Page 1

New challenge: Vertical World’s big expansion, 11 NOVEMBER 2015 | VOL. 18, NO. 8

Coastal rising CEO sets course for Everett bank, 6-7

Supplement to The Daily Herald

More from The Herald Business Journal: On www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com: ◗ Keep up to date with our weekly newsletter. ◗ See what’s on the local business calendar and submit your events. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ heraldbusinessjournal On Twitter: @HBJnews

The Herald Business Journal 1800 41st St., Suite 300 Everett, WA 98201


2 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

November 2015

CALENDAR

Port of EVERETT

REPORT

Nov. 10, 16*

Port Commission Mtgs; Possible Budget Adoption*

Dec. 5

Creating Economic Opportunities

Holiday on the Bay; Holiday Farmer’s Market

2016 PorT oF EvErETT BudGET MESSAGE The allocation of funds will support our continued effort to remediate legacy contamination on our properties, the reinvestment in our facilities, maintenance of our facilities and equipment and investment in growth opportunities. The Port’s capital investment plan is supported with a long-term funding strategy, which includes a mix of bonds, loans and increased operating revenues.

The 2016 Preliminary Citizen Budget Guide is designed to highlight the budget overview for each of the Port of Everett’s business lines. For 2016, the Port is proposing $25.5 million in operating expenses and $6.6 million in non-operating expenses, combined with a $45.9 million in capital investment – for a total Port budget for 2016 of $78 million. This budget employs close to 100 employees who operate and manage a full service international seaport, marina and the development of nearly 3,000 acres of waterfront property. It also supports more than 100,000 local longshore hours. Port of EVERETT

EXECUTIVE

Pigeon Creek Public Access Trail is temporarily closed to accommodate construction of a new rail line at the Port of Everett Seaport.

Structuring our capital investments as strategic initiatives has allowed us to more directly tie the importance of the individual projects with our strategic development priorities. A large portion of our budget is subject to external and global economic factors. Therefore, the Port is working to build a budget that is sustainable and invests in infrastructure so we can respond to any opportunity or challenge that may come our way in 2016.

The Port of Everett’s 2016 budget of $78 million is designed to position the Port to implement its capital initiative portfolio. The budget assumes a slight decline in seaport activities and modest growth in the marina and real estate divisions.

The budget is based off $32.1 million in operating revenues, $4.8 million in nonoperating revenue (includes a 1-percent SEAPORT growth in property taxes), and $9.4 million The Port is working on the second phase of the in grants and third party payments. South Terminal Wharf These revenues, along with cash reserves Strengthening and Imand anticipated borrowings, will pay provement project, which for all operating costs and $45.9 million includes, design and in environmental cleanups and capital engineering. investments.

MARINA

real Estate development Enhancing Public Access Marina recapitalization remediating Historic Contamination Marina Maintenance Seaport Maintenance Creating a New Waterfront Community Preparing for larger Ships

300

250

200

150

100

50

The Everett Farmer’s Market will be moving near Boxcar Park in 2016 to accommodate the construction of the Grand Avenue Bridge.

John Carter | Chief Financial Officer

other

0

1439305

REAL ESTATE

We appreciate your commitment to and involvement in the Port of Everett.

CAPITAl NEEd BASEd oN INITIATIvE C A P I TA l I N I T I AT I v E S

Snohomish River Maintenance Dredging is now underway between the Everett Yacht Club and Anthony’s Homeport.

The Port of Everett Commission will open a public hearing on November 10, and continue the public hearing to November 16, when the Commission will consider adoption of the final 2016 Port budget.

MIllIoNS

Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

Information you would like to see in next month’s update? Please e-mail lisam@portofeverett.com

Stay Connected! Visit www.portofeverett.com ‘Like’ us on Facebook; ‘Follow’ us on Twitter and Instagram


TABLE OF CONTENTS

NOVEMBER 2015

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Coastal Community Bank president and CEO Eric Sprink took charge at the bank just as the recession hit .

COVER STORY

CVS Health builds two pharmacies in Snohomish County . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Despite setbacks, Eric Sprink leads Coastal Community Bank into a new era, 6-7

BUSINESS BUILDERS

BUSINESS NEWS

Monika Kristofferson: Developing your work team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Mountain Pacific Bank took unusual path to survive the recession . . . . . 4 1st Security Bank keeps community focus in expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Heritage Bank plants flag in a big way in Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Vertical World to open major expansion near Paine Field . . . . 11

James McCusker: Look for the little signs to tell the bigger story . . . . . 17 Andrew Ballard: Business strategy needs abundant pre-planning . . . . 18 Tom Hoban: Everyone needs to help fix Everett’s homeless problem . . . 19 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . 20-21

Fluke’s parent company could move to Everett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

BANKRUPTCY FILINGS . . . . . . . 21

Developer plans $100 million business park in Arlington . . . . . . . 12

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 24-25

Olympus Spa offers warm experience to combat Northwest cold . . . 14-15

PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . 22

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 26-27

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Maureen Bozlinski 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 mbozlinski@heraldnet.com

Contributing Writers: Quinn Russell Brown, Deanna Duff, Melissa Crowe, Jennifer Sasseen Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban, James McCusker, Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Coastal Community Bank president and CEO Eric Sprink stands in the bank’s new headquarters in Everett. Dan Bates / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal. 1423794

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3


4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

Mountain Pacific’s survival story Everett bank built homes to get through the recession By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal Editor

EVERETT — Mountain Pacific Bank’s prospects looked so bleak during the recession that regulators figured the bank would close. The Everett-based bank was heavily invested in real estate at a time when it was bad to be invested in real estate. “When we eventually got out of the (ceaseand-desist) order, they commented that we were in their top Mark Duffy five of banks that would fail,” said Mark Duffy, Mountain P a c i f i c ’s CEO. “They assumed that Rick Pedack we would fail.” But that didn’t happen. Instead, Mountain Pacific completed a remarkable turnaround, getting back into the good graces of the regulators. And more importantly, the bank started making a profit again. Mountain Pacific went from losing $580,000 just three years ago to earning $780,000 in profit last year. And this year, the bank is on pace to earn $1 million in profit for the first time. And all of that came about with a gamble. At the height of the recession, Mountain Pacific found itself owning a lot of land, projects where contractors and developers had walked away. The bank could have sold the land for fraction of what it had invested. Instead, the bank went from financing projects to constructing them. On one project, the bank built 24 homes on a lot in south Everett. The bank had an offer for $85,000 for each undeveloped lot

JIM DAVIS / HBJ

Chris Henderson (left) of Granite Falls, and John Williams of Stanwood put down a frame in a house in Arlington’s Trophy Ponds subdivision, one of the troubled properties Mountain Pacific Bank took over during the recession.

on the project, but was able to make $100,000 a lot by going into the construction business. That was about $360,000 at a key time for the bank. “I tell people it helped save the bank,” Duffy said. Duffy and Mountain Pacific made a smart move during a rough time for all banks, said John Collins, president and executive director of Community Bankers of Washington. “That’s a good example of bankers using their initiative to keep the bank solvent and get through those tough times,” Collins said. “I have a great amount of respect for Mark.” Mountain Pacific started 10 years ago and, in July 2006, opened its main branch at 3732 Broadway in Everett. The bank opened a second branch in Lynnwood in 2008. But just as the bank was getting going, the recession hit. At the time, there were 14 community banks headquartered in Snohomish County. Now there are seven and only two in Everett. All of the failed banks had one common denominator: They loaned out too much money on construc-

tion projects. Mountain Pacific was no different. It had followed successful strategies employed by Snohomish County heavyweights Frontier Bank in Everett and City Bank in Lynnwood, which both collapsed during the recession. “A lot of us followed their formula, which was the construction lending,” Duffy said. “Around here, everyone was going, ‘We’ve never had a real estate recession.’” By 2009, the recession was in full force and Mountain Pacific, like other banks, started foreclosing on properties. “We had an actuary, a plumber, painter — guys that were in different industries became developers,” Duffy said. “We realized when we ended up with property back that the professional developers, their projects definitely didn’t have as many issues as the guys who were in it as a second career.” By March 2009, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the state Department of Financial Institutions put a ceaseand-desist order on the bank. “As I told my sharehold-

JIM DAVIS / HBJ

A model house sits in the 35-lot Trophy Ponds subdivision of Arlington.

ers at the first bad meeting, which was in 2009 when everything was falling apart, I said, ‘I have my life’s savings in the bank, I put everything in when I started the bank,’” Duffy said. “I told them you don’t have a better CEO to turn this around, because I have my life’s savings here and my career is on the line.” The first thing the bank did was stop making any loans except to existing customers. Then the bank raised some capital. To entice investors, the bank offered a warrant that allowed people to invest at $3 a share in 2009 and 2010 — much lower than the initial offering of $10 a share — and then buy shares again in 2014 for that same price. And the

bank got creative. With all of the land on the books, the bank decided to build homes. City Bank of Lynnwood was already doing the same thing. Mountain Pacific started with a couple of homes on an eight-lot development and found that it made some money. At the time, the few builders who were constructing new homes were making the houses as cheap as possible. Mountain Pacific felt that it could spend a little bit more money yet still make a home for low cost. “What I learned is you sell to the wife,” Duffy said. “That’s why we always put in a five-piece bathroom and granite tabletops and

the hardwood floors.” But the bank didn’t build too many homes before regulators put a stop to both City Bank and Mountain Pacific. “The story we heard is it came out of Washington, D.C., they didn’t want to take the risk,” Duffy said. “If they had to come in and close the bank they didn’t want to have all of these building projects.” City Bank went under soon after. Mountain Pacific tried a different tact: What if they just put up the land and the bank directors put up the cash to build the homes? “We put up over a half a million dollars to front the construction of these homes,” said Rick Pedack, chairman of the Mountain Pacific board. “At the end of the day, if this didn’t work, we wouldn’t have gotten that money back.” Pedack said he was confident in the Puget Sound area economy. “Like I always like to say, Boeing is still building airplanes, Starbucks is still selling coffee and Microsoft is still making software,” Pedack said. “Those engines are huge for this area.” Altogether, Mountain Pacific and its directors built 70 homes. The bank still owns some of the troubled land, property on Whidbey Island, and in Bothell and Entiat near Lake Chelan. But most of the foreclosed upon parcels have been sold and developed. Pedack, who founded Seattle Speciality Insurance in Everett and continues with the company as chief marketing strategy officer after it was sold to National General Insurance, said that saving the bank by building homes was a rewarding experience. “We were helping guys and gals who were pounding nails,” Pedack said. “All of those folks were earning wages and putting food on the table and providing for their families.” While it helped the community, it also saved the bank. “As people have told me over the past couple of years,” Duffy said, “I’m smiling a lot more than I was then.”


NOVEMBER 2015

1420952

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5


6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

COVER STORY

PHOTOS BY DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Coastal Community Bank CEO Eric Sprink (left) works regularly with chief financial officer Joel Edwards and marketing director Laura Byers. Sprink led the bank during the recession when about half of the banks in the state closed or merged.

Coastal emerges from dark days By Quinn Russell Brown

For The Herald Business Journal

B

y all accounts, the past decade did a number on Washington’s banks. In 2006, more than 100 were headquartered in the state. Due to a mixture of mergers, acquisitions and closings, less than half remain today. The number of banks headquartered in Snohomish County went from 14 to just seven. One of those is Everett’s Coastal Community Bank, which tripled its market share to emerge from the recession as the largest bank headquartered in the county, measured by both assets and deposits. “We probably bank every third business owner,” said CEO Eric Sprink, looking out the window of his office on Evergreen Way. Sprink, 43, joined Coastal in 2006, just in time for the early signs of the downturn. “I thought it would be really cool to be a CEO going into a banking crisis,” he said earnestly, then burst into a laugh. For Sprink, tragedy plus time has brought comedy, or at least a little levity, to the largest banking crisis in decades. “It was tough, but at the same time, you

“Eric would not and could not take exclusive credit for the survival of the bank, but I can guarantee you that without his link in the chain, it would’ve been a lot tougher, if not impossible.” — Tom Lane look back and you laugh at the things you did,” he said. “The teammates you got through it with, you’re a lot closer now.” Most of Coastal’s clients are small business owners. “At the height of the recession, we stopped and said, ‘We have 465 clients who are now partners. We need to help them and they need to help us, or else none of us are going to get through it,’” Sprink said. In 2010, Coastal lost $6 million but hired 35 more employees and started to fund construction projects. The bank has expanded from seven branches before the recession to 12 in 2015, rebounding from a low point of 61 employees in the darkest days to 142 today. The bank opened new headquarters and a branch at 5415 Evergreen Way in Everett in 2014. Its newest branch opened in Marysville in August. A merger

with Lynnwood’s Prime Pacific Bank was expected to follow in October, but the deal was voted down by Prime Pacific’s shareholders. The move surprised leadership on both sides. Sprink gave his staff 30 minutes to reflect on the failed merger, then told them it was back to business as usual. “Yes, I’m bummed I didn’t get the merger, but that doesn’t stop who we are and what we’re doing,” Sprink said. “Coastal is doing so many good things. We’re making a difference. Our shareholders are winning. Life is good.” Sprink credits Coastal’s current momentum to its board of directors being aggressive during the downturn (he also serves on the board). Tom Lane, president of Dwayne Lane car dealerships, was chairman throughout the recession. He said he and Sprink often saw each other more than they saw their own wives.

“That was a horrendously dark period. You can tell by all the banks that went away,” Lane said. “Eric would not and could not take exclusive credit for the survival of the bank, but I can guarantee you that without his link in the chain, it would’ve been a lot tougher, if not impossible.” Lane attributes part of that to Sprink’s candid style of communication. “You know exactly where you stand at the beginning, middle and end of every conversation. It is painfully clear to everyone involved,” Lane said, laughing. “There are no hidden agendas.” Hal Russell, who sits on the board of Community Bankers of Washington with Sprink, echoed an appreciation for his straight talk. “There’s a fine line between being direct and being rude, and what Eric is not is rude,” said Russell, president and CEO of Commencement Bank in


NOVEMBER 2015

“You’re probably saying somewhere in this, ‘This poor guy can’t hold a job,’” Sprink said. “It’s all right, I’m getting better as I get older.” — Eric Sprink Tacoma. “He’s got a good sense of humor, and he can bring that humor into a sensitive discussion: he has the ability to make it sound a little more fun and upbeat, and get his point across.” This knack for conversation served Sprink well at the beginning of his career. As a freshman at Arizona State University, he worked nights and weekends in a call center for Security Pacific Bank. When his employer merged with Bank of America in 1992, many upset customers unleashed their frustration on him and his coworkers. “You deal with people’s financial situations and it’s very emotional,” Sprink recalled. “I hated it. I didn’t hate getting yelled at, I hated what we were doing.” So he asked the district manager if he could start working with customers faceto-face in a branch. “I said, ‘I know how to do new accounts, I know how to do loans, I know where all the service centers are. People are upset and I think I can help them.’”

Coastal Community Bank CEO and president Eric Sprink jokes around with chief credit officer Russ Keithley (left) and human resources manager Kerry Hester.

He worked at Bank of America until a merger with NationsBank in 1998, hopping to Centura Bank in North Carolina. He earned an MBA from the University of North Carolina at night, which let him move from hands-on lending and retail banking to the corporate realm of quality improvement and mergers and acquisitions. “It was nice to see both sides,” he said. When Centura Bank was acquired by a Canadian bank in 2001, Sprink declined a move to Toronto, opting instead for a job at the family-owned Washington Trust Bank in Spokane.

In 2006, a headhunter called him about the opportunity to work below Lee Pintar, Coastal’s founder and CEO. Sprink agreed to learn the ropes from Pintar and eventually replaced him as CEO of both the bank and the holding company. “You’re probably saying somewhere in this, ‘This poor guy can’t hold a job,’” Sprink said. “It’s all right, I’m getting better as I get older.” Despite his background at larger banks, Sprink said he’s always had the mindset of a community banker. “There are community bankers at all institutions,” he said. “It’s someone who

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

cares about their customers and goes out of their way to help people.” Still, he admits, “it’s much harder for a corporation to embrace that philosophy the larger it gets.” At bigger banks, for example, clients tend to belong to the bank, not the employees who secure them, and employees get shuffled around every few years to prevent them from collecting accounts that they can leave with one day. At Coastal, the employee owns the relationship with their clients, Sprink said. “Our customers like Coastal because of the person they’re dealing with. ...” he said. “No one says, ‘I love that building.’ They say, ‘I like the people in it.’ And then they get a warm feeling for the brand as an offshoot.” This attitude is one reason why forgiving the loans of Oso slide victims was a no-brainer for Sprink. Such a no-brainer, in fact, that he shies away from even addressing the subject anymore. His oneline response — “We did it to pick a fight with the big guys” — reflects his disbelief that national banks would try to collect losses. Outside of the office, Sprink stays active with a wife and three daughters. “We’re a soccer, soccer, soccer family,” he said. “My wife played. She got me into playing. My kids all play.” His oldest daughter, Chase, won the U-14 national championship this year. Sprink expects no less from his team at Coastal. “We want to be the best,” he said. “We may not be today, but we’re gonna be tomorrow.”

PUD Helps Businesses Achieve Savings The School of Hospitality Business Management WSU North Puget Sound at Everett, Washington Assistant/Associate Professor The School of Hospitality Business Management (SHBM) at Washington State University is seeking two (2) qualified applicants for two (2) full-time, tenure track teaching positions to begin August 16, 2016 at the rank of assistant or associate professor, depending on qualifications, with demonstrated research and lodgingindustry experience. Positions will be housed on the Everett campus, and will be primarily responsible for delivering courses for Everett, via on-line and other cutting edge distance teaching methods on a flexible schedule. This may include course delivery to other urban campuses or Pullman via videoconference, and/or online. Some travel to urban campuses, and/or Pullman may be required.

Don’t miss out on our great incentives!

Minimum Required Qualifications:

• • • •

A PhD in hospitality or closely related field from a nationally or internationally recognized university by the hire date. Demonstrated record of research published in and current research targeted towards top tier journals in hospitality and tourism. Demonstrated ability to teach Hospitality Business Management courses, with record of excellence in teaching and teaching effectiveness. For an associate professor level in addition to the qualifications above, a demonstrated record of publications in premier research journals in the field is required. Served at least six (6) years, or 72 months as an assistant professor or equivalent.

Preferred Qualifications:

• Soren Petersson Trade Products Maintenance Supervisor

With help from the PUD, Trade Products upgraded to an efficient compressed air system, an investment that paid for itself in a few short months. The Lynnwood business makes pull-tabs and other game products. It’s now saving more than $37,000 annually.

1439336

Call or go online today to learn more about how PUD energy-efficiency programs can help you save energy and money.

425.783.1700 Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

www.snopud.com “For Your Business”

Thirty-six (36) months of successful, continuous hospitality industry lodging or casino gaming operations experience, at the managerial level. In addition, the successful candidate must have proven ability to work effectively in a collegial environment with faculty, staff, and PhD students, and with individuals and groups from a variety of identities, cultures, backgrounds, and ideologies.

Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

Teaching four (4) undergraduate courses, and/or graduate courses per year (assigned in fall, spring, or summer) in the area of hospitality business management. Courses will be taught face-to-face, online and via streaming. Students may be in Pullman, Vancouver, Everett, Tri-Cities, Brig, or elsewhere around the globe. • Conducting scholarly research and producing publications in top-tier hospitality journals. • Serving on internal committees with other WSU faculty, external teaching partners, regional boards, and community entities. To apply, go to www.wsujobs.com to complete the on-line application and submit the applicant documents: cover letter, CV, and contact information of at least three professional references. Screening of applicants will begin on November 1, 2015. Position is open until filled. For more information about the position please contact search committee chair, Mark Beattie at mabeattie@wsu.edu. WSU is an EEO/AA employer and educator.

1443655


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

1st Security has Olympic ambitions By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Mountlake Terrace’s 1st Security Bank CEO Joe Adams (left) meets with Mark Lessard, president of Edmondsbased Wilcox Construction. The bank expects to keep its community focus as it adds four branches on the Olympic Peninsula.

seven. Bank of America is reducing its presence on the Olympic Peninsula by selling banks in Hadlock, Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Lien Research Corp. has been in business since 1988 serving our cliental with the knowledge and experience needed to legally protect the security of your assets. Toll Free: 800-446-4978 www.lienresearch.com Office: 425-252-6641 16710 Smokey Point Blvd., #210 Fax: 425-252-2754 P.O. Box 3409 Arlington, WA 98223 1439337

1st Security Bank’s board of directors unanimously decided to acquire all four. “It wasn’t really on our radar to expand, but the opportunity presented itself and the more we looked at it, the more excited we became,” said Joe Adams, CEO of 1st Security Bank. “We already have a Poulsbo branch and this essentially allows us to create a peninsula banking region with a total of five branches.” The approximate total for the new locations is $260 million in deposits. According to Adams, deposit amounts at the new branches are similar to a bit higher compared to 1st Security’s existing locations. As of June, 1st Security’s total deposits were approximately $470

data

million. With the new Olympic Peninsula cluster, 1st Security can better support staffing. It is easier to cover vacations, sick leave and emergencies. All employees will be retained in the acquisition with a possible increase in overall operations staffing. “The decision to sell rather than closing those banking centers was made to maintain job opportunities for employees and keep financial centers open in those communities,” said Britney Sheehan, regional media relations manager for Bank of America. All four of the banks are longtime, community institutions. In 2015, the Port Angeles location celebrated its 50th anni-

versary. The other three branches opened between 1974-1976. Two of the properties are owned by Bank of America and two are leased spaces. “1st Security has really demonstrated a strong commitment to serving the community, which was one of the reasons why they were selected,” Sheehan said. “They’re really committed to this market and doing a great job. We’re very supportive of the sale.” 1st Security remains poised for continued growth. According to Adams, the bank’s lending side boasted 20-25 percent annual loan growth in recent years. Staffing has grown from 80 employees in 2011 to 230 this year. Approximately 25

Transmissions of Marysville

grace

European • Japanese • Domestic One Day Service/Rebuilds in Stock 36 mo. Unlimited Mileage. Warranty Available

Custom databases If your business is unique, why should you expect to run it using off-the-shelf software? 206.463.1634 | www.datagrace.biz

1369431

The role and importance of a community bank is not often considered until times of transition. Mark Lessard, president of Edmonds-based Wilcox Construction, banked with a corporate institution for 16 years. He was stunned when his company’s line of credit was abruptly halved due to perceived disuse. He took his business to Mountlake Terrace-based 1st Security Bank. They immediately restored the line of credit and later even hired Wilcox Construction to remodel the Edmonds branch. “When times get tough, that’s when you need a local bank because they see you for being more than just numbers. They know you as part of the community,” Lessard said. This January, 1st Security Bank is expected to expand to new communities, adding four banks to its existing network of

additional positions are expected from the Bank of Amercia acquisition. “We’ve been pretty steady. We had an excellent amount of capital going into the recession,” Adams said. “More importantly, we didn’t end up with the concentration risks so many other banks had. Some were well outside FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) guidance for commercial real estate and construction lending.” While online banking is a popular option for many customers, 1st Security has also navigated continued success with brick-andmortar sites. They opened a new Mill Creek branch in May. “Online banking, though efficient, is not very warm and friendly. There are many customers who still prefer to actually talk to somebody,” said Melissa Harris, manager at 1st Security’s Mill Creek branch. Outreach goes beyond dollars and cents. A 1st Security branch manager helped found the annual Poulsbo Kid’s Day in partnership with local fire and police departments. The bank also participates in the Teach the Children to Save program whereby elementary-school children across Snohomish, King, Kitsap and Pierce counties learn banking basics. “Being Puget Soundbased, we’re very committed to the region even outside of traditional banking needs,” Adams said. “That’s harder to do when you’re based thousands of miles away.”

1439291

Free Local Towing w/Major Repair www.edstransmissions.com (360) 653-1835 10226 State Ave. Marysville


NOVEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

Heritage continues push into Seattle By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal Editor

When Whidbey Island Bank merged with Heritage Bank last year, one of the unstated goals was to expand the combined bank’s presence in Seattle. It made sense geographically. Whidbey Island’s coverage reached from the Canadian border to north King County. Heritage’s area was from Oregon to south King County. And it made sense financially. Before the merger, the separate banks had about $1.6 billion each in assets. Combined, Heritage now has about $3.6 billion in assets, enough to provide the capital for costly projects in downtown Seattle. “Both banks had some level of activity in King County, but the combined bank gives us size and scale to really handle that market,” said Bryan McDonald, Heritage’s chief lending officer. That’s why Heritage Bank planted its flag in a big way in downtown Seattle this summer. The bank in August opened a branch in downtown at 1420 Fifth Ave., Suite 3600, in Seattle. Last month, Heritage Bank expanded the staff at the office and now has 14 bankers at the site. “What we’ve found is a very strong acceptance by the market,” McDonald said. “You never know when you start something new, but this has been a process that has been going on for over a year

“You never know when you start something new, but ... at each step we’ve had results stronger than what we originally expected.” — Bryan McDonald and at each step we’ve had results stronger than what we originally expected.” King County is like Snohomish County in that the national banks — the Bank of Americas, the Wells Fargos and U.S. Banks — control most of the market. That’s even more so the case since Washington Mutual Bank closed in 2008 and its assets were purchased by New York’s J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. And that opens the door for a bank like Heritage, which has its roots in community banking. Heritage, with headquarters in Olympia, has 66 branches mostly up and down the I-5 corridor. Thirteen of those locations are in Snohomish County and another seven are in Island County. “I think the loss of WaMu gives an opportunity for a regional commercial bank to increase its presence in (the Seattle) market,” said Brian Vance, Heritage’s president and CEO. “There are some opportunities for a community bank with size and scale that has the desire to bank

that market. As always I think it takes the right team and the right people to accomplish that and I think Bryan has done an incredible job assembling that team.” McDonald wouldn’t say that community banks are better than corporate banks, but he did say the banks offer different experiences. Community banks tend to be deeply involved in the areas they grew from, he said. Community bankers are expected to join nonprofit boards and take part in civic life. “The responsiveness and relationship between the business owner and the bank is different,” McDonald said. “You would often have access to the chief lending officer or our CEO where you wouldn’t at (national bank.)” Banking is a high-touch business and being able to interact with decisionmakers quickly is important, Vance said. “I think that’s a key difference between a community bank and a national player,” Vance said. Heritage Bank doesn’t break out how

individual branches do in its earning report. But earnings are strong for the overall company. Heritage Financial Corp., the holding company for Heritage Bank, reported a net income of $9.5 million, or 32 cents for diluted shares, compared with $7.1 million, or 23 cents a share, for the same quarter last year. The company’s total assets have increased by $115 million since June. Loans receivable were up $56 million from the previous quarter. And McDonald credits part of that to the strategy in Seattle, where the bank opened the downtown branch in the City Centre building. (The bank does expect to close a smaller branch in Westlake next year.) While Seattle and King County has gotten a special focus this year, Heritage Bank has also added personnel and resources in Snohomish and Pierce counties, McDonald said. Those three counties are the fastest-growing counties in Heritage Bank’s coverage area. “If you drive around Snohomish County and downtown Everett, it’s pretty obvious that people are making investments in the county,” McDonald said. “I think we’re privileged to do business in some very strong markets,” Vance said. “The Puget Sound markets are doing well and we’re able to capitalize on the growth we’re seeing in the region.”

Building a community One business at a time.

Member FDIC

Now open on Evergreen Way! Dean Olsby

Larry Jacobson

Branch Manager Business Development Officer 1392614

Our new branch is an important part of our long term commitment to Everett and Snohomish County.

Evergreen Way Office 6920 Evergreen Way Everett, WA 98203 (425) 257-4495 peoplesbank-wa.com/business-banking


10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

BANK LOCAL

AND YOUR BANK COMES TO YOU.

When you bank with Mountain Pacific, you get advantages no other bank offers. Like our mobile branches. They pick up deposits at any location in Snohomish County. So you don’t have to worry about taking time away from your business. Best of all, banking local means your money stays right here in the community. Give us a call and we’ll show you how business growth accelerates for everyone when you keep your money local.

Keeping it local

EVERETT 3732 BROADWAY 425.263.3500

LYNNWOOD 19705 HIGHWAY 99 425.493.5200

BALLARD 5470 SHILSHOLE AVE NW #310 206.397.3110

MOUNTAINPACIFICBANK.com

(moving to 2244 NW 56th St., Seattle, WA 98107)

Member FDIC 1440564


NOVEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

New challenge awaits county climbers Vertical World to open new indoor rock climbing gym near Paine Field By Melissa Crowe

For The Herald Business Journal

It will be a whole new place to tackle gravity. The owners of Vertical World Everett plan to build a new indoor rock climbing gym just south of Paine Field. The gym called Vertical World North will feature 20,000 square feet of climbing space, about three times bigger than the Everett gym with plenty of room for enthusiasts to practice bouldering, toprope and lead climbing. Plans also include health club equipment, a yoga studio, full showers and an outdoor patio with a fire pit to add a ski-lodge feel, perfect for relaxing after a climb, meeting new friends or catching up with old ones. “You go to your health club because your wife thinks you’re fat,” said Rick Johnston, owner of Vertical World Inc.. “This is where you want to hang out, this is part of your lifestyle.” Vertical World North is expected to open this spring at 12300 Beverly Park Road off Highway 525, said Johnston, whose company also runs indoor rock climbing gyms in Seattle and Redmond. He declined to say how much the new gym costs. When it opens, his company plans to give up the gym at 2820 Rucker Ave. in downtown Everett to another group to operate as Summit Everett. K.J. Maxwell, manager of Vertical World Everett, has been climbing since the late 1980s. “It’s more popular now than it’s ever been,” Maxwell said. The new location will give them space to share the sport with people living in the north Puget Sound area. “We have people who have been climbing for a long time, people who are brand new to it,” he said. Some come for weight loss, others for the mental break, but most for a good challenge.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Kira Walters (left), of Everett, ascends a bouldering wall at the Vertical World climbing gym in Everett. Vertical World plans to build new indoor rock climbing gym three times bigger in south Everett.

“Just like runners, you can escape and focus on the movement and the objective at hand, you can let go of those other things,” Maxwell said. Monthly memberships start at $20 for children up to $63 for an all-access pass to any Vertical World location. Climbers can also drop in without a membership for $16 for one day. The gym has gear rentals for chalk bags, belay devices, harnesses and shoes, all priced $5 and less. The idea for Vertical World came to Johnston at 20,000 feet. Johnston, who quit his law firm job, wanted a place where climbers could train and hang out during the off-season. “It’s a fair weather sport,” he said. “Spring through fall you get most of your climbing in, in the winter time there’s not much going on unless you go east to the mountains or out to the desert.”

In 1987, in a run-down warehouse next to the train tracks on Elliot Avenue in Seattle, he and Dan Cauthorn opened Vertical Club, later known as Vertical World Seattle. It was the country’s first indoor rock climbing gym. He said the pushback was intense. Leading outdoor retailers refused to talk to him. His friends called him crazy. “You’re not supposed to bring climbing indoors,” he said. “There was a lot of headwind and I had to battle that.” Now, there are more than 400 gyms in the U.S. and Canada, and there’s no doubt in Johnston’s mind that indoor rock climbing is a success. “It’s like a different universe now,” Johnston said. “We were just gluing rocks on the wall and trying to create a place for climbers to hang out. We had a few classes here and there. Now it’s a multi-dimensional service industry.”

Since Johnston opened his first gym, Vertical World expanded into Redmond and into Everett about seven years ago. The gyms boast teen programs, toddler groups, children’s programs, birthday parties, and a much more broad membership base. He wants climbers at Vertical World to know the founders of the sport — Royal Robbins and Wayne Harding — to be able to properly handle themselves safely in technical situations. The gyms have been described as alcohol-free nightclubs for cheerful athletic nerds. Johnston said that’s not quite the case. “It’s not a replacement for outdoors by any means; it’s an alternative health club,” Johnston said. “It’s people who want to use it as an alternative health club all the way to people who want to rock climb outdoors every day.”

DON’T LET A

PAST DUI

STOP YOUR BUSINESS TRAVEL

TO CANADA!

1439293


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

Fortune 500 Business park to add 2,000 jobs company may land in Everett By Kari Bray

Herald Writer

By Jim Davis and Dan Catchpole Herald Writers

EVERETT — Word is out that Everett could land the headquarters of a new company potentially large enough to be listed on Fortune 500, an annual compilation of America’s largest businesses. The parent company of Everett’s Fluke Corp. announced earlier this year that it’s separating into two businesses by the end of 2016. One company would remain known as Danaher, which is based in Washington, D.C. A second company, known now as NewCo, would include Danaher’s test and measurement businesses, such as Fluke, as well as its other specialty industrial businesses.

1444664

The group of businesses that would make up NewCo generated $6 billion in revenue during its last fiscal year. A state official said last month that NewCo had made the decision to open its new headquarters here. Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson confirmed the city has been trying to attract the company’s headquarters, but said the city hadn’t heard the official word. Fluke and Danaher representatives aren’t commenting. If the new company does set up shop in Everett — and it remains the same size — it would rank somewhere about 400 on Fortune magazine’s list of biggest businesses. That would make it one of only 11 companies on the list in Washington, and the only one outside of King County.

ARLINGTON — A Bellevue developer plans to build a $100 million business park near the Arlington Municipal Airport. The city announced last month that GS Venture Partners has purchased the former Northwest Hardwoods and Weyerhaeuser log mill site at 20015 67th Ave. NE. Chris Gayte, the developer behind GS Venture Partners, plans to build up to 1 million square feet of aerospace, manufacturing and industrial work areas in 11 different buildings. The project is called the Gayteway Business Park. BNSF Railway has agreed to add two rail spurs on the 54-acre property for businesses to ship and receive products, Gayte said. The city expects the business park could create up to 2,000 new jobs. That’s based on the square footage of the planned business park divided by the average

CRAFT ARCHITECTS

A drawing of a building in the proposed Gayteway Business Park in Arlington.

number of square feet per employee in manufacturing and industrial businesses — roughly 500 square feet per employee, City Administrator Paul Ellis said. Northwest Hardwoods closed in February 2012. The property was put up for sale. Gayte purchased it for $4.2 million, according to county tax records. He made the decision to buy and build there. The city fast-tracked permits to make the project a reality on a short timeline, he said. Officials had been talking with Gayte since June about the land, access

and utilities, Ellis said. It likely will be three to five years before the business park is fully built out. Several companies are interested but none have committed, Gayte said. He plans to construct buildings as businesses demand the space. Each new structure will be customized for the company that moves in. Gayte’s background is in luxury homes. He owns Bellevue-based Gayteway Custom Homes and is trying his hand at commercial development with GS Venture Partners. A master plan of the site shows buildings ranging in size

from about 42,000 square feet to more than 200,000 square feet. “The 54 acres, they just don’t make that kind of property anymore,” Gayte said. “Businesses in Everett and Marysville that are looking to expand can come here because we can build the size of buildings they need.” Gayteway is a win for the city, which aims to recruit a diverse business base and up employment numbers, Ellis said. He hopes to see a variety of manufacturing and industrial companies in the park.


NOVEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

Firm brings metal edge to design Snohomish’s Gagnon Welding 42 does custom welding for businesses By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

In Ryan Gagnon’s world, welding and metal fabrication give ideas solid form and an industrial edginess. From gates, stairways and railings, to bar stools, beer towers and stainless-steel countertops, to reclaimed-wood tables and wine-bottle holders — the list goes on and on — Gagnon Welding 42 Inc. has been pulling objects from the ether for 15 years from its base in Snohomish. “If you can dream it, we can make it happen,” Gagnon said. Starting out in late 2000 with a single truck and a trailer, Gagnon, now 43, first worked by himself as a mobile welding and metal-fabricator company. He found plenty of business. “It’s amazing how, if you just show up on time and you return phone calls, people will use you,” he said. Within a couple of years, he’d moved to a shop location, started hiring employees, sold his truck-and-trailer combination and bought a bigger truck. Today he has four “rigs,” nine employees — eight in the shop and one in the office — and is buying the building that houses his shop at 1208 10th St. in Snohomish. He also recently opened 42 Metal Design a few blocks away, at 905 First St., to display some of the furniture and other creations that come out of his shop. Store hours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; hours will increase as the business grows, Gagnon said. And grow it surely will, as more people discover what Gagnon Welding 42

GENNA MARTIN / THE HERALD

Michael Callahan builds metal brackets for a wedding chapel at Gagnon Welding 42 in Snohomish. The company does custom welding for restaurants and business and also makes custom furniture.

“He looks at projects from a different angle. He’s not your ordinary welder.” — Mike Lavallee Inc. can do. Just ask Mike Lavallee, artist and owner of Killer Paint airbrush studio next door. “He looks at projects from a different angle,” Lavallee said of Gagnon. “He’s not your ordinary welder.” He figures it’s Gagnon’s artistic bent that makes them connect so well. And they trade their talents; Lavallee painted the distinctive flame designs on Gagnon’s work trucks and Gagnon has done projects for Lavallee that include building showcases, security bars, a business sign and the gate in front of his garage. Gagnon learned his trade in a welding course he enrolled in after high school at Lake Washington Technical College in Kirkland, now called the Lake Washington Institute of Technology. From there, he worked for eight years at Kenworth Truck Company in Renton, welding truck axles and mostly doing the same thing day in and day out. It was years later that he

realized his artistic side, after he’d opened his shop. He’d been doing “a lot of gates and railings,” he said, when he met Don Bellis, president and co-owner The Rock Wood Fire Pizza. Bellis had been picking up a truck from Lavallee’s Killer Paint airbrush studio. “He popped next door and said, ‘Hey, are you interested in welding stuff for our restaurant?’” Gagnon said. That was at about number three for the restaurant chain, which started in Auburn and now has some 20 restaurants ranging throughout the Pacific Northwest — including in Lynnwood and Mill Creek — and as far north as Alaska and south in Texas. “It went from building little stuff to helping create everything from tables to beer towers to a crane falling out of the wall,” Gagnon said. Gagnon Welding 42 Inc. “played a major role in the construction of all metal elements in our restaurants,” wrote Bel-

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Gagnon Welding 42 creates custom designs like this circular staircase.

lis, in a testimonial on the welding company’s website, going on to say that not only is the company skilled in welding and metal fabrication, it is also artistic. “We can simply give Ryan a rough sketch, or idea,” Bellis wrote, “and he transforms that into something cool.” Gagnon said, “It’s not all me; I also have good employees that help create a vision with me.” For long-distance projects, such as those for The

Rock Wood Fire Kitchen in different states, Gagnon said he usually ships his shop’s creations, then he and employees travel to the site “in a pack of four” and install them. These days his company’s work is apparent in the industrial metalwork at a variety of restaurants, including the Trails End Taphouse and Restaurant, and The Black Duck Cask and Bottle in Issaquah. “We’re very fortunate that we got in with different restaurants,” he

said, “where people let us design and help create.” As for the 42 in his company’s name? That’s a creation of a different sort, arising from a rowdy night with a snowboarding friend many years ago, Gagnon said. The two were idly wondering how far it was to Mount Baker, where they planned to snowboard the next day, and decided to make a bet. Whoever guessed closest won and the other guy had to buy lift tickets. “We said, on the count of three say your number,” Gagnon explained. “And we both said 42.” It’s been a family number ever since, so much so that his 16-year-old son, Riley, even claimed it for his football jersey. Gagnon also has two daughters: Rainey, 14, and Ria, 11. His wife, Rebekah, works in the shop office. Sometimes he needs advice himself on how to do something, such as welding bronze, which is when he calls on mentors like Chris Gallagher, an owner of Metalistics Inc. in Everett, which rolls the metal many fabricators use in their projects. Gallagher said he is always happy to “pass along our vast, limited knowledge” to other metal fabricators. “It’s kind of a network of fabricators,” he said, “and we all know each other.” Residents of Snohomish are very supportive of each other, Gagnon said, and 99 percent of his business comes from word-of-mouth. “The nice thing about the community is, a lot of us, we all use each other,” he said. Everything he does now is custom-made, but in the future, Gagnon said he’d like to move away from that a bit and sell more out of his 42 Metal Design store. “I’d love to whip out that fish tank five times,” he said. “I’d love to make a table five times.” Still, nothing beats the one-on-one with his clients. “My favorite part of my job is seeing the customer’s face, seeing the customer happy,” he said. “It’s really cool.”


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

Lynnwood spa offers Korean healing By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

Olympus Spa is the opposite of the cliche spa for the elite that charges over-the-top prices for beauty treatments. Here — in Lynnwood and Tacoma and soon in Tukwila — women of even modest means can find health and rejuvenation. Entry fees of $38 in Lynnwood and $35 in Tacoma buy them all-day admission to a variety of heated rooms designed in accordance with thousands of years of Eastern wisdom. There’s a sea-salt room to detoxify the body and burn calories, a charcoal room to help cleanse the blood and lungs, a sand room to strengthen the cardiovascular system, a jade/mud room, meditation room and reading room. Hydrotherapy rooms include hot whirlpools to relieve stress and to soothe aching muscles and joints, a mugwort steam sauna and an herbal dry sauna. “We really focus on restoring health,” said Sun Lee, 40, son of the spa’s founders and manager of the Lynnwood site. It was their mother’s idea, said his brother, Tae Lee, 38, who manages the original spa in Tacoma and interpreted recently as his parents told their story. The Lees left South Korea in 1990, when the boys were teenagers, and settled in Tacoma, near family. Prompted by the wet and windy Northwest winters that chilled

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The various temperature pools range for 60 to 104 degrees at the Olympus Spa, modeled after a Korean bathhouse, in Lynnwood. Below, Myong Lee started the spas for his wife, Young Lee.

Korean spa Olympus Spa hours are 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and from 9 a.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays. The spa is closed Sundays. More info: 425-697-3000 or www.olympusspa.com.

her body and left her hands and feet perpetually cold, Young Lee, now 62, dreamed of the hot

425-265-1111 425-265-1111 2210 112th StEverett SW, Everett 2210 112th St SW,

bath houses of her native Korea. “Why don’t we start a spa like in Korea?” she

425-265-1111 425-265-1111 425-265-1111 2210 112th St SW, Everett 2210 112th St SW, Everett 2210 112th St SW, Everett

asked her husband, Myong Lee, now 72. Her husband embraced the idea and set about working to make it happen, importing materials like jade, Elvan stone and a purified charcoal made by burning wood of a special oak tree in a kiln for seven days.

Such materials can transmit deeply penetrating, therapeutic heat to the human body, Myong Lee said. When the stones, jade, sand, salt and charcoal are heated to certain temperatures, they emit far infrared rays and heat that Myong Lee says not only heats the body, but

helps with healing. Discovered by a German scientist through a spectroscope in the late 18th century, far infrared rays have been the subject of much study in recent years. Invisible to the naked eye, their effect on the body is like sunshine without the damaging ultraviolet rays. Regardless of modern studies, Koreans have been using the heat energy of far infrared rays for centuries — in stone crockery and pots that cook food readily without burning it, in the natural stone used to hold and transmit heat in steam baths and, perhaps most notably, in traditional heated floors, a concept that originated in Korea. While the Lees were well aware of the warmth the far infrared ray generates, their quest to bring that warmth to Northwest women was not without obstacles. One partner didn’t see the vision and left the project. A bank also was skeptical and required the Lees to go through a lot of hoops, Myong Lee said. But they persisted and, in 1997 — three years after beginning their quest — the Lees opened their first Olympus Spa in Tacoma. There are rooms for massages and body scrubs, rooms for a host of beauty treatments, including manicures and pedicures, facials, waxes and moisture treatment — all available for an additional charge — as well as the therapeutic heated rooms and pools. There is even

Celebrating our 10thyear yearininbusiness! business! Celebrating our 10th

Continued on Page 15

Specializinginin Specializing Celebrating

10th year business! Celebrating ourour 10th year ininbusiness! CelebratingSpecializing our 10thinyear in business!

Lexus, Mercedes-Benz,Volvo, Volvo, Lexus, Mercedes-Benz,

Scion, Toyota, Mini, BMW&&your yourvehicle. vehicle. Specializing in Scion, Toyota, Mini, BMW

Specializing in Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Volvo, Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Volvo, Scion, Toyota,Mercedes-Benz, Mini, BMW & your vehicle. Lexus, Volvo, Investing in maintenance and repair yourvehicle vehicle Investing in maintenance and repair forforyour isis aa Scion, Toyota, Mini, BMW & your vehicle. Scion, Mini, smart financial choice and can you thousands over time. in save maintenance and repair for Toyota, your vehicle is aBMW & your vehicle. smart financial choiceInvesting and can save you thousands over time. Investing inour maintenance and repair At Turn Key Auto Service, all of technicians are trained tofor your smart financial choice and can save you thousands overvehicle time. is a At Turn Key Auto Service, all of our technicians are trained to maintenance andtechnicians repair for vehicle is atime. urn K ey Ain uto ervice, all oftools, our areyour trained to safeguard your safeguard your investment with the choice proper software and At TInvesting Sthe smart financial and can save you thousands over safeguard your investment with proper tools, software and Investing in maintenance and repair for your vehicle isthat a investment with the proper tools, software and assured knowledge. You can rest assured that your investment willknowledge. continue toYou can rest smart financial choice and can save you thousands over time. At Turn Key Auto Service,will all continue of our technicians are trained to knowledge. You can restinvestment assured that your investment to your willchoice continue to function at it’syou optimum performance. smart financial and can save thousands over time. function at it’s optimum performance. At Turn Key Service, all of our trained to function at it’sAuto optimum performance. safeguard your investment with thetechnicians proper tools,are software and

All of our work is backed by a 24K/24 month limited warranty All of our work is backed by a 24K/24 month limited At knowledge. Turn Key Auto Service, allwarranty of our technicians are trainedtoto You can rest assured that your investment will continue safeguard your investment the proper tools, software and onalabor new parts andwith labor for a worry free repair. All of our work is backed by 24K/24 month limited warranty on new parts and for a worry free repair. TurnKeyAutoService.com safeguard your investment with the proper tools, software and new parts and labor for a worryat freeit’s repair. TurnKeyAutoService.com function optimum knowledge.onYou can rest assured that your performance. investment will continue to

1444191


November 2015

The Herald Business Journal 15

g CVS enters Snohomish County market

ra te ed ct nt he on ne ng des, ng ar es nd din to in ps al pt

re th rng st ut er nd so ed a ee

d, rs ir ed in ms dy of ddnd all al he ms en

15

ness!

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal Editor

One of the biggest names in health care is staking a claim in Snohomish County. CVS Health is building two pharmacies along Highway 99, one in Everett and the second in Lynnwood. It’s just a year after the pharmacy giant first moved into Washington, opening three stores in King County. “That marked our entry into the Pacific Northwest, where we did not have a retail presence,” said Stephanie Cunha, CVS public relations manager, in an email. And the company plans to continue its expansion

d

ue to

in Washington. Another store is in the works in Seattle, she said. The Everett store at 11819

Airport Road is expected to open in the first three months of 2016. The Lynnwood store at 19507

a tea cafe and a restaurant featuring Korean dishes for both vegetarians and carnivores. It didn’t take long for local women to embrace the Lees’ vision. In 1 1/2 years, the Tacoma site was making a profit. Soon it was getting crowded and customers were complaining about traffic and long travel times. When research indicated “that 60 percent of customers were coming from Federal Way and north,” Tae Lee said, his parents started seeking a second site, eventually settling on Lynnwood. Tucked away behind the Lynnwood Convention Center off 196th Street, the Lynnwood Olympus Spa’s exterior gives little indication of what’s inside.

Highway 99 is expected to open later that spring. The stores will hire a total of 36 people. The stores will

“My parents’ highest priority was to promote women’s health.”

Continued from Page 14

— Tae Lee

Kevin Clark / The Herald

The Mud & Jade Room at Olympus Spa, modeled after a Korean bathhouse, in Lynnwood.

And the simple pleasures of gleaming wooden corridors edged by small white stones and bamboo plants, of darkened rooms with warm, canvas-covered floors of salt and sand, of hushed camaraderie in sauna, pool and lounging areas, is a secret known only to women. Nudity is required in the pools

and men are not allowed beyond the front desk. The Lees said they’ve considered opening a spa for men, but decided against it. Research shows 70 percent of spa clients are women, Sun Lee said. Husbands can take comfort in knowing that pleasing their wives with the gift of a spa visit will also

MANAGE YOUR BUSINESS NOT YOUR IT SYSTEMS

hicle.

to

Jim Davis / HBJ

CVS Health, one of the biggest names in health care, plans to open two pharmacies in Snohomish County along Highway 99.

post signs to direct people CVS’ online application process. Both stores will be between 12,000- and 13,000-square feet. In addition to the pharmacy, CVS stores include photo labs, beauty departments and general merchandise. CVS, which is headquartered in Rhode Island, has more than 7,800 retail stores and 1,000 walk-in clinics and, along with Walgreens, is one of the biggest players in the U.S. drug store market. CVS Health, which changed its name from CVS Caremark last year, made about $139.4 billion in revenue last year. The company also made its share of headlines. In 2014, CVS became the first major phar-

indirectly benefit them, he added. It’s a philosophy embraced by the Lees, Myong Lee in particular. “This spa is a family-owned business dedicated from a husband to his wife as a gift of honoring women,” states the Olympus Spa website. Young Lee uses the Tacoma spa every day. Her circulation has improved and her hands and feet are no longer cold, she said, and she’s happy other Northwest women can enjoy the same healing.Visitors encouraged to write in a journal had simi-

lar remarks. “I have released some of my burden here with a wonderful day spent with my beautifully spirited cousin — relaxing, talking, soaking and sweating out the toxins of everyday life,” wrote one woman. “This is such an amazing place and a true sanctuary.” Myong Lee estimated 50 to 150 women visit the 6,500-square-foot Tacoma spa on any given day, with 100 to 300 at the 15,000-square-foot Lynnwood site, which started turning a profit only six months after opening about 10 years ago.

macy chain to stop selling tobacco. This summer, CVS pulled out of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce after it was reported that the group and its foreign affiliates were engaged in a global lobbying campaign against antismoking laws. CVS is also growing. This year, the company purchased for $12.7 billion Omnicare, which distributes prescription drugs to nursing homes and assisted-living operations. And the company has reached a deal to buy the pharmacies within Target stores, adding another 1,600 pharmacies. Once the Target deal closes, CVS will operate 9,600 pharmacies or about one in seven retail pharmacies, according to the New York Times. Now the Lees are in the design phase of a third Olympus Spa, expected to open in about two years in Tukwila, about two blocks behind the South Center Mall. As profits have grown, so too have the family’s donations to charities, including to World Vision and to the Korean Millal Mission, to help support adults and children with disabilities around the world. For the Lees, the spas was never just about the money, Tae Lee said. “My parents’ highest priority was to promote women’s health,” he said. Sun Lee agreed, explaining that the goal of Olympus Spa is to provide “an oasis, or haven, for women to really find a place to relax in the midst of their busy lives.”

Room Rentals at Everett Station • • • •

• Business Continuity Management

Meetings Receptions Classes Corporate Events

• Security and Backup Plans • Network Assessments • Vendor Contract Coordination

206.651.5451 | www.hennesit.com 1443985

3201 Smith Avenue Everett, WA 98201

425-257-6707 www.EverettStation.org 1206302


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Every business needs a fast track.

Unlike the national banks, our loan process isn’t complicated. We understand you have a lot on your plate, so allow us to give your business a nudge in the right direction. No more waiting for loan approvals from national banks, and no more tapping your foot. We’re here, and we’re here to help. So call us or come in.

You’ll notice the difference.

Find out more at columbiabank.com or call 877-272-3678. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender

1279232

Building teams saves time, hassle “Talent is the multiplier. The more energy and attention you invest in it, the greater the yield. The time you spend with your best is, quite simply, your most productive time.” — Marcus Buckingham

H

ave you ever been on a team or worked with a colleague and your personalities didn’t quite click? The tension and butting of heads can definitely create a stressful work environment. Have you ever had a job that wasn’t a good fit for you to showcase your strengths and talents? After I graduated from high Monika school, I worked Kristofferson at a daycare with toddlers. Growing Office up as an only child and no parenting Efficiency experience yet, I hated it. I can still remember how great I felt the day I quit that job and, of course, that was quite a few years ago. It’s vital for us to know how to work together as a team in the workplace as well as how to relate to the many personalities we encounter through clients, customers and ancillary services. It takes knowledge about different personalies to know how to create the right fit for job duties and people. I love this quote for matching people to jobs: “Every minute devoted to putting the proper person in the proper slot is worth weeks of time later.” — Colman Mockler, CEO Gillette Who doesn’t want to save time? Not only will you save time filling roles correctly, you will help avoid feelings of frustration, stress and poor morale. One of the most common personality tests that you’ve probably heard of is the MyersBriggs Type Indicator assessment. This can be a good first step to learning more about how your team ticks. I also appreciate these two benchmark questions from Jim Collins in his book, “Good to Great,” when you are assessing your team? ■ Would you hire this person again? ■ If this person came to tell you he or she was leaving, would you feel terribly disappointed or secretly relieved? So, how do you create and foster fantastic teams? Follow these tips: Team melting pot Your team needs variety, it needs yin and yang. You need the outspoken person who draws out the shy, quiet person, but they shouldn’t drown them out. Keep in mind, opposites attract in marriage and in relationships. I see it all the time in my business when one spouse is organized

and the other is messy. Your team cannot be made up of all Type A personalities, there’s got to be a better balance so everyone can bring their best traits to the table. Delegate I feel like I write about delegation a lot but I firmly believe delegation is where it’s at to increase productivity. In this case, it’s an excellent way to make sure your team is being assigned tasks that they enjoy, come easily to them and are the best fit for the needs of the project. Don’t confuse delegation with sending work down the chain of command. Delegation can take place upwardly, downwardly and parallel to you in the company. Know yourself Make sure you know your own strengths and weaknesses when dealing with other personality types and work on improving your weaknesses. Accept other people as they are without trying to change them. Don’t expect perfection from yourself or others and be willing to admit your own mistakes. Lead the way If you’re a leader in the company, you may need to focus on leading teams more than working on projects. According to Lee Ellis in Leading Talents, Leading Teams, this is the appropriate breakdown for leadership: First line supervisor may work 70 percent & lead 30 percent Mid-level manager may work 50 percent & lead 50 percent Senior manager may work 20 percent & lead 80 percent Nurture teams A team should work together like a well-oiled machine. Think about how emergency room staff works together when a critical patient comes in. Everyone on the team stays calm, they know what their role is, they know what do and they work together to treat the patient in a life and death situation. If the team fell apart, the consequences would be dire. Nurture your team to keep morale, productivity and spirits up. You can do that with solid, open communication. It also helps to celebrate successes, organize social events outside of work. Build trust It’s well worth your time and energy to build a solid team and you will reap many rewards for doing so. For further reading, I’d recommend, “Leading Talents, Leading Teams” by Lee Ellis. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.


NOVEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Get business intel without Big Data hour, or half-hour, of business. This will give you a picture of your sales that will allow you to better arrange your staffing schedule and, if necessary, your business hours. Also, watch for changes in the time-sales picture for they may indicate a change in your customer base that needs to be addressed. You can also use the cash register receipts to examine the size of

customer purchases and to discover if there is a pattern to customer spending during the day. Depending on your product line you may find that browsers are responsible for more sales revenue than customers seeking a specific item. This characteristic should certainly be reflected in how customers are greeted, welcomed, and assisted as well as product display layout.

Smaller retail businesses have a theoretical advantage in the personal contact they have with their customers. Converting that theoretical into an actual advantage, though, requires good information, good staffing decisions, and constant attention. Ensuring that the in-store experience is pleasant and memorable is the only defense you have against the cold pricing

numbers of the Internet. These simple steps can get you started, and are almost certain to whet your appetite for getting to know your customers’ needs and preferences. That’s a good beginning. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

LARGE SEATING CAPACITY in our FREE Banquet Room!

Winner! Best Brunch!

Think of us for:

Business Meetings | Banquets Breakfast Socials

We offer:

Large seating capacity (up to 50!) Powerpoint Presentation Hook-ups Free Wi-Fi | Large Plasma TV | Privacy

Call Today to schedule your next event! Mon–Sat 7:30am–9:00pm Sun 9:00am–9pm Our Award-Winning Sunday Brunch 9:00am–1:30pm

So much more than just burgers! TULALIP | 8822 Quilceda Pkwy Tulalip, WA 98271 | 360-716-3605 1439016

I

f you want your busicustomers as Big Data ness to survive these provides to the largest days, you are going to firms in the country. have to be more agile; but As just one example, even more importantly you can measure smiles. you will have When you smile to make better to greet them do decisions. customers smile Many of back? If it is a those decisions restaurant, do will be based on they smile when “instinct.” But they receive the best ones their food or will be based on afterward? If it an instinct that is a retail store, James is informed and will they smile McCusker when paying for polished by the best informaan item? Business tion available. Keep a count Just as A-list of the smiles — 101 athletes will tell an estimate is all you that ‘the that is needed, more I practiced the luckbecause it is relative ier I got,’ the better your increases or declines that information is the better are important. In most your instincts will be. situations the number of Putting the best smiles will decline long information in front of before you become aware the decision-maker is the of actual or perceived purpose of “Big Data,” but erosion in your product’s you don’t need big data or quality, selection or the a big wallet to improve the emergence of a competinformation that supports itive threat. Keeping a your decisions. record of the number acts In fact, Big Data is as an early warning system not for everyone. The for you and the acquisition so-called analytics can be cost is close to zero. expensive and intimidatIn a restaurant, much ing for smaller companies. the same information can Worse, the end-product of be derived from listening all the statistical work may to the customers as they be difficult to understand, arrive, order and enjoy let alone implement. A lot their food. Do they sound of the results will probably happy or not? end up gathering dust in Like smiles, the relative someone’s desk drawer. increases or declines are No matter how small or telling you something how large your business about customer satisis, though, much of the faction that is timelier information you need to and more accurate than make good decisions is response cards, which tend already available to you. to report only the excepIn most cases a smaller tionally good or excepbusiness can put together tionally bad experiences. timely, decision-ready No matter what kind of information with less fuss business you are running and less cost than a giant you should know your corporation. customers’ behavior inside The best place to start, and out. In smaller busisurprisingly, is not with nesses, the cash register any data but with two or its computer software questions. What are the is your friend, especially decisions you need to if it tracks time-stamped make? What data would receipts. be most helpful to you in Initially you can use the making that decision? daily sales revenue to warn For most businesses, the you of any declines. We answers to these questions all tend to make excuses can be found by knowing for these declines, but your customers better. the harsh truth is that And, even if your smaller they often warn us that business is a single retail we are losing sales to the store you, can get much competition. the same (or even better) Use the receipts to see information about your your sales during each

EVERETT | 1611 SE Everett Mall Way Everett, WA 98208 | 425-290-8308

www.bobsburgersandbrew.com


18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Pre-plan to supercharge your strategy T

he three stages of strategic development are pre-planning, planning and execution. The most important function of developing a strategic marketing plan (or a strategic business plan) is pre-planning; ironically, this is the stage many businesses fail to adequately address. First I’ll ask you to buy-in to the concept that, to objectively develop and evaluate strategic alternatives, you should have a good understanding of the internal and external factors that may impact your business and the implementation of your plan. If you accept that premise, then conducting the following pre-planning (situation analysis) exercise will likely give you a competitive leg up and extend the shelf life of your plan. I’m suggesting more than the standard SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats). The four categories of the deeper drive I’m suggesting include: 1) internal; 2) external; 3) customer; and 4) competitor. Internal: These are factors within your company’s control. Begin by evaluating the internal strengths and weaknesses of your current marketing mix: product, price, place (distribution) and promotion. Another important area to access is your

infrastructure: facility, finance, technology and human resources. All of these assets need to be aligned to support the execution of your plan. External: These Andrew are factors outside Ballard of your company’s control. Next you’ll catalog opportuniGrowth ties and threats. In Strategies addition, a PEST analysis (political, economy, social and technology) is an effective tool to scan the environment. Every category may not impact your business, so focus on those that do. Customer: Understanding the “voice of the customer” is essential to the pre-planning process. Consider their views and values as they relate to your products and services. Also find out whom they view as your competition, and what on and off line media they consume. Ultimately, you want to learn what underlying motives drive their purchasing behavior. Competitor: Based on who your cus-

The days of five-year plans are long gone. The marketplace is far too dynamic and volatile. Set your sights on a three-year vision. tomers view as the top competitors, study them for their strengths and weaknesses. Look at their marketing mix and how they position themselves in your market space. The key to competitive positioning is to “own” a place in the mind of consumers.’ To achieve that “ownership” status, your point of difference must be highly valued by your target market. Another important consideration is the time period your plan will cover. The days of five-year plans are long gone. The marketplace is far too dynamic and volatile. Set your sights on a threeyear vision, but focus strategic priorities shorter term as a rolling plan to be adjusted when necessary. Another critical success factor is to make sure all of the planning participants receive a key findings report in advance of your planning session. All stakeholders must come to the planning table with a common understanding of current and forecasted conditions. Locally Owned & Operated

Fall 2015 OFFICE FURNITURE

It doesn’t matter whether you are considering “sustaining innovation” (optimizing existing products and services) or “disruptive innovation” (creating new sources of growth, which may include a business model pivot), being informed with reliable and real-time data will generate richer outcomes. Going through the process of evaluating your internal business situation and external market conditions will better prepare you for the planning stage. It is this fact base that will supercharge your strategy and produce an action plan that has the best chances for success. Be sure to check back for my December column, when I’ll delve into sustaining and disruptive innovation, how to make them both work and what determines which approach is best for your business situation. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

SALE

SALE

Optional: Heavy Duty Bookcases Hutch with 4 Laminate Doors, List Sale List $428 Sale $229 PL156 - 70 ¾”H $340 $189 Corner Station Task light, List $127 Sale $65 PL155 - 47 ¼”H $244 $135 PL181/179/107 • LIST $774 Tackboard, List $104 Sale $55 PL154 – 30”H $168 $95 Keyboard Tray, List $112 Sale $59

429

$

FROM $

SpaceMax is an affordable, in stock, panel system. Easy to install, as room divider or cubicle system.

$

95

SALE

2599

Electric Height Adjustable Tables

SpaceMax Panels

Complete package as shown, including desk.

SALE

209 $199

$

SALE

Sierra High Back & Medium Back

Stocked in Black Premium Bonded Leather. Model No. 10311 • List $395 | Model No. 10321 • List $365

$

SALE

149

Presta Mid Back

Mechanical The human body is designed for standing, not sitting. That’s why sitting for prolonged periods of time can cause many problems. Muscle strain, neck and back stiffness, and lack of circulation can result in loss of productivity. Performance Electrical Height Adjustable Tables can help promote a healthier and more efficient workplace.

Available Finishes:

Stocked in Black and Chocolate Leathertek. Model No. 5021 • List $285

Height Range

26“ to 51.5“

SALE

799

$

PLTDEAB7248NRBR24/ PLT2460 LIST $1500

EVERETT OFFICE FURNITURE carries a large selection of quality NEW and pre-owned office furniture. With a LARGE SHOWROOM, from the simplest task chair to a complete office solution, with design & installation, E.O.F. can solve your facility needs. www.EverettOfficeFurniture.com

Everett Office Furniture 1439243

2931 Broadway • Everett, WA

1439295

(425) 257-3242


NOVEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

BUSINESS BUILDERS

It can’t be just us-them with homeless I

t was too cold and wet outside for outdoor recess, so our daughter and her grade school classmates were in the gym when a homeless man somehow broke in through a locked door and lunged toward her playmate. It was unclear whether he was reaching at her to get her attention or whether he was intent on abducting her. He ran away, never to be found. It shook everyone up. All three of our kids went to a Catholic grade school located in the heart of downtown Everett. It’s linked to our church, so we have many different ministries and missions in and around the campus, which spreads across three city blocks. At one end, we feed the homeless and at another we sit with them at Sunday Mass. But this incident 10 years ago crossed the line, so I formed a volunteer foot patrol of dads and a few moms and took to the streets to protect our kids. During each school day, we stationed ourselves around the edges of campus in key locations confronting anyone who looked like they were trouble. Our patrols were effective, but in ways we never contemplated that first day. The experience taught me a lot about how to deal with the homeless problem that has

become epidemic in Everett in recent years. Most of them were not from the Everett area. Nearly all admitted alcohol or drug problems. Some Tom had mental health issues, too. Hoban What caught us by surprise were Realty their stories and Markets how we sorted through them to find good people, perhaps down on their luck, who cared about what we were doing as much as we did. I still can’t shake one vet’s stories of horrific firefights in Vietnam from my mind. Many were family men who lost it all to addiction. One, in particular, left a lasting impression on me. “I have a daughter too, man,” he mumbled. “She lives in Tennessee with her mom. Anyone touches her . . . and he’s a dead man.” With that connection, he jumped up and joined in to help us protect our kids. Over time, he became a quasi-informant for us that led to a safer environment.

Engagement by ordinary citizens and business owners has to be part of the equation to fully address the homeless problem in Everett. Such is the reality of Everett’s homeless problem. Some are heroes who are just on hard times, some are addicted ex-offenders looking for their next victim. Most are hungry, broke and broken souls from other places. Recently, I found an old timer sleeping under a set of stairs near my office, which is also in downtown Everett. We know each other by name now. He told me my informant from 10 years ago was back in Tennessee, clean and sober. Apparently he got to see his daughter graduate from high school earlier this year, just like me. We high-fived like two old friends. “Been keeping an eye on your school, too, bro,” he garbled with a serious but comforting smile. “Ain’t nobody gonna mess with that place. Y’all are cool.” Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson proposed this spring an ordinance that would restrict where and how the home-

CHRIS THILE

They’re emerging leaders of Snohomish County, the people in business and industry who shape the county for the better today and into the future.

NOMINATIONS sought for

Top nominees will be honored at an event in Spring 2016 and featured in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal.

Thursday, November 12 | 7:30 pm $49, $44 & $39 | Youth/Student $15 Multiple GRAMMY® Award-winner and MacArthur Fellow, a member of Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek, Chris Thile is a mandolin virtuoso, composer, and vocalist. Thile will perform Bach solo violin works on the mandolin, as well as his own compositions and contemporary music.

The Herald Business Journal, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and Leadership Snohomish County are seeking to honor the next generation of leadership in our community. The Emerging Leaders Award was created to annually recognize an emerging individual whose leadership has made a positive impact on Snohomish County. It pays tribute to an individual who exemplifies outstanding professional values: demonstrates the ability to go above and beyond the expectations of a leader; and serves as an inspiration to the community.

LOS LOBOS

Saturday, November 14 | 7:30 pm $59, $54 & $49 | Youth/Student $15 A multiple GRAMMY® Award-winning American Chicano rock band influenced by rock and roll, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues, and browneyed soul.

To recognize a person, please complete the nomination form found on theheraldbusinessjournal.com/ emergingleaders between Nov. 1, 2015, and Jan. 8, 2016. All nominees must currently work or reside in Snohomish County.

SEATTLE INT’L COMEDY COMPETITION

Wednesday, November 18 | 7:30 pm $34, $29 & $24 | Youth/Student $15

For questions about the nomination and application process, please contact HBJ editor Jim Davis at 425.339.3097 or jdavis@heraldnet.com

Regional touring comedy festival featuring nationally recognized comedians. This show may contain adult material not suited for children.

In partnership with:

1440844

ec4arts.org | 425.275.9595 1367241

theheraldbusinessjournal.com/emergingleaders

less could panhandle in Everett. That got rejected by the City Council — and the ACLU threatened to sue over it. The mayor was bringing back a revised ordinance in late October. He also was launching a number of other initiatives on homeless, including commiting $1 million to hire five new police officers, two social workers and another prosecutor. While it’s encouraging that Everett’s city government is prepared to write ordinances and create some legal framework to support its police force, engagement by ordinary citizens and business owners has to be part of the equation to fully address the homeless problem in Everett. The win-win is to protect businesses and citizens while saving a few of these poor fellows from a life on the streets. That involves everyone. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

410FOURTHAVENUENORTH EDMONDSWA98020


20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — Everett Community College has announced plans for a $2.5 million expansion of its Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center. The 17,000 square feet of space will include eight classrooms and a lab for EvCC’s new mechatronics technician program.

furniture industry.

EVERETT — Locally owned and operated Everett Office Furniture has added two new Nadlae members to Ainley their team. Nadlae Ainley is an interior designer and Dan Talley is an account executive Dan Talley for business development. Both Ainley and Talley have 20 years of experience in the office

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE

MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Co. started construction on a 26,000-square-foot addition to the south end of its manufacturing plant. The new project, expected to be complete in 2016, will be mostly warehousing space for the business at 16726 Tye St SE, Monroe. When it’s finished, Canyon Creek Cabinet’s manufacturing plant will be 285,000-square-feet total. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — 1st Security Bank of Washington has named Monique Szyszka-Ramos as new vice president and branch manager for its Overlake branch in Redmond. BOTHELL — McMenamins opened its Historic Anderson School in Bothell, a hotel with bars and restaurants hidden around the former

Long-term includes regularly scheduled vessels only. Ship port calls 2015 YTD: 110 Barge port calls 2015 YTD: 46 Ship port calls 2014: 105 IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

The tiki bar area is packed with patrons at the Anderson School McMenamins in Bothell on its opening day.

junior high campus. The project also includes a brewery, a 134-seat movie theater and a 112-footlong saltwater pool. The $26 million project at 18607 Bothell Way NE, Bothell is the Portland, Oregon, company’s first hotel in the Puget Sound area.

MARYSVILLE — Dana Pratt, president and founder of Pratt Pest Management Northwest, announced a company-wide effort to raise money to support of Susan G. Komen Puget Sound, which raises money for breast cancer research. Pratt Pest

MARKETPLACE AUTO GLASS • GLASS REPLACEMENT • TINTING • VINYL WINDOWS

Rock Chip Repair…

Serving Snohomish County Since 1980

$

3495

CLEAR-VIEW GLASS COMPANY 4317 Rucker • Everett 425-258-9399

FREE

1419303

Quality Transmission Service & Repair

• Remanufactured • Automatic • Standards • Differentials • CV Axles Drivelines • Repairs and/or Replace

Serving the NW Since 1952

www.edstransmission.com

1419306

Pest Solutions

tion of Evalua cility! fa r u o y

TRANSMISSIONS Our Speciality, Not a Sideline

www.clearviewglass.com

Commercial

a day for Call To

TRANSMISSION SERVICE

Experts in Servicing Medical Facilities & Sensitive Environments. Green Science, Great Neighbors Since 1991

1105 10th St. in Marysville

360-629-7378

www.prattpest.com

1419307

1811 Everett Ave. Everett (425) 252-2161

EAST VALLEY

SAND & GRAVEL CO. DBA Penny Lee Trucking, Inc.

3” CLEAN CONCRETE $7.00 TON 3” MINUS CONCRETE $4.50 TON OVER 35 PRODUCTS CRUSHED & WASHED ROCKS LANDSCAPE MATERIAL RECYCLED ASPHALT & CONCRETE PIT RUN & SCREENED BARROW GRAVEL CHIPS DISPOSAL SITE FOR CLEAN DIRT/ASPHALT/CONCRETE

29 YEARS

of Outstanding Reputation for Quality Products and Service 1419304

Same Day Deliveries OPEN Mon. – Fri. 7am – 5pm

360-403-7520

5802 Cemetery Rd • Arlington, WA 98223 www.eastvalleysandandgravel.com

To have your business or service showcased here, please call 425-339-3445 today!

1442274

Management has been supporting local community efforts since 1991 and will donate at least $1,000 from new sales generated in October. To learn more, visit www.prattpest.com. EDMONDS — A new WinCo Foods grocery store opened Oct. 22 at the former TOP Food & Drug Store on Highway 99, the third store by the employee-owned company in Snohomish County. WinCo has hired about 150 employees for the store at 21900 Highway 99 in Edmonds. BOTHELL — Real estate firm MainStreet Property Group announced the $63 million sale of a Six Oaks Apartments + Retail, which includes 203 apartments. MainStreet declined to name the buyer of the property, but a records search listed the buyer as Belkorp Holdings Inc., based in Vancouver, British Columbia. EVERETT — The first Holiday on the Bay Decorated Wreath Fundraiser at the Port of Everett is in support of the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation. Local businesses and community partners are invited to drop off decorated wreaths at the Port’s Administration Office by Nov. 23. Wreaths will be auctioned at a silent auction on Dec. 5. MONROE — Coastal Community Bank, the City of Monroe, Monroe’s Chamber of Commerce and the Monroe Library

Barge port calls 2014: 80 Nov. 1: Pegasus Ocean, NYK Bulk Nov. 3: Westwood Robson, Westwood Nov. 10: Westwood Victoria, Westwood Nov. 15: Shengking, Swire Nov. 17: Westwood Pacific, Westwood Nov. 19: Millennium Falcon, ECL will host the first Monroe Business Symposium from 4 to 6 p.m. Nov. 5 at the East County Senior Center at 276 Sky River Parkway, Monroe. To reserve a spot or for details, contact Katy Woods at 360-8055484 or kwoods@coastalbank.com. EVERETT — Congressmember Suzan DelBene will give the keynote address at the first ever North Puget Sound Small Business Summit. The day-long event will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 6 at Xfinity Arena’s Edward D. Hansen Conference Center. Attendance is free with advance registration. For more information, or to register, visit www.communitytransit.org/smallbizsummit. MARYSVILLE — On Oct. 20, The Greater Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce celebrated a ribbon-cutting ceremony for financial adviser Angie Lane at Edward Jones Investments, 2701 171st Place NE, Suite 204, Marysville.


NOVEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

BUSINESS BRIEFS Many local business leaders attended the event. LYNNWOOD — Get to know the Lynnwood Convention Center better with a behind-thescenes tour. On the third Monday of each month Convention Center staff offer a guided tour of both front and back-ofhouse for individuals and groups. To find out more or to schedule for a tour, contact info@lynnwoodcc.

com or 425-778-7155.

comedy.

MARYSVILLE — The Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce has announced its first Christmas Party Fundraiser, planned to be an annual event. The semi-formal event is scheduled for 5 to 9 p.m. Dec. 3 at the Tulalip Resort Casino. It features a champagne reception, silent and live auctions, a Tulalip Resort dinner and an hour of

EDMONDS — Scott’s Bar & Grill in Edmonds held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Sept. 25 to celebrate the official opening of the Komen Room, an outdoor covered, heated and enclosed room named to honor the founder of Restaurants Unlimited, Rich Komen.

College has hired Tonya Drake as the vice president for College Relations and Advancement. Drake Tonya has been Drake serving as the interim VP for College Relations and Advancement.

LYNNWOOD — Edmonds Community

REDMOND — Pacific Northwest Aerospace

Alliance has announced its new board. Bill King of SubRosa Aero was elected chairman and will replace J.C. Hall of Esterline. Ted Croft, Pyrotek Inc., was elected vice chairman and will replace Jim Sheehan of Technical Aero and returning board member Keith Sims, Composite Solutions, will replace John Graham as secretary. Hall, Sheehan and Graham will remain on the board. Tom Sanger, Moss

Adams, was re-elected treasurer. MILL CREEK — Laughing Buddha Yoga Studio is offering free Friday night yoga classes from 5:30 to 7 p.m. The business, at 17624 15th Ave. SE, No. 111A, Mill Creek, is owned by Dawn Torres. She offers donation meditation and yoga classes at other times. Go to www.laughingbuddhayogastudio.com for details.

Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Sept. 1-30.

BEYOND MARVELOUS

15-15325-CMA: Chapter 11, Nathan Construction Inc.; attorney for debtor: Larry B. Feinstein; attorneys for special requests: John R. Tomlinson Jr., Richard J. Hyatt and Andrew R. Chisholm; filed: Sept. 2; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 15-15369-MLB: Chapter 7, RMK Contractors; attorney for debtor: Jeffrey B. Wells; filed: Sept. 4; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 15-15407-MLB: Chapter 7, Gurbinder Singh Dhaliwal and Parminder K Dhaliwal; attorney for joint debtors: Martin E. Snodgrass; special request: Pro se; attorney for special request: Thomas A. Lerner; attorney for special request: Michael A Padilla; filed: Sept. 09; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 15-15495-TWD: Chapter 11, Jeffrey A. Webb and Donna J. Webb; attorney for joint debtors: Jacob D. DeGraaff; special request: Pro se; attorney for special request: James K. Miersma; attorney for special request: Lance E. Olsen; attorney for special request: W. Adam Coady; filed: Sept. 9; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

SUCCESS

Transform your meeting into an unforgettable event. Experience unrivaled four-diamond accommodations, flexible meeting spaces and state-of-the-art facilities. JUST 30 MINUTES NORTH OF SEATTLE

1443933

15-15496-MLB: Chapter 7, Northcreek Custom Fencing Inc.; attorney for debtor: Thomas D. Neeleman; filed: Sept. 14; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation

FOUR-DIAMOND

RESERVATIONS:866.716.7162 | TULALIPCASINO.COM


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

PUBLIC RECORDS Snohomish County tax liens These federal and state liens were filed between Sept. 1 and Sept. 30. They are listed by document type, lien number, date filed, grantor (+ signifies additional names) and address or grantee (+ signifies additional names) and agency.

Federal tax liens 201509020111:Sept. 2; Reed, Joanne L, 14806 60th Ave. W, Edmonds 201509020112: Sept. 2; Govaert, James J, 3029 Belmonte Lane, Everett 201509020113: Sept. 2; Rowley, Wade (+), 6503 175th Place SE, Snohomish 201509020114: Sept. 2; Grant, Jeanette W (+), 12715 15th Ave. W, Everett 201509020115: Sept. 2; Sherman, John A, 23632 Highway 99, Suite F235, Edmonds 201509020116: Sept. 2; Lara-Flores, Arturo (+),1001 W Casino Road, Apt. G103, Everett 201509020492: Sept. 2; Gladwell, Corey, 1608 Highland Court, Mukilteo 201509020493: Sept. 2; Crenshaw, Kelvin N, 6608 49th Place NE, Marysville 201509090254: Sept. 9; Jefferies, Robert D,8028 Broadway, Everett 201509090255: Sept. 9; Haapalainen, Marci L (+), 6416 Fleming St., Apt. B, Everett 201509090265: Sept. 9; O’Malley, John E, 402 Amberwood Circle, Sultan 201509090266: Sept. 9; Walker, Jessie L, 20410 Dawson Road, Lynnwood 201509090267: Sept. 9; Herron, Alison M (+), 3018 Russell Way, Lynnwood 201509090268: Sept. 9; Berentsen, Lisa A, 15027 Forty Five Road, Arlington 201509090269: Sept. 9; Osemene, Justin C, 13824 N Creek Drive, Unit 2301, Mill Creek 201509090270: Sept. 9; O’Brien, John F, 16510 134th St. NE, Arlington 201509090271: Sept. 9; Saban, Sarah M (+), 12591 Eagles Nest Drive, Mukilteo 201509090272: Sept. 9; L&M Marine (+), 3712 Rockefeller Ave, Everett 201509090273: Sept. 9; Delgado, Silvia (+), 3612 150th Place NE, Marysville 201509160337: Sept. 16; Lauritzen, Lori P, PO Box 1312, Sultan 201509160338: Sept. 16; Petermeyer, Jeffery W (+), 4012 148th St. SE, PMB M08, Mill Creek 201509160339: Sept. 16; ACGI (+), 7907 212th St., Suite 218a, Edmonds 201509160340: Sept. 16; Vasullakeba, Roko, 15805 52nd Ave. W 1, Edmonds 201509160341: Sept. 16; Brown, Mimi, PO Box 942, Mukilteo 201509160342: Sept. 16; Charneski, Michael L, 14102 N Creek Drive, Apt. 2626, Mill Creek 201509160343: Sept. 16; Pangburn-Roberts, Jeanne, 4101 236th St. SW, Apt. J207, Mountlake Terrace 201509160344: Sept. 16; Sign-A-Rama (+), 221 SE Everett Mall Way, Suite M9, Everett 201509160345: Sept. 16; Meyers, Edward A,6810 Armar Road, Apt. 20, Marysville 201509160346: Sept. 16; Duvall Diesel & Automotive, 3530 230th Drive NE, Granite Falls 201509220291: Sept. 22; Bradley, Kam (+),18802 67th Ave. NE, Arlington 201509220292: Sept. 22; D&L Restorations Inc., 2626 119th St. SW, B-3, Everett 201509220293: Sept. 22; Brasear, Sheila R, PO Box 880, Everett 201509220294: Sept. 22; Moser, Louise S, 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201509220295: Sept. 22; Moser, Louise S (+), 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201509220296: Sept. 22; Moser, Bruce M, 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201509220297: Sept. 22; Roiss, Marguerite (+), 23617 36th Place W, Brier 201509220298: Sept. 22; Jones, Barbara J

(+), 2907 Ray Fryberg Drive, Marysville 201509220299: Sept. 22; Roesler, Lisa M (+), 5013 71st Drive NE, Marysville 201509220300: Sept. 22; Magic Group Inc., PO Box 2469, Snohomish 201509220301: Sept. 22; Smith, Teresa, 632 58th St. SE, Everett 201509220302: Sept. 22; Hodges, Terry B, 6307 4th Ave. NE, Seattle 201509220303: Sept. 22; Hodges, Terry B (+), 6703 234th Place SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509220304: Sept. 22; Hodges, Terry B (+), 6703 234th Place SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509220335: Sept. 22; Sound Garage Door Company Inc., PO Box 3127, Arlington 201509220336: Sept. 22; Mika, Adam (+), PO Box 1677, Marysville 201509220337: Sept. 22; Cumpton, Sean M, 322a 172nd Place SW, Bothell 201509220338: Sept. 22; Castle Painters (+), 7703 57th Drive NE, Marysville 201509220339: Sept. 22; Jimmy Jacks Inc., 13428 Highway 99, Everett 201509220340: Sept. 22; Grant & Associates (+), 12623 133rd Place SE, Snohomish 201509220341: Sept. 22; Drayton, Vernon L Estate Of, 825 72nd Drive SE, Everett 201509220342: Sept. 22; Cafe Twin Eagles Inc., 1208 1st St., Snohomish 201509220343: Sept. 22; Robert P Williamson PLLC, 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., Suite 205, Mill Creek 201509220344: Sept. 22; Enviro-Tech Diving Inc., PO Box 490, Stanwood 201509220345: Sept. 22; Enviro-Tech Diving Inc., PO Box 490, Stanwood 201509220346: Sept. 22; Bio Management Northwest, PO Box 564, Mountlake Terrace 201509220347: Sept. 22; Nicolas, Dolores L, 6106 51st St. NE, Marysville 201509220348: Sept. 22; Schmitt, Mary E, PO Box 1293, Everett 201509220349: Sept. 22; Batchelder, Karlene, 3817 168th St. NE, Suite 6, Arlington 201509220350: Sept. 22; Edmonds, Dale (+), 3817 168th St. NE, Suite 6, Arlington 201509220351: Sept. 22; Walkley, Shelly (+), 309 W Mukilteo Blvd., Everett 201509220352: Sept. 22; Guzman Trucking Inc., 5805 6th Ave. NW, Tulalip 201509220353: Sept. 22; Adriatica (+), PO Box 819, Lake Stevens 201509220354: Sept. 22; Houghtaling, Kenneth R, 13531 49th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201509290331: Sept. 29; McDonald, Gail J (+), PO Box 683, Lynnwood 201509290332: Sept. 29; Richman Poorman Computers Inc.,607 SE Everett Mall Way, Suite D, Everett 201509290333: Sept. 29; Rowley, Wade (+), 6503 174th Place SE, Snohomish 201509290334: Sept. 29; Wired Electric Inc.,13300 Bothell-Everett Highway, PMB 687, Mill Creek 201509290335: Sept. 29; Gavilanes, Diego P, 2512 140th Place SE, Mill Creek 201509290336: Sept. 29; Smith, David J, 632 58th St. SE, Everett 201509290337: Sept. 29; Smith, David J, 632 58th St. SE, Everett 201509290338: Sept. 29; Smith, Teresa, 632 58th St. SE, Everett 201509290339: Sept. 29; Smith, David J, 632 58th St. SE, Everett 201509290340: Sept. 29; Smith, Teresa, 632 58th St. SE, Everett 201509290341: Sept. 29; Smith, Eddie L (+), 616 18th St., Snohomish 201509290342: Sept. 29; Brennan, James E, 1728 114th Drive SE, Lake Stevens 201509290343: Sept. 29; Torres, Lorraine (+), 22110 86th Ave. W, Edmonds 201509290344: Sept. 29; Foster, Kevin C, 6920 Colby Ave., Everett 201509290345: Sept. 29; Lakoi, Afatareki T, 8022 60th Drive NE, Apt. 1, Marysville 201509290346: Sept. 29; Reihs, Dean L, 3322 Broadway, Everett 201509290347: Sept. 29; Rogers, Donavon E, 2303 75th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201509290348: Sept. 29; Bagley, Johnathan D, 6600 Wetmore Ave., Everett 201509290349: Sept. 29; Lacasse Con-

struction (+), 2726 Rucker Ave., Everett 201509290350: Sept. 29; Puget Sound Glass Inc., PO Box 2505, Everett 201509290351: Sept. 29; Prendiville, Kirby E, 17114 29th Drive SE, Bothell

Partial release of federal tax lien 201509090256: Sept. 9; Nathan, Charles L,11515 Heberlein Road, Woodway 201509090274: Sept. 9; Whitley-Hathaway, S, 705 175th Ave. NE, Snohomish 201509180282: Sept. 18; Parker, Debora L (+), PO Box 1524, Lynnwood 201509220305: Sept. 22; Chin, Thomas,14031 19th Drive SE, Mill Creek 201509290185: Sept. 29; Morgan, Laura L (+), 5705 95th Place SW, Mukilteo

Release of federal tax lien 201509020117: Sept. 2; Puente, Justin R,3912 149th Place SW, Lynnwood 201509020118: Sept. 2; Soley, Michael T,7532 Lower Ridge Road, Everett 201509020119: Sept. 2; Park, Eun K (+),11421 26th Drive SE, Apt. B, Everett 201509020120: Sept. 2; Farrenkopf, Lynda M (+),2711 84th Drive NE, Everett 201509020121: Sept. 2; Dupuis, Mark R,16605 6th Ave. W, Apt. D102, Lynnwood 201509020122: Sept. 2; Carr, Leonard M (+),4123 143rd Street NW, Marysville 201509020123: Sept. 2; Park, Eun K (+),11421 26th Drive SE, Apt. B, Everett 201509020124: Sept. 2; Wong, Steve,13407 31st Drive SE, Mill Creek 201509020125: Sept. 2; McAuliffe, Kerryn C,11522 Bollenbaugh Hill Road, Monroe 201509020126: Sept. 2; Boss Janitorial (+),PO Box 12511, Mill Creek 201509020127: Sept. 2; Jays Automotive Machine Shop (+),11303 Highway 99, Everett 201509090275: Sept. 9; Bruesch, Shane R,3330 Gorin Drive, Everett 201509090276: Sept. 9; Bruesch, Jennifer M (+),3330 Gorin Drive, Everett 201509090277: Sept. 9; Spanswick, Tammy,1733 W Beaver Lake Drive SE, Samammish 201509090278: Sept. 9; Galyean, Stan M,3315 97th Drive SE, Everett 201509090279: Sept. 9; Johnson, Mark G,23301 Lakeview Drive, Apt. A104, Mountlake Terrace 201509090280: Sept. 9; Galyean, Stan M,PO Box 396, Lake Stevens 201509090281: Sept. 9; Absolute Windows Gutters & Pressure Washing Company,13431 Forest View Ave. SE, Monroe 201509090282: Sept. 9; Mackay Landscape Services (+),441 S Sams St., Monroe 201509090283: Sept. 9; Espinoza, Gloria Nancy,20429 53rd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201509090284: Sept. 9; Lynnwood Cleaning Services (+),PO Box 741, Lynnwood 201509090285: Sept. 9; Fernandez, Donald (+),17d Marina Drive, Hat Island 201509090286: Sept. 9; Lynnwood Cleaning Services (+),PO Box 741, Lynnwood 201509090287: Sept. 9; Yargus, Shannon L (+),1921 147th St. NW, Marysville 201509090288: Sept. 9; Steelcor Industries Inc.,6202 214th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509090289: Sept. 9; Silcox, Gregory D,322 167th Place SE, Bothell 201509150325: Sept. 15; Seattle Pacific Lighting Company,10712 SE 3rd St., Bellevue 201509150326: Sept. 15; Morgan Branch CNC,19011 62nd Ave. NE, Unit 2, Arlington 201509160347: Sept. 16; Sno-King Dispatch Service,16409 20th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201509160348: Sept. 16; German, Deborah,13318 Meadow Drive, Snohomish 201509160349: Sept. 16; Leading Edge Auto Glass Inc.,5909 73rd Ave. NE, Marysville 201509160350: Sept. 16; Rawlings, Donald,PO Box 854, Goldbar 201509160351: Sept. 16; Rossi, Maureen A,2515 168th St. SE, Bothell 201509160352: Sept. 16; Leading Edge

Auto Glass Inc.,5909 73rd Ave. NE, Marysville 201509160353: Sept. 16; Wade, Heidi J,30208 80th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201509160354: Sept. 16; Wilson, Wendy W,15888 S Lakeshore Road, Chelan 201509220355: Sept. 22; China Dragon Restaurant,10119 Aurora Ave. N, Seattle 201509220356: Sept. 22; Purfeerst, Robert Craig,7509 210th St. SW, Unit 5, Edmonds 201509220357: Sept. 22; Haebpe, Roswitha M,20810 Highway 99, Unit 24, Lynnwood 201509220358: Sept. 22; Lobaugh, Lisa,3211 75th Drive NE, Marysville 201509220359: Sept. 22; Gold Bar Restaurant & Lounge,PO Box 12277, Everett 201509220360: Sept. 22; Peglow, Donna Anne,PO Box 339, Silvana 201509220361: Sept. 22; Peglow, Donna Anne,PO Box 339, Silvana 201509220362: Sept. 22; Reed, Margo E,19615 50th St. SE, Snohomish 201509220363: Sept. 22; Exterior Stucco Inc.,7030 193rd Place SW, Lynnwood 201509220364: Sept. 22; Pacific Harbor Construction,10325 E Davies Loop Road, Lake Stevens 201509220365: Sept. 22; Pacific Harbor Construction Inc.,10325 E Davies Loop Road, Lake Stevens Wa 201509220366: Sept. 22; Herbs Security Inc.,3903 176th Place SW, Lynnwood 201509220367: Sept. 22; Druchinin, Zoya N,28624 139th Ave. NE, Arlington 201509220368: Sept. 22; Risk Management Services.,9534 NE First Street, Bellevue 201509290352: Sept. 29; Soley, Michelle M,7532 Lower Ridge Road, Everett 201509290353: Sept. 29; Platis, Damon A,19805 48th Ave. W, Apt. A102, Lynnwood 201509290354: Sept. 29; Bunyan, Anthony, 4525 164th St. SW, Apt. X106, Lynnwood 201509290355: Sept. 29; Allard, Paul T,20810 31st Place W, Lynnwood 201509290356: Sept. 29; Platis, Damon A,20016 Cedar Valley Road, Suite 103, Lynnwood 201509290357: Sept. 29; Lee, Eva L,9905 239th Place SW, Edmonds 201509290358: Sept. 29; Allard, Paul T,20810 31st Place W, Lynnwood 201509290359: Sept. 29; Cesar-Romero, Ezequiel,4405 241st St. SW, Mountlake Terrace

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201509020195: Sept. 2; Bi Lo Machine Products, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201509080226: Sept. 8; Arlington 76, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201509210374: Sept. 21; Ramm Ex Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201509210375: Sept. 21; Ramm Ex Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201509210376: Sept. 21; Ramm Ex Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax lien 201509090257: Sept. 9; Badgley, Gary, 20701 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish 201509090290: Sept. 9; Lawler, Margo, 905 118th St. SE, Marysville 201509160355: Sept. 16; Bruesch, Shane R, 3330 Gorin Drive, Everett 201509160356: Sept. 16; Bruesch, Jennifer M, 3330 Gorin Drive, Everett 201509290360: Sept. 29; Jenson, Cheryl,4931 243rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509290361: Sept. 29; Jenson, Cheryl,4931 243rd SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509290362: Sept. 29; Jenson, Cheryl,4931 243rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509290363: Sept. 29; Jenson, Cheryl,4931 243rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509290364: Sept. 29; Jenson, Cheryl,4931 243rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509290365: Sept. 29; Jenson, Kenneth,4931 243rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201509290366: Sept. 29; Jenson, Kenneth,4931 243rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace


NOVEMBER 2015

1443946

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

04/11

1,233

734

9.5

12,341

38,800

14,500

21,200

$3,415,252

05/11

1,315

820

9.2

11,974

39,300

14,700

21,200

$4,103,347

06/11

1,279

866

10.1

10,737

40,200

15,200

21,500

$4,202,089

07/11

1,207

851

10.1

10,388

41,100

15,700

21,800

$4,169,784

08/11

1,325

916

9.1

9,443

41,400

15,900

22,100

$4,591,484

09/11

1,161

837

9

8,938

42,100

15,800

22,100

$4,117,816

10/11

1,226

828

8.8

9,342

42,300

15,000

21,900

$4,165,352

11/11

1,041

854

8.7

9,989

43,100

15,000

21,700

$4,317,909

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713*

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$11,603,019*

* Note: Previous tallies only calculated sales tax for unincorporated Snohomish County. This shows the tally for incorporated cities as well as the county.

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 231.31

233.25

233.81

235.92

234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617


NOVEMBER 2015

Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

03/11

$73.93

712,625,392

225

4,327

$3.70

04/11

$79.78

637,552,469

217

4,065

$3.92

05/11

$78.03

562,380,445

257

3,972

$3.99

06/11

$73.93

543,602,022

213

4,196

$3.86

07/11

$70.47

446,373,984

241

3,935

$3.78

08/11

$66.86

521,884,745

227

4,181

$3.75

09/11

$60.51

455,591,472

192

3,896

$3.86

10/11

$65.79

493,315,047

214

3,883

$3.80

11/11

$68.69

518,192,703

188

3,334

$3.67

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

N/A

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

N/A

N/A

7,018

$2.79

Prime Pacific

is the Place for your Small Business needs.

SBA Loans for Businesses

We invest in your business to help you succeed! At Prime Pacific Bank, we recognize that small business owners sometimes may not be able to get traditional loans due to lack of collateral or equity. Fortunately, our bank is pleased to tell you that you can still get the loan services you need for your business to grow and expand! We offer Small Business Administration government guaranteed loans for businesses. Among other benefits, SBA loans can give you: ■ Longer Term Financing ■ Eligibility to purchase real estate, inventory and other needs ■ Fixed Interest Rates

1442468

ECONOMIC DATA

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

■ And much more!

Building Our Community, One Business at a Time Main Branch

Kenmore Branch Mill Creek Branch

2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036

6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028

2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012

425-774-5643

425-415-6564

425-357-1516

Mention this ad and receive a free gift when you open a new account.


26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

BUSINESS LICENSES Arlington Absolute Fire Protection: 3707 234th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7699; Fire Protection Equipment and Supplies (Wholesale) Aloha Services: PO Box 3113, Arlington, WA 98223-3113; Services Eco-Therm Installation: 7419 204th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5114; 360-435-5475 Essential Wellness: 3204 Smokey Point Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-8476; 360-6533751; Wellness Programs HD Construction: 18933 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6316; 360-322-7672; Construction Companies Life Tone Coaching: 17321 80th Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9837; Counseling Pitstop Lube: 16831 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8407; 360-653-4652; Automobile Lubrication Service Shelby Wiseman Salon: 3131 Smokey Point Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-4711; 360-3227975; Beauty Salons Sno King Visitation: 17610 82nd Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-3739; Visitation Services T Davis Consulting: 6115 275th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5659; Consultants-Business

Edmonds 12th Man Cleaning Service: 16208 48th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-4806; Janitorial AG Pro Safety: 8707 Madrona Lane, Edmonds, WA 98026-8653; Safety Consultants Airlane Motel: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Hotels and Motels Aki’s Lash Lounge: 8705 238th St. SW, No. J, Edmonds, WA 98026-8959; Beauty Salons All Brands Security Systems: 535 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3149; 425-245-9837; Security Systems Austin Harp Arts: 110 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-7210; 425-678-8439; Arts Organizations and Information Best Security Systems: 8604 242nd St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-9042; 425-245-9839; Security Control Equip and Systems-Wholesale Bloom Training: 1233 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds, WA 98020-2658; 425-361-7992; Training Programs and Services Cascadia Art Museum: 190 Sunset Ave., Edmonds, WA 98020-4134; 425-678-8845; Museums Coiled Spring Speed Shop: 6510 128th Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-3165 Crossroads Leasing Office: 4901 148th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026; 425-697-9007; Leasing Service Faintest Idea: 838 Fir St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3903; Nonclassified Hot Sands: 9818 Edmonds Way, No. A, Edmonds, WA 98020-5902; 206-355-4479 JS Coats Capital: PO Box 1195, Edmonds, WA 98020-1195; Nonclassified

Mi Familia Panaderia/Bakery: 16609 48th Ave. W, No. 9, Edmonds, WA 98026-4819; Bakers-Retail Musikyoshi: 1042 Edmonds St., Edmonds, WA 98020-2905; Nonclassified SL Lunch Pennington Catering: 18427 Homeview Drive, Edmonds, WA 98026-5539; Caterers Sami Imports: 23423 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-9325; 425-582-2712; Importers (Wholesale) Sarmiento Construction: 24316 90th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-9012; Construction Seattle Children’s Chorus: 110 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3190; 425-967-5662; Music Instruction-Vocal Sound Oxygen Service: 7320 216th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-8006; 425-967-6347; Oxygen (Wholesale) Tom Sheehan Rare Coins: PO Box 1477, Edmonds, WA 98020-1477; Coin Dealers

Everett A Right Way Auto Sales Inc.: 1323 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-1717; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Absolute Mortgage: 909 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3746; 425-322-4222; Real Estate Loans Acks Construction: 12414 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5544; 425-267-2300; Construction Companies Ades Mexican Deli: 10316 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-3833; 425-353-1560; Delicatessens Aero Apartments: 2901 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4252; 425-322-5172; Apartments Bergman Walls & Associates: 2918 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4077; 425-263-9797 Bodywork Center: 9303 Goblin Lane, Everett, WA 98208-2427; Nonclassified Buffalo Wild Wings Grill & Bar: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2857; 425-265-0668; Restaurants Cold Creek Kitchen & Bath: 12025 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-8537; 425-212-9068; Kitchen Cabinets and Equipment-Household D&P Products: 1310 Industry St., Everett, WA 98203-7124; 425-551-1381; Retail Dawg Days Grooming Spaw: 2614 Chestnut St., Everett, WA 98201-3205; Pet Washing and Grooming Dynamic Trucking Solutions: 5633 Glenwood Ave., No. A, Everett, WA 98203-3087; Trucking Express Manufacturing: 131 60th Place SE, Everett, WA 98203-3471; Manufacturers Flat Rate For Hire: 2110 127th Place SW, Everett, WA 98204-5580; Nonclassified GMA Of Everett: 9129 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-7121; 425-512-0578 Glam Space Inc.: 1202 Shuksan Way, Everett, WA 98203-7105; Nonclassified Global Radio Outreach: 4011 Friday Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4818; 425-512-0129; Radio Stations and Broadcasting Companies

Green House: 13601 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5496; Greenhouses Greenhouse Data: 2707 Colby Ave., No. 705, Everett, WA 98201-3565; 425-258-2500 Grinding & Shining Concrete: 1111 Rockefeller Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1549; Concrete Contractors Ink Tears Tattoos: 1908 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-2360; 425-258-5695; Tattooing Joe’s Mow & More: 115 108th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-7008; Mowing Service Kensington Properties: 13410 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5454; 425-743-6668; Real Estate Management Lander Robinson Labs: 9505 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3853; 425-948-6330; Laboratories Leasing Office Of Potala Village: 2900 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201; 425-7891920; Leasing Service Little Discovery Childcare: 900 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204-1628; 425-353-3283; Child Care Service MAC Distributing: 10614 2nd Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7048; Distribution Services Moontree Asian Tapas: 1728 W Marine View Drive, No. 112, Everett, WA 98201-2094; 775-846-5558; Restaurants Northend Performance: 1323 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-1717; 425-404-3675 Player’s Bar & Grill: 10730 19th Ave. SE, No. F and G, Everett, WA 98208-5190; 435316-3414; Restaurants Pro Players Sports: 1710 100th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-3839; 425-225-6181; Athletic Organizations Riverside Play Garden: 2605 Cleveland Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3303; 425-610-3595; Gardens Root Cause Response: 1206 56th St. SW, No. B, Everett, WA 98203-5929; Nonclassified Scott M. Lord Law Office: 3530 Oakes Ave., Everett, WA 98201-5011; Attorneys Small Business Center Foundations: 3927 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4926; 425-4053005; Office Buildings and Parks Spring Clips For Family Hair: 2531 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-3020; Beauty Salons Staging PNW: 2006 State St., No. B, Everett, WA 98201-2637; Lighting Engineers Super Simple BB: 1227 Broadway, No. B, Everett, WA 98201-1773; Nonclassified Tattoo Tears Inc.: 1007 130th St. SW, No. B101, Everett, WA 98204-7397; Tattooing Technical Advantage: 2329 W Mukilteo Blvd., Everett, WA 98203-1537; 425-374-7113 TJ’s BBQ By The Beach: 75 -6129 Alii Drive, Everett, WA 98201; 425-308-1815; Barbecue Restaurant United Legal Support: 205 E Casino Road, Everett, WA 98208-2603; 425-405-3121; Attorneys West Coast Productions: 2916 State St., Everett, WA 98201-3842; Nonclassified

Lake Stevens ABC Service: PO Box 748, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-0748; Services

Brat From Deutschland: 512 91st Ave. NE, No. B, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2566; 425320-8825; Restaurants Elevate Music Together: 9524 Chapel Hill Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3967 Griffin Media: 11120 18th Place SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7926; Nonclassified Personal Assistance Plus: 7731 30th St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4505; Miscellaneous Personal Services Sky High Threads: 1214 113th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9468; Nonclassified

Lynnwood 52nd Glass: 20404 63rd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7428; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc. Accudental: 7411 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5052; Dentists Actpoint KPI: 5105 200th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6397; 425-977-2120 Advent Clean Technologies Inc.: 3711 164th St. SW, No. K240, Lynnwood, WA 98087-9106; Nonclassified Amelia’s Salon: 813 202nd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7181; Beauty Salons Atrix Logistix: 1207 145th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6269; Logistics Caulker: 532 151st Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2622; Caulking Contractors Champion Taekwondo School: 7528 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5095; Martial Arts Instruction Cigarette 7: 4100 194th St. SW, No. 390, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613; Cigar Cigarette and Tobacco Dealers-Retail City Center Motel: 4100 194th St. SW, No. 390, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613; Hotels and Motels Cliffhanger: 17525 Highway 99, No. A, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3105; 425-775-8679 Costco: 18109 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037; 425-313-6275; Wholesale Clubs Dental Services: 20720 Crawford Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8644; 425-776-3547; Dentists Derangedhyena Art: 19410 Highway 99, No. 232-A, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5102; Art Galleries and Dealers Designs By Shi: 14518b 15th Park W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6260; Nonclassified Devine Coffee: 17211 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3108; Coffee and Tea Doyle Ventures: 2023 208th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7912; Nonclassified End Zone Bar & Grill: 14019 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1727; Restaurants Garage Door: 7500 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5090; 425-245-9639; Doors-Garage Hammer Construction: 6925 216th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7358; 425-673-8090; Construction Companies Heaven Sent Fragrance: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; Aromatherapy Highly Favored Painting and Services: 19802 48th Ave. W, No. O11, Lynnwood, WA

1439335

PLEASE NOTE: See the full list of this month’s business licenses at www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.


NOVEMBER 2015 98036-5532; Painters Hoot Loot: 2411 135th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1212; Nonclassified Just In Time Deburr: 4302 146th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5558; Nonclassified Lee and HZ: 18015 12th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8250; Nonclassified Motif Apartment Homes: 3331 204th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6855; 425-3611192; Apartments Olympic Legal Access: 4100 194th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613; 425-582-8928; Attorneys Rentsafari.com: 19009 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4717; 425-582-8152 Replay Cafe: 15002 Highway 99, No. B, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2318; 425-446-0660; Restaurants Seraph Management International: 18009 Highway 99, No. C, Lynnwood, WA 980374499; Management Services So Cultured: 6110 202nd St. SW, No. 106, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6083; Nonclassified Sun Flower Cleaners: 3609 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-7017; 425-743-3929; Cleaners Woodrow Car Center: 6309 193rd St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5140; Nonclassified

Marysville 360 Espresso: 17309 27th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4745; 360-926-8604; Espresso and Espresso Bars Arnold Dotsons Trucking: 8520 72nd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6647; Trucking Bulldog Auto Sales: 3520 136th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7815; 360-651-6535; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Columbia College: 13918 45th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7853; 360-653-4480; Schools-Universities and Colleges Academic Creative Dog Training Academy: 6021 80th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8510; Dog Training Dairy Queen: 11525 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98271-7244; 360-322-7558; Ice Cream Parlors

Mountlake Terrace

Harbour Homes: 8342 75th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7939; 360-386-8446; Home Builders Jucundum De Libellorum: 2506 168th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4471; Nonclassified Just Peachy Frozen Yogurt: 17020 Twin Lakes Ave., No. C105, Marysville, WA 982714731; 360-926-8657; Yogurt Latin Cleaning: 4349 151st St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8970; Janitor Service Mother’s Medicinal Bar: 6922 58th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8820; Bars No Limit Welding: 3906 132nd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7883; 360-651-0077; Welding Peterson Tools: 4414 128th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8730; New-Used Tools Pochi Lifestyle Cafe: 4345 151st St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8970; Restaurants Superior Cycle Services: 5614 89th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2614; Services

B Bar: 5700 238th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5132; Bars Fitzs Sports Bar: 23307 67th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2735; Bars Paradise Market: 23204 57th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4627; 425-6738057; Food Markets Sparkle Photo Booths: 4310 236th St. SW, No. X308, Mountlake Terrace, WA 980434980; Photography

Kalli Foods: 7096 44th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2548; Food Products-Retail Lady N A Bucket: 11108 Chennault Beach Road, No. 192, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4903

Lakewood No Mess Pet Dish: PO Box 237, North Lakewood, WA 98259-0237; Pet Supplies and Foods-Retail

Banfield Pet Hospital: 15418 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012-9030; 425-316-3452; Animal Hospitals I Tech Ted 1: 13921 34th Drive SE, No. A, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4669; Nonclassified Mill Creek Firearms: 3026 135th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5614; Guns and Gunsmiths Sechrist Travel: 14513 N Creek Drive, No. E309, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5483; Travel Agencies and Bureaus

Monroe Amore A Painting Co.: 120 N Sams St., Monroe, WA 98272-1818; Painters Prison Break Brewing: 114 N Lewis St., Monroe, WA 98272-1502; Brewers Route 2 Taproom and Grazing: 19813 U.S. 2, No. E07, Monroe, WA 98272-2352; 206379-1422; Bars Taylor Made Appraisals: PO Box 355, Monroe, WA 98272-0355; Appraisers

73rd Ave. SE, No. 1, Snohomish, WA 982968723; Coffee and Tea Pro Home Exteriors: 1800 Bickford Ave., No. B201, Snohomish, WA 98290-9904 Skyfire Studio: 511 Ave. D, No. A, Snohomish, WA 98290-2346; Nonclassified Snohomish Learning Tree Preschool: 1910 Bickford Ave., No. F, Snohomish, WA 982901764; 360-568-3344; Education Centers Thrive Art School: PO Box 2064, Snohomish, WA 98291-2064; Art Instruction-School

Stanwood

Mukilteo

Mill Creek

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

Snohomish Anchor Eight Farm: 19010 114th Place SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-8661; Farms Bean Scene: 12817 Robinhood Lane, Snohomish, WA 98290-8688; Bean Brokers and Dealers (Wholesale) Epic Farm: 6708 164th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8788; Farms Guilty Passion Productions: 5511 96th Drive SE, No. B, Snohomish, WA 98290-9281 Hennessey Automotive: 21625 Echo Lake Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-7857; Automobile Repairing and Service Herbal Underground: 5324 171st Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9370; Herbs Mimi’s A Shabby Chic Country: 9702 160th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7014; Boutique Items-Retail Naoma Technologies: 20931 64th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6043; Nonclassified Narrative Coffee and Consulting: 15317

Fisher Family & Associates: 8817 Viking Way, Stanwood, WA 98292-8080; Nonclassified Greenworks Of Washington: 27407 Old 99 N, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-939-0903; Nonclassified Lifecycles Counseling: PO Box 551, Stanwood, WA 98292-0551; Counseling Services Northwestern Auto Transport: 18513 75th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6953; 360652-6763; Trucking Trones Family Gunsmithing: 26304 36th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-4922; Guns and Gunsmiths

Sultan A Reasoner Construction Services: 1207 Kessler Drive, Sultan, WA 98294-7631; Construction Companies

Tulalip Imagine Learning Community: 8209 Marine Drive, Tulalip, WA 98271-9632; Education Centers Tribal Resources Inc.: 527 130th St. NE, Tulalip, WA 98271-6771; Nonclassified

Woodway Abbott Laboratories: 21901 Nootka Road, Woodway, WA 98020-4166; 425-967-7363; Laboratories

We Know Feet Inside and Out! From simple sprains to major pains, the doctors at Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett are trained exclusively to diagnose and treat ankle and foot problems.

Meet Meet today’s today’s informed consumer. informed consumer.

Is your business ready to connect?

Is your business ready to connect? When experience, knowledge, and personal attention are important to you – give us a call %% %% % % % % %% %% and meet these special doctors. have more of of smart are more check their practice have more of of phone smart are more check theirshowrooming practice confidence Millennials likely to phones Let us help you put your best foot confi dence phone likely phones showrooming in info found Millennials are owners don’t buy fromto a before they (visiting online than disconnected go an don’t hour brand that a sleep and they stores to(visiting try in info found are owners buy from before forward! other for an hour or without shares the immediately out products

73 9292 7575 73

online than disconnected per or day othersources for anless hour sources less per day

SECOND LOCATION! Alpine Foot & Ankle Clinic 17432 Smokey Point Boulevard, Arlington WA • 360-653-2326 www.alpinefootandankle.com Practicing at both locations:

Dr Jarrod Smith & Dr Robert Stanton

1423791

3131 Nassau Street • Everett, WA 98201 (across from Providence Everett Medical Center, Pacific Campus)

425-339-8888

www.ankleandfootnorthwest.com

go an hour checking without their phones checking their phones

70 70 5050 4141

brand that

customer shares the experience

customer experience

sleep and

stores to try

after they awake

before buying online)

after they beforeout buying immediately products awake online)

Sound Media Business Development Solutions:

Connecting customizable socially integrated channels to measurable strategies for informed consumers.

Sound Media Business Development Solutions:

1400128to Connecting customizable socially integrated channels strategies for informed consumers. www.soundmediabds.com measurable | 425.339.3062


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2015

Mike Morse, Morse Steel 4th generation owner Runner Sports dad

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Mike Morse—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

HeritageBankNW.com | 800.455.6126 1233758

© 2015 Heritage Bank Member FDIC

Herald Business Journal - 11.01.2015  

i20151030125926201.pdf

Herald Business Journal - 11.01.2015  

i20151030125926201.pdf