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Don’t Forget To Cast Your Ballot!

ELECTION

2015

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Halloween parties, costume contests and carnivals

GHOULISH GO GOs

Oroville’s business Trick or Treat this Friday BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photos

These Goulish Go Gos were among the more than 90 volunteers that helped to make this year’s Haunted Hayride through Dave and Judy Tabers Orchard particularly scary last Saturday. According to Judi Taber the ride, an annual Halloween time event, gave more than 600 participants a tractor pulled wagon ride this year. Taber said there were riders from as far away as Seattle and Spokane, with the Spokane visitor saying they liked it better than Scarywood, which they said cost too much. The Haunted Hayride helps to raise donations for the food bank and each rider was asked to donate a non-perishable food item. In addition, the Oroville Cub Scouts were raising money selling hotdogs and hot chocolate for those waiting in the long line to ride. The Haunted Hayride is sponsored by Taber’s Taste of Summer and Oroville RE/MAX Lake and Country Realty. For more photos see pages B4 and B5.

NORTH COUNTY – With last Saturday’s Haunted Hayride as a ghoulish preview of things to come this Halloween, there are many events planned for the spooky holiday, starting off with the Business Trick or Treat in Oroville on Friday, Oct. 3. The Oroville Chamber of Commerce sponsored event starts after school at 3 p.m. and goes to 6 p.m. Kids are encouraged to dress up in their Halloween costumes and come downtown to collect some treats from the local businesses that are showing a green “Trick or Treat Here” poster in their window. There will also be a contest for the businesses for Best Decorations and Best Costumes. In the past the completion has been fierce and entertaining. Those businesses that want to participate are encouraged to call chamber president Clyde Andrews at 509-476-3684 or Leah Palmer at 509-429-0201. The decision to have the event on Friday, rather than Saturday, was due to the fact many more businesses are open on Friday, than Saturday, giving the kids many more places to trick or treat, according to Leah Palmer, Oroville Chamber of Commerce secretary. She polled the businesses to find out who would be open and who would be closed. Vicki’s Back Door Club will also be having a Halloween Costume Party on Friday, Oct. 30 starting at 6 p.m. The Wilders will perform music from 7 to 9 p.m. The club is located at 1415 Min Street and participants are asked to enter at the red back door off the alley. On Saturday, the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club is hosting a 3K Dog Walk for fun and enjoyment of all local dog lovers. Pet owners are encouraged to create a costume for their dog and take part in the walk. Entry is a donation of dog food for Donations of dog food for No Paws Left Behind dog rescue

or to the the Leader Dogs for the Blind organization, whose program “empowers people who are visually impaired or deaf-blind with skills for a lifetime of independent travel, opening doors that may have seemed to be closed to them with the lost of sight.” The event starts at Chief Tonasket Park with registration at 9 a.m. and the walk starting at 10 a.m. A costume contest begins at 1 p.m. The Oroville Coop Preschool will be presenting the Halloween Carnival in the Haunted Hallway from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. The event features carnival games, a cupcake walk, a raffle, photo booth and hotdogs. Tickets are 50 cents each or 25 for $10 (cash and credit cards). All ages are welcome and encouraged to dress in costume. Halloween Soup for the Family is planned on at the Chesaw Memorial Building from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. A meal of soup and bread for all who attend is offered. The event is billed as an alternative to kids to Halloween on Saturday. Organizers promise fun games, fun food, candy, crafts and a special Christian story. Costumes of a non-scary nature are recommended. Call 509-485-2397 for more information. The Tonasket Eagles is having their annual Halloween and costume party on Saturday, with prizes for first, second and third places. The party features karaoke with Linda Wood starting at 8 p.m, judging will be at 10 a.m. Members and guests invited. The Oroville Eagles is planning a Halloween Party. D. J. Karl will provide the music. Organizers say there will be a costume contest and promise other fun activities. The party starts at 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. The Pastime Bar and Grill will have a Halloween Party starting at 9 p.m. on Saturday with special guest DJ, DJ Don King, in charge of the music. There will be prizes for best costumes at midnight. There is also a Halloween Party at the Chesaw Tavern starting at 9 p.m.

General election ballots must be in by Nov. 3 Contested races for Oroville City Council and Tonasket and Oroville School Boards THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN COUNTY – Voters have until Tuesday, Nov. 3 to get their ballots cast for the upcoming General Election, which sees several contested races in the Oroville and Tonasket areas. This week the Gazette-Tribune is looking at several of the candidates for office, especially those on the Tonasket School Board, Oroville City Council and Oroville School Board (see page A2). OROVILLE SCHOOL BOARD There are three city council positions, all with four-year terms, up for grabs next Tuesday. Incumbent Neysa Roley faces a

challenge from Chris Allen for Council Position 5. Council Position 3 is currently held by Ed Naillon, who has decided not to seek another term. Robert Fuchs and David “Mac” McElheran are seeking Naillon’s seat. Fuchs works for Hughe’s Department Store and McElheran works for the U.S. Border Patrol. Incumbant Walter A. Hart III is also on the ballot running unopposed for a return to Council Position 4. OROVILLE SCHOOL BOARD While Todd Hill and Mike Egerton running unopposed for a return to Oroville School Board in Director Positions 1 and 4, there are two races with candidates seeking the same seats on the board this go around. Becky Lewis, a school volunteer and president of the Oroville Preschool Co-op Board and Kolo B Moser, a U.S. Border Patrol Agent, both seek Director Position 2, the seat being vacated by longtime board

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 44

member Amy Wise. Ryan Frazier, a former Oroville High School Social Studies teacher, who works for Sun Lakes Realty is looking to unseat incumbent Rocky DeVon, the current board president and owner of RE/Max Lake & Country, for Director Position 5. TONASKET SCHOOL BOARD. Ty Olson, owner of TyOlson Construction is facing a challenge from Joyce Fancher, a retired Tonasket teacher who has held office in the past as a city councilwoman and school board member for Position 4, also a four year term. Catherine Stangland, the current school board chairwoman, seeks another four year term in Position 2, as does incumbent Jerry D. Asmussen for Position 5. TONASKET CITY COUNCIL. In Tonasket all the seats on the council up for election have single candidates – Jensen Sackman, Position 2; Maria Moreno, Position 4 and incumbent

Claire Jeffko, Position 5. Sackman and Jeffko will be running for four year terms and Moreno for a four year short and full term. OTHER OFFICES Herbert Wandler will find himself back on the board for Hospital District 4. The current North Valley Hospital District Commissioner is running unopposed for another six-year term in Position 3. Candidates for other offices include: Gary Nelson, Cemetery District 4 (Riverview, Oroville); Kenneth D. Ripley, Commissioner Position 3 for Fire District 1 (Oroville, Rural); Duane Van Woert and Jack Denison, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 4 (Tonasket area), Mark Robanske for Position 3, for Fire District 12 ( Swanson Mill); Michael Woelke and Robert K. Bauer, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 16 (Aeneas Valley) and Guy D. Fisher, Leland “Lee” Chapman and Mike

SEE CANDIDATES | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Cantwell, for Commisioner Positions 1, 2 and 3, respectively for the Lake Osoyoos Water District. TONASKET PARKS & REC DISTRICT This election sees an important issue for Tonasket area residents wishing to see a new pool built and maintained there. The proposition seeks to create a Tonasket Park and Recreation District. If approved would allow the district to tax people within the district to “provide leisure time activities and recreational facilities.” If it is created the district would be authorized to impose regular property tax levies of 15 cents or less per thousand dollars of assessed valuation on all property located within the Tonasket Park and Recreation District for each of five consecutive years to provide a means of both maintaining a community swimming pool and maintaining existing Tonasket City Parks.

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Sports, Schools

A6-A7 B1-B2 B3

Valley Life Classifieds Obits

B4-5 B6-B7 B8


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

MEET THE CANDIDATES

CANDIDATES | FROM A1 The district would be governed by a newly elected five member board. The ballot also asks voters within the district’s boundaries, both inside and outside of Tonasket city limits, to vote for the new board members. In positions 1 through 3, the seats are all unopposed and the candidates are: Kathleen Thompson, Billie Kay Attwood and Jordon Weddle, respectively. In position 4, the voters are asked to choose between Tyler Graves and Shawn E. Brazil. In Position 5, both David Stangland and Michael Ward’s names will appear on the ballot. However, Ward said he has dropped out of the race and will not serve if elected. He told the Gazette-Tribune he is throwing his support to Stangland, a retired Tonasket physician.

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

This week we ask some of the candidates, especially those that are competing for the same office, to tell us a little about their backgrounds, why they want to be elected and what issues and/or concerns they feel are important to the position they are seeking. Here are their responses in their own words: TONASKET SCHOOL BOARD POSITION 4 JOYCE FANCHER Background: I am now retired, but enjoyed teaching in the Tonasket School District for 22 years. Many years ago I served on the Tonasket School board for 10 years. I worked in banking and so have a b ackg round in finance. I also served Joyce Fancher s e v e r a l years on the Tonasket City Council. I have a Bachelor and Masters Degrees in Mathematics Education and have National Board Certificate for Math Education. My family includes my husband, Tom Fancher and three children and spouses: Brett and Michele Fancher; Ryan and Holly (Bringman) Fancher; Tara and Matt Deebach. I also have five wonderful grandchildren. Why do you want to be elected? Having worked so many years in the Tonasket School District, I have in intimate knowledge of the nuts and bolts of our educational system from the inside. I understand what is takes for a student to learn. Our school board consists of good people who care about the education of our children, but they may not fully understand how each of their policy decisions affects the students and teachers. While it is important to look at the district as a whole unit, it is also important to understand education from the student and teacher perspective—the very foundation of learning. Finally, as a retiree, I not only have a unique perspective to offer, but I have the time to devote to this important position. Important issues/concerns: 1) The primary issue is space limitations. Not only is our student population growing, but the ways those spaces are educationally used is now more challenging. The obvious answer is to submit a bond proposal to meet our educational needs—however we must be mindful of the economic conditions within our area. The wildfires put many households in economic despair. For that reason, I urged the school board to delay the submission of a bond issue for one year. I do strongly support the need for a replacement maintenance levy issue this year—that is critical for a sound educational system. 2) For me the second issue is the use of teaching time. From experience I can attest that we use way too much time for testing. This is not using our educational time wisely. I would limit the time classroom teachers must spend testing students instead of teaching. 3) The third issue is “the end product.” When students graduate from Tonasket are they ready for college; a vocational school; a job? Have Tonasket students had the opportunity to take all the classes they need? Have struggling students had remediation opportunities they need? Have accelerated students had the opportunities they want and need? I’m not sure our Middle and High School schedules allow for all of this to happen. I would like to see teachers having the opportunity for input into the scheduling and student placement.

CASTING BALLOTS If you mail your ballot, sufficient first class postage must be attached and it must be postmarked by the day of the election, Nov. 3, 2015. Okanogan County Election Official Mila Jury advises voters to check with the local post office for cut off times. Ballots may also be dropped off at the Okanogan County Auditor’s office or at drop boxes in Tonasket, Tonasket City Hall/ Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave.; Omak, next to Police Station, 8 N Ash or Pateros, 180 Pateros Mall in parking lot. Those with questions may contact the Okanogan County auditor’s office at 509-4227240.

TY OLSON Background: My immediate family is my wife Kathy and my daughter Jentri and son Jesse.  My parents, grandmother and majority of extended family lives in the area as well.  Our kids are enrolled in Tonasket Elementar y school. I am Ty Olson currently in position 3 on Tonasket school board and have served one term.  In the past I have served as board member on North Central Washington Home Builders Assoc. as delegate for Okanogan County.  I have volunteered coaching youth sports.  I have volunteered and served on the board and as arena director for the Tonasket Junior Rodeo the past several years.      Why do you want to be elected? While we have a very diverse board, we are becoming very cohesive board with a good chemistry existing. I am excited about the addition of a new superintendent and look forward to continued momentum in the Tonasket School District. In the future we will be running a bond for new construction and with owning a construction company for 15 years I have knowledge that will be beneficial when working with teams as the much needed construction takes place on facilities. As a local business owner I understand the local economy and use my experience to cross over and be an informed board member working for the kids and families in the district. I have two children in the district and their ability to learn, participate and have opportunities alongside all the children/students in the district is of the highest importance to me. Important issues/concerns: Most important issue facing our district right now is a need for expansion of facilities. Second most important, is continued maintenance of our facilities. Third, is to get reserve balance back to where school board wants it. I would handle these issues through strategic planning with board and superintendent, as well as reaching out to the community for input and support. OROVILLE CITY COUNCIL POSITION 5 CHRIS ALLEN Background: Hello my name is Chris Allen and I am 33-yearsold. I live in Oroville with my wife Heather, daughter Bailee, and sons, Cacey and Hunter. We are proud to call Oroville our home. I’m a successful business owner, I am Chris Allen an emergency medical technician and also a certified nurse’s assistant. I am very familiar with the problems facing EMS system. I will work diligently and relentlessly to create the A+ ambulance service we have grown to know and love. I will utilize all willing and available volunteer EMTs and with your help we will once again make this town the greatest in the Okanogan Valley. Why do you want to be elected? I believe it is time for meaningful change in city government. They have forgotten the role of government is to serve the people, not the other way around. At a recent city council meeting the president of the senior citizen center was not allowed to speak on the importance of our local ambulance volunteers. This is part of a disturbing pattern where important decisions are made behind closed doors. City government officials are rarely present at city functions. The decision to fire our dedicated ambulance volunteers and hire a for-profit private ambulance with

fewer people on duty and without a back-up ambulance was typical of their disregard for community interests. If elected, that will change. I will listen carefully with my only motivation being what is best for the community. I will attend city events, encourage local business development and be visible in the community. Now is the time to stop fixing the blame for the past and fix the course for the future. Important issues/concerns? Public safety, jobs and economic development. We begin by fixing the ambulance problem. I will work to assure a service where dedicated local volunteers are able to serve their community. This will save almost $ 200,000 of taxpayer money per year. I will seek available grant funds to give our police department the tools and people to reduce crime. Economic development brings jobs. I will work with the Chamber of Commerce and local business in a partnership designed to revitalize our community. We need to make our community a destination location. I will seek economic development grant funds to promote our community. Jobs come with economic development. All of this comes with partnerships, cooperation and hard work. I am going to work to make sure all three are part of our formula for success.

NEYSA ROLEY Background: I am 43-yearsold and my immediate family includes my husband Ross Roley and five children Gareth (wife Elizabeth), Eric, Dayna (husband Garret), B et hany, Bonnie, and brand new grandson Asher. Neysa Roley It has been my pleasure to serve eight years as Oroville City Council-Member, and Okanogan Public Health District board member for six years, I have earned my Advanced Certificate of Municipal Leadership, and served on the following committees: Library, Airport, Parks, Solid waste, Industrial Park. I have also been on the board of the Chamber of Commerce, a chamber member, and a member of various church and community organizations. I like to volunteer wherever I am able. Professionally I currently work as a Substitute Parapro for the school district. In the past I have been an EMT, activities assistant at the nursing home, pharmacy technician, social worker, and a receptionist. But the most important job I’ve had has been as a homemaker and mother raising my five children. Why do you want to be elected?: I want to continue to serve as a Councilwoman because I love Oroville. My husband and I couldn’t ask for a better place to raise our kids. I have been impressed time and again with the way this community rallies together and supports one another when there is a need. I have never experienced that kind of whole community caring anywhere else. I’m proud to live here and be associated with such fine people. Are there problems facing this city? Yes. Are there solutions? Always. Complaining never accomplished anything, however. Being an elected Civil Servant is the best way to effect change, provide leadership, change the future, and give back to the community. I’ve never been one to sit on the sidelines. I believe I can accomplish things, and that’s what I’m trying to do. Important issues/concerns? 1. I see the many empty storefronts in town and share every citizens concern. Our businesses are the backbone of our city. They provide local shopping, employment, draw in tourism, and provide local tax revenue. I have been in support of any action to come before the Council that would create a favorable business environment and encourage and sup-

port business owners. I encourage every resident to do their part to support local businesses and stimulate growth by shopping local whenever possible. 2. My dream project would be to bring in another hotel to provide much needed accommodation space, employment, tourism, and revenue for the city. In the meantime I will see the library remodel complete and all of our parks further developed. These important projects will enrich the lives of citizens and visitors. Also critical will be the improvement and expansion of the airport runway and facilities, and to provide for further business growth. 3. Every person in Oroville and the surrounding area is no doubt aware of the ambulance service controversy. One of our greatest needs and focus right now needs to be in arranging a contract with an ambulance provider that will provide the level of service that our citizens deserve. As negotiations begin, I will keep the public’s safety and the City’s financial responsibility in the forefront as the greatest priorities. My long term presence on the council and mutual respect of my fellow council members enables me to have a voice that is listened to and respected as opposed to someone who desires to bring conflict and a private agenda. I am privileged to be able to speak on behalf of the citizens of Oroville and will always provide a listening ear to anyone’s concerns and ideas. Thank you for trusting me with your vote.

OROVILLE CITY COUNCIL POSITION 3 ROBERT FUCHS Background: My name is Robert Fuchs and I’m 51-yearsold. I was born in Germany, my wife Steffi and I moved to the U.S. in 1996 and became U.S. Citizens three years ago. We have two beautiful kids, Lena who is 16 years old and a junior, Robert Fuchs Paul is 11 and in sixth grade Before we moved to Oroville 15 years ago we lived on Guam, California and North Carolina. I have worked at Princes/Hughes Department store for 13 years and my wife works at the school as a lunch lady. I was a volunteer at the Oroville Fire Department for ten years and a soccer youth referee for two. Imp or tant issues/ concerns?:My main concerns for the city is to bring more businesses to town and find things to do for our youth. For new businesses we should try to give tax breaks to make our city more attractive to invest in and find easy and affordable loans for start-ups. I believe our local kids need a place to meet and play – like the senior center, we need a youth center. We have a need for the tourist and the local kids to have more activities like skate park, climbing wall and a play ground in the city park. We should have movie nights during summer at the city park to bring locals and tourists together. I will do my best to make our beautiful area a better place to live and to visit. Thank you in advance for electing me for city council. DAVID ‘MAC’ MCELHERAN Background: I am 43-years old and have a wife Michelle and a daughter Macy, age eight and a son, Gavin, age six. I worked in sales and service for seven years at Les Schwab Tire Center, prior to joining the US Border Patrol, 12 years ago. Mac McElheran I started my career in southern New Mexico and we moved to Oroville in May 2008. Additionally, I have been very involved in several charity organizations, both as a law enforcement officer and private citizen. Why do you want to be elected?: If elected, I hope to find ways for small businesses to succeed in Oroville. Important issues/concerns?: We need open discussion between the people of Oroville, the businesses, and the Council/Chamber to find new and creative ways to implement those ideas. New ideas also require funding. Another goal is to find someone in our community who is proficient at grant writing. There are a lot of great ideas that could improve our community, but without proper funding, those

ideas can only go so far. For Oroville to grow and thrive over the next few years, we need to support the existing small businesses, and find ways for new businesses to flourish. These businesses provide jobs for our citizens, promote tourism and improve the appearance and appeal of our great small town.

OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT POSITION 2 BECKY LEWIS Background: Nearly four years ago, my husband, Clint, and I moved here from Bellingham, Wash. Since that time we have put down our roots and made Oroville our home. We are proud parents of two children. My children are enrolled in the Oroville S c h o o l Becky Lewis District and attend classes from the Pre-K on up to the elementary grade levels. Why do you want to be elected? I know and understand the concerns that most parents face today and empathize with your feelings. As my children are being educated, I have chosen to immerse myself in school issues. I have frequently volunteered and provided a helping hand when needed. I am passionate about the role education plays in the future of us all. I have functioned, not only in our school system, but as the president on the board of Oroville Co-Op Preschool as well. I have valuable skills to offer to help our district face challenges relating to personnel issues, budget constraints and technology advances. I am acutely aware of and fully understand the value and needs for extracurricular activities and other programs to provide opportunities for our children. As a concerned and involved parent, my voice will help ensure a brighter future for our youth and the community of Oroville as a whole. Together I know that we can achieve the mission of the school district, which is “To empower all students to reach their full potential.” Our community deserves thoughtful representation and strong leadership. As a School Board Member, I will bring strong leadership and fresh ideas, as well as collaborating with school and community members as we strive for the finest educational outcomes of our children. I would like to elicit your support so that I can bring my passion, perspective and tenacity to the school board of Oroville School District. I am committed to asking the tough questions, expecting answers and making sure there are workable solutions. I will work diligently to put our community on a course, which will help parents, teachers, students and other residents to achieve a more efficient, progressive and excellent educational system. KOLO MOSER Background: I am Kolo Moser and I live in Oroville with my wife Stacy and two children. and am seeking your support during the up coming school board election. This is the first public office I have sought, I have no political a s p i r a t i o n s Kolo Moser yet I believe in public service. I have served my Country as a Federal Law Enforcement Officer for the last 28 years where I have held several key leadership positions. I have experience in budgeting, staffing, building coalitions, planning, peer/ employee development and labor relations. I also believe in giving back to the community. I volunteer at youth activities and am currently a board member for the North Central Washington Youth Football League, Oroville Youth Football Team President, head youth football coach and am look forward to volunteering again with Oroville Youth Wrestling. Why do you want to be elected? I am running for school board so I can continue my service to the community. Oroville is located in one of the truly premier locations in Washington and our schools should reflect the same. Important issues/concern?: I am willing to work with faculty, students, parents, board members and legal council to do what is needed to ensure our children get the education they deserve

and need. Thank you for your support.

OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT POSITION 5 RYAN FRAZIER Background: I am 29 and a graduate of Eastern Washington University: BAE in Education, Major in Social Studies Why do you want to be elected? I am an educated person seeking an educational position to make educational decisions that can make a difference for our Ryan Frazier students in the Oroville School District. Important issues/concerns? I will focus on as a School Board member are; 1. Bullying: I think we need to address this for students and staff in our school to make it a safer place so they can focus on education. 2. Transparency: I want to make communication with the Board easier for the students, staff and community so that they are well informed about our school decisions. 3. Alternative Schooling: I think Oroville needs an Alternative School to catch students that can fall through the cracks of normal public school systems, and I hope I can find like minded individuals to help get this going. ROCKY DEVON Background: I am 50-yearsold and have four children: a daughter, age 30 and three sons ages 25, 14 and eight. Current school board president, R e s o lut i ons Committee member for W S S D A , Regional Director for NCW Rocky DeVon Association of Realtors, State Director for Washington Realtors, Planning Commissioner for City of Oroville for nearly 8 years. 5.5 years on State Building Code Council T.A.G.: farm worker housing signed into law under Governor Gary Locke under that position, allowing for building of farm working housing on Sawtells Road. Important issues/concerns? 1.) After the closure of the Kinross-Kettle River Buckhorn mine shuts down its operations and following this summer’s wildfires, do you expect to see difficulties with future levies and bonds due to a possible decrease in property tax valuations? The closure of the mine is of great concern to me. They represent 25 percent of the district’s assessed values and this will cause a tax burden shift to remaining tax payers. If we are unable to pass a levy our district will not qualify for levy equalization dollars resulting in a significant financial hardship for the district. This makes it imperative that we pass the levy to receive equalization dollars and avoid a significant budget shortfall. 2.) I would like to see the College in the Classroom program allow students to complete a AA degree. This would require state criteria to be passed allowing schools to use all the different credits from different schools to qualify for an AA. I’d also like to see better cooperation and communication between the public school and the needs of home school families and those pursuing alternative school programs within district boundaries. 3.) Although we have a lot of very involved parents that are of great assistance to the school and their children the need for more assistance is one of our more challenging concerns. Parents that help coach, volunteer in classrooms, chaperone field trips and events and are active in the day to day learning of our students at home greatly improves our student’s chances of success both in and out of the classroom. OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT POSITION 1 TODD HILL Background: I grew up in Okanogan and have lived in Oroville since August of 2003. I have four amazing children in the Oroville S c h o o l District ranging from Todd Hill elementar y

SEE CANDIDATES | PG A3


OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

MEET THE CANDIDATES CANDIDATES | FROM A2 to high school. I have had the opportunity to view the Oroville School District through the eyes of a father as well as a police officer. I believe that the Oroville School District is one of the best in Okanogan County. Oroville School District has some of the most talented teachers and dedicated staff. Why do you want to be elected? I am honored to represent the citizens of the Oroville School District and feel it is a privilege to be a part of the educational process of the students in the Oroville School District. Important issues/concerns? School Districts all across Washington State are facing a funding crisis. The Washington State Legislature has been mandated by the Washington State Supreme Court to fully fund basic education. As a school board member I am partnering with the Washington State School Director’s Association and collectively we are speaking to our state representatives and senators urging them to fully fund basic education. These extra dollars coming from the state will help ensure the needs of the teaching staff are being met. The Oroville School District is facing issues in the elementary school facility with outdated resources. The bathrooms in the

north wing of the school are outdated and need to be remodeled. Our kitchen also needs to be remodeled and expanded. We are currently in the process of developing a committee to help with assessing the needs and putting together a levy for voter approval. Finally we are working to update our curriculum to be used with the schools districts iPads. We have hired a curriculum director who has been working tirelessly to find the best curriculum for our school district.

TONASKET PARKS & REC COMMISSION

ing machine and to clear new ski runs. I was active with the Tonasket Swim Team helping to set up for swim meets and serving as a starter. Why do you want to be elected? I am running for Tonasket Parks & Recreation District Commissioner to raise awareness of the need for a Parks & Recreation District and the need to pass the Parks & Recreation District levy to provide the funds necessary to maintain and operate the new Tonasket Swimming Pool. Important issues/concerns? The issue facing Tonasket that interests me most is the need

DAVID STANGLAND Background: I am 65-years old and have a wife, Catherine and daughter, Johanna. I retired Dec 31, 2014, having practiced medicine in Tonasket for over 34 years. I am a member of the Sitzmark Ski Club and served as president for several years David Stangland during which time over $100,000 was raised to purchase additional land and a groom-

for a community swimming pool. Until four years ago, the city swimming pool provided a place to learn to swim, swim team meets, water aerobic classes, lap swimming for exercise, fun summer recreation and jobs for young people. The pool was closed after 61 years of use as the expense of repairs and maintenance became prohibitive. Recognizing that swimming is a critically important life skill and a fun physical activity, volunteers formed the Tonasket  Swimming Pool Association over two years ago with a goal of building a new pool in Tonasket. They have worked diligently planning and

fundraising and have pledges and donations totaling over $628,000. With the passage of the levy for maintenance and operation expenses, the association is optimistic the remaining funds will be raised to build the pool next spring. The City of Tonasket is unable to fund the maintenance and operation of the pool, necessitating the formation of the Parks and Recreation District, which will be able to collect up to $15 annually per $100,000 taxable property valuation in the district to maintain and operate the pool. I look forward to serving as a new Parks & Recreation

District Commissioner and to being involved in the maintenance and operation of the Tonasket Swimming Pool, an important asset for our children and the entire community. Thank you for your vote and for supporting the creation and funding of a Parks and Recreation District. Editor’s Note: Michael Ward originally filed for the same position on the Tonasket Parks and Rec. Board, he has since dropped out of the race. He said his name will appear on the ballot, but he will not serve if elected. He has thrown his support to Stangland.

GREETINGS FROM OROVILLE

Halloween 3K Dog Walk, Oct. 31 SUBMITTED BY CONNIE MADEN TONASKET/OKANOGAN VALLEY LIONS

TONASKET – A 3K Dog Walk will be held in the Chief Tonasket Park Saturday, Oct. 31, with dog owners encouraged to create costumes for themselves and their pets and to plan to take part in this fun activity. The event is hosted by the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club for the fun and enjoyment of all dog lovers. Registration for the event is at 9 a.m.; the 3K starts at 10 a.m.; and the Costume Contest takes place at 1 p.m. The event supports both Leader Dogs for the Blind and N.O. Paws

Left Behind Dog Rescue. Leader Dogs is a program that empowers people who are blind, visually impaired or Deaf-Blind with skills for a lifetime of independent travel, opening doors that may seem to have closed with the loss of sight. N.O. Paws Left Behind is located in Oroville and is a shelter for all unwanted or homeless dogs that “need a place tot get loved and cared for.” The entry fee is a donation for the Leader Dogs, or a donation of dog food for No Paws Left Behind. Meetings are held the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at Whistler’s Family Restaurant in Tonasket. For more information on membership, contact President Tracie Utt at (509) 826-9534.

Submitted by Oroville Chamber of Commerce

The Oroville Chamber of Commerce has created a jumbo postcard to help promote the area. On the front side the card features 13 local pictures, a map and list of features of the area. “The address side has text describing the area, a space to write a note, and of course, a blank area for address,” said Clyde Andrews, Oroville Chamber President. The postcards are offered free with the hope that individuals will mail the card to others. A standard first class letter (not postcard) stamp is all it takes. You can pick up a card at many of the local businesses. The jumbo post cards were created in conjunction with rack Cards featuring the same pictures. These rack cards are being distributed in display racks from Wenatchee to Kelowna, according to Andrews. These are the product of the Discover Oroville Committee of the Chamber of Commerce. The printing of the rack cards and jumbo pos cards, and the distribution of the rack cards are paid for by lodging tax funds from the City of Oroville and Okanogan County. “Most travelers today are getting their detailed information from the internet. These cards are designed to drive visitors to our website for that information. They also do a great job in branding our area as a great destination point.” said Andrews.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Dee Dee Louise Tompkins, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 20 to three counts of distribution of a controlled substance (one count of which was delivery to a person under 18 years of age). Tompkins was sentenced to 12 months in prison and fined $2,320.50. The crimes occurred Feb. 17, March 2 and March 12. Conchita Delphine Perez, 35, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 20 to five counts of forgery and ten counts of thirddegree theft. The court dismissed five additional charges of forgery. In a second case, Perez pleaded guilty to two counts of tampering with a witness. Perez was sentenced to a total of 38 months in prison and fined $1,200. The crimes occurred November 2014 and January 2015. Timothy Scott Eiffert, 39, Okanogan, pleaded guilty to theft of a motor vehicle. Eiffert was sentenced to four months in jail and fined $1,260.50 for the July 16 crime. Joseph Nathanael Bowers, 23, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Oct. 23 to harassment (threats to kill) and violation of a nocontact order. Bowers was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended, and fined $600. The crimes occurred Aug. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Alfredo Gonzales Jr., 38, Omak, with three counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred May 25, May 28 and Sept. 8. The court found probable cause to charge Matthew Brandon Pursley, 30, Okanogan, with second-degree assault (DV) and harassment (threats to kill). The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 20. Juvenile A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Oct. 21 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The girl was sentenced to seven hours of community service (converted to one day in detention with credit for one day served) and four days confinement in a private residence with credit for four days served. The crime occurred Oct. 13. DISTRICT COURT Wade Allen Reddington, 42, Okanogan, guilty of third-

degree DWLS and two counts of fourth-degree assault. Reddinging was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,156. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 32, Omak, guilty of seconddegree criminal trespassing. Renion was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $558. Jesus Galvan Renteria, 41, Riverside, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Renteria was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $808. Shane Lee Rich, 36, Oroville, guilty of DUI and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI and violation of a trip permit. Rich was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 94 days suspended, and fined a total of $6,247. Roger Paul Satrom, 67, Tonasket, guilty of reckless driving. Satrom was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,108. Johnny Thomas Snell Jr., 41, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Snell received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $768. William Christopher Taylor Jr., 21, Omak, guilty on two counts of fourth-degree assault. Taylor was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,183. Jennifer Lynn Valdez, 21, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Valdez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined $808. Anthony Jay Whitaker, 19, Riverside, had a charge dismissed: driver under the age of 21 while consuming alcohol or marijuana. Whitaker was fined $400. Alyssa Ann Williams, 22, Omak, guilty of DUI. Williams was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Wesley Paul Wirth, 38, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wirth was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $818. Andrew Curtis Wynecoop, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wynecoop received a 90-day suspended sentenced and fined $468.

911 CALLS/JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Oct. 19, 2015 Automobile theft on Ed Figlinski Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Omak River Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near River-

side. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Harassment on Dixon Rd. near Omak. Threats on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Building materials reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Lemanasky Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Elmway in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on Jackson St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Pine St. in Omak. Threats on Senna St. in Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Fraud on Central Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Assault on Golden St. in Oroville. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 28, DOC detainer and a warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 24, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and violation of a protection order (DV).

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015 Weapons offense on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Firearm reported missing. Trespassing on Eden Valley Lane near Oroville. Trespassing on Utke Lane near Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Ivy St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Central Ave. in Oroville. Jacob Kirk Bowles, 31, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: first-degree criminal trespassing, fourth-degree assault and third-degree malicious mischief. Charles Reuben McNeil, 30, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI and firstdegree DWLS. Juliann Marie Orr, 19, booked on three FTA bench warrants: second-degree theft, thirddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Dee Dee Louise Tompkins, 28, court commitments for two counts of delivery of a controlled substance and one count of delivery of a controlled substance to a person under 18 years of age. Michael Andrew Z. Lezard, 28, booked on two counts of second-degree rape (forcible compulsion) and one count

of attempted second-degree rape (forcible compulsion). Camron Michael Wickizer, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree assault and for violation of a no-contact order.

Wednesday Oct. 21, 2015 Burglary on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Theft at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds near Tonasket. iPad reported missing. Assault on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Burglary on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Littering on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Railroad Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Joseph Darwin Cormier, 25, booked for second-degree assault (DV), interfering with reporting (DV) and resisting arrest. Omar Rodolfo Ortiz Feria, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Louis Mark Clark, 23, booked for DUI, no valid operator’s license without ID and an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michelle Ann Hernandez, 25, DOC detainer. Brittany Leigh Wilson, 35, booked on three State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI, thirddegree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Heliodoro Luquin Xhurape, 29, booked for possession of a stolen motor vehicle and reckless driving.

Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015 Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Littering on Nick Cain Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Tonasket Terrace Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Theft on Badger Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on O’Neil Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on O’Neil Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Oak St. in Omak. Fraud on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Drugs on Jasmine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ferry St. in Omak. Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan.

Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Elmway in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Probation violation on Engh Rd. in Omak. Three reports of theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Nicholas John Bosco, 46, booked for third-degree DWLS. Angelica Lopez Torrence, 23, booked for second-degree burglary. Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, booked on three FTC warrants, all for third-degree DWLS. Reyes Melchor Hinojosa, 49, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: first-degree DWLS and DUI. Michael Jay Lynch, 55, court commitment for DUI. Kristina Ranae Hudson, 38, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Raymond Richard Raab, 74, booked on four counts of intimidating a public servant and four counts of obstruction.

Friday, Oct. 23, 2015 Domestic dispute on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Kendall St. in Riverside. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Trespassing on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Fuel reported siphoned. Trespassing on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on S. Ash St. in Omak. Fraud on N. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on E. Seventh St. in Omak. Residence reported egged. Israel Corrales Bejar, 22, booked on two probable cause warrants: second-degree assault (DV) and fourth-degree assault (DV). Jose Dionicio Perez Garcia, 32, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing, two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: both for seconddegree criminal trespassing; and two Tonasket Police Department FTA warrants: third-degree theft and resisting arrest. Rodolfo Martinez Pamatz, 53, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and third-

degree DWLS.

Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015 Threats on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on Jim Creek Rd. near Omak. Threats on Burton St. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. DWLS on Main St. in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Firearm reported missing. Trespassing on S. Lake Loop near Oroville. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. DWLS at the Oroville Port of Entry. Edward Don Chaja Jr., 64, booked for harassment (threats to kill). Casey Peone, no middle name listed, 21, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia and two FTA warrants: both for third-degree DWLS.

Sunday, Oct. 25, 2015 Violation of a no-contact order on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on George Rd. near Omak. Illegal burning on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Automobile theft on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Orchard St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Elijah Keith Stanger, 21, booked for disorderly conduct.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Is FEMA responsible for making everyone whole again?

It was recently announced that the Federal Emergency Management Agency will be funding for public assistance to help rebuild after the recent fires in Washington State. The announcement was applauded by everyone from Jon Wyss, chairman of the Okanogan County Long Term Recovery Group (OCLTRG), to local state and national legislators. Wys thanked FEMA for issuing the PA declaration and strongly encouraged FEMA to issue the IA declaration to support the local communities impacted by the 2015 fires, after being rejected by FEMA for IA last year. Unfortunately the IA, or Individual Assistance request, was turned down and now the agency seems to have lost whatever good will it had garnered by granting the PA request. According to the information provided in the governor’s application for assistance, “the 2015 Washington Wildfires consisted of eight major Out of and multiple smaller fires burning over one My Mind fires million acres of land to date” – which threatGary A. DeVon ened life, safety, and destroyed homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure in Asotin, Chelan, Columbia, Douglas, Ferry, Garfield, Klickitat, Lincoln, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Stevens, Whatcom and Yakima counties, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Spokane Tribe of Indians, and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation. “The Okanogan Complex Fire, the largest of the wildfires, is now the largest wildfire in state history with more than 522,920 acres burned. It forced Level 3 immediate evacuations of more than 1,900 residents. This particular fire burned in Okanogan County and Colville Tribal communities that were heavily impacted from the previous largest state fire – the 2014 Carlton Complex. These communities are still struggling to recover from that event, which burned 256,108 acres. There is significant physical damage as well as personal and economic hardship brought upon these communities,” states OCTLRG in their release. The PA declaration will initiate assistance to our state and local governments for emergency work and the repair or replacement of disaster-damaged facilities, while an IA declaration would make assistance available to individuals and households. I suppose what we have to ask ourselves is whether FEMA, or the federal government in general, is responsible for making everyone whole after a national disaster. Should the aid stop at helping rebuild public infrastructure – much of which will come out of local taxpayer’s and electric ratepayer’s pockets if we don’t get that aid. With federal help the burden is spread over everyone in the nation, without it is borne by those in the affected counties alone. As far as not getting the IA the matter isn’t clear – what has happened elsewhere where national disasters have struck? Did FEMA or some other federal agency pick up the bill? We know when storms strike the East Coast or there is flooding in the MidWest, homes, farms and business are often rebuilt right in the path of the next storm or the next flood. Do they get assistance to rebuild or are they insured, whether through personal, business or federal flood insurance? We’d like to know how we compare and if FEMA or some other agency has stepped in with Individual Assistance there, why would those living in rural Washington not be just as eligible. This summers fires were just as devastating. We guess what we’re saying is we should be treated just as fairly as anyone else living anywhere else in the country when disaster is declared.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Everyone should visit the Depot Museum

Depot Museums’ Annual Meeting will be Nov. 4 at 4 p.m. two weeks from now! The annual meeting will be for members and the people from a place called Oroville and the surrounding area. It has been noted that many of our citizens have never been to the museum and Visitors Center, EVER! It is very sad that this is a common occurrence among the “millenniums” and the ones born during the last century. The Oroville Depot Museum has visitors from more than 21 countries, including Canada, and almost 3,000 visitors this year. This year we had 131 fires in the Lower Okanagan in B.C. and you know what happened here! We had road closures for most of our season, May through September. It cost the county over $100,000 daily and we cannot know the loss to our area. By this time over the last few years we have had more than 13,000 visitors, down slightly due to fires in the last two years. The Depot Museum and Visitors Center is your introduction to the City of Oroville, the Okanogan County and the United States of America. All of you should take the time and use some of that energy to visit, inquire, contribute and help the Board of Directors continue to give the visitors to our area the kind of attention they deserve. The City of Oroville and the Chamber of Commerce are very supportive of the efforts of the Museums Board of

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, October 18-25, 1940: The Okanogan County PUD has levied a one-half mill tax for the coming year. This would raise $4,950.91 and when added to the estimated $20,000 on hand Jan. 1, 1941, would total $24,950.91, the amount anticipated for expenditures during the coming year. Fifty-eight horses were purchased in Okanogan County, for army use the past week. Three of these came from Douglas County, two from Chelan County and the remainder from all parts of Okanogan County. The horses will be shipped to Fort Robinson, Nebraska from which point they will be distributed to Cavalry units throughout the United States. A total of 341 men between the ages of 21 and 35, registered in Oroville for the military service on Oct. 16, twentyfour of those were registered from out of state. John Hancock, local Oroville attorney, will leave for Spokane Saturday where he will be admitted to practice before the Federal Court. Attorney Hancock, who for the past few months has been spending a couple days a week a Tonasket, has given up his office in that city to devote his time entirely to his practice in Oroville. He also received word that he is to be appointed Conciliation Commissioner for Okanogan County, handling farm debt moratoriums. John’s Auto Service of Oroville, is showing the new 1941 Pontiacs, the only car with no clutch with prices beginning at $825. Doctors V. C. Norine and T. P. Conners, of Tonasket, were in Oroville on Tuesday making arrangements to open an office here. They have rented the ground floor apartment in the Peerless Hotel Building and expect to have it open and ready for business the first of this coming week. The management of the Liberty Ball Room at Oroville, announce a Halloween Dance for Saturday night, Oct. 26. Everyone is invited to come and have a good time. Special decorations and entertainment

Directors and the work they have done. It is now your chance to come, visit and spend a few minutes to see what we are doing and what the next year will bring. It will be an Oroville year and your relatives will be on display and showing you your history, your strength and your future. Please attend especially if you do not belong to the organization, see what is being offered to all of those people coming through your town, and what your town has to offer. Arnie Marchand Volunteer at the Museum

Stricter gun laws would not have helped Dear Editor, The Oct. 8th cartoon with the picture of the Second Amendment in the trash can, entitled “The only “common sense gun law” that might have prevented the Oregon community college shooting…” This sentiment seems to parallel the iniquitous masters of gun control throughout history. The letter below the cartoon, by Tom Hastings of the Oregon Peace Institute continued in that vein, but failed to mention how many people have been killed throughout history when “common sense gun control” is enforced. Tom didn’t mention why the gun decided to go to the college that day, or what its motives were, or how it loaded, aimed, and fired itself. Does Tom stand proudly with the will be part of the evening’s fun. The Serenades will furnish the music with Lila Atchison as vocalist. Grocery Prices: Pink Salmon, 2 for $.25; Cigarettes, most brands, $.15 per pack; Candy bars, for $.05 or 4 for $.09; 2 pkg’s Morton salt, $.17; Bliss coffee, 2lb. $.39; Black pepper, 1 pd. $.19; 4 lb. bag raisins, $.21.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: October 21-28, 1965: The Oroville Junior High Wasps will be looking for their third win when they meet the Okanogan Bulldogs, Oct. 26. The Wasps now have a 2 -1 record having lost to Tonasket. The Wasps added two more touchdowns during the fourth quarter with Steve Chamberlin’s fine quarterbacking and a 435 yard pass plan to Don Rounds. The final budget for the Okanogan PUD showing revenue of $1,940,000 and expenditures of $1,889,207 in 1966 was adopted by the Board on Monday. Major costs include $1,306,000 for normal operations, normal construction expenditures of $304,000 and debt service of $173,000. The bulk of the receipts will come from the sale of electrical energy estimated at $1,900,000. The Hornets rolled over the Republic Tigers 39-0 in a non-league battle to bring the Hornet football schedule past the midpoint of the season. The Oroville gridders will be out to win the remaining games and try to overcome the non-beaten Tonasket Tigers. The International Curling Rink at Osoyoos opened Sunday, Oct. 17 for the winter curling season. All persons interested in trying out for the game are urged to come to the rink any evening this week for free instruction and practice. The school vacation for apple harvest proved profitable for both the producer and the students as shown by a survey just completed by High School Principal, Stan Porter. The students were able to help fill the need for harvest as well as earn money for themselves. The total amount earned by 364 students and school employees was $36,460. This is about $13,000 more than last year. The senior high school students made the best use of harvest time with 91 percent of the students working. This week’s “Citizens of Tomorrow” shows pictures as follows: Gayle Carper, age 5 and Gaius Carper, age 9, children of Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Carper; Doreen Kaye, Janet Louise and Alden William Ripley, children of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ripley and Mark Nelson, age 5 and Monte Nelson, age 7, children of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Nelson. Weather Wise by Marge

Stalins, Pol Pots, Maos, Hitlers and Castros of the world who have forced gun control on their own people by killing them? A question that won’t be asked at any presidential debate, but should be is, : Why did the founding fathers see the need for uninfringed gun ownership? Why was it a right that they assumed? And if gun control is such a great idea, why do the Bloombergs, Clintons, Obamas and all the other elites of the world travel with armed body guards? Protection for them seems to be a good thing. Does the Declaration of Independence need to be “fixed” as well; all men are not created equal and are not endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights? Only important people deserve protection in the Utopian world of tyrants. B.O. has made it his pastime trashing the Constitution, He has impugned the first, second, fourth, ninth, 10th and 14th, amendments of the document, and now with the help of the Republican leadership, He is pushing an “agreement “with Iran that would make him and those who support this plan the biggest funders of terrorism ever…, $150 billion can buy a lot of guns and other things needed for the development of a “stable middle east,” right? Apparently if Iran likes its nuclear weapons they can keep them in the Obama plan! Arming those who continue to inflict terror seems to be the only answer in the world of Obama. Steve Lorz Tonasket Frazier, official observer: Oct. 20, 63 degrees maximum and 39 degrees minimum; Oct. 21, 66 and 40; Oct. 22, 69 and 32; Oct. 23, 64 and 29; Oct. 24, 52 and 34; Oct. 25, 62 and 30 and Oct. 26, 64 and 31. No precipitation for the period.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: October 4-11, 1990: Builders of the Hillside Park Senior Apartments are predicting that the 30 unit complex will be finished by mid October. Local residents have rented the majority of the 14 apartments already spoken for, according to Geneva Reeder, the on-site manager. As part of its ongoing effort to upgraded the Tonasket Airport, the city, with the aid of the state will begin installing a $16,000 lighting system for the facility. Included in the new lighting will be illumination of the runway, a rotating beacon, threshold and approach lights as well as distance to go markers. Tonasket received a grant the Aeronautics Division of the Dept. of Transportation and the city will contribute the remaining $2,600. The Lady Hornets won their first victory of the season as Coulton Auditorium witnessed another match off between the Hornets and their traditional rival, Tonasket Tigers, on the Volleyball Court. The final scores for the first two sets were 15-13 and 16-14. It took five games to find the final winning score. High speed southern winds wreaked havoc on apple orchardists and power companies alike last week as wind speed reached over 60 miles per hour. Nearly 100 percent of some apple growers remaining crops were affected, according to Ben Copple, Manager of Chief Tonasket Warehouse. Maurice Sawyer, with Gold Digger in Oroville, said their growers did not have a severe bunch of damage but there are some growers with young trees that were uprooted. Oroville Grange members, in regular meeting on Oct. 4, voted to give $500 to the Ambulance Associated drive for a defibrillator. They are also challenging other organizations to get behind this effort also. The official crowning of Miss Jo Meiers as Oroville’s Homecoming Queen at Oroville High School along with Princesses Brandy Beanblossom and Jenifer Gee. Real Estate Bargains in the area: 4 bedroom house, 1 1/2 baths, like new condition, wood and electric heat, backyard privacy, $75,000.00; 10+ acres,6 miles south of Oroville, with creek, well, electric power and irrigation water, $35,000.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Get the candy ready for Trick or Treaters Get the candy ready, or was Halloween canceled here, also? Don’t think so, yet. It truly amazes me how the few can cause old traditions to be canceled in so many places. The answer is always (THEY) wanted it changed. Who the heck are THEY? This week I noticed the original Cascade Market building (now Frontier Foods) is getting much needed renovation, beginning with a new front on the Main street. Thinking back, a lot of years when the building was first opened brought to mind, how pleased we were to have a third market in town. Prizes were awarded at the grand opening, and although I am not usually a winner of raffles etc., I was awarded one of the prizes, a Dormeyer stand, electric mixer. I remember how elated I was because ‘til then my mixer was one of the little hand

Looking for in home care? SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Some events to watch for in November include: Our Pancake Breakfast served on Saturday, Nov. 14, at 8 to 10 a.m.; and, Thanksgiving Potluck on Thursday, Nov. 26, at 1 p.m., (We will provide the turkey, dressing, potatoes, and gravy.) Mark your calendars. Don’t forget to purchase a raffle ticket from Roberta Cole for a beautiful quilt, handmade by Karen Quayle. Kudos to Jan Harper. Twenty-three attended our Bingo on Tuesday, last, and all looked like they were having a good time? It’s time to think about purchasing Senior Citizens membership for 2016. Just a couple of words about In Home Care of Central Washington IHCCW. Some of its qualities include: IHCCW is managed locally by an elected board of directors from the Senior Centers in Okanogan County. It employs local caregivers that are familiar to many in our community. Its supervisors are available

Halloween and costume party on Saturday SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Deer season is over unless you have a tag for a late hunt. There were lots of deer this year due to the fires, lots and lots of doe. This Saturday is Halloween be sure to watch for children walking the streets, they are so excited and not watching for you drivers. The Tonasket Eagles is having their annual Halloween and costume party. Prizes for first, second and third place will be judged around 10 p.m. Karaoke with Linda Wood starting at 8 p.m., come on in and enjoy the fun. Its always fun to try and figure out who is who. On Saturday, Nov. 7 the Eagles will be having their fifth annual Chili Cook Off. Hot and Mild classes. Prizes given for hot, mild, and people’s choice. Judging at 5 p.m., there is no entry fee. 5 quarts min/max. Please have your chili here by 4:30 p.m. Chili will be served after the judging by donation. All proceeds goes towards the Reader Board. Also on that same day we are

Another date to keep in mind is / Mae Mosby (Clayton’s cousin) and after Tuesday, Nov. 10 when the annual retiring from Olympia, they resided in meeting of the Okanogan Borderlands Colville, Wash. Condolences to the family. Historical Society (Depot Can you believe that in two Museum) will be held. This days we must turn the calenis the membership meeting dar page to November? Oh! and election of officers for My gosh! Where does the 2016 with discussion on next time go? And don’t forget to year’s theme, which will be set your clocks back an hour, the 100th Anniversary of the next Saturday. Remember the Irrigation District project. little phrase, (Spring Ahead There will be refreshments and Fall Back) served and perhaps you can How long has it been since add some suggestions for you had a dish of homemade the project. The time is 4 p.m. at the Depot Museum. THIS & THAT ice cream? It’s nice to have family that still sticks with the Please come and support the Joyce Emry old tradition and invite folks museum. You know the sayto share the treat with others. ing, “It takes a village... to get things done (or something like that). Nancy (Greene) Zimmerman, sister of Anyway, more volunteer bodies could Barbara Shaw and Bill Greene was here help lighten the load for the ones that visiting from Olympia and checking up on her brother, who had recent radical diligently, trudge on. Word has been received of the death surgery. Joe Shaw is the official ice of former State Senator Scott Barr, who cream maker and spoils Nancy with her was on his way to the century mark favorite dessert. The berry fruit cobbler but only lived 99 years, plus. Scott was was a nice addition. These people are from Edwall, Wash., later married Dollie my cousins and it was nice visiting over

held jobs that I turned a wheel to make it work. I’m guessing it was about 1950. This past week coffee was $4.99 for a short two pounds. And that was a heck of a deal. In 1940 two pounds of Bliss Coffee was 39 cents. Don’t know what the hourly wage was... but not much, for sure. Mark the date of Saturday, Nov. 7 on your calendar and go and take friends with you to the United Methodist Church for their annual bazaar and spaghetti luncheon, which consists of great spaghetti, fresh, crisp salad, garlic bread and dessert. It is with great appreciation to John and Becky Dejardens (Hometown Pizza/ Bakery) for taking the burden of preparing the dinner. Bazaar is open at 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Do some early Christmas shopping or buy something special for yourself.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS to answer questions and provide assistance to deal with the special needs of clients. So, if you are looking for in home care, consider IHCCW. As a non-profit corporation IHCCW can accept tax deductible donations. Address: PO Box 3699, Omak, WA 98841. Questions? Call 1-800-640-6907. Isn’t teamwork something to admire? Adult and Aging Care, in Wenatchee, had surplus bookshelves, which our librarian, Betty Bair, wants, very much. Raleigh Chinn spoke for them, but, how to get them here? By faith? Well, would it so happen that Ruth LaFrance, with the help of her friend Joe will be in Wenatchee this Wednesday, with a pickup truck? Would you believe they agreed to pick up the items? There must be a higher power involved, here, you think? I knew a man, who ended every sentence with a question mark? He would raise the pitch of his voice, ever so slightly, at the end of every sentence, as if he wasn’t sure, or to elicit confirmation I guess? Kind of an annoying diplomatic nuance, you

TONASKET EAGLES having a Dessert Auction starting at 7 p.m. Desserts are needed please contact Val at 509-5578666 or just bring one in. Lots of our members like sitting in the beer garden to smoke or just chat with friends and in the winter time it gets cold. All proceeds will go towards propane to keep you warm and toasty. Karaoke to follow the dessert auction. Members and guests welcome. From the Bingo corner: We had 25 players no one won the Pick-8, it now stands at $16,203. Come join the fun, never know

think? When sparring for diplomatic position, though, would you think a well placed question, instead of a zealous exclamatory proclamation might save the day, anyway? Something for you kings and queens to think about? Speaking of kings, (and Raleigh,) I was enjoying reading the Charter to Sir Walter Raleigh, March 25, 1584, by Queen Elizabeth. Would you believe when Sir Walter Raleigh went out to conquer North America, that he was forbidden to interfere with lands which he encountered “possessed of any Christian Prince, nor inhabited by Christian People(?)” (Prince, meaning king, I suppose). He, and his heirs were subject to penalty and “...restitution, and satisfaction of all such injuries done...” So, doesn’t that make us all feel more secure? After all, as King George and George Washington said, “Every man in the colonies is a king, in his own right.” Even more us Seniors? And, for a donation of $3.50, can we really get lunch at the Senior Center? You know, fun, food, and friends? See you there? And, don’t forget. Question everything? Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Leonard Paulson; Pinochle, Bev Holden; High Man, Ted Paris; High Woman, Bev Holden. you may be the big winner. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. with lots of good food to choice from. Joker Poker is still growing, its up to $1975.00. You could win half on Saturday at 6:45 p.m. (must be present to win). Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Wanda Sutherland and Bill Maple, second place Joanne Michels and Gladys Fifer, low score went to Ward Seim and Carol Ross and last pinochle to Wanda Sutherland and Bill Maple. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

VOTE ROCKY

DEVON

Oroville School Board Pos. 5 Paid for by Rocky DeVon

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Busy week on our highlands hilltop SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Wow! what a week. It started out last Sunday, Oct. 18 after church at the Community Building in Chesaw with decorating for the annual Highland Hooters Red Hat Lady Tea/ Luncheon. Ladies were gathered from Chesaw, Molson, Oroville, Tonasket, Omak, Okanogan, Osoyoos, Penticton and others. There were about 50 in attendance for the day. It was quite a sight with all of them dressed in purple and wearing large “Red Hats” – “Girls Just Want To Have Fun.” The Community Building was decorated in Red and Purple. The Luncheon was prepared this year by Peggy Doyal. It has been a tradition in the past four or five years to hold an auction of miscellaneous items or anything in red or purple. As in the past we choose a good place to donate our profits. We will make that choice at our Christmas Party in December. Tuesday was a day for resting and to catch up on other things. Wednesday was a couple of trips to the doctor and a trip to Walmart for meds and grocer-

HILLTOP COMMENTS ies. Friday was “get ready for the weekend.” On Saturday at 2 p.m. in the Rodeo Club Hall in Chesaw was the Celebration of the life of Bob Jewett who passed on Aug. 28. Let me tell you, that hall was packed, there was not even standing room available. It was the same for the food, I think that was the biggest potluck meal I have ever seen. Bob was a “good guy.” He was always willing to drop everything and help a friend or community member when they were in need. His positive and humorous attitude along with his willingness to be of help to anyone gained him and abundance of respect from everyone who knew him. We will miss you, Bob. Later, over in Molson, at 6:30 p.m. folks were gathering for the annual Harvest Supper. The proceeds of this supper will go to the Molson/Chesaw Fire Department. The Ladies of the Highland Stitchers Sewing group raffled off two handmade quilts. They were beautiful. Thank you ladies. The Annual Christmas Bazaar in Chesaw will be on Nov. 7

Jessa Marie Kinney

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from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Community Building. Call Beth at 509-485-2397 or Marianne at 509-485-2103 for tables. Lots of homemade items, cookies, jewelry and much more. The kitchen will have “Chili, your Way” On a bun, in a bowl, with onions or cheese, or without. Get your Christmas shopping started. Halloween Soup for the Family will be Saturday in the Memorial Building in Chesaw on Oct. 31 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Soup and bread for all. Let’s give our kids an alternative to Halloween, like some fun games, fun food, crafts and a special Christian story. Did we mention candy? A fun non-scary costume is a must. Call Beth at 509-485-2397 for more information. = Friday, Nov. 6 will be the next BINGO night in Molson at the Grange Hall. Just north of the Cherry Street Bridge we have seen the Canadian Honkers gathering for their long trip south for the winter. What a sight! Honor the veterans on Nov. 11 at the Chesaw Mercantile. Come and have a cup of coffee and a cookie and visit with a vet. All are welcome. Thanksgiving is coming up soon. Free Thanksgiving dinner to all. Everyone is invited to dinner on Thursday, Nov. 26 at the Community Building. Until next week.

BIRTHS Zoe Mariah Glover was born to Misty and John Glover of Oroville, Wash. at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She joins siblings Peyton, five and Jonalynn, 19. Her grandparents are Dennis and Joann Loudon of Oroville and Terry and Marie Glover of Oroville.

submitted photo

Jessa Marie Kinney was born to Boyd and Megan Kinney of Tonasket at 2:18 am on Monday October 5, 2015 at North Valley Hospital. She weighed six pounds, one ounce at birth and was 19 inches long. She joins her siblings Arlin and Jamie, both age 5. Her grandparents are Les and Karen Kinney of Tonasket, and Jason and Tonya Houck of Harrington. 312 S. Whitcomb

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CLOSED THURS. OCT 29 THE MARTIAN FRI.-SAT-SUN.MON.-TUES.,THURS.-FRI. OCT.30-31,NOV. 1-2-3,5-6. ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY 7:30PM

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a tasty treat. EASY OVEN CHICKEN One whole fryer, cut into serving pieces. Sauce: 1 pkg. Lipton dry onion soup mix, 1/4 cup water, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 1/2 cup ketchup Mix sauce ingredients and pour over chicken pieces and cover with foil. Bake at 350 degrees 1 to 2 hours until done, uncover and cook for a few minutes to brown. Ymmm! All the cars that were parked at and around Taber’s Fruit Barn, last Saturday night, was the annual Haunted Hayride must mean they drew a very large crowd. I’m 88-years-old and I’m still wondering what I’ll be when I grow up! No family has yet solved the problem of what to do with possessions that are not good enough to keep, but too good to throw away. Steve Retasket is home after a stay in the hospital, in Wenatchee. Hopefully he will continue to gain strength and be more comfortable. ‘Till next week..

Nov. 6, 2015 Fri: 5pm-9pm Nov 7, 2015 Sat: 9am-5pm Newport High School 4333 Factoria Blvd SE Bellevue, WA 98006

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103 min

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BRADLEY COOPER, SIENNA MILLER, DANIEL BRÜHL. FRI 6:45, 9:45. SAT *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. SUN.*3:45, 6:45. MON-THURS. 6:30 PG

ADVENTURE/ COMEDY - JACK BLACK, DYLAN MINNETTE, ODEYA RUSH. FRI.: 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30. SUN. *3:30, 6:30. MON-WED. 7:00.

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PAGE A7

OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR 3 and 4 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-322-3412, leave message.

Oroville Business Trick or Treat OROVILLE - This year’s Business Trick or Treat Event will be on Friday, Oct. 30 from 3 p.m. to 6 pm. All Oroville businesses with a neon green trick or treat sign in their door or window will be handing out treats for the kids.This is a great family event. Also, there is a contest for the businesses for best costumes and best decorations. Call Leah Palmer at 509-429-0201 to take part in that contest. Brought to you by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce.

Oroville Library Storytime OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Nov. 4. For more information contact julesbob1@ gmail.com.

The Roots of Music

Tonasket Farmers’ Market TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers’ Market, which next meets on Thursday, Oct. 29, has changed its hours for the month of October. The market will begin and ending one hour earlier — 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. every Thursday. There is plenty of healthy, fresh, local grown produce available.

Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - There will be a Stroke Support Group meeting on Thursday, Oct. 29 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church located at 1516 Fir Street. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome! There will be refreshments.

Slippery Slope to Perform OROVILLE - “Slippery Slope,” made up of Chuck Oakes, Ron Champagne, Tom Barrett and Jim Attwood, will perform Thursday, Oct. 29 at Esther Bricques Winery in anticipation of Halloween. Halloween attires is encouraged! Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861, check out the website – www.estherbricques.com, or checkout Esther Bricques Winery’s Facebook page.

Tillers Folly Concert OSOYOOS - Tiller’s Folly will perform on Thursday, Oct. 29 at the Osoyoos Community Theatre, 5800 115 St. Advance tickets $23 at Imperial Office or Sundance Video, $25 at the door. Students $15. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.

Farmers’ Market Finalé OROVILLE: The final Oroville Farmers’ Market of the year will be Saturday Oct. 31 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board has presented this market each week.. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Public Library. For more information call 509-429-3310.

First Aid & CPR Classes OROVILLE - There will be first aid and CPR classes held on Nov. 2,

TONASKET - The Roots of Music: Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes with George Halekas will take place on Friday, Nov. 6 at 5:15 at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center. The fall season begins with a compelling presentation that weaves together music and ecology, as biologist George Halekas surveys the unique beauty of nature’s soundscape, and explores why Earth is considered a ‘sonic jewel’ and ‘singing planet.’ This educational event is sponsored by Humanities Washington, coordinated by the Okanogan Highlands Assoc. and hosted at the CCC. The presentation is free; dinner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. On the menu: Roasted chicken, squash soup, salad greens with apples, craisins and cranberry dressing, and rolls. More info: okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw or 509-476-2432.

and FCCLA will be providing a refreshment area for veterans and community members to sit, visit, and reflect. They will have decorated tables for the veterans to sit at, enjoy the refreshments, and watch the assembly. They encourage our community members to attend our assembly and celebrate America’s Veterans with us.

Benefit Roast for Don King OROVILLE – A benefit “Roast” and Auction for Don King, who was diagnosed with cancer this past March, is planned at the Oroville Eagles on Saturday, Nov. 14. The fundraiser, to help with medical expenses, includes a dinner cooked by the Oroville Fire Department. Doors open at 4 p.m., dinner starts at 4:30 p.m. and auction at 6 p.m. The Roast starts after the auction. King started chemo and radiation in the middle of May and completed treatment the end of June. Rules for the Roast are as follows: 1. Anyone donating $50 will have a 4-8 minute time limit to Roast Don. 2. No filters, anything goes. 3. Organizers are also setting up a Skype call in number for anyone who cannot make the Benefit Roast and would like to participate in giving him a bad time. All donations can be dropped off at Joey King’s. Questions can be directed to Martin Rosales, email Martin_Rosale@Hotmail.com or call 206-391-5551. Oroville Contact Annette Rounds 509-560-0351.

Tonasket Community Church UCC

Sun., Nov. 1st  2 to 4 p.m. with special program at 3 p.m.

~

Enjoy light refreshments Special memories and pictures from the past and present. A wonderful faith walk. Pictures and memories gladly accepted, but we would love to see you!

May the comfort of God love fill you with HOPE AND PEACE Tonasket Community Church 24 East 4th St., Tonasket, WA Information: 509-486-2066 / helencasey3644@gmail.com

United Methodist Church

Welcomes you to our

Christmas Bazaar Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Spaghetti Luncheon & Country Kitchen

Planning Commission Hearing

United Methodist Bazaar OROVILLE - The United Methodist Church will hold their annual spaghetti luncheon and Bazaar, Saturday, Nov. 7. The bazaar opens at 10 a.m. and goes to 3 p.m. Serving for lunch begins at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Community Coat Closet OROVILLE - Warm coats for winter for children and adult will be given away on Sunday, Nov. 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Depot Museum, 1210 Ironwood in Oroville. The event is sponsored by the Oroville Royal Neighbors of America, Sterling Bank and community donations.

Fire Dist. 16 Budget Meeting AENEAS VALLEY - The Okanogan Fire District #16 commissioners will hold their annual public budget hearing Monday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m. at 20 Bench Creek Road in Aeneas Valley. The public is invited to attend. Call Mike Woelke at 509-486-1386 for more information.

Veteran’s Day Assembly TONASKET - In honor of Veteran’s Day, the Tonasket High School ASB will be hosting a Veteran’s Day Assembly on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015 in the Tonasket High School Commons from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The students would like to encourage all veterans to please bring items to be displayed on our Veterans’ memorabilia table. They would like to create an iMovie with all veterans photos. Please email your photo to Anita Asmussen – aasmussen@tonasket.wednet.edu, no later than Nov. 2 to be included in this year’s iMovie. Before the assembly, from 8:45 to 9:00 a.m., THS ASB

TONASKET - The Tonasket Planning Commission will hold a public hearing On Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 3 p.m. The agenda includes a continuation of the public hearing and Final Review of Zoning Code Chapter 17. The meeting was originally scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 20 and then rescheduled for Oct. 27 is now on Nov. 17

Community Christmas Bazaar OROVILLE - The Oroville Future Business Leaders of America Community Christmas Bazaar will be Friday, Nov. 20 and Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Oroville Elementary gym. Those that would like to reserve a booth ($20) should contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427.

Food Banks The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Online listings: Go to www.gazette-tribune.com and click on “Calendar” at the top of our homepage and then “Add Event” to list events on our webpage. To list in the newspaper for two weeks, send your event information to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or by mail to Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. Please include day, date and time, as well as a contact information phone number or email.

11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

 VOTE

Trinity Episcopal

TONASKET

Church of Christ

School Board Position 3 Paid for by Joyce Fancher

VOTE

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Joyce

FANCHER CHRIS

ALLEN Oroville City Council Position 5

A Community Voice  Local Sustainable EMS Paid for by the people to elect a voice.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

to ELECT

9th & Fir St., Oroville

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

October National Breast Cancer

Awareness Month

Menopause treatment Educating young women about breast cancer and breast cancer risk A

Hormone replacement therapy can elevate breast cancer risk and may not be an appropriate menopause treatment for all women.

Upon reaching a certain age, women go through the natural process of menopause. This change typically occurs when a woman reaches her late 40s or early 50s. The transition to menopause happens over several years and results in fluctuations of hormone levels in a woman’s body. During this transition, many women experience a variety of symptoms, from mood changes to hot flashes to vaginal dryness. These symptoms can be so severe they impact daily activities and can impede quality of life. Hormone replacement therapy, or HRT, may be prescribed to alleviate the side effects of perimenopause and menopause. However, HRT is not without risks, including an increased chance of developing breast cancer. According to The Mayo Clinic, HRT, which includes medications containing female hormones to replace the ones the body no longer makes naturally after menopause, used to be a standard treatment for women with severe symptoms. In the largest clinical trial to date, a combination estrogen-progestin pill was found to increase the risk of certain serious conditions, including blood clots, heart disease, stroke, and breast cancer. This type of therapy also may make a woman’s breasts appear more dense on mammograms, making breast cancer more difficult to detect. When undergone for more than a few years, HRT has been confirmed by multiple studies to increase the risk for breast cancer. Women concerned about HRT and cancer risk, especially those with a significant family history of breast cancer, generally want to avoid the use of hormone therapies. But what is a person who is experiencing many side effects of menopause that can be so easily remedied by hormone therapy to do? Research into HRT alternatives has discovered a host of natural treatments that can provide relief. Soy: Soy offers some promising results, especially with regard to relieving hot flashes. Soy is very high in phytoestrogens, or plant estrogens. Red clover and flaxseed are other sources of plant estrogens. Phytoestrogens

are less potent than pharmaceutical estrogen, and scientists believe they do not contribute to breast cancer in the way natural or pharmaceutical estrogen may. Black cohosh: Black cohosh is a member of the buttercup family and is a perennial plant native to North America. Preparations of black cohosh are made from the roots and underground stems. Black cohosh has long been used by natives of North America to treat malaise, gynecological disorders, rheumatism and other conditions. Black cohosh is now sold as an herbal remedy to alleviate hot flashes and excessive sweating in menopausal women. The National Institutes of Health awarded more than $7 million to the University of Illinois to study the efficacy of black cohosh and other herbs in treating certain symptoms of menopause. Dong quai: This herb is in the celery family and native to Asia. In Chinese medicine, dong quai has been considered a “female ginseng” because of its way of balancing the female hormonal system. As such, dong quai has long been used to relieve the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and menopause. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, researchers are unsure if dong quai acts like estrogen or blocks estrogen in the body, as studies have produced mixed results. Lifestyle changes: Women may need to dress more lightly, use a water atomizer to spray their bodies to cool down and keep their bedrooms cold to alleviate hot flashes. Vaginal estrogen: If vaginal dryness and pain during intercourse are the primary symptoms, vaginal estrogen rings or suppositories may be necessary. These provide estrogen directly to the affected area while only allowing very low levels to enter the bloodstream. In turn, vaginal estrogen may not increase breast cancer risk in the same way as other hormone therapies. Hormone replacement therapy can alleviate menopausal symptoms, but also it can elevate breast cancer risk. Other options are available, and women can speak with their doctors about alternatives to HRT.

t the age of 12 to 15, many young women are experiencing the body and life changes that accompany adolescence. It can be difficult to imagine that breasts that are just beginning to develop may contain cancer. But such is the reality for some girls. The majority of women who receive a breast cancer diagnosis are over the age of 40. Experts at Monroe Carell Jr. Hospital at Vanderbilt University note that only 5 percent of breast cancer cases are found in women under the age of 40. However, the hospital recently treated a 14-yearold girl who found a lump and learned she had a rare form of breast cancer called a phyllodes tumor. In 2009, a 13-year-old from Little Rock, Ark. found a quarter-sized lump in her right breast, while a 19-year-old student at the College of New Jersey was diagnosed with cancerous cells and underwent a bilateral mastectomy. Though such cases are rare, it behooves teenage and adolescent girls to familiarize themselves with the disease and be mindful of their breast health. Some organizations have increased breast cancer messages for young girls, and it is not uncommon to find young women participating in runs and fundraisers for breast cancer research. Some organizations even conduct breast cancer workshops to educate young women about breast health. Dorothy Paterson of Texas, a former Girl Scout leader who was diagnosed with breast cancer herself, began conducting workshops for Girl Scouts in 2007. The idea isn’t to scare girls into believing they have the disease, but rather to increase their awareness of changes in their bodies that may or may not be normal. Some parents worry that educating children about breast cancer

may cause them to worry unnecessarily, especially considering a young girl’s risk of developing breast cancer is so minimal. However, others see the importance in schooling girls early on about a disease that is so common. Advocates of teaching young girls about breast cancer often note that any effort to help save lives and promote health is worthwhile. Just as with older women, adolescents and teens should realize that eating healthy foods, exercising, avoiding alcohol and tobacco, and maintaining annual physical exams with a doctor are key ways to reduce the risk for cancer.

• Performing Mammograms 5 days a week in October (Monday-Friday). • Our Imaging Center has the leading technology in Digital Mammography. • Get your mammo before October 31st and you will be entered into a drawing for 1 of 3 prize baskets! To schedule your appointment call 509-486-3124 North Valley Hospital 203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket www.nvhospital.org

THE JOURNEY TO

BEATING CANCER JUST GOT SHORTER.

If you’re battling cancer, you shouldn’t have to sacrifice quality of care for convenience. At Confluence Health, you don’t. We have a highly experienced cancer care team in a state-of-the-art facility. We’re also a Network Member of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, which means you get streamlined access to SCCA’s pioneering research, consultations with SCCA doctors and educational support. It’s world-class cancer care, close to home. For more information, visit confluencehealth.org or call 509.826.1800

We have all been touched in some way

or know someone who has been affected by breast cancer. Because of this, it is important to offer support to those in every stage of this disease as well as those who are beating the odds and now stand as survivors.

Omak Clinic

916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA 98841


OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

BRAGGIN’ RIGHTS

Mark and Preston Riggs (father & son) from Ephrata, WA. 3 x 4 Mule Deer.

Kylar Anderson from Oroville. First Buck! 1 x 2 Whitetail.

Jay Thacker from Oroville. 4 x 5 Mule Deer.

Easton Anderson from Oroville. 3 x 3 Whitetail.

HUNTING

Okanogan County 2015

Mike Hodgson Pogue from Omak. 4 x 5 Mule Deer.

Martin Grooms from Omak. 3 x 4 Mule Deer.

SPORTS

Tigers and Hornets volley the lead BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILE - Oroville hosted Tonasket on the volleyball courts Thursday, Oct. 22, losing the match 1-3 to the Tigers after winning the first set 25-21. “We really started to show what we are capable of,” said Oroville Coach Nicole Hugus, adding that the Hornets played “really well as a team.” The Hornets lost the second set 18-25. “We started to make a few mistakes, and some of the girls lost confidence,” Hugus said. The Tigers won the third set 25-10 and the fourth set 25-13. “We just made too many mistakes. This was definitely a game we could have won,” said Hugus. Serving stats for Oroville show Jennifer Cisneros 12/13 with one ace, Havannah Worrel 10/11, Mikayla Scott 10/12 and Courtnee Kallstrom 10/12 with two aces. Passing, Wendy Ortega went 46/49, Hilderbrand was 34/38 and Kallstrom was 30/34. Hitting, Scott went 27/31 with six kills, Hilderbrand was 26/30 with seven kills and two blocks, and Worrell hit 14/17 with three kills and one block. For Tonasket, Olivia Sutton served 13/14 with eight kills, Alexa Sutton had seven kills out of 19 serves, Taylor Pilkinton served 20/23 and was credited with 11 assists and Faith Lofthus

served 16/16. “The girls played well together,” said Tonasket Assistant Coach Johnna Sutton. Tonasket lost 3-1 at home to Lake Roosevelt October 20 after winning the first set 25-22. The first two sets were closely matched and the scores often tied, but the Raiders won the second set 25-22. They easily beat the Tigers 25-8 in the third set, but Tonasket made Lake Roosevelt work hard for a 25-21 win in the final set. Tonasket’s Vanessa Pershing had five kills, Olivia Sutton had four and Kasey Nelson had two. Pilkinton had five assists. Lofthus served 13/13 and Alexa Sutton served 14/15. The Hornets traveled to Manson October 20. “We lost 0-3 to a very strong and hard-hitting Manson team,” said Coach Hugus. “Unfortunately we do not have many girls with the height to block them.” Serving, Scott went 11/12 with one ace, Kallstrom was 7/8 and Cisneros went 6/8 with one ace. Hilderbrand passed 21/24, Kallstrom was 17/18 and Scott passed 11/13. Scott hit 12/13 with two kills and one block, Hilderbrand was 6/8 with one block and Kallstrom hit 7/7 with one kill. The last games of the regular season were scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 27, with Oroville hosting Brewster and Tonasket hosting Bridgeport.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Hannah Hilderbrand jumps to send the ball flying over the net during Thursday’s (Oct. 22) game against the Tigers.

Tonasket’s Vanessa Pershing attempts to block a ball spiked over the net by Oroville’s Hannah Hilderbrand Thursday, Oct. 22.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Taylon Pilkinton sets the ball up for Vanessa Pershing to send over the net, tying the score 14-14 in Tonasket’s second game against Lake Roosevelt Tuesday, Oct. 20.

Kasey Nelson defends the net in the opening volley of the third set in the Tigers’ game against the Lake Roosevelt Raiders Tuesday, Oct. 20. Backing her up are JV players Meri Hirst and Alexia Gavin.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

SPORTS

Oroville Hornets holds Liberty Bell to four KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Lady Hornets hosted Liberty Bell on the soccer fields Thursday, Oct. 22, falling to the team who is currently third in league; but holding the Mountain Lions to four goals in the shutout. So far this season, Liberty Bell has shut out Brewster, Manson, Omak and Bridgeport. “The girls played a great game,” said Oroville Coach Tony Kindred. “They are constantly improving.” Kindred said the girls played with improved passing and communication against the Mountain Lions. With mulitple shots on goal, the Hornets were not able to score, but played with improved defensive skills and a bit of a change in the line up. “The girls played well, reducing the loss margin by six from the previous contest at Liberty Bell,” Kindred said. Oroville’s two wins this season so far have both been to Manson. The Hornets beat the Trojans 4-0 at the beginning of the season and 1-0 October 15. Their last game was scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 27 at home against Bridgeport. Earlier in the week, Oroville traveled to Tonasket where they were shut out by the Tigers 8-0.

SCHEDULES OCT. 29-NOV 7

Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC -Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Saturday, Oct. 31 XC - 1B/2B District 5/6 Championships at Walla Walla Point Park, Wentachee, noon VB - 2B District at Ephrata HS through Nov. 7 GSC - 1B/2B Districts at Apple Bowl, Wenatchee, through Nov. 7

FOOTBALL

Standings CENTRAL WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W Okanogan 3 Brewster 3 Oroville 2 Manson 1 Tonasket 0

Overall L W 0 7 0 6 2 3 3 2 4 1

L 1 1 4 5 6

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W Mabton 4 Warden 4 Soap Lake 1 White Swan 1 Lk Roosevelt 1 Kittitas 0

Overall L W 0 7 0 7 2 4 3 1 3 3 3 1

L 1 1 2 6 4 5

GIRLS SOCCER Gary DeVon/staff photo

Sophomore Marisa Aubin kicks the ball to a teammate during the game against Liberty Bell October 22. Tonasket traveled to Okanogan Thursday, Oct. 22, where they lost 1-6. When the Tigers faced the Bulldogs earlier this season, they played a closer game but fell 2-3.

Okanogan is currently first in the CW 2B League, with eleven conference wins and zero losses. Tonasket remains second in league, with eight league wins and three league losses; 11 and

Jenna Valentine, who came in fifth at 22:06. Tonasket’s Haley Larson finished in eleventh place with a time of 25:04, and Victoria Chervinska came in fourteenth place at 26:56. Bryden Hires of Tonasket placed sixteenth at 19:37, and teammate Riley Morris came in twenty-second at 19:57. Finishing first for Oroville was sophomore David Iniquez, who came in twenty-seventh at 20:16. Tonasket sophomore Justin McDonald came in twenty-ninth place at 20:18, and Oroville freshman Matthew Galvan came in thirty-first at 20:28. Zion Butler came in thirtyninth place for Tonasket at 20:50, and freshman Eric Owsley came in fourty-fourth at 21:04. Oroville’s Javier Castillo came

in forty-sixth at 21:09, and Tonasket’s Zach Clark finished fifty-first at 21:13. Also running for Oroville were Luis Vazquez and Emmanuel Castrejon, finishing in 22:10 and 22:23 respectively. Rade Pilkinton of Tonasket finished in 22:32, and Oroville’s Daniel Castrejon came in at 2:57. Oroville’s Dakota Haney pulled a personal best to finish the course in 26:52, followed by teammate Yohnney Castillo at 27:03. Tonasket freshman Mithchell Fitzhum came in at 43:42. District championships take place this Saturday, Oct. 24, at Walla Walla Point Park in Wenatchee. The girls’ varsity race starts at noon, and the boys at 12:45. The combined boys/girls JV race begins at 1:30 p.m.

three overall. 1B/2B District Championships will be held Oct. 31 through Nov. 7 at the Apple Bowl in Wenatchee.

CENTRAL WA LEAGUE (1B/2B)

League Overall Pts W L W L T Okanogan 0 11 0 13 2 0 Tonasket 0 8 3 11 3 0 Liberty Bell 0 7 3 9 3 0 Bridgeport 0 6 5 8 5 0 Brewster 0 4 7 4 11 0 Oroville 0 2 9 2 9 0 Manson 0 0 11 0 14 0

League Overall Pts W L W L T Warden 0 2 0 12 2 1 Mabton 0 0 2 4 11 0

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tournament matches, including split sets)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League

W Brewster 12 Okanogan 12 Manson 6 Lk Roosevelt 6 Tonasket 6 Liberty Bell 5 Bridgeport 5 Oroville 0

Overall

L 1 1 7 7 7 8 8 13

W L Sp 12 1 0 12 1 0 6 7 0 6 7 0 6 7 0 5 8 0 5 9 0 0 13 0

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League

W Warden 9 Kittitas 5 Waterville 5 Soap Lake 4 White Swan 4 Mabton 0

Overall

L W 0 12 4 6 4 9 5 5 5 5 9 2

L Sp 1 0 7 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 11 0

Tiger runners third in Crunch Bunch closing in on end of season CW 2B League BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

WINTHROP – Tonasket’s Cross Country Team took third place in the Central Washington B League Championships, held Saturday, Oct. 24 at Liberty Bell High School in Winthrop. Liberty Bell came in first with 37 points, followed by Brewster with 80 and Tonasket with 107. Bridgeport, Manson, Okanogan, Riverside Christian, Lake Roosevelt and Oroville placed fourth through ninth, respectively. Taking third place as individuals for both the boys and girls Tonasket teams in the 5,000 meter races were Hunter Swanson with a time of 17:08 and Johnna Terris coming in at 21:26. Terris was followed by teammate

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Bryden Hires was the second Tiger to finish at league championships.

Dakota Haney pulled a personal best at league championships.

Haley Larson finished in 11th place at league championships.

Do You Love Basketball? Would You Like to Make $1,500 to $3,000 Every Winter!

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket traveled to Okanogan Friday, Oct. 23, to meet up with last year’s 2B state champion football team, where they did their best to execute solid plays against the Bulldogs. The Tigers lost 0-46 to the team that beat Brewster earlier this year 61-14 and tromped Chelan 47-0. “I thought we really competed hard versus Okanogan,” said Tonasket Coach Jay Hawkins. “They are a really good team with lots of speed.” The Bulldogs are first in the league, followed by Brewster with Oroville in third place.

Okanogan scored just once in the first quarter, on a 19-yard pass with the extra point kicked in. They scored three touchdowns in the second quarter, and twice in the third quarter including a 39-yard run. The Tigers held them to just one touchdown in the fourth quarter. In the Tigers’ attempts to score, sophomore running back Jesse Ramon had fifteen carries for 60 yards; sophomore quarterback Rycki Cruz had 11 carries for 16 yards and freshman running back Ethan Smith had six carries for 12 yards. In the passing game, Cruz completed two of five attempts for ten yards with one interception.

Freshman Jordan Thrasher received both passes for the gained yards. “We did a nice job of focusing on winning the play,” Hawkins said. Tonasket travels to Omak this Friday, Oct. 30, to end their season with a non-league game against the Pioneers. Oroville, who currently stand third in league with two wins and two conference losses had a BYE last Friday but will travel to Spangle to play Liberty this Friday, Oct. 30. The 2B State competition will be held Nov. 13 through Dec. 5 at the Tacoma Dome.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Defensive lineman Zach Lofthus adds one more body to the pile of Tigers stopping a King Salmon during the Tigers’ win against Ketchikan earlier this season. Also in the fray were defensive lineman Kyle Huber, linebackers Jonathan Freese and Jesse Ramon, and defensive back Vance Frazier-Leslie.

OKANOGAN COUNTY NEEDS OFFICIALS Come to our meeting

November 4th at 6:30 p.m. Omak High School Commons

FREE PIZZA!

What You Need:  The playing experience you have  Even temper  Passion for the game What You Get:  You are able to exercise and get paid  Satisfaction of helping others  Give Back Time Commitment:  Flexible (1-4 nights a week) Just come check it out! No Commitment.

New Patients Welcome • General Dentistry Dental Implants • IV Sedation Available

Dr. Alan Singleton Dr. Ashkan Afshinkia For more information call

Jess O’Dell at 509-429-3677 or Mike Thornton at 509-429-3500 Mikalt32@gmail.com

8524 Main Street, Osoyoos

250-495-6144 www.osoyoosdentalcentre.com


OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SCHOOLS

Katie Teachout/staff photo Katie Teachout/staff photo

School Board members Ty Olson, Lloyd Caton, Catherine Stangland, Ernest Cerrillo and Jerry Asmussen join Principals Jeff Hardesty (center), Jay Tyus (back) and Jeremy Clark (right) in celebrating Tonasket High School being named one of America’s Top High Schools.

Students don’t generally do well in high school without a solid background in middle and elementary schools, so Superintendent Steve McCullough presented the plaque to all three principals. Missing from the photo is Special Education Director Liz Stucker.

Newsweek honors Tonasket High BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket High School received a plaque in recognition of being recognized as a top school for low-income students by Newsweek. In a list published by Newsweek in August, Tonasket High School was ranked 281 out of 98,500 schools nationwide. Newsweek has been publishing lists of the 500 best public high schools for college readiness in the United States for more than a decade, and in 2014,

Newsweek began publishing two lists; one called ‘America’s Top High Schools’ which lists schools based on performance alone (the absolute list), and a list called ‘Beating the Odds,’ that takes poverty rates into account when ranking schools based on performance (the relative list). According to Newsweek, their ‘Beating the Odds’ list seeks to identify schools that do an excellent job of preparing their students for college while also overcoming the obstacles posed by students at an economic disadvantage. Tonasket ‘beats the odds’ of poverty,

with a student retention rate of 97 percent, a graduation rate of 95.9 percent, an SAT/ACT composite score of 51.6 and a counselor-student ratio of 1.343. College readiness scores were at 80.4, and poverty was 61.9 percent. Bridgeport High School was also on the ‘Beating the Odds’ list, at 494 of 500 schools listed with a college-readiness score of 76.9, a graduation rate of 100 percent and poverty at 98.6 percent. Newsweek collaborated with the research firm Westat to develop a threestep methodology for ranking schools nationwide. A short list analysis evalu-

ated schools based on proficiency rates on standardized state-level math and reading/language arts assessments. The absolute list identified schools performing at or above the 70th percentile in each state. The relative list identified school performing 0.5 standard deviations or more than their state’s average when accounting for students’ socioeconomic status, based on the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. The schools on the short list were then surveyed for college-readiness based on six indicators: college enrollment,

graduation rate, weighted AP/IB/Dual enrollment composite, weighted SAT/ ACT composite, student retention and counselor-to-student ratio. For absolute rankings, schools were indexed by college readiness scores alone, and the relative list controlled for student poverty levels. A plaque commemorating Tonasket High School was presented by North Central Washington Educational Service District, and given to administrators by Tonasket Superintendent Steve McCullough at the school board meeting Monday, Oct. 26.

Leader in Me already School District office to leading to results at OES be restructured Attendance, math and reading levels all up over previous two years SUBMITTED BY CYLEY MOSER, TEACHER OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Oroville Elementary is proud to announce that our Leader In Me showcase day will be held on Wednesday, June 1, 2016. The Leader In Me is based off Stephen Covey’s Seven Habit’s of Highly Effective People, which has helped many to prioritize what is important to them in their lives. The Seven Habits we are learning to live by are: 1. Be Proactive, 2. Begin With the End in Mind, 3. Put First Things First, 4. Think Win-Win, 5. Seek First to Understand Then to Be Understood, 6. Synergize, and 7. Sharpen the Saw. These Habit’s don’t just live within the school, in fact they are even more effective when used outside of the school day. Oroville Elementary began this initiative to get our students to solve problems inside school walls, however we have already seen these habits take a ripple effect into the community. This year the community will see even more positive changes in our school. This is our second year as a Leader In Me school and we have already begun to

teach and learn in a different way. During conference week you may be surprised to see your own child leading you around the classroom and discussing academic progress and classroom events, instead of the teacher being the primary resource in the conference. The Leader In Me is brought to life by our students who prove to us each day that we are ALL leaders. Our school-wide goal is to break down barriers that prevent us from being our best selves and changing the way we look at the world. Our vision is to have students who act responsibly, take initiative, work together, plan ahead, network, and speak up because they WANT TO. We have already seen a change in the climate, attendance, and academics in our school after beginning The Leader In Me. One cannot be successful in life with another person’s dream; this desire needs to come from within. This is why The Leader In Me is so important to our school; we want our kids to think for themselves! We have begun our process of forming leadership communities that will guide our school toward the completion of academic, social, and personal goals. The best part about our committees is that they are created, staffed, and directed by our kids! If you are interested in joining any of our outstanding leadership committees we would love your help! This year our committees include artwork creation, event planning, community engagement, and many more! We need parent and community input on

On your way home from Canada... Stop, Shop and SAVE at the Osoyoos Duty Free! Call 250-495-7288 Hwy. 97 S. Osoyoos, B.C.

how to make our school an inviting and exciting place to be. If you are interested, please contact the school office at (509) 4763332. We can’t wait to hear from you! Thank you to all the parents, community members, and businesses that helped Oroville Elementary create a memorable Leader In Me day in 2015. Please join us for our second annual Leadership Day on June 1, 2016 to see all that your students have accomplished, be prepared to learn more about how they plan to carry these skills with them into their college and career ready lives.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket School Board approved Superintendent Steve McCullough’s recommendation the district office be restructured with the hiring of an Assistant Business Manager and a District Office Receptionist/ District Communications and Public Relations Manager. External Business Manager Trisha Schock’s position will be retained, with the goal of having her duties eventually taken over by district staff after they have been trained by Schock. A perma-

nent position offered to Schock was declined. She is unable to relocate to Tonasket due to family obligations elsewhere. “Trisha has had three other job offers this year already, and they were extremely lucrative offers, so I don’t know how much longer we will have her,” said McCullough. “If we wait too long to hire new staff, we won’t have her to train the next person.” Schock said she wasn’t actively seeking work elsewhere, but had received the offers nonetheless; assuring the school board she would not be leaving her position before new staff was

fully trained. The board approved receipt of a gift of $5,000 to the district. Gifts valued at over $1,000 can only be accepted by board approval. The donation came from The Sisters of St. Dominic School through the Tonasket American Legion Post. The donation was made after the Sisters heard about this summer’s wildfires and wanted to help. The only stipulation about how the money is to be used is that it “be used for the school children.” St. Dominic School is located in New Orleans, Louisiana. “They understand about disas-

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PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

HAUNTED VALLEY LIFE

Haunted Hayride 2015

Another wagon load takes off for parts unknown, first stop Blood Alley. Keep your hands and feet inside the wagon at all times.

Gary DeVon/ staff photos Look out she’s got a knife.

A couple of dollies you don’t want to have anything to do with no matter how much they ask you to come out and play..

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While we have a very diverse board, we are becoming very cohesive board with a good chemistry existing. I am excited about the addition of a new Superintendent and look forward to continued momentum in the Tonasket School District. In the future we will be running a bond for new construction, and with owning a construction company for 15 years I have knowledge that will be beneficial when working with teams as the much needed construction takes place on facilities. As a local business owner I understand the local economy and use my experience to cross over and be an informed board member working for the kids and families in the district. I have 2 children in the district and their ability to learn, participate and have opportunities alongside all the children/ students in the district is of the highest importance to me. I would appreciate your vote and feel free to contact me in person with any questions or conversation. Paid for by Ty Olson

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usbank.com/dreambig | 800.209.BANK (2265) *1.50% Introductory Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is available on Home Equity Lines of Credit with an 80% loan-to-value (LTV) or less. The Introductory Interest Rate will be fixed at 1.50% during the five-month Introductory Period. A higher introductory rate will apply for an LTV above 80%. Offer is available for new applications submitted from September 12, 2015–November 20, 2015. After the five-month introductory period: the APR is variable and is based upon an index plus a margin. The APR will vary with Prime Rate (the index) as published in the Wall Street Journal. As of September 11, 2015, the variable rate for Home Equity Lines of Credit ranged from 2.99% APR to 8.25% APR. Higher rates may apply due to an increase in the Prime Rate, for a credit limit below $125,000, an LTV at or above 80%, a low credit score and/or not having a U.S. Bank personal Package Checking account. A U.S. Bank personal package checking account is required to receive the lowest rate, but is not required for loan approval. The rate will not vary above 18% APR, or applicable state law, or below 1.50% APR. Choosing an interest-only repayment may cause your monthly payment to increase, possibly substantially, once your credit line transitions into the repayment period. Repayment options may vary based on credit qualifications. Interest only repayment may be unavailable. Loan approval is subject to credit approval and program guidelines. Not all loan programs are available in all states for all loan amounts. Interest rates and program terms are subject to change without notice. Property insurance is required. U.S. Bank and its representatives do not provide tax or legal advice. Your tax and financial situation is unique. You should consult your tax and/or legal advisor for advice and information concerning your particular situation. Other restrictions may apply. Mortgage and Home Equity products offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Deposit Products are offered through U.S. Bank National Association. Customer pays no closing costs, except escrow-related funding costs. An annual fee of up to $90 may apply after the first year and is waived with a U.S. Bank personal Platinum Checking Package. See the Consumer Pricing Information brochure for terms and conditions that apply to U.S. Bank Package Checking accounts. Member FDIC ©2015 U.S. Bank. All rights reserved. 150859 9/15


OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

HAUNTED VALLEY LIFE

Is this what happens to those who get pulled from the wagon?

Don’t they make a cute couple -- so this is what they mean by “the baby had a face only its mother could love.” Mikaela McCoy earned community hours by doing the make-up for many of the volunteers. She also did face painting. Mikaela McCoy earned community hours by doing the make-up for many of the volunteers. She also did face painting.

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PAGE B6 6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • October 29, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Black Bear & War Eagle Patented Claims on Palmer Mountain near Loomis, 35.5 acres. Black Bear was a gold producing mine in 1890’s and 1940’s. Reports available. $75,000 for both. Contact Teri at blackbearclaim@ gmail.com for further information. Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent

Announcements

AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

LOCAL PICKUP FOR:

Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 2 BR Starting at $400/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Marie at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

WWW.TRADITIONSLTD.COM MON-SAT 10:30AM-5PM WWW.TRADITIONS-LTD.COM

Found Announcements FIRST AID AND CPR CLASS will be held on November 2, 3, 4, 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm, in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information, call Ben Hylton, (509) 223-3412, leave message.

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Subscribe to the...

ANSWERS

Across 1. Doctor’s order 6. Follower of Mary 10. Become friendlier 14. About to explode 15. Apple spray 16. Pro ___ 17. Kind of jar 18. Foul 19. “Ars amatoria” poet 20. Battery terminal (2 wds) 23. Cloudless

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

We are looking for YOU to join our team! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN ADMIN HR Generalist Full time Grants Accountant/ Internal Auditor Full time OMAK MEDICAL Behavioral Health Specialist Full time Pharmacy Technician Full time. Bilingual preferred. Occasional travel to Brewster required. Roomer Full time. Bilingual required OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred

BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics

www.gazette-tribune.com

Crosswords

Job description and application available online: www.oroville.wednet.edu Closes: October 30 Equal Opportunity Employer

BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

25. Bounces

10. Hot and humid

26. Characteristic of the nobility

11. Devastation

30. Family head

12. Inclined

31. Blah (2 wds)

13. Walks in water

32. Club used by India’s police

21. Clean and brush a horse

36. Maple genus

22. Morally wrong

38. Bush-league 40. Bad look

23. Small, bulbous plants with showy spring flowers

41. One who goes for the gold?

24. Flax fabric

43. Like composition paper

26. Sandler of “Big Daddy”

45. Ace

27. Kind of dog

46. Message-carrying bird (2 wds)

28. Altercation (hyphenated)

49. Unfaltering

29. ___ friends

52. Bloodless

33. Crow’s home

53. “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” for one

34. Graceful bird

57. Asian nurse

37. Goes back over

58. Rake

39. Indemnify

59. Agenda entries

42. Harassed

63. Automatic

44. Rid from one’s mind

64. Mass number

47. Sweet cicely (pl.)

65. Brown ermine

48. Densely populated slum area

66. “Aeneid” figure

49. Animal catcher

67. Absorbs, with “up”

50. Abnormal tissue growth

68. Cher’s singing partner

51. A Muse

Down

54. It comes easily to hand, toy (hyphenated)

1. Backboard attachment

56. Cluckers

2. Victorian, for one

60. Long, long time

3. Consumes

61. “Gee whiz!”

4. Is repentant

62. Chester White’s home

6. ___ lamp 7. Came down 8. French Sudan, today 9. Officer promotion without pay increase

BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

At Thompson Bees in Oroville we are interested in hiring an auto mechanic for a full time position. We are also interested in hiring someone who has experience with tire service and sales, tow truck operation, and/or general mechanics. If you have experience or interest in any of these things, please call Michael at 509.476.3948 or stop in at 610 Hwy 97 in Oroville.

Feed Hay & Grain Excellent Feed Straw Very short in length, no waste. Will deliver. Call / leave message 360-380-5055

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF October 26, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED RN’s up to $45/hr, LPN’s up to $37.50/hr, CNA’s up to $22.50/hr, Free gas/weekly pay, $2000 Bonus, AACO Nursing Agency, 1-800-6564414 Ext2

Public Notices This is to give notice that the City of Tonasket, Washington has conducted an evaluation as required by Executive Orders 11988 and 11990 in accordance with HUD regulations at 24 CFR 55.20 to determine the potential affect that its activity in the floodplain and/or wetland will have on the environment. The City of Tonasket, Washington intends to undertake a project to be funded by a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) from the Washington Department of Commerce including the following project elements: Main Lift Station Rehabilitation: Project work will consist of removing and replacing all mechanical and electrical equipment within the existing wet-well and valve vault and replacing the above ground electrical panel. Grinder Pump Lift Station: Project work will consist of removing and replacing the pumps and all mechanical and electrical equipment within the existing wet-well and replacing the above ground electrical panel. Rehabilitation of Gravity Sewer Main: The sewer main beneath Weber Road has experience root intrusion and pipe blockage. This main and potentially its connected services will be lined to exclude roots from the pipe. It has been determined that no practicable alternative other than to proceed with the proposed work is available, as the existing infrastructure is located within the 100-year floodplain of the Okanogan River. Rehabilitation of the proposed sewer system improvements has been designed to minimize floodplain and wetland impacts, as all new infrastructure will be installed underground or above the base flood elevation. Implementation of the proposed sewer system improvements will reduce the risk of failure in the Parry’s Acres area. Although the project is located in the 100 year floodplain and/or wetland, the improvements cannot be undertaken in any other location due to the locations of the existing infrastructure and the scope of the project. There is, therefore, no practicable alternative. The proposed improvements conform to applicable floodplain protection standards. Replacement of the failing sewer system infrastructure in the Parry’s Acres area near Tonasket will eliminate the potential for adverse impacts to public health, water quality and floodplain and wetlands associated with sewer system failure. Residents of the community will benefit from the elimination of this potential threat to public health. This project will be funded by the HUD/Community Development Block Grant Program administered by the Washington Department of Commerce.

Continued on next page

Did you know? We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

Think Green!

Public Notices

35. “Pumping ___”

55. Beef cut

5. Below

Oroville School District Openings Head & Assistant High School Girls’ Basketball Coach

(Country Harvest General Store)

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Help Wanted

Health General

Date of Publication: 10/29/2015 City of Tonasket 209 S Whitcomb Ave, PO Box 487 Tonasket, WA 98855 509-486-2132 To: All interested Agencies, Groups and Individuals

Subscribe to the...

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com


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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for the County of Okanogan Petitioner Mandie R. Miller Vs. Respondent Rahmier D. Harley No. 15-3-00137-5 The State of Washington to the said Rahmier D. Harley:

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PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, November 3, 2015 at 7:00 pm to consider

Sinlahekin Wildlife Area P.O.Box C Loomis, Washington 98827 October 26th, 2015 TO: Prospective bidders FROM: Justin Haug, Manager Sinlahekin Wildlife Area RE: Call for bids on the Eyhott Island Wildlife Area Agricultural Lease The Department of Fish and Wildlife will be accepting sealed bids on approximately 50 acres (+/-) of agricultural fields on the Eyhott Island Unit of the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area. Sealed bids will be opened at the Washington Department of Fish and

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 44 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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Wildlife, Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Headquarters, 1680 Sinlahekin Road Loomis, Washington on November 23, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. Please call 509-223-3358 to receive your bid packet and/or if you have any questions regarding this lease opportunity. Bids will be accepted if mailed and received on or before November 23, 2015 or hand delivered before 1:30pm November 23, 2015 in ENVELOPES PROVIDED in Bid Packets ONLY. Completed bid packets should be mailed to: WDFW Sinlahekin Wildlife Area P.O. Box C Loomis, Washington 98827 ALL INCOMPLETE BIDS OR BIDS RECEIVED AFTER 1:30 P.M. ON NOVEMBER 23, 2015 WILL BE REJECTED. Please review the information sheet prior to submitting in your bid. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 29, 2015. #OVG665181

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possible increases in City revenues, including property tax revenues, for the year 2016. The Ad Valorem taxes will be adopted during the same meeting. Citizens attending shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 22, 29, 2015 #OVG663649

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You are hereby summoned to appear within ninety days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within ninety days after the 29th day of October, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the petitioner Mandie R. Miller, and serve a copy of your answer upon the Okanogan Superior County Court at the address below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgement will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. Petitioner, Mandie R. Miller, requesting dissolution of marriage. Okanogan County Superior Court 149 3rd Avenue North - 3rd Floor PO Box 112 Okanogan, WA 98840 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune October 29, November 5, 12, 19, 26 and December 3, 2015. #OVG664507

Sudoku

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Notice of the Intent to Adopt an Election Resolution The Okanogan Conservation District Board of Supervisors will hold a meeting at 5:00 PM on November 5, 2015 at the USDA Service Center, 1251 S. 2nd Ave, Okanogan, WA to adopt a resolution setting the date, time, location and manner of an election to fill a Conservation District Supervisor’s expiring term. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on October 22 & 29, 2015 #OVG662492

Public Notices

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Written comments must be received by Alice Attwood of Tonasket, 209 S Whitcomb Ave PO Box 487 Tonasket, WA 98855 on or before November 13, 2015. A more detailed description of the project and Federal Insurance Administration (FIA) flood maps are available for citizen review by contacting the local government. Alice Attwood City Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 29, 2015. #OVG665189

Public Notices

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OCTOBER 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE October 29, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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Puzzle 45 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.63)

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7

3

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9

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9

Puzzle 40 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

3

1

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7 6 5

6 4 2 3 5

8 1 9 7

2 7 5 1 3 6

8 4 9

9

8

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1

3 9 2 4

6 8 7 5 2

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3

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1

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1 6 4 2 7 3 8

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Puzzle 37 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

9 7 3 4

5 2 8 1

8

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1 3 7 6

5

3 8 6 1 4

9 2 7

4

2 6 7 3 9

1 5 8

9

7 1 5 8 2 6 3

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2

4 9 1 5 7 8 6

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1

6 3 4 2 8 7 9 5

7 8

5 9 6 3 4 1 2

Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

8

2

6

2 1 9 7 6

3 8 4 5

6 5 4 2 8

9 7 3 1

9 7 1 5 3 2

4 8 6

3 8 2 4 9 6

5 1 7

5 4 6 8 7 1 2 9

3

1 9 8 6 2 7 3 5

4

7 6 5 3 4 8 1 2 9

5

8

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7

3 5

2 3 8

1

1

2

9 4 6

4 7 9

1 4 9 7 6 2

5 8 3

3 1 8 4 5

6 9 2 7

9 5 2 8 7 1 3

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1 6 3 8 4

5 2

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1 4 5 7 9

8

Puzzle 42 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.69)

4 2

3 9 1 5 6 7 8

Puzzle 38 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45)

2

7

8

5

3 6

4 3 7

9

1

8

1 2 4

5 6 9

1 9 6 8 4 2

3

9 5

6

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8 4

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1 7 5 4 2

2

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4 9 1 6

7

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3 5 2 7 9

7

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9 1 6 3 5

1 2

4 8 9 6

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

9

HOME

5

Find The Right

7 5

1 6

9 3

5 8

8 1

4 2

3

7

Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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Enjoy plenty of space with the large yard. Home features several upgrades including vinyl windows and wood floors. MLS#841799 $101,000

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BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

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PAGE B8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 29, 2015

SCHOOLS | FROM B3 Clark said students were responding well to the Leader in Me program, with the Tiger Trait program focused on the Seven Habits of Happy Kids. The trait for October is “Be Proactive” and for November, “Begin with the End in Mind.” Middle School Principal Jay Tyus also reported on successes with the Leader in Me program, including teacher Rennie McCormick leading a Student Recognition Action Team, and Maintenance Supervisor John Verbeck and staff having a “cando” attitude when it came to “transforming their learning environment to model our efforts around the 7 Habits and a culture of leadership.” Tyus said the For Free Friday program which hosts an event on the last Friday of each quarter would continue this year, with Gear-Up Director Michele Giovia coordinating the Central Washington University Science Department as guest workshop presenters for October 30. Students earn the right to participate in Free Fridays by having no missing assignments, and no ‘F’ grades. Those unable to

participate work with teachers to get their grades improved and assignments completed on Free Fridays. The Fall Sports Assembly takes place at the middle school Friday, Oct. 30, with Teanna Wilson and Nathan White assisting the students in putting the event on, as well as a Veterans Day assembly with the help of Kari Alexander’s Leadership Class. Tyus said the SADD club has changed their name to ROAR and is designed to diminish choices that harm self or others. Middle School Book Clubs are reading ‘I am Malala,’ and ‘Video Game Club.’ School board members and staff in attendance sang ‘Happy Birthday’ to Janet Glanzer when McCullough announced it was her birthday. “Thank you for all that you do for us,” said Stangland. “You are a huge gift to us, so we are happy to celebrate you.” The board went into executive session at the end of the meeting to consider professional negotiations, grievances or mediation. The meeting was adjourned with no motion made.

OBITUARIES

Chuck Rodriquez

CHUCK RODRIQUEZ

Quilt race to be held in Molson SUBMITTED BY THE HIGHLAND STITCHERS

MOLSON – The public is invited to join The Highland Stitchers at the Molson Grange Sunday, Nov. 8 for an afternoon of fun and friendly competition that begins at 1 p.m. If you can sew a straight ¼ inch seam, operate an iron and want to benefit those less fortunate in your community; bring your sewing machine, basic sewing supplies and your competitive spirit for the chance to win one of several valuable prizes. The Highland Stitchers will be doing a “Jelly Roll Race” to make a quilt top in less than an hour. Check out youtube.com and search for “Jelly Roll Race” for more information on this fun event. All fabric, pre-cut into the 2 ½ inch strips that make up a jelly roll, irons and ironing boards will be provided. There will be two classifica-

tions, with prizes for each class. Seamstresses can participate as an individual or get a group together to do the race. Prizes will be based on speed and accuracy. All completed quilt tops will be quilted and bound by The Highland Stitchers and will be displayed at the next Molson Quilt Show, held the last Saturday in August. Afterwards, the quilts will be given to anyone in need in the community. The Highland Stitchers would like to make as many quilt tops as possible, so spread the word by inviting friends, co-workers and family. RSVP by Tuesday, Nov. 3 so there can be enough jelly rolls for everyone. Contact Lisa Chaplin at (509) 485-2077 or Vicky Didenhover at (509) 485-3020 for more information. “Like” the seamstresses on Facebook by searching for Highland Stitchers in Molson.

Roberta Jo “Bobbie” Rickel

ROBERTA JO ‘BOBBIE’ RICKEL

DENTISTRY

Thank You... Chris & Andrea Field and

C&F Construction for buying my Chicken at the Okanogan County Fair!

Noah Hilderbrand

Thank you... The Okanogan County Fair Advisory committee wishes to thank the following people for their help in the success of the 2015 Fair: Ben Atkins for his help in the information booth Roger Sawyer for awesome entertainment at the Grandstand Clayton Bailey for signs Our Rodeo Queen Alexee Howell for all her hard work and Her Wonderful Mom Marcie for all her hard work as well Our Superintendents who did a great job in all the buildings Multiple Businesses that without their support we could not have a fair and All those who entered entries in the fair to make the fair possible and all those who attended!

Thanks Again! See you next year!

Chuck Rodriquez died on October 22, 2015 from a blood clot in his heart. Chuck was born in California in 1966 on September 12. Growing up there made enjoying the outdoors easy. Surfing, skateboarding, baseball and fishing were his favorites. His love for fishing continued a favorite pastime throughout his days. Chuck was an expert door hanger and finish carpenter. His skills learned in a carpenter apprentice program were honed from years of experience. Chuck moved to Tonasket in 2010 to be closer to family. He leaves a legacy as beloved son, father, grandfather and friend. His laugh and wicked sense of humor will be remembered. Chuck is preceded in death by

his brother, Louis Rodriquez. He is survived by his parents Tim and Rebecca Cude, brothers Ryan and Mike Cude, children Courtney Bewley, Adrianna Rodriquez, Alicia Rodriquez, Briana Rodriquez, Charles Rodriquez Jr, Isiyes Lopez and Monica Rodriquez, grandchildren Aaron Burris, Daniel Hamilton, Angelo Rodriquez, Heather Martinez and a large extended family. A private family gathering celebrating his life is planned. Thank you for the outpouring of thoughts, prayers and memories of Chuck. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

Roberta Jo “Bobbie” Rickel passed away on October 20, 2015, with her husband by her side at home in Tonasket. She was born October 30, 1939 in Breeze Basin, Colorado to Donald VanClief Cooper and Josephine May Lewis Cooper. She spent the first part of her adult life raising a family, living in various parts of the country from Colorado, Bellingham, Alaska and Maine then to Tonasket where she met and married I.V. Joe Rickel, her husband of 27 years. They made their home on the ranch above Tonasket, she loved ranch life, raising chickens, milking her cow and working in her garden. Bobbies hands were never idle, she was always embroidering, crocheting, or knitting and made most all of her gifts. Bobbie had a big heart, kind soul and gentle nature, and will be greatly missed by those she

leaves behind. She was a wonderful cook, many enjoyed her meals, she worked at: Romars Restaurant, the Round-up cafe and in the kitchen at North Valley Hospital. She was preceded in death by her parents, her brothers Butch Cooper, Blake Hall and granddaughter Theresa Fancher. She is survived by her Husband I.V. Joe Rickel at home, her daughter Debbie Jones of Tonasket, her son Bill Sluys of Denver Colo., step-daughters Pam Fancher of Tonasket and Tenise Kessler of Connell, step-son Kenneth Rickel of Cheney, nine grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Memorial service will be on Monday November 2, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. at Bergh’s Chapel, 801 Main St., Oroville Wash. with Pastor Leon Alden, officiating. Bergh Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements.

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

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“They understand about disaster,” said Board Member Catherine Stangland. The board approved several policy updates, including moving school board meetings from Monday evenings to Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. year-round. The change will take effect at the beginning of December 2015. School Board Meetings are held at the School District Office on the second and fourth weeks of the month. The board also approved updates to policies addressing District Ownership of Staff Created Work; Excused and Unexcused Absences; and Child Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Prevention. Further discussion was warranted on policies addressing Bid Limits; Targeted Student Learning Policy; Curriculum Development and Adoption of Instructional Materials; and Waiver of High School Graduation Credits. The board approved the Superintendent’s request to create a Supervisory Advisement Committee. McCullough said with such a diverse community, he would like input from community members, especially those from outlying areas such as Ellisforde and Loomis. Schock reported school revenues being down compared to expenditures, which is typical of the month of September. She said when the school received the second half of property taxes in October the numbers will come back up in a typical trend. Schock said the district was making “really good strides” towards having a better cash balance. “We are significantly higher than where we were at last year, or over the last three years,” said Schock. ASB President Rachel Silverthorn gave updates on various school clubs. She said the ASB was doing a children’s coat drive, and was working on having a water fountain capable of filling water bottles put in at the high school. Silverthorn said donations for the fountain were received from Subway and the Tonasket Booster Club, and the ASB would be funding the remainder of the cost. She said ASB was attempting to set up a Facebook page, which would be monitored by the ASB Leadership Class. Silverthorn said the ASB would host a Veteran’s Day Assembly Nov. 10 from 9 to 10 a.m. Veterans are asked to bring in items to be displayed on the Veterans’ memorabilia table. An iMovie is being created with veterans photos, and veterans are asked to email their photos to Anita Asmussen at aasmussen@ tonasket.wednet.edu no later than Nov. 2. Veterans are invited to arrive at 8:45 a.m. prior to the assembly to enjoy refreshments and reflections with other veterans and community members. Elementary School Principal Jeremy Clark reported about 230 people attended a Pumpkin Bingo last week, with pumpkins donated by Beyer’s Market. He said an Early Literacy training last Saturday was well attended, and included staff from Oroville and Bridgeport. The elementary school will be holding a Veteran’s Day Assembly Tuesday, Nov. 10, in the afternoon with a musical presentation by Mrs. Morris’s classes, and a commemorative video.

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 29, 2015  

October 29, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 29, 2015  

October 29, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune