up in this movie? So while it’s entirely predictable, full of follow-your-dreams sentiment, Anthony Lucero’s sincere little indie does provide an exemplary heroine. Juana is a steadfast class jumper who refused to be pigeonholed as just another Latina. She’s a striver—aided by her kindly widowed father, immigration status never mentioned—who sends her daughter to parochial school. And she’s battling the sexism of her new trade, delivering one angry speech about all American restaurants keeping “Latinos in the back, in the kitchen, hidden. I don’t want to be in the back anymore.” This is an excellent point in an otherwise mundane movie. The two stars have chemistry, though no romance (unlike Burnt, which brandishes Sienna Miller). The knife-work and kitchen texture here appear authentic, yet no one loses a fingertip or starts a stove fire. Even a cutesy confection like Jon Favreau’s Chef conveyed the chaos, egotism, and panic that underlies every great meal; and Burnt better shows the personal cost of such culinary obsession. (Why’s Aki so nice to Juana? What’s his story? We have no idea.)

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 24 23


Ambivalent Atrocities

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24

Keaton (left) and Ruffalo in the newsroom.

Terrific story, and director Tom McCarthy (The Visitor) mostly lays off the hard sell. If anything, Spotlight is a little too respectable; McCarthy and co-screenwriter Josh Singer hit each scene exactly on the button, and then move on to the next one. And what excuse is there for how washed-out the film looks? The filmmakers say they studied All the President’s Men, but did they actually see it? Nevertheless, Spotlight excels at digging into the nooks and crannies of deep-seated corruption and making those shadowed places come to credible life. McCarthy, an actor himself, casts some glorious people to embody the participants in this system: along with the starry main cast, there’s Stanley Tucci and Billy Crudup as lawyers with different views of justice; Len Cariou as the powerful Cardinal Law; and, particularly, longtime character actors Paul Guilfoyle and Jamey Sheridan, who serve nuanced portrayals of complacency and guilt. Arriving at a time when our culture appears to have embraced the idea that it is better to believe what you want to believe and that “the media” is not to be trusted, Spotlight creates excitement out of the day-to-day business of recognizing uncomfortable facts. (Meridian, Lincoln Square. Rated R, 127 min.) ROBERT HORTON E

film@seattleweekly.com

Festen puts a civilized veneer on the most shocking of family secrets. So why doesn’t it work? BY ALYSSA DYKSTERHOUSE

COURTESY OF JOHN ULMAN

It’s got a big ensemble cast, but if you want a measure of what Spotlight does very, very well, keep an eye on the new guy. In the film’s opening minutes, new editor Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber) arrives at The Boston Globe. In Schreiber’s canny performance, Baron is woefully free of warm ’n’ fuzzies; he’s a blunt outsider in a clubby town—he came from Miami, for crying out loud. We spot him as a corporate stooge who will surely act as antagonist to the Globe’s band of reporter heroes, those hard-talking pros with their sleeves rolled up. In a story full of hard-won disclosures, Baron’s gradual emergence as a beacon of journalistic integrity and moral conviction is perhaps the movie’s subtlest revelation. Baron presided over a Pulitzer-winning 2002 Globe exposé of the Catholic church’s cover-up of widespread sexual abuse of minors by priests. Spotlight tells this story through multiple viewpoints: Deputy Managing Editor Ben Bradlee, Jr. ( John Slattery), investigative team leader Robby Robinson (Michael Keaton), and Globe reporters played by Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams, and Brian d’Arcy James. The approach allows us to see how the scandal permeates every level of Boston society, from blue-collar Catholic neighborhoods where disgraced priests are hidden to tony golf courses where church attorneys share the links with socialite Bradlee (yes, the son of the Washington Post editor immortalized by All the President’s Men, a movie that looms large behind this one).

STAGE

Toms as truth-teller.

D

songs to Helge and dancing in the midst of atroaddy issues. You’re never too old for cious accusations. Festen juxtaposes savage behavior them, and Hollywood exploits the with upper-class social mores. hell out of them to print money. Fundamentally, Festen is a play about an adult child battling his father. Even if it There are some worthwhile nuances, like the were a Lifetime movie—my guilty pleasure—I interplay between Christian and servant/ingénue would change the channel. Or take a nap. (A Pia (Emily Chisholm). Chef Kim (Ray Gonzalez) Deadly Adoption was more plausible and less perprovides the show’s most potent moment when plexing.) Though well executed, New Century he facilitates an evening of truth-telling by saying Theatre Company’s production left me confused “Tonight is for Christian. No one leaves here until and indifferent. he’s done,” then instructing the staff to trap In this 2004 adaptation of the Dantheir guests by hiding the car keys. But ish film The Celebration, a wealthy how did Christian get so tight with 12th Avenue Arts family gathers to celebrate the 60th Pia and Kim? Why didn’t Michael 1620 12th Ave., birthday of patriarch Helge (Bradattend his sister’s funeral? Why does wearenctc.org. ford Farwell). We soon discover Helene hate him? What is Christian’s $15–$30. 7:30 p.m. dinner comes with a not-so-subtle relationship with both of them? Thurs.–Sun. vat of simmering dysfunction. Eldridge’s adaptation, like the movie, Ends Nov. 21. Among his three grown children, is exasperatingly light on backstory. I Christian (Conner Toms) bears the like my tragedy with a side of tears, while biggest burden. Dark secrets will be dragged Festen creates more questions than catharsis. into the light, resulting in some sort of catharsis. If you remember Thomas Vinterberg’s Yet in such a familiar plot, one requiring our acclaimed 1998 movie, I needn’t disclose Helge’s emotional connection to work, playwright David awful secret. And if you haven’t, it’s not so hard to Eldridge and director Wilson Milam aren’t aimguess. Still, the family intrigue and dark themes ing for likable, empathetic characters. Most of here induce authentic discomfort. We all have them are brooding, belligerent buffoons. For some shame in our past. Some of us lay it out for example, Christian’s siblings Michael (MJ Sieber) display, while others pack it prettily in Louis Vuitand Helene (Betsy Schwartz) repeatedly engage ton luggage. Both approaches have their costs and in near-physical combat. Though raised in an dividends. Christian demands candor, while the environment of polite privilege, they behave rest of his family appears absolutely at ease with more like barbarians. Meanwhile, Michael and repression and avoidance—provided, of course, his wife Mette (Brenda Joyner) vacillate from that the wine and food keep flowing. him being a verbally abusive asshole to her being For me, this production isn’t entirely good a near-dominatrix. or bad. I do think, however, that it’ll frustrate Much of this intermission-free banquet debacle theatergoers like me who believe traumas can focuses on the business of serving food; and I, as a be healed through some sort of process. That very professional food server, often found myself paying American notion may explain why Eldridge’s more attention to that than the dialogue. (When adaptation has been better received in Europe someone poured wine from the left, I cringed.) than here. Festen ends with a short morningHelge’s family snaps their fingers to summon the after scene suggesting that while nothing is servers, which is rude but somewhat predictable in mended, all parties have simply resolved to move such a mollycoddled milieu. Yet their strange sense on as if nothing happened. E of decorum permits singing boisterous birthday stage@seattleweekly.com


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EST. 1907 2ND AVE & VIRGINIA ST

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

connecting them to the ground like a statue’s f you’re an artistic director of a ballet compedestal. The result is almost terrifyingly beaupany, many considerations go into plantiful, with the lights playing off the dancer’s ning a season. The biggest is the calendar, musculature. In this unisex role, Leah Merchant specifically the holiday show that opens makes long phrases out of the movement, while right after Thanksgiving and brings in a sizDylan Wald emphasizes the sculptural aspect. able chunk of your annual revenue. But while Both approaches are full of wonderful images. Pacific Northwest Ballet is busily preparing to launch a new Nutcracker, not everyone in the audience is looking for sugarplums. Which is Current PNB dancer Price Suddarth has why, for the past few years, Peter Boal has been choreographed for its school and Next Step scheduling work from the contemporary shelf laboratory program in the past. Signature is his in November. This strategy suits dancers and first commission for the main company, and spectators alike, giving everyone a last taste it’s his most ambitious creation to date. Into of the 21st century before gorging on 30 minutes are packed multiple duets, 19th-century confectionery. several solos, material for small and large ensembles, and complex patEmergence starts at neoclassical McCaw Hall terns for the full cast. It’s a very and ends at contemporary. Kiyon Seattle Center, 441-2424, pnb.org. $30 dense work. Stylistically he seems Gaines’ 2012 Sum Stravinsky was and up. 7:30 p.m. to have absorbed something made as a nod to the relationship Thurs.–Sat. 2 p.m. Sun. from everyone in his past, but between George Balanchine and Ends Nov. 15. especially from William Forthe composer, and as an acknowlsythe: arms circle and legs wheel, edgement of previous PNB direcwhile everything moves at full range. tor Kent Stowell, who used the same The score by Barret Anspach is also new, “Dumbarton Oaks” concerto years before. borrowing and manipulating various themes The dance is as lively as its score. Gaines, who from Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons.” These musical retired from performing last spring, created quotations, like the movement references, add a charming showcase for his fellow dancers. another layer to the structure of Signature. Many of the parts are triple-cast to spread the When PNB staged Crystal Pite’s Emergence opportunities around. Angelica Generosa and two years back, the response was phenomenal. Benjamin Griffiths have the same sense of quick Even people who prefer the 19th-century clastiming—clearly demonstrated in the opening sics were dumbfounded by her powerful evocamovement. Kylee Kitchens and Maria Chaption of insect life, the visceral nature of the hive man both work with the same amplitude that she created. (No surprise that it lends its name Lindsi Dec originally brought to the central pas to the program.) de deux. Chelsea Adomaitis gives her opening There are individual standouts here, includsolo a more contemplative feeling, as she traces ing Margaret Mullin’s newborn creature and circles on the floor and in the air. Sum StravinLaura Tisserand and Batkhurel Bold as leader sky is a major step forward for Gaines. and consort. But it’s the hive that counts; the Jessica Lang’s The Calling reaches back to ensemble is the foundation here. In a field where early modern dance—that era of Ruth St. Denis group activity is often decorous and orderly, the and Martha Graham, when costumes acted cast of Emergence seems to channel the group almost like a part of the set. Set to medieval choawareness that birds and insects have for their ral music, the solo piece is remarkably dynamic, swarm. Their fluid cohesion as they flock and even though the dancer is wearing an extra-long coalesce makes those in the audience feel alone, skirt, standing in the middle of what appears like even vulnerable. E an ocean of white fabric. As the soloist stretches and twists, the skirt extends those torqued lines, dance@seattleweekly.com

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calendar

PICKLIST

NOVEMBER 12

’Mo-Wave

Thursday

Cinema Italian Style

SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net. $7–$12 ($20–$25 includes party). 7 p.m. SCOTT JOHNSON

NOVEMBER 13

Friday

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

Jesse Eisenberg

26

An actor often pegged as the smart guy undone by his neuroses (in The End of the Tour, Zombieland, The Social Network, etc.), Eisenberg has lately turned his braininess to the page. His off-Broadway millennial brawl The Spoils, in which he also starred this summer, got excellent reviews; and he’s become a regular humor contributor to The New Yorker. Much of the latter work is collected in Bream Gives Me Hiccups (Grove, $26), most of it short-form and riffy. The effect is like bingeing on sketch comedy, as we veer from a romantic e-mail exchange that gets threadjacked into an analysis of Bosnian genocide in the ’90s to a series of failed pickupline scenarios. (Post-gender-normative proves surprisingly unsuccessful, or maybe that’s no surprise at all.) In your mind’s eye, most of these stories play like auditions or acting exercises; and you can easily imagine Eisenberg playing these parts. In “We Only Have Time for One More,” for instance, the leader of a bar band gets sucked into the digression/apology hole while trying to exit the stage gracefully— then his soliloquy becomes psychoanalysis: “My life has become so narrow that I don’t really have any new experiences to write about. That’s why you guys heard three songs about how fast my Honda Accord is. The first two were kind of interesting, but the last one was hackneyed. I get it.” Of course Eisenberg gets these sad, selfdefeating characters. He’s played them. Tonight, Sherman Alexie will chat with the future Lex Luthor. Oh, and Eisenberg’s also been cast in a coming Woody Allen movie, which makes all the sense in the world. Seattle Central Library,

1000 Fourth Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Soto’s Inner Galactic, at Velocity.

Inner Galactic

Charles and Ray Eames’ charming 1977 short film The Powers of Ten illustrates how the vastness of outer space resembles the microscopic world of the atom. Maya Soto’s new performance work, Inner Galactic, poses a similar comparison. In it she substitutes “the vast and complex inner workings of the heart” for our atomic anatomy. Working with composer Nico Tower, the local dancer/choreographer uses the popular imagery of space travel—complete with silvery suits and bulbous helmets—to frame an introspective journey through an interior landscape that is as complex and adventurous as anything NASA might devise. (Through Sun.) Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave., 3258773, velocitydancecenter.org. $18–$20. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

Jonathan Lethem & David Shields

This almost sounds like a belated Halloween event. Visiting from New York, the author of Motherless Brooklyn and Chronic City will join the local scribe and UW professor (War Is Beautiful ) in a discussion of mortality and the body. Shields says, “It’s a little bit late for that,” meaning Halloween, but the starting point for their chat will be Lethem’s new novel-in-progress. “It’s about a guy who undergoes brain surgery, and that’s about all I know,” says Shields. “I’m gonna talk to him about how does one talk about mortality without being grim and gruesome about it. I’m really interested in mortality’s relationship to art.” Shields is prepping a few questions for Lethem, who’ll first read from his untitled work. Conversational cues might come from Cormac McCarthy (the centrality of death to art) and Woody Allen (our meaninglessness and aloneness in the cosmos), says Shields. Then there’s the midlife theme. He wrote The Thing About Life Is That One Day You’ll Be Dead in 2008, near the same age Lethem—married, with two kids—is now. That tap on the shoulder, mortality, “seems to happen to men almost biologically

to men in their 50s.” Once upon a time, “You tried to leave a beautiful corpse. Keats died at 25.” Nowadays, writers go to the gym and drink herbal tea. The old days of Dylan Thomas-like excess are gone, and writers live much longer. However, in the case of Lethem’s protagonist, that means cancer can sneak up on you—unlike Hemingway’s shotgun-blast final punctuation. (Lethem also appears at 1 p.m. Sunday at Fantagraphics Books in Georgetown with Peter Bagge, Megan Kelso, and Jim Woodring—local contributors to Best American Comics 2015, which he edited.) Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. $5–$10. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

NOVEMBER 14

Saturday

Seattle Shorts Film Festival

With 31 shorts, both animated and live-action, this weekend festival ventures near and far in its offerings. The local documentary Even the Walls concerns the controversial Yesler Terrace redevelopment and gentrification. From England, Beverley tackles racism in ’80s Britain. Oregon director Sherilyn Wong’s The Mobile Stripper has a shy mall cop near-abducted by the sassy proprietress of a hot-pink camper van equipped with a brass pole. (Some may be reminded of Something Wild.) The festival is programmed in six different blocks of films, with no repeat titles. Topics include cowboy comedy, superhero parents, and gender-nonconforming youth— namely, Jeremy Asher-Lynch’s documentary Tomgirl, an enormously affecting profile of an Everett 7-year-old. (Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready supplies the soundtrack.) If your time is limited, we also recommend The Haircut (about a teen girl in military school) and Shelter (about rescue dogs). SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), seattleshort.org. $12 individual, $40 weekend pass. 10 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. (Same schedule Sun.) SCOTT JOHNSON

COURTESY OF JOSEPH LAMBERT JAZZY

Over 16 features will be showcased in this year’s fest, some of them directed by the biggest names in Italian cinema. Titles include the Italian Golden Globe-winning comedy The Legendary Guilia and Other Miracles (about a B&B running afoul of the Mafia) and a beautiful restoration of the Taviani brothers’ lovely 1982 The Night of Shooting Stars. Notable given the current European immigration crisis is Jonas Carpignano’s Mediterranea, about African migrants struggling to adjust in a nation that may not want them. From the recently deceased Claudio Caligari, Don’t Be Bad—a ’90s crime tale—is Italy’s submission in this year’s Oscar derby for Best Foreign Language Film. The week-long festival begins and ends with a gala after-party. Launching the festivities tonight is My Mother, from Nanni Moretti (The Son’s Room, The Caiman), about a film director (Margherita Buy) dealing with an overbearing star, played by John Turturro. (Through Thurs.)

Sweet gay baby Jesus—the lineup for this weekend’s queer arts and music festival is divine. Where to even start? Headlining this night of the fest is Le1f, an incredible New York rapper with elastic dance moves like a haute-couture Gumby and rhymes that can jump from sensual to fierce to fun in the blink of an eye. His appearance is especially significant given the blank check Macklemore & Ryan Lewis owe him for ripping off the riff from “Wut” for “Thrift Shop.” Le1f is also bringing fellow NYC rappers and associates Dai Burger and Destiny, who have described their music as “sassy girl rap” and “high-tech fairy girl music,” respectively. Sharing the bill are Olympia shredders Slouch, whose transcendent Toxic Bitch EP is like a white-hot kick in the face from a wrathful queer God— truly revelatory hardcore. Olympia is churning out some of the greatest punk bands in the country right now, and Slouch is among the cream of that crop. Also waving the Oly flag is Aeon Fux, the insect-obsessed doom-wop artist whom you can read all about (in comic form!) on page 19. Holding it down from Seattle are our very own columnist Sassyblack (excellent cosmic R&B), Erik Blood (beautiful immersive shoegaze goodness), and Lisa Prank (prom-tastic one-woman pop-punk). With Re-Ignition and Deejay Dewey Decimal & Mathematix. (’Mo-Wave also includes a full night of music on Friday, also at Chop Suey, and a companion art exhibit at Vermillion, with Thursday opening party, running through Dec. 5.) Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison

St., 538-0556, mowavefestival.com. $15–$18. 21 and over. 5 p.m. KELTON SEARS

NOVEMBER 16

Monday

Maira Kalman

Your eyes lock. The world spins and stands still at the same time. Perhaps your heart even flutters as you immediately understand everything about love and companionship in all its gentle simplicity. That’s what dogs are like, as we see in Kalman’s beautifully illustrated new Beloved Dog (Penguin, $29.95). A writer and longtime illustrator for The New Yorker, she understands the intense bond humans form with their dogs. Of these ferociously loving friends, she writes, “There are flowers, birds, babies, buildings. I love all of these. But above all, I am besotted by dogs.” Most prominent is Kalman’s own Pete, the heart-healing Irish Wheaten who came into the family after Kalman’s husband died. Depicting Pete in reading glasses and sunflower hats, Kalman writes, “He did what everyone said he would do. Help to keep us as sane and as happy as we could be. Quite an extraordinary achievement.” In Kalman’s perceptive illustrations, Pete wears an ever-so-slight smile, gazing patiently and amusedly at her. Other dogs are no less incisively rendered, showing us canine companionship, joy, loss, gain, frenzy, and calm. Pete’s love is patient and eternal. Max the dog poet dreams of living in Paris. Another seeks to cheer his friend, who happens to be a bird. Kalman will sign books and discuss dogs tonight with Steve Scher. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, bookstore. washington.edu. Free. 7 p.m. MARA SILVERS E


■ THE STUDY OF TIME AND MOTION SEE CONVO, PAGE 18. PE|MO Perpetuum Mobile’s new

dance/activism work is Anatomy of an Accident. Open Flight Studio, 4205 University Way N.E. Pay what you can. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sun. Ends Nov. 15. ■ INNER GALACTIC SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 26.

GANSANGO MUSIC & DANCE COMPANY Traditional and contempo-

BLOWN YOUTH Dipika Guha’s

female-centered rethinking of Hamlet. Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, cornish.edu. $5–$12. Opens Nov. 12. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Nov. 21. CAST OF ONE Solo improv. Atlas Theater, 3509 Fremont Ave. N., seattle comedygroup.com. $10. 8 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 12. ■ COME FROM AWAY A new musical based on the true story of 38 planes diverted to Newfoundland on 9/11. Somehow a community forms at the tiny airport. Created by Irene Sankoff and David Hein; Christopher Ashley directs. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center. $17 and up. Previews begin Nov. 13, opens Nov. 18. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Dec. 13. DIMENSION FORCE Seattle Public Theater Youth play out this fantasy about a supervillain who’s captured a time machine. Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, seattlepublictheater. org. Free. 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13; 2 & 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14; 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. EXPLORING THE WORK OF QUIARA ALEGRIA HUDES A read-

SHOGGOTHS ON THE VELDT

The Rogues Gallery (“a Geek Theater Company”) presents this Lovecraftian spoof. The Lab at INScape, 815 Seattle Blvd. S., theroguesgallery.tv. $15–$20. Opens Nov. 13. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sun. plus Mon., Nov. 30. Ends Dec. 5. UNITARD “House of Tards” is this NYC sketch-comedy trio’s new show. JewelBox Theater at the Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., therendevous.rocks. $12–$18. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14, 4 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15.

AS YOU LIKE IT Shakespeare’s

cross-dressing comedy, with live music. Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., ghostlighttheatricals.org. $12–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. Ends Nov. 21. THE BALLAD OF KARLA FOX Scot Augustson’s latest shadow-puppet show is a Hitchcock-inspired thriller. Theatre Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., printersdevil.org. $15–$18. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Nov. 21. ■ BUYER AND CELLAR You’re probably unaware that Barbra Streisand’s Malibu basement resembles a picturesque shopping mall. Playwright Jonathan Tolins’ very funny one-man show, performed by Scott Drummond, spins this tantalizing tidbit into a retail fantasia. ALYSSA DYKSTERHOUSE Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center. $34 and up. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun. plus some weekend & Wed. matinees; see seattlerep. org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 22. ■ FESTEN SEE REVIEW, PAGE 24. FIREFACE Splinter Group performs Marius von Mayenburg’s dysfunctional-family drama in a private home; you’ll find out where when you buy your ticket. brownpapertickets.com. $5–$25. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 7 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 22. MAD SCIENTIST CABARET A theatrical spectacle of clowning, dance, puppetry, and more. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., annextheatre.org. $5–$10. 11 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Nov. 13.

■ MOTHER COURAGE AND HER

CHILDREN Brecht’s dark satire on war profiteering. Center Theatre at Seattle Center. $27–$50. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat. plus some matinees; see seattleshakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 22.

■ MR. BURNS, A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY In the post-apocalyptic world of

playwright Anne Washburn, pop culture is currency, and The Simpsons is a particularly rich trove. Her play’s most engrossing moments come through the layering of art, amateurism, and half-remembered rituals. Directed by John Langs, this production is crisp and lively, with performances that pull you into a dark, strange time. MARK BAUMGARTEN. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St. $15–$20. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see act theatre.org for schedule. Ends Nov. 15. MY DEAR MISS CHANCELLOR

Caitlin Gilman’s 1840-set play uncovers a secret cabal of woman fencers. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., annex theatre.org. $5–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.– Sat. Ends Nov. 14. MY MAÑANA COMES Elizabeth Irwin set her dramedy in the kitchen of a posh New York restaurant, where the staff dreams of better tomorrows.

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY COMPETITION A show-

■ INVERTED SPACE New music and

ice cream from this UW group. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., invertedspaceensemble.com. $5–$15. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 11. SEATTLE SYMPHONY Bruch, Strauss, and Nielsen. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., seattle symphony.org. $21 and up. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 12; 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13 (one hour, no Nielsen); 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14. CAPPELLA ROMANA Choral music from medieval Cyprus. Blessed Sacrament Church, 5050 Eighth Ave. N.E., cappellaromana.org. $10–$44. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13.

■ NORTHWEST SINFONIETTA

Verdi, Schubert, Rossini, and Morton Feldman. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., northwestsinfonietta. org. $20–$40. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13. SKYROS QUARTET From this up-and-coming group, Dvorak, Shostakovich, and Turina. Queen Anne Christian Church, 1316 Third Ave. W. $5–$10. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13.

the African diaspora, with folk singer Naomi Wachira. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S. $10. 9 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14. GALLERY CONCERTS A recital by lutenist Stephen Stubbs. Queen Anne Christian Church, 1316 Third Ave. W., galleryconcerts.org. $15–$30. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14, 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. RAINIER SYMPHONY Wagner, Sibelius, and Weber (with clarinetist Sean Osborn). At Renton IKEA PAC, 400 S. Second St., Renton, 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14; and Foster PAC, 4242 S. 144th St., Tukwila, 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. $12–$17. rainiersymphony.org. THALIA SYMPHONY Hummel, Delibes, Tchaikovsky, and Weber. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., thaliasymphony. org. $15–$20. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. SEATTLE YOUTH SYMPHONY

Glinka, Barber, and Brahms’ Fourth. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., syso.org. $27–$52. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. MUSIC NORTHWEST Seattle Symphony musicians play Brahms and Haydn. Olympic Recital Hall, 6000 16th Ave. S.W., musicnorthwest.org. $16–$18. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. LES DIVAS DE L’EMPIRE Cabaret songs by classical composers. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., opera ontap.org. $15. 7 p.m. Mon., Nov. 16.

AUTHOR EVENTS ■ MICHELLE VISAGE The drag star

chats with Seattle’s Jinkx Monsoon about The Diva Rules : Ditch the Drama, Find Your Strength, and Sparkle Your Way to the Top. SIFF Cinema Egyptian, 805 E. Pine St., siff.net. $35 (incl. book). 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 11. ■ DAVID B. WILLIAMS His new local history is Too High and Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography. Third Place Books. 7 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 12.

case for stand-ups from around the world. See seattlecomedycompetition. org for schedule and venues, from Vancouver to Bellingham. Ends Nov. 29. WATER BY THE SPOONFUL Quiara Alegría Hudes’ Pulitzer-winner. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., theatre22.org. $18–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 14. For many more Current Runs, see seattleweekly.com.

LARIONOFF Beethoven’s 10 violin sonatas over three evenings, with preconcert lectures (a half-hour before showtime) by Melinda Bargreen, Lisa Bergman, and Sean MacLean. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, music.washington.edu. Free. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13, 4:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14–Sun., Nov. 15.

DANCE

Sibelius’ and Nielsen’s 150th with some

BLOODY WEDNESDAY “An act of dark, deep, and womb-born expression of the divine Feminine in all her bloody, nasty glory.” LoFi Performance Gallery, 429 Eastlake Ave. E., $7. 8 p.m. Wed., Nov. 11. ■ KT NIEHOFF wants to create events that bring groups together; recently she’s been using spaces that have that social component in their DNA. In 2010, she created A Glimmer of Hope or Skin or Light as a multipart event that popped up all over town. For this revival, she’s bringing back the finale, an elaborate cabaret show where spectacular showgirls usher you into a world full of glamorous potential. SANDRA KURTZ ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., acttheatre.org. $20–$35. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Nov. 14. ■ PNB: EMERGENCE SEE REVIEW, PAGE 25. AKRAM KHAN This fusion artist mixes the dances of his Indian heritage with contemporary styles from his home in the UK. Meany Hall, UW campus, uwworldseries.org. $43–$48. 8 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 12–Sat., Nov. 14. GLOBAL DANCE PARTY Talented local performers celebrate through dance and music. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., stgpresents.org. $10. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 13.

EAR SUPPLY Adjusted for Inflation

■ ROBIN MCCABE & MARIA

ORCHESTRA SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER SINGERS Celebrating

■ JONATHAN LETHEM & DAVID SHIELDS SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 26. ■ JESSE EISENBERG SEE THE PICK

LIST, PAGE 26.

■ RAINN WILSON In conversation

with John Roderick, the UW alum recalls his path from band geek to The

BEGGARS CAN’T BE CHOOSERS

is the theme for readings by Leslie Jamison, Roger Reeves, and Alexis M. Smith. Hugo House. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 20. TOM ALPHIN Everyone a Gehry: Alphin shows you how in The LEGO Architect. Elliott Bay. 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 20. MITCH ALBOM The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto is his Zelig-like novel of a guitarist who meets everyone in the music world. University Book Store, Mill Creek. 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 20. For many more literary events, see seattleweekly.com.

BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Conventional wisdom says the violin is the instrument most like the human voice, but in Judy Dunaway’s hands—disturbingly so—it’s the balloon. Inspired by the unconventionality of the ’50s–’60s Fluxus (anti-) art movement, she began experimenting with the balloon as soundmaker; as she put it in a 2001 article, it “signified, with its comic and rude sounds, a rejection of high culture.” But instead of going that direction, her balloon works are darker, more dramatic, because of the voice-like howls, moans, and squeals she draws from it. Naturally, allowing air to escape slowly through the nozzle mimics breath’s effect on vocal cords, but manually rubbing an inflated one, too, produces unsettling, all-too-human wails; it also works as an amplifier, a resonating box, if other sound-producers are held against it. (Search her name on YouTube for performance videos

demonstrating all three methods.) The Bostonbased Dunaway will be joined in concert this weekend by two local musicians: Susie Kozawa, whose highly imaginative use of toys and other found objects shades from whimsical to bittersweet, and exploratory flutist Esther Sugai. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. E., waywardmusic.org. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

ing in Spanish of Elliot, A Soldier’s Fugue. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676, acttheatre.org. $10–$15. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 11. FRINGE EXPLOSION Topics of works in the Pocket Theater’s minifestival include gay domestic violence and a Chekhov sendup set among actual seagulls. Pocket Theater, 8312 Greenwood Ave. N. $10. Opens Fri., Nov. 13. Runs Fri.–Sun.; see thepocket. org for full lineup. Ends Nov. 29. HOTEL Cirrus Circus’ new show is set in an abandoned hotel. School of Acrobatics & New Circus Arts (SANCA), 674 S. Orcas St., sanca seattle.org. $10–$20. Opens Nov. 13. 7 p.m. Fri., 3 & 7 p.m. Sat. Ends Nov. 21. IN SUSPENSE A high-school computer attack leads to drama in Leonard Goodisman’s new play. Eclectic Theater, 1214 10th Ave. $12–$25. Preview Nov. 12, opens Nov. 13. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus some weekend matinees; see eclectictheatercompany.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 28.

Current Runs

ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., artswest.org. $17–$37.50. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 22. NEW CITY SALON An evening of music and staged poetry. New City Theater, 1406 18th Ave. $15. 8 p.m. Fri.– Sat. Ends Nov. 21. QUIXOTE: BOOK ONE Playwright Octavio Solis’ new adaptation of Cervantes. Cornish Playhouse, Seattle Center, cornish.edu. $5–$17. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Nov. 13. ■ SAUCED Directed by Paul Budraitis, this noir-inspired tale’s setting is the Diamond Club, a Seattle gin joint. Written by Terry Podgorski, with songs by Annastasia Workman, we’re transported back to bygone times. MARK BAUMGARTEN Nordo’s Culinarium, 109 S. Main St., cafenordo. com. $65–$99. 7:30 p.m. Thurs. & Sun., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Dec. 20.

CLASSICAL, ETC.

■ SEATTLE WOMEN’S STEEL PAN PROJECT Music and dance of

Office and beyond in The Bassoon King: My Life in Art, Faith, and Idiocy. University Temple United Methodist Church The Sanctuary, 1415 N.E. 43rd St., bookstore.washington.edu. $25–$27 (incl. book). 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14. ■ DAVID SEDARIS Tickets for the thoughtful storyteller and all-aroundfunny human, regularly featured in The New Yorker and on This American Life, will sell out fast. Benaroya Hall, benaroyahall.org. $45–$54. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. DONALD KENTOP reads from Frozen by Fire, his newly published poetry book about the 1911 fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. Seattle Central Library. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. ■ MAIRA KALMAN SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 26. ■ RICK MOODY His novel Hotels of North America is inspired by the phenomenon of online reviews. Elliott Bay. 7 p.m. Mon., Nov. 16. ■ ANTHONY DOERR Seattle Arts & Lectures welcomes the Pulitzerwinning author of All the Light We Cannot See. Benaroya Hall, lectures. org. $10–$75. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 18. ■ PETER GURALNICK Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock ‘n’ Roll is his biography of the Sun Records founder who changed America. Elliott Bay. 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 18. NANCY PEARL Seattle’s, and probably America’s, fave librarian speaks. Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway. Free, but register at local. aarp.org. 6 p.m. Wed., Nov. 18. ROSE ALLEY PRESS Readings to celebrate the press’ 20th anniversary. Room 202, Good Shepherd Center, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., rosealleypress.com. 7 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 19 & Fri., Nov. 20. JOSHUA L. REID The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs explores the link between the people and the ocean. University Book Store. 7 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 19.

COURTESY OF JUDY DUNAWAY

THEATER Openings & Events

KEVIN BERNE

Jenn Colella in Come From Away, opening at Seattle Rep.

rary arts from West Africa. University Heights Center, 5031 University Way N.E., uheightscenter.org. Free. 3 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14. DASSDANCE TeXtURE is Daniel Wilkins’ new work, combining installation art, spoken narrative, lighting sculptures, and All-Terrain Dance. MLK FAME Community Center, 3201 E. Republican St., dassdance.org. $20. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14, 5 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15.

rarities. First Free United Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., osscs.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14. DUO MELIS Piazzolla and more for two guitars. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., seattleguitar. org. $28–$38. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 14. ■ JUDY DUNAWAY SEE EAR SUPPLY, BELOW.

27


calendar Openings & Events ANNUAL FALL ART EXTRAVAGANZA Studio artists

open their doors, with holiday and children’s activities. The Building, 316 S.W. Othello St. 5-10 p.m. Sat. CHARLIE BARR He shows new landscape paintings in Urban Diverson. Opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Wed. Gunnar Nordstrom, 800 Bellevue Way N.E. (Bellevue), 425283-0461, gunnarnordstrom.com. 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Noon-5 p.m. Sun. Ends Dec. 5. ■ BYRON BIRDSALL He paints Mt. Rainier and other familiar alpine landscapes, some with climbers in the frame, in a tradition recalling Dee Molenaar. Also on view, wooden bowls from Dian Friend. Opening reception, 2 p.m. Sun. Kirsten Gallery, 5320 Roosevelt Way N.E., 522-2011, kirstengallery.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Ends Dec. 27. ■ CAPITOL HILL ART WALK OseiDuro fashions are on view at Glasswing. Joseph Gray and Reilly Donovan team up for Psychospatial at Dendroica. This weekend’s ’Mo-Wave queer music festival has a companion show at Vermillion. Other venues include Cairo, PCNW, Calypte, and Ghost. And the CoCA Art Marathon concludes tonight (Summit Building, 420 E. Pike St., cocaseattle. org) with auction on Friday. See capitolhillartwalk.com for all venues. 6-9 p.m. Thurs.

■ GEORGETOWN ART ATTACK

Tatiana Gill brings new comix to Fantagraphics. Rainier Cycles hosts artist Jim Koch. All City Coffee has Clown Riot, by Edward Matlock, which purports to depict a 1997 clown uprising. At Machine House Brewery, photographer Steven

Sutterby contrasts the streets of London and Seattle. A dozen local artists contribute to Krab Jab’s An Illustrator’s Take on the Fairy Tale. Equinox has its studios open as usual, and the Trailer Park Mall boasts all kinds of crafts for the holiday season. Downtown Georgetown, see georgetownartattack.com for all venues. 6-9 p.m. Sat. PHILIP GOVEDARE Sky Paintings offers just that—swirling compositions of clouds and light. Opening reception, 2 p.m. Sat. Prographica, 3419 E. Denny Way, 322-3851, prographicagallery.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Dec. 19. ■ FAYETTE HAUSER As part of the ongoing Counter-Couture show at BAM, this former member of the gender-bending (and fashionbending) performance troupe The Cockettes will appear for a screening of the 2002 Cockettes documentary. She and curator Michael Cepress will do a Q&A. SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff. net. $7-$12. 7 p.m. Wed. HANNA MYERS She addresses mental illness in MLLE X. Opening reception, 6-10 p.m. Thurs. Twilight Gallery, 4306 S.W. Alaska St., 933-2444, twilightart.net. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Noon-6 p.m. Sat. Ends Dec. 5. NAOSHI The children’s book illustrator will be signing Ice Cream Work. KOBO Gallery, 604 S. Jackson St., 381-3000, koboseattle.com. Noon-5 p.m. Sat. SCOTT TALLEY He offers new oil paintings in Object. Opening reception, 6-9 p.m. Sat. Studio E Gallery, 609 S. Brandon St., studioegallery.org. 1-6 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Ends Dec. 5. ■ BRENNA YOUNGBLOOD Winner of the biannual Gwendolyn Knight | Jacob Lawrence Prize, the young Los

Wimps

Angeles artist shows paintings and collage works. Opens Saturday. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $12–$19. Weds.Sun. Ends April 17.

Ongoing

CAMP FIRES BAM goes totally gay

with this queer art tribute to Léopold L. Foulem, Paul Mathieu, and Richard Milette. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts.org. $5-$10. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sun. Ends Feb. 14. ■ MARY COSS Her sculpture show Trace includes a large central sculpture, made of old wedding dresses sewn tentlike over wire, that’s shaped like a pelvic bone. The intent is to explore “a narrative around artifacts, the cultural remnants of life, using the form of a human bone as a relic to tell this story.” Method Gallery, 106 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 223-8505, methodgallery.com. Noon-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Ends Jan. 2. DEALER’S CHOICE The annual group show features the likes of Victoria Adams, Guy Anderson, Nathan DiPietro, Morris Graves, Susan R. Hall, Paul Horiuchi, David Kroll, Alden Mason, Nancy Mee, Anne Siems, Jared Rue, and Gerard Tsutakawa. Woodside/ Braseth Gallery, 622-7243, 1201 Western Ave., woodsidebrasethgallery.com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.Sat. Ends Nov. 28.

COURTESY KILL ROCK STARS

VISUAL ARTS

GENIUS: 21ST CENTURY SEATTLE Various locals, seletected

by The Stranger, present works new and old. Boldface names include Sherman Alexie, Drew Christie, Web Crowell, Ellen Forney, Victoria Haven, and Jim Woodring. Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave., 622-9250, fryemuseum. org. Free. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sun. (Open to 7 p.m. Thu.) Ends Jan. 10.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

from Instagram and Google Image Search, people love looking at photos from far away, at images of things we can’t afford (also known as Amazon window-shopping). Morse included re-creations of 37 works by Leonardo, Rubens, Raphael, Caravaggio, and company—all the guys later rejected by the Impressionists (running concurrently upstairs). Gallery was meant to be educational, and today it actually does teach us something: how good ideas get ahead of themselves in one field, fail, but can find success in another. One of America’s first tech barons, Morse (1791–1872) was all about information. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $12–$19. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wed.–Sun. (Open to 9 p.m. Tues.) Ends Jan. 10.

When Henry Christian and John Johnson formed HILLSTOMP, it had the feeling of a whim: two buddies who were just discovering hill-country blues, messing with a bottleneck slide and banging on buckets. The sound was crude—and pretty reliant on all that stomping—but the spirit was spot-on. A decade later, the Portland duo is still going and still very true to its name. And though Johnson has traded his buckets for a proper kit and Christian’s trance style has become deeply refined, there will still be stomping. With Gravel Road, The Crossroad Exchange. Tractor Tavern. 9 p.m. $10. 21 and over. MARK BAUMGARTEN REPTAR is named after the dinosaur

COURTESY TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART.

BY BRIAN MILLER

Sometimes a bad painting, like a bad movie, is so much more reflective of its times than the quality stuff. Currently traveling the country, Gallery of the Louvre (1833) is a painting of other paintings. The very large canvas was devised as a greatest-hits summary of the Louvre’s collection for those American viewers who’d never visit France (nor likely leave their hometowns). It was designed to tour the U.S. and transmit what we might call cultural information—that deemed good and valuable abroad. Of course, given that the tobacco-spittin’ U.S. was then being convulsed by Jacksonian populism, westward expansion, and a looming schism between North and South, we shouldn’t be surprised that the painting’s debut tour was a flop. (One hundred years of storage followed.) What makes it interesting was the artist: Samuel F.B. Morse, later famous as an inventor; his Morse code made him the Mark Zuckerberg of his day. And 28 Gallery wasn’t a bad concept; as we know

Wednesday, Nov. 11

Thursday, Nov. 12

FUSSY EYE Relaying the Information

MUSIC

from Rugrats, but unlike the classic cartoon, the band hasn’t aged quite as well. From the get-go, the overly polyrhythmic group was already biting from some well-worn territory tread by mid-to-late-2000s indie staples like Vampire Weekend, Dirty Projectors, and Animal Collective. On 2012’s Body Faucet, Reptar seemed content to splash some neon on those bands’ established style and call it good— tossing all the pitch-shifted vocal runs, Afro-inspired guitar lines, and buzzy electronics into a blender without really adding any of its own spice. This year’s follow-up, Lurid Glow, deals in the same pastiche, but the references sound even more dated in 2015. But hey! Local openers Oh, Rose, from Olympia, are more than worth your time. Seven, the band’s new record, rocks a style the group calls “ghost meat wave.” Whatever that is, we like it a lot. Album lead-off “Lottery” is a rollicking, blanket-fort-building rev-up that (if we’re sticking to the vintage Nickelodeon theme) would’ve sounded great on The Adventures of Pete & Pete. With Breathers. Vera Project. 7:30 p.m. $10 adv./$12 DOS. All ages. KELTON SEARS

Friday, Nov. 13

■ The experimental pop of

MICACHU AND THE SHAPES

sounds as if it were crafted out of bits of lint, string, and orphaned Tupperware lids front woman Mica Levi found lying around her floor. Lest you think I’m just being cheeky, she straight-up has recorded her vacuum cleaner. As a result, the band’s lo-fi freak nuggets have a refreshingly unplaceable quality; half the fun of a Micachu record is figuring out how the band made all the weird, mutated sounds bellowing and burping out at you. See them live tonight and find out. Barboza. 7 p.m. $12. 21 and over. KS

As CITY AND COLOUR, Dallas Green built a reputation as a pretty straightforward performer, known for stripped-down acoustic songs, a pristine voice, and a chart-worthy sense of melody. But since leaving his other gig as lead singer for Canadian post-hardcore outfit Alexisonfire, Green has been expanding his project’s sound. If I Should Go Before You, City and Colours’ fifth full-length, sounds like the completion of that metamorphosis, featuring a full band that gives Green’s songs body without sacrificing the soul. With Hurray for the Riff Raff. Paramount. 8 p.m. $30. All ages. MB

■ Seattle punk trio WIMPS some-

how managed to slack its way onto storied Northwest label Kill Rock Stars. Yet the band has not compromised its sound with any sort of unseemly ambition, as can be heard on Suitcase, the full-length that will be celebrated tonight. The band is tighter, sure, but the songs, featuring staccato guitar runs and Rachel Ratner’s blurt, still consider adult ennui from the perspective of someone in firm couchlock. It’s a fun—valuable—perspective from which to view our city and its own ambitions right now. “Oh, Capitol Hill,” Rachel Ratner sings on the band’s lament of progress, “Capitol Hill.” “You used to be such a thrill, while I was swallowing pill after pill after pill.” With Stickers, MomButt, Boyfriends. The Funhouse. 9:30 p.m. $7 adv./$10 DOS. 21 and over. MB

Saturday, Nov. 14

■ The members of Welsh punk band

JOANNA GRUESOME met in an anger-management group, which is probably why their music sounds so honest—it’s a legit outlet for some very real feelings. Weird Sister, the group’s 2013 debut LP, expertly mixes the melodic twee-tendencies of its homeland (they sing about cardigans sometimes) with righteous, fuzz-laden feedback and glorious overblown screaming—an unlikely blend that works surprisingly well. Peanut Butter, the band’s 2015 follow-up, was unfortunately also the last for front woman Alanna McArdle, who left the band months after its release citing mental-health problems (touring nonstop will do that to a person—feel better, Alanna!). Fear not, though—the band is soldiering on, subbing in Kate Stonestreet of Glasgow queer punk band Pennycress to take the mic. Stonestreet can growl like a beast and croon sweet melodies on the turn of a dime, so the sound JG fans have come to love definitely isn’t straying too far in this new incarnation. With Tony Molina, King of Cats, Neighbors. Vera Project. 8 p.m. $12. All ages. KS

Those looking for models of longevity in rock will find two examples tonight as THE CULT and PRIMAL SCREAM share the Showbox stage, each with 30 years of near-continuous recording and touring behind it. Both bands were formed in the UK as post-punk began to fracture into the distinct subcultures that would shape pop music throughout the ’80s and ’90s. Fans can expect some of that past, as The Cult is celebrating the 30th anniversary of its goth pop breakout, Love, this year, and Primal Scream will be reissuing its acid house-inspired rock album Screamadelica later this month. The Showbox. 8 p.m. $42.50 adv./ $45 DOS. 21 and over. MB

Sunday, Nov. 15

■ Everyone’s favorite cult-band-

that-might-actually-be a-cult, THE POLYPHONIC SPREE, has been

rocking its 21-member happy-pill pop for 15 years now. Thinking about how many robes they’ve probably gone through in that time boggles the mind. The group is best known for its impossibly joyous 2002 single “Light and Day/Reach for the Sun” which, according to a 2010 poll, took the top spot as the “Most Used Song in UK Adverts.” TPS is as smile-core as ever—its new single, “Hold Yourself Up,” reminds the listener that “There’s a meaning in my conscience/I’m headed for the sky/I’m reaching for my confidence.” Tonight’s show will probably be the best remedy to any S.A.D. onset you may be experiencing. The Polyphonic Spree is the musical equivalent of one of those light-therapy boxes. With Magic Cyclops, ANDY. Tractor Tavern. 8 p.m. $27. 21 and over. KS

Bandcamp favorites and Olympia natives RVIVR have risen to the top of the recent pop-punk revival by standing staunchly against the bratty cis-white boys who typically comprise it. The band has been known to evangelize about gender equity and queer rights at length between songs at its live shows. This actually led one butthurt Portland man to publicly air his grievances in a goofy Examiner article about feeling “alienated” after a 2012 RVIVR set. Go figure! Anyhoo, the group’s Bicker and Breathe EP from late last year is full of the same boy/girl screamalong vocals, woah-oh-ohs, and triumphant riffage all those punklifers have come to love from the band. With Shellshag, Pale Angels, Bottlenose Koffins. Narwhal. 9 p.m. $8. 21 and up. KS


FILM Opening Friday

HEIST Heat meets Speed in this high-speed thriller from Scott Mann (no relation to Michael) starring Robert De Niro, Dave Bautista, and Gina Carano. (R) Varsity LOVE THE COOPERS Jessie Andrews (I Am Sam) directs this Christmas-com with a cast too big for Santa’s bag: Amanda Seyfried, Diane Keaton, John Goodman, Olivia Wilde, Marisa Tomei, Ed Helms and more. (PG-13) Opens wide MY ALL AMERICAN Aaron Eckhart and Finn Wittrock star in a life-inspired football flick from Rudy screenwriter Angelo Pizzo. Expect tears, tackles, and touchdowns. (PG) Opens wide THE 33 Dramatizing the Chilean mining disaster (and rescue) of 2010, with hope, adventure, and survival. Antonio Banderas, James Brolin, and Juliette Binoche star. (PG-13) Opens wide

Local & Repertory CHASING SHADOWS There’s

RESISTENCIA: THE FIGHT FOR THE AGUAN VALLEY Director

Jesse Freeston will discuss his new documentary, about land reform in Honduras, with Honduran activists Berta Cáceres and Miriam Miranda. (NR) Grand Illusion, $10. 7 p.m. Sun. SAMURAI COP 2: DEADLY VENGEANCE Director Gregory

Hatanaka will introduce his new tongue-in-cheek action sequel. The movie stars Bai Ling and Tommy Wiseau (of The Room), though other cast members will be in attendance. (R) SIFF Cinema Egyptian, $7-$12. 11 p.m. Sat. ■ STRANGERS ON A TRAIN In Alfred Hitchcock’s 1951 suspense classic, tennis player Farley Granger and rich creep Robert Walker meet at random. They then agree, sort of, to exchange (“criss-cross”) murders in this bowstring-taut adaptation of the Patricia Highsmith novel. Walker’s an out-and-out psycho, but a seductive psycho, as the soft jock Granger discovers. The gay subtext just about subsumes the murder story as one man insinuates himself into the life and conscience of another. As is generally the case with Hitchcock, the sexual and the criminal are bound together with guilt—so you can almost imagine them as lovers before prissy Granger, in a panic, tries to end their sordid affair. BRIAN MILLER (PG) Central Cinema, $7-$9. 7 p.m. Fri.-Sat. & Mon.-Wed. plus 3 p.m. Sat. THROW MOMMA FROM THE TRAIN From 1987, Danny DeVito’s

black comedy takes the Hitchcock favorite (above) as its premise. He and Billy Crystal attempt to swap murders, but to much broader effect. (PG-13) Central Cinema, $7-$9. 9:30 p.m. Fri.-Wed.

Follow us!

ings in unheated rooms—exactly Spielberg’s cup of borscht. Nicely complicating the situation is the way Abel, the enemy, comes to be a sympathetic figure. The British stage giant Rylance gives a marvelously detailed performance as the kind of guy Spielberg appreciates—a schlub doing his job. ROBERT HORTON (PG-13) Sundance, Majestic Bay, SIFF Cinema Uptown, Pacific Place, Lincoln Square, others ■ ROOM Joy (the excellent Brie Larson, from Short Term 12), we shall learn, was abducted as a 17-year-old. We meet her as the young mother of Jack (Jacob Tremblay, both of them confined to a garden shed/prison that forms the 5-year-old boy’s entire known universe. A skylight above, a few books, and TV cartoons blur into a magical realm for Jack; notions of what’s real and imaginary are just beginning to settle into his head. Adapted by Emma Donoghue from her 2010 novel, Room takes a big turn after an hour, Jack’s task, like Alice’s in Wonderland, is to understand the rules—or their absence—in two different realms. Lenny Abrahamson, of Frank, provides direction that’s both sure-handed and dry-eyed. MILLER (R) Guild 45th, Pacific Place, Lincoln Square SPECTRE 007 (Daniel Craig) is in disgrace as usual, while MI6 (still led by Ralph Fiennes’ M) is itself threatened by an upstart new spy agency. There’s also a self-satisfied new villain (Christoph Waltz) who goes by different names, and a new Bond girl, Dr. Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), also trying to escape her past. Spectre has a signature look and operating system that reinforce the Bond brand: quality, familiarity, lack of surprise (though many delights), and a design consistency that leads inexorably to the next product launch. It looks back, beginning with the famous theme and gunbarrel intro, then swoops forward in a seamless one-take assassination sequence in Mexico City. The filmmakers must show they can keep up with the Bourne and Mission: Impossible pretenders breathing down their necks. To this Bond-ophile,

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Ongoing

■ BRIDGE OF SPIES In Steven

Spielberg’s true-life saga, New York lawyer James B. Donovan (Tom Hanks) is plucked from his profitable private practice to defend a Soviet spy, Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance), in the late 1950s. What pricks Spielberg’s interest is the way Donovan is ostracized for performing a constitutional task during the height of Cold War. A few years later, Donovan is given another difficult task: negotiate a prisoner trade for the downed U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers. This section is all snowy East Berlin alleys and tense meet-

Spectre’s best moments after the Mexico City hit are familiar polish7710 ings of old 007 tropes. Boat chases helicopter, plane chases cars, Jaguar chases Aston Martin, and so on. This enjoyably overstuffed entertainment, also directed by Skyfall’s Sam Mendes, again has Bond reluctantly excavating more of his fraught/ repressed past. Yet amid these sticky snowdrifts of memory, one suspects that Ian Fleming would have little use for all the talk of wounded heroes and stolen childhoods. MILLER (PG13) Cinerama, Sundance, Big Picture, Majestic Bay, Thornton Place, Ark Lodge, others

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

BEATRICE AGUIRRE/WARNER BROS.

snow in the mountains, which means it’s time for the annual Warren Miller ski movie, with visits to the French Alps, Alaska, Utah, the Andes, and the Himalayas. Look for Crystal Mountain’s Ingrid Backstrom among other skiers and riders. (NR) Meydenbauer Center (Bellevue), warrenmiller.com. $22. 3, 6 & 9 p.m. Sun. DANGEROUS MEN Evidently a revenge-themed action flick filmed between 1989-2005 by Iranian-born John S. Rad. The log line makes it sound like Death Wish with a female star. (R) Grand Illusion, $5-$9. Fri.Thurs. See grandillusioncinema.org for showtimes. ■ FOUR BY TRUMBO With the Bryan Cranston-starring biopic Trumbo to open next Friday, here’s a chance to see a quartet of the blacklisted screenwriter’s greatest hits: Spartacus (an actor portrays Kirk Douglas in Trumbo), Papillon, Gun Crazy, and Exodus. All are worth seeing (and all play at least twice), though it would’ve been more interesting now to see the two movies for which Trumbo earned Oscars under a false name: Roman Holiday and The Brave One, the latter a bullfighting melodrama that doesn’t hold up too well. (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, $5. Fri.-Thurs. See siff.net for showtimes. ■ ROBERT HORTON Our eminent film critic is giving several free talks this week. “Before Ultron: Artificial Intelligence in the Movies” considers movies including 2001 and Her (Shoreline Library, 7 p.m. Thurs. Mercer Island Library, 1 p.m. Sun.). Then at Scarecrow Video (7 p.m. Mon.) he joins erstwhile SW critics Richard Jameson and Kathleen Murphy for a wide-ranging discussion—what they’ve seen and liked so far this year, and what lies ahead during the holiday and awards season. JAMES BOND-ATHON Showtimes aren’t given, so maybe these 007 movies are on continuous loop. This Sunday it’s the 1964 Goldfinger, with Sean Connery as Bond and Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore. Then there’s the timeless exchange between our hero, strapped to the table with laser aimed at his crotch. “Do you expect me to talk?” asks 007. “No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to die!” replies Gert Fröbe’s villain. (PG) King’s Hardware, 5225 Ballard Ave. N.W., 782-0027, kingsballard.com. Free. Sundays through Nov. 29. ■ NIGHTFALL Ida Lupino directs the film noir nugget The Bigamist

(1953) and plays one of two women— Joan Fontaine is the other—married to Edmond O’Brien. Interestingly, the plot is driven by infertility and the desire to adopt a child, while the movie toggles in flashback between L.A. and San Fran. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $63–$68 series, $8 individual. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Dec. 10.

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HIGHER GROUND

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learly I am in support of the legalization of marijuana. And I’m passionate about the subject not only because I enjoy smoking weed, but I’d also prefer not to be arrested for buying it. Regardless, I try to be objective on the matter, understanding that not everyone likes to get high (on cannabis, anyway), and that countering decades of Reefer Madness may take time. So in an effort to be more neutral and journalistic, I’d like to let the plethora of statistics I’ve gathered speak for itself. Although numbers, of course, cannot speak. Twenty-three states plus D.C. now allow medical marijuana, four have passed measures to legalize recreational cannabis, and 27 have decriminalized various amounts of weed possession. Legal cannabis sales last year were $2.7 billion, $1.55 billion in 2013. Estimates for this year are over $3.5 billion (not including ancillary products such as pipes, papers, grinders, vaporizers, etc.). According to a Gallup poll taken last month, 58 percent of adults think cannabis should be legal, an all-time high (no pun intended). Last year only 51 percent were in support, and in 2010, only 48 percent. The first time the Gallup poll asked about ganja was in 1969, when it found only 12 percent in favor of legalizing marijuana (and four percent claiming to have ever tried it). Among Americans born between 1981 and 1997 (i.e., whippersnappers, aka millennials), 71 percent support marijuana legalization. Thirtyfive percent of senior citizens (65 or over) support cannabis reform, as do 58 percent of baby boomers. Only 29 percent of those aged 70 to 87 think weed should be legal. Even though the majority support the right to smoke marijuana, they don’t necessarily want it in their faces. According to Pew Research, 62 percent of Americans don’t want weed smoked in public, even if legal, and 15 percent don’t want guests using it in their homes. As for opening a pot store in their hood? Fifty-seven percent have no problem with a legal cannabis business in their neighborhood. Women hold 36 percent of the executive positions in the U.S. cannabis industry, as compared to 22 percent of business-executive positions in the nation as a whole. Almost half of us have tried weed at some point (49 percent), and 12 percent—around 22 million Americans—have fired up (or eaten a brownie) in the past year. Over the past decade, the number of adults who say they used pot in the previous year has doubled.

According to the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, in 2013 40 percent of teens said they had used marijuana—down from 47 percent in 1999, but up from 37 percent in 2009. According to a 2013 study by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, almost 20 million Americans are monthly marijuana users, and 33 million try it every year. Twothirds of those who say they use pot on an annual basis also report that they don’t use any other (illegal) drugs. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, one in every three users experiences abuse of or dependency on the substance, adding up to 6.8 million Americans. It’s estimated by the United Nations that worldwide, 3.8 percent of the population—about 266 million adults—uses marijuana at least once per year, and 22.5 million smoke cannabis daily. The countries with the highest percentage of potheads? Papua New Guinea (29.5 percent), Palau (24 percent), and Ghana (21.2 percent). Italians like it a lot (15 percent), as do Nigerians (14 percent). Lowest on the list? Japan (0.1 percent) and Singapore (0.004 percent). A nationwide survey conducted by the University of Michigan found that 5.9 percent of college kids smoke weed on a near-daily basis, and only 5 percent smoke cigarettes, marking the first time since the study was first conducted in 1980 that more college students smoked cannabis than cigarettes. The average rolled joint contains half a gram of marijuana. Since an ounce is slightly more than 28 grams, you’ll get almost 60 joints in an ounce. (Unless of course you are Snoop Dogg.) Fifty-nine percent of Americans say that weed is easy to get a hold of, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Among kids aged 12 to 17, 48.7 percent say it’s easy to obtain, and for those 18 to 25, 75 percent do. That’s an even higher percentage than the 26-to-34 age group; 69 percent of them said it was fairly or very easy to get. Among those 35 to 49, 60 percent had no trouble getting the ganja, while only half of those 50 or older could find a dealer. According to the packaging, the serving size for Nacho Cheese Doritos is just 11 chips. Eleven. That’s a lot to think about. Oh, and #LegalizeIt. E For more Higher Ground, visit highergroundtv.com.


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Employment General

Multi-Media Advertising Consultant Puget Sound Region, WA Do you have a proven track record of success in sales and enjoy managing your own territory? Are you competitive and thrive in an energetic environment? Do you desire to work for a company that offers uncapped earning opportunities? Are you interested in a fast paced, creative atmosphere where you can use your sales expertise to provide consultative print and digital solutions? If you answered YES then you need to join the largest community news organization in Washington. The Daily Herald/La Raza is looking for a candidate who is selfmotivated, results-driven, and interested in a multi-media sales career. This position will be responsible for print and digital advertising sales to an exciting group of clients from Bellingham to Tacoma. The successful candidate will be engaging and goal oriented, with good organizational skills and will have the ability to grow and maintain strong business relationships through consultative sales and excellent customer service. Every day will be a new adventure! You can be an integral part of our top-notch sales team; helping local business partners succeed in their in print or online branding, marketing and advertising strategies. Professional sales experience necessary; media experience is a definite asset but not mandatory. If you have these skills, and enjoy playing a pro-active part in helping your clients achieve business success, please email your resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com ATTN: LARAZA in the subject line. We offer a competitive compensation (Base plus Commission) and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employee (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

PART TIME/FULLTIME JOB OPPORTUNITY NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED 20+Positions: Start a Career in the call center industry Description: Transfer Agent – Filter agent – Collection Representative Requirerments: • Must be 18 years or older - Clear U/A Clear Background

FT Tree Climber $1,000 Incentive after 30 days as FT Climber Full Time- Year Round Work We perform Residential Tree Trimming, Pruning & Removal work. Climbing Gear, Vehicle & DL Req. Company Sponsored Medical Avail. & Voluntary Dental Email work experience to recruiting@treeservicesnw.com 1-800-684-8733 ext. 3434

Excellent Career Growth

Paid Training– Commission – Bonus – Paid Holidays Compensation: $11.00 - $15.00 Hourly Apply online: Jobs@receivables performance.com Walk-In Interviews Monday to Friday 10:00am to 5:00pm Receivable Performance Management

Employment Computer/Technology Back End Engr, MIX & Web Srvs sought by FiftyThree in Seattle, WA. BS in CS, Cptr Engrg, or rltd +3 yrs exp. Know of sys arch, distrbutd sys, & of data strc & algo fr implmtng & dsgng sys. Exp in dsgn clntserv intrctn modl thru API & in wrtg unt & intgrtn tstng as prt of dvlp cycl. Req ocasnl trvl to NY ofc for mtg & wrkg sesns. Perm US wrk auth. Aply @ www.jobpostingtoday.com 23510. TECHNICAL Cisco Systems, Inc. is accepting resumes for the following position in Seattle, WA: Software Engineer (Ref.# SEA1): Responsible for the definition, design, development, test, debugging, release, enhancement or maintenance of networking software. Please mail resumes with reference number to Cisco Systems, Inc., Attn: M51H, 170 W. Tasman Drive, Mail Stop: SJC 5/1/4, San Jose, CA 95134. No phone calls please. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without sponsorship. EOE. www.cisco.com

Business Opportunities

Jobs@receivablesperformance.com

Order Generator Work for the Northwest’s Largest Tree Preservation Service. No Experience Necessary. Must enjoy working with people and being outdoors Set Your Own Schedule. Paid Orientation, Marketing Materials & Company Apparel Provided • $500-$750/ Week Average, Top Reps earn $1000+ • Daily Travel & Monthly Cell Phone Allowance Available • Group Medical & Voluntary Dental Plan Avail Email resume to recruiting@evergreentlc.com 1-800-684-8733 ext. 3434 ECO ELEMENTS METAPHYSICAL BOOKS & GIFTS Part Time Position Immediate Must Be Experienced in Retail Psychic Tarot Reader Sales and Metaphysics Drop off resume in person & book list to: 1530 1st Ave Science/Research Intellectual Ventures Property Holdings LLC, IP research & feasibility company, has openings in Bellevue, WA for Research Scientist, Mathematical Modeling: Develop mathematical models for development, refinement & utilization of infectious disease models; Project Scientist: Develop object detection software using image processing, machine learning & classification algorithms. Mail resume & reference job title to Intellectual Ventures Attn HR J.D. 3150 139th Ave SE, Bldg 4, Bellevue, WA 98005

Employment Services WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

Employment Computer/Technology Alstom Grid Inc. has openings for PROJECT ENGINEERS in Redmond, WA - perform assigned system integration and testing tasks, and integrate software applications for customers (domestic and international travel and possible short-term relocation at client sites throughout the U.S.) Apply online at https://alstom.taleo.net/ careersection/2/ jobsearch.ftl?lang=en and search for Job# RED000IF. EOE.

TAX PROBLEMS? You Could Save Thousands On Any Amount You Currently Owe The IRS

To Get Your Free Report “What the IRS Does Not Want You to Know” GO TO www.nunnbettertaxresolution.com Nunn Better Tax Resolution LLC, Redmond, WA

Toll Free: 844-SOS-1040

Turn Key Restaurant For Sale Glass Alley Cafe, 5575 Harbor Ave., Freeland Family Tragedy Forces Owner to Move out of State Dear Whidbey Island Community & All of Our Devoted Patrons It is With Great Sadness that I am selling my successful wellestablished restaurant. See why Glass Alley Cafe has attracted a steady following; visit website: glassalleycafe. squarespace.com Established Return Clientele! This is a rare and exciting opportunity to earn, learn & be your own boss with such a fine establishment such as Glass Alley Cafe! $59,000 For your serious inquiry & personal tour appointment directly with owner, please contact Debbie at: (360) 969-2320 maytopcat@cox.net

Home Services Lawn/Garden Service

Announcements

Henning Gardening

Real Estate for Rent King County VASHON.

Plant. Prune. Weed. Bark. Mow. Debris Removal. Call Geoff for fall cleanup

206-854-1794

Real Estate for Sale Lots/Acreage

6 HOUR MIN . LIC . INSURED

KENDRICK.

Announcements

ADOPTION: Super Fun Family Vacations, NYC Executive, Financial Security, Lots of LOVE awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid 1-800-243-1658

EARN A $75,000

IDAHO RETREAT 11 ACRES comfortable home built in 1954. 3 BR, large living room kitchen and dinign rooms areas. Basement. Barn, corrals, and outbuildings. Lovely creek running through property. Well maintained roads. $199,000. FSBO. Call Cliff, evenings and weekends 208-289-5349 weekdays 208-553-5380

ISLAND COUPLE SEEKS ACCOMMODATIONS NOW Needed immediately! I have 2 well established house dogs, I’m willing to pay deposit for. Please call Elaine Kearney 206-303-7890 or Dave Kearny at 206-910-3851. WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent Greenlake/WestSeattle $550 & up (1st/last/deposit) Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

PAYDAY.

Are you a creator? A DIY Dreamer? A maker? We’re on the hunt for the first-ever Mrs. Meyer’s Home Maker. And we’re looking for somebody just like you. You already do it for the love, now do it to get paid. GET INSPIRED AT

MRSMEYERS.COM/MAKER NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF ANY KIND NECESSARY TO PARTICIPATE OR RECEIVE AN AWARD. Submission Phase begins 09/01/15 at 8:00:00 a.m. ET and ends 11/20/15 at 11:59:59 p.m. ET. The Home Maker Hunt is intended for participation from residents of the 50 U.S. & D.C., 18+. Void where prohibited. Subject to Terms and Conditions available at mrsmeyers.com/maker. Brought to you by S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. Only one finalist selected. Not an offer of employment. Finalist will receive one-time $75,000 payment. ©2015 The Caldrea Company. All Rights Reserved.

Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

Professional Services Music Lessons GUITAR LESSONS Exp’d, Patient Teacher. BFA/MM Brian Oates (206) 434-1942

is on instagram.com

Classified Ads in

just $9 per line per week (or less if running long term) Contact 206-623-6231 classifieds@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

KING’S MASSAGE

Employment General

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Appliances AMANA RANGE Deluxe 30” Glasstop Range self clean, auto clock & timer ExtraLarge oven & storage *UNDER WARRANTY* Over $800. new. Pay off balance of $193 or make payments of $14 per month. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

Call

Classified

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad Enroll Now! Severe Allergies to Food or the Environment? Earn $200 per qualified plasma donation and help advance medical research! 425-258-3653 - plasmalab.com

GOODNESS MOVING APTS. OFFICES 206-851-3995

HAPPYHAULER.com

Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted!

Singing Lessons

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062 WE PAY CA$H FOR OLD VIDEO GAMES! ---------------GAME OVER VIDEOGAMES --------------Bellevue – Crossroads 425-746-GAME Seattle – Northgate 206-364-GAME GameOverVideoGames.com

Classified Ads Get Results!

$ TOP CASH $

PAID FOR UNWANTED CARS & TRUCKS

Up To $1000

7 Days * 24 Hours Licensed + Insured

ALL STAR TOWING

425-870-2899

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 11 — 17, 2015

REPO REFRIGERATOR Custom deluxe 22 cu. ft. sideby-side, ice & water disp., color panels available

UNDER WARRANTY!

was over $1200 new, now only payoff bal. of $473 or make pmts of only $15 per mo. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

KENMORE FREEZER

Repo Sears deluxe 20cu.ft. freezer 4 fast freeze shelves, defrost drain,

interior light *UNDER WARRANTY* Make $15 monthly payments or pay off balance of $293. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

KENMORE REPO Heavy duty washer & dryer, deluxe, large cap. w/normal, perm-press & gentle cycles. * Under Warranty! * Balance left owing $272 or make payments of $25. Call credit dept. 206-244-6966 NEW APPLIANCES UP TO 70% OFF All Manufacturer Small Ding’s, Dents, Scratches and Factory Imperfections *Under Warranty* For Inquiries, Call or Visit Appliance Distributors @ 14639 Tukwila Intl. Blvd. 206-244-6966

STACK LAUNDRY Deluxe front loading washer & dryer. Energy efficient, 8 cycles. Like new condition * Under Warranty * Over $1,200 new, now only $578 or make payments of $25 per month

Flea Market

Bazaars/Craft Fairs

COFFEE TABLE, octagon, 4 bevelled glass panels, base underneath, Excellent cond. $50. Must see! Bellevue 425-641-0643. SEATTLE

HOLIDAY BAZAAR

Bazaars/Craft Fairs BOTHELL

%206-244-6966%

Gifts, Crafts, Baked Goods, Treasures and much more... Friday, 11/20, 9am-4pm Satur., 11/21, 9am-3pm BALLARD NW SENIOR CENTER, 5429 32nd Avenue NW, Seattle, WA 98107 (2 blocks North of Locks) VASHON ISL.

Auctions/ Estate Sales Mercer Island

Estate Sale 6950 SE Allen Street (First Hill). Fri-Sat. Nov. 13-14 9AM-3PM. Furn., Tools, Dishes, Art, ‘96 Subaru, Bruno Hansen Dining Set, 55+ Years of Living! Park at top of hill. Don’t rely on GPS.

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

Want to stop drinking to numb the pain?

Volunteers are needed for the APT Study examining two different types of treatment for people who have both alcohol problems and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Counseling is provided at no cost. Call the APT Study at

MY FRIENDS & MORE Holiday Bazaar! Join us to Celebrate our 16th Anniversary of Community Fun with Fabulous Local Artisans! Saturday, November 21st, 10am to 5pm, one block North of Home Depot (18701 120th Ave NE). Santa arrives at 1pm! Parents bring your Camera for Free Photos with Santa! Pets Welcome! Free Admission, Free Parking, Free Refreshments and Free Children’s Craft and Play Area Provided! Tour Buses Welcome. Full Wheelchair and Stroller Access. www.craftybug.com

Sat 11/21; 10-4

VENDORS; A FEW SPACES STILL AVAIL. 55+ Tables; Crafts, Gifts, Bake Sale, Music, & Refreshments. 9329 SW Cemetery Rd McMurray Middle School Molly 206-329-4708

Lake City Emblem Club’s Annual Holiday Bazaar for Charity

206-764-2458

n o s u w o M l l A o R f G A T INS @

32

Appliances

D I N I NG

W E E K LY

MUSIC

FILM

Nov 14th, 10am to 4pm

Shoreline Elks 14625 15th Ave NE Shoreline, 98155 Talented Crafters & Artists with Specialty Items. Bake Sale. Lunch Available! Admission FREE! Open To The Public

HAPPY HOUR

Temporary, Temporary-to-Hire & Direct Hire Do you have administrative experience? We place: Receptionists

Bookkeepers

Administrative Assistants

Executive Assistants

Office Support Specialists

Legal Assistants

Office Managers

Accounting Assistants

Data Entry Personnel

Marketing Assistants

NEVER A FEE TO YOU! Apply Online: www.tyiseattle.com Or call today — we’re here for you!

206.386.5400

Temporarily Yours Staffing

720 3rd Ave. Ste. 1420 - Seattle, WA 98104 “The friendliest and preferred agency”

Abandoned Vehicle AUCTION!!! 11/13/15 @ 11AM 1989 Chevy C1PU C15011E 1994 Dodge Van AVR7808 2001 GMC Yukon AJA1215 2002 BMW 5254D AHN4480

EVENTS

14315 Aurora Ave N.

RENTON.

AM-PM TOWING INC

Preview 10-11AM

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER The inside scoop on features, columns and reviews.

Auto Events/ Auctions

BIG D TOWING Abandoned Vehicle Auction Friday 11/20/15 @ 11AM. 3 Vehicles Preview 10-11am. 1540 Leary Way NW, Seattle 98107

ARTS AND E

BIG D TOWING Abandoned Vehicle Auction Tuesday 11/17/15 @ 11AM. 1 Vehicle Preview 10-11am. 1540 Leary Way NW, Seattle 98107

Clark’s Towing, LLC Public Auto Auction 11/20/15- 12 PM SAT, NOV 21st, 9 TO 3 ANNUAL ST. ANDY’S Gals Holiday Bazaar! Lots of Crafts, Gifts, Holiday Decorations, Baked Goods and Raffle Items. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Youth & Women Programs. St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 3604 NE 10th Ct, Renton Highlands. For more info and directions, see www.standrewpc.org or call: 425-255-2580.

Preview at 11am

Auction @ 1780 NW Maple St., Issaquah, WA 425-392-6000 To view list go to: www.clarktow.com

Stan’s Mountain View Towing Inc Abandoned Vehicle Auction 9000 Delridge Way SW, Seattle WA Wednesday 11/18/15 Gates Open 9AM, Auction 12 PM 206-767-4848

Seattle Weekly, November 11, 2015  

November 11, 2015 edition of the Seattle Weekly

Seattle Weekly, November 11, 2015  

November 11, 2015 edition of the Seattle Weekly