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Hospital District’s numbers continue to improve

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New roof installation and HVAC system completed

Katie Teachout/staff photos

A semi-tractor trailer carrying a load of white rock calcium carbonate left the road after a deer hit by a car in the northbound lane flew through the truck’s windshield near Janis Bridge south of Tonasket. The accident occurred around 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 4, according to the incident report by Washington State Patrol Trooper Ted Shook. The crash led to the temporary closure of the northbound lane as rock was being removed from the highway. Richard L. Sanche, 50, Vernon, BC, was driving a 2015 Honda Civic northbound on SR97, when it struck the deer. The deer became airborne and crashed through the windshield of a 2007 Kenworth truck with dump trailer being driven by Lloyd Caton Jr., Tonasket. The truck, owned by Sawyer & Sawyer, went over the centerline and across the northbound lane and came to rest off the road in the northbound ditch, according to Trooper Shook. Caton was transported by ambulance to North Valley Hospital, then airlifted to Confluence Health for further treatment. Sanche, whose car ended up parked on the shoulder of the road, was not injured. Both drivers were wearing seatbelts at the time of the accident. Sanche’s car, while damaged, was drivable from the scene. The tractor-trailer was towed by Randy’s towing after the calcium carbonate quarried by Columbia River Carbonates, near Wauconda, was transferred to another truck. Neither driver was charged in the accident.

NVH would begin the Lean journey. The Lean program addresses waste in the U.S. Healthcare system. Attending the tour were Board Member Adam Tibbs, CEO Zwicker, RN/ER Coordinator Katrina Kindred, RN Lynzie Wince, RN Bernice Hailey, RN Kris Kauffold, Shauneen BY KATIE TEACHOUT Range of Purchasing, Radiology Leader KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Shane Pyper, and Olma. Tina Smith, Director of Nursing TONASKET - At the North Services, said they were excited about Valley Hospital District Board of going live with the Health Information Commissioner’s regular meeting Oct. 29, Technology EpowerDoc program startCEO Mike Zwicker reported a positive ing Nov. 3, and that EpowerDoc staff budget of $3,399,310. would be onsite 24/7 Zwicker said for the hospital’s first patient revenue four days of using the exceeded last year’s by program. “The surgery crew is very $2 million. Zwicker Chief Information said a gross income happy with the way it Officer Kelly Cariker of $2.2 million plus turned out, with temper- reported hardware grants, unrestricted being installed for contributions and ature, air flow, noise and the EpowerDoc prolevies totaling about to go live Nov. the ability to adjust it. ” gram $170,000 brought the 3 at 8 a.m. and comtotal to $3.4 million, Kelly Caricker, Chief Information Officer pletion of the new compared to $3.2 North Valley Hospital District roof installation and million last year. The HVAC system. administrator said “The surgery crew the largest expenses is very happy with the way it turned out, were $10.7 million in salary and wages, with temperature, air flow, noise and the employee benefits of $2.6 million with a ability to adjust it,” said Cariker. total $22.5 million in operating expenses. Cariker said an inspection from the Zwicker said he “would like to shave State for Long Term Care had a finding off some adjustments on expenses” but on food holding temperatures, so new would need to meet with Chief Financial thermometers were purchased for staff to Officer Helen Verhasselt for that. carry around and monitor food. Six lockA quality report on Housekeeping down and two security watch drills in was presented by Ancillary Services October garnered positive feedback from Director Noreen Olma, who introduced the admitting and ED staff concerning her Housekeeping lead, Cherry Lorz. In the security team. a recent HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Human Resources Director Jan Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Gonzales introduced new employSystems) survey, 84% of respondents ee Sarah Grooms as the Community gave NVH housekeeping services “top Outreach Liaison. Gonzalez said a wellmarks.” HCAHPS surveyors contact half ness challenge of having all staff memof all patients who stay in a hospital. bers getting lipids and other health Olma also reported the VA Clinic’s indicators checked was at 28 percent medical director is out on family medi- participation. The goal is to reach 40 cal leave. The clinic is in the process of percent by November 15, as that would securing an interim medical director to give the hospital a huge break on medical be available remotely for consultation, premiums. Gonzales said the hospital lab and on-site two days a month. was available for employees to have the “We’re hoping to top the 800 mark this testing done at a reduced cost. month in getting vets registered,” said Gonzales reported reduced employee Olma. turnover in the third quarter overall. Olma said a tour of Kittitas Valley “Going down is good,” said Gonzales. Healthcare in Ellensburg at the beginning of October provided a lot of ideas for how HOSPITAL | PG A2

Parks & Rec District gets nod from voters Frazier, Fancher, lead in races for school boards BY GARY A. DE VON

election count is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 12, with the expected certification on Tuesday, Nov. 24, according to Jury.

TONASKET PARKS AND RECREATION DISTRICT

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The pro Parks & Rec. District votes increased by nearly 400 votes from the OKANOGAN – Even after two ballot first count and is now leading 884, or counts, approval of the Tonasket Parks 64.86 percent, to 479, or 35.14 percent and Recreation District seems assured against. An increase by another one perand two incumbent cent over Tuesday’s school directors may ballot count. have lost their seats on The proposi“We have about 385 their boards if the foltion seeks to create low-up ballot counts ballots left to count” a Tonasket Park and continues along the Recreation District Mila Jury, Elections Official same lines as the electhat would allow the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office tion night count and district to tax people the second count on within the district to Friday. “provide leisure time The first ballot count for the Nov. activities and recreational facilities.” The 3 General Election took place at the district would be authorized to impose Okanogan County Auditor’s office at regular property tax levies of 15 cents or 8:24 p.m. and the second count was less per thousand dollars of assessed valFriday, Nov. 6. uation on all property located within the “We have about 385 ballots left to Tonasket Park and Recreation District count,” said Deputy Auditor Mila Jury, a for each of five consecutive years to procertified elections administrator. vide a means of both maintaining a comThe results are unofficial until all the munity swimming pool and maintaining valid ballots are tallied – in order for balexisting Tonasket City Parks. lots to be counted they must have been The district would be governed by a postmarked by election day. The next

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 46

newly elected five member board. The ballot asked voters within the district’s boundaries, both inside and outside of Tonasket city limits, to vote for a new board of five members. Running unopposed for the Parks & Rec. Board were Kathleen Thompson, Billie Kay Attwood and Jordon Weddle, for positions 1 through 3, respectively. In position 4, the voters are asked to choose between Tyler Graves and Shawn E. Brazil. Brazil increased his 75 vote lead on Tuesday in the Friday count. He currently has a 99 vote lead with 486 votes to Graves’ 387. In position 5, David Stangland and Michael Ward both appeared on the ballot, although Ward had dropped out of the race and threw his support to Stangland. According to Tuesday’s count Stangland was leading 715 to 257.

OROVILLE SCHOOL BOARD In an upset vote, it appears Ryan Frazier, a former Oroville High School social studies teacher has defeated Rocky DeVon, the sitting chairman of the school board in Director Position 5. Frazier was a probationary teacher whose contract was not picked up after the 2014-15 school year. He is leading

Source: Okanogan County Auditor’s Office

Proposition 1, the creation of a new Tonasket Parks and Recreation District, was leading in the ballot count by 405 votes after the second ballot count following the Tuesday, Nov. 3 General Election. The proposition is expected to pass. DeVon, who owns Oroville RE/MAX Lake and Country Realty, 658 votes (61.38 percent) to 406 votes (37.87 percent). While DeVon’s overall percentage went up after the second count, he still trails well behind Frazier, who currently works for Sun Lakes Realty in Oroville. Kolo Moser, Agent in Charge of the

SEE ELECTION | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Oroville Station of the U.S. Border Patrol, is ahead in the race against Becky Lewis, president of the Oroville Co-op Preschool. Moser has 653 votes (63.58 percent) to Lewis’ 364 (35.58 percent) for Director Position 2. The winner will

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Obituaries Sports

A6-A7 A8 B2-B3

Classifieds Real Estate Schools

B4-B5 B5 B8


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015

NEWS HOSPITAL | FROM A1

CELEBRATING 10 YEARS

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, Essential I sings with BlueJay Hankins backing him as DJ at the Sick Donkey Records Ten Year Anniversary Party and Family Reunion. Hankins and Essential I have been performing together since 2003. Left, John Jones engineers the sound as people of all ages enjoy dancing to music that kept people hopping until 1:30 in the morning at the Riverside Grange. Hankins rented the grange overnight, and said 15 people camped out rather than travel after the festivities.

“Turnover of RNs in acute care is way down from 2014, and NACs are way down in long term care. It has been a long term goal to keep turnover down.” Long Term Care Manager Linda Holden attributed the lower turnover to a more selective interview process, as well as treating the NACs well; giving them “lots of support and lots of autonomy.” Gonzales said being selective of who was chosen for the NAC classes helped also. “District-wide, turnover is the lowest it has been since 2010,” said Gonzales. She reported workers compensation claims being very low, with just 11 submitted so far this year. “At the current rate, we could match our record, set in 2007 of 13 claims filed during the year,” said Gonzales. “This means everyone is being careful and paying attention. Controlling time-loss days helps rates not go up exorbitantly.” Gonzales also reported a reduction in dollars spent on grievances. In 2013, the hospital had one grievance filed and settled for $5,000; and one termination settlement for $15,158 paid in compensation and benefits. In 2012, one grievance was filed and settled for $5,000; in 2012 one grievance was filed and settled for $8,500; and in 2011, two grievances were filed. The hospital won in arbitration and settled the other one for $10,000. So far in 2015, one grievance was filed with no costs involved in

settlement; and one termination case is in litigation. Gonzales said the figures in her report did not include staff time spent in dealing with the issues, or, in some cases, attorney’s fees. “In summary, employee grievances and termination settlements cost the Hospital District dearly,” said Gonzales. Training

the incumbent, Position 5.

es include: Gary Nelson, Cemetery District 4 (Riverview, Oroville); Kenneth D. Ripley, Commissioner Position 3 for Fire District 1 (Oroville, Rural); Duane Van Woert and Jack Denison, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 4 (Tonasket area), Mark Robanske for Position 3, for Fire District 12 (Swanson Mill); Michael Woelke and Robert

“Controlling time-loss days helps rates not go up exorbitantly” Jan Gonzales, Director NVH Human Resources

to help reduce costs of employee turnover was held for all management staff in 2014, and will continue for Senior Leaders as well as all Leadership employees in 2015. Patient Financial Services Director Jana Symonds reported her trip to Chicago, Ill and Mobile, Ala. to share with other hospitals the story of NVH’s financial recovery. She said it led her to the realization “people are in a lot worse shape than we were in and even than we are in now.” “It is with great pride that I can tell our story and hope to be an inspiration to other hospitals that have not made those transitions,” said Symonds. Symonds said she came to really appreciate NVH’s disaster training on her trip. “The disaster training we had helped with a crazy plane ride. It

was chaotic, the man next to me started screaming in Chinese, he choked the stewardess down in the aisle and the plane was put on lockdown,” Symonds said. Symonds said the Health Information Management department was hardest hit by the Federally required switch to ICD10. “We are fortunate to have Payge (Fries, Health Information Manager) here, as she has a solid background and is capable of training our staff where other facilities have had to hire CDI teams or send their staff to be trained,” said Symonds. Symonds said she discovered some areas in the billing department where new employees needed more training, and made some changes to shorten the time bills are in Accounts Receivable. “We are doing a great job recognizing weaknesses early on and thus making the necessary changes before we are in grave danger,” said Symonds. Holden reported that after downsizing last year and laying off some staff in Long Term Care, she was concerned about patient responses on a Quality Indicator Survey. The annual survey by Residential Care Services was performed in early October and Holden said she was happy with the results. The Board canceled their meetings for Nov. 26 and Dec. 31, but will hold the meetings scheduled for Nov. 12 and Dec. 10. The board went into executive session to discuss matters regarding litigation.

ELECTIONS | FROM A1 take the seat being vacated by Amy Wise, a long time member of the school board. Moser’s lead increased slightly over Tuesday’s original vote count. Returning to the board in Position 1 will be Todd Hill and for Position 3, Mike Egerton. Both the incumbents ran unopposed for their seats.

TONASKET SCHOOL BOARD In a closer race it appears Joyce Fancher, a retired Tonasket teacher and former Tonasket City Councilwoman and school board member, has regained a seat on the school board in Director Position 3. In the second vote count Fancher increased her lead to 146 votes over Olson, owner/operator of Ty Olson Construction. The current vote count is 545 (53.87 percent) to 438 (45.17 percent).

Incumbents Catherine Stangland, Director Position 2 and Jerry D. Asmussen, Director Position 5, each ran unopposed and were elected to new four-year terms.

also returning to the council in Position 4. Hart, a long time member of the council, ran unopposed this election.

OROVILLE CITY COUNCIL

All three positions up for election on the Tonasket City Council were unchallenged. Elected to Positions 2 and 4 are Jensen Sackman and Maria Moreno, respectively, while Claire Jefko,

Neysa Roley, the incumbent for the Oroville City Council in Position 5, has stretched out her lead to nearly 100 votes over her challenger, Chris Allen. After the first count she led by 58 votes and after Friday’s count she leads 210 to 118 against Allen. In the council seat being vacated by Ed Naillon, David “Mac” McElheran is leading Robert Fuchs for Position 3. McElheran has a 48 vote lead (up two votes from Tuesday’s count), 182 to 134, over Fuchs for Council Position 3. Incumbent Walt Hart III, is

TONASKET CITY COUNCIL

returns

to

OTHER UNOPPOSED OFFICES Herbert Wandler finds himself back on the board for Okanogan County Hospital District 4. The current North Valley Hospital District Commissioner ran unopposed for another six-year term in Position 3. Candidates for other offic-

THE EFFECTS

K. Bauer, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 16 (Aeneas Valley) and Guy D. Fisher, Leland “Lee” Chapman and Mike Cantwell, for Commissioner Positions 1, 2 and 3, respectively for the Lake Osoyoos Water District. For full county election results see: http://results.vote.wa.gov/ results/current/okanogan/.

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NOVEMBER 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Twenty-six cords of firewood were donated by the Boy Scouts for local fire survivors. The wood was harvested at the Lake Bonaparte Boy Scout Camp from a wind storm in 2013 that took out 162 trees.

Fire survivor and Tonasket Distribution Center volunteer Steve Moen (above and below) unloads firewood donated by the Department of Corrections. DOC officer James O’Hara and Long Term Recovery volunteer Peter James (above, left to right) watch the goods get stacked at the GO Recycle Center for fire survivors to claim.

Firewood ready for fire survivors to claim Scouts, Dept. of Corrections, donate wood for winter

use,” said long-time camp volunteer Kevin Erwert. He contacted Lael Duncan of the Okanogan County Community Action Council, who was excited to hear of the gift.

KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

“From adversity can come new opportunity, if only we dare to dream.”

TONASKET As temperatures drop, concerns increase for people left homeless from this summer’s wildfires to keep warm over the winter. The Boy Scouts were the first to step up, with a delivery of 26 cords of seasoned firewood to the GO Recycling Center on Clarkson Mill Road. The wood was harvested at the Camp Bonaparte Boy Scout Camp at Lost Lake, after a 2013 wind storm that took out 162 trees; including a 148-year old Douglas Fir tree that took out the Commissary. “It occurred to me that rather than sell the firewood to raise a few bucks for the scout camp, perhaps it could be put to greater

Kevin Erwert Property Volunteer and Council Executive Board Member Bonaparte Scout Camp

“Part of the Boy Scout Oath is, ‘to help other people at all times,’ and when I contacted Walter Mueler, our Scout Executive, he was excited,” said Erwert, who went on to say that the same wood that had caused all the damage to the scout camp, and destroyed his “beloved commis-

sary building” was also the same wood that was going to help some folks out this winter. “It was going to help them just as it had helped us at the scout camp, for we never would have build a new Commissary building in my lifetime, had it not been for that micro burst storm,” said Erwert. “From adversity can come new opportunity, if only we dare to dream.” On Wednesday, Nov. 4, a semitrailer pulled in to the Recycle Center with 10 more cords, courtesy of the Department of Corrections (DOC). “It’s going to keep people warm this winter, that’s the idea behind it,” said DOC officer James O’Hara. O’Hara works at the Olympic Corrections Center, a 400-bed minimum security facility about 20 miles outside of Forks. Rhonda Hinkley, Public Liaison with the Tonasket Distribution Center (TDC), said the connection with the DOC happened through Jim Rawley, a Tonasket

native who lives on the coast now and whose uncle, Randy Riggins, works at the corrections center. “Randy was concerned about the people affected by the fires,

emails one evening, and within 24 hours we heard, ‘OK, we will have a truck headed your way.’” O’Hara said the opportunity for the DOC to deliver firewood to Okanogan Complex survivors came together quickly at his end, as the facility was already partnered with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The collaboration originated with DOC providing fire suppression services to the DNR, and expanded to allow prisoners to gather firewood to be donated to local senior citizens. “We’re a minimum security facility, so prisoners can do community action work,” said O’Hara, adding, “It’s a rare opportunity to be able to provide heat for homes.” Correctional Services provided the trucking, with truck driver Nathan Glass hitting the road at 5 a.m. to bring the load over from Tumwater. “The firewood is seasoned, so it should be ready to right into stoves,” O’Hara said of the mix of

“There was a flurry of emails one evening, and within 24 hours we heard, ‘OK, we have a truck headed your way.” Rhonda Hinkley, Public Liaison, Tonasket Distribution Center

and wanting to help,” said Hinkley. “He asked himself, ‘I wonder if they could use firewood?’ He approached us six weeks ago. It took awhile to connect the dots, with episodes of phone tag, but once we got the ball rolling it only took a couple of days. There was a flurry of

hemlock and fir. Steve Moen, who lost three homes over 60 acres in the Okanogan Complex, pulled a forklift up to the semi to offload the firewood, loaded onto pallets. “Steve is our most dedicated volunteer outside of the core team,” said Hinkley. “I don’t know what I would do without him,” said Stacy Storm, who manages the TDC warehouses. Fire survivors wanting firewood can get an intake form from Case Manager Laurel Silvan at the Community Cultural Center. Silvan sends vouchers over to Storm at the TDC, which people can pick up during the TDC’s hours of Friday through Monday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Then they take the voucher to Maria Cornwoman at the GO Green Recycling Center, open Tuesdays from noon to 6 p.m. and Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. GO Green is located at 3 Rodeo Drive, just south of Tonasket off Hwy 97 at Clarkson Mill Road.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Ira Leo Frank, 20, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 5 to POCS (methamphetamine), obstruction and use of drug paraphernalia. Frank was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $2,260.50 for Oct. 16 crimes. Katheryn Elizabeth Bigwolf, 20, Oroville, pleaded guilty Nov. 3 to three counts of third-degree assault (health care worker) and one count of third-degree assault (law enforcement officer). Bigwolf was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $600 for the July 17 crimes. Larry Fredrick O’Bryan, 34, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 3 to first-degree reckless burning (lesser included of second-degree arson). O’Bryan was sentenced to 4.5 months in jail and fined $600 for the Aug. 5 crime. Cara Ann Campbell, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 3 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Campbell was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $1,260.50 for the Sept. 29 crimes. Troy Steven Pierre, 19, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 3 to POCS (methamphetamine). Pierre was sentenced to 15 days in jail with fined $2,260.50 for the Sept. 18 crime. The court issued Oct. 28 an arrest warrant for James Jonathan McKinney, 31, Okanogan, for three counts of delivery of a controlled substance. The crimes allegedly occurred in March and June. The court found probable cause to charge Deena Jean Lazard, 27, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 28. The court found probable cause to charge Eli Paul Van Brunt, 30, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred July 22. In a second case, the court found probable cause to charge Van Brunt with additional charges of second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Those crimes allegedly occurred July 9. DISTRICT COURT Terrence William Steven Finley, 38, Omak, had two charges dismissed: third-degree malicious mischief and fourthdegree assault. Finely was fined $500. Jose Plascencia Gomez, 70, Tonasket, guilty of firstdegree negligent driving. Gomez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $508. Shavonna Lee Gorr, 25, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault dismissed. Duane E. Hall, 36, Omak, had a first-degree vehicle prowl charge dismissed. Seth Jared Harris, 29, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Harris was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $618. Wade Russell Hudson, 32,

Tonasket, had an obstruction charge dismissed. Jesse Owen Jane, 39, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Jane was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $508. Ciara Marie Lasarte, 29, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and making a false or misleading statement. The court dismissed and obstruction charge. Lasarte was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,058. Fernando Martinez Gonzalez, 20, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: minor frequenting a tavern. Martinez Gonzalez was fined $200. Clifford Steven McCauley, 41, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Nov. 2, 2015 Automobile theft on FS 30 Rd. near Tonasket. Child abuse on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Hanford St. in Omak. Christopher Augustus George, 28, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV) and third-degree DWLS. Russell Ellis Gardner, 22, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants, all for third-degree DWLS. Jamaree Josefina Ponce, 21, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants, all for third-degree theft. Zeke Andrew Smith, 35, booked for violation of a nocontact order (DV). Marcos Pino Hernandez, 44, court commitment for DUI. Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015 Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Sex offender registry on N. Birch St. in Omak. Burglary on John St. in Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Two-vehicle crash on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Fraud on River Overlook Rd. near Omak. Theft on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Railroad St. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Drugs on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 28, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Clarence Desautel, no middle name listed, 52, booked on an OCSO warrant for intimidating a public servant.

THANK YOU ... Tonasket Feed & Supply

Daryl Anthony McCraigie, 26, booked for DUI court violation. David Leslie Louis, 34, DOC detainer. Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2015 Burglary on Grove St. in Riverside. Illegal burning on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Energy drink reported missing. Trespassing on Dry Gulch Rd. near Oroville. Abandoned vehicle on LoomisOroville Rd. near Loomis. Public intoxication on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Harassment on N. Birch St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Kay St. in Oroville. Fraud on Central Ave. in Oroville. Drugs on E. Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Maybelline Mary Moses, 29, booked for DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Shelby Joreen George, 26, booked for residential burglary, second-degree burglary, second-degree theft and a DOC secretary’s warrant. Stephen Kane Kuykendall, 46, DOC detainer. Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 One-vehicle roll-over crash on Mary Ann Creek Rd. near Oroville. Drugs on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Recovered vehicle on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on Jasmine St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Josephine Michelle Valdez, 23, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Chauncey Montague Rickles, 38, court commitment for DUI. Jacob John Besel, 28, booked on an OCSO warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Derek James Bell, 35, booked on four OCSO warrants: two for POCS and one each for third-degree DWLS and altering markings on a firearm. Lance Victor Paul, 21, booked for residential burglary, second-degree burglary, second-degree theft and thirddegree malicious mischief. Francisco Gonzalez, 21, booked on a DOC warrant. Jeremiah Joseph Turner, 38, court commitment for DUI. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 27, DOC detainer. Friday, Nov. 6, 2015 Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on Jasmine St. in Omak. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Theft on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Assault on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in

Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Hanford St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on 14th Ave. in Oroville. DWLS on N. State Frontage Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on E. Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Gabriel Jose Saenz, 42, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and second-degree theft. Charles Leroy Ellis, 46, booked for first-degree DWLS. Anastasia Marie King, 22, booked for second-degree theft. Harvey Everett Jason Heath, 43, booked for first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015

Tonasket. Television reported missing. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Michael Paul Utigard, 62, booked on three counts of first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 43, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Sherilynn Nielson, no middle name listed, 47, booked for fourth-degree assault. Francisco Bud Bitonti Jr., 36, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Brandon Matthew Herz, 29, DOC detainer. Richard Lynn Gregory, 67, booked for DUI. Johnathan Charles Von Grote, 24, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Harassment on Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Hanford St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. MIP/C on Dayton St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on Jackson St. in Omak. Drugs on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on Edmonds St. in Omak. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Table reported missing. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in

Warrant arrest on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Illegal burning on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Lode Rd. near Oroville. Theft on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on LoomisOroville Rd. near Loomis. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Fire on Central Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville.

Sunday, Nov. 8, 2015

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

PERMIT TO CONTROL PLANTS, ALGAE IN LAKES TO BE UPDATED BY DOE SUBMITTED BY SANDRA PARTRIDGE ECOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS

OLYMPIA – Keeping Washington’s lakes clear and safe for swimming, boating and fishing can sometimes require carefully monitored efforts to control aquatic plants and algae. Licensed applicators, local governments, homeowner associations and lakefront homeowners may apply for an Aquatic Plant and Algae General Permit to control plants such as Eurasian watermilfoil. Milfoil can form large mats that can make swimming and boating dangerous and also affect lake health. The permit also allows for the use of algicides and phosphorous-inactivation products to reduce toxic algae blooms in lakes. Toxic algae blooms can make people sick, especially small children and the elderly. Pets can die after drinking water with a toxic bloom and should not swim in lakes with toxic algae. The permit also helps local governments and organizations maintain infrastructure by allowing treatment of excess weeds on roadsides, along ditch banks, and in flood-control structures. The Washington Department of Ecology invites comments on minor changes it is proposing to make to this permit. Changes proposed include requiring less paperwork and a streamlined environmental review process. Ecology will accept comments on the changes until 5 p.m. Dec. 18. It will hold an in-person and online webinar workshop/public hearing at 1 p.m. Dec. 7 at Ecology’s Lacey offices, located at 300 Desmond Dr., Lacey. Visit Ecology’s website to review the proposed permit changes, to sign up for the webinar, and to find out how to provide comments.

Thanksgiving

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DUI on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. David Thomas Kay, 34, booked on an FTA warrant for POCS. Michael Leroy Donner, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Wendy D. Snook, 59, booked on an FTA warrant for felony harassment. Mark Anthony Combs, 52, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of an antiharassment order. Jennifer Lynn Valdez, 21, booked for second-degree burglary.

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NOVEMBER 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Eyman pleased with pro-initiative vote OPINION BY JERRY CORNFIELD EVERETT HERALD

Voters have spoken and no one could be pleased more by what they said than Tim Eyman. The professional initiative promoter from Mukilteo had another anti-tax measure on Tuesday’s ballot. And like many of its predecessors it is passing with support in nearly every county in the state. “I’m absolutely elated,” he gushed in a phone call after downing four glazed doughnuts at a pop-up Election Night party at a Krispy Kreme in Seattle. “It is incredibly gratifying.” Initiative 1366 may be his boldest attempt yet to force state lawmakers to do something many don’t want to do, which is to make it harder on them to create new taxes or raise existing ones. The measure requires the state’s sales tax be reduced by a penny next year unless the Legislature approves a constitutional amendment requiring any new or higher tax be approved by a two-thirds majority of both the House and Senate. Voters must approve the constitutional amendment too. On Tuesday, I-1366 was passing with 54 percent statewide. It was ahead in 35 counties, including Snohomish and Island counties. However, it is losing in King County where the largest mass of pro-tax voters lives, so the final outcome is sure to be closer. Regardless of the ending margin, Eyman said the results show when it comes to taxes most voters would like to see them go down if they can and make it harder for them to go up if they can’t. Eyman celebrated this political touchdown with a little extra step in his victory dance. Obviously he enjoyed repelling foes who contended the measure amounted to blackmailing lawmakers with the loss of billions of sales tax dollars for schools and state programs if they didn’t pass the taxlimiting constitutional amendment. Eyman also relished that most voters apparently didn’t give a hoot he was the driving force behind the initiative, though opponents strived to disparage the measure by tying his name to it. This could have been a year for such a tactic to work. Eyman is under investigation by Attorney General Bob Ferguson for allegedly breaking a bunch of election laws in 2012 in order to pass his last antitax measure. He’s been publicly accused of secretly moving hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions between two initiative campaigns and failing to disclose making $300,000 for himself in the process. “They threw everything they had at us,” Eyman said. Now, in an ironic twist, before Ferguson begins prosecuting Eyman for any past electoral hanky-panky, he could be defending the legitimacy of the initiative entrepreneur’s latest undertaking. Opponents vowed Tuesday to continue their fight in the courts, confident the state Supreme Court will eventually deem I-1366 an illegal manifestation. “While we are obviously disappointed in the outcome,” began Christian Sinderman, a spokesperson for the anti-1366 coalition, “We have felt all along that this measure was likely unconstitutional, and look forward to next steps to prevent 1366 from cutting billions from already inadequate education funding.” Eyman figured this might happen. “We knew where the legal landmines were and designed the initiative in a way to not step on any of those landmines,” he said. If he’s right, any explosions this measure sets off will be in the Legislature and on the 2016 campaign trail. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www. heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623; jcornfield@heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblosaldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblo.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Post-fire treatments: Making the best choices Dear Editor, Landowners within the burn areas are understandably anxious to protect their homes and property from further damage and to see the land recover. There are many different treatment options available to landowners; however, not all treatments are equal in terms of effectiveness and return on investment. Some treatments can even cause more damage and cost landowners more in the long run. Before implementing any treatments, it is recommended that individuals and communities consult with non-commercial experts in the post‐fire treatment profession who can provide perspective and guidance. The Okanogan Conservation District is offering free site visits to fire-impacted landowners to help them evaluate treatment choices. District staff will also refer landowners to other experts in specific fields such as foresters, hydrologists and engineers as needed. Differing opinions exist about the use and effectiveness of various post‐wildfire treatments. Okanogan CD staff rely on field experience and published scientific studies to provide the best available information to landowners. The most important thing to understand is that treatments need to be suited to the specific site, particularly the soil burn severity. A treatment that works on one piece of land may not work well on a neighboring parcel. Okanogan CD’s website has links to several references regarding post-fire treatments at www.okanogancd.org/fires. Landowners may find the “Treatments Comparison Table” particularly helpful, along with the “After the Burn” link. Landowners are encouraged to contact a conservation planner at 509-4220855 or by email at intakes@okanogancd.org to arrange for a free site visit. Kirsten Cook Education & Outreach Coordinator Firewise Program Coordinator Okanogan Conservation District

Thank God for the Second Amendment Dear Editor, I read the letter from Tom Hastings concerning repealing the 2nd Amendment. I also read the fine response letters explaining and defending the 2nd Amendment. I am quite shocked a professor in the Conflict Resolution department at Portland State University who directs PeaceVoice and considers himself a pacifist would begin trying to win people over to his viewpoint of non violence by calling the 2nd Amendment stupid! Without the first 10 Amendments, also known as the Bill of Rights, the Constitution would not have been ratified by the states, and this country would not exist as we know it. You, the writers of the other letters about the 2nd Amendment, myself and the Editor of the paper would most certainly have been arrested by now! The Constitution was created as a solution to the oppressive governments our Founders saw throughout history and in this country at the time under England, where the Government Would Be Under The Control Of The People, Not The People Under The Control Of The Government! “WE The People” wrote the rules on how our government was to specifically function. So WE are ABOVE the Constitution! Therefore, not only is it an individual right to bear arms, it is a right that can not even be restricted constitutionally! The Bill of Rights is not something the government benevolently granted the people! It was to distinctly tell the government the lines it could not cross! The rest of the 10 Amendments are only possible because of the 2nd Amendment! You can have your own opinions, but not your own facts. The Founders were very clear on why this was included. “To disarm the people...[i]s the most effectual way to enslave them.” - George Mason, referencing advice given to the British Parliament by Pennsylvania gov-

ernor Sir William Keith, The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution, June 14, 1788 • James Madison: Americans have “the advantage of being armed” -- unlike the citizens of other countries where “the governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.” • Patrick Henry: “The great objective is that every man be armed.... Everyone who is able may have a gun.” • Samuel Adams: “The Constitution shall never be construed... to prevent the people of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms.” • Alexander Hamilton: “The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.” “Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed, as they are in almost every country in Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops.” - Noah Webster, An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution, October 10, 1787 This propaganda of disarming the public for their own good is not a new idea. “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.... Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.”- Thomas Jefferson, Commonplace Book (quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria), 1774-1776 After Sandy Hook, Obama directed the CDC to study the best way to reduce gun violence. It found the best way to reduce firearm-related crime is to increase the number of guns in the hands of law-abiding citizens, since citizens possessing privately owned firearms used them to stop crime as much as 10 times more often than criminals used them to commit crimes. (Whoops!) Honestly, “Common sense gun control laws” disarm the public, which historically has never turned out good for the public! “Gun Free Zones,” Advocates should first try it out for themselves. I assume Mr. Hastings has one of these signs at his residence. They also ought to be displayed where advocates work, like the Capitol building and White House. While speaking before the Constitutional Convention in 1787, James Madison said, “A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty.” Candidate Barack Obama: “We cannot continue to rely on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives we’ve set. We’ve got to have a civilian national security force that’s just as powerful, just as strong, just as well-funded.” One of the few legitimate duties of government is to protect borders. Understandably, FBI, Border Patrol and Customs are well armed. Alarmingly, under Obama, 73 federal agencies are now armed with BILLIONS of mostly hollow point bullets, forbidden under the Geneva Convention of war, and have SWAT teams. This includes the EPA, NOAA, Department of Education, Social Security, Postal Service, and Agriculture Departments! Homeland Security has almost 2 billion rounds alone, and at last count 2717 armored personnel carriers! Fish and Wildlife, BLM and Park Service are among 24 federal agencies employing more than 250 full-time officers. Major General Curry asks a troubling question: “We have local police, backed up by each state’s National Guard, backed up by the Department of Defense. So in addition to all these forces why does DHS need its own private army? Why do the SSA, NOAA and other government agencies need to create their own civilian security forces armed with hollow nose bullets?”

Amazingly, most American federal and local police SWAT teams probably have fewer restrictions on conducting forced entry raids than do US forces in Afghanistan. At last count, 80,000 of these raids occur per year! A few that surprisingly made the news: • The Department of Education raided the home of Kenneth Wright looking for his estranged wife who was accused of misusing federal aid for students. Officers from the Department dragged Mr. Wright out of his house in his boxers at 6 a.m., threw him to the ground and handcuffed him. While this occurred his children -- ages 3, 9 and 11 -- were left in a patrol car for two hours. His estranged wife no longer lived at the house and was not there at the time of the raid. • Officers in full SWAT gear from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service stormed the home of Kathy and George Norris, grandparents in their 60’s. The agents instigated the raid for George’s failure to file the proper paperwork for orchids he imported. • The EPA led a joint raid along with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Coast Guard, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (the guys that predict the weather) and the U.S. Park Service on an Alaskan mining operation for possible violations of the Clean Water Act. • The Bureau of Land Management had a long standoff with Cliven Bundy, a rancher, over his use of federal land to graze his cattle. It only ended when armed citizens came to stand with him and publicity got too intense. • In 2010 the FDA raided Dan Allyger’s Rainbow Acres Farm, an Amish farm in Pennsylvania, because he had been selling unpasteurized milk across state lines. The Federal Government has a domestic para-military force almost as large as the entire United States Marine Corps! It only answers to political appointees put there by the President! When called by YOUR Congress to answer questions regarding rules of engagement or how often their SWAT teams are deployed, the standard answer is “we can’t tell you that”. They have also been caught in lies on how much ammunition and weaponry they actually possess. Need more? The National Defense Authorization Act, NDAA, the Bush Patriot Act on steroids, was sarcastically passed on Constitution Day in 2012. Sections 1021 and 1022 authorize the indefinite military detention, without charge or trial, of any person, including an American citizen, and applies the “Law of War,” to U.S. soil, making the United States legally a battlefield! It gives the President Sole Authority To Decide Who Is An Enemy Of The United States And Deal With Them As He Sees Fit! According to Washington’sBlog, Jan. 6, 2015, Obama has killed more people with drones than died on 9/11, almost 5000. This includes 4 American citizens, one being a purposeful assassination! THESE are the kinds of incursions the Constitution and Bill of Rights were written to protect us against. Freedom can be taken away, but it can also be given away through shear ignorance! Mr. Hastings, what other rights do you think are stupid? A government that operates outside it’s constitutional boundaries is a dangerous government. Thank God for the 2nd Amendment! David Wolosik Oroville

Water forum diverts from the real issue Dear Editor, A few words about the recent Canada, United States trans-border Osoyoos Lake Water Science Forum in British Columbia Canada. A meeting such as this certainly provides an avenue for speeches and presentations about climate change, sustainable fisheries, pollution and fresh water scarcity. But such an event, commendable though it was for addressing symptoms of problems and allowing individual constituencies to promote tax transfers under the banner of “worthy

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c i a i “ s o o i r e i L g s i a d M t T b o d a n i a a p c M f i t p a t s t C i r f I N t s r m a i e c t


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Seeing signs that winter is coming Signs of winter, such as snow, on the surrounding mountain tops are getting closer to us and the temperatures have gotten to the freezing level so most of the flowers are a thing of the past. We had a busy past week. A doctor’s appointment in Wenatchee, Monday; Tuesday a day to catch our breath and then to Davenport, Wash. for the memorial of Scott Barr, who passed away at age 99. He was married to Clayton’s cousin, Dollie Mae. Then Thursday was my regular pinochle day and all five players were on hand, for the first time in quite a while, due to hip surgeries and other ailments, then Friday to Tonasket to have lunch with Bob Hirst and more card playing. If my mother was alive she’d most likely say, “You’re burning the candle at both

Pancake breakfast this Saturday, Nov. 14 SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Some events to watch for include: Our Pancake Breakfast is this Saturday, Nov. 14,from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.; And, Thanksgiving Potluck is on Nov. 26 at 1 p.m. (We will provide the turkey, dressing, potatoes, and gravy.) See you there. The Menu for next week is: Tuesday, chicken fettuccini; Thursday, bratwurst and sauerkraut; Friday, baked fish. For seniors 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8. And, for a donation of $3.50, can we really get lunch at the Senior Center? You know, fun, food and friends? See you there?

ends, aren’t you?” Our good buddy, John Lawson is home from a short stay in the hospital, due to pneumonia. Dollie Christenson is having serious health issues. She is a determined person and has such faith, that maybe she’ll win this battle also. We certainly hope so., and she is so fortunate to have her daughter, Joan giving her the best of care. UPDATE: Dolly has passed away but I don’t have dates and times of services. One big drugstore chain buys another. Rite Aid is now Walgreen’s. Very different from the little store I worked in, for so many years. In those days the pharmacist was often consulted for a diagnosis before making the trip to the doctor... and often correctly.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS “Seven, that’s the time we leave - at seven.” This is a line in what song? And, who was the famous movie star who sang it in 1944? I asked this question in last week’s Gazette-Tribune. The answer: “A Sentimental Journey,” by Doris Day. Can’t get it out of my head. “According to the latest Watch and Listen  magazine poll just out yesterday (Saturday, Nov. 7,)  Doris Day’s  1944’s hit  Sentimental Journey  is now considered to be the  Greatest Song in the History of Music.” MEDIAMASS Can you believe that?  Just declared the greatest song in the history of music last Saturday?  And I can’t get it out of my head from a week and a half ago!  And, I wasn’t even been born yet in

The bazaar at the United Methodist won by a landslide against Eastern Church was very well attended. Lunch Oregon University. was a delicious spaghetti with the trimI didn’t think I’d like the “online” mings, and those attending advertising flyers from Akins nearing a hundred (the largmarket as they are now doing est ever, I believe) It was that, instead of mailing them a successful day monetarily but it was okay and is proband so many joyful converably a cost cutter for them. sations. One of my favorite things We had the pleasure of havto eat are the HUGE green ing Anita (Emry) McIntosh grapes. Not cheap but so (cousin) and her daughter delicious! and son-in-law, from Moses It is not too early to start Lake. She is also a cousin to making Holiday cookies and Gordon Roberts She met up THIS & THAT freezing them, making less with classmates from years work later when you might Joyce Emry gone by and even her fifth have other things to do. grade teacher, Evelyn Dull. Her parents, Dale and Ruby Emry lived MELTING MOMENTS in Oroville, had an orchard, then moved • ½ pound butter on after some years. • 1¼ cups flour By now your Thanksgiving plans • ½ cup powdered sugar have probably been made. A good tip • ½ cup corn starch is to do as much ahead of time, as possible, so you too can join in the visiting Mix the above and roll into balls. and football, if you’re a fan of that. Press down with a floured fork. Bake at Gonzaga played last Saturday and 350 degrees until lightly browned.

1944. 1944. That was the year our troops were beginning to return home from the greatest war in the history of wars. It was more than a “Sentimental Journey.” It was truly “…waiting up for heaven.” It was about going home. Contrary to a recent obituary hoax, Doris Day is alive and well, and lives in Carmel, Calif..  Just thought you royalty ought to know. “Of course the war wasn’t over until May 7, 1945, but the first line of “Sentimental Journey” goes like this: “I’m gonna take a sentimental journey.” It anticipates a future perfection, like the number “7”, “heaven”, “memories”, and “home.” The second to last line says, “Gotta take a sentimental journey.” It hasn’t happened yet, but is only a “yearning.”” Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Bev Storm; Pinochle, Dolly Engelbretson; High Man, Carl Cole; High Woman, Boots Emry; 1500 Pinochle, Boots  Emry  and Ted Parks

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The first of the Christmas Bazaar has come and gone in Chesaw. There were new venders and some that have come before. There were many things to choose from and a good chili lunch from the country kitchen. The next big event in Chesaw will be the free Thanksgiving Dinner at the Chesaw Community

HILLTOP COMMENTS Building on Thursday, Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. The meal will include turkey or ham, stuffing, potatoes and gravy, yams, corn, green bean casserole, salad, pickles, olives, cranberries, rolls, and dessert. Coffee, tea and cocoa also sparkling cider. Come and enjoy an afternoon of friendship and food. See you there. I am going to report on the pinochle winners now just so I don’t forget. The Low’s went to Ken Ripley ad Berdie Nelson. The High’s were awarded to Jerry

rules that society needs in order to thrive, as it faces the challenges of the future. It matters what kind of research objectives universities prioritize and reflect ethical value, hark back to the Copernicus University Charter for Sustainable Development that obligates universities to cooperate internationally toward sustainable development in an ethically responsible manner. The charter not only concern the routine direction of research relating generally to sustainable development, but to making an ethical commitment to this objective. I suggest that it is urgent for the University of British Columbia Okanagan and Washington State University, in cooperation, to invite the local populations to participate in a conversation to address the following topic: “What kind of society do the constituents of the Okanagan want for their children and grandchildren?” Only a future-focused forum of this sort, with some guidance from skilled and thoughtful academics, has any hope of reaching any sort of viable guidelines for improving our shared economic and social environment. The above suggestion comes with recognition that national economies are made up of local and regional economies; and that investment decisions to foster sustainable economic production are not made in government offices in Washington or Ottawa but rather in local and regional economies across the country. May I also say, parenthetically, that when many levels of government operate within overlapping local and regional jurisdictions that the risk is increased that “nobody is ultimately responsible?” (Just to add an extra helping of mashed potatoes to an otherwise already difficult to digest meal). I further suggest that the societies on both sides of the border, in British Columbia and Washington State, promote the revitalization of the Canada, Sweden, United States IISRE research initiative (“the International Institute for Sustainable Regional Economies”). This Initiative, of which I am a founding participant, performs necessary research directed toward increased understanding about systemic issues that hamper investment in sustainable economic production and employment in regional economies such as the Okanagan and Okanogan watersheds, as well as in Sweden and beyond. It is essential that local and regional governments meet their responsibilities. Their area of responsibility is not and cannot be the private sector’s. Lest we again forget: the political/economic system fostered after the American Revolution, relies on an effective government to curb private sector excesses - witness the 2008 collapse - which, if left unaddressed, tanks the economy and turns social satisfaction on its head. Ultimately, I’m not holding my breath that the social and political establishment, including First Nations, will put political bias and self-interest aside and focus on issues that really matter to the survival of democracy, humanity and our grandchildren’s future. I can only suggest. Kell Petersen Osoyoos, BC

Beeman and Ina Visser. Nobody was awarded the Traveling Award. Fancy that. There were 30 in attendance. We had some Lucky winners on Friday Night Bingo last week. The next Bingo Night will be on Friday, Nov. 20 at 7 p.m. Bring your friends and try your luck. There will be a meeting on Nov. 14 at 1 p.m. to start the planning of the annual Christmas Party for the Highland Children. If you want to help please call Michelle at 485 3606. Volunteers are needed in the planning stage and the day of the party. The meeting will be held in the Chesaw Community Building. Until next week.

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BENEFIT ROAST FOR DON KING

LETTERS | FROM A5 causes,” only diverts society’s attention away from the real issue, which is political and governmental failure and a lack of accountability with respect to the cause of the water problem itself. (The catering, I should add, was excellent.) “Woolgathering” sessions such as this one (no offense to the sheep farmers, I hope) can and will continue until hell freezes over, but they will not contribute much to the cure or mitigation of the underlying disease. Nor will they cure the systemic faults in our political-economic system or in government, which, remaining unaddressed, allow a further escalation toward social, economic and environmental adversity, ultimately causing irreparable harm to society. Let us remember that while water covers 70 percent of the globe, only 3 percent is fresh water, and only a fraction of that supports life on the land. Amplify that overwhelming reality by implanting it within the semi-arid eco-system of the Okanagan, and one should readily be able to see that sustainable economic development and employment in this region hang by a thread. Managing the water resources that we have is of critical importance. To place the issue in another broader context, we might remember that earthquakes, floods, or drought, for example, are acts of nature. On the other hand, the lack of sustainable economic development, the reduced prospects for employment that follow, and the social adversity that ensues –all of these are not acts of nature but are of our own doing. Lest we forget, in a democracy, it is the voters who have the responsibility for curbing greed and bad policy, and ultimately government failure. Ignorant and complacent voters are what we must fear. For as Churchill put it: “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.” My own research focuses on the “allocation mechanism” and its faults. The political-economic system, which the United States implemented in its Constitution in 1788, allocates resources through a mix of capitalism and socialism. It allows for the profit motive in the pursuit of personal happiness, while also allowing for a degree of collectivism and planning for the betterment of the society. At its root, it allows freedom of expression, personal and academic, to increase understanding and for the betterment of society. The mixed monetary economies of Canada, Sweden, Israel, and others follow from this model. My intellectual hero, Churchill, once again, pithily called democracy “the worst form of government, except for all the other forms that have been tried from time to time.” I have studied the private sector in the Okanagan as well as First Nation variants, for a very long time. We must realize that sustainable social satisfaction and political stability depend upon sustainable economic production and ultimately upon relevant research in our universities. It is justifiable that the society that makes up the Canadian Okanagan and U.S. Okanogan should ask whether their universities are doing the proper research to increase needed understanding and to do that research at an early enough stage to develop the methods, systems, and policies with respect to, for example, the municipal structures, and taxation and appeal

Chesaw Christmas Bazaar has come and gone

That recipe comes from a Molson community cookbook, so it’s bound to be good. It matters not what cookies I make, the grandkids all say, “They’re okay, but I’d rather have the sugar cookies, with pastel frosting. Sorry to learn that our neighbor, Gary Thornton has some serious health issues and hoping they are correctable. There will be another pancake breakfast at the Senior Center Nov. 14, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., this coming Saturday. Also the Memorial for Noreen Harnasch is the 14th at the United Methodist Church. And there will be Thanksgiving dinner Nov. 26 at 1 p.m., with the Oroville Senior Center providing the turkey, dressing, potatoes and gravy, with the remainder being pot luck. I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a man by the way the way he handles these three things. A rainy day, lost luggage and tangled Christmas lights. (especially the last item). ‘Til next week.

OROVILLE – A benefit “Roast” and Auction for Don King, who was diagnosed with cancer this past March, is planned at the Oroville Eagles on Saturday, Nov. 14. The fundraiser, to help with medical expenses, includes a dinner cooked by the Oroville Fire Department. Doors open at 4 p.m., dinner starts at 4:30 p.m. and auction at 6 p.m. The Roast starts after the auction. King started chemo and radiation in the middle of May and completed treatment the end of June. Rules for the Roast are as follows: 1. Anyone donating $50 will have a 4-8 minute time limit to Roast Don. 2. No filters, anything goes. 3. Organizers are also setting up a Skype call in number for anyone who cannot make the Benefit Roast and would like to participate in giving him a bad time. All donations can be dropped off at Joey King’s. Questions can be directed to Martin Rosales, email Martin_Rosale@Hotmail.com or call 206-391-5551. Oroville Contact Annette Rounds 509-5600351.

4-H Leaders Council

County Courthouse Room 101, in Okanogan at 6 p.m. Information 509-422-7245

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County 4-H Leaders Council meeting will be Thursday, Nov. 12 at the WSU Extension Office,

Vaughn and Engel to Perform 509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

OROVILLE Sandy Vaughn and Reed Engel will perform live Thursday, Nov. 12 at Esther Bricques Winery. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861, check the website – www.estherbricques. com, or check out Esther Bricques Winery’s Facebook page.

Indoor Flea Market OROVILLE - Indoor Flea Market and Craft Bazaar at Appleway 1300 Main Street Friday Nov. 13 and Saturday Nov. 14. For more info or to sign up come to

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PAGE A7

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD CONT’D FROM | PG A6

Planning Hearing

Appleway or call 509-476-3900.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Planning Commission will hold a public hearing On Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 3 p.m. The agenda includes a continuation of the public hearing and Final Review of Zoning Code Chapter 17. Originally scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 20 and then rescheduled for Oct. 27, it is now on Nov. 17.

WE Women Auction Notice The annual auction sale for the Whitestone/Ellisforde Church of the Brethren Women’s Fellowship will be held on Friday, Nov. 13 at the Whitestone Church, 575 Loomis/Oroville Hwy, Tonasket. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and the auction will begin at 7 p.m. There will be handwork (pillowcases, dishtowels, jewelry), baked goods, candies, etc. up for auction. There will also be a silent auction table. You’ll find something for Christmas gifts or your own needs. There will be refreshments by donation. Everyone is invited and urged to come. Proceeds will go to mission projects, including Mission Aviation Fellowship, Disaster Ministries, North Valley Nursing Home and to help maintain kitchen supplies for the two churches. For further information call 509-223-3427.

Oroville Senior Citizen Breakfast Oroville Senior Citizens Pancake Breakfast is scheduled for this coming Saturday, Nov, 14, from 8 to 10 AM, at 1521 Golden Street. It includes pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice and milk. All for $8.

Spiritual Movie Night OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more information call 509-476-0200.

Rescheduled Tonasket

Oroville Library Storytime OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Nov. 18. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com

Community Christmas Bazaar OROVILLE - The Oroville Future Business Leaders of America Community Christmas Bazaar will be Friday, Nov. 20 and Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Oroville Elementary gym. Those that would like to reserve a booth ($20) should contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427.

Chesaw Thanksgiving Dinner CHESAW - There will be a Free Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. The menu includes: turkey or ham, stuffing, potatoes and gravy, yams, corn, green bean casserole, salad, pickles, olives, cranberries, rolls and butter and dessert (pie), coffee, tea, hot cocoa and cider.

Continuing Ed Scholarships OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation would like to remind former OHS graduates that Friday, Dec. 4 is the deadline to apply for their Continuing Education

HONOR OUR

VETERANS Honor past and current military for their service and sacrifice.

Grant Lewis Branch of Service: US Marine Korea 1952 - 1955 from your family

Scholarships. This local financial aid program offers aid to those OHS grads that have completed at least one year of vo-tec school or college. Aid will be awarded for the winter term. Access to applications and information is online at orovillescholarshipfoundation.org

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item The Calendar allows listing your event up to two weeks before the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included before the two week limit. Our online calendar at www. gazette-tribune.com allows events to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info contact. Place events online by clicking “Add an Event” on the homepage. List your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once submitted, it can take up to 48 hours to appear on the calendar. To list your invent in the newspaper submit them us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 509-476-3602

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all

Do you have a Special Event or Special Person you want to honor at your church? To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015

OROVILLE YOUTH SOCCER

OBITUARIES

Patricia “Pat” Lorz

PATRICIA ‘PAT’ LORZ Patricia “Pat” Jean Lorz, beloved wife, mother, grandmother and

Christine “Dolly” Christensen

CHRISTINE ‘DOLLY’ CHRISTENSEN Christine “Dolly”Christensen, age 82, of Oroville, Washington, went to be with her Lord and

NORENE HARNASCH Norene Harnasch passed away

friend passed away on November 1, 2015 in Chewelah, Washington at the age of 69. Pat was born on December 30, 1945, the daughter of Forest and Marjorie (Wishon) Stephenson. Pat was born and raised near Long Beach, Calif. In 1978 she moved to Loomis, Wash. with three children in tow. There she met and married Emmett Lorz which will forever be one of her greatest triumphs. They welcomed a new daughter to the family in 1981. Pat worked in real estate before moving to Valley, Wash. in 1988. She also had her own bookkeeping business and did bookwork for several businesses in the area. Pat enjoyed gardening, cooking and spending time with family and friends, but her true joy was being a grandma. She is survived by her husband, Emmett Lorz, her children, Jeff Ritter (Mary), Jill Vugteveen

(Tim), Michele Danly (Chris), and Amanda Parrish (Richard), and her grandchildren, Lucas and Jaden Vugteveen, Jared and Peyton Danly and Isaiah and Isabella Parrish. A memorial service for Mrs. Lorz will be held at 2 p.m., Friday, November 6, 2015 at the Valley Bible Church, Valley, Wash. with a luncheon to follow at the Stevens County Fire District 4 Training Center, Valley, Wash. The graveside service will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, November 7, 2015 at the Mountain View Cemetery in Loomis, Wash. If one wishes, memorial contributions may be given to the Valley Food Bank. Please visit the online memorial and sign the guestbook at www.danekasfuneralchapel.com. Danekas Funeral Chapel & Crematory has been entrusted with the arrangements.

Savior Jesus Christ November 5, 2015. She went peacefully at home surrounded by her family. Dolly was born March 8, 1934 in Kamloops, BC Canada to her beloved mother Nettie Leonard and her father Pete Paul. She is preceded in death by the love of her life Sonny Christensen. Dolly is survived by her loving daughter JoAnn Leonard, her beautiful granddaughter Natika Leonard and adopted son Mike Waller, all of Oroville. She moved to Tonasket, Wash. in the late 1950s to be a nanny for Hazel and Jack Stevens. Soon after that she met and married the love of her life, Sonny Christensen. They were married for 50 years until he went home to be with the Lord. Sonny and Dolly made their home in Oroville. Through the years Dolly worked for many of the local orchardists, as she enjoyed being outdoors. In the 70s she worked

at Valley Evaporation Company and the Bin and Pallet. She made many lifetime friends at this time. We are sure this is where she picked up her southern drawl. She was also a domestic engineer for many homes in the valley. Dolly retired in the 90s and she and Sonny loved to travel and visit family and friends. Celebration of Life service with be held Saturday, November 14, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Valley Christian Fellowship, 142 Eastside Oroville Rd., Oroville. A luncheon at the Oroville Grange Hall, 622 Fir Street, Oroville, will follow the service. The family would like to give special thanks to Alyssa Brown and Tracey Kitterman for showing so much love, care and concern and for making Dolly so comfortable in her last days. Also special thanks to North Valley Hospital and Frontier Home, Health & Hospice Care.

July 29, 2015 in Kennewick, Washington. Her memorial service, originally scheduled in August, was postponed due to the wildfires. The rescheduled

celebration. Norene Harnash’s obituary is available online at www.gazettetribune.com/obituaries/noreneelva-harnasch/70654/

XXXXX/staff photo

The Oroville Youth Soccer teams recently participated in a soccer tournament sponsored by River Valley Soccer Club in Omak. The tournament held on Oct. 31, saw the two U8 teams, two U10, one U12 and one U15 Oroville soccer teams competing against River Valley Soccer Club and Methow Youth Soccer Cub teams. The Oroville teams were very successful, with The U15 team, coached by Jim Elias, won First place in their age group! Oroville’s U12 team, coached by Jim Elias, also won First place! One of the Oroville U10 teams coached by Jose Bugarin and Yudi Morales,won second place in the U10 division, and our other U10 team, coached by Erin Johnson and Alfonso Garcia placed fourth. The coaches offered congratulations to all the soccer teams who participated in the tournament.

DENTISTRY Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

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NOVEMBER 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

VETERAN

Local woman fondly recalls service in the Navy during World War II

Submittted photo

Mary Davis in her Naval Nurse Corps dress whites. “It was a long way from my New Jersey home,” said Hancock. “We went by train and it took us a Mary Davis Hancock recalls couple of days to get there, so we her service in the Navy during nurses became good friends on World War II with joy and exu- the trip down.” The Naval Air Station had five berance. An RN who earned her nursing outlying bases along with the degree from New Jersey’s Cooper main base. “I met a wonderful girl there Hospital in 1942, Hancock worked a year in the Outpatient named Emily, assigned to and Emergency Ward at Cooper the main base. She was from before enlisting in the military at Massachusetts and we became best friends. That friendship lastthe age of 21. “I decided to join the Navy. ed until her death three years Why the Navy I do not know,” ago,” Hancock said. The two recalls Hancock. She and a friend were sent to Ellyson Field, which signed up in January 1943, and Hancock described as “a lovely they were both sent to Brooklyn Air Base near the Atlantic Ocean at Pensacola Beach, with sparNaval Hospital for six months. “We were right off the bat given kling sugar-white sand.” Hancock said it was “very many shots which made us all sick,” Hancock said. “They did scary” to be the first two women not know where we might go, to come onto a base with hundreds of males. so we had to “There were have malaria enlisted Medical shots, typhoid Corpsmen, fever shots, “I loved my Navy Nurse officers plus several experience and never cadets, and Annapolis others.” officers, plus once regretted any Hancock Navy and was assigned decision to join the Marine flight to the instructors Outpatient Navy Nurse Corps.” teaching the d e p a r t m e nt Mary Davis Hancock, men to fly for at the Naval World War II Veteran combat in the Hospital war zones,” said Clinic. Hancock. “We “We treated all Navy and Marine Corps, and were officers, so we ate with the general enlisted Navy service- other officers and got to know men plus all their dependents. them pretty well. We were treated Therefore, there we did a lot of as queens. We had our choice, so general family practice,” said they treated us pretty well. No Hancock. “I remember a lot of the one had better say a smart word fellows came back with malaria, to us, or they were in trouble. syphilis and gonorrhea. We gave The boys didn’t put up with that. Arsenic derivative shots each Every night we had a date, but week to the infected. Syphilis was we couldn’t go with the enlisted men.” very hard to cure.” Hancock laughed as she Half a year later, Hancock and nine other Navy nurses were recalled, “We were both blondes, sent to the Naval Air Station at and I think a lot of the men were scared of us.” Pensacola, Florida. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Mary Hancock models her Navy cape one last time before donating it to the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Project in Tonasket. Hancock left her Naval Nurse Corps emblem (above right) in place on the cape. The collection of uniforms is currently on display at the Omak Performing Arts Center.

Hancock said she and her girlfriend each had their own little apartment in the barracks, with the administrators below them, “so we were protected.” “Then later they brought in the WAVEs and they had their own barracks.” WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) were recruited right out of high school. According to Time-Life’s The Home Front: U.S.A. in World War II, once the United States entered the war, there was a nationwide rush to enlist in the new Womens Army Auxiliary Corps. WACS were allowed to serve overseas, but not until late in 1944 were WAVES allowed to travel to safe areas such as Hawaii, Alaska and the Caribbean. By 1944 there were over 200,000 women on active duty in the armed forces. Over 77,000 women were recruited into the Naval Reserve. Women in the Navy were never assigned to combat duty, and few of them ever got to leave the United States. Hancock was assigned to Surgical and Outpatient Department, as well as to all

emergency air crashes, accompaning the doctor on air crashes. “The servicemen were learning to fly, so some mistakes were bound to happen, and there were a lot of crashes; usually with no survivors. This was hard to take, as these were men in their early twenties like I was. It was sad. I knew some of those boys,” said Hancock. Of America’s World War II airmen, 52,000 were killed in combat, 36,000 killed in noncombat aircraft accidents and 15,000 were killed in stateside training, according to Laura Hillenbrand, author of “Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption.” At times the number of deaths of airmen in training averaged 19 per day. Hancock said a highlight of her service was the discovery of Penicillin, which she called “a miracle” for the service people. “I shall never forget the introduction of Penicillin to the Navy personnel. We were told it was gold and not to waste one tiny drop,” said Hancock. “The serum was locked up at all times. Pneumonia and infections were cured almost overnight. It was wonderful and such a blessing. You would see these boys get a shot and just come alive. It was different then. Civilians didn’t get the drug until the war was over.” In the spring of 1943, the Navy nurse met a Marine flight instructor at the Pensacola base named Kelly Hancock, from Winthrop. The two were married that fall. “At that time I had to be discharged, because you couldn’t be married and stay in the mili-

submitted photo

Mary Davis Hancock in her military uniform. The photograph is inscribed, ‘Love to the sweetest husband in the world.’ tary. They had to change that, as they were losing too many nurses. Three months after I left, you could be married and you couldn’t get out unless you were pregnant.” Hancock said when she asked for her discharge papers, she was told her next assignment was going to be to go to San Diego and then on to a hospital ship in the Pacific war zone. “I was tempted to postpone my marriage; I loved the Navy. I am sure glad I didn’t, as I had a wonderful marriage and three great children,” said Hancock. “Plus, I got to live in the Northwest for 69 years. If I had gone on the hospital tour, I might not have come back.” She said when she told her parents about the quick engagement, they voiced their concern. “I only knew him four months before I married him, so my folks were a little worried about it. They said, ‘What do you know about him?’ I didn’t know much, other than he was from Washington State. I had a wonderful marriage. You never know.” The two were married on the base in late September of 1944. They returned to the Northeast, where their first baby was born in Cooper Hospital, where Hancock had trained. “It was wonderful. Everyone there knew me,” Hancock said. “After the war, my husband retired from the Marine Corps and went to law school in Idaho, and I had my three children,” said Hancock. “We moved to Okanogan in 1950, and to Omak in 1951. Then he was made City Attorney, and he did that for a lot of years,” said Hancock. “When penicillin first came out, polio was going around, so I used to go down to the hospital and help. But I had these three little babies, so my husband didn’t want me involved.” It may have been the end of her nursing career, but her legacy was carried on by her two daughters; Phylicia Lewis became a nurse practitioner and has worked at the Confluence Health Clinic in Omak the past 20 years. Their son carried on his father’s tradition; becoming a lawyer whose own son followed suit. Military service was not a family tradition for Hancock, but once the war broke out her brother joined the army, where he

Submitted photo

Kelly Hancock, the man who stole Mary Davis’ heart and gave her a wonderful home and family, is pictured here in his Marine Corps uniform. served in the European theater. “He was in the Battle of the Bulge and all those terrible things,” said Hancock. Her sister went to work for the Pentagon. Hancock said she didn’t have any kids, so after her sister’s husband passed away, the Hancocks moved her up to Omak. “My brother came out from New Jersey to visit our sister in Apple Springs,” said Hancock. “She had dementia, but she looked at him and said, ‘You were lost at sea,’ and he said, ‘Yes, I was.’ She was working at the Pentagon, so she knew about it but couldn’t tell my mother and dad. In those days, computers were whole walls; she knew where all these ships were but she had to keep quiet. She died in 2001.” Hancock recalled her first trip to Winthrop, where her husband’s parents still lived, in the early days of her marriage. “I thought ‘My gosh, what did I get myself into? I can’t go any further, I’m stuck.’ I thought this

was a real hick area,” said the New Jersey native. “I grew up in Depression days, and when Kelly brought me to his parents farm, his mother said, ‘Well, we have to go get a chicken, and they would go and chop the head off.” Hancock said while serving in the Navy, she had “fabulous” meals. “Food was rationed, but we had everything in Pensacola. Steak and everything. We sat down and ate with the other officers, and everything was very nice. I never had to try out the c-rations.” She remembered getting food ration coupons while she was still in New Jersey. “You couldn’t buy eggs or flour. Everybody was united; it was a lot different. Everyone was together.” Asked if she would recommend military service to young adults now, she said yes. “I loved my Navy Nurse experience and never once regretted any decision to join the Navy Nurse Corps.”


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015

SPORTS

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Brent Baker/submitted photos

Oroville’s Jaxon Blackler, number 75, tries to fight off a hold by a Mabton linemen during Friday’s playoff loss. The lack of penalties called on plays such as this was a source of consternation for the Hornets throughout the contest.

Above, Hornet senior Logan Mills battles for yardage despite the efforts of four Mabton defenders. Below, Andrew Mieirs intercepts a Mabton pass in the second half of Oroville’s season-ending 42-20 loss.

Mabton OB shrugs off Hornets

Vikings end chance at further post season play BY BRENT BAKER SPECIAL TO THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

MABTON - Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson said prior to Friday’s district playoff game at Mabton that Vikings quarterback Roy Zavala accounted for 75 percent of his team’s offense. Stopping him was the key to the Hornets’ chances of an upset; as it turns out, they weren’t able to do so, which was indeed why Mabton ended Oroville’s season, 42-20. Mabton advances to the state tournament next week, while the Hornets finish at 3-6 overall while again playing one of the toughest Class 2B schedules in the state. “Overall we played hard and didn’t give up,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson. “I expected the offense to do better, but Mabton was so much faster to get to the ball that it was hard to get the big play.” Zavala rushed for 147 yards on

13 carries, completed 13-of-21 passes for 188 yards and even caught a pass for 55 yards to account for 405 out of Mabton’s 533 yards - as it turns out, 75.7 percent of the Vikings’ offense. Despite trailing by three touchdowns heading to the fourth quarter, Oroville put together three scoring drives as the Hornets finally got their offense on track. Nathan Hugus connected with Andrew Mieirs with a 9-yard touchdown pass to get Oroville on the board, and added scoring runs of 4 and 2 yards. But the defense, tired from chasing Zavela all over the field for nearly three hours, couldn’t stop him down the stretch as he ripped the Hornets with scoring runs of 42 and 36 yards to keep the game from getting close. “Personally, I thought those last two touchdowns Mabton scored were excessive,” Hutchinson said, “along with all the celebration on the sideline. After a six hour drive I was determined to play everyone and thought Mabton with their 40 players would do the same, but they kept Zavela and all the starters in ‘til the end.”

The Hornets had chances early to change the tone of the game. Oroville stuffed the Vikings early but had a promising drive end on downs at the Mabton 5-yard line that could have netted an early lead. The Hornets stopped Mabton’s next possession and had the ball at midfield, but the Vikings recovered a bad snap. Zavela, a Class 2B equivalent of the Seahawks’ Russell Wilson, raced to the outside and down the sideline for a 32-yard touchdown to open the scoring. “I should have called a time out after the turnover,” Hutchinson said. “I could tell our boys were going to over-pursue and try to get the ball back. Once they did that, he was gone. “We started out well on defense containing Zavela. But the boys got frustrated on offense due to Mabton’s speed in getting to the ball carrier, and the dropped passes.” It looked as if the Hornets would escape the first half trailing just 9-0, but the game’s most controversial play proved costly. Zavela caught a 55-yard pass from backup quarterback

Ventura Rodriguez as time apparently expired on the half. But officials ruled that Zavela had been tackled and called time out with one second left despite protests from the Hornets; Zavela hit Rodriguez with a 10-yard touchdown pass as time expired. Mabton scored on the opening drive of the second half to take a 22-0 lead. Hugus completed 11-of-34 passes for 133 yards and one touchdown and rushed for 43 yards on 11 carries. Logan Mills added 37 yards on 11 carries and Caleb Mills ran for 20 yards on nine carries. Stetson Spears had three receptions for 59 yards; Mieirs added three catches for 43 yards and Seth Miller had three catches for 22 yards. Defensively, Spears led the way with 9.5 total tackles, Miller had 7.5 tackles and Hugus had 5.5 tackles. Logan Mills and Charlie Arrigoni each had sacks. Mabton (8-2) moves on to play top-ranked Lind-Ritzville/Sprague in the first round of the 16-team state tournament next week. The Hornets (3-6) will lose nine seniors to graduation.

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Brent Baker/submitted photo

The Tigers had many a scoring chance against Okanogan, but didn’t reach the scoreboard until the final minutes of their season-ending 2-1 loss. Pictured in the air is midfielder Kayla Willis.

Backup goalkeeper Rose Walts, forced into the net after starter Madison Gariano was injured in the previous game, proved herself more than up to the task with several difficult saves during Saturday’s loss.

Mandi Wilson’s deflected shot just seconds later got the Tigers back to within 2-1, but there wasn’t enough time left to mount a last desperate attempt for a tying goal. “I thought for the most part we played great,” Collins said. “We played hard. I was happy with the pressure we put on them. Ashlynn (Willis) had a couple of close ones. “It’s frustrating losing to Okanogan again, but it was the best we’d played them this year. We were right there.” What was just as costly, and more frustrating, as far as the Tigers’ state tourney ambitions went, was the way the Warden game ended. Tonasket put six shots off the crossbar or goalposts in the final 12 minutes of that one-goal loss, which kept the Tigers out of the district title game. “I’ve never seen anything like that,” Collins said. “The way we shot the ball that day, we could have won by three or four goals.”

Despite their best effort against Okanogan this season, Tonasket saw its season end with a 2-1 loss to the Bulldogs in Saturday’s winner-to-state game.

Okanogan knocks Tigers from playoffs BY BRENT BAKER SPECIAL TO THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

WENATCHEE - Tonasket’s playoff nemesis struck the Tigers down once again. For the third time in four years, Okanogan handed Tonasket a district playoff defeat. The Bulldogs used a pair of setpiece goals in the second half to edge the Tigers 2-1 in Saturday’s winner-to-state, loser-out game at the Apple Bowl in Wenatchee. It was the kind of game everyone expected from two of the state’s better Class 2B teams; few expected it to be in the district’s third place game. The unexpected meeting came courtesy of a pair of upsets four days earlier, when Liberty Bell knocked off Okanogan 1-0 and Warden defeated the Tigers 5-4. That set up a district title meeting between Warden and Liberty Bell (won by Warden, 3-2), while Tonasket and Okanogan were left to play for the district’s final play-

off entry to the eight-team state tournament. The Tigers had to play Saturday without starting goalkeeper Madison Gariano, who was injured in the second half of Tuesday’s contest. In her place stepped senior Rose Walts, who turned in an outstanding effort in the high-stakes game. “Rose played great,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “Unfortunately it cost us a bit, too. She’s just a beast out on the field, and we missed that at times.” Okanogan’s own “beast,” Jill Townsend, thus had no one of similar size to match up with her, and that played at least a part in the Bulldogs’ first goal. Townsend, setting up at the far post, headed in Alexis Jones’ free kick to put Okanogan up 1-0 with about 18 minutes to play. Jones also picked up the assist on Okanogan’s second goal, as Keanna Egbert knocked in a header - also at the far post - off a corner kick with about two minutes to play.

Brent Baker/submitted photo


NOVEMBER 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS

Tigers make big strides at XC Finals

Photo by Brent Baker

Photo by Brent Baker

Nine Tonasket runners - including a full seven-man boys team - ran at Saturday’s (Nov. 7) state cross country finals in Pasco.

Tonasket’s Jenna Valentine and Johnna Terris, along with most of the other competitors at the start line, get in some light-hearted pre-race warm-ups prior to Saturday’s (Nov. 7) state finals run in Pasco.

by nearly 40 seconds and 14 spots. “I wanted to place on the podium this year (top 16) and

establishing a new Tonasket state finals record, with Valentine close behind (27th, 21:12.0).

BY BRENT BAKER SPECIAL TO THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PASCO - Oft-times a cross country race doesn’t go exactly to plan. But for the Tonasket frontrunners, things couldn’t have gone much better at Saturday’s state finals race at Sun Willows Golf Course in Pasco. The Tigers’ experience from being there last year showed. Hunter Swanson reached the medal podium to lead the Tonasket boys team to a 10th place finish, while Jenna Valentine and Johnna Terris finished in the top half of the girls’ field. “Our goal every year is to not only race at state, but to PR (run a personal best) as well,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “It was great to have so many race so well in the last two races of the year.” Swanson placed 12th with a career-best time of 16:46.7, bettering his performance last year

Photo by Brent Baker

Freshman Garrett Wilson turned in the fifth-fastest time by a Tiger on this course. beat last year’s time by at least

30 seconds,” Swanson said. “The Zach Clark (103rd, 19:43.5), race was exactly as I thought it Justin McDonald (116th, 20:06.3) would be. I went out with (Tarell and Zion Butler (126th, 20:34.0). “Hunter getting a medal, Manjarrez of White Swan) and (Andrew Gannon of Bickleton) Garrett running times near what and the three of us raced all the Hunter ran last year (were highlights),” Thornton said. “Bryden way to the finish.” ran through the pain of his Swanson back, and also missed the Zach Clark school state finals record of “When I’m running (in went from the middle of 16:45 by one practice) a lot of times I the JV to our second. runner The Tigers wonder why I’m doing fifth in the last two also improved this to myself. But weeks.” two spots on Sophomore their team perwhen I’m out racing, Kenneth formance of a of year ago, cutting like today, I’m like, ‘Yeah, Brooks 80 points off this is why I do this. This College Place won the inditheir team score. is why I signed up.” vidual state Freshman title with a Garrett Wilson Jenna Valentine, run of 15:44.6. turned in the Tonasket Cross Country runner The girls’ fifth-fastest time race took run by a Tiger on that course, finishing 36th in place 90 minutes earlier, with 17:55.6. Also competing were a thick fog still blanketing and Bryden Hires (69th, 18:43.7), slickening the course. Terris finished 24th in 21:06.7, Riley Morris (82nd, 19:21.0),

Photo by Brent Baker

Johnna Terris set a school state finals record at the Class 1B/2B state finals with her time of 21:06.7. St.

George’s

teammates

Madison Ward (19:11.9) and Marika Morelan took the top two spots. Thornton was pleased with the strong finish of his girls squad. “We had four girls collapse (from exhaustion) at the finish at the district meet, and Johnna and Jenna both racing their best at state,” he said. Terris, a junior, achieved her goal of cracking the top 25, while Valentine had hoped to get under the 21 minute mark. “That race went by so fast,” Terris said. “(After being to state last year) I wasn’t as nervous.” Despite missing her time goal by 12 seconds, Valentine seemed more than pleased with the finish of her cross country career. Though Terris is the new school record-holder, Valentine broke the old record as well. “When I’m running (in practice) a lot of times I wonder why I’m doing this to myself,” she said. “But when I’m out racing, like today, I’m like, ‘Yeah, this is why I do this. This is why I signed up.’”

Tigers maintain dignity on the grid iron BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tigers had another nearwin when Soap Lake traveled to Tonasket for a non-league matchup to finish off their seasons. The Soap Lake Eagles went home with a 24-21 win. “We were glad to get the win, and happy no one got hurt on either team,” said Eagles Head Coach Tony Blankenship. “This time of year is tough, because the kids are so banged up. We’ve got a lot of young kids, and it’s been a tough season.” Blankenship, in his first year as head coach of the team, said this was the first time since 1984 that Soap Lake had seven wins in one season. The first quarter ended with the teams tied at 7-7 after running back Jesse Ramon scored

a touchdown with a 16-yard run and the Eagles scored on a 41-yard pass, and the extra point was kicked in for both teams. “We got off to a great start with our first drive for a touchdown,”

“.....and the players were great right up to the end. Tonasket has some really classy kids.” Tony Blankenship, Soap Lake Football Coach

said Tonasket Head Coach Jay Hawkins. “We had difficulty maintaining momentum because

we gave up too many explosive plays.” In the second quarter, Soap Lake scored on a 10-yard pass with the extra point kicked in. As the clock ran out for the first half, the Eagles asked for an extra play, and used it to kick in a 27-yard field goal. “Soap Lake was awarded the last play because they used a time-out,” said Hawkins. “The referees believed there was still time on the clock.” The Tigers came back onto the field for the second half ready to re-claim the game. “I thought the team did a great job of flushing the bad at the

“We have a history in our program of being respectful of our opponents and referees. We are really fortunate to have great kids that play football.” Jay Hawkins, Tonasket Football Coach

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tigers’ assistant coach Shawn Rader offers encouraging words to a team frustrated with a season of near-wins during Friday’s (Nov. 6) game against Soap Lake.

half,” Hawkins said. “We played with more enthusiasm and confidence in the second half, and won a lot of plays.” They held the Eagles from scoring again in the third quarter, while Ramon scored on a fiveyard run, and Jeffrey Luna kicked in the extra point a second time. Both teams again scored in the fourth quarter; Soap Lake on an 11-yard pass with the extra

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Jesse Ramon gets tackled near the goal line before running the ball in the last five yards for a touchdown in the third quarter. point kicked in. With five and a half minutes left to play, Tonasket scored with quarterback Rycki Cruz throwing a 19-yard pass to tight end Austin Rimestead, Luna kicked in a third extra point to close the gap from 14-24 to 21-24. “The one-yard line was killing us,” said Blankenship of several turn-arounds that took place close to the goal line through fumbles and interceptions. “We were glad to get out of here with a win.” The win was close, with the first half ’s last-minute field goal making all the difference on the scoreboard.

Cruz completed eight of nine attempted passes for a total of 109 yards with one touchdown and one interception. Ramon caught two for a gain of 17 yards, Luna caught four to bank 68 yards, freshman running back Ethan Smith caught one for a five-yard gain, and Rimestead caught the 19-yard pass for the touchdown. Rushing, Ramon had 17 carries for 120 yards and two touchdowns, Cruz had seven for 17 yards, Smith had five for 20, and Christian Garcia-Herrera had two for 12. Statistics were recorded for

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the team this year by sophomore Mandi Wilson. Blankenship said he and his team enjoyed the hospitality extended to them. “In the three hours we were here, the coaches were great, the principal and athletic director were great, and the players were great right up to the end,” said Blankenship. “Tonasket has some really classy kids.” “We have a history in our program of being respectful of our opponents and referees,” said Hawkins. “We are really fortunate to have great kids that play football.”


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 12, 2015

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Houses For Sale Black Bear & War Eagle Patented Claims on Palmer Mountain near Loomis, 35.5 acres. Black Bear was a gold producing mine in 1890’s and 1940’s. Reports available. $75,000 for both. Contact Teri at blackbearclaim@ gmail.com for further information.

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121.

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Happy 90th Birthday

Josie Gladden

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Celebrate with her on

Sat., Nov. 14 from 1 - 3 p.m.

Tonasket Senior Center. No Gifts.

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.59

ANSWERS 7

Sponsored by

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509-476-3602

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Puzzle 46 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Crosswords

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

movies

7. Affecting the entire body

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25. “___ Ng” (They Might Be Giants song)

8. Thin, wispy cloud

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26. Masefield play “The Tragedy of ___”

10. Criticize, slangily

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29. “Hurry up!” (3 wds)

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Puzzle 43 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

32. Reduced instruction set computer (acronym)

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33. “___ next?” (contraction)

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Puzzle 40 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

48. Obi, e.g. 49. Flightless flock

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ANSWERS

Across 1. Converts scrambled message 8. Corpse 15. Complacently foolish 16. Ape 17. Runs aground 18. Replaces shoe bottom 19. Circle 20. Bolted 22. 100% 23. Dam 24. King Julien in “Madagascar”

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available:

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CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

We are looking for YOU to join our team!

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we are interested in hiring an auto mechanic for a full time position. We are also interested in hiring someone who has experience with tire service and sales, tow truck operation, and/or general mechanics. If you have experience or interest in any of these things, please call Michael at 509.476.3948 or stop in at 610 Hwy 97 in Oroville.

www.gazette-tribune.com

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Health General

At Thompson Bees in Oroville

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 46 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

7

Blue Grass Straw for sale. $90 per ton plus delivery. 3’x4’ bales. Call Gary at 509531-0546 for more information.

Announcements

Sudoku 4

Feed Hay & Grain

The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract delivery route. Please call 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / 3050 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

55. Coal miner 57. Erstwhile 58. Fatty 59. Cracker and bun seeds

9. Foreign heads of state 11. Above 12. Appraise 13. Without beginning or end 14. Closes securely again 21. Bypass 24. Contact, e.g. 27. Aggravate 28. “___ of Eden” 30. Hunted 31. ___ bag 33. Wave with a crest of foam 34. “Unimaginable as ___ in Heav’n”: Milton 35. Spanish waist-length jackets 36. Buttercup family member 37. Women’s shirt-like garments 38. Cicatrix 39. Jubilance 40. Most flushed 41. Globes 43. Time in power 44. Runs off (with) 48. Minute marine animal with a transparent body

60. Scholastics

50. “La Scala di ___” (Rossini opera)

Down

52. Tried to get home, maybe 54. “Get ___!”

1. Refuses to acknowledge 2. Beseech 3. Light automatic rifle

56. “___ to Billie Joe”

OKANOGAN ADMIN HR Generalist Full time OMAK MEDICAL Behavioral Health Specialist Full time Pharmacy Technician Full time. Bilingual preferred. Occasional travel to Brewster required. OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER, INDIAN AVE: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual required. BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

4. Broadcasting (2 wds) 5. Mar, in a way 6. Antiquity, in antiquity

www.gazette-tribune.com

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for an ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER, 8 hours per day, Monday – Friday, 260 days per year. Preferred qualifications: two or four year degree in business related field or applicable certification; two plus years experience working in K-12 school district or governmental setting; college level training in finance, accounting, and data processing; two years of experience in a school district working with financial and/or human resources data (preferred Skyward/WESPaC software). Beginning salary $55,000. Position closes November 24. To apply, applicants must complete an online application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

DISTRICT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST/PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a DISTRICT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST/PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER 7.5 hours per day, Monday – Friday, 260 days year. Experience preferred in pubic relations using oral and written communications as well as social media. Position closes November 17. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Pets

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF NOVEMBER 9, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED Agfinity Incorporated at Eaton, CO, is seeking a qualified CEO / General Manager. This is a multi-location energy, feed, grain, agronomy, and TBA cooperative with sales of $300 million. Business degree and or successful agricultural business management experience desired. To Apply: http://tinyurl.com/nkz4c48 / For more info contact Larry Fuller, 701220-9775 or Email larry.fuller@chsinc.com RN’s up to $45/hr, LPN’s up to $37.50/hr, CNA’s up to $22.50/hr, Free gas/weekly pay, $2000 Bonus, AACO Nursing Agency, 1-800-656-4414 Ext 2 HELP WANTED-GOVERNMENT NAVY RESERVE Serve part-time. No military exp needed. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE. training with U.S. Navy. Good medical/dental, vacation, great reer. HS grads ages 17-34. Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, jobs_seattle@navy.mil

Paid pay, caCall or

THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days’ vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 4756289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. % for school. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil ADOPTION Super Fun Family Vacations, NYC Executive, Financial Security, Lots of LOVE awaits 1st baby.*Expenses paid*1-800-243-1658* ANTIQUES Antique Sale, 75 Dealers, Centralia Square this Weekend, Nov 13-15. I-5 Exit 82, East to downtown, 201 S Pearl, 98531 (facing city park) www.myantiquemall.com

Public Notices CALL FOR BIDS Sealed bids for surplus equipment and materials will be received at the office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, P.O. Box 1729, 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, WA 98844, until 10:00 A.M. local time on November 30, 2015, and then will be

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Puzzle 37 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

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NOVEMBER 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE November 12, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices Continued from previous page publicly opened and read. Bid forms are available at the office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. For information concerning the bids, contact Jay O’Brien at 509-476-3696. Bid items are available for inspection at the District’s office and yard located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, WA 98844, from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00P.M., Monday through Friday. No warranty is implied or expressed as to the condition of the equipment and materials. All bid items are on an “as is” condition. Should a bid be accepted, no refunds will be made. All bids are to be accompanied by cash, certified check or personal check issued on a bank in the State of Washington. All equipment and materials are to be removed by the successful bidder within 5 working days after notice of acceptance of bid. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive any informalities in the bidding. BID ITEMS Road Grader 1969 Backhoe Air Compressor 2- Pallets Copper Lead Wire Pallet of Surplus Pump Bowls SME Motor (serial # 1210dp2619) SMP Pump (serial #0397071511) SMP Pump (serial #c647011731) Miscellaneous Office Machines DATED this 2nd day of November, 2015. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Jay W. O’Brien Secretary/Manager Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, and 19, 2015. #OVG666780 PUBLIC NOTICE BUDGET ADOPTION HEARING The City of Oroville 2016 Budget Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 1, 2015 in the City Council Chambers. The formal Adoption Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 15, 2015. Copies of the proposed budget will be available November 19, 2015 for any concerned citizens and may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk during normal business hours until the adoption hearing date. Citizens attending the hearings shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, 2015 #OVG664642

www.gazette-tribune.com

PAGE B5 5

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for the County of Okanogan Petitioner Mandie R. Miller Vs. Respondent Rahmier D. Harley No. 15-3-00137-5 The State of Washington to the said Rahmier D. Harley: You are hereby summoned to appear within ninety days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within ninety days after the 29th day of October, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the petitioner Mandie R. Miller, and serve a copy of your answer upon the Okanogan Superior County Court at the address below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgement will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. Petitioner, Mandie R. Miller, requesting dissolution of marriage. Okanogan County Superior Court 149 3rd Avenue North - 3rd Floor PO Box 112 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 29, November 5, 12, 19, 26 and December 3, 2015. #OVG664507

NO. 15-2-00440-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The State of Washington to the said Lorna Gail McGowan, presumed to be a single individual, her heirs and assigns, any and all other persons appearing on title or claiming any right, title or interest herein, in the property of the Plaintiffs. You, and each of you, are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after November 12, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court and answer the complaint of the plaintiffs and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for the plaintiff, at his office below stated; and, in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demands of the complaint in this action which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action is to quiet title in Plaintiffs to real estate in Okanogan County, Washington, described as: Okanogan County Parcel Number: 6421058000 Tract 1058 Okanogan River Ranches Division NO. 5 as recorded in Volume H, Section 1 of Plats, pages 12 and 13 , Auditor’s File No. 574397, Records of Okanogan County, Washington. DATED this 27 day of October, 2015. /s/Roger A. Castelda Roger A. Castelda, WSBA #5571 Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket , WA 98855 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 12, 19, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2015. #OVG667599

SECTION 2, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR ROAD PURPOSES, 15 FEET IN WIDTH, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 14 OF SAID GRAPE ARBOR ADDITION TO OKANOGAN; THENCE SOUTH 88°54’ WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINES OF LOTS 14 AND 13 OF SAID ADDITION, A DISTANCE OF 264 45 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 12; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 15.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88°54’ EAST TO THE POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH A LINE RUNNING SOUTH 35°16’ EAST, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1325 NICKELL ST, OKANOGAN, WA 98840-9741 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/9/2004, recorded 7/23/2004, under 3077698 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from LEANN L DAUER, AS HER SEPARATE ESTATE , as Grantor(s), to TRANS NATION TITLE COMPANY , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION DBA DITECH COM , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION DBA DITECH COM (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follo wing amounts which are now in arrears: $28,039.52 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $72,153.23 , together with interest as provided in the Note from 8/1/2012 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/11/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/30/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/30/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank.

The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/30/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address( es ): NAME LEANN L DAUER, AS HER SEPARATE ESTATE ADDRESS 1325 NICKELL ST, OKANOGAN, WA 98840-9741 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 1/31/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at

little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/ homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 8/4/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-618904-TC IDSPub#0088648 11/12/2015 12/3/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 12, December 3, 2015. #OVG650719

PUBLIC NOTICE Preliminary Budget Hearing The City of Oroville will hold a public hearing to consider the Preliminary 2016 Budget during the November 17, 2015 regular council meeting. Citizens attending shall have the right to provide oral and written comments and suggestions. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, 2015 #OVG664640 Tonasket Planning Commission Public Hearing Notice The Tonasket Planning Commission Public Hearing meeting is scheduled for Tuesday November 17, 2015 at 3:00pm. The agenda includes Continuation of public hearing and Final Review of Zoning Code Chapter 17. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, 2015. #OVG666915 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN DALE EDWARD McGOWAN, a single individual; Plaintiff, vs . LORNA GAIL McGOWAN, her heirs and assigns; any and all other persons appearing on title and JOHN DOE and JANE DOES I - X, Defendants.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-14-618904-TC APN No.: 1120001200 Title Order No.: 8426544 Deed of Trust Grantor(s): LEANN L DAUER Deed of Trust Grantee(s): GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION DBA DITECH COM Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3077698 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 12/11/2015 , at 10:00 AM at the main entrance to the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd N, Okanogan, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 12, GRAPE ARBOR ADDITION TO OKANOGAN, WASHINGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK H OF PLATS, PAGE 13,

REAL ESTATE GUIDE www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Upscale, open-concept living! This spacious 4 bedroom/3 bath home feels very warm and inviting! Bright and well-appointed with granite counters, vaulted ceilings, and dual closets in the master. Cross-fenced individual pastures for animals, irrigation district water, garden space, chicken coop, and dog run. Panoramic views and conveniently located between Oroville and Tonasket with paved road right to your driveway! MLS#841722 $289,000

NEW HOME BY XMAS

11 ACRES. 3-bdrm, 2-bath. Over 1800 sqft. Big Kitchen w/Appl. Lots of Cupboards. Open Living Concept. 2 Decks. 6-person Hot Tub. Home Lives Bigger Than It Looks. Easy Care Yard. 1200 sqft Garage w/overhead & walk-in Doors. Circular Drive. Lots of Parking. Trees. Private. NICE PLACE. Between Omak & Tonasket. $182,000.00

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA SUN 509-476-2121 LAKES Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

REALTY

HILLTOP REALTY

BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT HOME Hardwood & Tile Floors, Granite Counters 4 Bedrooms/4 1/2 Baths Indoor Pool, 8.39 Acres Motivated Seller $337,800

www.windermere.com

Missed out on that dream home? You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

This unique 58+ acre property has easy access off of a paved county maintained road, nearly a half mile of Similkameen River frontage, a rustic cabin and is surrounded on 3 sides by BLM and Dept of Wildlife land. The property is on both sides of the road and surrounds a Dept of Wildlife boat launch and has power running through it. A great setting for your dream home or a recreational get-away. NWML#861713 $130,000

Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds. Check them out today!

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Concrete

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

RYAN W. GUNN

n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil

Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 12, 2015

SCHOOLS

Tonasket Middle School introduces parents to the Leader in Me BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket Middle School Principal Jay Tyus and Counselor Josh Thayer held their first Leader in Me Parent Night Wednesday, Oct. 28, to introduce parents to the program’s concepts and how those ideas can be reinforced at home. Tonasket’s Middle School staffed trained for three days over the summer to bring the concepts into their classrooms. The Leader in Me was developed for schools to introduce the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People as written by Stephen Covey, and the Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens as written by Covey’s son, Sean Covey. There are currently 2,550 Leader in Me schools worldwide. “In the scheme of things, these ideas are timeless,” said Tyus, as he explained how Covey had researched the some of the world’s most important people and discovered them to have several traits, or habits, in common across cultures and ages. Tyus said that when Leader in Me was written, it focused on an elementary school in South Carolina that was failing. With an impending closure of the school, the principal asked the community what they wanted from the school, and was surprised to discover it didn’t have anything to do with math or reading, but with things similar to the traits listed in the Seven Habits. She began implementing those traits in the classroom, and soon had a school with a waiting list to get in. “It’s not a program, but a process,” said Tyus, “designed to help teachers develop leadership skills in their students, help students discover their unique strengths, give all students an opportunity to shine—to become leaders, and to help infuse the language of the Seven Habits into all curriculum.” “In the past, there weren’t many leadership roles, which got people thinking about the scarcity of leadership. The Leader in Me presents opportunities for leadership to become about the

process of your life rather than being a boss over someone. We want everyone to shine,” said Tyus, adding that at first it could cause some resistance among some of the students “used to getting all the attention,” but the shift in thinking would occur when the kids realized “there is enough awesome out there for every kid.” “Someone else shining in a situation doesn’t make the next person less,” said Tyus. “This is what we are working on with 11-14 year olds. Everyone has gifts and the opportunity to give back.” Tyus said the Leader in Me also helped train kids for a competitive job market. “Boeing engineers said colleges are not preparing kids to be our employees,” said Tyus. “They don’t know how to work together or communicate with other cultures. They are competitive instead of being team players,” said Tyus, adding that it was never too late to start learning the principles taught in The Seven Habits. “Parents and business leaders want kids to learn goal setting, organization, time management, planning, teamwork, conflict management, creativity, analytical skills, to be able to have fun, the desire to learn, and good health and hygiene.” Thayer said middle schoolers all received manuals laying out the Seven Habits. The first three are about private victories, and three through six are about relationships, or public victories. 1. 1. Be Proactive. Be in charge of you, and make sure you have enough time and space to organize your thoughts. 2. Begin with the end in mind. Many people, especially middle schoolers, like to live in the moment. Plan ahead and set goals, and think about how you want something to turn out before getting started on it. Think about how you can contribute to your school developing a mission statement. 3. Put First Things First. Get homework done and done

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket Middle School Principal Jay Tyus (left) and middle school counselor Josh Thayer (center) hold their first parent night for the Leader in Me program, new this year in Tonasket Schools. Martha Wisdom (right) translates the presentation from English to Spanish. The quote on the screen, from Dr. Stephen R. Covey reads, “Leadership is communicating a person’s worth and potential so clearly that they are inspired to see it in themselves.”

4.

5.

6.

right, then chores and dinner and then free time; not vice versa. “We do what we gotta do on the front 40 so we can play on the back 40,” said Thayer, quoting his father. Think Win-Win. As a team, understand that you have an idea, and your teammate might have another one. Work on finding a middle ground that is a win for both. Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood. It’s better to listen first and talk second. Seek to understand what someone is telling you so they can feel heard, validated and understood. Synergize. Synergy is achieved when two or more people work together to create a better solution that either would have thought of, or been able to accomplish, alone. “A tree grows because of strong roots, and the public victories won’t be good unless you start with

7.

the personal ones first,” said Thayer. Sharpen the Saw. This means having balance in your life, and taking time to revitalize your body, brain, heart and soul.

“We want kids to be re-energized in mind, body, thoughts and social/emotional areas,” said Thayer. “I thought this was a weird habit, until I researched where it came from,” said Tyus. “A guy was cutting down a big tree limb with a nasty, worn-out saw. He was sawing like crazy, sweating and getting nowhere. A friend comes by and says, ‘Sharpen your saw,’ but he says he can’t because he’s too busy cutting wood. The moral is, if you take the time to take care of you, your work gets done faster.” Thayer said the challenge was to get kids to implement and work the seven habits, both in

school and at home. Tyus said the reverse took place in his home. He told the story of his son, now a teacher himself, who had studied the Seven Habits in a leadership class years ago. “I didn’t know what he was reading, but he sat us down one day and talked about his goal; how he had accomplished everything he needed to do already— chores and homework, so could he take the car to Wenatchee? We came up we a solution, and off he goes. But before he left, he showed us the book and said, ‘Hey, this stuff works!’” Tyus recalled with a laugh. Tyus said the process of implementing the Seven Habits would include parent and community trainings, after staff members became certified trainers. The school plans to have another parent night in December with students presenting some of the information, and to have a training session for parents in the

spring. The Elementary School is making use of Covey’s Seven Habits of Happy Kids. “Our school is using ‘The Leader in Me’ program as an introduction to personal leadership,” said Principal Jeremy Clark. “All students have the capacity to lead in their own lives, and affect those around them by making positive choices. ‘The Leader in Me’ provides students with activities to help them learn practical character and life skills that will lead to those positive choices. Written to appeal to their age level, students are presented with fun activities designed to get them thinking.” Parens can find ideas to use at home for reinforcing a child’s learning and to involve the family in a fun, interactive way can turn to “The Parent’s Place” at www. TheLeaderInMe.org.

SLEEP OVER SCIENCE CAMP

Submitted photos

Science Camp Sleepover -- An overnight adventure targeted at students in the fourth, fifth and sixth grades attending Omak, Tonasket and Oroville Elementary school took place when the students got invited to Eastern Washington University’s Spokane campus to learn about health care careers. Current students at EWU, UV School of Medicine and WSU teach the campers skills that they themselves have learned and what it means to work in a health profession through hands on activities, games, labs and experiments. On Nov. 6 , 50 students from the Okanogan Valley traveled to Spokane for a one of a kind adventure. After a long bus ride, arriving on campus, pizza for supper,the science fun could start. Divided in small groups, students visited a variety of workstations. What exactly does it mean to be Pharmacist or a Dental Hygienist? Things we have to do to prepare our self for an emergency? How does it feel to have a disability and how can a Physical Therapist or a Occupational Therapist help? A few question that got answered at the end of the night. Above, left, Leo Chen and Paul Fuchs wearing special googles, those googles simulate a vision disability. Walking through a obstacle course, they felt what it is like not to be able to have a full vision, how much life can change for a person without a proper eyesight. Above, right, be a Pharmacist -- measure, mix, heat and stir the ingredients to develop a medicine,or in this special occasion- create your own lip balm. Left, Make a list of item you think you need in an emergency.At the end of the session each camper received a emergency kit.

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 12, 2015  

November 12, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 12, 2015  

November 12, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune