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TONASKET SCHOOLS IN THE

Veterans Day Assemblies

NEWS FOR FFA, GARDEN

Tonasket and Oroville High Schools to honor veterans on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 9 a.m.

See B3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Tonasket council hears budget requests

ALL DRESSED UP

RR crossing, sidewalks and pedestrian bridge also discussed

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Above, Aaden McNaer, six, chugs down the street dressed as a locomotive and Ava Ozo, three, as Queen Elsa (from the Disney movie “Frozen”) for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce’s annual business Trick or Treat event, held last Friday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oroville businesses reported giving away hundreds of treats to the many kids who dressed up for Halloween and participated. Left, Gru (Supt. Steve Quick) and his Minions, Shay Shaw, Betty Cole and Erin McKinney, from the movie “Despicable Me,” were the winners of Best Costume in the Business Halloween Costume and Decorations contest. The group at the Oroville School District Office have earned the title several times over the years Submitted photo

concerns is that in the event of an emergency along Railroad Avenue or within the industrial area which contains several buildings with atmospheres controlled by ammonia and other toxic chemicals, people using the park would be unable to evacuate. BY KATIE TEACHOUT The city gained permission from the KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Okanogan County Commissioners for Tonasket City Council met Thursday, the new access, then received permisOct. 29 and further discussed the bud- sion from Genesee & Wyoming Inc. get. At a budget workshop held Oct. 14, (G&W), the CSCD’s parent company, department heads submitted requests for for a new crossing. Mayor Patrick Plumb then asked the UTC in January 2015 needed items. for approval of a new Police Chief crossing. After meetDarren Curtis asked ing with the UTC in for Surface tab“More than ten people Tonasket along with let computers, new county maintenance chairs for the police told me they intend to personnel and one station, stop stick vote for the Tonasket county commisstrips and $7,000 to sioner, the decision $10,000 for a new car. Parks and Recreation was made to upgrade Superintendent Hugh a temporary crossJensen needs a paint District. ” ing constructed by striper, a vehicle and Clair Jeffko, Council Member the federal Bureau of a new mower. Mayor City of Tonasket Reclamation in the Patrick Plumb said he early 1990s, finding would like to increase this option to be the rates for water by five most cost effective and least damaging percent and sewer by two percent in 2016. City Clerk and Treasurer Alice to the wetland areas west of the railroad Attwood requested to have medical cov- tracks. G&W approved a basic crossing, ratherage continue, a new phone system for city hall, a maintenance agreement for er than a fully signalized crossing, due computer hardware, new front doors for to infrequency of trains on the track and expected limited, seasonal use of city hall and a cost of living increase. In the ongoing attempt to secure a new the crossing to be located at the southcrossing of the Cascade and Columbia ern boundary of the county’s shop land. River Railroad (CSCD), to provide sec- The UTC then informed the city that new crossings require fully signalized ondary access into Chief Tonasket Park, facilities. With further explanation of the the council discussed a traffic study of planned use of the crossing, UTC staff the area prepared by City Planner Kurt agreed to consider the option after being Danison at the request of the Washington provided the traffic study which details State Utilities and Transportation the Average Daily Trips expected to use Commission (UTC). the crossing. Chief Tonasket Park is located on In other city business, Councilwoman city-owned property adjoining the city’s Claire Jeffko asked who’s responsibilwastewater treatment plant, with the ity it was to fix a heaving sidewalk near Okanogan River as the opposing bound- the railroad tracks. Attwood said the ary. The park is accessed from Railroad abutting property owner is responsible. Avenue, so visitors to the park must Plumb said because the property was travel through a busy industrial area to located on the railroad it was probably access the baseball fields, soccer fields, the city’s responsibility, so Jensen said he skate park, Water Ranch, boat launch would look at it the next day. and other amenities. Jeffko also reported more than ten The city has been attempting to develop a second point of access into the park since the late 1980’s. One of the city’s SEE COUNCIL| PG A2

OEA says demands on teachers’ time too high Union president says demands increase, while time and pay do not BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Dr. Lynn Johnson, president of the Oroville Education Association, says more is being asked of Oroville teachers, while time to accomplish tasks and compensation remain the same or less. Johnson made a presentation to the Oroville School Board at their Monday, Oct. 26 meeting. “I’m here as a representative of the OEA to let you know about legislative actions that have impacted the Oroville School District. I know you are aware that teachers all over the state have walked out or gone on strike,” said Johnson, assuring the board that wasn’t her group’s intention, but that they should be aware of how these new demands and their impact on the district. Johnson, a teacher at Oroville, is a member of the certified contract negotiating team for the teacher’s association. She has 29 years in education as a teacher

and as an administrator, she said. At one pay the costs to renew certifications, but time she was the Oroville Elementary the salaries continue to decrease.” School principal. The information she Johnson said the school hours have presented came from UniServe and increased for students as well. the Washington Education Association “There are longer student days and (WEA), according to Johnson. teachers have lost up to 15 minutes of Johnson said there was a long list preparation time each day, added up over of requirements for a school year they’ve teachers in Washington lost over six days of State, including the time to prepare and “The bottom line is we get ready for school,” Washington State Te a c h e r / P r i n c i p a l have to attract teachers Johnson said. Evaluation Project. She then addressed to our district and we the online planner. (TPEP). “TPEP is time conare already remote. I’m “It’s great for adminsuming, for princiistrators and teachers asking you to keep that like it, but it takes more pals and teachers and teachers are not proin mind when you are time than a planner on vided additional time a desk. The concern is negotiating” or pay for all of this an unreasonable workwork. There are 53 difload continues to grow Dr. Lynn Johnson, President ferent items that have without pay,” she said. Oroville Education Association to be observed or the Like many of the teacher has to pronew state requirevide evidence of,” said ments of teachers Johnson. Johnson said, “Again, it’s not that it is a Then there are changes to teacher bad thing, in just takes more time.” certification requirements, according to Johnson said altogether teachers were Johnson. averaging about 50 days of work that “They are super, super tough on new wasn’t compensated for. teachers. They’re putting in double duty,” “Students are suffering, there are less she said. “Seasoned teachers continue to breaks to revitalize, too much testing and

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 45

teachers can’t/won’t do it all. Students are feeling the pressure,” Johnson said. She warned that there is a shortage of teachers in the state and fewer people are choosing to go into teaching as a career. She said if Oroville doesn’t compensate for the extra time being asked of teachers like other districts in the state are having to do, then the few teachers that are looking for jobs will look elsewhere. “College students are not choosing teaching, there are less and less that are interested. The bottom line is we have to attract teachers to our district and we are already remote. I’m asking you to keep that in mind when you are negotiating,” she said. For the teachers here I am not saying things are all bad, we just have to take care of our people.” To make the district more attractive to teachers she suggested providing an attractive contract that is comparable or better than other districts. She said there were disparities between the Oroville and Tonasket school districts. “One teacher was approached (by Tonasket) and said that they’ve got a better contract. We want to be professionals,” she said. Chuck Ricevuto, a veteran teacher at Oroville High School addressed the situation to School Director Rocky DeVon,

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

the president of the school board. “Rocky you were one of my students and I think you know we took the time to personalize our instruction to students... that time to do that is gone,” said Ricevuto. “I want to compliment you for the time you took to personalize what you taught,” said DeVon. “It has been a big message that the school directors and myself have been taking to the state, no more programs without the money to pay for them.” DeVon said he was also worried about the closure of the Buckhorn Gold Mine, which is about 25 percent of the district’s property evaluation. He said he appreciated what teachers do, but he had to see a way to make it all balance out. “I appreciate the comparison you gave us between Oroville and Tonasket,” added School Director Todd Hill. “I’m not against Mr. Quick, but look at the number of administrators we have and only 550 students. He was hired as a part time superintendent and you moved him to full time. Do we really need a full time superintendent,” asked Johnson, reminding the board the district had the same number of administrators it had when the district had twice the students.

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Sports, Schools

A6-A7 B1-B2 B3

Veterans Classifieds Real Estate

B4-5 B6-B7 B7


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015

NEWS

Free Friday features CWU staff and students BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

submitted photo

Rod Moore, employed at OK Chevrolet since 2009, has moved from being the Service Manager into a new position as General Manager.

Moore named new General Manager at OK Chevrolet THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET – OK Chevrolet welcomes Service Manager Rod Moore into a new position as General Manager. Moore, who moved to the valley in 1994, has a combined 20 years of automotive experience in the Okanogan Valley. He started employment at Price Motors in 1994 as a lot attendant,= and

began to perform light service work. In 2000, Moore graduated with a degree from General Motors Automotive Service Excellence Program. He worked seven years as an automotive technician before being named Service Manager for Sunrise Chevrolet in Omak. In 2009 Moore moved to Tonasket to manage the OK

Chevrolet Service Department. “OK Chevrolet has the best staff I have ever had the privilege to work with,” said Moore. “It is an honest, down home, caring, small town, local, family, forever hometown dealer.” Moore lives in Tonasket with his wife of 17 years, Nicole. They have two children; Ryley, age 11 and Miranda, age 8.

Tonasket Middle School students had a treat in store for them when Michele Giovia arranged for ten Central Washington University students and staff members to present four different Halloween-themed science activities throughout the day Friday, Oct. 31. Giovia is the Gear Up Director for the Tonasket School District. “They were quick lessons, about 35-minute sections where students learned how different things affected the brain,” said Giovia. “We wanted students to learn more about the human body, and how things that happen to the brain affect behavior,” said Anne Gustafson during an activity that had middle schoolers playing with brains made of jello. Gustafson is a Behavioral Ecologist in the Master’s program at CWU. Free Friday events, held on the

last Friday of each quarter, are for any middle school student eligible to participate. Students maintain eligibility by keeping their grades up and having all their assignments turned in. “It was a lot of fun,” said Giovia. “One activity used Glow powder lotion to see how quickly an infectious disease would spread, and in another activity they learned about creepy critters like lizards and snakes. In the activity with the jello brains, gummy worms were placed in different parts of the brains, and students and staff discussed what areas of the body and behaviors that would affect. The last activity of the day was just playing fun Halloweenthemed games like Zombie tag and Halloween Red Rover.” Giovia said about 150 students participate in the activities throughout the day. The program was funded by Gear Up. “It was awesome. On Monday and Tuesday (Oct. 26-27) we took the entire seventh grade to the college, and some of the same

students and staff who came to the school on Friday worked with them. The kids were like, ‘Hey I recognize you!’ It was great,” said Giovia. “The students stayed at the dorm, and on Monday got a tour of the college. Tuesday morning they toured a museum in Yakima, then went back to the college in the afternoon and did science activities.” Giovia said student tours of CWU are funded with Gear Up grants, and CWU is the home of the program. According to the CWU MOSAIC2 GEAR UP Project website, 2040 students in Brewster, Highland, Lake Chelan, Manson, Omak, Oroville, Quincy and Tonasket school districts and Orchard and Pioneer Middle schools in the Wenatchee school district, are served, beginning in 6th or 7th grade. The program runs for seven years. GEAR UP is a discretionary federal grant program designed to increase the number of low-income students prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 people telling her they intended to vote for the Tonasket Parks and Recreation District on the current ballot. Plumb said he appreciated Councilman Dennis Brown attending the IACC conference and suggested other council members plan to attend next year. Both Brown and Councilman Scott Olson expressed concern over properties in town listed on Christian Johnson’s Building & Permits Department Activity Synopsis under the compliance section as “just being monitored.” “The unenclosed pool on First Street has been awaiting action

for three years,” said Brown. Johnson’s report also stated all environmental permits being issued for the South Whitcomb Ave. Sidewalk Improvements project, and the Legacy Pedestrian Bridge project, as awaiting selection of a contractor. people telling her they intended to vote for the Tonasket Parks and Recreation District on the current ballot. Plumb said he appreciated Councilman Dennis Brown attending the IACC conference and suggested other council members plan to attend next year. Both Brown and Councilman Scott Olson expressed concern

over properties in town listed on Christian Johnson’s Building & Permits Department Activity Synopsis under the compliance section as “just being monitored.” “The unenclosed pool on First Street has been awaiting action for three years,” said Brown. Johnson’s report also stated all environmental permits being issued for the South Whitcomb Ave. Sidewalk Improvements project, and the Legacy Pedestrian Bridge project, as awaiting selection of a contractor.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket sixth-grader Zander Batton and seventh-grader Whitney Wilson dig their fingers into a “Zombie brain” made from jello Friday, Oct. 31, with the help of CWU students and staff. Anthony Denice (left), is a primate behaviorist.

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NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS

Oroville & Tonasket celebrate Halloween

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above left, the winner of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce’s Business Halloween Best Decorations went to Sun Lakes Realty for their decorations. “They were amazing, both the decorations and costumes,” said Leah Palmer, who organized the event. Honorable mentions went to the Camaray Motel for their hallway of mirrors for decorations and the Oroville City Hall crew, above, dressed up as their husbands, for costumes. Far left, Phouthasorn Chomthong, was ghoulish at her shop Heart Hair and Nails. “The kids and many parents had great costumes too,” said Palmer, about the Business Trick or Treat on Friday. Left, Police Chief Juan Castaneda (far right), with the help of his Deputy Sophia Castaneda and little brother deputy Jual Castaneda brought his suspects (played by his parents, Juan and Sabrina Castaneda) to Chief Tonasket Park Saturday morning to take part in the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club Howl-O-Ween 3k dog walk. Also taking part in the 3k was the Grim Reaper, played by Jose Castaneda. The event, designed to raise money for N.O. Paws Left Behind Dog Rescue and Leader Dogs for the Blind, included costume prizes and lunch.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Dustin Cody Smith, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 27 to forgery and second-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes occurred July 24. In a second case, Smith pleaded guilty Oct. 27 to POCS (heroin), forgery, thirddegree theft and third-degree possession of stolen property. Those crimes occurred July 23 and Aug. 4. Smith was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined a total of $3,521. Nichole Marie Gonzalez, 32, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 27 to five counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), and one count each of POCS (methamphetamine) and bail jumping. Gonzalez was sentenced to 36 months in prison and fined a total of $2,210.50. The crimes occurred between February and June. The court issued Oct. 22 a criminal summons for Robert Eugene Bass, 61, Tonasket, for two counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, two counts of unlawful hunting with the aid of dogs, four counts of unlawful hunting of big game and one count of third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred in June. The court issued Oct. 27 an arrest warrant for Manuel Cabrera Jr., no middle name listed, 26, for second-degree TMVWOP, third-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 19. The court issued Oct. 27 a second arrest warrant for Cabrera for second-degree burglary, thirddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Those crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 6. The court issued Oct. 28 an arrest warrant for James Jonathan McKinney, 31, Okanogan, with three counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred in March and June.

The court found probable cause to charge Ira Leo Frank, 30, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine), obstruction and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 26. The court found probable cause to charge Troy Steven Pierre, 19, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine). The crime allegedly occurred Sept. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Joseph Darwin Cormier, 25, Omak, with second-degree assault (strangulation) (DV), interfering with reporting (DV), third-degree escape and tampering with a witness (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 20. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Andrew Lezard, 28, Okanogan, with two counts of second-degree rape (forcible compulsion) and one count of attempted second-degree rape (forcible compulsion). The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 9. The court found probable cause to charge Angelica Lopez Torrence, 33, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 22. The court found probable cause to charge Edward Don Chaja Jr., 64, Tonasket, with harassment (threats to kill). The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 24. The court found probable cause to charge Raymond Richard Raab, 74, Tonasket, with four counts of intimidating a public servant and four counts of obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 22.

Civil The state Department of Revenue assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes, interest and fines: Wayne David Lawson DC, Okanogan, $787.52; Sully’s Cafe, Loomis, $4,329.70; Alternative Medicine Okanogan, Okanogan, $2,031.66; and Backcounty Forestry, Omak, $5,442.08. DISTRICT COURT Wendy Limon Amezcua, 24, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Amezcua was fined $200.

Shawna Rae Anderson, 43, Okanogan, had a fourthdegree assault charge dismissed. Anderson was fined $200. Jessica L.D. Ballesteros, 19, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Ballesteros was fined $500. Darren Ray Best, 47, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and first-degree negligent driving. Best was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined a total $1,383. Manuel Cabrera Jr., no middle name listed, 26, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Cabrera was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $658. Judy Mae Carroll, 60, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: supplying liquor to minors. Carroll was fined $200. Daggon D. Chaska, 23, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Chaska was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $858. Delia Ann Marie Cheer, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and first-degree criminal trespassing. Cheer was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined a total of $341. Louis Mark Clark, 23, Omak, had two charges dismissed: reckless endangerment and obstruction. Nicholas James Corter, 23, Tonasket, guilty of making a false or misleading statement. Corter was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $808.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Oct. 26, 2015 Trespassing on Hennepin St. near Okanogan. Illegal burning on Miller Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on N. Main St. in Conconully. Outboard motor reported missing. Fraud on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Vinmar Lane near Okanogan. Littering on Hwy. 7 near Oro-

ville. Burglary on Blue Lake Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on Eighth Ave. in Oroville. Harassment on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Bob Neil Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Tonasket Shop Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on Danker Cutoff Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Hanford St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Third Ave. in Oroville. Danny Joe Smart, 24, booked for DUI. Jodi Ann Nanamkin, 29, booked for POCS and use of drug paraphernalia. Ruth Emily Marchand, 42, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: DUI and second-degree DWLS. Robert Charlie Atkins, 24, DOC detainer.

Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015 Vehicle prowl on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Patterson Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Kay St. in Oroville. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. George Joshua E. Gilmer, 35, DOC detainer. Jacob Robert Guy Nanamkin, 25, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV) and an FTA bench warrant for POCS. Raymond Joseph Moore Jr., 54, booked on two FTC warrants: DUI and physical control. Wednesday Oct. 28, 2015 Vehicle-vs.-cow crash on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Burglary on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on N. Frontage State Rd.

near Tonasket. Theft on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Drugs on Jasmine St. in Omak. Drugs on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Sinlahekin Rd. near Loomis. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. TMVWOP on Jackson St. in Omak. Public urination on Juniper St. in Oroville. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 43, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Joe Ballesteros Lopez, 21, booked on four FTA warrants: two for second-degree DWLS and two for third-degree DWLS. Deena Jean Lezard, 27, booked for three counts of POCS and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. Stephen Moses Jr., no middle name listed, 55, booked for POCS, third-degree DWLS, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a prescription drug without a prescription. Eric Andreas Bakken, 51, court commitment for violation of a no-contact order.

Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 Assault on Copple Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Dwinnell Cutoff Rd. near Oroville. Drugs on Pogue Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on N. Birch St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. Adam Luntsford, no middle name listed, 41, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: DUI, third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Danail Joseph New, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for harassment. Joshua Dean Allen, 34, booked on three warrants: second-

degree criminal trespassing, second-degree vehicle prowl and second-degree TMVWOP. George Elmer Britt, 31, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI.

Friday, Oct. 30, 2015 Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Burglary on Omak Airport Rd. near Omak. Automobile theft on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Sandflat Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Crowder Rd. near Okanogan. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Omache Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on Omak Ave. in Omak. DUI on S. Granite St. in Omak. Fire on 11th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Central Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Patrick Joseph Wapato, 21, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. William Martin Shawl, 31, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: DUI and hit-and-run (unattended vehicle); and a DOC secretary’s warrant. Dwight Eldon Backherms, 52, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Ciara Marie Lasarte, 29, DOC detainer. Jennifer Lynn Valdez, 21, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for first-degree criminal trespassing. Miguel Angel Dominguez Santana, 19, DOC detainer. Angelo Ricardo Coy, 30, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV), resisting arrest and obstruction.

SEE COPS | PG B8

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Buckhorn Mine recognized nationally for safety record In October, Kinross Kettle River-Buckhorn performance, to stimulate greater interest in safewas notified that the Buckhorn Mine was award- ty and to encourage development of more effeced the Sentinels of tive accident prevenSafety Certificate of tion programs among Achievement from the the nation’s mineral National Mining Assomining operations. ciation. This is a great This program is sponaccomplishment that sored by the National builds on the mine’s Mining Association milestone which they (NMA), who receives reached on Friday, the mining safety staOctober 16 2015 of tistics annually from going 4 years without the Mine Safety and a lost time incident. Health Administration The Certificate of (MSHA.) Achievement in SafeThe Buckhorn Mine ty is awarded to only was classified in the the top five operations large underground of all U.S. mining opmetal mines category. erations, in each minTo be eligible for the ing category that have award, the Buckhorn met all of the award Mine must: (1) have criteria. The Sentinels reported employment of Safety awards are data to MSHA for awarded annually to each quarter in which the nation’s safest it was active during mines. This award the calendar year was initiated in 1925 The Buckhorn Mine earned the Sentinels of Safety (January 1 - DecemAward from the National Mining Association last month. by then-Commerce ber 31); (2) have not Secretary Herbert experienced a work Hoover and remains the nation’s most prestigious injury that resulted in a fatality, permanent disabilaward recognizing mining safety. The purpose of ity, days away from work or days of restricted work the annual Sentinels of Safety award program is activity; (3) have a No Days Lost (NDL) injury into recognize achievement of outstanding safety cidence rate no greater than the national average

for these same category; and (4) have accumulated at least 4,000 employee - hours during the calendar year. This national recognition is a testament to the hard work and efforts EVERYONE puts in each and every day to ensure that we all go home safe and healthy.

Miners conduct the quarterly weighing of a selfrescuer.


NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Teachers: A case of you get more than you pay for

While the demands on our students continue to increase, especially in the form of testing requirements which seems to change from year to year, so too does the demand on our teachers’ time. While we ask more of our teachers apparently the state feels they don’t have to give the people we trust with our kids either the time or pay for doing it. Dr. Lynn Johnson, president of the Oroville Education Association, tried to make that point at the last Oroville School Board meeting. She talked about how teachers across the state are being asked to do more, like TPEP, The Teacher and Principal Evaluation Project, which was part of a broad education reform bill passed by the Washington State Legislature in 2010, with implementation beginning in 2013/14. Traditional evaluation systems have a twotiered ranking of “satisfactory” or “unsatisfactory.” TPEP calls for a four-level rating system Out of and eight minimum criteria. My Mind Dr. Johnson explained TPEP includes 53 data Gary A. DeVon items that have to be kept track of, or give evidence in support of. Like many things passed down from above, the funding to pay teachers for the extra work is not provided by the state, nor is the time to meet all the requirements being asked of our teachers. And this is just one of many examples Dr. J presented to the board. And, while other school districts are trying to find ways of compensating teachers for their time, Oroville hasn’t kept up, because, like many rural school districts the money just isn’t there and the legislature continues to balk at funding real basic education as required by the state constitution. Are teachers overworked? – Ask someone who isn’t around teachers all day and they might say no. Ask someone who gets a chance to observe a teacher on a regular basis and they might change their mind. Are they overpaid? Certainly not for the jobs we entrust them to do, nor compared to most professions that require the same level of education. In fact their pay is actually decreasing, even after state voters tried to increase their compensation through the initiative process. My mom spent nearly her entire career at Oroville Elementary School and for the most part I think she loved it. She put in extra hours at home grading papers and doing the things most teachers do without getting paid for them. When school supplies were short or non existent, as they often were, she like her fellow teachers, paid for them out of her own pocket. And, while she loved it, she advised all her children not follow her into teaching because she felt the pay was too low compared to other professions that require that level of education (well maybe not journalism). For a long time I wasn’t so sure about her advice, but perhaps she was right all along and it sounds like it’s just getting worse. And that’s a big problem for small schools like Oroville and Tonasket, more people are choosing not to become teachers in Washington State, which has an average teacher salary ranking 42nd in the nation. If your Oroville or Tonasket and you want to draw good teachers to your school and keep them, you have to do something to attract them. That’s probably isn’t going to be our rural, slower-paced lifestyle. And the old argument that it costs less to live here doesn’t fly either – home prices and rents might be lower, but not the cost of groceries, gas and most other necessities. According to Johnson, Tonasket has stepped up with some incentives, let’s hope the Oroville Board heeds the OEA’s words and looks at ways we can attract and keep good teachers in a teacher short state.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Blood on your hands Dear Editor I would like to invite each and every citizen of Okanogan County to boycott the next upcoming movie “The Hateful Eight” of director Quentin Tarantino which will debut in December 2015. Mr. Tarantino recently declared at a rally in New York City that police officers are murderers, which seems to be the popular hateful rhetoric going around. Tarantino himself helped to organize the rally. Police organizations nation wide are calling for a mass boycott of movies directed by Tarantino. Tarantino is just another example of the self-important spewing forth hate rhetoric towards an organization that is here to help the public. Any organization has its bad apples but to broad brush the peace officers across America is reckless and dead wrong. Clay Warnstaff Oroville

Dream came true Dear Editor,

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712

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SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

My name is Paul Fuchs, I am 11-years-old and I am attending the Oroville Elementary School. Like every year my friend and I went Trick or Treating on Main Street, we enjoy a good time together and the candies too. This year the staff at the Camary Motel asked me to enter my name in a drawing, I did not even know what the prize was, they did not tell me. I put my name in anyway. Later that night we received a phone call. They told me I won a prize. It was a Kindle Fire!!! I could not say anything! I was totally speechless I did not believe it was true! I was so happy! My own Kindle Fire! I always wanted a Kindle Fire, because I had nothing to play any mobile games or read eBooks on. In the future I hope I will use my new Kindle to read many interesting eBooks and play games. I hope the person who donated the Kindle Fire will read this letter, because I’d like to say “Thank you very much” and let you know how happy you made me! Thanks, you made my dream come true! Yours, Paul Fuchs Oroville

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, November 1 - 15, 1940: Only eight men from the upper Okanogan Valley had their draft number drawn on the first draft. Those included: William Stogenga, Emil B. Banich, Ithiel Ramsey and Clifford A. Lane all from Oroville: Cornelius A. Kearney, William O. Hensey and Francis W. Fleming from Tonasket and Sam Miller, Chesaw. They were among the first 3,434 men called in Okanogan County. Formal opening and Flower Show at the H.W. Nelson Flower Show and Green House in Tonasket on Nov. 17. The Oroville Business Club resumed their weekly meeting at the Peerless Monday night following a postponement during hunting season. The new officers, A. M. LeMay and John Hancock, Secretary assumed their duties. Among the topics of discussion were: Is there an opening for a bank in Oroville; to purchase uniforms for the school boy patrol; gather information about federal money for the use at the airport and information on the number of pheasants released in the county by the game department. An insert in this issue announces that the Grand Coulee Dam is 92.8 percent complete with only 63.3 percent of the contract time elapsed and that the first “Coulee Power will flow on Jan. 1, 1940.” Roosevelt re-elected as President of the United States over Wendell Wilkie and Arthur B. Langley is leading for the Washington governorship. George Engstrom, proprietor of George’s Five and Ten of Oroville, located in the old First National Bank building, returned home with his new bride, formerly Helen Cassal of Winthrop. The Oroville Schools and stores will be closed on Monday for Armistice Day. This will allow everyone wanting to attend the Annual Armistice Day football classic between Oroville and Tonasket High Schools, an opportunity to do so. The Oroville Hornets Football Team went to Tonasket for the Armistice Day game and came back with a well earned 12-6 victory. They will meet again in Oroville on November 21, when the Tigers will attempt their revenge. More horses will be purchased by the Army Remount Service next week in Okanogan and Tonasket. Only geldings will be purchased and no off colored horses will be accepted. The price will range from $150.00 to 175.00 per animal. Grocery Prices: Mother’s Cocoa, 5 Lb. for $.15; Miracle Whip Dressing, $.29; 2 oz can of pepper, $.05; 5 lb. box chocolates, $.79; 2 lb. carton of crackers, $.17; Large can of oysters, $.13.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: November 4 - 11, 1965: A fire completely destroyed John’s Pontiac building and the living quarters of the John Kammers. Owner, Ray Kammers was working on a truck and was draining gas from the tank when his trouble light slipped and ignited the gas. Kammers was treated at the hospital for second and third degree burns to his hands and face. Lost in the fire were three new Pontiacs on the showroom floor, two vehicles belonging to Bud Clark and a Jeep belonging to Richard Forrester. A. Z. Wells Foundation grant to the St. Martin’s Hospital in Tonasket to purchase high-low beds, which can be adjusted for the patients care of the benefit of the attending nurses of staff. All beds

Paul Fuchs and his new Kindle Fire

of this type are now used in the hospital. Oroville voters elect new school directors. Art Henderson and John Haskell were seeking the post held by Clayton Emry for the past eight years and Kem Smith was running for re-election unopposed. Haskell won the seat with a vote of 125 against Henderson’s 30. A close watch is being kept on the Canadian Border west of Oroville as police continue their search for a transient worker who fired on two officers Saturday night. Sheriff Horner accuses Kaufman of having fired a 3 caliber semi-automatic rifle at Okanogan county Deputy Sheriff Lloyd Loney and officers, Russell Manchester and John Chestnutt, of the U.S. Border Patrol. He was being sought for questioning about a check written in the name of John Thorndike at the IGA store in Oroville. On Monday of this week, a business transaction developed with John Kelly purchasing George’s Body Shop in Oroville from George’s Super Service in Tonasket. Kelly is well known in this community, as he and his family have lived here for the past 20 years as the former owner of the Western Auto Store, driving the Molson-Chesaw Mail Route and driving bus routes. Bob Neal, who has been operating the shop since 1957 will remain in the business. The Oroville Hornets had to struggle to come out on the long end of the score of 14-0 against the Okanogan Bulldogs during the last 53 seconds of the game. Paul Schwilke assumed management of the Mobil Service Station on Oct. 18, 1965. The business was formerly owned and operated by George Kidwell. Free Dog Sled Rides will be offered by and at the Cascade Market on Main Street in Oroville on Nov. 13. Grocery Prices: Center Cut Pork Chops, $.89 lb.; Slab bacon, $.59 lb.; 5 lb. tin Honey, $.98; Bananas, $.13 lb.; Large Texas Pink Grapefruit, 12 for $.1.00; Doughnuts, 6 for $.29; Cucumbers, 2 for $.15. Weather-wise by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: Nov. 3, 48 degrees maximum and 25 degrees minimum; Nov. 4, 58 and 32; Nov. 5, 53 and 36; Nov. 6, 52 and 30; Nov. 7, 54 and 31; Nov. 8, 50 and 40 and Nov. 9, 55. Weekly precipitation,Nov. 3,.09” and Nov. 4, .02”.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: November 1 – 8 & 15, 1990: In an attempt to negotiate a peaceful solution of a disagreement among the nine cities and the county over jail fees, the county has agreed to drop the lawsuit brought against the cities last year. In late 1987, the county began demanding that the cities pay $15 booking fees and a $40 per day for housing nonfelon prisoners for the cities. The cities refused to pay the more than $200,000 in jail and booking fees for 1988 and a few years prior. The Board of Directors of the Riverview Cemetery is asking the Nov. 4 voters to approve an $11,000 annual levy, in an attempt to ward off bankruptcy. Located southwest of Oroville on the western side of the Similkameen River, the cemetery has faced severe financial problems over the last several years. Miss Stacey Ayers, of Tonasket, was pronounced Miss Tonasket Rodeo 1991 by Master of Ceremonies Lloyd Caton Jr. during the coronation ceremonies Friday night at the Village Fare. Stacie is a senior at the Tonasket High School and he daughter of Wayne and Lori Ayers of South Pine Creek. It appears that the Tonasket School District has not yet hit upon the right combination of factors to guarantee approval of a school bond as the latest issue went down to defeat in last Tuesday’s General Election. Despite winning a majority, he $3,223,000 issue failed to garner the necessary 60 percent voter approval. Director Jeff Sandberg and his Oroville High Pep Band helps to warm the fans with their “hot” sounds. “The Peerless is exactly where it was when I bought it last year” remarked W. B. “Mac” McPherson about the restaurant and lounge he bought in a Marshal’s Sale a year ago this week. During that time, he has had four heat pumps installed and did major repairs to the roof. McPherson said that he has been looking for someone with the financial means to lease the place, hire good help and be able to meet payroll. A picture of turbulent waters shows the feeding time for over 600,000 Chinook

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

The countdown to Thanksgiving begins I can’t believe it! And, then another month and you know what that will be. Word has been received from our friend, Mary Ellen Lemond, in Michigan, that she has shingles, again. Once is enough for me and I hope my shot still kicks in, if needed. It isn’t often that we hear of someone wanting to gain weight. It is usually the other way around, but for Doris Reynolds, (twin of Dee Patterson) she must reach a prescribed weight to be able to tolerate the treatments for the Hodgkin disease, she is battling. There is only one positive thing about the disease and that is, that now days the success of the treatments is very high. And we certainly are hoping that all goes well for her. These rainy, dreary days, of recent, aren’t nearly as much fun as sunshine and pretty flowers, but that’s life. I guess we weren’t promised a rose garden, year ‘round. If you find a path with no obstacles it

probably doesn’t lead anywhere. Have you been to the American Legion for Wednesday night hamburgers? Sure beats cooking at home and no dishes to wash. It’s a win-win situation. On Saturday, Nov. 7, the annual spaghetti luncheon/bazaar will be held at the United Methodist Church. Deep appreciation to (Hometown Pizza) John and Becky Dejardens for their assistance in preparing and obtaining the necessary foods, for a delicious spaghetti, crisp salad, garlic bread and pumpkin pie for dessert. There will be seating available for those that can’t accommodate the stairs. For the first time there will be a few vendor tables offering items other than just items made by the church. Come and be surprised! Lunch starts at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and bazaar is 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Meet friends and make new ones. One of our faithful members, at the Oroville Senior Citizens, is Darlene Allen. News comes of serious health

issues with Darlene. Hank and Darlene a home in Hawaii would be having the moved to Oroville some several years best of two worlds, wouldn’t you say? ago to give “in-home care” to Ruby That is the case of Wallie Akowa who is Sherling, Darlene’s mom. able to move back and forth And later decided to sell their as the seasons change. Have a home in Spokane and live life good winter, Wallie! in the ”slow lane.” Hopefully As you drive past the her diagnosis and treatment Oroville Free Methodist will be beneficial and we’ll Church, you will notice the see them back at our lunch absence of all the shrubs, tables. bushes, flowers etc. that Jim Weaver, artist and past once were located there, suraid to the cook at the Senior rounding the church. Also Center, has the misfortune the “YAK” building, (once of having a detached retina Dr. Lamb’s office) and where and was sent to Spokane for THIS & THAT the youth group of the comevaluation and corrective Joyce Emry munity have met for quite procedures. Best wishes for a few years. Watch for new a speedy recovery are being construction of a replacement sent to him. building to be used for receptions etc, to Who says senior citizens are drab and replace the use of the basement of the dull? Well, maybe some are but not those church which proved, through the years, found in Oroville. From “Shady Ladies” to be too small and stairs that were detriDoris Hughes and Evelyn Dull, wearing mental to some. lamp shades for their hats, to “Minnie I noticed a man cleaning and removPearl” Betty Steg, Barbie Freimuth, as ing/replacing bricks around the base of a lovely bride and the prize winner, the trees that adorn Main Street. Time Roberta Cole, in a bright purple witch wears on them. Hopefully soon we can outfit, and others. Whata’ a bunch of fun get some new businesses to fill some ladies.!!!! of the empty shops. That too is being To have a home on Lake Osoyoos and worked on.

Come shop the Chesaw Christmas Bazaar Nov. 7

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Next Senior Pancake Breakfast is Nov. 14

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Have you started your Christmas shopping yet? Well, Saturday, Nov. 7 would be a good day to start at the Chesaw Christmas Bazaar. You can shop from 9 a.m. ‘til 2 p.m. in the Community Building in Chesaw. There will be homemade items, books, jewelry, dried flowers, cookies, baked goods and more. The Country Kitchen will be serving chili “your way.” With or without cheese or onions, in a bowl or on a bun. Join us for

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Some events to watch for in Nov. include: Our pancake breakfast served on Saturday, Nov. 14, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Thanksgiving Potluck is on Nov. 26 at 1 p.m. (We will provide the turkey, dressing, potatoes, and gravy). Mark your calendars. Our Halloween Costume Party Friday was wonderful fun. The prize for best costume went to Roberta Cole. Roberta was dressed in purple, with a pointed hat, and she fit the part very well of, well, you know. (You think she cast a spell on the judges?) Second prize went to Betty Steg, as Mini Pearl, and third prize went to Barbie Fremuth, dressed as a bride. I think that Doris Hughes and Evelyn Dull sported costumes that were not, in any way dull, as the shady ladies. They were runners up. And, of course, there was that sprightly young fellow with a huge spider hanging from his hat. Not to forget the box lady. After lunch, Thursday last, the bingo crowd, gobbling gobs of Halloween candy and had a great time playing, bingo? We are looking to find a cabinet, preferably near the snack table. Our goal is that the the “bingoers’” setup is less disruptive to the kitchen staff. OCTN, our meal provider, has the space rented until 1 p.m., and the kitchen staff has a limited time to prepare and clean up. The rule is that everyone is to stay out of the kitchen until

Looking for more volunteers SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

The Auxiliary Ladies have the new raffle basket on display and will be happy to sell you tickets for it. It’s a coffee theme, and it’s pocked with goodies. Come in, take a look, and buy a ticket or two. All monies will go toward the ladies’ charities. DJ Note and Renegade Productions will be here on Friday, the 13th! It’s Karaoke at it’s finest. The party is on beginning at 9 p.m. and will rock on until

North Countryopoly available to order Nov. 7 SUBMITTED BY A LLENE HALLIDAY OROVILLE GRANGE REPORTER Raleigh Chinn/submitted photo

Roberta Cole, dressed in a purple witch’s costume, won for Best Costume in the Oroville Senior Center’s Halloween Costume Contest during their Halloween party on Friday. 1 p.m.. Now, I know, that you kings and queens are not bound by any rules, in all matters of the realm. But, there is the gnawing concepts of “consideration” and “the golden rule” that even kings and queens should consider when dealing with, you know, mere “subjects?” Remember. With the proper attitude, all things are possible (but, that’s another story). The Menu for next week is: Tuesday, split pea and ham soup; Thursday, orange glazed chicken; Friday, beef roast. For Seniors age 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can

EAGLEDOM AT WORK closing time. Get your friends together and come in and join us. On Saturday, Nov. 21, the band North Half will be at the Oroville Eagles. This will be a special event open house and the public is invited to join us. North Half is a very popular band that we don’t get to enjoy nearly often enough. The pool league is on again and Burgers and More will be too. That’s every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Your Eagles need volunteers especially in the kitchen! I can’t find anything in our by-laws to

afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. And, for a donation of $3.50, can we really get lunch at the Senior Center? You know, fun, food, and friends? See you there? “Seven, that’s the time we leave - at seven.” This is a line in what song? And, who was the famous movie star who sang it in 1944? (I woke up with this tune in my head yesterday. I wasn’t even born in 1944). Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Ken Ripley; Pinochle, Darlene Firpo; High Man, Leonard; High Woman, Bev Storm.

prevent the Aerie members from volunteering their time and talents to the Auxiliary projects. Come on people. Get out there and help! Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Queen of Hearts will be drawn at 6:30 every Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 pm to 7 p.m. every day. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker, and Meat Draw. We open early on Sundays when the ‘Hawks play at 10 a.m. We have free pool every Sunday. We are People Helping People!

ITEMS PAST | FROM A5 salmon as they fight to get their share of a special feeding mixer at the new fish rearing station located on the bank of the Similkameen River near Oroville. The fish will remain in the rearing pond until April, at which time they will be released into the river in an effort to start an annual migration of adult salmon. Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputies raided a barn seven miles south of Oroville and seized over 1800 marijuana plants last Thursday, Nov. 8 in what turns out to be the larg-

est and most valuable marijuana bust in county history. (NOTE:

312 S. Whitcomb

This writer thought “what a difference 25 years makes.”)

509-486-0615

At October’s meeting Cindy Nelson reported all the spaces have been sold for the Grange’s fundraiser board game, NorthCountry”opoly.” It will be available to order on Saturday, Nov. 7 (call Cindy at 509- 560-9271) and will be on sale in local stores on Monday, Dec. 7, in plenty of time for Christmas shoppers. A hearty thanks to all who

Chili Cook-off is Saturday, Nov. 7 SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Well November is upon us and those leaves are down and ready for raking and the weather is cooling off. We hope everyone had a great Halloween. Our annual Halloween party went well and a great thanks to all that came and also participated. The following placed for our costume event. First place went to Roxi Pelton as a Spider Queen, second place to Terry Pelton as Sir Lanceo-lot, and third place to Vicki Wilkinson as Michael Jackson. Don’t forget to mark this Saturday down for our 5th annual Chili Cook-off on Nov. 7 at 5:30 pm. Come and enjoy tasting some fine chili and help decide this years winner in the hot and mild categories. There will also be a dessert auction during the event. Bingo will be on Friday at 7

OROVILLE GRANGE have shopped at our monthly Flea Markets and to all who have donated items for these events. Wednesday, Nov. 21 we will have bargains galore in our “bag and box” sale. Everything you can fit into either a bag for $2 or into a box for $5, both of which we will provide. Members discussed the possible effects of this year’s hot summer weather on various crops. Apparently, tomatoes did not produce as well as expected. Also, there were reports of area filbert trees not being pollinated result-

p.m. and the kitchen will open at 5:30 p.m. for some of those great hamburgers and fries and other great food, so get on down here and come enjoy yourself and try for that big bingo prize. Bingo is also looking for more volunteers to help out during the evening and also there is always more room for participants to play bingo. Come on down for a great evening of fun. Saturday we will be having Karaoke at 9 p.m. after the chili event and don’t forget Joker Poker Drawing at 7 p.m. Come and try and get the joker for the prize pot. Sunday at 1 p.m. will be our weekly pinochle, if you enjoy good company and playing cards come on in and we will make sure you get a seat. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows. Nellie Paulsen took home first place and second place went to Ward Seim. Carol Ross and Wanda Sutherland grabbed the last pinochle of the day while Jo Porter had low score. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

to the Tonasket Distribution center along with some hats. Thank you ladies for this great donation to those in need. There will be a Free Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. The menu includes: turkey or ham, stuffing, potatoes and gravy, yams, corn, green bean casserole, salad, pickles, olives, cranberries, rolls and butter and dessert (pie), coffee, tea, hot cocoa and sparkling cider. The next Bingo night in Molson will be on Nov. 6 at 7 p.m., bring a friend and join in the fun. Honor a veteran on Wednesday, Nov. 11 at the Chesaw Mercantile. Come and visit with a veteran, have a cup of coffee and a cookie or two and thank them for their service. ing in no nuts being produced - only empty shells. Samples of walnuts that were misshapen and rotten were examined. A recent book, The Garden of Invention, which relates the remarkable achievements of botanist/horticulturist Luther Burbank, was also discussed. He worked with nature to improve vegetables, fruits, flowers and trees by grafting, cross-breeding and selection in Santa Rosa, Calif. He is credited with changing that state from primarily producing wheat to being the fruit and vegetable capital it became in the late 19th century. Join us at our monthly evening meetings the third Wednesday at 7 p.m. or come early for the potluck at 6 p.m. Give your ideas for improving crop production in the hotter, drier summers we have been experiencing. Questions? Call 509-476-4072.

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a day of shopping and fun. For info call Beth at 509-485-2397. I messed up on the Pinochle report last week so all you players will get two weeks worth of winners, Now, for the week of Oct. 19 the highs went to George Penner and Judy Ripley, the lows went to Ray Visser and Sally Eder. Alan Moore was the Traveling winner. There were 33 in attendance. The week of Oct. 26 with 34 players, Darrel Bunch and Ina Visser were high, Harold Harper and Evlyn Dahl were the Lows. Carl Cole won the Traveling. Three of the ladies from the Highland Stitchers took 56 quilts

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NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR EVENTS PLANNED TO HONOR LOCAL VETERANS TONASKET TONASKET - In honor of Veteran’s Day, the Tonasket High School ASB will be hosting a Veteran’s Day Assembly on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 10 in the Tonasket High School Commons from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The students would like to encourage all veterans to please bring items to be displayed on our Veterans’ memorabilia table. Before the assembly, from 8:45 to 9 a.m., THS ASB and FCCLA will be providing a refreshment area for veterans and community members to sit, visit, and reflect. They will have decorated tables for the veterans to sit at, enjoy the refreshments, and watch the assembly. They encourage community members to attend the assembly and celebrate America’s Veterans with them. OROVILLE OROVILLE - Oroville High School will be holding a Veterans Day Assembly on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 9 a.m. at the Coulton Auditorium. Veterans are encouraged to attend. The assembly is open to the public. CHESAW CHESAW - Honor a veteran on Wednesday, Nov. 11 at the Chesaw Mercantile. Come and visit with a veteran, have a cup of coffee and a cookie or two. Thank them for their service. Ruby Scene at Winery

OROVILLE - “Ruby Scene,” featuring Denny Richardson and others including Sonny Lanigan and Sandy Vaughn, will perform live Thursday, Nov. 5 at Esther Bricques Winery. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, call 509-476-2861, check the website – www.estherbricques. com, or check out Esther Bricques Winery’s Facebook page. United Methodist Bazaar

OROVILLE - The Oroville United Methodist Church will hold their annual spaghetti luncheon and Bazaar, Saturday, Nov. 7. The bazaar opens at 10 a.m. and goes to 3 p.m. Serving for lunch begins at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. CCC Auction

TONASKET - Tonasket Community Cultural Center will hold their annual benefit auction Saturday, Nov. 7. Doors open at 4 p.m. with the silent auction. Fine wines by Esther Bricques Winery will be served. A steak stroganoff dinner begins at 6 p.m. Games begin at 6:30 p.m., and the main live auction starts around 7 p.m. This fun evening features lots of good food, many varied auction items such as local overnight stays, gift certificates, desserts, a flight and more.

and ‘singing planet.’ This educational event is sponsored by Humanities Washington, coordinated by the OHA and hosted at the CCC. The presentation is free; dinner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for nonmembers. More info: okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw or 509-476-2432. Charity Stich-a-Thon

MOLSON - Highland Stitchers will be doing a “Jelly Roll Race” quilt top sew-day for charity on Sunday, Nov. 8 at the Molson Grange from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Bring your sewing machine and basic sewing notions. All fabric “jelly rolls” will be provided. Prizes awarded for fastest completion, accuracy and “quilter’s choice.” Refreshments served. Completed quilt tops will be quilted, finished and displayed at the Highland Stitchers 2016 Molson Quilt Show on Saturday, Aug. 27. All quilts will be donated to people in need in our community. RSVP by Tuesday, Nov. 3. Contact Lisa Chaplin at 509-4852077 to RSVP and information. Fire Dist. 16 Budget Meeting

AENEAS VALLEY - The Okanogan Fire District #16 commissioners will hold their annual public budget hearing Monday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m. at 20 Bench Creek Road in Aeneas Valley. The public is invited to attend. Call Mike Woelke at 509-486-1386 for more information.

OVOC Auditions

Transit Authority Meeting

OMAK - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus will be holding auditions for their annual spring community show, Nov. 7 and 8. This year’s show is The Adams Family: A Musical. Vocal auditions are Saturday, Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Omak HS/MS Choir room. Register for an appointment time through Judy Johnston at jj@themoodswings.net. Dance Auditions and script readings are Sunday, Nov. 8 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Virginia Granger School in Okanogan. These are open to all who have had a vocal audition. Contact Johnston for more info.

OMAK - TranGO will hold a Public Board Meeting on Monday, Nov. 9 at 6 p.m. The location will be in the Council Chambers of Omak City Hall, 2 Ash St N, Omak, WA 98841. Please call (509) 557-6177 or visit www.okanogantransit.com for any questions

Community Coat Closet

OROVILLE - Warm coats for winter for children and adults will be given away on Saturday, Nov. 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Depot Museum, 1210 Ironwood in Oroville. The event is sponsored by the Oroville Royal Neighbors of America, Sterling Bank and community donations. Chesaw Christmas Bazaar

CHESAW - The Chesaw Christmas Bazaar will be Saturday, Nov. 7 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Communiity Building in Chesaw. There will be homemade items, books, jewelry, dried flowers, cookies, baked goods and more. The Country Kitchen will be serving chili “your way.” With or without cheese or onions, in a bowl or on a bun. Join us for a day of shopping and fun. For info call Beth at 509-485-2397. The Roots of Music: Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes

TONASKET - The Roots of Music: Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes with George Halekas will take place on Friday, Nov. 6 at 5:15 at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center. The fall season begins with a compelling presentation that weaves together music and ecology, as biologist George Halekas surveys the unique beauty of nature’s soundscape, and explores why Earth is considered a ‘sonic jewel’

Historical Society to Meet

OROVILLE - The Borderlands Historical Society General Meeting for members and friends is Tuesday, Nov. 10 beginning at 4 p.m. at the Oroville Depot Museum. Please enter by the freight doors. Oroville Library Storytime

OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Nov. 11. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com. Vaughn and Engel to Perform

OROVILLE - Sandy Vaughn and Reed Engel will perform live Thursday, Nov. 12 at Esther Bricques Winery. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, call 509-476-2861, check the website – www.estherbricques. com, or check out Esther Bricques Winery’s Facebook page. Indoor Flea Market

OROVILLE - Indoor Flea Market and Craft Bazaar at Appleway 1300 Main Street Friday Nov. 13 and Saturday Nov. 14. For more info or to sign up come to Appleway or call 509-476-3900. WE Women Auction Notice

The annual auction sale for the Whitestone/Ellisforde Church of the Brethren Women’s Fellowship will be held on Friday, Nov. 13 at the Whitestone Church, 575 Loomis/Oroville Hwy, Tonasket. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and

the auction will begin at 7 p.m. There will be handwork (pillowcases, dishtowels, jewelry), baked goods, candies, etc. up for auction. There will also be a silent auction table. You’ll find something for Christmas gifts or your own needs. There will be refreshments by donation. Everyone is invited and urged to come. Proceeds will go to mission projects, including Mission Aviation Fellowship, Disaster Ministries, North Valley Nursing Home and to help maintain kitchen supplies for the two churches. For further information call 509-223-3427. Benefit Roast for Don King

OROVILLE – A benefit “Roast” and Auction for Don King, who was diagnosed with cancer this past March, is planned at the Oroville Eagles on Saturday, Nov. 14. The fundraiser, to help with medical expenses, includes a dinner cooked by the Oroville Fire Department. Doors open at 4 p.m., dinner starts at 4:30 p.m. and auction at 6 p.m. The Roast starts after the auction. King started chemo and radiation in the middle of May and completed treatment the end of June. Rules for the Roast are as follows: 1. Anyone donating $50 will have a 4-8 minute time limit to Roast Don. 2. No filters, anything goes. 3. Organizers are also setting up a Skype call in number for anyone who cannot make the Benefit Roast and would like to participate in giving him a bad time. All donations can be dropped off at Joey King’s. Questions can be directed to Martin Rosales, email Martin_Rosale@Hotmail.com or call 206-391-5551. Oroville Contact Annette Rounds 509560-0351. Planning Hearing

TONASKET - The Tonasket Planning Commission will hold a public hearing On Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 3 p.m. The agenda includes a continuation of the public hearing and Final Review of Zoning

EARLY DEADLINES for the Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune Our Nov. 12 publication Classified and Legals deadline Monday, Nov. 9 at noon Display Advertising Friday, Nov. 6 at 5 p.m.

their Continuing Education Scholarships. This local financial aid program offers aid to those OHS grads that have completed at least one year of vo-tec school or college. Aid will be awarded for the winter term. Access to applications and information is online at orovillescholarshipfoundation.org

Code Chapter 17. Originally scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 20 and then rescheduled for Oct. 27, it is now on Nov. 17 Community Christmas Bazaar

OROVILLE - The Oroville Future Business Leaders of America Community Christmas Bazaar will be Friday, Nov. 20 and Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Oroville Elementary gym. Those that would like to reserve a booth ($20) should contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427.

Food Banks

The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Chesaw Thanksgiving Dinner

CHESAW - There will be a Free Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. The menu includes: turkey or ham, stuffing, potatoes and gravy, yams, corn, green bean casserole, salad, pickles, olives, cranberries, rolls and butter and dessert (pie), coffee, tea, hot cocoa and cider.

to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info contact. Place events online by clicking “Add an Event” on the homepage. List your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once submitted, it can take up to 48 hours to appear on the calendar. To list your invent in the newspaper submit them us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Listing Your Item

Continuing Ed Scholarships

The Calendar allows listing your event up to two weeks before the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included before the two week limit. Our online calendar at www. gazette-tribune.com allows events

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation would like to remind former OHS graduates that Friday, Dec. 4 is the deadline to apply for

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

LOOMIS

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015

Wildlife Biologist George Halekas first speaker for Highlands Wonders The Roots of Music: Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OHA CONSERVATION COORDINATOR

Fall is in the air, and with the cooler weather comes a new indoor Highland Wonders season, offering a diverse array of presentations to deepen the community’s understanding of the natural world. The season begins on Friday, Nov 6, with a compelling presentation that weaves together music and ecology. Biologist George Halekas surveys the unique beauty of nature’s soundscape, and explores why Earth is considered a ‘sonic jewel’ and ‘singing planet.’ The vibrant musical heritage of humanity is a wonderful component of this rich soundscape diversity, and the conversation will begin by looking at the emergence of music in ancient huntergatherer societies from an ecological perspective. The focus will then shift to exploring Earth’s soundscapes from the large planetary scale, to investigating representative habitats like the rainforest and ocean, as well as listening to the fascinating details of individual bird and whale song. Time permitting, we’ll come full circle and listen to contemporary music composers who take a more inclusive or interactive approach to making music with nature’s orchestra. “I enjoy learning about where the arts and science interweave,” Halekas said. “The evolution of sensory awareness of the environment by hearing sound, leading to the ability to project and interact with the surrounding soundscape, occurred comparatively late in earth’s history. Currently we have beautiful

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unique soundscapes in every biogeographic life zone on earth, and amazing singers like humpback whales and songbirds, along with the inspired musical tradition of humanity representing every human emotion in every age and culture. We truly have a singing planet!” Halekas, a member of the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau, is a former Wildlife Biologist with the OkanoganWenatchee National Forest. He is captivated by the power and expressiveness of music and its ability to capture human emotions. A lifelong conservationist, he is drawn to understanding the relationship between living organisms with their surrounding environment, especially through sound. Since retiring as a biologist, he has served on a multi-year task force that advised the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife in developing a balanced Wolf Conservation and Management Plan. He records nature’s sounds and enjoys collaborating with visual artists, music composers, and biologists through his recordings. Halekas currently lives near Deer Park, Wash. While the presentation is free, a dinner benefiting the Community Cultural Center is available starting at 5:15 p.m., followed by the presentation with tea, coffee and desserts. For those that want dinner the cost is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. On the menu: Roasted chicken, squash soup, salad greens with apples, craisins and cranberry dressing, and rolls. The Community Cultural Center (CCC) is located at 411 S Western Ave, Tonasket. This educational event is sponsored by Humanities Washington, coordinated by the Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA) and hosted at the CCC. Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story

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SEPT. 30, 2015 Onecima Alvarez Andaya, 29, Tonasket and Angel Javier Morales Salazar, 26, Tonasket. OCT. 1, 2015 Pamala Gayle Lester, 55, Okanogan and Larry Lee Prentice, 57 Sedro Woolley, Wash. Nora Suzanne Waller, 34, Okanogan and Mark Daniel Kayser, 34, Okanogan.

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tional series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources by helping increase awareness of local natural history. Donations are always welcome. Questions? www. okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw or 509-476-2432.

Chavez, 25, Bridgeport and Ricardo Pio Huerta, 25, Bridgeport.

OCT. 14, 2015 Krystal Meghan Turvey, 27, Brewster and Cecil Cavazos Jr., 27, Brewster. OCT. 15, 2015 Rosa Isela Ramos Sanchez, 42, Oroville and Jose Santos Reynoso Guzman, 35, Oroville. Roxana Bravo Villagran, 30, Bridgeport and Gustavo Ambriz Cervantes, 36, Bridgeport. OCT. 20, 2015

Ana Bertha Alvarado Lagunas, 33, Bridgeport and Arturo Servin Pahua, 25, Bridgeport Elvia Flores Leon, 41, Brewster and Guillermo Mendez Sanabria, 35, Brewster. Pamela Edinger, 66, Omak and Petr Kindl, 49, Omak. OCT. 29, 2015 Dorinda Elizabeth Fonda, 82, Oroville and Joseph George Enzensperger IV, 63, Oroville. Onecima Alvarez Andaya, 29, Tonasket and Angel Javier Morales Salazar, 26, Tonasket.

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versation. These diverse and engaging speakers cover a variety of topics, including popular culture, photography, architecture, literature, food, film and history. Best of all – these presentations are free and open to the public. For more about Speakers Bureau, visit www.humanities. org/programs/speakers. OHA is a non-profit organization that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The Highland Wonders educa-

Oroville and Roy Garrett King, 28, Oroville. Miwako Pessoa, 41, Okanogan and Wilson Queiroz Pessoa Jr., 51, Okanogan. Lori Lynn Rodio, 49, Twisp and Caine Steven Brand, 41, Chelan. OCT. 9, 2015 Amanda Rose Boyett, 33, Brewster and Matthew Thomas Llewellyn, 32, Brewster. Anali Rubio, 28, Brewster and Juan Jose Hernandez Villalpando, 30, Brewster.

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as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org. The Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau is one of Humanities Washington’s oldest and most popular programs. A roster of 28 cultural experts and scholars provides high quality public presentations across the state, encouraging audiences to think, learn and engage in con-

Juanita Rose Reynolds, 28, Okanogan and Tyson James Lewis Lazard, 29, Okanogan. OCT. 2, 2015 Annabella Valverde Alfaro, 17, Oroville and Diego Santana, 19, Oroville OCT. 6, 2015 Jennifer Mae Park, 35, Wauconda and Jeffrey Allen Ferguson, 50, Wauconda. Sara Joanne Woodard, 25, Toledo, Ore. and James Eugene Willis, 41, Toledo, Ore. OCT. 7, 2015 Anita Fransisca Leopard, 29,

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NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Tiger soccer cinches tenth shut-out

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tiger Morgyne Hjaltason fights for the ball before passing it to Lisa Kudlik, who then scored a goal during first half of the Tonakset’s game against Bridgeport Saturday, Oct. 31. The last time Tonasket played Bridgeport (September 22), the Mustangs managed to get one The Tonasket Tigers shut out goal in the net to the Tigers’ seven Bridgeport 5-0 Saturday, Oct. points, but Keeper Madison Gariano let 31, and as this nothing get article went to press, they only “There were some great past her on Halloween. needed to win goals made today.” The Tigers one more game have had ten to go to State. Darren Collins, Coach, Tonasket Tigers shut out wins “If we win Soccer Team so far this seathe next one, son. we will have “It was nice control over our destiny,” said Tonasket Head to come up with a big win without Jaden on the field,” said Collins. Coach Darren Collins. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket eigth grader and forward Heidi Cruz, shown here in the final minutes of Saturday’s (Oct. 31) game against Bridgeport, is a force to be reckoned with.

Midfielder Vugteveen had to sit a senior in her first year playing this one out after being red-card- soccer, had to work hard to keep ed at their last game (a 6-0 shut- the the Tigers from scoring more out against Brewster October 27), goals than they did. Midfielders Kayla and Ashlynn but was eligible be back in play for the Tigers’ scheduled game Willis each had four shots, Midfielder Amanda Padilla against Warden Tuesday, Nov. 3. had three, “They played Midfielder a great secLisa Kudlik ond half,” and Forward said Collins. Heidi Cruz “Usually, they each had two, come out tired and Midfielder the second half, M o r g y n e but they picked Hjaltason and it up and we Forward Rose played a full Walts each had game; a great one. game.” Scoring the This game goals were was a “loser Ashlynn Willis out,” so with a Hat Trick B r i d g e p o r t ’s of three and season is finKudlik with ished. “This two. When game, we she scored the knew would be Katie Teachout/staff photo fourth goal off tough. But they didn’t give up, Tonasket Coach Collins congratu- a pass from her and played to lates Lisa Kudlik after she picked sister, Ashlynn the end,” said herself up off the ground to score the Willis sent it in right between the Mustang’s final goal of the game. the top of the Coach Gabe goal and the top Gonzalez. “It is tough to begin a season of Meza’s fingers as she jumped with players with no experience. up in an attempt to stop the ball They are good, so we figured if whizzing past the top of her head. For the fifth and final goal of we made it to the playoffs, that the game, Kudlik had to pick would be great.” Bridgeport Keeper Flor Meza, herself up off the ground and

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tiger Mandi Wilson holds possession of the ball despite a Mustang’s best efforts to steal it away from her.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kayla Willis (#19) congratulates her sister Ashlynn after scoring a hat trick (three goals in one game).

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville Coach Tony Kindred encourages the Lady Hornets during halftime of their final game of the season. The Hornets lost the close-fought match to Bridgeport, 1-2.

continue to keep the ball away from the Mustang who knocked her down before she kicked the ball into the net. “There were some great goals today,” said Collins. Kayla Willis was credited with three assists, Ashlynn Willis had two and Hjaltason had one. “When I made it in, it felt really good,” Ashlynn Willis said. The Tigers host Warden Tuesday, Nov. 3 at 3:30 p.m. to see who will face Okanogan for the State Championship, held November 12-21 at Sunset Chev Stadium in Pasco. Warden, in the South Division of the Central Washington B

League, has two league wins and zero losses with 14 wins and two losses overall. Okanogan is currently first in the North Division of the Central Washington 2B League, with 12 league wins and zero losses and 15 wins and two losses overall. Tonasket, second in the North Division of the league, has nine league wins and three losses with 13 wins and three losses overall. Liberty Bell is third in the North Division with eight league wins and four losses and 11 wins and four losses overall. Oroville team won two games this year and lost ten for fifth place in league above Manson with zero wins.

Tonasket cross country runners head to State BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket’s boys’ cross country team (ranked ninth in state) qualified for State the second year in a row at the District 5/6 Championships this past weekend (Saturday, Oct. 31) at Walla Walla Point Park in Wenatchee. “They ran really well and we are looking forward to the state

meet,” said Coach Bob Thornton. The team running at state is Hunter Swanson, Bryden Hires, Garrett Wilson, Riley Morris, Justin McDonald, Zion Butler and Zach Clark with Eric Owsley attending as alternate. Coming in third place in the boys’ three-mile varsity race was Swanson with a time of 16:33.57. Wilson, a freshman, took eleventh place at 17:43.66.

Last year at the District 5/6 Championships, the boys team took second and Swanson placed sixth with a time of 17:47. In this year’s boys’ JV race, Zach Clark took first place with a time of 20:20.05. In the girls’ three-mile varsity race, Tonasket had six runners finish in the top 15. The girls’ team, though placing second in regionals and being

ranked fourth in state, lost by only four points to the secondranked team, and did not qualify to run at state as a team. “Johnna Terris and Jenna Valentine did qualify and will represent Tonasket well at state,” Thornton said. Terris came in third at 21:02.99, and Valentine came in fifth at 21:24.3. Katie Henneman came in ninth at 22:39.3, Victoria

Chervinska came in eleventh at 23:31.84, Haley Larson finished thirteenth at 24:14.55 and Kaylee Bobadilla finished fifteenth at 24:39.23. Henneman and Bobadilla returned from an FFA Nationals competition just in time for the race. “Coming back from a week long trip and running a three-mile race, we did okay,” Henneman

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said on Monday, Nov. 2. “I’m still sore from that race,” added Bobadilla. The girls’ team took first place last year at the district championships. Henneman came in third at 21:57, Terris in fourth at 21:58 and Valentine finished fifth at 22:02. For the girls, one team and the top five individuals go to State; for the boys, three teams and the top 15 individuals go to State.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015

SPORTS

Tigers end season with loss BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket football lost 7-42 when they played a non-league game in Omak Friday, Oct. 30. “We scored on a long drive in the fourth quarter. That made it 20-7 with six minutes to go,” said Tonasket head coach Jay Hawkins. “Omak then scored the final 22 points.” Jesse Ramon ran the ball in one yard for the touchdown, and wide receiver Jeffrey Luna kicked in the extra point. Ramon had a total of 86 yards on 20 carries, and quarter back Rycki Cruz gained 68 yards on 12 carries. Senior run-

ning back Christian GarciaHerrera had five carries for 25 yards. Freshmen Ethan Smith and Tanner Anderson each had one carry; Smith for two and Anderson for seven. Cruz completed four of 18 passes for for a total of 65 yards with one interception. Ramon received two for 51 yards, Luna received one for nine and GarciaHerrera received one for five. “Omak played with more energy and enthusiasm,” said Hawkins. “I thought we played good in stretches. We lacked consistency and did not win enough plays.” This was the final game of the season for the Tigers.

Melissa Mills/submitted photo

Caleb Mills pushes forward with the ball during the Hornets’ non-league game against Liberty last weekend. Mills rushed a total of 61 yards in the game.

Oroville falls to Liberty Hornets head to play-offs BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Hornet football team traveled to Spangle, in the middle of Spokane County, Friday, Oct. 30 where they faced the Liberty Football squad and came away with a 14-50 loss. “Liberty was very big physical up front, making it hard for us to get our running game going,” said Oroville head coach Tam Hutchinson. “Nathan Hugus did a good job of throwing the ball, but five dropped passes hurt, every time we started gaining some momentum.” Liberty racked up 22 points in

the first quarter before Oroville came on to score eight in the second quarter, with a nine-yard run for the touchdown by Logan Mills and a two point conversion run by his brother Caleb. Liberty scored 14 more points in both the second and third quarters, but none in the fourth. A 12-yard pass by Hugus to Klinton Flowers earned the Hornets the last touchdown of the evening. “Defensively we needed to tackle better,” said Hutchinson. “The boys did play hard and never gave up, despite being down by 22 points quickly.” Oroville had 10 completed passes out of 25 attempts, and Liberty completed 12 of 15, with an average of 14.9 yards per pass compared to the Hornets’ 9.2

yards. The Hornets threw one interception. Oroville gained 116 yards through 33 rushing attempts, and Liberty had 29 attempts for 202 yards. Both teams earned eight first downs through rushing, and Oroville earned five first downs through passing compared to Liberty’s seven. Caleb Mills had 12 attempts running the ball for a total gain of 61 yards. Logan Mills had nine for 31, Connor Godwin had two for 15 and Seth Miller had three for 13. Hugus was sacked once for a loss of seven yards, but the Hornets sacked Liberty twice to put them back nine yards. Spears had six receptions for 67 yards gained, and Flowers had one for 12, Seth Miller had two for eight and Caleb Mills had one

for five. Hugus had five solo tackles with seven assists, Logan Mills had three solos and four assists, and Connor Godwin had four solos and two assists. Miller returned two kickoffs for a total of 37 yards, Spears had one return for 21, Caleb Mills had one for 13 and Godwin had one for 10. The Hornets next play Mabton in Mabton (near Yakima) Friday, Nov. 6, for the District 5/6 #3 seed to State playoffs. Mabton is in second place, behind Warden, in the South Division of the Central Washington B League with four league wins and one loss. Oroville is in third place, behind Okanogan and Brewster in the North Division with two league wins and two losses. Submitted photo

Tiger volleyball makes it Mills leads to District play-offs college team to

Tonasket alumni Emily Mills earned a personal record and set a new school record while competing at Regionals with the Olympic College Rangers.

Hornets finish season with game against Brewster BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket hosted Bridgeport on the volleyball courts Tuesday, Oct 27, beating the Mustangs 3-2. The Tigers lost the first game 24-26 before coming back to win the second 25-22. They lost the

first game 17-25, but won the second and third 25-22 and 15-11. Kasey Nelson had nine kills, Vanessa Pershing had six kills, Olivia Sutton had five kills, and Alexa Sutton had four kills. Taylon Pilkinton had 11 assists, and Faith Lofthus served 32 out of 32; three of which were aces. “For the first time in ten or 15 years the Tonasket Lady Tigers volleyball team is going to playoffs. It was a team effort,” said assistant coach Johnna Sutton. “Pam and I are very proud of the

girls!” The Tigers traveled to Ephrata Saturday, Oct. 31 for Districts and lost 0-3 to Warden. A close match with Soap Lake saw Tonasket out 2-3. OROVILLE Oroville’s Lady Hornets played their last game of the season against Brewster Tuesday, Oct. 27. Mikayla Scott served seven for 10 with two aces, Jennier Cisneros served seven for eight with one ace and Hannah Hilderbrand

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served seven for eight with three aces. Passing, Hilderbrand was 27/30, Courtnee Kallstrom 15/18 and Scott was 15/18. Scott hit 14/17 with four kills, Hilderbrand hit 18/22 with three kills and Kallstrom hit 6/8. “Mikayla Scott is my varsity senior player, and she played well all season,” said Hugus. “She finished her last game playing really well.” Hugus said that while the team lost their final game of the year, she was happy with the way they played. “We got along all season long and there was not a lot of drama,” added Hugus.

first-time title SUBMITTED BY DAN DITTMER HEAD CROSS COUNTRY/TRACK AND FIELD COACH, OLYMPIC COLLEGE

Emily Mills, a sophomore at Olympic College in Bremerton, won the Northwest Regional Cross Country Championships on Friday, Oct. 30. Mills is a Tonasket High School alumni. Held at Gold Mountain Golf Club near Bremerton, Mills ran 19:50 over the very hilly golf course to lead the Olympic

College Rangers to their first-ever Ladies Regional Cross Country title. Mills’ time was a PR (personal record) by two minutes and 16 seconds that set a new school record for this 5K course. Not bad for the conference 400 champion. With 200 meters to go, Mills was in second place by 20 meters, but charged to the finish line to win by two seconds. Last spring, Mills won her college 400 meter Track and Field Championship.


NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SCHOOL

FFA team takes silver honors at Nationals “It was a bit overwhelming,” said Bobadilla. “There were 47 state teams of four competitors LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Ton- each. But we met a whole lot of asket’s FFA Horse Judging team kids from different states, and came back with Silver honors made a lot of new friends.” “It was awesome,” Henneman from the National FFA Horse Evaluation Career Development agreed. “There were Event (CDE) about 65,000 held in people at the Louisville, Ky. convention,” Oct. 27-31, “We are pretty proud of said Clark. after taking how we did. It would “ T h e r e first place as were all difa team at the have been cool to ferent events,” State competition in come back and say, ‘We said Howell. “Everything September. won gold,’ but we’re from mechanThe team, happy with how we ics to parliawhich placed mentary proce28 out of 47 placed.” dure; agronoteams, is made Katie Henneman, Sophomore my to livestock up of senior Tonasket High School judging.” Lexee Howell, The CDE sophomores event, held at M a d y s o n Clark, Katie Henneman and the Kentucky Exposition Center Camille Wilson, and fresh- in conjunction with the 88th man Kylee Bobadilla. Wilson National FFA Convention and was named State Champion Expo, gives FFA members the in September, and Henneman opportunity to apply classroom placed ninth in state. This was the knowledge to real-life situations. “It’s a really hard contest,” said first time Tonasket FFA competed nationally in the horse judging Deebach. “If you mess up on one little thing, it drops you signifievent. “We were pretty proud of how cantly. These are all teams that we did. It would have been cool have already been state champito come back and say, ‘We won ons, so to place 28th out of 47 gold,’ but we’re happy with how teams is pretty good.” Deebach said he was especially we placed, especially since we only had a month to prepare and proud of how the girls performed some of the other teams had a lot on their oral reasoning. “It’s the hardest part, and each longer,” said Henneman. Other schools competed in State events kid had to do four sets. Every one in the spring, rather than fall; of the kids had three out of four giving them longer to prepare for scores in the 40s out of a possible 50 points. That’s very good,” Nationals. “We put out everything we said Deebach. “Camille scored a knew. We studied all that month 46, an extremely good score. She was probably just one point away at lunchtime,” Bobadilla said. The team traveled back East from being a national placer.” Deebach said some of the with their coach, FFA Advisor Matt Deebach, and Wilson’s students competing had already mother; flying out of Seattle graduated, and the event included schools of all sizes without diviSaturday, Oct. 24. “On Wednesday we com- sions. The school teams work peted 10 hours straight,” said together to complete practical Henneman. “We had to go in activities and do a team presenand judge eight classes of horses, tation. Fun outside the convention then we were told which four classes we had to give oral rea- center also provided educational opportunities. sons on.” “They really wanted to learn. The girls said they wrote out their page-long oral reasons We went to a horse park that before committing them to mem- is the US Equestrian Site where they hold Olympic trials and US ory. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Submitted photo

Katie Henneman, Lexee Howell, Madyson Clark, Camille Wilson and Kylee Bobadilla competed at the FFA Nationals competition in Kentucky after taking first place in Washington State. National Dressage competitions, and the kids stayed until closing, asking questions. They had to kick us out,” Deebach said. “We went to lots of cool places, including a horse farm where we got to touch a race horse worth $25 million,” Henneman said. “We got to go to the Mammoth Caves, and the Louisville Slugger plant where all the bats are made.” “We also got to see the Budweiser Clydesdales, and to touch a horse that was 19 hands,” said Clark. “A lot of the places we went to helped us learn more about horses.” “We went to an equestrian veterinarian clinic and got to see a live horse surgery,” said Bobadilla.

“It was a really pleasant trip. We met lots of nice kids,” said Deebach. The girls said it gave them a chance to grow closer as a team, and to get to know their advisor better on the plane flight and long car rides. “Deebach really helped us. He would give us extra assignments to do at home for practice, and say, ‘Make sure you do this.’ We wanted to do good for him; he is like another dad to us,” said Clark. “We all really respect him. We got even closer to him on the trip. He’s like a father to us,” Henneman said. “We could come to him about anything,” said Clark. “He’s always joking around. Even

when we were upset after the competition, he would always make us feel better.” The girls laughed about an adventure they had on the way home. “We got back into Tonasket at 4 a.m. Saturday morning, after fixing a flat tire in the pouring rain in Cashmere at 2 a.m.,” said Henneman. “We did good, as girls, helping Deebach change the tire.” Both Henneman and Bobdilla were dropped off in Wenatchee, where they competed in the regional cross country meet at Walla Walla Point Park. Clark headed straight from Tonasket to a regional volleyball tournament in Ephrata. The girls will all take part

in FFA again this year, with Bobadilla doing Novice Parliamentary, Howell doing Sales, and Henneman and Clark doing Parliamentary Procedure. The girls said the events and competitions helped prepare them for careers in a lot of ways. “It helps you with public speaking,” said Clark. “It also helps you get scholarships for college, and teaches you to be a fast thinker.” “You have to be good with memorization, and good with speaking,” said Henneman. “It helps you to be confident in what you say.” “It really opens you up to new experiences,” added Bobadilla. “And yes, you have to be confident.”

Pumpkins bring plenty of projects BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket’s fourth graders had fun harvesting 101 pumpkins from the school garden Thursday, Oct. 29. The students planted the pumpkins as third-graders last spring. “They were very excited and claimed ownership; everyone was saying, ‘These are my pump-

kins right here,’” said teacher Steve Roebeck. The pumpkins were passed on to Liz Moore’s FCCLA (Family Career and Community Leaders of America) class, who converted them into puree to make pies. The pies will be baked and sold by the high school cheerleaders before Thanksgiving. Contact Cheer Coach Jamie Portwood at jportwood@tonasket.wednet.

edu, or one of the cheerleaders, to order a pie for the holiday. Roebeck, who taught third grade last year but is now at the middle school as a Resource Room instructor, said his class would be taking care of the advertising for the project. “They’ll make some posters and write a small brochure to go with each pie for writing experience,” said Roebeck.

Roebeck received a small grant from the Okanogan County Retired Teachers Association that covered pumpkin seeds, potting soil and pots (the seeds were started in the classroom), along with extra funds to cover some of the cost for advertising and other ingredients for the pumpkin pies. “It turned out to be a project a lot of people got to take part in,” said Roebeck.

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PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015

HONOR OUR VETERANS Veterans Day is November 11th Remembering our veterans The men and women who defend the liberties and freedoms of the countries they represent and hold a special place in people’s hearts and an eternal spot in their countries’ histories. Any opportunity is a good time to commemorate the bravery and selfless deeds of military personnel, but certain prominent holidays in November make this an especially important time to thank veterans for their service. November 11 is Veterans Day in the United States and Remembrance Day in Canada. It’s also known as Armistice Day in other parts of the world. These holidays honor all military veterans who have provided service to their countries, and that each falls on November 11 is no coincidence, as the day

commemorates the anniversary of the end of World War I on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. Many places around the world pause and remember fallen veterans on November 11, but a good majority of Veterans Day and Remembrance Day commemorative events focus on past and current veterans who are still alive. There are many ways to honor the military at home and abroad. Show appreciation for military men and women. Always keep the military on your mind and never forget those who have served and didn’t return home. Armistice Day, Remembrance Day and Veterans Day are great ways to honor past and current military for their service and sacrifice.

Oroville’s Liberty Tree

George Frank Branch of Service: U.S. Air Force From: Tonasket

Roger A. Castelda Pictured above Rolly Clark Sr. and Rolly Clark Jr.

Rolly Jr. was instrumental to bringing Oroville’s Liberty Tree to life for veterans. The Liberty Tree honors veterans both past and present. To purchase a leaf for your loved one call Walt Hart at 509-560-9396.

U.S. Armed Forces Legacy

Branch of Service: 1ST LT. U.S. ARMY - INFANTRY PLATOON LEADER MOBILE RIVERINE FORCE 9TH INFANTRY DIVISION MEKONG DELTA, VIETNAM Thank you for your service.

Don Thorndike

Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Korea Love from your family

Ron McDougall Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Vietnam From: Oroville Love from your family

Andrew (Andy) Robinson Branch of Service: US Navy USS Camden (Persian Gulf & Iraqi Freedom) Love from your family

Roy A. Frazier Branch of Service: U.S.S Pocono (AGC -16). RM-2 US Navy (Korean War)

Vernon J. Hills

Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Korea Love from your family

Bill Curtis

Branch of Service: Air Force 1945-1947 Airplane and engine mechanic 747

Roy Pucket Branch of Service: US Navy Love from Carol Pucket & Kids

Thank you to a fine man and friend.

Branch of Service: PFC U.S. Army 1945-1945 (WWII) Love, Your Wife and Children

Tonasket’s U.S. Armed Forces Legacy offers a beautiful, inspirational tribute to all veterans of the United States Armed Forces. To find out more information on how to add your loved one to the Legacy wall call Roger Castelda at 509-486-1175, Michael Stewart at 509-486-2144 or George Frank at 509-486-2747.

ROY’S PHARMACY

Thomas Jones

Love, Jason, Vanessa, Cassidy & Hannah Seldal

Charles G. Burbery Branch of Service: Air Force USS Sperry AS-12 1950-1954, Korea Thank you for your service

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We salute our veterans and those currently serving in the US Military! 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 486-2149

Today we remember the sacrifices that our nation’s veterans have made to protect our country and the freedoms that America was built upon. 212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183

Joseph T. Even Branch of Service: CPL. U.S. Army (WWI) From your grandson Tom


NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Clyde Sutton Branch of Service: US Navy From Barb Shackette

Joe Schneider Branch of Service: US Army Love, your daughters Shelly & Joella

Brenda Helm Verbeck Branch of Service: USAF / Retired 1980 - 2000 Thank you for your service.

Major Mark Warder Branch of Service: US Army / active Son-in-law of George & Patti Hill Stationed in Stuttgart, Germany

Robert L. Burbery Branch of Service: US Army / S.P. 3 1955 - 1957 Thank you for your service.

Marion Carlson Branch of Service: US Navy WWII Veteran

PAGE B5

Thomas Even III

Rachael Even

Thomas Even Jr.

Branch of Service: US Army Sgt. 2004 - Present Afghanistan & Iraq Tours From Dad & Roberta

Branch of Service: USMC 1978 - 1982 From Tom & Roberta

Branch of Service: USMC 1980 - 1989 Love Roberta Scholz

Ricci Even

Randal Even

Gerald E Scholz

Branch of Service: USMC 1976 - 1980 From Tom & Roberta

Branch of Service: USMC 1977 - 1985 From Tom & Roberta

Branch of Service: US Army 1952- 1953 Love your children

John Mike Pershing Branch of Service: U.S. Air Force Son-in-law of Patti and George Hill Currently in Las Vegas, NV

Thomas Even Sr.

Edward W. Figlenski

Branch of Service: USMC 1952 - 1955 From your son Tom & Roberta

Branch of Service: US Army (WWI) Thank you for your service.

Frank Anthony Presto Branch of Service: PFC USMC M (WWII Marine Corps Base) San Diego, CA (1944 - 1945) Thank you for your service.

Leslie Warder Hill Branch of Service: US Marines Daughter of George & Patti Hill Currently stationed in Stuttgart, Germany with her husband

John L Burbery

James W. Pruitt

Branch of Service: SSGT USAAF Korea / 1950-1954 Thank you for your service.

Branch of Service: PFC U.S. Army POW STALAG 7A Love, your children

Carl D. Graham Branch of Service: US Navy (WWII) Thank you for your service.

Delmar A. Farley

J. Vincent Bretz Branch of Service: US Army Father of Patti Hill Deceased

Brandon G. Jones

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Branch of Service: CPL USMC 1999 - 2003 From Dad, Mom Stephanie

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One Stop Grocery Shopping! 18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 5, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 5, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Black Bear & War Eagle Patented Claims on Palmer Mountain near Loomis, 35.5 acres. Black Bear was a gold producing mine in 1890’s and 1940’s. Reports available. $75,000 for both. Contact Teri at blackbearclaim@ gmail.com for further information.

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

For Rent

Found

Help Wanted

Oroville Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no inside smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER

Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Orovile Senior Living, Henderson Apartments, on Lake, on Boundary Point rd, 2 bdrm, in good condition, no smoking, no pets. Taking applications, $675/month, first and last. (509)476-2449

we are interested in hiring an auto mechanic for a full time position. We are also interested in hiring someone who has experience with tire service and sales, tow truck operation, and/or general mechanics. If you have experience or interest in any of these things, please call Michael at 509.476.3948 or stop in at 610 Hwy 97 in Oroville.

Retired couple seek winter rental in valley for 3-5 months. Quiet, reliable. Local references. 509-486-4135

Help Wanted DISTRICT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST/PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

Announcements EARLY DEADLINE NOTICE CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FOR THE 11/12 edition WILL BE MONDAY, 11/9 at NOON. Please call 800-388-2527 or email

classified@soundpublishing.com

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Crosswords

ANSWERS

At Thompson Bees in Oroville

Rental / Vacation Spots Wanted

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Help Wanted

Across 1. “Polythene ___” (Beatles song) 4. Pack (down) 8. Confine 14. North, South and Central landmasses

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a DISTRICT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST/PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER 7.5 hours per day, Monday – Friday, 260 days year. Experience preferred in pubic relations using oral and written communications as well as social media. Position closes November 17. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

23. Bicycle seat

8. “Yadda, yadda, yadda”

25. Falling star

9. Less of a mess

27. Marathon

10. Drive-in employee

29. Outdo

11. Removes by suction

32. Contents of some cartridges

12. Wild cherry

35. Bringing up the rear

13. Building additions

37. Sylvester, to Tweety

15. Jokes and ___

38. Corpulent

21. Sweet last course

39. Anger 40. “Gladiator” setting

24. Knowledge gained through tradition

42. “___ what?”

26. King ___, Egyptian pharaoh

43. ___-friendly

28. Sparkle

44. Chaotic

30. ___ souci

45. Unified whole

31. “Don’t go!”

48. ___ of the Unknowns

32. Chinese dynasty

50. For the time being

33. “O” in old radio lingo

52. Sharp ends

34. Daily publication

56. Flight segment

36. “___ we having fun yet?”

58. Catch, in a way

40. BBs, e.g.

60. Commuter line

41. Revival

61. Long-running Broadway musical

43. Final: Abbr.

63. A short sonata 65. End of a threat (2 wds)

47. Classical Greek verb form expressing action

66. Kind of ears

49. First act

67. Cylindrical and tapering

51. He took two tablets

68. Achy

53. Lake nymph in Greek mythology

69. Blonde’s secret, maybe Down

16. Prickly plant

1. Airborne units

17. Second stomachs

2. Amorphous creature

18. ___ tunnel syndrome

3. Apportioned, with “out”

19. Lying, maybe

4. ___-tac-toe

20. Blend

5. Insight

22. Dilutes

6. Drone, e.g. 7. Church song

46. Big hit

54. Having a thin, metallic sound

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for an ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER, 8 hours per day, Monday – Friday, 260 days per year. Preferred qualifications: two or four year degree in business related field or applicable certification; two plus years experience working in K-12 school district or governmental setting; college level training in finance, accounting, and data processing; two years of experience in a school district working with financial and/or human resources data (preferred Skyward/WESPaC software). Beginning salary $55,000. Position closes November 24. To apply, applicants must complete an online application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer Carrier Wanted: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract delivery route. Please call 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / 3050 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Health General

EARLY DEADLINE NOTICE CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FOR THE 11/12 edition CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

We are looking for YOU to join our team! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN ADMIN HR Generalist Full time Grants Accountant/ Internal Auditor Full time OMAK MEDICAL Behavioral Health Specialist Full time Pharmacy Technician Full time. Bilingual preferred. Occasional travel to Brewster required. OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER, INDIAN AVE: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual required.

Health General

BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

RECEPTIONIST MEDICAL ASSISTANT – CERTIFIED Confluence Health in Okanogan County, WA is growing! Give your career the chance to grow with an integrated healthcare system. As part of the team at Confluence Health, you’ll be a key contributor to our success. We currently have the following openings: To learn more about these opportunities and to apply on-line, please go to www.wvmedical.com and click on the Careers tab.

www.gazette-tribune.com

TWISP MEDICAL: RN Full time See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Feed Hay & Grain Excellent Feed Straw Very short in length, no waste. Will deliver. Call / leave message 360-380-5055

55. Bluish gray 56. Advance, slangily 57. Radial, e.g. 59. Game on horseback 62. Formerly known as 64. “Tarzan” extra

Vehicles Wanted

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

WILL BE MONDAY, 11/9 at NOON. Please call 800-388-2527 or email

classified@soundpublishing.com

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF NOVEMBER 2, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED RN’s up to $45/hr, LPN’s up to $37.50/hr, CNA’s up to $22.50/hr, Free gas/weekly pay, $2000 Bonus, AACO Nursing Agency, 1-800-6564414 Ext 2

Public Notices City of Tonasket Final Budget Hearing The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be holding the Final Budget Hearing on the 2016 Budget during the regular Council meeting on Tuesday, November 10th, 2015 which is scheduled for 7:00 pm. Anyone interested is invited to attend and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall, 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the hearing. Tonasket is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Alice Attwood Clerk Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 2015. #OVG666838 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 11/10/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1998 Subaru Legacy Lic# AJL9501 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 2015. #OVG664613 CALL FOR BIDS Sealed bids for surplus equipment and materials will be received at the office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, P.O. Box 1729, 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, WA 98844, until 10:00 A.M. local time on November 30, 2015, and then will be publicly opened and read. Bid forms are available at the office of the Oro-

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Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Check us out!

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Inc.

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems

Colville  Spokane  RepublicLic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

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Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area!

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power / Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

Serving all of Eastern Washington...

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7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

– Pumping Truck Available –

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

Ferry & Okanogan County

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Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates!

800-845-3500

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Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Chelan & Kittitas County

Fogle Pump & Supply,

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Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

“The Water Professionals”

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n Civil

OROVILLE

509-782-5071

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n Felony / Misdemeanor

Well Drilling

Bridal Registry  Kitchen Gadgets Candles  Gifts  Collectibles

Law

n Criminal

Storage

MINI STORAGE

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Something for Everyone!

Attorney at Law

n Family

Hidden Treasures

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RYAN W. GUNN

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www.osoyoosreadimix.com

Marylou’s

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GUNN LAW OFFICES

Gifts

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Concrete

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BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

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BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT HOME Hardwood & Tile Floors, Granite Counters 4 Bedrooms/4 1/2 Baths Indoor Pool, 8.39 Acres Motivated Seller $337,800

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA SUN 509-476-2121 LAKES Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

11 ACRES. 3-bdrm, 2-bath. Over 1800 sqft. Big Kitchen w/Appl. Lots of Cupboards. Open Living Concept. 2 Decks. 6-person Hot Tub. Home Lives Bigger Than It Looks. Easy Care Yard. 1200 sqft Garage w/overhead & walk-in Doors. Circular Drive. Lots of Parking. Trees. Private. NICE PLACE. Between Omak & Tonasket. $182,000.00

Check them out today!

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Fantastic commercial location right on Hwy 97 previously used as a veterinary clinic. Spacious downstairs reception and clinic rooms perfect for mixed animal practice. Upstairs apartment with approximately 1,700 sqft could be utilized by practice owner or rental income. Property features hay shed, dog kennel, and fencing. MLS#865920 $145,500

REALTY

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NEW HOME BY XMAS

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HILLTOP REALTY

Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

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1974 double wide manufactured home,1008 sq ft., 2 bed, on 2.05 acres, Deck on the front and porch on the back. Out building, the value is in the land. Huge yard. NWML#863788 $127,000

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

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You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

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Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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509/476-3378

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

www.windermere.com

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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Subscribe to the...

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Tonasket Planning Commission Public Hearing Notice The Tonasket Planning Commission Public Hearing meeting is scheduled for Tuesday November 17, 2015 at 3:00pm. The agenda includes Continuation of public hearing and Final Review of Zoning Code Chapter 17. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, 2015. #OVG666915

PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council has set their schedule for the 2016 Budget Workshops. All Budget Workshops will be held in the City Council Chambers. Budget Workshop dates and times are: -Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 8:30 am (all day workshop) -Tuesday, October 13, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 6:30 pm The public has a right to attend any workshop and make comments. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, October 8, 22, November 5, 19, 2015 #OVG655239

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PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 11/10/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1998 Ford Contour Lic# AVG3313 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 2015. #OVG663843

PUBLIC NOTICE BUDGET ADOPTION HEARING The City of Oroville 2016 Budget Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 1, 2015 in the City Council Chambers. The formal Adoption Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 15, 2015. Copies of the proposed budget will be available November 19, 2015 for any concerned citizens and may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk during normal business hours until the adoption hearing date. Citizens attending the hearings shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, 2015 #OVG664642

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to difficulty place therating numbers Puzzle 45 (Hard, 0.63) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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PUBLIC NOTICE Preliminary Budget Hearing The City of Oroville will hold a public hearing to consider the Preliminary 2016 Budget during the November 17, 2015 regular council meeting. Citizens attending shall have the right to provide oral and written comments and suggestions. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, 2015 #OVG664640

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PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 11/10/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1993 Geo Metro Lic# 350YSG Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 2015. #OVG663892

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In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for the County of Okanogan Petitioner Mandie R. Miller Vs. Respondent Rahmier D. Harley No. 15-3-00137-5 The State of Washington to the said Rahmier D. Harley: You are hereby summoned to appear within ninety days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within ninety days after the 29th day of October, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the petitioner Mandie R. Miller, and serve a copy of your answer upon the Okanogan Superior County Court at the address below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgement will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. Petitioner, Mandie R. Miller, requesting dissolution of marriage. Okanogan County Superior Court 149 3rd Avenue North - 3rd Floor PO Box 112 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 29, November 5, 12, 19, 26 and December 3, 2015. #OVG664507

Sudoku

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www.gazette-tribune.com

Public Notices

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ville-Tonasket Irrigation District. For information concerning the bids, contact Jay O’Brien at 509-476-3696. Bid items are available for inspection at the District’s office and yard located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville, WA 98844, from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00P.M., Monday through Friday. No warranty is implied or expressed as to the condition of the equipment and materials. All bid items are on an “as is” condition. Should a bid be accepted, no refunds will be made. All bids are to be accompanied by cash, certified check or personal check issued on a bank in the State of Washington. All equipment and materials are to be removed by the successful bidder within 5 working days after notice of acceptance of bid. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive any informalities in the bidding. BID ITEMS Road Grader 1969 Backhoe Air Compressor 2- Pallets Copper Lead Wire Pallet of Surplus Pump Bowls SME Motor (serial # 1210dp2619) SMP Pump (serial #0397071511) SMP Pump (serial #c647011731) Miscellaneous Office Machines DATED this 2nd day of November, 2015. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Jay W. O’Brien Secretary/Manager Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 5, 12, and 19, 2015. #OVG666780

Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE November 5, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


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SBA opens Disaster Loan Outreach Centers in Okanogan and Chelan

SBA can also lend additional funds to businesses and homeowners to help with the cost of improvements to protect, prevent or minimize the same type SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Director Nancy Porzio of disaster damage from occurring in the future. For small businesses, small agricultural coopof the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Seattle District Office announced last week that eratives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture, and most private nonSBA will open Disaster profit organizations of any Loan Outreach Centers size, SBA offers Economic in Chelan and Okanogan Injury Disaster Loans counties to meet the needs “Low-interest federal loans are (EIDLs) to help meet workof businesses and residents who were affected by the available to businesses of all sizes, ing capital needs caused by the disaster. EIDL assiswildfires that occurred Aug. most private nonprofit organiza- tance is available regard9 – Sept. 10. The centers of whether the busiopened Monday, Nov. 2 at tions, homeowners and renters less ness suffered any property 9 a.m. at the Lake Chelan Chamber of Commerce whose property was damaged or damage. Disaster loans up to and at the Okanogan Bingo destroyed by this disaster.” $200,000 are available to Casino Administration Nancy Porzio, Director homeowners to repair Building. U.S. Small Business Administration or replace damaged or “Low-interest federal destroyed real estate. disaster loans are available Homeowners and rentto businesses of all sizes, ers are eligible for up to most private nonprof$40,000 to repair or replace damaged or destroyed it organizations, homeowners and renters whose property was damaged or destroyed by this disaster,” personal property. Interest rates can be as low as 4 percent for busisaid Porzio. “SBA representatives will be on hand at nesses, 2.625 percent for private nonprofit organizathe following Disaster Loan Outreach Centers to answer questions about SBA’s disaster loan program, tions and 1.875 percent for homeowners and renters explain the application process and help each indi- with terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts and terms vidual complete their application,” Porzio contin- are set by SBA and are based on each applicant’s ued. The centers will be open on the days and times financial condition. Applicants may apply online using the Electronic indicated until further notice. No appointment is Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at necessary. https://disasterloan.sba.gov/. OKANOGAN COUNTY Disaster loan information and application forms SBA Disaster Loan Outreach Center, Okanogan are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Bingo Casino, Administration Building, 41 Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or emailingdiAppleway, Okanogan, WA 98840. Open Mondays sastercustomerservice@sba.. Individuals who are - Fridays 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Veterans Day, deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339. Wednesday, Nov. 11 For more disaster assistance information, or to CHELAN COUNTY download applications, visit http://www.sba.gov/ SBA Disaster Loan Outreach Center, Lake Chelan disaster. Completed applications should be mailed Chamber of Commerce, 216 E Woodin Ave., Chelan, to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing WA 98816, Open Mondays - Fridays 9 a.m. to 4:30 and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, p.m., Closed Veterans Day, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Fort Worth, TX 76155. Businesses of all sizes and private nonprofit orgaThe filing deadline to return applications for nizations may borrow up to $2 million to repair or property damage is Dec. 28, 2015. The deadline replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery to return economic injury applications is July 28, and equipment, inventory, and other business assets. 2016. SUBMITTED BY RICHARD JENKINS

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COPS & COURTS | FROM A4 ing. Miguel Angel Dominguez Santana, 19, DOC detainer. Angelo Ricardo Coy, 30, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV), resisting arrest and obstruction.

Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015 Domestic dispute on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Landen Lane near Oroville. Three-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Conconully Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on E. Jonathan Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Arson on Cherry St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Bicycle reported missing. Assault on Cherry St. in Oroville. Illegal burning on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Carla Daniela Delapaz, 23, booked for first-degree rendering criminal assistance. Chase Wayne Nicholson, 30, booked for DUI. Enrique J. Vargas Hernandez, 19, booked for minor DUI. Franklin John Raschka, 36, booked for third-degree

DWLS and failure to transfer a title within 45 days.

Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015 Warrant arrest on S. Overland Rd. near Oroville. Public intoxication on Tyee St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Fairview Dr. near Okanogan. DWLS on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Edmonds St. in Omak. Public intoxication S. Ash St. in Omak. Structure fire on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. DWLS on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Jonathan Muniz Valdovinos, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Louis Lee Zacherle, 28, booked for DUI and obstruction. William Dwane Gallas, 50, booked on an OCSO warrant for third-degree DWLS. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 32, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Marie Gomez Aispuro, 30, DOC detainer. Shyanne Renee O’Bryan, 19, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for MIP/C. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled

Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 05, 2015  

November 05, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 05, 2015  

November 05, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune