Seattle Weekly, November 04, 2015

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FOOD A VASHON FARMER RIFFS ON RAMEN PAGE 14 FILM AN OLD-SCHOOL 007 PAGE 21

State of Emergency What Seattle’s latest anti-homelessness move will and won’t do. By Casey Jaywork Page 5 NOVEMBER 4-10, 2015 | VOLUME 40 | NUMBER 44

Much Music

The 22-year-old with 11 albums and one Matador Records contract. By Dusty Henry Page 15 SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM | FREE


EARSHOT

JAZZ FESTIVAL

Seattle’s Jazz Festival October 9 – November 18

EVENTS THIS WEEK:

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 PANAMA HOTEL, 6PM

Paul Kikuchi: Songs of Nihonmachi

Reimagined popular songs of Seattle’s Nihonmachi (pre-WW2) Japantown. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 & FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 ROYAL ROOM, 8PM

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey & Skerik

JFJO’s Battle For Earth psychedelic musical comic book is just out. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 NECTAR LOUNGE, 8PM

Blades / Ciotti / Coe w/ DJ Logic / Industrial Revelation

A burning B3 organ group and a band of Seattle geniuses. Hellofa night of music. (Presented by Nectar Lounge.) FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 PONCHO CONCERT HALL, CORNISH COLLEGE OF THE ARTS, 8PM

Art Lande Quartet

A one-off reunion of the great Seattle post-bop band of the early 1980’s. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7 TULA’S RESTAURANT AND JAZZ CLUB, 7:30PM

Ed Reed & Anton Schwartz play Hartman and Coltrane

A salute to one of the great vocal jazz albums of all time — John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7 BENAROYA HALL, ILLSLEY BALL NORDSTROM RECITAL HALL, 7:30PM SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8 KIRKLAND PERFORMANCE CENTER, 2PM MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9 EDMONDS CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 7:30PM

Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra presents Lush Life: Celebrating Billy Strayhorn’s 100th Birthday Seattle’s top big band salutes Duke Ellington’s brilliant right-hand man, with readings by Lush Life author, David Hajdu. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7 CHAPEL PERFORMANCE SPACE, 8PM

Torsten Mueller & Phil Minton

Two giants of the improvising scene, Vancouver-based German bassist Mueller and the inimitable English vocal shaman, as compellingly idiosyncratic as any musicians you’re likely to hear. (Presented by Nonsequitur and Polestar.) SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8 PONCHO CONCERT HALL, CORNISH COLLEGE OF THE ARTS, 8PM

Jay Clayton in and out

Dawn Clement and Julian Priester join Clayton for originals, standards, electronics, poetry, and a tribute to Ornette Coleman. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9 TOWN HALL SEATTLE, 7:30PM

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

James McBride and The Good Lord Bird Band

2

The saxophonist and celebrated author of The Color of Water. (Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures and Seattle Times.) MONDAY & TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9 & 10 PONCHO CONCERT HALL, CORNISH COLLEGE OF THE ARTS, 8PM

Anat Cohen Quartet

The brilliant Israeli-born clarinetist with her new band.

COMING UP...

Wayne Horvitz @ 60, Billy Strayhorn Project, Brad Mehldau Trio, Larry Fuller Trio, Scott Amendola Band w/ Nels Cline & Jenny Scheinman, Chris Potter Trio, Sara Gazarek & New West Guitar Group, and Hugh Masekela

More than 50 events in venues all around Seattle Buy tickets at www.earshot.org & 206-547-6763


inside

VOLUME 40 | NUMBER 44

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

November 4-10, 2015

a night of

artful pairings

ExcEptional local WinEs. DElicious FooD pairings. spEctacular sEtting.

news&comment 5

OUR BRAND IS CRISIS

BY CASEY JAYWORK | Declaring a

9

state of emergency, the mayor takes immediate steps to alleviate the pain of homelessness. Plus: Charter-school advocates press on, despite the court ruling; soccer returns to Tacoma. (Well, Kent.)

THAT ’70S SHOW

BY RICK ANDERSON | One local

writer can’t let go of a 43-year-old air tragedy—and what he’s uncovering is only deepening the mystery.

food&drink

13 PRECIOUS AND FEW BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | The overly

clever Eden Hill does have its inspired moments—the service, for one. 13 | THE BAR CODE 14 | PROFILE

arts&culture

15 STYLE COUNSEL

BY DUSTY HENRY | How does a 22-year-old get signed by a major label? Ask Will Toledo, aka Car Seat Headrest. 16 | CONVERSATION | The gents from the Now Serving podcast. 17 | COMIX 18 | ELECTRIC EYE

Bringing classical to Bellevue; the 24th Bond; Babs onstage; and more.

25 CALENDAR 25 26 27 28 29

| | | | |

THE PICK LIST PERFORMANCE VISUAL ARTS MUSIC FILM

ODDS&ENDS 4 | CHATTERBOX 30 | HIGHER GROUND 31 | CLASSIFIEDS

TRANCHE CELLARS CHARLES SMITH WINES CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten

BAER WINERY FoRCE MAjEURE VINEYARdS AMBASSAdoR

thursday, noVember 12

EDITORIAL

6 pm - 9 pm

News Editor Daniel Person Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle

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Arts Editor Brian Miller

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Music Editor Kelton Sears Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Sara Bernard, Ellis E. Conklin, Casey Jaywork

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

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JOE MABEL

chatterbox

In last week’s paper, Francesca Lyman of InvestigateWest documented for-profit thrift store Value Village’s highly profitable business model. Many charity-watchers feel the store’s parent company, Savers, misleads customers into thinking Value Village is a charity operation, when in fact only about 17 percent of its revenue goes to charity partners. Readers were not shy about sharing what they thought.

“My sincerest thanks for your article on Value Village filling your head with ideals of ‘good deeds’ while they’re really just filling their pockets.” I thought they were a nonprofit—I’ve donated quite a bit of stuff to them. I will say as a shopper I prefer VV over, say, the Salvation Army which to me seems overpriced and dirty. At least VV is clean and orderly. But they do need to be transparent and let the public know they are a for-profit company. Thanks for sharing. Lee Nichols, via Facebook

My sincerest thanks for your article on Value Vil- Value Village actually does a lot for its nonprofit lage filling your head with ideals of “good deeds” partners besides giving money. Northwest Center while they’re really just filling their pockets. Years helps to employ people with disabilities and also back I loved the idea of not only recycling usable offers early learning programs for children with goods but giving to charity as I purchased. I went disabilities. Value Village employs a lot of people to work at Value Village thinking it was a great with disabilities and partners with Northwest fit. Aside from the simple fact that the charities Center to use their stores as test sites to assess are minimally donated to, the company treats skills of people they are trying to employ. employees very poorly. LearyTraveler, via Reddit They demand a fast pace, and that’s why you find their stores disorganized, filled with overIn the food section, Chason Gordon broke down priced and now broken treasures. (Goodwill is what fans of In-N-Out Burger might expect from actually very similar.) I actually CaliBurger, a China-based chain asked my boss when I worked that has been sued for its uncanny Send your thoughts on there how much we paid our similarities to the beloved In-Nthis week’s issue to charity partners, and she said “it Out. Burger-lovers were skeptical. wasn’t important for me to know.” letters@seattleweekly.com

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

I personally feel that a thrift store has no business pricing something for what an antique store would sell it for, and much preferred to price items reasonably so that they would sell before they got broken, not to mention there is so much merchandise that they throw out. thatgirlmeesan, via e-mail

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Buying used still does more good than harm overall, especially for the planet. Reuse trumps recycling a million times over. Nicole Munson, via Facebook.com According to the article, VV takes in $1.2B and gives charities $200M. Seems like a good deal to the charities that do not pay the operational costs of running the business. James Mize, via Facebook I don’t think most people shop there because their money is going to charity, I think people shop at Goodwill/Value Village/etc. because they get something for a fraction of the new retail cost and they don’t mind something used when it fits their need perfectly fine. derrickito1, via Reddit

Surprise, a Chinese company has found a way to try to copycat In-N-Out Burger. For twice the price, you can get a bad imitation of the real thing. I wonder if they also duplicated INO’s efforts to pay their employees higher than minimum wage, allow managers to earn six-figure salaries, and provide significant growth opportunities for good staff? I highly doubt those profits are being passed on. Don’t be fooled by Full Tilt ice cream and Rachel’s Ginger Beer—this is NOT a local company. Everything about this reeks of bad ethics and poor taste. July Carla, via e-mail We made a special trip Saturday to CaliBurger, got there, went inside, and then they said they had to close since they had sold so many burgers at lunchtime!!! Paid for parking and the trip from Lynnwood, all for nothing! NOT GOING BACK!!!! Carson Steele, via Facebook

I categorically agree with this article. This place is charging twice the price for a poor substitute and not treating its employees to salaries above minimum wage or any of the perks INO offers. I’m going to support local. Carla Vikingstad, via Facebook Why can’t we just get a freakin’ In-N-Out here?

Vicki Meglemre, via Facebook E

Comments have been edited for length and clarity.


news&comment CITY HALL

Crisis Mode

What does the mayor’s homelessness declaration mean for those on the margins? BY CASEY JAYWORK

O

you can go, and if you don’t like those options, that’s fine, but you can’t stay here. And if you do come back here, that’s where I think the threat of arrest becomes real.’ ” But while the city is scrambling to ramp up its capacity for shelter and services, the plain fact is that another hundred shelter beds isn’t adequate for a homeless population that measures in the thousands. So at (relatively) safe unpermitted encampments, the city’s goal is to stabilize. “There may be places,” says O’Brien, “where we say, ‘Look. We don’t have a place for you to go right now. Where you are is actually relatively safe. We’re going to give you a portapotty. You gotta put the needles in the container. Use the trash pickup. You gotta keep this orderly. It’s unsanctioned, you’re not here legally, but we’re going to support you living in crisis as best we can, for your sake and the broader community’s sake.’ ” Homeless advocates were generally pleased with the mayor’s declaration, but Real Change founder Tim Harris cautioned that it could forebode a crackdown on unauthorized encampments. “I see a [request] to the state to allocate resources to the clearance of unauthorized encampments,” he says. “I’m curious what’s behind that—in what ways would the police be used to resolve the crisis?” But overall, he says, “I’m not really that worried about it. . . . My top-level reaction is this is a very, very good thing.” But what do the Seattleites actually living in those

encampments think? Mike Mitchum, a lanky man with big glasses and strong opinions who’s part of another encampment under the highway, is skeptiScenes from Nickelsville, cal of any overtures from the one makeshift solution to the problem. establishment. He shares his thoughts with me as we’re seated with some of his neighbors on a circle of old couches surrounding a campfire. “They’re making more money than us just talking about” homelessness, he says. “If [politicians] didn’t have The city will send us, they’d be out of a job because they social workers, cops, wouldn’t have anybody to talk about!” and clinicians to places Cody says that while he appreciates like the underpass where help and wouldn’t mind access to hot I found Cody. At unsafe water and electricity, he mostly just wants to encampments, the city will be left alone. He reckons he could probably get post an eviction notice and then off the street if he really worked at it, but doesn’t send in outreach teams to connect people to like the loss of freedom and the need to rely on shelter beds, drug rehab, medications—whatever other people. “A lot of people don’t want serthey need. “There’s a recognition,” says O’Brien vices,” he says. “Most of us are loners.” staffer Josh Fogt, “that we’ve done outreach Asked what message he’d want to give city before, and just kind of outreaching to folks leaders, he replies, “Don’t you have more imporwithout anything to offer them is really hard.” tant things to worry about than homelessness? Is “To the extent that folks say, ‘I’m not interoutreach really gonna solve anything, or is it just ested in [services],’ ” says O’Brien, “then I believe going to draw more people?” E the message will be, ‘You can’t stay here, it’s not safe. We’ve given you some options about where cjaywork@seattleweekly.com

Fast takes from the news desk Bell Hop

What started in Seattle years ago as a grassroots effort by teachers and parents to better align bell times with what scientists say are teenagers’ natural sleep patterns has now landed in front of the Seattle School Board for a vote. The plan the board will vote on tonight dictates that, starting next year, all middle and high schools will start class at 8:50 a.m. Today, the majority of high school and middle schools in Seattle start an hour earlier—at 7:50, a time at which, scientists say, teenage brains are not yet awake, leading to learning and behavior problems. Meanwhile, most elementary schools will start at 8 a.m., which proponents also suggest better aligns with the biology of youngsters, who typically have more energy earlier in the morning. (Their current start time is either 8:40 or 9:30.) As one parent noted at a recent school-board meeting: “My mornings consists of dragging an exhausted middle-school student out of bed while my elementary-school student, who’s excited and ready to go, waits another two hours to go to school.” The reason it has taken the school district so long to revise bell times is that the logistics are a bitch. After-school programs, busing patterns, and myriad other factors had to be accounted for in the new schedule. And as is, the plan is not perfect, with some parents feeling put out by the proposal. Their opposition is rooted in the fact that some bell times would shift forward: The schedule calls for 13 elementary and K-8 schools to start at 9:40 a.m., 10 minutes later than they start now. Jen Simonic, a parent of a fourth-grader at John Hay Elementary, says anyone who’s spent time with kindergartners knows they’re not able to stay focused that late into the afternoon. “By 2 o’clock, these kids are puddles. It’s like being at a bar at the end of the night. Now you’re going to have them stay until 4? That’s just not right,” she says. DANIEL PERSON

Broad Politics

Comcast: Can’t live with ’em, can’t kill ’em. That, at least, seems to be the sentiment on the City Council right about now. “I find that the frustration people feel against Comcast is a real unifying factor,” observed Councilmember Kshama Sawant in a budget meeting last week. “Even if people disagree on other things, when I mention Comcast, everybody agrees, ‘Oh my God, we need to do something about this.’ ” As the Council takes up Mayor Ed Murray’s $5.1-billion budget, both Sawant and her colleague Bruce Harrell want the city to bring you Internet access. But what kind, at what cost? Harrell wants wi-fi targeted toward the 15 percent of Seattleites who don’t already have it at home. He’s asked to add $250,000 to the city’s 2016 budget (which the Council is currently reviewing) to pay for a contractor to do a feasibility study on such a project. Sawant, on the other hand, wants to go further and spend $5 million for a pilot municipal-broadband project. A previous feasibility study suggested a similar project, but it’s unlikely Sawant will have the Council’s support; the proposal faced some skepticism when introduced on Thursday, with eyes turned toward Tacoma’s floundering effort at public broadband—the Internet utility Click!, which has been bleeding subscribers in recent years. To stay afloat, Click! requires an annual taxpayer subsidy of $8 to $9 million. “I would like to know how other cities are doing,” Councilmember Tom Rasmussen said. “How is Tacoma doing?” CASEY JAYWORK E news@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

This new homelessness package—the roughly $7 million, plus the city and county declarations of emergency—was midwifed over the past

several weeks by City Councilmembers Sally Bagshaw, John Okamoto, and Mike O’Brien (with a backstage assist from Council president Tim Burgess). “The focus in the beginning,” says O’Brien, “is on unauthorized encampments” that are large or unruly, or “where we think there’s dangerous situations, meaning, ‘Hey, you’re on a cliff over the freeway. We don’t want you falling off.’ ”

SARA BERNARD

bviously we’re all fuckin’ crazy,” says Cody. “We live under a freeway.” Cody’s a 28-year-old construction worker, smoker, loner, and resident of “the Jungle”—the long stretch of land beneath and beside I-5, home to countless, ever-shifting homeless encampments. Clad in a gritty construction jacket and an orange bandanna tied over his skull, he tells me that he’s been mostly homeless for a decade, and living down here between the freeway’s support pillars for half a year. We’re seated in lawn chairs outside his tent, surrounded by a perimeter fence cobbled together from wood pallets and scrap metal. The constant repetition of cars hitting bumps in the highway overhead creates the impression that there’s a drum circle nearby. The orange-yellow light of sunset beams down at us through the gap between the northbound and southbound platforms. Cody’s been on-again, off-again homeless since he became an adult. “I work when I can,” he says. “I was doing day labor, but I got suspended for unkind words to the office lady for fucking with my money.” I ventured into the Jungle on Monday, after Mayor Ed Murray declared a civil emergency in response to Seattle’s homelessness epidemic. King County’s homeless population jumped by 21 percent last year, to 10,000, continuing a pattern of failed fixes by policy makers. “People have been murdered, people have been raped, people have fallen to their death on the freeway,” Murray said at a press conference Monday morning. He compared Seattle’s situation to the refugee crisis in Europe. “To simply say we’re not going to fund people starving in our streets, people who are living in their cars when they’re 7 years old . . . As a Roman Catholic, I just can’t go there.” The declaration gives Murray broad powers he says he’ll use to bypass red tape and create shelter for the nearly 3,000 schoolchildren the city says are currently homeless, as well as a bully pulpit to pressure state and federal leaders to re-fund social services. The city will also invest an additional $5.3 million into homeless prevention and crisis services, including 100 new shelter beds. That money will come from the sale of part of a city property that’s currently used for training firefighters and public-utility workers. County executive Dow Constantine also proclaimed a state of emergency at the county level, and promised $2 million in funding for homeless services.

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EDUCATION

news&comment

Charter Schools Are Dead. Long Live Charter Schools. In the wake of a crippling Supreme Court ruling, Seattle charter schools are fighting back. And may be expanding. BY SARA BERNARD

E

classes in West Seattle next year. The state-run Washington State Charter School Commission approved Summit Atlas’ application less than a month before the Supreme Court’s ruling; it signed its official contract about six weeks afterward. There was just one little caveat: Should the Supreme Court come back with a mandate upholding its ruling, that contract would be void. For those who’ve been following headlines, by the way, The Seattle Times’ “State Charter School Commission starts to pack up” (Sept. 9) was a mischaracterization—so much so that the Commission issued its own press release to clarify things. “We weren’t clos-

Charter supporters in Seattle rally for their cause.

Washington State Charter Schools Association CEO Thomas Franta. “One of the things I’m encouraged by is that even if the Court doesn’t do the right thing, a bipartisan group of legislators have said that they are ready, willing, and able to fix the funding in the next legislative session.” Franta and others are confident, therefore, that this is not the end of the road. Case in point: The news hook for the event at Summit Sierra was to showcase Summit Atlas, a sixth-through-12thgrade charter school set to launch its inaugural

ing shop,” explains executive director Joshua Halsey. “We were doing the prudent thing—contingency planning in the event that the Supreme Court ruling was finalized.” And so far it hasn’t been. The only difference is that for now they’re not going to be accepting new charter-school applications in February 2016. “We were right at the point of finishing all of our contracts when the Supreme Court ruling happened,” says Greg Ponikvar, Summit Atlas’ perhaps-principal-to-be. “We really wanted to

finish that piece of the puzzle.” No matter how things shake out, lacking that final signature could compromise the opening of a school that hundreds of parents and students in West Seattle have been waiting for for more than a year. “As long as there’s hope,” he says, “we want to make sure we’re ready to move forward with West Seattle.” It seems safe to say that all the parents who showed up for the Summit Sierra event are also very, very ready to move forward with West Seattle. Felicia Hyllested and Nancy Spiro are two such; both have sons who attend fifth grade in a traditional public school. “We’ve been following [Summit Atlas’] process since the application,” says Spiro. “We’ve been along for the entire ride.” “The emotional ride!” says Hyllested. “We were really excited for our kids to have an option school in our area—and then getting it taken away without even getting a proper start . . . ” “We’re hoping and wishing and praying and doing all that we can,” adds Spiro. “It’s not fair. Something that we voted into law, to take that away, just by a few special-interest groups? That’s unconstitutional, I feel.” The two women point out a handful of things they like about Summit Sierra—project-based learning, for instance, and racial diversity: 20 percent African American, 20 percent East African, 28 percent Asian and Pacific Islander, 12 percent Latino, and 20 percent white, according to principal Malia Burns. But they also note Sierra’s small class sizes. The schools their fifth-graders attend are “really full schools,” says Hyllested. “Our boys get quiet in those kinds of settings and get a little bit lost.” To find a middle school where their sons would each have a dedicated teacher/mentor, as do the students at Summit Sierra, would be a dream. “I don’t know that [traditional public-school] teachers are able to do that . . . when you’ve got 30-plus kids in your class and they’re rolling through all day long.” “I want my child to have this,” implores Linda Sikora, another parent gunning for Summit Atlas to open in 2016. She describes a student she’d just spoken with who’d struggled with math in traditional public school, but no longer does. “I almost cried. Because there was this child—she came to life. She opened up and her eyes lit up and she looked at me. ‘I’m different. I learn differently.’ I got the truth bumps—that’s what I call them. Tingle all the way down,” she said, starry-eyed. “This is how the world should be.” Ponikvar acknowledges the uncertainty, but points to parents like Sikora as a motivating factor. “What keeps me going is just the families we heard from today,” he says. “Seeing parents who are so desperate for options. We know it’s a long road, but I think with their support we’re gonna get there.” For now, though, it’s a waiting game. “The ball is in the Court’s court,” says Halsey. “There is no timeline they are required to operate under.” E

sbernard@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

The plaintiffs in the case that challenged the charter law might debate the word “glitch,” but charter-school operators have good reason to believe that that’s what this is. Since the Court’s ruling in early September, Attorney General Bob Ferguson has filed a motion for reconsideration; the Washington State Charter Schools Association and others have seconded that with their own supporting documents; and 10 legislators and four former attorneys general have both filed amicus briefs. The briefs challenge the Court’s definition of a “common school” and argue that the legislature’s 2015–17 operating budget made a point of not diverting funds

slated for traditional public schools to charter schools instead. And hundreds of parents have been writing op-eds, sending letters to legislators, and attending every meeting and press event and rally possible, fingers crossed. “We’re doing everything we possibly can, and I know the schools are as well, to make sure that there is no disruption for families this year,” says

SARA BERNARD

lijah Cook leans over a small laptop in his ninth-grade algebra class at Summit Sierra, one of Washington’s nine new charter schools. He and his classmates are using linear equations to make stock-market predictions—you know, like most 14-year-olds. Elijah seems happy and relaxed. “I just like this school . . . because last year, I was getting in trouble a lot,” he says. “And I kind of don’t want to get in trouble here, you know what I’m saying? I just like the community and all the people here. I just wanna respect the teachers because I like them all and they’re really helping me a lot.” Sure, the kid could have been groomed for visitors. The event that has brought several dozen eager parents and a handful of reporters to his school is clearly designed to impress its guests—and thus maintain enthusiasm and support for charter schools in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling that struck down Washington’s nascent charter law. But Elijah and every single student and parent in attendance certainly don’t seem groomed—more like fervent, authentic, and utterly devoted. The Supreme Court may have deemed the law unconstitutional, but it has yet to issue a mandate to enforce that ruling. As a result, it’s business as usual until the limbo is resolved: Charter schools are still receiving monthly checks from the state, the Washington State Charter Schools Commission is still operating, and charter-school supporters are as passionate and committed as ever. “We feel like now we’ve not only created history in Washington state by allowing more choice through charter schools,” Summit Washington chief regional officer Jen Wickens tells a semicircle of gathered visitors, “but we’ve proven that there’s demand for them, and that they can do exceptional things for students, socially, emotionally, academically. Now we feel like we have more to lose.” She notes that the final ruling hasn’t been announced, but Summit Public Schools (the Californiabased nonprofit that runs Summit Sierra in south Seattle and Summit Olympus in Tacoma) promises that the schools will continue operating through the academic year, no matter what. “We are hopeful that our elected officials will do the right thing,” she says, “and stand behind the will of the voters and fix this glitch.”

7


SPORTS

news&comment

The Stars Align

A sex scandal makes way for the return of a storied franchise. BY DANIEL PERSON

T

he Tacoma Stars is the type of sports franchise that, in search of the team’s media rep, you might start chatting up the owner instead. No cloistered owner suites, no carefully curated media access. At the Tacoma Soccer Center in the shadow of I-5, Lane Smith sits above the eastern goal and watches his team warm up for an evening scrimmage, noshing on Chinese food delivered in Styrofoam boxes. The Stars are an arena soccer team, occupying that sometimes tenuous but often thrilling territory where an obscure sport meets professional athletics. It can be thought of as a cross between soccer and hockey, with players allowed to kick the ball off the sidewalls to create dizzying angles. The game moves far faster than regular soccer, and much to an American audience’s taste, goals can reach into the double digits. Netting is required to protect fans from errant kicks, and Smith flinches a few times as hard, practice shots-on-goal sail directly at his head. While graciously allowing a reporter to pester him, Smith has an intense, earnest air this night, exactly one week out from the beginning of the Stars’ season, the team’s first season as a top-tier arena-soccer team since 1992. “The Stars are back November 6 [7:30 p.m. at Kent’s ShoWare Center] as a professional soccer team,” Smith said. “The question is, how is Tacoma and the South Sound and Seattle going to embrace that?”

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TACOMA STARS

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

It’s an interesting question, given the Stars’

history and the legacy of indoor soccer in the region—which is equal parts feel-good story and soap opera. The Stars date back to 1983, when the team joined the fledgling Major Indoor Soccer League, soon to become the top-tier indoor soccer league in the country. ’83 was also the year the Tacoma Dome opened, and the Stars were the concrete behemoth’s first tenants. Over the next nine years, the Stars would simultaneously amass eight losing seasons and a horde of devoted fans—who understandably focus their memories on the single winning season the Stars notched. That year, 1987, the Stars made it to the national championship. Game six and seven were played in the Tacoma Dome, and to this day those two games hold the record for best-attended indoor soccer games in the history of the sport. (Game 7 had 21,000 spectators.) Tacoma lost the championship to the Dallas Sidekicks, but the City of Destiny was so proud of its team that it threw a parade anyway. The Tacoma News Tribune recently called those Stars “the closest thing to a pro sports franchise this city has ever

seen,” though Tacoma Rainiers fans might disagree. But for certain, to recall cheering for the Stars is a mark of a true South Sound local, as the Stars were not long for this world. In 1992, the Major Indoor Soccer League folded and the Stars burned out. Efforts began in 2004 to revive the franchise,

with halting results. The team went through an alphabet soup of second-tier indoor-soccer leagues, changed its name to the Tacoma Galaxy for a brief period of time, and went bankrupt. In 2014, Smith, who also owns a stake in the U-23 Sounders, purchased the team out of bankruptcy with little plan for what he was going to do with a semi-professional team competing in a sport that many had never heard of. As a Tacoma native, he said, he didn’t want just anyone owning the rights to the name. “I did it to protect the brand,” he recalled. But opportunity to do something big with the team came quickly with the stunning collapse of Seattle’s arena-soccer team, the Seattle Impact. The Impact formed in 2014, owned by a man named Dion Earl. But before it even played its first game, the Impact lost its coach and assistant coach for lack of payment. Most of its players left in protest midway through the season after two members of the dance team accused Earl of sexual assault. Left without a team and assault accusations to fight, Earl agreed to sell Smith the rights to play in the Major Arena Soccer League—now the highest level indoor-soccer league in the country. The Stars finished the Impact’s season while also playing in the semi-pro Western Indoor Soccer League, but needless to say, no one fully celebrated the return of the Stars to major-league soccer under such unsavory circumstances. Now, though, the Impact is a distant memory and the Stars are ready to resume history.

At this point, the Stars are not a perfect fac-

simile of the earlier team, if for no other reason than where they’ll be playing The Stars their home games: Kent. “I know the elephant in are looking forward. the room is, ‘Why are you playing in Kent?’ ” Smith says at the Tacoma practice arena. The simple answer is that the ShoWare Center—also home to the Seattle Thunderbirds hockey team and, formerly, the Seattle Impact (and no teams that claim Kent itself as their home)—makes the most financial sense. But Smith says it’s also an opportunity for the city of Tacoma to come to the table to help bring home its famed franchise. “I don’t think there’s a more beloved team in Tacoma,” Smith says immodestly, “than the Stars.” E

dperson@seattleweekly.com


HALE AND LINDY BOGGS PAPERS, LOUISIANA RESEARCH COLLECTION, TULANE UNIVERSITY

n a fall day three years ago, freelance writer Jonathan Walczak sat before a computer tapping out his first report on an apparent plane crash in Alaska. “Forty years ago yesterday,” he began—in a story that would appear Oct. 17, 2012 in Seattle Weekly, where Walczak, 24, had earlier worked on a fellowship—“Hale Boggs, a powerful Democratic congressman with a colorful past, disappeared in a small plane over Alaska. The massive search that ensued turned up no leads, and the plane, along with the bodies of Boggs and three others who died, remains hidden somewhere in the wilderness.”

The last known photo of Congressmen Nick Begich, left, and Hale Boggs, taken shortly before they disappeared.


SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

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Walczak was still awaiting responses when he took a job as a web producer at MSN.com near the end of 2011. But he continued to pursue the story as a freelancer. In the 2012 piece for the Weekly, he disclosed what he’d found: “Amid hundreds of pages in Boggs’ FBI file is a single sheet of information that has apparently never been reported. Around 11:30 p.m. on July 23, 1970, two years before he disappeared, Boggs was driving in Washington, D.C., when a late-model Lincoln Continental forced him off the road. He gave chase and was able to take down a license-plate number. No additional information is available in the file, and the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department, which investigated the incident, told the Weekly that it could not locate any relevant records.” He also learned that “Immediately after Boggs disappeared, the U.S. Coast Guard station in Long Beach, Calif., received a call from an individual who claimed to know where the plane crashed. The tipster said he had access to experimental electronic equipment, and he provided detailed directions to the wreck. The FBI apparently found him credible,

ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY

alczak didn’t realize it then, but his story on the plane’s disappearance was the start of a reporting excursion that would take up most of his writing time and much of his money over the next three years. He’d learn hidden secrets about what had been a headline-rattling case from the 1970s, digging up startling and hard-to-believe takeaways. Through documents and interviews, he’d get to know the 58-year-old Boggs, who went down in the twin-engine Cessna with Alaska Democratic congressman Nick Begich, 40; his aide Russell Brown, 37; and pilot Don Jonz, 38, a military veteran with 17,000 hours of air time. He learned that they departed Anchorage early on Oct. 16, 1972 for a Begich re-election rally in the capital of Juneau. The forecast included possible turbulent headwinds and icy rain. The six-seat plane, carrying some light luggage, lifted off over distant mountains, with a flight plan likely to take them across snowfields, islands, bays, ocean coastline, and Prince William Sound. The plane had six flight-hours of fuel for the three-and-a-half-hour trip. It was never seen again. Boggs, the U.S. House majority leader, had come along as a favor to the Begich campaign, Walczak found. A 15-term congressman from Louisiana and father of political commentator Cokie Roberts, Boggs appeared destined to be elected the next Speaker of the House. He was instrumental in helping pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and served on the Warren Commission, which declared that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in the assassination of John F. Kennedy. He was popular enough to win re-election in November 1972, three weeks after he went missing and was presumed dead. His widow, Lindy Boggs, won a special election to replace him and went on to serve eight more terms. She died two years ago at age 97. Not that Begich needed a lot of help, or that the trip to Juneau was crucial, Walczak also learned. The freshman congressman—and father of Mark Begich, later Anchorage’s mayor and a U.S. Senator—also won re-election while presumed dead. The loser, Republican Don Young, won the subsequent special election and has held the seat since. When Walczak’s story ran in the Weekly, younger readers could be forgiven if they didn’t immediately grasp the importance of what had been the nation’s biggest search-and-rescue effort, involving 40 military aircraft and 50 civilian planes searching over 325,000 square miles for 39 days. (The baffling hunt also led to Congress passing a mandatory law requiring that small planes be equipped with emergency locator devices.) After officials agreed the plane likely hit rough weather, crashed, and sank out of sight or was consumed by ice, the nation shrugged and turned its eyes back to Watergate and Vietnam. Walczak was among the generations born after the 1972 disappearance had faded into history. It wasn’t until a slow news day during his fellowship in 2011 that he came upon the story. Cruising the Internet on his office computer, he clicked a Wikipedia index of famous disappearances. As he read down the chronological list, there, just after D.B. Cooper (1971) and before Jimmy Hoffa (1975), was the name Hale Boggs. Cooper and Hoffa, OK. But, Hale who? “I’m a history and politics nerd,” says Walczak, now a freelance writer in New Orleans—Boggs’ hometown—“and it surprised me that I had never heard of the vanishing of a House majority leader in Alaska. It seemed like a fascinating story.” He wanted to know more, but couldn’t find what he needed from web searches. So he began filing Freedom of Information Act requests with various federal agencies.

He has provided the Weekly with a copy of the piece, along with photos and records to support his reporting. What follows is the essence of his findings. In his research, Jon Walczak learned that after

Hale Boggs disappeared, rumors flew that the Democrat had been assassinated. Skeptics claimed the Cessna was somehow sabotaged or bombed because Boggs disagreed with the lone-gunman theory of the Warren Report, and was about to declare it a sham. Walczak didn’t buy it. Between living with his family in North Carolina and doing research at Tulane University in New Orleans—where the papers of Boggs, a Tulane law grad, are stored— Walczak learned that Boggs had in fact supported the commission’s findings. “In 1967, according to a memo I obtained,” he writes, “Boggs told an FBI agent he reread the [Warren] report ‘just to make absolutely certain there were no loopholes.’ He stated he found none, and went on to call fellow New Orleanian Jim Garrison—the quixotic district attorney who launched an independent inquiry into

1. Jerry Max Pasley, a murderer and bomber with Mafia ties. 2. Pegge Begich, widow of missing Congressman Nick Begich. 3. Sal Spinelli, a mobster. 4. Anita Spinelli, Sal’s wife. 5. Toby LaVetter, the justice of the peace who married Pegge and Pasley.

with one agent, whose name is redacted, stating his opinion that the ‘source of aforementioned information is reliable.’ ” It wasn’t all that Walczak was hoping for. But it was a start. And now there’s a finish. Walczak spent $30,000 over the past three years, interviewing several dozen people, searching through thousands of law-enforcement documents, and traveling twice to Alaska where he waded through hip-deep snow and flew the Boggs plane route—all the while wondering if he could come up with a story worth repeating. “I burned through my savings, and when that ran out, I put everything on credit cards,” he says. “But every time I almost moved on [to another story], I learned some crazy new piece of information that reinvigorated me.” He now has a surprising tale to tell. On a payper-view ($2) website he just created, his 40-page narrative, called Four Gone, details how Begich’s widow went on to marry an admitted murderer and bomber with Mafia ties who later told local and FBI officials he had helped bomb the congressmen’s plane. Walczak calls it the “never-before-told story of the disappearance of Hale Boggs” and the others.

Kennedy’s death—a ‘mental case.’ ” However, were conspiracy theorists right for the wrong reason? As Walczak probed onward, Begich, rather than Boggs, began to emerge as the most likely link to a bomb scenario. Walczak isn’t claiming a bomb was hidden aboard the plane. It could have gone down in bad weather, he allows. But why have such allegations remained buried in police and federal files for more than four decades? “I find it extremely suspicious,” Walczak says, “that the widow of a missing congressman married a murderer and bomber with Mafia ties less than 17 months after her husband vanished; that this man later told the FBI the missing plane was bombed; and that these allegations warranted such a brief, lackluster investigation by the feds.” Some events work against the bombing theory, beginning with the fact that dozens of planes have crashed into the Alaska Bush and have yet to be found. A search of NTSB databases back to 1962, according to a July report in the Alaska Dispatch News, reveals more than 40 open cases of missing aircraft. Federal authorities say they still get calls

about possible leads in the Boggs/Begich mystery and consider the disappearance an open case. “An official end to the search for answers,” said NTSB official Don Johnson, “does not occur until we find out what happened.” On the apparent crash day, two emergency signals were detected: a weak one 150 miles northeast of Anchorage, the other west of Juneau lasting for 40 minutes. Neither signal could be pinpointed, and just as suddenly as they started, they stopped.Was either beacon from the downed plane, and if so, does that rule out a midair explosion? Then again, if the plane for some reason crashed and sank, as many think, would there have been any signal? Just as curious was a ham-radio broadcast heard by a number of northern California operators on the evening of the disappearance. “This is Alaska mobile needing assistance,” a breathless man broadcasted; then, “Oh, my God, we’re going to hit the rocks. I’m out of gas. I’m heading down. This is it.” A sheriff who looked into the report said he didn’t think it was a hoax. The Air Force disagreed, later finding it to be a false broadcast by a “sadistic person.” The Alaska search ended in November 1972, and the four men were officially declared dead by or shortly after Christmas. On Jan. 31, 1973, the National Transportation Safety Board adopted its final report, finding the disappearance inconclusive. Without wreckage, there was no way to definitively determine what happened. “Mechanical failure seems unlikely, though a thorough inspection of the plane was completed the day before it vanished,” Walczak writes, “and it seemed to be in good shape. Theories continue to center on ice and pilot error. Jonz’s reputation is eviscerated. Years later, however, one unexpected person comes to his defense: Lindy Boggs, ever the lady. She calls Jonz a ‘magnificent pilot’ and says she has ‘no blame for the pilot. I know he valued his life, too.’ ” Walczak was unable to interview Lindy Boggs before her 2013 death. Last year, though, he got a voice mail from Tommy Boggs, her son, who agreed to an interview. They played phone tag, and on Sept. 11, Walczak left Boggs a phone message to set up a meet. Four days later, Boggs died of a heart attack. His sister, Cokie Roberts, turned down an interview request, but she has said her father’s plane crashed into water and sank, period. Chatting on MSNBC last year after the disappearance of Malaysia Flight 370, she said she understood what relatives of the missing were going through, faced with the likelihood the plane crashed into the sea. They’re “saying to the Malaysian government, ‘Why are you just telling us that without any proof?’ ” Roberts said. “Well, they do have the equivalent of proof, but that’s very hard for people to accept.” In her father’s case, the U.S. “brought in our spy planes . . . And there were all these sightings along the way, and people calling and saying they had heard something, some radio communication, and then the psychics came in and all of that, because people can’t wrap their minds around the idea of a plane just disappearing into the bottom of the sea.” No one from the Begich clan would comment, either. Among those Walczak did talk with was pilot Jonz’s ex-girlfriend, Cheryl Mitchell, who, then 21, was at the airport. She was the last person to see the four men alive. Newspapers at the time referred to her as a “mystery witness,” and it took Walczak more than a year to find her. Now named Cheryl James, 63 and living in Nevada, she said she rode with Jonz to the airport and met the congressmen and the aide at the plane, then left. “James says she didn’t see anything suspicious on the plane or in the disappearance,” Walczak writes. “She believed the official explanation that Jonz crashed in bad weather. However, she did hear wild rumors that he


trail of a decades-old mystery.

reports of a bombing. When the plane disappeared somewhat later, it was thought to have crashed in bad weather. The following year, he moved to Anchorage and met a woman he had met and dated in Arizona, before the plane disappeared, he told the lawmen. They knew and associated with some of the same people in Tucson, he claimed. She was Pegge Begich. They fell in together and wed within a year. She bought him lavish gifts, including two cars and co-ownership of a bar. His partners, Pasley claimed, were Pegge Begich and one of the men he had given the locked briefcase to in 1972. According to a transcript of Pasley’s confession, he was fishing one day with the partner when the man got drunk and began talking about the briefcase Joe Bonanno allegedly sent to Alaska. It was “a fucking bomb,” the man said, according to Pasley—a high-tech bomb. The man also admitted to putting the bomb aboard the congressmen’s plane, Pasley claimed. The investigators sitting there were stunned. “That would be so fuckin’ heavy,” one says. “I mean, that’s like killin’ the president, for Christ’s sake.” After the initial interview, Walczak tells the Weekly, the investigators notified the FBI, who

and I didn’t hear anything back for several weeks. And I’m thinking, ‘What the hell’s going on here?’ And so I called her, got a hold of her, and even her, she got sort of paranoid and said we had to meet off-campus, a twosome, and she goes, ‘This is strange. Immediately when the SAC [Special Agent in Charge] read through this, he apparently called Washington, and they said, ‘You will do nothing there. You will send everything you’ve got to us.’ ” Grimes followed up with his FBI contact, who told him, “The only thing we got back from Washington was that the whole thing was unfounded.” Said Grimes: “I was shut down completely after my interview, after I released it all to them.” Walczak tells us he spoke with all three investigators on the record, and “they were very surprised at how lackluster the FBI’s investigation of Pasley’s claims were. They said everything was hush-hush and swept under the rug, and the investigation was shut down after a cursory examination of the facts. Pasley agreed to testify under oath and to take a polygraph test, but it’s unclear if the F.B.I. ever administered one.” A pilot experienced with the type of plane the men flew in told Walczak a bomb could be easily hidden in a rear compartment. But by whom, and

why? Walczak names names and talks theories, and suggests that if such a hit was ordered by one of the Bonannos, it was done as a favor to someone else. Walczak agrees that, in part, what he found borders on the absurd. Still, he says, “There is no question that Pegge Begich married this man, Jerry Pasley. I have their marriage license and photos of their wedding. There is no question Pasley claimed that Pegge’s missing husband was murdered. The question is whether or not Pasley was telling the truth.” Even if he was, according to an FBI document, it might not have mattered, a U.S. attorney told a federal agent after reviewing the case in 1995. It would be nearly impossible to prosecute since no wreckage or bodies were found, he surmised. Either way, Pasley was risking the possibility that ratting out Joe Bananas and the others could lead to an early death in prison. “He did want to go to a safe place in prison so he wouldn’t be assassinated or killed,” ex-state trooper Dave Tullis, one of the inquisitors, said, “but other than that, I don’t think he asked for much.” As it turned out, Pasley did die somewhat early in prison—15 years later, at age 69—from liver cancer, taking the truth with him. That was 2010, two years after Mark Begich won his Senate seat by defeating Ted Stevens, the longest-serving Republican in Senate history. Having been found guilty nine days earlier of seven felonies for failing to disclose $250,000 in political gifts, Stevens hoped to become the first convicted felon to win Senate re-election. Out of almost 300,000 votes cast, Stevens, who’d normally steamrolled to victory, lost by 39,000. Begich, the first Democrat to win the Senate seat since 1981, served only one term, however, beaten last year by Republican state Attorney General Dan Sullivan. Walczak learned from FBI files that in 2001 Senator Stevens had inquired about the Boggs/Begich plane crash. A constituent who had seen a show about the vanishing on the History Channel, raising questions of foul play, requested the Senator to dig deeper into the investigation. An FBI agent examined the bureau’s file, which included Pasley’s claims, and two weeks later responded to Stevens that nothing appeared out of the ordinary. Stevens was not made aware of Pasley’s allegations, Walczak says. The year after losing his Senate seat, Stevens was un-convicted, his felony case dismissed due to prosecutorial misconduct. The following year, 2010, Stevens, whose wife had been killed in a 1978 Alaska plane crash that he’d survived, died in an Alaska plane crash. What if Pasley’s claim had leaked out in the past decade? How would voters have reacted to the story that Mark Begich’s mother had married a mobster who claimed he was in on the bombing that killed her husband—Mark’s father? What suspicions would have been raised about political assassinations in the Last Frontier, and how might the claims have changed the course of events? “If Pasley wanted to hurt the Begiches, I’m sure he could have,” says Walczak. But he never went to the press. “I do know he didn’t ask for anything in return for making these claims—he didn’t ask for a reduced sentence or money. And if he wanted to screw the Begiches, or if he wanted to become famous, he could have made more of an effort to reach out to the media.” In the end, the truth is as elusive as a lie is persua-

sive. Perhaps a line Pasley used at his trial, while acting as his own attorney and confessing to murder, is the closest we’ll get to an answer. “I’m a liar,” he said, “but I’m an honest liar. I’ve got no reason to really lie here.” The jury, finding him guilty, believed him. E

randerson@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

The 1973 special elections to replace the two dead congressmen resulted in a 1-1 outcome for their widows. Though Lindy Boggs won and went on to a successful congressional career, including an ambassadorship under the Bill Clinton administration, an eager Pegge Begich was shut out. Alaska’s Democratic Party picked Emil Notti as their candidate instead, and he got thumped by Republican Don Young. The widow Begich tried again in 1984 and then 1986, losing both times to Young. She later moved on to Nevada and seemingly lived a quiet life. But, Walczak learned, on March 4, 1974, 16 months and 16 days after her husband vanished, Pegge Begich had married a Mafia-connected killer and bomber named Jerry Max Pasley in Arizona. He was a charming, handsome thug, Walczak says, and the marriage lasted just two years. Following a tip, Walczak obtained their marriage license and photos of their wedding from an undercover Arizona investigator who had secretly observed the wedding. After requesting records and talking to other police sources, Walczak learned that in 1994, while in prison for murder, Pasley had spoken with investigators from the Anchorage Police Department, Alaska State Troopers, and the Arizona Department of Public Safety, helping clear up several unsolved killings and making a series of startling claims—most prominent among them, that he had transported a bomb to Alaska in 1972. A Navy vet, Pasley grew up in Detroit where, after leaving the service, he met Peter Licavoli, Sr. who ran a Motor City mob called the Purple Gang and orchestrated bombings in Arizona. Pasley, Walczak discovered, began helping Licavoli with arms trafficking and extortion. Through Licavoli, he met members of another mob family—the Bonannos. Legendary New York Mafia don Joseph (“Joe Bananas”) Bonanno, Sr.—who helped inspire the character Vito Corleone in The Godfather—had semi-retired to Tucson, and was on mostly friendly terms with Licavoli. Bonanno’s enterprises extorted money from Tucson businessmen, and those who refused got a visit from Pasley. “He used routine methods of intimidation— property damage, fights, whatever it took—but if you really pissed him off, he bombed your business,” Walczak writes. This was in part confirmed by Pasley, who later admitted to multiple bombings. “His work caught the attention of Salvatore ‘Bill’ Bonanno, Joe’s son, and the two became friends. In 1971, famed author Gay Talese briefly mentioned Pasley in his best-selling book on the Bonannos, Honor Thy Father. In the book, Talese wrote that Pasley was Bill’s friend and the co-owner of a cocktail lounge . . . It was Bill Bonanno, Pasley later said, who ordered him to bomb the house of Judge Evo DeConcini, the former attorney general of Arizona and an exmember of the state Supreme Court.” DeConcini, who was not harmed, had been friends with Joe Bonanno, but their relationship soured amid negative press. Pasley also worked as a paid FBI informant, reporting to Special Agent David Hale. Later, Pasley would claim that Hale had tried to instigate a mob war between Joe Bonanno and Pete Licavoli

undertook their own prison interview with Pasley by having their homes bombed. Hale denied the in 1995. Pasley named the the primary perpetraclaim, but resigned his FBI post. tors of the alleged bombing, and said he met the In his 1994 prison interview with law officers, brother of one of the men in Anchorage. The Pasley, then 53, was doing life for gunning down brother was murdered in Anchorage 27 days a man in a Tucson motel. (At his trial, the Tucson after Pasley spoke with the agents. He was shot Citizen reported, Pasley, already convicted of one to death by a cab driver under suspicious circummurder, acted as his own attorney, then admitted he stances, but the driver was not charged. was a killer—“I’m not bragging. I’m not boasting. One of Pasley’s original interviewers, Mike I’m ashamed I’ve killed people.” When finished, he Grimes, now a retired Anchorage police sergeant, thanked the jury for “stopping by.”) told Walczak that Pasley had admitted to playing a He had nothing to lose by naming names and role in three or four unsolved homicides before he spilling his guts to investigators, inmate Pasley told his lawmen visitors. He wanted to come clean about got to the alleged Boggs bombing. “What he was telling me, other than the local murders,” Grimes several other, unsolved, killings, including the death said, “went way beyond my pay grade, definitely all of Nick Begich, his ex-wife’s first husband. federal offenses. So I took it to the FBI.” In 1972, Pasley claimed, he was given a locked When he returned to Alaska after the interview, briefcase in Tucson by a Bonanno lieutenant and Grimes recalled, he arranged a meeting with an told to take it to Anchorage. There he handed it off agent he knew in the FBI’s Anchorage office. He to two men, and the next day returned to Arizona. told her what Pasley said, “and she’s going, ‘Oh, my The exact timing is unclear, but Pasley said he was God.’ I gave her the information, told that “something big” was Walczak on the gave her a copy of the transcript, about to happen. But there were no

JONATHAN WALCZAK

landed at a remote strip in Canada, or that he fled to some exotic locale.” The consensus Walczak was now hearing indicated Jonz most likely crashed around Prince William Sound—somewhere between Portage Pass and Johnstone Point, about an hour into the flight. Sen. Mike Gravel thought the plane made it through Portage Pass and crashed into the sound, “and with all the icing, went right to the bottom.” Walczak felt the story drifting away. But he kept digging—and struck Alaska gold: Pegge Begich’s second husband.

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5.9 ABV

WINTER IS COMING • SO DARK AND COLD

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

Mukilteo • Mountlake Terrace

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diamondknot.com


food&drink

BARCODE

Eden Hill’s painstaking menu deserves a try.

Whiskey Burnout?

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

BY ZACH GEBALLE

Fanciful Flaws

R

Pound cake with foie gras cake batter.

A pig-head candy bar.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EDEN HILL

L

Another dish that almost works but suffers angle and lightly fried. It’s meaty and savory, the from an imbalance of ingredients is the cold muslightly battered exterior crisp but not greasy. Here sel escabeche. As with much of the menu, the chef the dollop of pear Champagne it’s served atop takes great care in drawing out flavor. To the liquid makes sense, and brings an autumnal sophisticathat the mussels are cooked in, he adds white wine, tion to the more “plebeian” pig head. Even the sherry vinegar, and peppers, then soaks the poached small pile of Merlot-soaked cabbage is wellshrimp and mussels in that pickling liquid aligned with the overall dish. It’s in a for a week, which brings them salinity preparation like this—playful, exotic, and a delicate zing. He serves them in delicious—that you truly get a taste that liquid, with green olives and three for what the chef is striving to do. EDEN HILL slices of grilled crostini coated with With a few more plates in this 2209 Queen Anne fennel aioli. It’s light and lovely, but vein, the restaurant is poised to Ave. N. comes with only two medium-sized appeal to more than just a wellNew American shrimp, three tiny mussels, a couple heeled Queen Anne clientele. pieces of cauliflower, and maybe three olives. I understand the choice to not use Similar in size and intimacy to a meaty mussel like a Penn Cove in a cold, Lloyd Martin at the other end of refined dish like this, but why not give us more of Queen Anne Avenue, Eden Hill takes a simthe little guys? Instead we’re left with a pool of the ple approach to its interior, which seems a bit in carefully crafted broth and nothing to do with it. contrast to the food but is effective nonetheless. What a shame—especially for $17. Light blue-and-white flowered French Country The Rare Beef, five small pieces of tenderloin, is wallpaper is perhaps the most noticeable design soaked in a sake-sesame-soy sauce for three days, feature, though I took quite a liking to the midwhich does flavor it nicely, though this is the dish century modern chairs with backs and soft, that comes with the “dots” and “drops” (of cucumber, white leather seats. Two large navy-blue leather honeydew, and wasabi, which add minimal interest) banquettes line each side of the dining room and and slices of grilled housemade focaccia. It comes off provide roughly six two- and four-tops. There’s like an expensive deconstructed roast beef sandwich. also bar seating, and a couple romantic two-tops in each corner by the windows. But what I enjoyed most of all about my There are certainly inspired moments, however, experience was the polite, flawless service. Immeand it’s abundantly clear that Petty puts a lot of love diately after receiving our order, the server told into his work; he’s especially successful when he us her plan for the pacing of the dishes. No willy edits the dishes. For instance, sugar pumpkin ricotta nilly, table-crowding, eat-and-run workings here. gnocchi (he makes his own ricotta) is an absolute This is a meal meant to be savored under low delight. Six or seven large-ish gnocchi, which light, and indeed we were there for two hours. achieve that rare balance between dense and fluffy, That’s not everyone’s cup of tea these days, I are buried under salty, crispy kale sprouts and slivknow, but the understated elegance felt like an ers of chanterelles, all tossed in luscious sage crème antidote to the fast-paced, small-plate, industrialfraîche. I couldn’t detect the pumpkin flavor, but it style restaurants that I frequently find myself was so good I didn’t care. Call it “House Gnocchi” in lately. I’ll be back for the foie gras batter and always have a version of it on the menu. alone—but also to see if more elaborately devised Likewise, a gimmicky-sounding Crispy Pig concepts get dialed back to a just-right dose of Head Candy Bar brings the best of a few welldelicious whimsy. E chosen and -prepared elements to the plate. Head cheese is compressed into a candy bar-sized rectnsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

et me just get this out of the way: I freaking loved the “Lick the Bowl” dessert at Eden Hill, a small, quaint new restaurant in Queen Anne. Three lightly toasted pieces of salted pound cake come on a plate next to a mini-stainless steel mixing bowl and a tiny spatula that looks like it hails from an American Girl doll store. Inside the bowl is “foie gras cake batter,” which you spread over the cake like frosting with the spatula, or lick right out of the bowl. The presentation is corny, and I hate the fetishization of all things foie gras. Add to that the “cake batter” flavor, another pet peeve of mine, and I was primed to hate everything this dessert represents. But that salty, umami-rich foie batter flavored with various liqueurs and the “secret” ingredient of malted milk, according to chef Maximillian Petty, made it as impossibly irresistible as the last drops of batter you once licked out of mom’s mixing bowl. That said, it’s $15, and while the tongue-incheek display and the extravagant ingredients work here, it’s emblematic of the restaurant’s modus operandi—an often problematic one. The restaurant deems itself “avant-garde,” so I expected some of the preparations and exhibitions to play to that conceit. Too often, though, it feels more like a bad trip back to the ’90s, where “dots” and “drops” and “dollops” of ingredients—all words used to describe a single dish during my visit—do little more than illustrate the plate. The worst offender was the veal sweetbreads, three pieces of them, that come splayed across a narrow plate with ovals of cauliflower panna cotta, a hidden mass of “torched” uni, ribbons of carrot, a stray couple pieces of raw cauliflower, a basil-Parmesan crumble, and a cauliflower cracker: a mess of a dish that needs instructions on how to even go about eating it. It’s unfortunate, because the sweetbreads themselves are delicious (bathed in milk for two days to extinguish any hint of iron) and coated in a sweet, fruity Saskatoon demi-glace. I imagine the chef figures that the brine of the uni will make a good foil for the sweetbreads, but instead it fights them. For $24, hold the uni and give me three more nuggets of sweetbreads, please.

Understated elegance.

ecently a guest said something to me that I truly didn’t expect to hear: “I’m tired of whiskey. What else do you have?” Given the seemingly endless demand and passion for whiskey that’s developed over the past decade, I was a bit surprised. But after a bit of reflection, it made sense. With any trend, some get burned out, others never buy in. So what do we do for them? The first question: Are we replacing sipping whiskeys, or whiskey as the base for a cocktail? For those who enjoy sipping, two candidates stand out. Aged brandies, mostly Cognac and Armagnac, are in many ways similar to fine whiskey. Both spend upward of a decade in oak barrels, and thus display rich vanilla and baking-spice notes. Unlike whiskey, though, these brandies are made from distilled wine; thus they don’t have the sweetness and texture that corn whiskeys tend to have, but instead a brightness that can be almost refreshing. While Cognac and Armagnac are specific places in France, local distillers are increasingly experimenting with aging brandies, both those made from wine grapes and those made from other fruits like apples. Agave spirits like tequila and mezcal are another frequent option for those who want brown spirits but not whiskey. Perhaps even more than brandy, they show an incredible range of flavors and styles, from the dark and smoky notes of certain mezcals to an almost tropicalfruit-like bouquet in others. This is largely because dozens of different species of agave can be turned into mezcal, while only blue agave is used in tequila. Those species grow in different climates in wildly different shapes, and that riotous diversity comes through in spades when tasting. I recommend checking out bars like Barrio or either Mezcaleria Oaxaca location to experiment. For those who like their whiskey in cocktail form, options abound. Several bartenders I talked to spoke of trying to present a different flavor combination with whiskey at the core. Most classic whiskey drinks are some combination of sweet and bitter (think the Old Fashioned or Manhattan), so changing the expectation of jaded drinkers can be fun. Citrus can pair well with whiskey, as in classic drinks like the Blood and Sand (orange juice, scotch, and cherry Heering) or in plenty of modern takes. I’ve also started to see bartenders play around with fresh herbs; sage in particular can combine with rye whiskey in fascinating ways. All that said, whiskey is still king in the cocktail world, and for every drinker who might be a bit tired of it, tens or even hundreds are still gaga for it. With new distilleries opening almost daily around the world, there’s a broader range of styles and approaches than ever before. Still, I’m excited to have a range of answers and suggestions for the next whiskey-jaded guest who wants to try something just a little different. E

13


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n a quiet evening on Vashon Island two years ago, hungry diners gathered for a different type of Sunday supper: hearty bowls of noodle soup served as part of the island’s private supper club Meat and Noodle, which has hosted many such suppers for its members since it began in May 2013. Everything in the bowl, give or take an optional squirt of Sriracha, is local—the noodles made by friends; pieces of locally raised pork confited low and slow; a colorful smattering of assorted herbs and edible blossoms; sweet radishes picked from a nearby farm; and a restorative broth three days in the making from bones that farmer and butcher Lauren Garaventa had saved from an earlier slaughter. “Meat and Noodle is fully determined by what is available to me at the time. I never know what I’m going to make until I know what meat I have that week and I know what the farm and island has,” says Garaventa, who is quick to admit she’s not a chef and has never worked a line. Rather, her supper-club pop-ups have grown from intimate gatherings at her house to sold-out dinners at larger farms on Vashon and select Seattle venues. “The ethics of meat are pretty important to me,” she says. “In America, there’s not really any, say, ramen or pho that were up to my standards in its use of ethical meats. Meat and Noodle was sort of my answer to that . . . I took the idea of ramen where every place in Japan has a different style. It’s never fully Asian flavors; I use butter and different herbs like parsley, and other ingredients you don’t normally find in ramen.” As a butcher, Garaventa worked at Sea Breeze Farm and its restaurant/butcher shop La Boucherie, eventually taking over for head butcher Brandon Sheard. She did a stint at Seattle’s Rain Shadow Meats and currently works as a butcher at Sheard’s Farmstead Meatsmith, a personal mobile abbatoir on Vashon. She now also owns and operates Needle Creek Farm on Vashon with the help of three farmers to raise eight to 12 pigs, 20 sheep, and three cows for meat production. “People say, ‘We can’t buy meat anywhere on this island.’ That just seems so unacceptable to me. When you have a demand for well-raised and well-handled meat, there should be a place to buy it.” Vashon is not, in fact, short of good produce and well-raised livestock, she notes, but regulations requiring that meat sold wholesale or to restaurants be processed at USDA-certified facil-

An al fresco pop-up.

ities prove prohibitive for small farms that often lack such infrastructure or access to it. The idea is one that Garaventa is not crazy about. “I spend so much time making sure that my animals are happy, healthy, and never stressed or scared, and for the last 48 hours of their life to be loaded up to a truck and taken hours away from their farm seems really strange to me,” she says. Garaventa sells half portions of live animals to individuals (not restaurants or stores); the animals are then slaughtered by Farmstead Meatsmith for the customers. Purchasing meat in large quantities is difficult for individual customers, and she goes the full mile to ensure that those who buy it know how to use it. Ask, and she’ll butcher down that half-animal to manageable portions or even sell certain parts in a marinade. Ask, as chef Chris Lueck did for a sustainable meat program at his new Mediterranean restaurant Isola, and Garaventa and business partner Molly Biehn will help secure sourcing and start a charcuterie program. “Since working with Isola, a lot of the questions that I have for small restaurants is how to use whole animals. You have to be deliberate when you’re thinking about that part of the cycle, because a whole animal is so big and most restaurants won’t go through all of that before it goes bad.” Garaventa plans to open her own restaurant, bar, and butcher shop on Vashon as a way to establish a blueprint for ethical, sustainable meat programs in small restaurants. “A restaurant that opens with that idea [of using whole animals] . . . once that happens, it starts the thinking process for all the dishes, how the kitchen will work, and everything will be shaped from that perspective,” she adds. The new brick-and-mortar will also serve as an official space for Meat and Noodle to thrive, and, Garaventa notes, the dishes may evolve into something different from the expected soup noodles. After most of the meat at Needle Creek is sold, Garaventa is left with a freezer full of bones, which she will use to make broth for Meat and Noodle. A new season of her pop-ups begins again this month and will continue for the next few months—until every last bone is gone. E

food@seattleweekly.com

For more information about Meat and Noodle and its upcoming pop-ups, visit facebook.com/meatandnoodle. ab

ANDREW PLOTSKY

1333 5th Ave

Seattle, WA 98101 206.623.3070


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Fortunately he found a drummer quickly through a Craigslist posting, and later brought in bassist Ethan Ives after Ives opened for the band at a local show. Toledo was staying with a friend who let him live in his space rent-free. Eventually, however, Toledo’s savings began to dwindle, and he started to realize he’d need to get a job. He walked to a coffee shop to start his job hunt only to find an e-mail from Lombardi saying he was coming to their next show. The serendipitous contact led to the band’s signing.

The Teens Are Alright Seattle transplant Car Seat Headrest jumps from Internet cult favorite to Matador signee.

DUSTY HENRY

BY DUSTY HENRY

Musical wunderkind and pinball wizard Will Toledo.

wordiness of Matador icons like Pavement and Guided by Voices, his music undoubtedly does touch on a similarly vulnerable vein with his thoughtful stream of consciousness. Take “Times to Die,” on which Toledo directly calls out the risk Matador founder Chris Lombardi took in signing him with the lines “Got to have faith in the one above me/Got to believe that Lombardi loves me/It’s a deal/I want a deal” and jokes about being “invited into the divine council.” Car Seat Headrest started while Toledo was still a high-schooler in his hometown of Leesburg, Va. He began recording songs on his laptop in the backseat of his family’s car—it was the only place he says he could find privacy. These sessions would result in his first few releases under the name Nervous Young Men. He’d later change the name to Car Seat Headrest in college, inspired by those backseat sessions. “I was trying to go for a name that was mysterious and intentionally devoid of meaning,” Toledo says. “I think it was very Internet at the start. I guess vaporwave in a way, even though I didn’t know what vaporwave was at the time.”

Toledo claims his ambiguous name took on more meaning with each release. With each album, he would branch further away from indie rock and into more experimental territory, looping guitars and synthesizers on his Audacity recording program. Every record took on a new identity, with the common denominator being the lo-fi presentation. “I made more experimental music because I didn’t really plan on showing it to anyone,” Toledo explains. “I was just putting it up online for a couple people or something. Then it just grew from there, and I just always kind of kept that name because once people started following the music it would’ve been weirder to change it.” Slowly the project began to pick up steam, leading to over 25,000 downloads via Bandcamp. As his audience grew, Toledo started to put more focus into his work. Through college, Car Seat Headrest remained primarily a solo project, with other musicians coming in from time-to-time for performances. In 2014 he moved to Seattle to find a better band culture, a move he documented in last year’s appropriately titled How to Leave Town.

music@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

P

rinted in the packaging of Car Seat Headrest’s new album Teens of Style, released Friday, is an unnamed ancient Egyptian poem. At its core, the poem is a lesson that no one comes back from the dead to tell others what the afterlife is like. Instead it tells the reader to “Encourage thy heart to forget it/Making it pleasant for thee to follow thy desire/While thou livest. Put myrrh upon thy head/And garments upon thee of fine linen/Imbued with marvelous luxuries.” “It ended up tying in with the idea of style,” the band’s songwriter and front man Will Toledo says, “the ephemeral nature of what we do as teenagers, but then on a larger scale as human beings, whether or not it matters in the larger scheme of things.” At 22, Toledo is just barely out of his own teenage years. Understandably, the frustration of youth permeates his catalog. After recording an astounding 11 albums over just four years and building a cult following on Bandcamp in the process, the recent Seattle transplant got picked up by classic indie label Matador Records. While it may seem lazy to compare Toledo’s style to the lo-fi aesthetics and witty

The band’s label debut, Teens of Style, is a reintroduction to the band for old fans and CliffsNotes for newcomers. The majority of the tracks are re-recordings of songs from Toledo’s albums Monomania and My Back Is Killing Me Baby. He says he’d been building the tracklist in his head even before Matador reached out, wanting to share these songs with a larger audience should he ever get signed. While he says the album feels more like a compilation to him, it sounds remarkably cohesive—riddled with teen angst and constant barrages of streaming thoughts. Lead single “Something Soon” is a powerful manifestation of youthful anger; Toledo croons about wanting to kick his dad in the shins and rants at his television. The Brian Wilson–style harmonies on the chorus heighten the wistful rebellion. On “Times to Die” he shouts out the devil while talking about record execs listening to his demos; later, on “Los Borrachos,” he laments how boring sadness is. Toledo says his candid, unfiltered songwriting style forces him to “stick to stuff that’s honest and that reveals something beyond surface-level lyrics or whatever.” This selfawareness makes him combative with himself as well, rendering his lyrics as an intricate puzzle for listeners to solve. “I like undermining myself so other people don’t have to,” he says. “I’m kind of interested in exploring that aspect of humanity, I guess, the inconsistency of it.” During the breakdown on “Strangers,” he discusses falling in love with Michael Stipe’s music, misinterpreting his lyrics, and feeling as though Stipe was speaking to him directly. It’s a tender moment in a raucous song—looking back fondly at his own naivete. Given that his audience tends to skew younger, it’s easy to imagine teens having the same experiences with Teens of Style. “It just seems like teenagers have the highest likelihood of being able to enjoy music,” Toledo says. “I remember being a teen, and you feel like you’ve got nothing better to do than listen to music. When you get older it gets harder and harder to just set aside time for that. I think that’s who I’ll continue writing towards, other than myself—the younger people who can really be dedicated to it, as opposed to just squeezing it in on a schedule.” Despite labels’ slower album cycles, Toledo is already looking ahead. He and the band have already recorded their follow-up, Teens of Denial, with producer Steve Fisk. For the next two months they’ll tour the United States and Europe. No doubt more teens will run into Car Seat Headrest with its new heightened visibility—though Toledo isn’t quick to declare himself the next Stipe. His intentions for his music and fans, it seems, are pure. “If it’s meaningful for them, then I’m happy,” Toledo says. E

15


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SW: What role do you see Now Serving playing within the dance-music community?

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Spaceotter and Almond Brown.

SO: I think Almond comes from a very long tradition of African-American truth-tellers who realized they have nothing to lose by speaking what other people wouldn’t. They get cast as “angry” because polite white folk often would rather live with their illusions rather than fix problems that might benefit them in some way. This is a strong part of what attracts me to him, and furthermore to what I see is the healing force of black culture in the U.S.—truth-telling as tonic to what’s fucked up.

Spaceotter: We give people a chance to tell their stories in a way that they can’t through music. And I think that particular kind of history Speaking of calling it like it is, you two were is making people realize that they have things in fairly vocal in your critique of Seattle Weekly’s common that they didn’t think about before. cover story on secondnature. What was your Almond Brown: It also puts a personreaction to reading that story in the paper? ality behind the DJ. For all those peoAB: I thought the article was wellple who have seen Wesley Holmes intentioned, but divisive in its own Now Serving for years but didn’t know Wesley way and inaccurate on many levNew episode Holmes, you get to sit down for an els. I took offense because there With Mikey Mars. hour and a half and listen to that are so many people that work so mixcloud.com. guy’s journey. hard in this underground comWed., Nov. 4 SO: I think in terms of the munity to keep it alive. To read an dance-music community, I feel some article that kind of shit on that and things coming together that haven’t gave props to a bunch of people that been together in this way before. I think we’re nobody knew, was disrespectful. part of that. SO: I was surprised by my reaction. I thought it was a great article in a lot of ways. I mean, You two frequently discuss the politics of beautiful article about some kids doing cool race and sexuality within electronic music—do things. Some kids doing things that we did when you feel that making this conversation a priorwe were coming up, and I loved that they got the ity has made any impact on the local scene? attention. AB: I think it’s been important for us to bring AB: But this ain’t no brand-new shit. This is up those issues. And it’s not just a message about not new. I’m supposed to be waiting for UNIrace on a national level, it’s also about how it CEF to drop off all the goodness from these kids affects us here locally. in Tacoma. Like we’re starving down here on the SO: And it’s interesting to bring that back to ground. Child, bye. the local community, because house music in parSO: If you’re talking about the underground ticular started in the gay black clubs in Chicago. techno scene, and these people bringing youth Bringing that perspective and that voice back in and vigor into it, completely cool with that. But may be a big part of how we come together— when your tagline is that you’re “revitalizing the coming back to the roots of this music. Seattle dance-music scene,” I take issue with that. How does Almond Brown’s characteristic Seattle dance music is on fire right now. It has blunt honesty play in the polite, “let’s not talk been for years. The whole slant of the article was, about it” culture of Seattle? here is this group from the outside coming to save AB: You’ll never find me out there just stirring the city because Seattle’s got nothing going on, up shit. I’m blunt and to the point because someand that’s a tired narrative. That same narrative has times somebody’s gotta do that, and I’m always chased a lot of people away from Seattle who were gonna be the loudest bitch on the bus. One of the doing good work, and has starved others that for most potent weapons of the oppressed is our voices. years had to promote their parties in the shadow This is why, as tedious as it is, sometimes there’s of that narrative. It was no disrespect to the secvalue in calling out BS. It shows that I, and many ondnature crew. I can’t wait to hear them. E like me, will not be silenced. And that is power. If folks can’t deal with that—sorry, not sorry. music@seattleweekly.com

BROOKLYN BENJESTORF

NOVEMBER 13 Th aT ThE MOORE ThEaTRE

ou know those extra-special friends, the ones whose conversations take on a wild and expressive quality that’s so exquisitely entertaining, it makes you say “Somebody should be recording this shit?” Well, that’s basically how the Now Serving music podcast was born. Almond Brown and Spaceotter, two seasoned local house DJs who bring out a little something extra in one another, started the podcast in 2013 as a just-for-kicks improvisational talk show. But over the past two years, Now Serving has evolved into a living, breathing oral history of Seattle house music. The deeper into the episodes you get, the more complete the picture becomes, and it’s done in a belly-achingly hysterical way. So funny, in fact, that Now Serving tops the Mixcloud comedy charts every time they drop a new episode.


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Cats and Dogs Fremont Foundry hosts the Halloween event of the year.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

ith three floors of fun, bars tucked away all over the place, and multiple balconies offering twinkling views of the city, Pet Cemetery at Fremont Foundry was certainly one of the best Halloween parties the city had to offer this year. Two stages kept the party jumping, boasting a bevy of local DJ talent as well as headliners Motez,

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East Side Story Or, building a home for classical music in the suburbs’ wealthy epicenter. BY GAVIN BORCHERT

B

Tai, in turn, had been recruited by Su (whose Resonance’s stage is a box of warm golden sister is a student of hers). “He asked me if I can wood with a deconstructed cubist ceiling. Softly help him engage musicians since I know a lot padded chairs surrounding the largish round of players in town,” says Tai. “I thought of the tables are upholstered in tweedy gray and scarlet, idea of First Friday Salons because we want to with a matching border of tawnier red around attract residents and business people in downthe proscenium; the unfinished ceiling above the town Bellevue who may not be used to going to tables brings a touch of industrial chic. A bar to concerts. With FFS, people would know they one side supplies refreshments. It’s a nice comprohave a place to hear great music in an mise between a traditional recital hall that intimate setting and unwind from a prioritizes acoustics and close listening week’s hard work.” and a club that values intimacy and First Friday Operations manager Kristoapproachability, yet which risks Salon pher Jenkins agrees that increasturning performances into back288 106th Ave. N.E. ing Bellevue’s cultural opportuground music. An October conResonance.events. nities was a strong motivation cert by the Girsky String Quartet $20–$25. 8 p.m. for the opening of Resonance, revealed a fairly dry acoustic (a bit Fri., Nov. 6. as was, beyond that, “stimulating ironic, given the hall’s name), excela sense of community” between the lent for two of the quartets on their two groups the space hopes to serve: program: a finely etched one by Men“You have the ticket purchaser, the consumer delssohn and one from 1924, by turns gruff of music; you also have organizations who need and eerie, by Erwin Schulhoff. a place to perform.” Not only MWN, he says, This recital was one of the First Friday Salons, was “desperate for a reasonable space—a highone of Resonance’s self-produced concert series quality space they can present their work.” (others include “On Stage With KING-FM,” hosted by the station’s on-air personalities, and “Crosstalk,” which will include music and discusThe history of classical performance east of sion). Putting all these together is conductor Julia Lake Washington in recent decades has been a Tai. “Who would I invite to play in my living cycle of waxing and waning, brief honeymoons room?” was her criterion, she says, for curating the of enthusiasm that never quite kindle a steady series; upcoming performances will feature Trio Par- flame. The generic Meydenbauer Center has dalote, the Mosaic Brass Quintet, keyboardist Byron been used for ballet, opera (notably the Seattle Schenkman (in an evening of songs with soprano Opera’s Young Artists Program productions), Clara Rottsolk: the word-friendly acoustic will be chamber music, and orchestral concerts, and is splendid for lieder), and guitarist Michael Nicolella. ideal for none of these; the Seattle Chamber November’s Salon, this Friday, brings in clarinetist Music Society experimented with mini-seasons Sean Osborn for an evening of clarinet quintets. at Redmond’s Overlake School; the Bellevue

Philharmonic tried a number of homes before it gave up the ghost, a casualty of the Great Recession, in 2011. (From its ashes has risen the Lake Washington Symphony Orchestra, which plays in Westminster Chapel.) The Kirkland Performance Center offers classical music only once in a great while (lightning struck with a memorable Kronos Quartet concert some seasons ago). Bastyr University hosts Seattle Pro Musica and other choruses, as do various churches here and there. All this makes the planned Tateuchi Center, with a 2,000-seat concert hall and a 250-set black-box theater, slated to break ground in spring 2017 and open in fall 2019, seem a quixotic endeavor; then again, tech-boom money has to go somewhere, and maybe by then enough of it will trickle down to the performing arts. Until then—and with luck, long after—we have Resonance, designed to appeal to those with disposable income again who may yet be wary of the perceived off-putting-ness of more traditional classical performance spaces. The next step, of course, is to dissuade them from this stereotype; the Seattle Symphony/Benaroya Hall experience isn’t any more “formal” or “stuffy” than that of any movie theater. (Try chatting casually during a SIFF screening and see how far you get.) Attractiveness, welcoming-ness, and comfort were high priorities for Resonance’s organizers, but the highest, excitingly, was sound itself—making a space for music to achieve its maximum impact. As Jenkins puts it, their hope for the venue is “presenting music in its truest form.” E

gborchert@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

ellevue! The very name breathes success, wealth, privilege; its air fragrant with new money, its downtown a grandiose maze of factory-fresh office buildings, luxury-goods boutiques, and upscale eateries—the mirrored monoliths of consumerism, as glittering as they are soulless. Can art thrive—even survive—in such a place? This time, maybe. The latest of many precarious attempts over the years to establish classical music on the Eastside opened in September: Resonance, a recital space at the base of the 140-unit North Tower of the residential SOMA Towers, nestled under a Szechuan restaurant, La Bu La, and just a block or two from Bellevue Square. With cafe tables rather than theater seats, it’s inspired by the informalizing trend of recent years that’s put chamber music in coffeehouses and opera in dive bars—but also by practical need: Music Works Northwest, a nonprofit community music school, lacked a performance space. (Its Bellevue studios and classrooms are located nearby.) MWN had been in discussion with arts patron John Su of Su Development, the mixeduse developers that hosted the art gallery Open Satellite (2007–11) in the Elements Apartments building, and their plans “fell into place when we were in greatest need,” says Karen Nestvold, MWN’s director of development and classical programs. Resonance will bring that “extra level of professionalism,” she says, to faculty and student recitals. The space is also planned as a commercial recording studio, designed in consultation with veteran recording engineer Steve Smith.

RICK WONG

Resonance was packed at its September 11 opening.

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FILM

Opening Friday

Past Imperative The new 007 flick keeps to an old but still-satisfying template. BY BRIAN MILLER

Shu as watchful killer.

WELL GO USA ENT.

T

P The Assassin

All This Gorgeous Fog

Craig and Seydoux travel in style.

It’s been eight years since Taiwanese master Hou Hsiao-hsien released a feature (his lone European project, Flight of the Red Balloon). Much of that time was spent on the sheer physical effort of mounting a meticulous period piece, a film that would find the arthouse filmmaker indulging in his first martialarts picture. Well. One can only pity the unsuspecting chopsocky fan who wanders into The Assassin after spotting the groovalicious poster, which features Transporter star Shu Qi brandishing a dagger. The scenes of swordplay are brief, clean, and void of fun. They are a momentary distraction from the film’s real concern, which is something to do with emptiness and regret. The time is the 9th century. A young woman, Nie Yinniang (Shu), has been trained in isolation as an assassin. Her trainer, also a woman, sends her home to kill a local governor, Tian Ji’an (Chang Chen)—the very man to whom, in childhood, Yinniang was promised to marry. He has a wife and a mistress now, both of whom are part of political intrigue at the court. For her part, Yinniang lurks around the edges of her former world, an outsider reluctant to carry out her mission— she’s like a comic-book heroine, able to slip in and out of the royal grounds without leaving a trace. (Shu and Chang acted together in Hou’s Three Times, and they carry a mysterious sort of connection, as well as movie-star glamour.) This is as much plot as Hou is inclined to convey; without a cheat sheet, there are many moments in The Assassin that will puzzle even the most eagle-eyed viewers. By not providing story particulars, Hou encourages us to be immersed in the very specific sights and sounds of this world. Shot on 35 mm, The Assassin is a lush-looking movie, stately in its movement and dense in its deep sadness. Could Hou have gotten his effects and still provided a little more storytelling clarity? Maybe. But after a while, the movie’s countless fogbanks and smoke clouds become as much its subject as the petty intrigues of some long-forgotten political dispute. In the final few sequences, the fog literally overwhelms the screen—and the characters—as the emptiness takes over everything. That’s a tough sell for an alleged martial-arts movie, and when The Assassin played at Cannes this year, it inspired walkouts. It also won the Best Director prize. (SIFF Cinema Egyptian. Not rated. 104 min.) ROBERT HORTON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

does he drink? Dr. Swann later asks. “Too achieved in his own life. An upper-class snob and much.”) It’s not that Bond has no inner life; Tory, he’d have little use for all the talk here of rather, picking up on the family ghosts of Skyfall, wounded heroes and stolen childhoods; and when he’s disdainful of sentimentality. In these postM cites Orwell to his new boss, Fleming (1908– Brosnan pictures, the franchise has dialed back 1964) would’ve spit out his vodka martini. the humor, toughened the action, and edged To this Bond-ophile, Spectre’s best moments 007 closer to sociopathy. The evolution would be after the Mexico City hit—alone worth your impossible without Craig—the best pure actor ticket price—are familiar polishings of old 007 in the Bond lineage—and his gift for brooding. tropes. Boat chases helicopter. Plane chases cars. This spy expects the worst from people, living Jaguar chases Aston Martin. Pistol shot takes people, and harbors more affection for the dead down chopper (just like in From Russia With ( Judi Dench’s M, Vesper from Casino Royale, Love). And Seydoux’s entrance in a shimmering etc.). For that reason, Spectre is a someceladon-green dress on a North African what humorless movie, with its few train could almost make Amtrak laugh lines going to the supporting fashionable. At the same time, the Opens Fri., Nov. 6 players. (I can’t get killed in the necessity of the smiling supervillain at Cinerama, Sundance, field, Q protests to Bond, Because to again explain his evil plot—the Meridian, Majestic Bay, who would take care of my cats?!?) totalitarian surveillance state and others. Rated PG-13. Edward Snowden has warned us 148 minutes. against—to Bond, again strapped As with Skyfall, Bond is relucin some sort of computerized tantly excavating more of his fraught/ torture chair, is laughably recherché. repressed past, much of it having to do (What the screenwriters fail to grasp is with his boyhood orphan years with the that Bond might want his memories zapped Austrian Oberhauser family. Amid those snowaway, to be an amnesiac like Bourne.) drifts of memory, we also travel through exotic Couldn’t we just stop explaining things? locales including Morocco and Italy. (In Rome, Couldn’t we, as in most modern action movies, one would like more of Monica Bellucci and less simply leave psychology and motive behind, as boardroom time with the corporate cartel of evil Fleming preferred? No couch trip for 007— that gives the film its title.) The globetrotting is style is all he needs, and Spectre has scads a given, as are the fast cars, beautiful women, and of style. For depth, these films only require five-star-hotel life; the Bond movies never make inherited tradition, and that is what keeps the any concession to those of us who brown-bag our world’s most successful movie franchise movlunches and fly coach. ing toward its sixth decade. But next time, Moving faster in its first half than its second, please: less typing, less remembering, and more Spectre represents aspirational luxury, sex appeal, running toward the future. Even Apple occaand danger. These films have always been about male fantasy, rooted in the Cold War glamour that sionally tries something new. E novelist Ian Fleming wished for but never quite bmiller@seattleweekly.com

MGM/COLUMBIA /EON PRODS.

here are a lot of careful unveilings in Spectre , the 24th James Bond movie in 53 years, which carries a strong awareness of its own brand halo. Q (Ben Whishaw) reveals the new Aston Martin DB10 to James Bond (Daniel Craig), who’s in disgrace as usual with his superiors—thus a nice laugh when Q informs him that the prototype is meant for 009 instead! More reveals: The sleek spiraling tower for an upstart spy agency to replace stodgy old MI6 (still led by Ralph Fiennes’ sighingly impatient M); a self-satisfied new villain (Christoph Waltz), who goes by different names; and a new Bond girl, Dr. Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), also trying to escape her past. Each new addition to the franchise gets a fanfare and rollout that would make Steve Jobs envious. Part of the task here for director Sam Mendes (back from Skyfall ) is to place Spectre in an Apple-like product ecosystem. The movie has a signature look and operating system that reinforce the brand: quality, familiarity, lack of surprise (though many delights), and a design consistency that leads inexorably to the next product launch. As iPhone leads to iPad, one Bond movie points to the next, even as the actors change. (Craig’s sour discontent on the press circuit can be read as signs of such change—or savvy contract negotiation.) In automotive terms, Spectre is a restomod—a respectful restoration of the vintage original, modernized beneath the skin with new technology. It looks back, beginning with the famous theme and gun-barrel intro, then swoops forward in a seamless one-take assassination sequence in Mexico City amid Day of the Dead festivities. The filmmakers must show they can keep up with the Bourne and Mission: Impossible pretenders breathing down their necks, yet the action is cut with the vermouth of Bond’s dry humor. When an explosion sends an entire building façade toppling toward him, Craig registers just a flicker of wordless amusement—Of course this would happen. What next? There’s a trace of Buster Keaton to his stony visage. Bond never laughs out loud in this enjoyably overstuffed entertainment, but his face bears the laugh lines of a man who chuckles often in private. And what does Bond do at home alone, anyway? When ever-loyal Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) visits his sad London bachelor flat, it’s surprisingly sparse, with unhung art and halfempty booze bottles on the floor. (How much

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 21


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Bellucci’s otherworldly TV host in Tuscany.

» FROM PAGE 21 Suffragette First the Beatings, Then the Vote

Saving some zingers for the end credits is now a familiar trick at the movies. Look, here are all the wacky outtakes, ad-libs, and flubbed lines! This fictionalized account of the English suffrage movement, circa 1912, takes a different strategy: a postscript roster of all the countries, before and after Britain, that gave women an equal vote. We come early but not first on the list, at 1920 with our 19th Amendment. England took a tiered approach between 1918 and 1928. The most honorable #1 slot belongs to New Zealand, in 1893. And who do you suppose is last? Our old pal Saudi Arabia, this very same year of 2015. I mention all this because an historical documentary approach would’ve been preferable to Sarah Gavron’s pat, schematic docudrama. She and screenwriter Abi Morgan incorporate real historical figures and make one composite their heroine: the unschooled East London laundry worker Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan), who’s got a small son and a sympathetic husband (Ben Whishaw) who also toils at her cruel laundry. She, like all the other urban poor we meet, is shackled by notions of class respectability and propriety; to protest working conditions, sex-predator bosses, or the lack of electoral representation would be unladylike. Yet Maud is drawn to the stone-throwing example of her co-worker Violet Miller (AnneMarie Duff ) and becomes, to her astonishment and her husband’s “shame,” a suffragette. Now imagine that last word being uttered like “feminazi” from Rush Limbaugh’s blubbery lips. During the Georgian era, suffragettes were widely ridiculed and despised. A few wealthy women here run the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) as a kind of hobby, yet the organization is led by firebrand Emmeline Pankhurst (Meryl Streep), who spends most her time hiding to avoid arrest. A few scenes of the her donning disguises and ducking in and out of speaking halls suggest the kind of thriller Suffragette might’ve been. Likewise the mob scenes (with police beating women), mailbox bombings, and shop-window shatterings anticipate the militancy of our late Civil Rights era. Pankhurst is like the Malcolm X of her day, but Streep zips through her few scenes. Instead, the bulk of the movie belongs instead to Maud the martyr, with indignities and outrages stacked predictably upon her. (She’s paid 13 shillings a day to men’s 19—an imbalance many women will recognize today.) This dull, uplifting classroom movie makes her more the victim than

inspiring example. Brendan Gleeson’s cop, the Javert figure, registers the ambivalence of what he knows is a lost cause. I only wish there were more such character shadings among these women on the right side of history. (Guild 45th, Pacific Place, Lincoln Square. Rated PG-13. 106 min.) BRIAN MILLER

P The Wonders

Sweet Like Honey

Here’s Tuscany, but without the romance. The cinematography is fuzzy, the people grubby, and the work, beekeeping, demanding. No travelogue under the Tuscan sun in The Wonders, just an oddball coming-of-age tale that creates loopy magic by the end. The growing-up is owned by Gelsomina (Maria Alexandra Lugu), the oldest daughter in a honeymaking family. As the best worker on the farm, she has a special closeness to bossy German-born patriarch Wolfgang (Sam Louwyck), whose insistence on old-fashioned methods is testing the patience of his exasperated French wife Angelica (Alba Rohrwacher, from I Am Love). Gelsomina’s three younger sisters muck about the ramshackle place, in various states of wildness. (The dialogue is in Italian, but the characters have mixed Euro-origins.) This vaguely clinging-to-Woodstock existence is altered by two ripples: The family takes in a nearlymute German boy in need of straightening out, and Gelsomina connives to enter them all in a realityTV contest—something she already knows her father will hate. The show purports to elect the “most traditional” Italian family, so we suspect our heroes will have little chance of winning. But writer/director Alice Rohrwacher has other fish to fry. Along with the grungily realistic view of rural life, she’s busy creating surreal non sequiturs, like the camel that arrives as a family pet or the first appearance of the TV people—a glamorous crew plopped down like a gaudy circus from a Fellini movie. I’m not sure all of this blends smoothly, but The Wonders does create the believable perspective of a restless adolescent. We’re never far from Gelsomina’s point of view, and the tug between wanting her father’s closeness and needing to explore her own imagination is richly imagined. When she develops a parlor trick of having a live bee crawl out of her mouth, it’s as though she’s concocted an autobiographical metaphor out of what’s in front of her. Her spirit guide is the exotic host of the reality-TV show, played by Italian superstar Monica Bellucci (currently distracting James Bond from the plot of Spectre). The distance between Bellucci’s all-world level of dazzle and the humble workings of an apiary make for a peculiar sort of charm, a movie where you have to dig a little to find the honey. (Seven Gables. Not rated. 110 min.) ROBERT HORTON E

film@seattleweekly.com


The Passion of the Bart

STAGE

Mr. Burns is a great idea, well staged, that ultimately eats itself. BY MARK BAUMGARTEN

I

t’s well into the first act of Mr. Burns, a post-electric play that a

JOHN ULMAN

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

stranger is led onstage, his hands held aloft in surrender. Those circled around the campfire point their guns suspiciously at the interloper. He means no harm, he tells them. He’s only passing through, a drifter in the post-apocalyptic world of playwright Anne Washburn. His name is Gibson, he continues. They holster their pistols, but the ragtag group is still wary. They ask if he’s happened upon any of their relatives, whom they haven’t seen since the nuclear plants went into meltdown, months ago, and the electricity went out. They run through lists of names they’ve written in journals. He hasn’t seen any of them. All the world’s a sitcom? From left, Adam Standley, Claudine And then, just as their suspicion begins Mboligikpelani Nako, and Andrew Lee Creech. to fade into indifference, Gibson (Adam Standley) makes himself invaluable. Before Gibson’s arrival, the group was not the only ones. An entire industry of traveling recounting an episode of The Simpsons from the Simpsons storytellers has cropped up in the years not-too-distant past. Matt (Erik Gratton) leads since the collapse. Again, the deep laughs come the retelling of “Cape Feare” with a passable imperfrom The Simpsons script—Matt’s Homer impersonation of Homer. His delivery of the episode’s sonation now deliciously dead-on. laugh lines delights both his campfire company and But there’s more to this story than mere TV the audience. Then, at the episode’s culminating nostalgia, and Washburn’s second act shows real moment, Matt forgets a crucial line. D’oh! promise. The troupe’s Diet Coke commercial Gibson hears all this from the woods before sells us an idealized vision of the past. “The being discovered. So, just when the group is about freezer is chock-full of ice,” we’re told, realizing to send him back into the darkness, he delivers that manmade ice—like electricity—exists only the line. “Oh, I’ll stay away from your son, all in memory. It’s heartbreaking. A medley of pop right,” he says in the stentorian shudder hits then changes the mood, the cast of the episode’s villain, Sideshow Bob. dressed in gold chains and performing “Stay away . . . forever! ” And just a choreographed routine. I’ve seen like that, Gibson is embraced. better high-school musicals, but ACT Theatre 700 Union St., 292-7676. In this new wasteland, pop that’s not a criticism; rather, Mr. $15–$20. Tues.–Sun. culture is currency; and through Burns’ most engrossing moments acttheatre.org. three short acts that span 82 come through this layering of art, Ends Nov. 15. years, that currency both shapes amateurism, and half-remembered the post-electric world of Mr. Burns rituals. We’re watching ACT profesand is itself reshaped by that world. sionals playing self-taught comedians Directed by John Langs, this production is trying to reconstruct art (well, entertaincrisp and lively, with performances that pull you ment) as a bulwark against the void. Each into a dark, strange time. (Matthew Smucker flubbed line or argument about a stage direction makes the desolation real via deftly articulated is there to remind you of the desperate situation. sets.) Yet none of this can save a script that So it’s disappointing when Act 3 abandons struggles to move beyond a kind of dorm-room this troupe of survivors. Set 75 years later, it’s a thought experiment: “What if the world ended sitcom-length rock opera that splices together and you had to build a civilization with a group ’90s radio hits, obscure pop-culture references, of strangers?” the 2013 play asks. “Who would and the now-totemic “Cape Feare” episode (origbe your God? Who your devil?” inally from 1993) to tell a kind of religious origin story. Now a bleating, sacrificial Bart Simpson is set upon by a cannibalistic Mr. Burns. The enjoyThe foundation of that new civilization can be ably imperfect theatricality of Act 2 is gone, and seen in the gang’s acceptance of Gibson. It’s the production is flat. The laugh lines have been a moment ripped from real life. Who among distorted, bled of any irony. The drama is ridicuus hasn’t secured entry into a social group with lous and the delivery bombastic. some amusing movie reference or song lyric? We This of course is Washburn’s point: how all borrow from the same pop-culture repository, primitive rituals of social cohesion grow into and The Simpsons is a particularly rich trove for dehumanizing institutions. Yet the effect is an such citations. And Washburn borrows liberally. off-putting bore. That religion is a target, we get. Act 2 comes seven years later, beginning in But must entertainment be sacrificed to make the middle of a rehearsal. The campfire survivors such a point? The Book of Mormon would suggest have turned into a traveling performance troupe, otherwise. So would The Simpsons. E now staging “Cape Feare” with more polish, costumes, music, and even commercials. They’re mbaumgarten@seattleweekly.com

23


STAGE

CHRIS BENNION

Present

Drummond plays all the roles on stage.

In Her Employ

Nothing in this comedy about Barbra Streisand is true, yet there’s some truth to it. BY ALYSSA DYKSTERHOUSE

U

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

F E A T U R I N G W O R K F R O M 40 L O C A L A R T I S T S

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Tickets are $25 and include:

• complimentary glass of sparkling wine • passed appetizers • • fabulous prizes • swag bag • drinks specials • • Teatro ZinZanni cast appearances •

Much to Alex’s credit (meaning Drumnless you read her 2010 book My mond’s), I felt as though I was wandering with Passion for Design, you’re probably him among the merchandise. Physical and verbal unaware that Barbra Streisand’s flair serve as his sandwich boards. While Malibu basement resembles a piclaughing out loud, I found myself thinkturesque shopping mall. Not content with ing, perhaps wishing, that this could plastic bins on IKEA shelves, she stages somehow be true. Anyone who’s her storage in a series of Potemkin Seattle stores. #CrazyRichPeople, right? Repertory Theatre, hit bottom in a ridiculous job will commiserate when Alex ruefully Upon learning this tantalizing (Seattle Center), tidbit, playwright Jonathan Tolins seattlerep.org. $34 and up. asks, “Is this what it’s come to?” Though reminiscent of David asked himself, “How would you Runs Wed.–Sun. Sedaris’ Santaland Diaries, Buyer & like to be the guy who worked Ends Nov. 22. Cellar isn’t just about another quirky down there?” A humor essay ensued, job. First produced off-Broadway in followed by his hit comedy Buyer & 2013, without any trace of righteous resentCellar. Given my own wacky work history, ment, it imparts post-recession insight. Babs’ much retail tedium among it, this idea intrigued oblivious book exhibiting her opulent wealth was me. Better still, every element of the Rep’s propublished when the economy was tanking, with duction realizes its premise. widespread un- and under-employment. Perhaps An aspiring actor (what else?), Alex accepts her portfolio took a hit, yet she and her onethe shopkeeper job in Streisand’s private fantasy percenter friends are thriving today. Alex lends a mall. Initially ambivalent about Babs, the disvoice to those of us who cashed in our 401(k)s gruntled Disneyland washout and former Funny to cover rent, those of us still struggling in the Girl forge a friendship—at least according to service sector where unstable incomes—aka the Alex (Scott Drummond). This being a one-man gig economy—induce palpable panic. show, we never get her side of the story, which Also, there’s something poignant about this is laced with Alex’s snarky asides. Yet Buyer & retail intersection between classes. Streisand Cellar isn’t a simple celebrity take-down. Tolshops, Tolins shops, I shop, we all shop. The ins’ script smartly touches upon star-fucking, only difference is price point. Yet no matter how income inequality, and the limits of loyalty to an much stuff we acquire, no matter how dotingly employer. displayed, those purchases provide only passing All we know at the outset, when Alex strolls pleasure. Despite her extravagant estate, this onstage, is that the mall is real. With no regard imaginary Streisand—carrying the baggage of from the fourth wall, he admits the rest is a her unhappy upbringing—craves genuine comconstruct of the playwright’s overheated imagipanionship from eager-to-please Alex, but their nation. Drummond is charismatic in all the roles relationship remains transactional. She’s the boss, here: Alex, his boyfriend Barry, Babs herself, her he’s the help, and they fight about overtime. estate manager, and a Disney casting director. Granted, Buyer & Cellar is a light, witty stage With an engaging conversational style, Alex comedy, not some profound Brechtian indictlures you into Babs’ showrooms—which exist ment. Most of those laughing in the audience will only in his description. Catherine Cornell’s be able to relate to Alex’s workplace anxieties. And elegant set is a bare stage, painted eggshell white, most want to do a good job and please those who upon which Robert J. Aguilar’s lively lights and sign our paychecks. More important, we want our Kevin Heard’s textured sounds create the retail work—however mundane—to matter. E fantasia. David Bennett provides astute direction for this 90-minute one-act. stage@seattleweekly.com


calendar

PICKLIST

NOVEMBER 4

We also see how Hunter became a hit singer and won roles over James Dean and Paul Newman. Mocked and forgotten during the ’60s and ’70s, Hunter had a comeback of sorts with 1981’s Polyester ( John Waters is among those interviewed here). Once sold to America as the dreamy boy next door, Hunter at 84 just seems glad and grateful to be remembered. The doc doesn’t offer much more than that, but sometimes happiness is enough. (Through Thurs.)

Wednesday Simon Winchester

Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. (Also: Ravenna Third Place luncheon, $40, 1 p.m. Thurs.) DANIEL PERSON

NOVEMBER 5

Thursday Alexander Mouton

NOVEMBER 8

Sunday

Gloria Steinem

will emerge. (Through Dec. 3.) Gallery4Culture, 101 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), galleries.4culture.org. Free. First Thursday opening reception, 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Amy McCullough

In the introduction to her memoir The Box Wine Sailors (Chicago Review Press, $17), McCullough imparts this bit of wisdom: “The only difference between bravery and stupidity is a happy ending.” Fortunately for McCullough and readers of this alternately charming and harrowing tale, she got that happy ending. Still, the appeal of McCullough’s account is in her willingness to look stupid, dangerously stupid, as she and her partner-in-adventure Jimmie brave the Pacific in a sailboat too small for oceanfaring. With a very modest budget, they gleaned know-how from YouTube and a few books and depended on the goodwill of salty sailors they meet on their way from Portland to Mexico. There is no boasting from McCullough, my friend and former colleague at Willamette Week. Instead the reader is offered a boldly honest view of a young couple who gave up their jobs for a chance to spend time with each other and to test themselves against the elements. Along the way, they get to know their boat intimately, record an album, get drunk, explore a cookbook’s worth of ramen recipes, and almost die. That they survived makes for a happy ending. That they truly lived makes for a great story. Ravenna Third Place,

6500 20th Ave. N.E., 523-0210, ravennathird place.com. Free. 7 p.m. MARK BAUMGARTEN

NOVEMBER 6

Friday

Carrie Brownstein

Long before the advent of Portlandia—yes, Generation Y, there was such a time—were the days of Sleater-Kinney, the iconic leader of the

Hunter in his ’50s prime.

’90s riot grrrl movement. The defining group (Brownstein, Corin Tucker, and Janet Weiss) has recently reconvened, but this is an entirely literary appearance, as Brownstein will discuss her new memoir, Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl (Riverhead, $28), with local novelist Maria Semple. In her book, the Redmond-raised Brownstein sheds light on her early turmoils and creative struggles, a depiction simultaneously conflicted and brilliant. Of her teenage years, she writes, “I needed to press myself up against small stages, risking crushed toes, bruised sides, and the unpredictable undulation of the pit, just so I could get a glimpse of who I wanted to be.” Later came Evergreen State College and the rise of Sleater-Kinney. Of this period she recalls, “It was an extreme way to start, but I learned later on how hard it can become to unsettle yourself, to trip yourself up, and I think that’s a good place to write from . . . The stakes should always feel high.” Brownstein describes the precariousness of nearly being consumed by her artistic endeavors, which have now grown far beyond music. Hunger is jarring, queer, feminist, fragile, and brash. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org. $35 and up (includes signed book). 7 p.m. MARA SILVERS

Tab Hunter Confidential

Being a child of the ’90s, I had no idea who Tab Hunter was before watching this enjoyably fascinating documentary. It follows a familiar formula—rise, fall, redemption—in relating the life of a briefly famous and hugely handsome Hollywood icon of the ’50s. We see how Hunter emerged from bit parts to polished Warner Bros. product, and director Jeffrey Schwarz includes many clips from that era. All the while, as Hunter explains, he had to keep his sexuality a secret. (“You were rewarded for pretending you’re someone you’re not,” he says.) I had no idea— any more than filmgoers 60 years ago did—that he and Psycho star Anthony Perkins were lovers.

In our busy, frenetic daily lives, the value of profound human connection is often sidelined. It is rare to find a role model who can be both productive and grounded, successful and humble, forward-looking yet sensitive to the past. For Steinem, feminist icon and revolutionary organizer, it’s the personal encounters on her path that she prioritizes above all else. My Life on the Road (Random House, $28) chronicles her journeys across the country and around the world, spanning decades and meeting notables from all walks of life. She’ll discuss those meaningful meetings tonight with Wild author Cheryl Strayed, who knows something about trailside encounters. At 81, Steinem has the status of a living legend, but her new book seeks ever to share those accolades with her travel companions, both fleeting and long-term, who have so deeply impacted her life’s work and philosophy. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St.,

hedgebrook.org. $15–$60. 7 p.m. MARA SILVERS

NOVEMBER 9

Monday

Garth Risk Hallberg

Every once in a while, a book arrives with Earth-shattering buzz. These usually come from renowned authors—J.K. Rowling’s Casual Vacancy, for example, or Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant—with an established fan base. City on Fire (Knopf, $30) is different. The North Carolina native Hallberg, with a few short stories behind him, spent six years finetuning his debut novel; and even before it had a publisher, the manuscript got million-dollar movie offers and became the focus of a massive bidding war. Set in New York at the end of the ’70s, City on Fire follows the intersecting lives of estranged heirs, punk-rock lovers, journalists, and more. A mystery then unites them all during one of New York’s most infamous nights—the July blackout of 1977. The 900page tome is dense, enjoyable, and layered with strata supporting the main narrative: handwritten note-pages, stained manuscripts, and cheeky music zines. Will Hallberg become the new must-read author? He’s off to a good start. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. 7 p.m. (Also: Third Place, 7 p.m. Tues.) SCOTT JOHNSON E

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

Even when the Cold War seems a quartercentury past, its ghosts are still with us. Putin is trying to reclaim the old Soviet empire, and Eastern Europe is protesting the refugee swarm—saying, in effect, that all these Syrians are a problem for the affluent West to resolve. The local photographer Mouton was there at the beginning of the Communist bloc’s collapse, living in East Berlin when the wall came down. What he’s done since, as we see in Some Time Later . . . I’m Here: Photographs From Poland & Ukraine, is to document the rubble and the displaced survivors. Ethnic and language groups were dispersed by both Hitler’s war and Stalin’s edicts; and in 2013 Mouton, a Seattle U professor, set out to find the white-haired old pensioners and war veterans in Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Lviv. His 22 images are full of decrepit old buildings and people, which is not to say they’re all impoverished and sad. These folks are survivors, unsurprised by anything, with a stoic reserve of memory that puts present troubles, Putin included, in their proper perspective. Mouton says the series was inspired by W.G. Sebald, the late German writer who so ceaselessly investigated his country’s guilt, atonement, and imperfect recovery. He lived (until 2001) to see his nation united, if not quite so prosperous as today. Poland and Ukraine may lag behind, but as their Russophone populations sadly decline, smaller and more homogenous nations

Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935. $5–$9. See grandillusioncinema.org for showtimes. SCOTT JOHNSON

WARNER BROS.

The first thing I did when I picked up The Pacific (Harper, $29) was flip to the index and look up our city. You might be disappointed that even where Seattle earns mention, it’s only in passing. This seems like a bit of an oversight by Winchester—and one I hope someone razzes him about tonight. As the traffic-snarling visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping showed, Seattle is no small player in the recent history of the book’s namesake ocean. But then, Winchester is attempting to create a sweeping portrait of the largest and oldest body of water in the world, dating back to the breakup of Pangaea 250 million years ago. He has to focus on the highlights. Using the Pacific as a vehicle to talk about ocean acidification and the North Korean government in the same book can seem a bit contrived and disorienting. (Its full subtitle: Silicon Chips and Surfboards, Coral Reefs and Atom Bombs, Brutal Dictators, Fading Empires, and the Coming Collision of the World’s Superpowers.) That said, Winchester makes a compelling argument that the Pacific—in terms of trade, military buildup, and environmental cataclysm—will serve as center stage for the most important events of the 21st century. Thus The Pacific uses history for its intended purpose: to tell us what’s to come. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth

25


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CALENDAR THEATER Openings & Events AS YOU LIKE IT Shakespeare’s

cross-dressing comedy, with live music. Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., ghostlighttheatricals. org. $12–$15. Opens Nov. 6. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 9 & 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15. Ends Nov. 21.

THE BALLAD OF KARLA FOX

Scot Augustson’s latest shadowpuppet show is a Hitchcock-inspired thriller. Theatre Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., printersdevil.org. $15–$18. Preview Nov. 4, opens Nov. 5. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Nov. 21. CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG

Caractacus Potts and his flying car are back. Seattle Children’s Theatre, Seattle Center, sct.org. $25 and up. Preview Nov. 5, opens Nov. 6. 7 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., 2 & 5:30 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Dec. 27. FIREFACE Splinter Group performs Marius von Mayenburg’s dysfunctional-family drama in a private home; you’ll find out where when you buy your ticket from brownpapertickets. com. $5–$25. Opens Nov. 6. 8 p.m. Fri.– Sat., 7 p.m. Sun. Ends Nov. 22. LOL! Comedian Brett Hamil performs at this benefit for the Seattle Community Law Center’s efforts to end homelessness. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., seattlecommlaw.org. $100–$150. 5 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. LOST AND FOUNDED The UW School of Drama reads Athol Fugard’s Sizwe Banzi Is Dead on this series paying tribute to Seattle’s shuttered theater companies (in this case Seattle Group Theatre). Meany Studio Theatre, UW campus, drama.washington.edu. Free. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 9. ■ MY FAIR LADY The enduringly popular and hit-filled 1956 Lerner and Loewe musical is directed by our homegrown Tony- and Pulitzerwinning Brian Yorkey, who must love the thing. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah. $38–$70. Preview Nov. 4, opens Nov. 5. Runs Wed.–Sun., plus Tues. starting Nov. 24; see village theatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 3. (Runs in Everett Jan. 8–31.) QUIXOTE: BOOK ONE Playwright Octavio Solis’ new adaptation of Cervantes. Cornish Playhouse, Seattle Center, cornish.edu. $5–$17. Opens Nov. 6. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., plus 2 & 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. Ends Nov. 13.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

THE RESISTIBLE RISE OF ARTURO UI Brecht’s Mob satire/Third

26

Reich allegory in a staged reading. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., endangered speciesproject.org. $10–$15. 7 p.m. Mon., Nov. 9.

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY COMPETITION A show-

case for stand-ups from around the world. See seattlecomedycompetition.org for complete schedule and venues, from Vancouver, Wash., to Bellingham, Nov. 4–29.

THE STAY UP LATE SHOW

Rebecca Davis’ talk show/cabaret welcomes guests Jennifer Jasper and Emmett Montgomery. JewelBox Theater at the Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., brownpapertickets.com. $15–$20. 7 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 5.

CURRENT RUNS

■ BUYER AND CELLAR SEE REVIEW, PAGE 24. ■ FESTEN As a movie, the Danish The Celebration caused a sensation back in 1998. Then, working against the usual stage-to-screen path, English playwright David Eldridge wrote a hit adaptation that debuted in 2004. If you’ve seen the movie, you know the long-buried family secret, which emerages during a large, loud, cheerful 60th birthday celebration. BRIAN

MILLER 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave., wearenctc.org. $15–$30. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends Nov. 21. ■ IF/THEN The big selling point is star Idina Menzel, who originated the role on Broadway last year. The musical has college professor Elizabeth (Menzel) contemplating all the alternate life paths she might’ve taken; new to New York and newly divorced, she’s got to reinvent herself somehow. What’s a girl to do? Split herself in two! The book and lyrics come from Issaquah’s own Village Theatre-trained Brian Yorkey, with songs by his Next to Normal collaborator Tom Kitt. BRIAN MILLER The Paramount, 911 Pine St., stgresents.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 4–Thurs., Nov. 5; 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6; 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7; 1 & 6:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8.

■ MOTHER COURAGE AND HER CHILDREN Brecht’s dark satire on

war profiteering. Center Theatre at Seattle Center. $27–$50. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat. plus some matinees; see seattleshakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 22.

■ MR. BURNS, A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY SEE REVIEW, PAGE 23. ■ SAUCED Directed by Paul

Budraitis, this noir-inspired tale’s setting is the Diamond Club, a Seattle gin joint. Written by Terry Podgorski, with songs by Annastasia Workman, we’re transported back to bygone times. MARK BAUMGARTEN Nordo’s Culinarium, 109 S. Main St., cafenordo. com. $65–$99. 7:30 p.m. Thurs. & Sun., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Dec. 20.

DANCE ■ KT NIEHOFF In 2010, local cho-

reographer KT Niehoff created A Glimmer of Hope or Skin or Light as a multipart event that popped up all over town. For this revival, she’s bringing back the finale, an elaborate cabaret show where spectacular showgirls usher you into an environment full of glamorous potential. SANDRA KURTZ ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., acttheatre. org. $20–$35. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus 10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. Ends Nov. 14. PE|MO Perpetuum Mobile’s new dance/theater/activism work is Anatomy of an Accident. Open Flight Studio, 4205 University Way N.E. Pay what you can. Opens Nov. 7. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sun. Ends Nov. 15. EMERGENCE PNB’s mixed-repertory program is an excellent snapshot of the company, with a ballet based in the neoclassical tradition (Kiyon Gaines’ Sum Stravinsky), a soon-to-be classic of contemporary ballet (Crystal Pite’s fierce Emergence), a work that unites early modern dance with current styles (Jessica Lang’s The Calling), and a wild card—a premiere by company member Price Suddarth. SK McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, pnb.org. $30 and up. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6; 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7; 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 12–Sat., Nov., 14; 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 15.

■ MUSIC OF REMEMBRANCE

Olivier Wevers and Whim W’Him perform Martinu’s jazz ballet La Revue de Cuisine, with characters including a whisk, a pot, and a dishcloth. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., musicofremembrance.org. $30–$45. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. For many more Current Runs, see seattleweekly.com.

CLASSICAL, ETC. ■ DANISH STRING QUARTET

Beethoven’s Grosse fuge, plus a piece by Alfred Schnittke based on it, plus one by countryman Per Nørgaard. Meany Hall, UW campus, uwworld series.org. $38–$43. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 4.

■ TOWN MUSIC Composer/

vocalist Lisa Bielawa performs with French new-music group Ensemble Variances. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., townhallseattle.org. $5–$25. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 4. ■ SEATTLE SYMPHONY The U.S. premiere of captivating Georgian composer Giya Kancheli’s Nu.Mu.Zu. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., seattlesymphony.org. $21 and up. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 5; noon Fri., Nov. 6; 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. UW SYMPHONY Sibelius, Stravinsky, and Beethoven with violinist Maria Larionoff. Meany Hall, UW campus, music.washington.edu. $10–$15. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. ■ LUMA GUILD Composer Mateo Messina’s 18th annual fundraiser for Seattle Children’s Hospital. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., lumaguild. org. $44–$80. 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6.

■ SEATTLE COMPOSERS SALON

A new-music open-mike night, with works by Nadya Kadrevis, Neal KosalyMeyer, Clement Reid, and Nicole Truesdell. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., composer salon.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. ■ FIRST FRIDAY SALON SEE ARTICLE, PAGE 19. BALLARD SEDENTARY SOUSA BAND “The world’s only seated

marching band” throws a party for their composer namesake’s birthday. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., townhall seattle.org. $5–$10. 1 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7.

■ ORIGINS: LIFE AND THE UNIVERSE New symphonic music

soundtracks extraterrestrial imagery. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., astrobioconcert.com. $22–$32. 2 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7.

■ OCTAVA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Bartok’s eerie Music

for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta. Maple Park Church, 17620 60th Ave. W., Lynnwood, octavachamberorchestra. com. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. LAKE WASHINGTON SYMPHONY

Verdi, Saint-Saens, and Tchaikovsky. Westminster Chapel, 13646 N.E. 24th St., Bellevue, lwso.org. $15–$35. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7.

SEATTLE BAROQUE ORCHESTRA

Serenades and other night pieces— not only Mozart’s famous one, but Biber and Boccherini too. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., earlymusicguild.org. $20–$39. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7. SEATTLE REPERTORY JAZZ ORCHESTRA Music by Billy

Strayhorn to celebrate his 100th. At Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 7 and Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., Kirkland, 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. $15–$48. srjo.org. JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET The SSO’s pianist in residence plays Schumann and Ravel. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., seattlesymphony.org. $20–$112. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. DAANA STRING QUARTET

Beethoven, Haydn, and more in a concert exploring the music heard in the U.S.’s earliest days. Music Center of the Northwest, 901 N. 96th St., mcnw. org. Free. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 8. LYDIA ARTYMIW A program TBA from this Philadelphia-based pianist. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, music.washington. edu. Free. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 9. SSO/UW Chamber music by Carl Nielsen from Seattle Symphony players and UW music students. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, music.washington.edu. Free. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 10. SOUND|COUNTERPOINT Chamber music by Scarlatti, Vivaldi, and others. Trinity Parish Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., earlymusicguild.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 10.


VISUAL ARTS

Roger Shimomura, at Greg Kucera.

Openings & Events

DAVID BECKLEY He photographs

Auschwitz and other fraught locales. Also on view, Sally Ketcham’s more colorful, less morbid photos and prints. First Thursday opening reception. Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com. Noon-5 p.m. Wed.Sat. Ends Nov. 28.

11/11

MARIANAS TRENCH

BEN BERES & CAROL SUMMERS

Yes, these are merely cute photographs of toys, but who can resist? (Also, Christmas is near...) Kristina Alexanderson, Shelly Corbett, Mike Stimpson (who combines Star Wars with kittens!), and Boris Vanrillaer are featured. First Thursday opening reception; and note the special workshop at 1 p.m. Saturday, so you can dazzle your Instagram followers. Bryan Ohno Gallery, 521 S. Main St., 459-6857, bryanohno.com. Free. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Ends Dec. 12. JURIED EXHIBITION Julia Fryett (of SLU’s Aktionsart) is the judge, and the 12 winners include six from the Pacific Northwest. First Thursday opening reception. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org. Noon-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. Ends Dec. 19. ■ TORI KARPENKO His tribute to Beat poet Gary Snyder, called The

11/04

LUNA

8:30PM

SHOWBOX AND KEXP PRESENT

Lookout, includes both paintings of the North Cascades—where Snyder worked two summers in a fire lookout during the early ’50s—and a full-size wooden re-creation of one of those structures, from which you can view the art. First Thursday opening reception. Traver Gallery, 110 Union St., 587-6501, travergallery.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. Ends Dec. 23. JUDITH KINDLER In The Shape of Things to Come, she promises to oscillate “between the stark formal qualities of modernism and postmodernism to the soulful and emotionally provocative narratives of contemporary life valued by the meta-modernists.” First Thursday opening reception. Abmeyer + Wood, 210 Second Ave., 628-9501, abmeyerwood.com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Ends Nov. 28. ROBERT MCCAULEY Bears! The Northwest native, recently returned home, paints bears and other fauna. Also on view, animals and mythic figures by painter Peggy Washburn. First Thursday opening reception. Linda Hodges Gallery, 316 First Ave. S. 624-3034, lindahodgesgallery.com. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 28. MINDFULLESSNESS Elizabeth Loux, Rachel Akerley, and Erin Marmer work in a variety of media to explore notions of friendship and collaboration. Also on view, driftwood hot wheels from Kiki MacInnis, called Parts and Labor. First Thursday opening reception. SOIL Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264-8061, soilart.org. Noon-5 p.m. Thu.Sun. Ends Nov. 28. ANDRE PETTERSON Modified photographs serve as a departure point for To and Fro, in which the artist explores “my continued fascination with typewriters and old bicycles.” First Thursday opening reception. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 622-2833, fosterwhite.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 25. ■ PUNCTUM That’s the theme for this juried (by Portland Art Museum’s Julia Dolan) contest, with winners among 213 entrants to be announced December 10. Thirty artists have their work on view. Opens Saturday. Photo Center NW. Ends Dec. 19. REMEMBER TO COME BACK

Diaspora and emmigration are the themes considered by ruby onyinyechi amanze, Clay Apenouvon, Mwangi Hutter, Délio Jasse, and Zohra Opoku. First Thursday opening reception. Mariane Ibrahim Gallery, 608 Second Ave., 467-4927, mari-

aneibrahim.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.Sat. Ends Dec. 23. ■ SAM REMIX Check out the Impressionists, eat, drink, dance, and be merry. DJ Fish Boogie and OneBeat provide music; Susie Lee lets you test her Siren app; artists lead tours through the museum; and there’s a live performance from The Horse in Motion. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $12–$25. 6 p.m.-midnight, Friday. LAURA SCHIFF BEAN In Redefined, she paints dresses “as a stand-in for the figure that reflects upon identity and gender.” First Thursday opening reception. Patricia Rovzar, 1225 Second Ave., 223-0273, rovzargallery.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sun. Ends Nov. 30.

11/06

CHERUB with HIPPIE SABOTAGE + SHOOKA

YELLOWCARD + NEW FOUND GLORY 11/13

8:30PM

11/07

7:00PM

OBSERVATORY with DJ SHARLESE

9:00PM

with BLOCKHEAD + MANATEE COMMUNE

LUCERO

11/17

11/24

RAC LIVE + BIG DATA

with KARL KING + FILIOUS

8:00PM

8:00PM

MAC MILLER DOM KENNEDY THE CULT + PRIMAL SCREAM TRAVI$ SCOTT SHOWBOX AND REIGNCITY PRESENT

with GOLDLINK + DOMO GENESIS + ALEXANDER SPIT + THE COME-UP

11/09

11/14

MISFITS

8:00PM

12/2

9:00PM

8:00PM

12/3

9:00PM

STUDIO SEVEN PRESENTS

with SHE DEMONS + AVOID THE VOID + BENEATH THE SPINLIGHT + SAYS THE SNAKE 11/18 7:00PM

SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX 12/15

THOMAS WOOD & ED KAMUDA

Moving Into Autumn offers landscapes from Kamuda. Wood often paints watery scenes suggesting Puget Sound. First Thursday opening reception. Lisa Harris Gallery, 1922 Pike Place, lisaharrisgallery.com, 443-3315. 10 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Ends Nov. 29.

9:00PM

AN EVENING WITH

GHOSTLAND

11/07

8:00PM

KEXP, SHOWBOX, AND MIKE THRASHER PRESENT

MAYDAY PARADE with REAL FRIENDS + THIS WILD LIFE + AS IT IS

with TIGERS JAWS

EMANCIPATOR ENSEMBLE

11/14 9:00PM

8:00PM

SHOWBOX AND KGRG PRESENT

THE AP TOUR

■ ROGER SHIMOMURA & WILLIAM KENTRIDGE Two great

artists need little introduction. The Seattle-raised Shimomura presents Pop-infused new works in Great American Muse, with traces of Disney, Hokusai, and Warhol. The South African Kentridge, subject of the Henry’s knockout 2009 show, has recent linocuts on offer (depicting typewriters, cats, birds, and such). Then there’s an additional treat during the First Thursday opening reception: Photographer Alice Wheeler will be signing her new book, Outcasts and Innocents: Photographs of the Northwest, featuring many music icons of the grunge era. Greg Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave., 624-0770, gregkucera. com. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Dec. 24 TATAU/TATTOO A history of ink and skin, beginning in the ancient cultures of the Pacific Islands and leading to modern hipster bars and sorority ankles. First Thursday opening reception. The Wing, 719 S. King St., 623-5124, wingluke.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sun. $10-$15. Ends Oct. 9. UN-WEDGED The annual group show, featuring 22 North American artists, was curated by Richard Notkin. Opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Saturday. Pottery Northwest, 226 First Ave. N., 285-4421, potterynorthwest. com, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Tues.-Fri. Ends Nov. 28.

with HOUNDSTOOTH

11/05

with THE WALCOTTS

SHOWBOXPRESENTS.COM

8:00PM

SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

■ IN LEGO, WE CONNECT

with SECRET SOMEONES

COURTESY GREG KUCERA GALLERY.

The former creates dense etchings in Horror Vacui (“fear of empty space”). The latter shows colorful woodcut prints dating back to 1958. First Thursday opening reception. Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 624-6700, davidsongalleries. com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 28. ■ CAMP FIRES BAM goes totally gay with this queer art tribute to Léopold L. Foulem, Paul Mathieu, and Richard Milette. Opens Friday. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts. org. $5-$10. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sun. Ends Feb. 14. MARY COSS Her sculpture show Trace includes disparate materials like old wedding dresses and wire to explore “a narrative around artifacts, the cultural remnants of life, using the form of a human bone as a relic to tell this story.” First Thursday opening reception. Method Gallery, 106 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 2238505, methodgallery.com. Noon-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Ends Jan. 2. DEALER’S CHOICE The annual group show features the likes of Guy Anderson, Morris Graves, and Paul Horiuchi. First Thursday opening reception. Woodside/Braseth Gallery, 622-7243, 1201 Western Ave., woodsidebrasethgallery.com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 28. ■ PETER DICAMPO The local photojournalist shows and discusses examples from his work in Africa, some represented by the hashtag #everydayAfrica, which seeks to rebut stereotypes and essentialism. Photo Center NW, 900 12th Ave., 720-7222, pcnw.org. $5-$10. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 4. ALANO EDZERZA Tahltan themes are rendered in wood and more modern materials in the Canadian artist’s Moving Forward. First Thursday opening reception. Stonington Gallery, 125 S. Jackson St., 405-4040, stoningtongallery.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri. (weekends vary). Ends Nov. 28. GROUP SHOW Fanciful work is featured from Alessandra Maria, Zachari Logan, and Joe Rudko. First Thursday opening reception. Roq La Rue, 532 First Ave. S., 374-8977, roqlarue.com. Noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Nov. 28.

CHRIS STAPLETON

27


El Corazon E orazon www.elcorazonseattle.com

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 7TH EL CORAZON

TAKE WARNING PRESENTS:

MUSICWERKS SEATTLE & EL CORAZON PRESENT:

Dangerkids, Palaye Royale, Bad Seed Rising, Sounds Like Harmony, Amanda Markley Doors 6:00PM / Show 7:00.

The Break Up, Adrian H & The Wounds, Murder Weapons, Pill Brigade Doors 8:00PM / Show 8:30.

GHOST TOWN

MY LIFE WITH THE THRILL KILL KULT

21+. $18 ADV / $20 DOS

ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $15

SATURDAY WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER JULY 22ND 7TH ELFUNHOUSE CORAZON

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 4TH FUNHOUSE

BRIAN FOSS PRESENTS:

THE SLOTHS

THRASHERS CORNER w/Burlington Coat SPIRIT CARAVAN

Doors at 8:00PM / Show at 8:30. 21+. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

Doors / Show Show 8:00PM 9:30. 21+. $7 9:00. 21+. $15

Elder, MOS Generator, Ex-GodsDoors 9:00PM / Felony, Upwell, Hell Raisers

The Heels, Sunset Flip, Pleasure Island

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 8TH FUNHOUSE

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 5TH EL CORAZON

METALACHI Stay Tuned, Dick Rossetti:Ex-

DEADLY D

Doors at 8:00PM / Show at 9:00. 21+. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

Doors 7:00PM / Show 7:30. ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

Minor Celebrity, Warning:Danger!

Double B & Laces, Mystic Arrows, Young Love

MONDAY NOVEMBER 9TH FUNHOUSE

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 5TH FUNHOUSE

DEADMICS

BRIAN FOSS PRESENTS:

VUG ARAKAS

Doors 8:30PM / Show 9:00. 21+. $7

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 10TH EL CORAZON

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 6TH EL CORAZON

I AM THOR! A SCREENING OF

DAN REED NETWORK

THE NEW DOCUMENTARY FILM ABOUT THOR Featuring live performances by: THOR, The Imps

Thaddillac, Future Shock

Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 8:30. 21+. $21 ADV / $25 DOS

Doors 7:00PM / Show at 8:00. 21+. $10 ADV / $12 DOS JUST ANNOUNCED 12/1 - CANCER BATS 12/6 - MOURNING MARKET 12/7 FUNHOUSE - MISS MASSIVE SNOWFLAKE 12/16 FUNHOUSE GLACIER VEINS 12/18 FUNHOUSE - THE BAD THINGS 5/28 - PRONG UP & COMING 11/11 - DEMUN JONES (REHAB) 11/11 FUNHOUSE - ARMED FOR APOCALYPSE 11/12 FUNHOUSE - BIG JOHN BATES 11/13 - OUR LAST NIGHT 11/13 FUNHOUSE - WIMPS (RECORD RELEASE) 11/14 - NIK TURNER’S HAWKWIND 11/14 FUNHOUSE - SHE IS WE 11/15 FUNHOUSE - THE YAWPERS 11/16 FUNHOUSE - HOLLY GOLIGHTLY & THE BROKEOFFS 11/17 - EVERCLEAR 11/18 - THE ACACIA STRAIN 11/19 - NORTHLANE 11/20 - HANDS LIKE HOUSES 11/20 FUNHOUSE - PONY TIME 11/21 - AIDEN 11/21 FUNHOUSE - TWIN RIVER 11/22 FUNHOUSE - LOS KUNG FU MONKEYS THE FUNHOUSE BAR IS OPEN FROM 3:00PM TO 2:00AM DAILY AND HAPPY HOUR IS FROM 3:00PM UNTIL 6:00PM. Tickets now available at Ticketfly.com – no per order fees for online purchases! Charge by phone at 1-877-987-6487. Online at www.ticketfly.com. Tickets are subject to a service charge. You can also buy advance tickets at the El Corazon Box Office – open weekdays from 11:00am to 9:00pm at the Eastlake Waffle Window. There is a $2 service charge per ticket at The El Corazon Box Office. The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html for an application email info@elcorazonseattle.com

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Seattle psych-poppers Spirit Award, also operates under the furry moniker ZOOLAB, under which he produces blissed-out, swagger-filled electronic tracks full of shiny synths. His latest Trestles EP is an aerobics instructor’s dream, and wouldn’t sound out of place at big-tent outdoor music festivals (tonight he will be joined by two live drummers). Zoolab is also an avid remixer, having reinvented tracks from Beat Connection, Jennifer Lopez, and tonight’s opener, Pillar Point. But make sure to catch the mid-show set from Newaxeyes, one of Seattle’s most exciting new bands, whose dystopic, doom-laden, dialup-modem-tossed-into-a-black-hole sound will soon manifest on a new LP produced by local sonic shaman Randall Dunn. Barboza. 8 p.m. $5. 21 and over. KELTON SEARS

Thursday, Nov. 5

■ The wait for a new DEEP SEA DIVER album will soon be over. Four

years ago, the Seattle rock outfit with the searing sound released its debut, History Speaks, and solidified leader Jessica Dobson as one of the city’s most devastating guitarists, capable of driving her band’s battle-ready songs over bracing peaks and through shadowy valleys while we all dance the darkness away. It sounded like the prelude to something great. This tour will provide a glimpse of how great. With Sisters, Bleach Bear. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15. All ages. MARK BAUMGARTEN

■ Globetrotting DJ and producer

LEFTO hails from Belgium and has

become an international trendsetting force through his adventurous Mixcloud sets. Reflecting the headliner, tonight’s lineup is appropriately eclectic, featuring Seattle Weekly columnist Sassyblack, whose excellent cosmic R&B ranges from the philosophical to the confrontational, especially on new track “Wanna Talk Shit (Okay).” Abstract beatmaker Diogenes, whose Death & Acid tape was one of our favorite local releases this summer, will also show up with his Roland SP-worshipping set. With LadyRyan. Kremwerk. 9 p.m. $10 adv./$14 DOS. 21 and over. KS

Friday, Nov. 6

When Lemolo announced in 2013 that its two members would part ways, it was a shock, but it wasn’t exactly surprising. The duo had ascended the ranks of Seattle’s indie folk scene by way of a tantalizing tension between Kendra Cox’s muscular drumming and MEAGAN GRANDALL’s dreamlike synth and vocal lines. After the amicable split, Grandall continued, and tonight will celebrate a new album, Red Right Return, that, without Cox, lacks much of that tension. But there are still drums here, serving as a necessary anchor to Grandall’s pop arias, which have matured into voluminous things of beauty. With Mimicking Bird, Maiah Manser. The Crocodile. 8 p.m. $15 adv./$17 DOS. All ages. MB

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Tonight, the EMP brings together MATT BISHOP AND DAMIEN JURADO for its Influencers Concert Series, a relatively new program that exhibits a kind of simple genius. By pairing an up-and-coming artist with an established act that has helped shape that young artist’s sound, the series will explore the intimate relationship that we all have with music,

SARAH MURPHY

Mojo Barnes, Ashtre, Golden Alchemy Doors 7:00PM / Show 7:30. ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

Bad Motivators, Detective Agency, Mona Reels

MUSIC ■ Terence Ankeny, the drummer for

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 4TH EL CORAZON

calendar

Deep Sea Diver uncover the artistic process, and, in that context, result in some powerful performances. This evening, Hey Marseilles leader Bishop will take the stage with a musical hero, whose songs he once covered in coffee shops. He’s probably super-nervous about it. EMP. 9 p.m. $20/$15 EMP members. All ages. MB

■ For TELEKINESIS’ fourth fulllength album, Ad Infinitum, primary member Michael Lerner changed everything. Instead of recording with one of indie pop’s top producers, he took the reins of the recording process. Instead of pumping out a collection of hook-laden guitar-pop tracks in two weeks, he built a studio in his home, conducted deep experimentation with synthesizers and drum machines, and took his time constructing an album with a new sound. The miraculous thing is that the new collection sounds both entirely new and distinctly like a Telekinesis album, with an unyielding rhythm at its heart, an appreciation for rich textures, and, of course, those undeniable hooks set like booby traps throughout. With Say Hi, NAAVI. Neumos. 8 p.m. $14. 21 and over. MB Last week we wrote about the ambitious organizing effort behind Bernie Man, a three-week block party created to raise money for the wild-haired democratic-socialist 2016 presidential candidate, Bernie Sanders. While that event skewed toward the electronicmusic set, tonight’s Ballard for Bernie fundraiser will, unsurprisingly (given its location), play into the neighborhood’s thriving alt-country scene. Tonight’s headliner shares Sanders’ initials: BIG SUR, a warbling five-piece featuring a lap-steel and a violin player. Front man Jake Hemming is so dedicated to his songwriting, he claims he hasn’t fixed his broken car stereo so he can drive around in silence and come up with songs. I imagine if Sanders’ car stereo broke, he might do the same, so he could drive around in silence and come up with ways to dismantle the death grip large corporations have on the middle class and remedy the profound moral bankruptcy that has allowed income inequality to raise to the highest levels of any developed country on Earth. TAKE THAT, BILLIONAIRE CLASS. With Mindie Lind, Kingdom Pine. Sunset Tavern. 8 p.m. $12. 21 and over. KS

Sunday, Nov. 8

On tonight’s second installment of the Ballard for Bernie campaign fundraiser, Everett staples THE MOONDOGGIES will serenade the Sunset with the Americana-inspired rock that’s been winning over fans for 10 years now. The band reportedly has “a lot of new songs on the horizon,” and may bust some out tonight. You might say the band has a lot in common with Sanders, a politician who has also spent a long career (44 years) slowly winning over fans, and also has a lot of new policies on the horizon, including his plan to remove marijuana from the federal controlled-substances list. And it’s about time, “since we have 2.2 million people in jail today, more than any other country. And we’re spending about $80 billion a year to lock people up. We need major changes in our criminal-justice system—including changes in drug laws.” With Country Lips, Ole Tinder. Sunset Tavern. 8 p.m. $12. 21 and over. KS Glam was all about pomp and splendor—the Thin White Duke was always dressed for any formal occasion. It makes sense, then, to pair the period’s breakout hits with full orchestral arrangements, which is exactly the plan for tonight’s

SEATTLE ROCK ORCHESTRA PERFORMS DAVID BOWIE & GLAM ROCK concert, a reimagining

of the group’s first covers show at The Moore five years ago. Beyond Bowie, tonight will also feature selections from ELO and T. Rex. Wear your finest feather boa. The Moore. 7 p.m. $20–$37.50. All ages. KS

Wednesday, Nov. 11

A lot of people hated on A$AP ROCKY’s new album AT.LONG.LAST. A$AP, arguing that the weirdo rap star acted more as a curator than an artist— but I tend to disagree. The best tracks on the sprawling record were the ones without the megastar guest features— the gorgeous bass-heavy psychedelia of “L$D” and the ethereal elevator-music jam of “Excuse Me.” But tonight, A$AP will nevertheless be joined by an army of megastars—including Odd Future’s lead rabble-rouser Tyler the Creator (who recently got himself banned from Australia for his alleged misogyny), the brilliant MDMA fueled outsider rap of Danny Brown, and young up-and-comer Vince Staples. WaMu Theater. 7 p.m. $46.50. All ages. KS


ONE OF THE BEST DOCUMENTARIES OF 2015

FILM Opening Friday

ALL THINGS MUST PASS Still

upset about the closing of Tower Records? This documentary from Colin Hanks chronicles its rise and fall. (NR) Sundance ■ I SMILE BACK In a big career turn, Sarah Silverman has gotten excellent festival reviews for her role as a sex-addict housewife. (R) Varsity LOVE A French film about romance and sex? Hardly surprising, but it’s in 3-D and directed by provocateur Gaspar Noé, of Enter the Void and Irréversible. (NR) Sundance MISS YOU ALREADY Haven’t reached your quota of tears shed in a cinema this year? Toni Collette and Drew Barrymore play BFFs, one with cancer. (PG-13) Opens wide NASTY BABY Kristen Wiig, Tunde Adebimpe, and Sebastián Silva (who also directs, as he did The Maid) star in this drama about three Brooklynites trying to have a baby. (R) Northwest Film Forum THE PEANUTS MOVIE Charlie Brown is back, with Linus and Lucy, in this kid-friendly adventure, which may send parents looking for their VHS copy of A Charlie Brown Christmas. (G) Opens wide

JACO The late bass player Jaco Pastorius is profiled in this new doc, with tributes from Flea, Sting, and others. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$11. 7:30 p.m. Weds. ■ MANHATTAN Okay, Woody Allen dates a high schooler in this wise, rueful 1979 romantic comedy, but somehow it didn’t seem as creepy then as it does now in the post-Soon-Yi era. Mariel Hemingway even got an Oscar nom for her very non-Lolitaish turn as a precocious 17-year-old, and Woody gives her the last word in the picture. Meryl Streep has one of her early good roles in the film, which is full of some of the Woodman’s very best writing. (How the mighty have fallen.) And when Woody complains about “brown water” running out the tap of his $700 apartment, you’ll think, “That’s all he’s paying?” (R) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $7-$9. 9:30 p.m. Fri.-Tues. ■ NIGHTFALL The film noir series continues with 1950’s One Way Street, in which mobbed-up doctor James Mason poisons his boss (who else but Dan Duryea?), steals his girlfriend (and the loot), and heads to Mexico. Needless to say, things don’t go as planned. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 6543121, seattleartmuseum.org. $63–$68 series, $8 individual. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Dec. 10.

“UNEXPECTEDLY INTIMATE AND EMOTIONALLY-CHARGED.”

spying from his U-2 plane. This section is all snowy East Berlin alleys and tense meetings in unheated rooms—exactly Spielberg’s cup of borscht. Nicely complicating the situation is the way Abel, the enemy, comes to be a sympathetic figure. The British stage giant Rylance (Wolf Hall) gives a marvelously detailed performance as the kind of guy Spielberg appreciates—a schlub doing his job. (PG-13) ROBERT HORTON Sundance, Majestic Bay, SIFF Cinema Uptown, Pacific Place, Oak Tree, Lincoln Square, Bainbridge, Kirkland, others OUR BRAND IS CRISIS This enjoyably cynical comedy about American political campaign strategists in Bolivia is based on a prior documentary that featured featured James Carville (the rough basis for Billy Bob Thornton’s Pat Candy). What’s new and fictional is berserk rival consultant Jane Bodine (Sandra Bullock), in search of redemption. But real problem with Our Brand, for fans and voters alike, is that it repeatedly tells us what we already understand: Politicians lie. Voters are fools. The game is rigged. Democracy is a rotten system—and yet there’s no better alternative. Jane and Pat keep trading shots and playing dirty tricks on each other, all quite amusing, but how can we American viewers be surprised by

– Zach Schonfeld, NEWSWEEK

A COLIN

HANKS FILM Featuring DAVE GROHL, ELTON JOHN and BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN

THE DOORS ARE CLOSED. BUT THE LEGACY LIVES ON. #TowerRecordsDoc TowerRecordsMovie.com

STARTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 4.81" X 3.5"

SEATTLE SUNDANCE CINEMAS SEATTLE 4500 9th Ave NE, Reserved Seats +21 All Shows www.sundancecinemas.com

WED 11/04

SEATTLE WEEKLY DUE MON 4PM (PT)

Sarah Silverman in I Smile Back, at the Varsity.

BROAD GREEN PICTURES

Local & Repertory ■ FANTASIA The 1940 Disney

Confidential playing this week, revisit his 1981 comeback, courtesy of John Waters (also a source in the doc). With Divine, Mink Stole, and the Waters stock company. (R) Grand Illusion, $5-$9. 9 p.m. Fri.-Sat. SEATTLE TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL Friday’s opening night

gala title is the risque-sounding Let’s Sin. After-party follows at Gordon Biersch. (NR) Pacific Place and other venues, see stff.org for tickets and schedule. Fri.-Sun. YAKUZA APOCALYPSE Vampires and Japanese gangsters—what more do you need to know? (NR) SIFF Cinema Egyptian, $7-$12. Midnight, Fri. & Sat.

Ongoing

■ BRIDGE OF SPIES In Steven

Spielberg’s true-life saga, New York lawyer James B. Donovan (Tom Hanks) is plucked from his profitable private practice to defend a Soviet spy, Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance), in the late 1950s. What pricks Spielberg’s interest is the way Donovan is ostracized for performing a constitutional task during the height of Cold War. A few years later, Donovan is given another difficult task: negotiate a prisoner trade for Francis Gary Powers, the U.S. pilot shot down over Russia in 1960 while

their antics? The movie constantly explains such underhanded deeds to the astonished Bolivians, but we know all this stuff already. (R) B.R.M. SIFF Cinema Uptown, Sundance, Ark Lodge, Pacific Place, Lincoln Square, Kirkland, Bainbridge, others ■ ROOM Joy (the excellent Brie Larson, from Short Term 12), we shall learn, was abducted as a 17-year-old. We meet her as the young mother of Jack (Jacob Tremblay), both of them confined to a garden shed/ prison that forms the 5-year-old boy’s entire known universe. A skylight above, a few books, and TV cartoons blur into a magical realm for Jack; notions of what’s real and imaginary are just beginning to settle into his head. (Emma Donoghue adapted her own 2010 novel.) Jack’s been kept in a paradoxical state of enchantment, since Joy needs to hold horrible reality at bay. To be vague about the plot, which takes a big turn after an hour, Jack’s task, like Alice’s in Wonderland, is to understand the rules—or their absence—in two different realms. Joy is meanwhile subject to regular attacks of doubt that I suspect many mothers will know. Lenny Abrahamson, of Frank, provides direction that’s both surehanded and dry-eyed. (R) B.R.M. Guild 45th, Pacific Place, Lincoln Square

ARTWORK © 2015 FOCUS FEATURES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MOTION PICTURE © 2015 PATHE PRODUCTIONS LIMITED, CHANNEL FOUR TELEVISION CORPORATION AND THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE LIMITED. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

CATE ROBERT TOPHER ELISABETH Confirmation #: BLANCHETT REDFORD GRACE MOSS Seattle Weekly #3

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-Stephen Holden, THE NEW YORK TIMES ALL.SFR.1104.SW

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

anthology cartoon, a huge hit in its day, sets Bach, Stravinsky, Beethoven, and others to cartoons. Of course it’s Mussorgsky’s “A Night on Bald Mountain” that everyone remembers most. (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, $10-$15. 1 p.m. Sun. & 7 p.m. Tues. (the latter at SIFF Film Center). ■ FANTASTIC MR. FOX In this 2009 stop-motion adaptation, Wes Anderson has added an existential layer to the protagonist of Roald Dahl’s 1970 children’s novel. Mr. Fox (voiced by George Clooney) is no longer just a devoted husband and father trying to put food on the table, but instead a gentleman bandit who walks upright and steals not out of necessity but because he’s good at it. Having given up his life of crime at the behest of Mrs. Fox (Meryl Streep), Mr. Fox remains, in his heart, footloose, fancy-free. Where Dahl’s book was essentially a survival story, Anderson’s film has become a nonconformist fable about that wildness of spirit we are encouraged to tame as we get older and “settle down.” Clooney and Streep do some of their best work, rendering an unusually convincing portrait of a marriage. (PG) SCOTT FOUNDAS Central Cinema, $7-$9. 7 p.m. Fri.-Tues. & 3 p.m. Sat.-Sun.

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We Need to Build a Weed Wall! BY MICHAEL A. STUSSER

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h! Canada! Not only did our neighbors to the north elect a handsome, progressive, yoga-practicing Prime Minister, but they put into power a man who promises to legalize marijuana across the Great White North, from VanCity to Haligonia. The Liberal Party’s Justin Trudeau pledged during his campaign to legalize recreational cannabis use “right away,” and, unlike our legislative clusterfuck known as Congress, Canada’s parliament typically pays attention to the will of its people. Canadian voters liked Trudeau’s reasoning for legalizing weed, including mega-tax revenues and eliminating the black market. Current laws were “making marijuana too easy to access for our kids,” Trudeau said, “and at the same time funding street crime, organized gangs, and gun-runners.” According to a University of British Columbia study, more than seven and a half million people use cannabis in Canada, and legalization could bring in between five and 12 billion dollars. (Not sure if that’s Canadian or U.S. dollars. It’s so confusing!) The news of Trudeau’s victory has already helped established canna-businesses in Canada. Shares of listed companies such as Mettrum Health and Aphria, which already produce for the medical system, have had major stock-price gains since Trudeau’s surprise win. The biggest current producer of Canuck chronic is called Canopy Growth Corp., and their shares are up more than 20 percent. “I think what you’ll see perhaps, after this election,” noted Canopy Growth CEO Bruce Linton, “is a recognition that there is an opportunity to collect taxes on something that is already being sold into the market illegally or illicitly.” Justin Trudeau isn’t just providing lip service in regard to the legalization of ganja . . . well, he is, actually. The Prime Minister-designate admits to having smoked reefer, and not just in a “tried it and didn’t inhale” kinda way. “When the joint went around the room, I usually passed it around to the next person,” he told HuffPo a few years back. “But sometimes throughout my life, I’ve had a pull on it.” According to the tube-ripping Trudeau, the last time he was high was three years ago, which would mean he fired up after having been elected Montreal’s MP. “Sometimes, I guess, I have gotten a buzz, but other times no. I’m not really crazy about it.” It’s a refreshing bit of candor from a politician in any country, really; Trudeau has said pot’s not his bag, but he doesn’t see a reason to bust the balls of adults who dig it. “I’m not someone who is particularly interested in altered states, but I certainly won’t

judge someone else for it,” Trudeau stated, adding he’d only gotten baked five or six times. “I think that the prohibition that is currently on marijuana is unjustified.” As in the United States, arrests for marijuana possession have been rising in Canada, but hopefully that trend will be reversed. Under the previous PM, conservative Stephen Harper, arrests soared by 30 percent (475,000 under his watch), and draconian mandatory minimum sentences were put in place. If Trudeau immediately allows for simple possession, those arrests will come grinding to a halt. He may also allow for home grows, currently not allowed under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. Trudeau said on the campaign trail last month in Vancouver that he’d work to pardon those currently in jail for marijuana-related offenses. “There have been many situations over history when laws come in that overturn previous convictions. And there will be a process for that that we will set up in a responsible way.” If Trudeau makes good on his legalization prom-

ise, Canada will be the first major (or “developed”) country to do so. (Sorry, Uruguay, you don’t count.) Even the Netherlands, Spain, and Germany, which have lax laws, haven’t fully legalized sale, cultivation, and recreational use. National implementation, of course, is complicated, given taxation levels, potential home grows, and impaired driving rules, and could take up to a year to create. And of course there’s the possibility Trudeau’s plans might piss off the U.S. government. “The biggest concern I always had was the thickening of the border and being off-side with the United States,” Trudeau noted about his plans. “I do not see this as a slippery slope. . . . I see this as an issue of legislators slowly catching up to where public opinion and public behavior actually is.” While America is taking a slow-but-not-so-sure state-by-state approach to legalization, there are myriad benefits to doing it at the national level. By listing cannabis as a Schedule I narcotic under federal law, the U.S. government maintains roadblocks related to interstate commerce, banking, insurance, and federal tax codes. It also is delaying scientific research on its medicinal uses, and leaving organic standards and oversight to individual states. Given our 3,987-mile border with Canada, we can either build a wall to keep Canadian potheads out, or legalize it ourselves. The choice is quite clear. E For more Higher Ground, visit highergroundtv.com.


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Turn Key Restaurant For Sale Glass Alley Cafe, 5575 Harbor Ave., Freeland Family Tragedy Forces Owner to Move out of State Dear Whidbey Island Community & All of Our Devoted Patrons It is With Great Sadness that I am selling my successful wellestablished restaurant. See why Glass Alley Cafe has attracted a steady following; visit website: glassalleycafe. squarespace.com Established Return Clientele! This is a rare and exciting opportunity to earn, learn & be your own boss with such a fine establishment such as Glass Alley Cafe! $59,000 For your serious inquiry & personal tour appointment directly with owner, please contact Debbie at: (360) 969-2320 maytopcat@cox.net Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

n o s u w o M l l A o R f G A T INS @ SEATTLE WEEKLY • N OVEMBER 4 — 10, 2015

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Employment General

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • NOVEM BER 4 — 10, 2015

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32

Respond to rbhiring@ywcaworks.org Details @ www.ywcaworks.org

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