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North Olympic Peninsula

VOTER GUIDE for the general election ending November 3, 2015

Clallam County ■ Jefferson County ■ Washington state

Published as a public service by the

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Introduction

Be sure to vote by 8 p.m. Nov. 3 T

HIS SPECIAL SECTION of the Peninsula Daily News, also available online at www. peninsuladailynews.com, provides voters with information about the Nov. 3 general election. It includes candidate questionnaires and biographical profiles for all contested races in Clallam and Jefferson counties. It also includes information on positions up for election in “About the Job” features and on local and statewide ballot measures. Races in which candidates are unopposed are not profiled in this section. Neither are write-in candidates. Also not profiled are races in which candidates have dropped out past the legal deadline but whose names still appear on the ballot. They include the Position 7 Port Angeles City Council race between incumbent Cherie Kidd and challenger Dan Bateham, who dropped out. Ballots were mailed by auditor’s offices in Clallam and Jefferson counties to registered voters Oct. 14. Voting continues until 8 p.m. Nov. 3.

Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb coordinated compilation of candidate questionnaires, profiles and position descriptions. Copy Editors Allison McGee and Emily Hanson and Managing Editor Michael Foster designed this section. Staff photojournalist Keith Thorpe processed photos. Candidates’ answers were limited to 75 words per question and were edited for length, grammar and spelling. For disabled voters, during the voting period, a voting terminal is available at the Clallam County Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles, and at the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. Ballots must be postmarked no later than Nov. 3 or dropped off by no later than 8 p.m. Nov. 3 at the following locations:

Clallam County ■ Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. A drive-up drop box is provided.

■ Sequim Village Shopping Center, near the J.C. Penney store, 651 W. Washington St. ■ Forks District Court lobby, 502 E. Division St.

Jefferson County ■ Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. A drive-up drop box is provided in the parking lot to the rear of the courthouse off Franklin Street. ■ Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock. An outside drop box is mounted in the parking lot.

Election calendar Here are some significant dates relating to the Nov. 3 election: ■ Oct. 14: Ballots were mailed out to registered voters for the Nov. 3 election. ■ Oct. 16: The North Olympic Peninsula Voter Guide for the general election was published in the Peninsula Daily News and posted online at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ Oct. 26: Voter registration deadline for people not registered to

■ List of unopposed candidates / Page 36 vote who want to vote in the Nov. 3 election. Registration must be done in person at the courthouse of the county of residence. ■ Nov. 3: General election ends at 8 p.m.

Have questions? Questions about Clallam County elections can be phoned to the county Auditor’s Office elections division at 360-417-2217 Mondays through Fridays. Voter registration information is available by phoning 360-417-2221. Questions about Jefferson County elections can be phoned to the county Auditor’s Office elections division at 360-385-9117 Mondays through Fridays. Voter registration information is available by phoning 360-385-9119. The Secretary of State’s Office in Olympia maintains a website with general voting information at www. vote.wa.gov.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

Clallam County

County commissioner, District 1 How would you have handled the Opportunity Fund dispute with county Treasurer Selinda Barkhuis? McEntire: The treasurer asked us to use a budget process that did not fit the facts. We handled this unprecedented disagreement appropriately, extending olive branches, holding hearings and signing agreements. All to no avail; the treasurer did not meet us halfway until the last moment. Fortunately, we can now move forward. We cannot pick and choose which law or policy to follow; we follow the facts, law and county policy, which we have done. Ozias: Treasurer Barkhuis raised a valid concern about a county policy, pointing out that non-elected administrators should not be able to move millions of dollars between funds without a public process. I would have advocated taking one of the two reasonable solutions she offered or attempting mediation, as suggested by the prosecuting attorney, as an alternative. Insisting upon a legal remedy when given so many options would have been detrimental to Clallam County and its citizens. Should a salary commission set public officials’ salaries, including county commissioners? McEntire: That is certainly one option the law provides for, but it does not seem to have wide support among county elected officials or on the board of commissioners. An advisory committee is what was recommended by the Charter Review Commission, with the salary-setting authority

About the job CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 1 Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan General election boundaries: Countywide Voters: 47,153 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Work session Monday; regular meetings every Tuesday Compensation: If Jim McEntire is re-elected, he will make $72,800. If Mark Ozias wins, he will make $69,300. Commissioners also receive a $60 monthly car allowance and a $40 monthly cellphone stipend. Duties: Approve a general fund budget that in 2015 is $34.4 million and which covers 274 full-time-equivalent positions, set a tax levy, approve county ordinances, approve the hiring of all employees and all terminations, serve on regional and statewide boards, and serve on the county Board of Health, which meets monthly. retained by the board of commissioners, and that is an equally good option. I am more than happy to follow the charter, which assigns that authority to the commissioners.

lands in the county be managed by the county? McEntire: The Board of Commissioners has been asked by the Charter Review Commission to set up an advisory committee to examine the pros and cons of this question and make recommendations. We have responded to this request by doing just that. We should await the recommendations of that committee. But one thing is clear now: I will use my seat on the state Board of Natural Resources to seek a greater financial return on the county’s trust lands.

Ozias: In 2014, when my opponent advocated for cuts to elected officials’ salaries, his fellow elected officials raised a chorus of concerns. One called the plan a “slap in the face,” while another worried it would discourage qualified candidates from seeking office. Public officials’ salaries are a complex subject that should not be politicized. A nonpartisan salary commission would be a fair and nonpolitOzias: While this concept is ical way to establish appropriate appealing on the surface, we salaries for elected officials. need to look more deeply. Should state forest trust

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Jim McEntire (R)

Mark Ozias (D)

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-775-7357

Phone: 360-461-2613

Email: votejimmcentire@ gmail.com

Email: markoziasgomo@ gmail.com

Campaign website: www.electjimmcentire.com

Campaign website: www. markozias.org

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 65

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 45

Education: Bachelor’s degree, U.S. Coast Guard Academy; master’s degree, public administration, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.; fellow, Secretary of Defense Strategic Studies Group

Education: Graduate, Cherry Creek High School, Denver, 1989; bachelor’s degree, politics and government, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, 1993; studied horticulture at South Seattle Community College, 2002-03

Occupation: Clallam County commissioner

Occupation: Executive director, Sequim Food Bank

Have you ever run for or held public office? Commissioner, Port of Port Angeles (2008-11); Clallam County commissioner (2012-present)

Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Port of Port Angeles commissioner, District 3 Should Lincoln Park’s obstructive trees be harvested to allow better flight-path access to William R. Fairchild International Airport?

Connie Beauvais, Michael Breidenbach

Beauvais: We have lost over 1,300 feet of runway because of tree obstructions. Currently, eight trees need to be removed. I would be greatly saddened if a plane had to make an emergency landing but couldn’t make it past the trees. The port has the option of working with the Federal Aviation Administration to deal with the issue or preferably working collaboratively with the city of Port Angeles to restore full use of our crucial runway.

county also needs to be respected. Tree removal and re-establishing a new park forest creates a great educational opportunity. Commercial thinning followed by the planting of new native trees by local schoolchildren would help share our rich history with forests.

Breidenbach: Lincoln Park is a wonderful community asset. The park’s history, use and forested areas need to be respected and protected. Removal of the trees to establish safe air service for the

Beauvais: Log yard revenue was $1.2 million in 2011; $980,000 in 2012; $1.1 million in 2013; $1.7 million in 2014; and is projected at $1.6 million in 2015. It is important for the port to

Candidates’ biographies, About the Job outline appear on next page.

How should the port adjust its budget to address the steep falloff in log exports?

grow and diversify business lines so any one line does not have a large deficit effect during slow times. I will strongly advocate marketing our available facilities and sites and going after more marine trade businesses while growing composite manufacturing jobs. Breidenbach: Having experience at several ports around the state, I am familiar with the port’s business. Log handling and processing at the Port of Port Angeles is not limited to export only and also includes barging, towing and water rafting of domestic logs. We will see domestic logs shipped from port facilities to help offset a drop in export revenue. If I am elected, I will focus on building additional revenue streams from other port business. What kind of development would you like to see at the former KPly mill property?

Beauvais: The port is currently working to complete the environmental cleanup of this property. The next step is to build a structure appropriate for a tenant. A marine trades business, either a current tenant looking to expand or a new marine trades business, would be most appropriate for this industrial site. Breidenbach: I want to help develop expanded dock facilities for additional maintenance and repair, increase marine trade construction and repair, and create a trade school in conjunction with Peninsula College. We cannot ignore the need for training and job placement for the increased economic activity that the port’s newly rehabilitated waterfront will bring. Our local workforce has a strong work ethic, and improved educational opportunities are key for our successful economic growth.

How would you improve the port’s recently adopted strategic plan? Beauvais: As the only candidate to attend all port meetings on this topic since April, and having provided input at an all-day workshop and public forums, I am eager to get to work on the new goals. In addition, the commissioners need to be more proactively involved in port decisions rather than delegating authority on major decisions, thereby increasing transparency and accountability. We must solve the Lincoln Park tree issue and foster better communication with stakeholders. Breidenbach: I would narrow the strategic plan’s focus by placing environmental cleanup as the first goal to accomplish. Secondly, increase dock facility improvements and construct a barge-loading dock within the next two years. PLEASE

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Clallam County commissioner, District 1/

CONTINUED

If we assume management, we also assume liability. We’re on the hook if there’s a fire or environmental lawsuit. This concept would also necessitate an entire new layer of bureaucracy within our county government at an unknown cost. This idea distracts from more potentially useful actions such as organizing leaders from junior taxing districts to put pressure on the DNR [state Department of Natural Resources].

tightly regulated because it consists of complex ecosystems that cannot be separated from their McEntire: In four ways: larger context. ■ Don’t make unneeded For example, a single neighbor changes to the existing shoreline management plan if it still serves who “armors” a bluff might cause increased erosion for neighboring its purpose — in other words, “if property owners as well as interit ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” ■ Since “no net loss of ecologi- fere with the source of material cal function” is undefined in state that feeds our natural spits. The shoreline management law, take a cautious approach in plan originally came about applying that term. ■ Use good science instead of through a grassroots, citizendriven effort, and the updated conjecture or a “precautionary document provides owners with approach.” How would you balance the guidance that protects their long■ Find ways to compensate need to protect shorelines property owners for “regulatory term investment. from environmental harm takings.” with the rights of shoreline Will you serve your full Ozias: Shoreline land is property owners to develop term in office? their land?

McEntire: Yes. Ozias: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? McEntire: In 2011, I said, “Voters have the opportunity to elect a thoughtful, fair-minded, sensible, responsible leader.” I have been a constructive, collegial, common-sense conservative — and I have served with openness, good humor and dedication to good governance. My focus has been on the economic advancement of our county, and I have an excellent record of doing what I promised.

Re-elect me, and that is what Clallam County voters can expect for the next four years. Ozias: We deserve a county commissioner who prioritizes citizen engagement. Who believes that we make better decisions when the people of Clallam County are consulted, engaged and actively involved in their own governance. A collaborative leader with a successful record of achieving results. I am excited about what we will accomplish when we begin planning strategically for our future and working together to achieve it, and I would greatly appreciate your vote.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

Port of Port Angeles commissioner, District 3/

CONTINUED

Then, generate measurable ideas through additional community involvement by reaching out to local governments and citizen groups. Finally, collaborate with Peninsula College to develop marine-trade training and job placement. The plan must improve economic growth and facilitate new business development.

About the job PORT OF PORT ANGELES COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Countywide Voters: 47,153 as of Sept. 23

Beauvais: Yes. Breidenbach: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Beauvais: I have a broad background in community relations, personnel and finance, with experience in private business, school districts and the federal government. I will use that expertise, as well as my determination to work hard as a port commissioner, to wisely manage the public assets under the purview of the port and to market those assets to create job opportunities. See www.connie4port.com to learn more about me.

Michael ‘Mike’ Breidenbach

Residence: Joyce

Term: Four years Will you serve your full term in office?

Connie Beauvais

Meetings: Second and fourth Tuesdays

Phone: 360-797-4261; 360928-9538

Residence: Forks Phone: 360-640-0333

Compensation: Eligible for up to $114 per day for portrelated activities for up to 96 days a year, or $10,944 and a salary of $254 a month for a maximum annual monetary compensation of $13,992; medical, dental, vision, long-term disability and life insurance.

Email: connie4port@ olypen.com

Email: elect@mike breidenbach.org

Campaign website: www. connie4port.com

Campaign website: www. mikebreidenbach.org

Duties: Approve a general fund budget that in 2015 is $7.5 million and covers 44 full-time-equivalent positions, establish policies and long-term strategic plans to guide the district, purchase and dispose of real estate, set rates and levy taxes.

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 64

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 63

Education: Associate degree, business arts, Heald Business College, Sacramento, Calif.

Education: High school, one year of college credits, Washington State University financial courses, University of Southern California export financial courses

Breidenbach: Experience, experience, experience. I have direct business experience operating with the Port of Port Angeles and other ports. As a past local port customer, I have insight and relationships with port executive management,

familiarity with field operations and deep respect for the hardworking port employees. As a lifelong Washington resident and resident of Clallam County since 1976, raising a family here and serving on the Forks City Council, I am fully invested in our community.

Got an idea for a story?

Occupation: State-certified operator and manager of the Crescent Water Association; owner, along with husband Jim, of Alpacas of Cedar Wind, Joyce Have you ever run for or held public office? I was elected to serve as a District 3 representative on the 2015 Charter Review Commission.

Occupation: Retired West Coast senior manager, Rayonier mill Have you ever run for or held public office? I have been on the Forks City Council, Position 5, for seven years.

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Forks City Council, Position 5 What should the city do about the backlog of timber harvesting, or arrearage, on Department of Natural Resources land? Kohout: The city needs to receive answers from the Department of Natural Resources. Do we have money coming that is due? Do we not have enough trees to sustain us? Either way, we have not been treated fairly, and they need to answer for it. We need to see complete transparency from DNR to know exactly where we stand.

I believe we need to invest more in the services of our tourists. Currently, there are not enough accommodations to support the influx, and they are turned away or leaving unhappy, sometimes even angry. These are people who will very likely never visit again. We need to harness this in a positive way and use it to save our community.

In light of recent mill closures, what would you do to spur more businesses in the Forks area?

Preston: Continue to reach out by identifying its customers. Providing a more attractive image. Encouraging investment in modern facilities to cater to those audiences. We have the housing capacity and land base to accommodate many more residents. There is plenty of local opportunity for honest, hardworking building-trades folks. Work with the schools to provide those skills to students that encourage independence and business risk-taking. Forks’ day is yet to come. I strongly believe it will.

Kohout: Seeing firsthand that serving tourism can really boost or hurt the local economy,

How would you expand recreational opportunities for residents and visitors?

Preston: Support the state Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Forest Service to meet the goals of the Northwest Forest Plan. It is complex how we ended up where we are now but not impossible to solve.

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Kohout: I would like to expand our current parks and trails to include more hands-on learning for our children to go out on field trips or family outings. A much-needed addition: a dog park. We should also look at how the park space is utilized. We could potentially bring in revenue with a cyclist camp, gift shop or concessions. We would have more presence in our beloved park. Maybe it would impact drug behavior, too? Preston: We have a bountiful geography already that is used just about to its capacity in the summer months. There are many other times in which there are remarkable things to do. We can improve on expanding the times when people plan to visit and explore. How? By embracing entrepreneurial spirit and identifying those great ideas and supporting those ideas through financing, collaboration and mentorship. How should the city pay for increasing government costs in light of flat government revenues? Kohout: No one likes new taxes, so the logical answer would be, what can we do to reduce our spending? If we work on our budget and have a goal of even a 5 percent reduction, I believe we can reach fiscal responsibility. Preston: Work on anything we can do to support the DNR and Forest Service to meet the goals of the Northwest Forest Plan. Work with the Timber Action Committee and the Wild Olympics Campaign to meet their objectives. PLEASE

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Christina ‘Stina’ Kohout

Jon Preston Residence: Forks

Residence: Forks Phone: 360-477-1116 Email: Ckohout228@ gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 32 Education: Henley High School, Klamath Falls, Ore.; Oregon Institute of Technology, anthropology, 1999-2000; Community College of the Air Force, electronic systems; currently enrolled in Peninsula College, major in education, minor in political science Occupation: Student Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Phone: 360-640-4493 Email: jpreston@century tel.net Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 56 Education: Lots of college classes, but no formal degree Occupation: Currently the owner and steward of the Frederick and Mary Rosemond arboretum (www.onrc. washington.edu/Rosmond Fund) Have you ever run for or held public office? No


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

Clallam County

Port Angeles City Council, Position 5 Given limited state funding, how should the city fund badly needed repairs to streets? Merideth: The city can start by thinking ahead. Repaving a road knowing it’s going to be dug up a short time later is a waste of taxpayer dollars. The city needs to continue to seek out matching state and federal dollars while keeping up with maintenance of our current streets. Being inviting to new businesses to increase the tax base, not taxes. Also, by giving up lower-priority city programs to readjust the budget. Smith: Most towns in America used to have a six-year “pavement preservation” cycle to reseal some streets on an annual basis. Money was budgeted each year for planned pavement treatment to maximize their useful cycle. Roads are not pretty, not sexy and easy to be ignored. They are necessary for a vital economy. We must turn around this short-sighted economic approach. However, with limited funds, the best we can do now is to triage. Do you support or oppose fluoridation of city water? Merideth: I oppose fluoridation of our city water. This program forces everyone who pays for water to have fluoride without a choice. It’s unethical for the city to make a medical-treatment decision when individual citizens can get fluoride in other forms and often do so without knowing it.

City Council Position 7 unopposed Dan Bateham, who filed as a candidate for Port Angeles City Council Position 7, dropped out of the race after the deadline, so his name still appears on the ballot. Incumbent Cherie Kidd also filed for the position and remains on the ballot. Because Bateham is no longer running for this position, candidate profiles and questionnaires for Kidd and Bateham do not appear in this voter guide. Water needs to be as safe and natural as possible without all the unnecessary expense and chemical byproducts. Finish the contract, then stop fluoridation. Smith: I oppose the fiat decision made by the council in direction opposition to the will of citizens (who were overwhelmingly against fluoride). Ten years ago, people signed petitions to get a ballot vote. The council did not listen. Fluoridation is one example of how this City Council has been derelict in its duty to represent the people. The result: overwhelming debt and a city that is barely able to maintain basic services. This needs to change. With the city facing immi-

nent budget shortfalls, what would you rank as city government’s lowest-priority program? Merideth: Programs that need to be cut are the ones that benefit the few and not the many. Our tax dollars have to support the programs that provide the highest dollar value to as many citizens as possible. One program I don’t see the usefulness in is the citywide Internet that was installed on every other street corner. Many people can’t even get a signal to access it. Smith: For a town of this size, we are overpaying for our government clerical workers, managers and administrators. Given that the median wage [of the citizens] is $41,000 a year, I think we need to downsize our government salaries to be more in line with the private sector. We need to look at the generous benefits and pensions and find a way to lower those costs. We cannot keep balancing the budget with rate hikes and fees. Did you favor or oppose the ban on fireworks? Merideth: I oppose the ban on fireworks. It’s just one more way government is controlling our lives. It’s once a year on the same day every year. Everyone knows that on July Fourth, there will be fireworks. It’s not a surprise. Unfortunately, there are those who are reckless, and law enforcement is often stretched thin as it is. Citizens need to educate their neighbors when they are being unsafe. We don’t need an outright ban. PLEASE

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Michael Merideth

Marolee Smith

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-461-7363

Phone: 360-417-0386

Email: imagnthat@live. com

Email: maroleedsmith@ gmail.com

Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 42 Education: Port Angeles High School graduate; associate of applied science degree, fisheries technology, Peninsula College; associate of arts degree, general studies, Peninsula College Occupation: Truck driver at Bruch & Bruch Construction Inc., Port Angeles Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Campaign website: www. maroleesmith.com Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 60 Education: Alameda High School, Alameda, Calif.; Merritt College, Peralta Community College District, Oakland, Calif. Occupation: Writer, author, researcher Have you ever run for or held public office? No

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

Forks City Council, Position 5 CONTINUED FROM PAGE This controversy is a negative for the long-term objectives of increasing revenue for Forks to grow and prosper. Getting the timber revenue stream back to where it should be is vital to increasing the base. Will you serve your full term in office? Kohout: Yes. Preston: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Kohout: I will not stop working until Forks is once again thriving and successful. After that, we need to rethink how Forks is viewed globally and put it back on the map. I have a lot of workable

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ideas and know this community can come together. I chose Forks because of its beauty, solitude and promise. I want Forks to choose me because of my dedication, integrity and perseverance. Preston: Forks might need a rocket scientist, and I love dogs. I like cats, too, but I’m allergic to some of them. I am terminally cheerful and not prone to resentment because somebody disagrees with me. I will speak my mind and then let the chips fall where they may. I value my independence and humility. I also value friendship, kindness and the anonymous gift. Life is short, so go for it.

About the job

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles City Council, Position 5/ CONTINUED

Smith: I think things were getting out of hand. The laws on the books were not being enforced, so people were getting too crazy. Something had to happen because common sense wasn’t working.

About the job PORT ANGELES CITY COUNCIL POSITION 5 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Citywide

Will you serve your full term in office? Merideth: Yes. Smith: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Merideth: I went to school here, I work here, I own a home here and my children are growing up here. The success and livability of this city is important to me. My wish is to see us strong, vibrant and full of increasing growth. I will do all that I can to make good decisions and move forward into the future.

Voters: 11,239 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Regular meetings first and third Tuesdays; work sessions fourth Tuesdays Compensation: The mayor, elected by the City Council, receives $650 per month; the deputy mayor, also elected by the council, receives $600 a month; all other council members receive $550 a month. Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2015 is $20 million; hire a city manager who is responsible for supervising a workforce of 240 full-time equivalent positions; adopt all ordinances, approve all contracts and serve on city, county, regional and state boards, commissions and subcommittees; and levy taxes. Smith: My opponent is a great guy. He’s young. He is busy with family and a full-time job. He was raised here, and all his experience is limited

to Port Angeles. All these are fine reasons to elect him. However, I have a wide range of experiences, a broad perspective and the depth that comes

from maturity. I am self-employed, and my children are grown. Most importantly, I have the time to devote to this fully.

FORKS CITY COUNCIL Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: City of Forks Voters: 1,427 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Second and fourth Mondays Compensation: No compensation Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2015 is $1.8 million and funds 28 full-timeequivalent positions; adopt all ordinances; approve all contracts; serve on city, county, regional and state boards, commissions and subcommittees; serve in a quasi-judiciary role in deciding on conditional use permits and land use appeals; and levy taxes.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

Clallam County

Sequim City Council, Position 1 How will you address the lack of adequate parking at Albert Haller playfield? Janisse: The overall issue is the interpretation of the 2001 city code. The state Department of Ecology has OK’d the additional parking at the Albert Haller playfields at the water reclamation site. It is now up to the city and outside organizations such as Sequim Family Advocates to sit down and discuss a way to resolve this issue. It may take actual changes to the city code or a change in the way it is interpreted. Leonard-Ray: I encourage city staff and Sequim Family Advocates to work together on a plan to make current parking safer and to provide more parking at the playfield. Parking at Carrie Blake Park and the Water Reuse Demonstration Site is clearly a problem at times and in more areas than at the playfield. Without a road through Carrie Blake Park, it is difficult to travel from the playfield lot in search of parking along Blake Avenue. What is your position on creating a metropolitan park district (MPD) that would oversee more facilities than the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center (SARC)? Janisse: The voters have spoken on this issue. All six Sequim precincts voted against the proposed park district. The city’s plan is the exact same proposal. At stake are the taxes of the proposed park taxing district, not just taxes from city residents. I would be against any pro-

About the job SEQUIM CITY COUNCIL Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Citywide Voters: 4,493 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Second and fourth Mondays Compensation: Newly elected council members will receive $250 per month, up from $150 per month. Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2015 is $8.4 million; hire a city manager who is responsible for supervising a workforce of 76 full-time-equivalent positions; adopt all ordinances, approve all contracts and serve on city, county, regional and state boards, commissions and subcommittees; and levy taxes. posed park district that included a property tax. I would support interagency agreements that would keep SARC in business without putting more pressure on the tax base. Leonard-Ray: I support a broad-based metropolitan park district that would oversee facilities including SARC. Sequim’s parks attract many users who do not live in the city, and an MPD would bring in much-needed funds to enhance and maintain the parks. Our aquatic center would have funding to continue operation. With an MPD, the city would be less likely to allow the creation of recreation areas without adequate parking. An MPD is a win for Sequim. Is the city’s relationship with the county good, or can it be improved?

Janisse: The city and county do have a good working relationship. One example is the current Carlsborg sewer partnership. This deal has benefited both Sequim and Clallam County. By using Sequim’s plants, the county saved on building costs they didn’t have, and the city gained the increased user fees but spread out the costs of operations, which saves everyone money. However, both the city and county should continue to look for ways to increase cooperation. Leonard-Ray: I cannot cite examples of the relationship between the city and the county being either good or bad. However, I have read statements in the city’s proposed comprehensive plan that suggest the relationship could be improved. PLEASE

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Brandon Janisse

Pam Leonard-Ray

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 208-206-2341

Phone: 360-912-3421

Email: janisseforsequim@ gmail.com

Email: pamleonardray@ gmail.com

Campaign website: www. janisseforsequim.com Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 30 Education: Sequim High School graduate, 2003; associate of arts degree, criminal justice, Peninsula College, 2009; bachelor’s degree, political science, Kaplan University, Chicago Occupation: Retail associate Have you ever run for or held public office? I ran for Sequim City Council in 2013 and the Clallam County Charter Review Commission in 2014.

Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 56 Education: Mead High School, Spokane, class of 1977; bachelor’s degree, elementary education, Washington State University, 1982; master’s degree, educationclinical counseling, The Citadel, Charleston, S.C., 1993; doctoral-level coursework, educational leadership, Clemson University, Clemson, S.C., 2007-10 Occupation: Nonprofit executive director of Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, Sequim; volunteer coordinator, city of Sequim, which is a volunteer position Have you ever run for or held public office? No

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Sequim City Council, Position 2 How will you address the lack of adequate parking at Albert Haller playfield? Lorenzen: I believe we should make parking space happen. Without it, we have an unfinished product. The city was very fortunate to have Sequim Family Advocates construct the playing fields. The city should finish it with appropriate parking facilities.

ating a park district that is going to add more taxes to the residents of the city and county. There is a way that doesn’t include piggybacking other things that the city would want to put into a park district. They have already started with almost twice as much tax, and there is not even enough in that amount to bring SARC up to par.

Why do we need it now? That will put another tax on the citizens of Sequim and maybe the county for no good reason. Will you serve your full term in office? Lorenzen: Yes.

Susan Lorenzen

John Miller

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-477-2677

Phone: 707-849-3127

Email: lorenzen@olypen. com

Miller: Yes.

Email: jmicc5@msn.com Campaign website: None

Campaign website: None Is the city’s relationship with the county good, or can it be improved?

Miller: Will have to work with all parties involved to find a way Lorenzen: I think it is fine. to make more parking, for sure. I would classify the relationThese fields are important to ship as harmonious and workable. the citizens and youth of Sequim. Choices include whether to find Miller: Every relationship can some property close to purchase in be improved. some way or change some of the Taking $20 million out of the rules that go with the environeconomy for the new City Hall is mental impact of a parking lot. not a good way to start. What is your position on What is your position on the creating a metropolitan park city’s proposed stormwater district that would oversee master plan? more facilities than the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Lorenzen: I think it is the Center? responsible, proactive thing to do. Lorenzen: I am for such a district. Miller: We haven’t had a need for it for the last 100 years. Miller: I’m not in favor of cre-

Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Lorenzen: I have a proven track record as a Sequim City Council member. I was part of many positive, constructive changes in the city. I’m not afraid to speak up, but I don’t speak just to hear myself talk. I’m honest and sincere in my actions. I’m independent, but I play well with others. Miller: I will work hand-inhand with my fellow council members and the county commissioners to make Sequim and Clallam County a safe place to move to and raise a family and will keep it affordable.

Sequim City Council, Position 1/

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 61 Education: Associate degree, weather technology, Community College of the Air Force, Montgomery, Ala.; bachelor’s degree, geography, and master’s degree, applied physical geography with emphasis on weather and climate, both from California State University, Sacramento, Calif.

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 60 Education: Piner High School, Santa Rosa, Calif., class of 1973 Occupation: Retired from Safeway Inc. Have you ever run for or held public office? I ran for the Sequim City Council in 2011.

Occupation: Independent distributor with AdvoCare Have you ever run for or held public office? Yes. I was on the Sequim City Council from January 2008 to December 2011. I did not run again because my husband died in June 2011 and I wanted to focus on raising my then-13-year-old son.

CONTINUED

The city and the county seem to not share the same vision for growth and development. I hope that the city and county can come together on an MPD. What is your position on the city’s proposed stormwater master plan? Janisse: Implementation and

cost will be factors here. A few questions would need to be looked at, such as: Where does the runoff from rainwater ultimately end up? It would be prudent for one to take a close look at the cost-benefit of the current and proposed plan. We need to use the runoff as a

resource and look for ways to make sure that the city comes out on top when it comes to cost. Leonard-Ray: It is difficult to accept the need for a costly plan to control stormwater with only 16 inches of precipitation a year. PLEASE

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

Clallam County

Sequim City Council, Position 7 How will you address the lack of adequate parking at Albert Haller playfield?

NO RESPONSE

Pratt: Look for the completion of a parks master plan and work with Sequim Family Advocates and other stakeholders for parking to serve the needs of all. With the completion of a parks master plan, we will work with SFA and other stakeholders to develop parking that will serve the needs of all. I will seek improved signage for optimum safety of usage and flow, and will encourage circulation of written parking options among playfield users. What is your position on creating a metropolitan park district that would oversee more facilities than the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center? Pratt: I strongly support a broadly focused metropolitan park district to address the parks and recreation needs of the greater Sequim Valley. Is the city’s relationship with the county good, or can it

Candidate James Russell did not respond to this questionnaire. be improved? Pratt: Generally, we have a good relationship. However, improvement is needed on respecting the city’s zoning in the urban growth area. The UGA is where our borders meet. It is land earmarked for future growth. The county has been approving growth in this area with no consideration for Sequim’s zoning. That independent approach seriously impacts our ability to economically provide necessary infrastructure when growth occurs. What is your position on the city’s proposed stormwater master plan? Pratt: Having a stormwater

master plan in place is a practical endeavor. It provides both the “big picture” and prioritized projects for handling stormwater when opportunities and money become available. To that end, the plan must be in place in order to apply for federal and state grants for stormwater abatement. Will you serve your full term in office? Pratt: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Pratt: I believe my record of the past four years indicates that I have no personal agenda in seeking this office. As a City Council member, I have contributed to Sequim’s leadership, vitality and vision. Transparency and accountability are essential to me, and I am pleased they are the qualities of the governance of Sequim. I am proud of the direction Sequim is taking and want to continue this work for another four years.

Candace Pratt Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-582-0114 Email: cpratt7545@ gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 77

Education: Bachelor’s degree, education, Tufts University, Medford, Mass., 1960 Occupation: Retired in 1997 by closing my bookkeeping service Have you ever run for or held public office? Served on Sequim City Council, 2012-16

Sequim City Council, Position 1/

CONTINUED

Even if the rainfall increases during the winter months and there are more storm events, I doubt we need all elements of this plan. We are not likely to capture enough water to balance the plan’s cost. Will you serve your full term in office? Janisse: Yes. Leonard-Ray: Yes.

Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Janisse: I offer an independent voice for the council. I offer the leadership and skills that would benefit the city and the constituents it serves. I would foster relationships with other council members, city management, NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] and the community. These partnerships often

result in win-win situations and a foundation for future success. I am certain that my team-focused, positive attitude and emphasis on quantifiable results would be a welcome addition to the city of Sequim. Leonard-Ray: I have the time, energy and commitment to represent the people of Sequim and their concerns. As a city of Sequim

volunteer, I have had the opportunity to build relationships that will serve me well even when I oppose proposals. Having these relationships in place before taking office is my greatest strength as a candidate. Through my volunteer role and through attending City Council and commission/ board meetings, I have come to understand city government.

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12

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Port Angeles School District, Position 3 Should the school district run the same high school construction bond as it did in February or consider other options? Erickson: Because the people in the district voted a strong “no” to the bond issue, a construction bond should be proposed instead. There are critical infrastructure problems at the high school: plumbing (students have almost no working water fountains available to them!), refurbish heating system (too hot and too loud), fix the leaking roof, replace worn carpets and broken tiles, and do cosmetic work in the classrooms like painting and replacing worn desktops. Jones: No. We can have a wonderful school replacement plan, but if it is not acceptable to the voters, it won’t serve our students or community. We must come up with a compromise plan to address the needs of the students and the needs of the taxpayers. Moreover, we must come up with a sustainable facility plan for not just the next few years but the next few decades, as all our school buildings are crumbling. How should the school district address the 32 percent graduation rate at Lincoln High School? Erickson: Congratulations to teachers and students at Lincoln High School. Those students likely would not have graduated from high school at all. How to increase that number? Attract and retain teachers trained to work with at-risk students. Conduct frequent in-services

About the job

Gene (Eugene) Kenneth Erickson

Residence: Port Angeles

PORT ANGELES SCHOOL BOARD Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Includes areas west of Agnew, the city of Port Angeles, the Lake Sutherland area Voters: 19,226 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Second and fourth Mondays Compensation: Eligible for $50 a meeting up to $4,800 a year. Duties: Approve a general fund budget for 2015-16 that includes $45 million for the general fund; hire a superintendent, who hires all school district employees (the district has 430 fulltime equivalent employees); approve polices and procedures for students and employees; and levy taxes

on teaching to all learning styles and needs of students at risk. Address the daily needs of students such as nutrition, child care, flexible class hours and home environment, and establish a liaison and support with the parents.

schools in the district?

Joshua Jones

Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-457-5392 Email: geneeric97@ hotmail.com Campaign website: www. geneericksonpaschoolboard. weebly.com Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 66 Education: Port Angeles High School, class of 1967; Peninsula Community College, twoyear degree-program, preparation for Western Washington University, 1969; WWU, history, political science, 1971; WWU, graduate studies, history, 197375; WWU, teaching certificate, 1991-93, K-8 elementary and history endorsement grades 4-12, special education endorsement training (all but law class and student teaching), recertification process, 60 credits, most at graduate school level, with focus on history and special education, particularly for students at risk.

Erickson: Frequent publicity is key. PDN, you do a great job on publicity. There is so much going on at every school in our district that is interesting and engaging. The Jones: By following the exam- district monthly newsletter ples of other national alternative should continue. schools that have higher graduaInvite the entire community tion rates. to “Back to School Night” and Occupation: Retired subWe need to adjust the school show off your school and stustitute teacher for Port Angeprogram to meet these at-risk dents. les School District students’ individual needs. More publicity for senior stoBeing flexible with class rytellers and readers with stuHave you ever run for times, matching students with dents at risk. or held public office? No involved adult mentors, helping Avoid approaching the comprovide for some of their basic munity only when money is material needs and providing needed. mental health and chemical to draw in the professionals and dependency counseling and serbusinesses that we need to thrive Jones: I think the community vices to those who need it are through meaningful, informative is engaged in our schools, but just some examples. opportunities. more can be done. Most importantly, I will help I will engage Port Angeles in How will you engage the community to improve public viewing our schools as magnets encourage a dialogue between the

Phone: 360-797-1844 Email: joshjones4pasb@ gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 40 Education: Kelso High School, Kelso, class of 1994; bachelor’s degree, University of Puget Sound, 1998; medical school, University of Washington, 2002 Occupation: Medical director, Peninsula Behavioral Health, Port Angeles Have you ever run for or held public office? No

school district and the community through transparent meetings and forums so that the best ideas from community members are heard. PLEASE

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

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Clallam County

Port Angeles School District, Position 4 Should the school district run the same high school construction bond as it did in February or consider other options?

Linn: A cohort rating for alternative schools is the poorest way I know of to evaluate a program. A much better approach would be to evaluate how many Linn: The voters rejected the students successfully completed February bond. the program, received their diploRunning the same bond would mas and went on to lead a probe a waste of time and money. ductive life. The new board of directors Lincoln High School has will have to come up with a new helped hundreds of young people plan. be successful. The need has not gone away. We must have a building Marti: Lincoln should be replacement plan. proud of the 32 percent rate. The graduates should be more Marti: If it didn’t pass once, it proud of themselves than kids won’t pass again. who had normal lives. One of the things that needs These are children whose parto remain are the shops. ents and society have let down. Most come with horror stories. The shop teachers love the They are the ones we could large, very well-equipped areas save. they work in. Most students who do not The cost of moving all the heavy equipment would be huge. graduate still have positive experiences at Lincoln. How should the school disHow will you engage the trict address the 32 percent community to improve public graduation rate at Lincoln schools in the district? High School?

Linn: Port Angeles does a good job of listening to the community. We receive valuable input from our many advisory committees, parent-teacher organizations, parent-teacher associations, civic groups, parents, students and the business community. What I would like to extend is our relationships with the local mental health community, our local drug and alcohol counselors, and our local homeless groups. Marti: Demand more accountability from the parents of children who are acting out or who are not attending or not working at school. What are your three overall education priorities that, in a perfect world, you would accomplish during your time in office?

Lonnie L. Linn

Rick Marti

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-477-7435

Phone: 360-457-9098

Email: lonnie_linn@ olypen.com

Email: rickmarti77@ gmail.com

Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 60 Education: High school Occupation: Construction estimator and sales Have you ever run for or held public office? Currently in second term on the Port Angeles School Board

Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 70 Education: Bachelor’s degree, music education, Colorado State University, 1966 Occupation: I retired from the building supply trade. I substitute teach in Port Angeles. Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Linn: ■ Make sure every student feels safe at school and at home. PLEASE

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Port Angeles School District, Position 3/

CONTINUED

What are your three overall education priorities that, in a perfect world, you would accomplish during your time in office? Erickson: I would love to see smaller class sizes K-12, later start time for high school students, attracting and retaining highly trained teachers with para-educator support in the classroom. Studies strongly suggest that students are likelier to succeed in smaller classrooms.

High school students do better starting school later (adolescents are chronically sleep deprived because of their brain’s developmental stage), and for most students, being taught in their learning style is essential. Jones: ■ Balance local educational needs and outside mandates. ■ Replace the high school as part of a sustainable facilities plan that makes sense to taxpayers. ■ Make mandatory testing

less intrusive on teaching. Will you serve your full term in office? Erickson: Yes Jones: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent?

I know many of the students and have substituted for numerous teachers. I’ve met most of the principals of these schools and worked with many of them in the past. The needs of the students, teachers and administrators are clear, and as a School Board member, I would be committed to creating a positive and safe environment for all.

Erickson: As a Washington Jones: I believe in service to state certified teacher, for 13 years, I have taught in every Port country and community. My wife and I have two kids Angeles school.

in the Port Angeles elementary schools, so I have a personal investment in making sure our schools live up to the promise of greatness I know they can achieve. I have a youthful exuberance I give to this community as a physician, and I want to give more of it in service to our schools.

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14

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Port Angeles School District, Position 5 Should the school district run the same high school construction bond as it did in February or consider other options?

trict address the 32 percent graduation rate at Lincoln High School?

schools in the district? Henson: I think we should increase the number of community programs that our school students are involved in.

Henson: I would have a meeting with the parents, students and Henson: No. Rerunning the teachers to determine why they same bond will generate the believe the graduation rate is so low. Shotthafer: Our community exact same response, whereas a Next, I would devise a plan of needs to believe school district revision of the bond may be action based on their responses. representatives value residents’ received better. input, not just when seeking Shotthafer: Students lose bond and levy funds. Shotthafer: I value the interest without a reason to attend. When talking to parents, they 58 percent of [school district] surAfter optional kindergarten, express positive views about spevey respondents who replied that Germany’s schools are compulcific school administrators. the bond was “too much money” sory through grade 9. However, parents thought and “taxes are too high.” After fourth grade, according to that those with the most control Formerly, timber provided their interests, abilities and parare not receptive to individuals’ almost all local school funding. ents’ wishes, students have options. needs and concerns. The district should pressure our Grades 5-9 provide two differI will invite the public to concounty representatives to claim ent vocational options and tact me about all concerns. owed [Department of Natural apprenticeships, or one school By consistently using a microResources] timber trust lands provides both academic and voca- phone at board meetings, school funds from uncut timber, potentional options. district representatives would tially $65 million to $85 million for Capturing students’ attendemonstrate respect for the pubservice districts, specifically schools. tion by providing them with lic’s attendance. For essential renovation assis- practical skill abilities before tance, the district meets criteria they lose interest would avoid What are your three overall for the Washington’s School Con- wasting students’ time and tax- education priorities that, in a struction Assistance Program, payers’ dollars and would incen- perfect world, you would perhaps even for the capital tivize graduation. accomplish during your time investments fund. in office? How will you engage the PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE How should the school dis- community to improve public

Port Angeles School District, Position 4/ CONTINUED

■ Eliminate the opportunity gap and make sure all kids have an even playing field. ■ Deliver the very best educational programs for all kids. Marti: ■ To make our schools more perfect, I would strengthen our ties to the world community. ■ Start bilingual education in the early grades so we graduate fluent students as every other developed country does.

■ Raise student awareness of world geography. Will you serve your full term in office? Linn: Yes. Marti: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Linn: I have been doing this

job for eight years. I take great pride in the accomplishments of our district. Many educational roadblocks are headed our way, Core 24, Smarter Balanced Testing, Common Core, just to name a few. I feel I am better prepared to deal with these roadblocks than my opponent. Marti: I have more hands-on experience working with children and teachers.

Jerusha Henson

Susan Shotthafer

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-477-6134

Phone: 360-452-4393

Email: contact@jerusha henson.com

Email: susanshotthafer@ gmail.com

Campaign website: www. jerushahenson.com

Campaign website: www. susanshotthafer.com

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 35

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 68

Education: Studied psychology for two years, Western State Colorado University, 2001-03; currently enrolled in the addiction studies program at Peninsula College

Education: Bachelor’s degree, political science and social science; certificate, international relations; master’s degree, education, California State University; teaching credentials: social science, English, Spanish and English as a Second Language (ESL)

Occupation: Former national park ranger Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Occupation: I have worked as a substitute teacher, K-12, for the past 11 years in the Port Angeles and Sequim school districts. Have you ever run for or held public office? Last fall, I was a candidate for the Clallam County Charter Review Commission.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

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Clallam County

Sequim School District, Position 1 What are the educational strengths and weaknesses in the district? Henrikson: The district offers a variety of programs that allow multiple paths into college and career readiness. Teachers are excellent, care for their students and have created a positive school culture for students and families. Weaknesses: Facilities are drastically below standard at all sites and lack building safety. I want my three children to engage in high-quality education when they go to school. Students and educators need to have the tools to accomplish this. Jeffers: Our district’s strengths lie within the dedica-

teach the new standards.

Sequim School District Position 1 About the Job outline appears on next page.

tion and commitment of our quality staff, our [Career and Technical Education] and extracurricular opportunities and our community involvement. The district lost sight of the 2010 strategic plan, losing vision and dominant focus on desired outcomes. We lack consistent monitoring of progress and innovative approaches to target focus areas. Additionally, teachers have not been adequately prepared or equipped with resources necessary prior to being required to

Should the school district have run the same bond in the Nov. 3 general election as the measure that failed in February? Henrikson: No. Due to inflation, the materials cost more now than in the prior election, and the facilities continue to decline. The bond should have been for more. It is difficult for educators to do their jobs effectively and for students to learn to their potential when they spend their days in sub-par conditions that include a variety of safety issues. Our maintenance department is excellent; however, they can only do patchwork maintenance so much. PLEASE

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Port Angeles School District, Position 5/ CONTINUED

Henson: ■ I would like to raise the graduation rate for all students. ■ I would like to see a new high school built. ■ I would like to see an end to bullying.

■ Restrict media entertainment: Excluding teacher-initiated instructional use, this will increase students’ focus and enhance performance and the academic environment, producing better-prepared students for the future.

Shotthafer: Through increased expectations, without additional spending, I hope to: ■ Raise graduation rates: We can motivate students by expanding their knowledge of vocational opportunities and promoting many more vocational scholarships. ■ Consistently applied dress code: Producing more serious attitudes, this will elevate students’ focus, performance, the school culture and employment preparation.

Will you serve your full term in office? Henson: Yes. Shotthafer: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Henson: I am a parent to one current school student and one future school student, and I would like to see them and their peers receive the best edu-

cation possible. Shotthafer: My background and classroom experience provide wider perspectives and awareness unavailable to individuals without classroom familiarity. Common-sense guides and our community affirm my strong desire for expanded focus on students’ knowledge and acquisition of practical skills. I want to help students gain genuine pride and self-worth by providing services ordinary people need and value. With more awareness that school provides attainable lifetime skills to support themselves and gain independence, graduation becomes worthwhile for students.

Robin Henrikson

Heather Jeffers

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-461-4422

Phone: 360-461-3725

Email: robinhenrikson 323@gmail.com

Email: heatherjeffers@me. com

Campaign website: www.facebook.com/Robin Henrikson323

Campaign website: www. electheatherjeffers.org

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 37 Education: Ph.D., education, October 2012; master’s degree in educational leadership, 2006; principal certification, Seattle Pacific University School of Education, Seattle; bachelor’s degree, special education, K-12 teaching certification, elementary education K-8 Teaching Certification, 2000, Western Washington University, Bellingham Occupation: Assistant professor of education, Seattle Pacific University School of Education Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 43 Education: Master of social work, University of Washington, 2000; bachelor’s degree, social welfare, UW, 1999; geriatric mental health certificate, UW, 2003; licensed nursing home administrator, state of Washington, 2012 Occupation: Executive director, Life Care Center of Port Townsend Have you ever run for or held public office? Appointed School Board director for District 1 in August 2014; candidate for Olympic Medical Center hospital commissioner, 2013


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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Sequim School District, Position 3 What are the educational strengths and weaknesses in the district?

Jim Stoffer, Charla Wright Candidates’ biographies appear on the next page.

Stoffer: The greatest strength in the district continues to be the teachers, administrators and staff who dedicate themselves to the success of our students and our schools.

In addition, volunteers, parent organizations and community support emphasize the importance of our schools in fostering a strong and vibrant community. Unfortunately, the antiquated facilities still pose our greatest hurdle to creating learning environments that support modern technology and the needs of 21st

century students. Wright: Some of the strengths within the district are the ability to foresee the need for change and increase student readiness for graduation and college, coupled with the experiences and drive of our dedicated teachers. All these strengths lend well

to educating well-rounded students who are prepared. Our weakness has been the district functioning without a current strategic plan. The strengths within our district are weakened without the vision and direction of a plan. PLEASE

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Sequim School District, Position 1/

CONTINUED

Jeffers: Data showed that the amount of the bond was not the reason for its failure, but rather it was the lack of voter turnout and awareness of need. There are differences of opinion as to when the bond campaign would be most successful. However, the community spoke loud and clear that they wanted to keep the momentum and run the same bond in November. It’s the board’s responsibility to represent its constituents, which we did.

groups, business partners, vendors, etc.), via social media and by routinely attending meetings and networking events for the Sequim and Jefferson County chambers of commerce, Peninsula Young Professionals Network, Sequim Sunrise Rotary and various school events. As a board member, I bring all concerns received before the board for discussion and ensure followup to each individual. Every interaction as an opportunity for engagement.

How will you engage the community to improve public schools in the district?

What are your three overall education priorities that, in a perfect world, you would accomplish during your time in office?

Henrikson: I love opportunities to engage the community in educational conversation. Discussing educational issues is what I do daily. I think we need to engage more of our community in a way that will invite them to become partners in our schools. Our entire community is impacted either directly or indirectly by the success of our students and teachers. When our community has a positive educational outlook and supports our schools, the entire city benefits.

Henrikson: ■ I would have people realize that School Board members don’t accomplish anything alone; the board as a whole accomplishes things together. A district can have the best strategic plan written, but without the ability to implement it with commitment, it is virtually useless. ■ Rebuild trust and confidence between educators and the School Board so that implementing quality programs is a partnership. ■ Build strong community support of our schools.

Jeffers: I engage with my comJeffers: ■ I want a 100 permunity through my work (staff, cent graduation rate, with all chilresidents, families, volunteer

dren graduating career- and college-ready. ■ I want all teachers to receive the professional development and resources they need in advance so they feel prepared and armed with the tools they need to tackle new standards and mandates. ■ I want all of our schools to be equally successful so that our district is the reason families choose to live in Sequim. Will you serve your full term in office? Henrikson: Yes. Jeffers: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Henrikson: While my vast and diverse educational background is a bonus, they should vote for me because I’ve spent over 10 years building trust in the educational and greater community as a teacher (just ask former students), instructional coach, assistant professor and, most importantly, a mother of three children in school. With any decision I would make as a board member, the community would be assured that I would weigh every issue carefully, completely and collaboratively. Jeffers: My experience in

About the job SEQUIM SCHOOL BOARD Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Election boundaries: Boundaries include the city of Sequim, all or parts of the communities of Agnew, Bell Hill, Blue Mountain, Blyn, Carlsborg, Diamond Point, Dungeness, Happy Valley, Jamestown, Robin Hill and SunLand in Clallam County, and Gardiner in Jefferson County. Boundaries include residents in the Port Angeles ZIP code. Voters: 21,961 in Clallam County, 286 in Jefferson County, as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: First and third Mondays Compensation: Eligible for $50 a day for attending School Board meetings and performing other services on behalf of the school district, not to exceed $4,800 annually. Duties: Approve a general fund budget for 2015-16 that includes $29.8 million for the general fund; hire a superintendent, who hires all school district employees (the district has 303 full-time-equivalent positions); approve polices and procedures for students and employees; and levy taxes. operations, facilities management, budget forecasting and strategic planning are needed skills and bring added value to the board. My social-work experience working with at-risk youth and their families lends a different perspective, along with innova-

tive ideas for approaches to address student failures. During this last year, I have proven to be a change-agent for the board’s new direction and focus and can offer consistency during transition with a new board.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

17

Sequim School District, Position 3/ CONTINUED

Should the school district have run the same bond in the Nov. 3 general election as the measure that failed in February? Stoffer: Yes. Remember, 57.59 percent of voters supported the bond. We simply did not obtain the 60 percent supermajority required by law to pass it. The needs haven’t changed, and inflation continues to raise the expected costs of the necessary improvements. Continued community education on the poor physical condition of our public schools and the need to modernize our facilities will gain the support necessary to convince the 60 percent supermajority of the voters. Wright: I support the current bond because of the need for improvement and expansion. We all want what is best for our children, and our equipment and classrooms are in disrepair and need upgrading. The School Board has worked hard at refining the bond as presented, but we need to demonstrate we will not give up. Our school district is the core of our community, and the bond must pass to be competitive and attract growth. How will you engage the community to improve public schools in the district? Stoffer: I will continue to meet voters and non-voters on a daily basis, taking every opportunity to talk one-on-one about their concerns, about the growth of our community and our stu-

tional priority is a current strategic plan. Without the “road map,” our efforts are not utilized to capacity. Second, give priority to parent resources and assistance. The core curriculum rolled out caused many parents and students to struggle and fail at math. With first-hand experience, Wright: The benefit of a small noticing lack of parental town is the community involveresources was obvious. ment. Last would be to provide stuAs business owners, commudents with updated science technity members and parents, we should be integrating ownership nology, since Sequim’s equipment of our community into the school is antiquated and soon will be obsolete. environment. If students and community Will you serve your full members are collaborating on term in office? educational projects that cross disciplines, learning is magnified, Stoffer: Yes. everyone feels like a part of the greater picture and ownership Wright: Yes. and responsibility are felt by everyone. Why should voters choose What are your three overall you over your opponent? education priorities that, in a Stoffer: Board member visiperfect world, you would accomplish during your time bility in the community is critiin office? cal. I have served as a volunteer Stoffer: ■ Focus on measurand advocate for the Sequim able and achievable improvement School District since 2002. in graduation rates that place I have demonstrated an abilstudents in a position to continue ity to make difficult decisions with higher education or progress and a talent for working through into specialized-skills training. complicated projects with multi■ Hold our state representaple deadlines. tives responsible to financially If elected, I have a unique persupport the voter-approved man- spective with my volunteer work dates to limit classroom size. and executive background in the ■ Improve existing facilities Coast Guard to analyze and and build new buildings to supunderstand decisions that will port our growing number of stucome before the board. dents. Wright: I am the best choice Wright: First, overall educafor School Board because my dent population, and about the needs of students coming of age in our technology era. Treating each person with respect, listening to their opinions and talking about the facts regarding taxes and public schools ensures that I reach voters outside of the traditional public forum events.

Jim Stoffer

Charla Wright

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-775-9356

Phone: 760-696-5154

Email: jamesstoffer@ wavecable.com

Email: charlawright1@ icloud.com

Campaign website: www. facebook.com/jim.stoffer

Campaign website: www. wrightchoiceforkids.net

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 55

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 50

Education: High School diploma, 1979, Nampa High School, Nampa, Idaho; bachelor’s degree, 1993, political science, Columbia College, Columbia, Mo.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, liberal studies, 2003, California State University, San Marcos, Calif.; master’s degree, curriculum design and instruction, 2010, University of Phoenix; multiple-subject teaching credential, 2003, California State University

Occupation: Retired, U.S. Coast Guard Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Occupation: Director of social services, Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim Have you ever run for or held public office? No

first-hand experience as a parent of two middle school-age children, teacher, manager and advocate provides me with ability to have insight. My attributes can be used to look into what children need,

how and what teachers need to be successful and demonstrate my abilities to maintain budgets, focus on leadership in management and use best practices in classrooms to achieve improved testing scores.

Green and portable. Subscribe to the Peninsula Daily News’ eEdition. It’s the print edition on your computer in a convenient page-turning format. News, features, photos, advertisements, comics . . . everything! Subscribe online at

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18

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Sequim School District, Position 5 What are the educational strengths and weaknesses in the district? Payne: ■ Strengths: teachers, partnership with community (sharing of facilities), strong record of fiscal responsibility and great options for [Career and Technical Education], collegebound and other students to earn a high school diploma. ■ Weaknesses: Education hasn’t changed much since I went to school. There is a need to think outside the box and engage technology and 21st-century learning such as online classes. The board also should be more vocal on local, state and federal issues that impact the district.

passed, will support our communities and county. Short: Absolutely. The costs of labor and supplies is increasing while our facilities are continuing to deteriorate. The February bond failed a supermajority by less than 3 percent, and with larger electorate participation in November, it will hopefully pass. Our district, our students, our community cannot afford for this bond to fail.

facilities to excel in education and our teachers have the facilities to help our students excel. ■ Really think outside the box on 21st-century education methods, not the same old way it has always been done. ■ Develop a curriculum that ensures our students are prepared for college or work after graduation.

Short: I believe the top three issues facing the district are improving student outcomes, addressing the crumbling infrastructure of our facilities and How will you engage the incorporating advanced technology community to improve public into the curriculum. schools in the district? The safety of our students outweighs any other concerns. Payne: I am actively involved Therefore, I believe improvein our community through Rotary, ment of our facilities is of utmost importance. Short: The primary strength of both Port Angeles and Sequim Technological improvements our school district is the dedication chambers of commerce, and nonprofit boards I sit on. can be built in and planned for and educational excellence of our I have talked to parents, stuwith modernized facilities, and teachers, staff and administration. Backed by parents and the com- dents, teachers and administrators students are better suited to learn to build a knowledge base of what I and teachers to teach in safe and munity, our students are offered can do to provide the type of educa- comfortable environments. great opportunities to excel. However, there is always room tion our communities need and students should demand. Will you serve your full term for improvement. in office? Beyond repairing and rebuilding Short: As a mother of children our district’s crumbling infrastrucPayne: Yes. ture, we need to work on improving in the district and as a small-business owner, I speak daily with parour student outcomes and graduaShort: Yes. tion rates by identifying and assist- ents, teachers and community members. ing struggling students. I discuss issues, correct misinWhy should voters choose formation and inform via converyou over your opponent? Should the school district sations and social media. have run the same bond in Personal connections, approachPayne: I have business the Nov. 3 general election as ability and transparency can management and legal experithe measure that failed in transform a “ruling body” into a ence to enhance the skill-set February? communitywide effort to improve of the board, and my children our school district. have and currently attend Payne: There is no doubt disIt is imperative that the comSequim schools. trict facilities are in need of an munity be informed and become Therefore, I have a direct conupgrade. involved in our school district in I wish the board would have nection to the schools and underdelayed proposing a new bond until order for our students to succeed. stand the issues facing the disthe new School Board was sworn in. trict today. As it is, the new board had to What are your three overall live with the bond as proposed. education priorities that, in a Short: As a mother and a Our students deserve better perfect world, you would accom- small-business owner, I have the than what they currently have. plish during your time in office? unique ability to support and Our future depends on it. inform both members of the school A community-approved bond is Payne: ■ Improve the infraand non-school community. a reasonable tax burden that, once structure so our students have the As a mother, I’m concerned

William Payne Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-912-4044 Email: wplawps@gmail. com Campaign website: www. williampayne.org Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 58 Education: High school diploma; bachelor’s degree in occupational education and master’s degree in business administration, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, Texas; law degree, University of Wyoming

Heather Short Residence: Port Angeles (within the Sequim School District) Phone: 360-417-2612 Email: electheathershort@ gmail.com Campaign website: www. facebook.com/electheather short Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 38 Education: Bachelor’s degree, 2001, master’s degree, 2002, Murray State University, Murray, Ky.; doctorate of veterinary medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.

Occupation: Attorney Occupation: Veterinarian Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Yes, I ran for Clallam County Superior Court judge in 2012 and Clallam County prosecuting attorney in 2014.

about the quality of our children’s education and the condition of the school facilities while understanding how committed and challenged our educators are in teaching in

Have you ever run for or held public office? No

overcrowded and under-resourced classrooms. As a business owner, I’m invested in continued economic growth driven by an educated workforce.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

19

Clallam County

Park and Recreation District 1 (Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center) What is your position on creating a metropolitan park district that would consist of more facilities than the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center? Goodman: Great idea, but my job first is to ensure SARC stays open. My job as commissioner is to choose the option (e.g., YMCA partnership, another SARC levy attempt, possibly a broad-based metropolitan park district, etc.) that gives SARC the best chance of success in its attempt to cover the financial shortfall and stay open for the long term. Jeffers: I would vote in favor of an MPD that would include all city parks, high school tennis courts and the aquatic recreation center. This vote would come with expectations of improvements to current parks and the hope for construction of new public tennis courts at Carrie Blake Park. With SARC’s growing deficit, from what source or sources would you derive the funding to keep the facility open? Goodman: Any source that is not illegal, immoral or fattening. Jeffers: I’d increase dues by 40 percent, eliminate discounts and exemptions, and implement initiation fees, card fees and late fees. These fees are common in all for-profit gyms. In addition, try selling naming rights to the building and making some exploratory calls to 24-Hour Fitness, LA Fitness and Gold’s Gym to see if there is any interest in obtaining a location on the Olympic Peninsula. Longer-term funding is possible by expanded participation in an MPD.

About the job CLALLAM COUNTY PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT 1 (SARC) Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: The city of Sequim, all or parts of the communities of Agnew, Bell Hill, Blue Mountain, Blyn, Carlsborg, Diamond Point, Dungeness, Happy Valley, Jamestown, Robin Hill and SunLand in Clallam County. Boundaries include residents in the Port Angeles ZIP code. Same precincts as Sequim School District except for one precinct in Jefferson County. Voters: 21,961 as of Sept. 23 (same as Sequim School District in Clallam County) Term: Four years Meetings: Second Wednesdays Compensation: None Duties: Pass an annual budget that in 2015 is $1.2 million and covers wages for 74 employees, all but two of whom are part time; hire an executive director; set policies and rates for the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center and issue general obligation bonds; and levy taxes. How would you address the failing ventilation, heating and air conditioning system at SARC? Goodman: Ensure proper preventative and/or corrective maintenance continues to be employed. Jeffers: I would suggest investigating a business-equity loan through a bank, a credit repayment plan through the company that is contracted for the work, a February bond measure just for repairs or closing the pool and adding covered tennis courts in its place, funded with a possible expanded MPD. I would also explore the possibility of state or federal grant

money set aside for health, wellness and exercise. What would you do to increase SARC membership? Goodman: Worry first about the most immediate concern: keeping SARC open. First things first. Jeffers: With over 3,000 members, I’m not convinced increased membership is the answer. However, this could be done with some targeted marketing, sign-up specials and corporate sponsorships. Special events would also generate new interest and bring in additional funding. PLEASE

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Gill Goodman

William Jeffers

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-683-5346

Phone: 360-670-6961

Email: gillo@olypen.com

Email: monty@olypen.com

Campaign website: None

Campaign website: None

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 74

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 46

Education: Bachelor’s degree, engineering, U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, Conn., 1963; master’s degree, electrical engineering, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif., 1969

Education: Bachelor’s degree in marketing and human resource management

Occupation: Retired Coast Guard captain Have you ever run for or held public office? SARC commissioner, 2010-present

Occupation: Retired banker Have you ever run for or held public office? No


20

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

Sequim School District, Proposition 1 BY CHRIS MCDANIEL PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Students need updated buildings, says a proponent of the $49.3 million construction bond proposed by the Sequim School District. Residents can’t afford it, says an opponent. The bond measure on the Nov. 3 general election ballot needs a 60 percent supermajority for passage. If approved, the bond would fund renovations and expansion of Greywolf Elementary School, construction of a new school to replace Helen Haller Elementary, renovations of Helen Haller to house fifth-graders, renovations and expansion of Sequim High School, the demolition of the Sequim Community School building and upgrades to the district kitchen and maintenance facility. The bond would fund a new science wing of six laboratory classrooms at Sequim High and add band, orchestra and choir rooms to the performing arts wing. The current science classrooms were built in 1967 or are housed in portable buildings that are deteriorating, the district said, adding that of its 29 portable classrooms, more than half are more than 20 years old. According to the district, the

estimated property tax rate to repay the 20-year bond would be 61 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. Combined with a levy already in place to fund educational programs and operations — $1.58 per $1,000 assessed valuation — the total district tax rate in 2016 would be $2.19 per $1,000 of assessed value. Two previous attempts to pass a construction bond failed. Voters defeated a $154 million measure by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin in April 2014. A $49.2 million bond last February also failed by a 57.59 percent to 42.89 percent margin, short of the required 60 percent supermajority.

Pros According to Brandino Gibson, vice chairman of Citizens for Sequim Schools, reasons to vote for the bond include: ■ An increase in campus security. ■ Access to cutting-edge technology. ■ A more efficient district kitchen, which serves all 2,800 students in the district. Gibson said moving Helen Haller students to a newly constructed facility would allow the district to discontinue the use of portable classrooms and bring students under one roof.

Proposition 1 The Board of Sequim School District No. 323 adopted Resolution No. 06-2014/2015 concerning capital improvements to district facilities. This proposition authorizes the district to renovate Greywolf Elementary School to increase its capacity, repurpose Haller Elementary, construct a new elementary school, expand the capacity of Sequim High School, improve school safety and security, and make other capital improvements, and authorizes the district to issue $49,300,000 of general obligation bonds maturing within a maximum term of 20 years and levy annual excess property taxes to repay the bonds, as provided in Resolution No. 06-2014/2015. Should this proposition be: { Approved { Rejected

“We are continually putting kids in temporary buildings,” he said. “How can they be safe in those environments? It is important for our kids to be in safe, equitable, adequate environments for them to learn properly.” And “this isn’t just about a new building,” Gibson said. “This about offering our current kids and future children an educational equality that is very much needed. Our buildings are outdated and old.” It would be difficult to renovate the existing buildings to incorporate modern technologies,

he said. “They can’t be updated to meet current needs and technologies. We need to have current facilities that can meet those technological needs.”

Cons According to Bryan Carter, a Sequim resident and former small-business owner opposed to the measure, reasons to vote against the bond include: ■ It would increase property taxes. ■ There is the extra cost of retrofitting existing buildings on

top of new construction. ■ Costs would increase to pay additional staffers at expanded facilities. Local residents on fixed incomes “just can’t afford” the tax hike, Carter said. “Why don’t they retrofit all the buildings they’ve got already? There is no practicality. They are saying they can’t be fixed [and] we need a new school,” he said. “It is mind-boggling, the amount of waste.” Portable buildings haven’t affected students detrimentally in the past, Carter said. “Why now do they all of a sudden need a brand-new building to be smart? It is the teachers that can teach. It doesn’t matter where they are,” he said. “If they can teach, they can teach, even under a haystack. They don’t need a brand-new building to teach.” The cost to provide salaries for additional teachers and staff members at the expanded facilities will add up over time, Carter said. “How are they going to pay for them? How can they justify [that]? Are they then going to go for another bond?” he said.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Chris McDaniel can be reached at 360-6812390, ext. 5052, or at cmcdaniel@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Park and Recreation District 1/

CONTINUED

Roll out some new programs like racquetball and basketball tournaments, after-hours rentals and a swim-event invitational. These are just a few ideas. Will you serve your full term in office? Goodman: Yes.

voters choose a candidate who fully understands SARC’s history, problems and financial situation; Why should voters choose knows the key SARC employees you over your opponent? and outside players; is knowlGoodman: I’m sure my oppo- edgeable concerning options for nent would do a great job once he short- and long-term solution; etc. got up to the learning curve. Time is not on SARC’s side. But in this critical time for SARC’s future, one would hope A new commissioner who Jeffers: Yes.

needs extensive on-the-job training is not the best choice. Jeffers: I want a fourth-quarter, end-of-game chance to save SARC. Some big ideas are needed quickly. I would push for keeping the building at full operation, solicit

large corporate donations, sell six-month and annual passes, and listen to the people of Sequim. The building needs cash flow long term without the help of bond measures or taxing the public. Those tax dollars need to go to our schools.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

21

Clallam County Fire District No. 1

Proposition 1: Property tax levy provide day-to-day management for the department, handle PENINSULA DAILY NEWS administrative duties, manage the budget, supervise and train The Board of Clallam County Fire Protection District No. 1 FORKS — A proposed operaDistrict revenue volunteers, perform routine tions and maintenance levy lid adopted Resolution No. 2015-051, concerning a proposition to fund maintenance, check certifications, District officials said in a lift for West End Clallam County District operations. engage the public and recruit Fire District No. 1 would end the mailing to voters that inflation firefighters, according to the dishas eroded the district’s buying department’s all-volunteer status This proposition authorizes the district to establish a regular trict mailing. power and the department can’t by funding a full-time paid chief property tax levy of $.75 per $1,000.00 of assessed valuation for The position will improve afford new equipment. position. collection in 2016 and authorizes annual increases of up to 3 response times during the day Property tax revenue has been If voters approve the levy, percent for each of the five succeeding years to fund a paid fire when many volunteers are property taxes would increase by “relatively static” while state timchief position and to maintain or increase staffing and service levels. unavailable, officials said. ber harvests revenue has 34 cents per $1,000 of assessed With stations in Forks and valuation, or $51 per year for the decreased in the past 10 years, The maximum allowable levy in 2020 shall serve as the base for Beaver, Clallam County Fire Disofficials said. owner of a $150,000 home. subsequent levy limitations as provided in Chapter 84.55 RCW. trict No. 1 covers a large swath of Revenue from property taxes The fire district would have a land from just south of the Jeftotal tax rate of 75 cents per $1,000 and timber sales averaged a comShould this proposition be approved or rejected? ferson County line to Grouse bined $168,200 between 1994 valuation — still the lowest tax Glen Road in the remote Sol Duc and 2003 compared to $138,200 rate of any fire district in the { Approved Valley. county, District No. 1 officials said. for the decade ending in 2013, Its volunteers also respond to officials said. “We’ve been an all-volunteer { Rejected calls beyond the district boundarIn addition, safety requirefire department forever,” fire disies when requested by partner ments are getting more strintrict Commissioner David Burt agencies through mutual aid gent. said. of retirements and people leaving volunteers this year. agreements. “We have to change our tires He said volunteer Chief Bill the area, officials said. Meanwhile, call volumes have Clallam County Fire District every 10 years in order to stay Paul already has a full-time job The Forks and Beaver staclimbed from 79 in 2000 to 124 in No. 1 has 2,654 registered voters, legal,” Burt said. and spends another 40 hours including 17 who live in Jefferson The fire district also has seen tions had 38 firefighters in 2000, 2014. running the department. The full-time paid chief would County. a decrease in firefighters because 37 in both 2005 and 2010 and 21 Departments nationwide are BY ROB OLLIKAINEN AND PAUL GOTTLIEB

changing from all-volunteer to having paid positions, Burt added.

Proposition 1

Clallam County

Charter Review Commission: Proposed amendments the community development director an appointed position — failed in two past elections. PORT ANGELES — Longtime Six other proposed changes to Clallam County voters may have a sense of deja vu as they ponder the county charter are relatively minor. proposed charter amendments “People must be moderately this year. content with our form of local govThe two substantive changes ernment because it is very rare to the county “constitution” as that we come up with a major proposed by the Charter Review Commission — electing commis- change,” said Norma Turner, who sioners by district and making has served on several past charter

BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

“Each district nominates its candidates for county commissioner, but then voters outside County commissioners the district, by a 2:1 margin, The three county commission- choose the candidate to represent the district,” reads the pro stateers are elected by voters countyment that was submitted to wide in general elections. That would change if proposed County Auditor Shoona Riggs. “Electing county commissioners charter amendment No. 1 — by district in the general election “Elections for board of commissions” — is approved by a simple offers government closest to the majority this November. people. Fairness dictates that the

review commissions and chaired the 2015 commission.

voters in a district should be able to choose their own commissioner.” Members of the charter review commission who opposed the measure — Nola Judd, Ron Bell, Mike Doherty and Turner — argue in the con statement that commissioners should have a countywide perspective and make decisions in the best interest of the entire county. PLEASE

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22

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Charter review, proposed amendments/

CONTINUED

Amendment 1

Amendment 2

Amendment 3

The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter concerning elections of Commissioners to the Board of County Commissioners. This amendment would require each commissioner to be nominated and elected solely by the voters of his or her represented district, replacing the provision that allows each commissioner to be elected at large, i.e., by a countywide majority, during the general election.

The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter, concerning the frequency the County reviews its Home Rule Charter. This amendment would require Clallam County to review its Home Rule Charter, by electing commissioners to serve on a Charter Review Commission, every five (5) years instead of every eight (8) years.

The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter, concerning the Board of Commissioners’ participation in transmitting citizen initiatives. This amendment would require qualified initiatives to be proposed directly to the voters without prior consideration, adoption, or rejection by the Board of County Commissioners.

Should this amendment be:

Should this amendment be:

Should this amendment be:

{ Approved

{ Approved

{ Approved

{ Rejected

{ Rejected

{ Rejected

Amendment 4

Amendment 5

Amendment 6

The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter, concerning the Board of Commissioners’ participation in transmitting citizen referenda. This amendment would require qualified referenda to be proposed directly to the voters without prior consideration, adoption, or rejection by the Board of County Commissioners.

The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter, concerning the time period to gather signatures for citizen initiatives. This amendment would increase the time for gathering signatures for initiatives from ninety (90) days to one hundred and twenty (120) days.

The Clallam County Charter Review Commission proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Rule Charter, concerning the Director of the Department of Community Development (DCD). This amendment would require the DCD Director to become an office appointed by the Board of County Commissioners instead of an office elected by the voting public at large.

Should this amendment be:

Should this amendment be:

Should this amendment be:

{ Approved

{ Approved

{ Approved

{ Rejected

{ Rejected

{ Rejected

voters to consider. Clallam County voters rejected a charter amendThe Clallam County Charter Review Commission The Clallam County Charter Review Commission ment to make the county’s proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home proposes an amendment to the Clallam County Home Department of Community Development director an Rule Charter, concerning the interpretation of the Rule Charter, concerning the Charter Review elected position in 1983. Clallam County Home Rule Charter. Commission Members’ one-year term of office. Clallam became the only This amendment would require charter county in the nation with interpretations to afford Clallam County those powers This amendment would cause the commissioners’ an elected DCD director conferred to charter counties under state law and this one-year term to begin on the first day of January, when voters approved the home rule charter. instead of beginning on the day of their election. same measure in 2002. A measure to have comShould this amendment be: Should this amendment be: missioners appoint a DCD director failed in 2007. { Approved { Approved This year, voters will be asked to consider the same { Rejected { Rejected proposal as charter amendment 6, “Department of Community Development Clallam County citizens “This part of the current Fifteen citizens, five from director.” Clallam is one of seven rejected the vote-by-district counties in the state to Home Rule Charter is not each commissioner district, “Land use decisions concept for electing commis- operate under a home-rule broken and does not to be were elected last November should not be politicized,” sioners in 1983 and again fixed,” the con statement to develop and propose charter, a type of county the pro statement reads. “Forcing this position to charter amendments for reads. in 2003, Turner said. constitution.

Amendment 7

Amendment 8

be elected mandates a political spin [to] every decision made and transparency and appearance of fairness in decision making is significantly compromised. Having an elected DCD has led to actions being filed against the county incurring thousands of dollars in costs to county taxpayers.” Authors of the con statement — Judd, Bell, Sue Forde and Rod Fleck — argue that “government closest to the people is usually most responsive to their needs.” An elected DCD director, “must account to you for their actions, and await your decision on election night,” they said. PLEASE

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

23

Clallam/Jefferson County

Fire District No. 3, Position 1 How would you address budgetary issues surrounding increased calls for service and static staffing levels? Gawley: By carefully balancing the needs of the community with the resources we have available. Not having enough people to serve the community is obviously unacceptable, but hiring beyond our needs is wasteful and irresponsible. We plan to grow with the community and will fund this by carefully prioritizing our expenditures and by prudent management of existing revenues. Ryan: A fire district-department is a business. Proper finance management is an important aspect of any business. PLEASE

About the job CLALLAM FIRE DISTRICT NO. 3 COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Election boundaries: East of Deer Park Road near Port Angeles to Gardiner in Jefferson County Voters: 23,639 in Clallam County, 342 in Jefferson County, as of Sept. 23 Term: Six-year short and full term

G. Michael Gawley

Meetings: First and third Tuesdays Compensation: Eligible for $114 per day for each day or portion of a day in performance of district duties up to $10,944, or 96 days. Duties: Approve a budget that in 2015 includes $10.4 million for the general fund (the fire district has 42 fulltime-equivalent positions) and levy taxes.

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Charter review, proposed amendments/ CONTINUED

Here is a brief summary of the six other proposed charter amendments that will appear on your ballot: ■ Amendment No. 2: “Frequency of charter review.” If approved, a Charter Review Commission would be elected every five years rather than every eight years to review the Home Rule Charter. ■ Amendment No. 3: “Transmission of initiatives to voters.” This amendment would send qualified initiatives directly to the voters without prior consideration, adoption or rejection by the Board of County Commissioners.

■ Amendment No. 4: “Transmission of referenda to voters.” This amendment would send qualified referenda directly to the voters without prior consideration, adoption or rejection by the Board of County Commissioners. ■ Amendment No. 5: “Signature gathering for initiatives.” This amendment would increase the time for gathering signatures for initiatives from 90 days to 120 days. ■ Amendment No. 7: “Home rule charter interpretation.” This amendment would require charter interpretations to afford Clallam County those

powers conferred to charter counties under state law and Clallam County’s Home Rule Charter. ■ Amendment No. 8: “Charter review commissioners’ elected term.” This amendment would cause the commissioners’ one-year term to begin Jan. 1 rather than the day of their election. The Charter Review Commission will reconvene Oct. 20 to finalize ballot language for proposed charter amendments that will appear on the 2016 ballot.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com.

Sean Ryan

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-809-0322

Phone: 360-912-0224

Email: GawleyFor Commissioner@mgawley.com

Email: ryanforfire commissioner@gmail.com

Campaign website: www. GawleyForDistrict3.com

Campaign website: www. electseanryan.com

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 72

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 53

Education: High school graduate; forestry, Pennsylvania State University, 1962; psychology, Oklahoma City University, mid-’60s; communications and computer science, University of Hawaii and various community colleges on Oahu, late ’80s and ’90s Occupation: I retired from the Federal Aviation Administration in 2005 after 32 years of service. Have you ever run for or held public office? I was appointed to the position of fire commissioner for Clallam County Fire District No. 3 in February 2014, and I continue to serve in that role today.

Education: High school Occupation: Owner, America’s Elite damage restoration service and repair Have you ever run for or held public office? Yes. I ran for fire commissioner.


24

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Fire District No. 3, Position 1/

CONTINUED

Being a business owner, I understand these kinds of challenges, and I plan to use my experience in proper budgeting and expenditure-control to help the commissioners and chiefs deal with our present budget and increased call-volume. With it being harder for people to commit their time, what would you do to increase the number of fire department volunteers? Gawley: Recruiting and retaining good volunteers continues to be challenging for departments around the country. As a volunteer myself for the past eight years, I feel it is important to care-

fully screen potential candidates beforehand to ensure we are bringing dedicated individuals into the fold. I would rather have 20 dedicated individuals than 50 who show up infrequently. I value quality over quantity and encourage volunteer feedback, which will help in our recruitment strategy. Ryan: To encourage new volunteer recruitment, I would look at expanding the Explorer program as well as look into offering volunteers potential health benefits and career advancement opportunities through training. What would be your

biggest accomplishment after six years in office?

wisely to support their needs.

the budget and curb the free-spending attitude.

Gawley: I do not like to think in terms of single accomplishments. Rather, after six more years in office, I would like to look back on a solid, well-managed, well-trained and well-equipped department staffed with dedicated individuals who truly care for the well-being of the community. We have that now, and with my help, we will continue to have that in the future.

What, if anything, would you change about how the district is run?

Will you serve your full term in office?

Ryan: If elected commissioner, my goal is to help make sure our community’s needs are truly met and to help make sure their money is being spent

Gawley: Yes Gawley: Right now, the public is protected by an efficient and responsive department, and I see no reason to make major changes to a system that works so well. We will continue to refine our process and adjust to changing situations and emerging technologies, but our core mission remains the same, and our community response will continue to be excellent. Ryan: I would change the culture in relation to

Ryan: Yes Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Gawley: I am an experienced commissioner with a full understanding and knowledge of the needs of this community. I pride myself in making decisions that are thoughtful, deliberate and thorough. It is my vision to move this department into the future by carefully plan-

ning its growth alongside the needs of the community. Simply adding more personnel to the payroll is short-sighted, very expensive and unneeded at this time. We are in great shape. Ryan: I’m sure my opponent is a quality person. I hold utmost respect for him, but what I can bring is many years of successful business experience, seven years of volunteer firefighting and an understanding of our community needs and resources to meet those needs. Our community needs to know what their money pays for and how it works for them.

Jefferson County

Port of Port Townsend, District 1 How would you fund necessary improvements to stormwater facilities and the marina at the port’s public boatyard? Talley: Stormwater improvements are critical to maintaining the port’s permit and keeping the boatyard open and providing jobs. I would fund these projects before using existing revenue for noncritical capital projects. All potential revenue sources should be considered: raising rates, raising taxes, tightening overhead, selling unoptimized port property and reducing services, along with low-interest loans, bonds and additional grants. All of these options come with pros and cons, and public input is critical.

Diana Wendy Talley, Steve Tucker

recently finishing upgrades at commercial and the C and D docks.

About the Job outline, candidates’ biographies appear on next page.

Should boatyard rates be increased, decreased or remain the same?

Tucker: We instituted environmental user fees proactively to pay for the stormwater system that we have today and to cover its maintenance. I am studying new, more costeffective technologies like biofiltration (an industrial-strength rain garden) to address future needs. Marina improvements are paid for by funds that are set aside each year. The Boat Haven reserve fund presently has $688,000 after

Talley: When additional revenue is needed, rate increases must always be considered. It’s important, however, to not lose valuable customers and harm local businesses in the process. The port also depends on the revenue stream from boatyard businesses to fund the rest of its countywide operations. All potential sources of revenue should be examined with respect to impacts on boatyard businesses and jobs, and rate changes should only occur after considering public input.

Tucker: The issue of boatyard rates is complex. On the one hand, we want to keep rates low to encourage commercial fishing boats and recreational boats to come to Port Townsend. On the other hand, we have to ensure that rates are sufficient to cover the costs of operation and maintenance. So, the way forward involves monitoring the economic and competitive environments and doing our best to chart a course that strikes the best balance.

The committee would include the many diverse stakeholders, including those who directly use the port’s boating and airport facilities, and those community members who are less directly impacted. The public should help guide policy and ensure a triple bottom line, and the process should be transparent and inclusive.

Tucker: Being a member of the committee that initially developed it, I spent a year getting my ideas into the original strategic plan. While the existing plan conSuggest one idea to add to tinues to serve us well, I would the port’s strategic plan. like to see the port look strategically at developing and diversifyTalley: As the plan is being ing port resources to help grow rewritten, I would add broad input the agricultural and energy secfrom a strategic advisory commit- tors of Jefferson County. tee that is comprised of citizens from all three port districts. PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE


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FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

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Port of Port Townsend, District 1/ CONTINUED

These are growth areas for our community, and the port can play a role in supporting them. What would you do to spur economic growth beyond the Port Townsend city limit? Talley: A marine trades incubator could be created in the Quilcene community to assist businesses with job creation and expansion. In addition, a maritime jobtraining program for youth, modeled on the successful program at the Port Townsend Aero Museum, would be invaluable for Quilcene youth who seek local employment. The port could partner with local agencies and nonprofits to promote these programs. Tucker: We just signed a 25-year lease with Coast Seafood Inc., the largest employer in Quilcene, and we are supporting a wastewater system for Quilcene’s commercial district. Our new infrastructure at the airport will attract new commercial activities. I envision the industrial park by the airport becoming a regional agricultural hub. We can support our growing agricultural sector by doing what we did in the maritime sector and develop the infrastructure to allow them to flourish. Will you serve your full term in office? Talley: Yes. Tucker: Yes. Why should voters choose

About the job PORT OF PORT TOWNSEND COMMISSIONER Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Countywide Voters: 22,789 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Workshop second Wednesdays, regular meeting second and fourth Wednesdays Compensation: Eligible for up to $114 per day for portrelated activities for up to 96 days a year, or $10,944 and a salary of $254 a month for a maximum annual monetary compensation of $13,992; medical, dental, vision, long-term disability and life insurance Duties: Approve a general fund budget that in 2015 is $3.1 million and covers 27 full-time-equivalent positions; establish policies and long-term strategic plans to guide the district; purchases and disposes of real estate and set rates; and levy taxes. Tucker: The maritime sector is already well-represented on the commission. Talley: Twenty-three years I bring balance to the commisago, I started my own business in sion by representing all of the the Boat Haven, and the maritaxpayers. time community helped me at I strongly support the marievery step. time industry but bring a I love this place. broader perspective that takes Being in the trenches, as it into account the entire commuwere, has given me the day-tonity. day understanding of how the I take pride in connecting the port could be so much better with some simple, practical, business- port with different groups and organizations throughout the like changes. county. The county needs a I’m not afraid to take robust maritime industry to continue providing economic develprincipled stands when it is in opment. the best interest of the port and the community. I will make that happen. you over your opponent?

Diana Wendy Talley

Steve Tucker

Residence: Port Townsend

Residence: Port Townsend

Phone: 360-379-8285

Phone: 360-385-0447

Email: lunataku@gmail. com

Email: tuckerworks@ gmail.com

Campaign website: http://dianatalley.wordpress. com

Campaign website: reelectstevetucker.com

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 63 Education: Shorecrest High School, Seattle, Class of 1969; associate degree, Seattle Community College, 1978; studied science one year, University of Washington, 19781979 Occupation: Owner, Taku Marine in the Boat Haven for 23 years; 37 years as a shipwright Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 65 Education: Bachelor’s degree, biology, Boise State University, 1976 Occupation: We retired 11 years ago when we sold Auto Works, the business we had built. Have you ever run for or held public office? I am the incumbent District 1 port commissioner. Running for port commissioner in the last election was the first time I had ever run for office.

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FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Jefferson County

Hospital District 2 commissioner, Position 2 What experience qualifies you for this position? Kolff: I have a master’s in public health and a medical doctor degree. As medical director of a nonprofit community health center for 17 years, I developed new, affordable healthcare clinics for mostly low-income folks in King, Snohomish, Skagit and Whatcom counties. Sea Mar now has 50 medical, mental health and dental clinics in 11 counties. I have grant-writing, management, strategic planning and leadership experience as president of Jefferson Land Trust and the ReCyclery, and as a City Council member. What should be the roles of the hospital CEO and the hospital commissioners in setting goals and policies? Kolff: Hospital commissioners set goals and policies for Jefferson Healthcare (JHC). The CEO must help develop a strategic plan that should be used to evaluate the CEO’s performance. Commissioners must address the problem that 33 percent of physicians at JHC would probably not recommend working there. Research confirms you cannot enhance patient experience, improve population health and

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NO RESPONSE Candidate Chuck Russell did not respond to this questionnaire. reduce costs without improving the work life of health care providers and staff. The management culture must change at the top. How much should the hospital work with other health care providers in the community? Kolff: The federal government will soon begin to pay for managing the health of communities rather than reimburse for services. This will encourage JHC to partner with different health care and wellness providers to keep our residents healthy and out of the hospital. Prevention and management of chronic diseases like diabetes require a communitywide effort of better nutrition, exercise and prevention of childhood obesity. Partnerships with the YMCA, public health, mental health and others are essential. What service should the hospital provide that it does not provide now? Kolff: Mental health and drug-abuse care, dental care, more affordable primary medical care services and chronic disease prevention were identified as health priorities more than a year ago, and yet JHC has not developed the federally required community health improvement plans to address them. Thousands of our neighbors cannot get or afford the care

About the job EAST JEFFERSON COUNTY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 2 (JEFFERSON HEALTHCARE HOSPITAL) Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: All of Jefferson County except West End precincts 600 and 601 Voters: 22,664 as of Sept. 23 Term: Six years Meetings: First and third Wednesdays Compensation: $90 a day for meetings and commissioner-related duties, not to exceed $8,640 a year; health insurance Duties: Pass a budget that in 2015 is $80 million and supports 480 full-timeequivalent employees; hire a CEO; lease existing hospital and other health care facilities and equipment and contract for health care services; and levy taxes.

they need. More financial relief for needy families is essential, since poverty and poor health often go hand-in-hand. Will you serve your full term in office? Kolff: Yes.

Kees Kolff Residence: Port Townsend Phone: 206-295-2275 Email: kkolff@olympus.net Campaign website: www.keeskolffmd.com Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 70 Education: Bachelor’s degree, Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa., 1967; medical doctor degree and master’s degree in public health, Harvard University, Boston, 1971; pediatric residency, Children’s Hospital, Seattle, 1971-73; Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar Fellowship, University of Washington, 1976-78; board-certified pediatrician Occupation: Retired medical director and practicing physician offering pediatric and family health care, Sea Mar Community Health Centers, Seattle Have you ever run for or held public office? Port Townsend City Council, 2002-06; mayor 2002-04 care, provider job satisfaction and strategic planning. I have worked in a setting Kolff: We have a health care cri- where everyone gets care, regardless of their ability to pay. sis in this country and our county. I will fight for a statewide, I have public health training, single-payer health care system. medical experience and proven The current board refuses to leadership skills. do that. I have successfully addressed issues like access to affordable It’s time for change. Why should voters choose you over your opponent?


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Jefferson County

Hospital District 2 commissioner, Position 4 What experience qualifies you for this position?

Governance policies are set by the board.

Dressler: Five years as hospital commissioner, three years as board secretary, one year as board chair. I have spent over 30 years caring for and about the residents of East Jefferson County. I am compassionate, knowledgeable, experienced and have already contributed to major improvements at the hospital during the past five years. Thirty-four years living in East Jefferson County; 26 years as a registered nurse at Jefferson Healthcare Birth Center; director of family business, 15 years.

Stafford: The hospital commissioners should set clear, measurable goals and policies for the hospital district. The CEO’s role is to execute those goals and policies and be held accountable for the achievement of those measurable goals.

Stafford: I worked in the information technology department at Jefferson Healthcare for five years. During this time, I worked closely with the directors of nearly every department and all the members of the strategic leadership team to create solutions for the data and information needs of the hospital. In this role, I came to understand not only the way that the many individual departments work but also how information is shared throughout the organization. What should be the roles of the hospital CEO and the hospital commissioners in setting goals and policies?

How much should the hospital work with other health care providers in the community? Dressler: A strength of Jefferson Healthcare is that the hospital district already works with many health care providers in the community and is open to work with others whenever a suitable opportunity occurs. A recent example is Jefferson Healthcare in partnership with Jefferson Mental Health Services have together employed a psychiatrist. Stafford: The hospital should engage and partner with all other health care providers in the community, along with agencies such as Jefferson County Public Health and Jefferson Mental Health Services, as much as possible. What service should the hospital provide that it does not provide now?

Dressler: We have already partnered with Jefferson Mental Dressler: The board provides Health Services, and I expect to see more comprehensive mental global direction to the CEO, health services being offered in with the expectation that the the near future. CEO and the administrative I would like Jefferson team will produce draft plans Healthcare to provide part-time for the board to review, modify neurology and dermatology serand approve.

vices as well as a gynecologist in the Women’s Health Center. Veterans services would be of benefit to members of our community. Stafford: The major health care service gaps in our community are mental health services, chemical dependency services and dental care. The hospital needs to work closely with its strategic partners within the community to address these gaps. Will you serve your full term in office? Dressler: Yes. Stafford: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Dressler: During the five years since I was elected to the board, huge improvements have been implemented, especially in the quality and safety of patient care, financial stability, new services, better nutrition and locally sourced foods. I have a vast knowledge of the health care industry acquired over 40 years, with experience in both clinical health care and business arenas. Just as important, I have the time and energy to continue to devote to the hospital district’s needs. Stafford: I will use my experience and knowledge to help the commission make the best possible decisions. I will bring fresh eyes and an open mind to addressing all the health care challenges currently facing our community.

Mari Dressler Residence: Port Townsend (4 miles southwest of the city)

Paul Stafford Residence: Port Townsend Phone: 360-302-1293

Phone: 360-385-6180 Email: reelectmari dresslerrn@gmail.com Campaign website: www. maridresslerrn.com Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 69 Education: Parkstone Grammar School for Girls, Poole, Dorset, England, 195764; Bournemouth College of Technology (now Bournemouth University), England, 1964-66; Salisbury and East Dorset School of Nursing, England, 1966-69, state-registered nurse; Southampton University Hospitals School of Midwifery, England 1970-72, state-certified midwife Occupation: Registered nurse (current license, active retired) Have you ever held or run for public office? I am currently Jefferson Healthcare hospital commissioner, Position 4.

Email: PaulStafford@ olympus.net Campaign website: www. votepaulstafford.com Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 48 Education: Port Townsend High School, class of 1985; attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y., 1985-87 Occupation: Owner, William James Bookseller, Port Townsend Have you ever run for or held public office? No


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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Jefferson County

Port Townsend City Council, Position 6 Port Townsend City Council, Position 6 About the Job outline appears on next page.

Given limited state funding, how should the city fund badly needed repairs to streets?

This PDA will bring housing providers like Habitat, public housing authority, OlyCAP and others together to discuss practical and achievable solutions. After we reach consensus on our best courses of action, we will utilize the extensive resources of the PDA’s stakeholders to distill this will into direct action.

Smith: It’s possible to mitigate infrastructure costs through subsidies, payment plans and Rice: The transportation sliding-scale options. improvement project currently in Payment plans would have effect in Port Townsend is the added benefit of providing designed to maximize the availthe city with a known revenue able state funding for road repair. stream, and differing arrangeHowever, many of our residen- ments could be made depending tial roads are exempt from these on applicant category of homefunding options. owner or developer. We must ensure that everyone A community housing trust with an interest in Port would be an effective way to cirTownsend is helping pave the cumnavigate the rent-control ban way, especially those who only in Washington — as “landlord,” dwell here seasonally. the trust sets affordable rents. I propose finding methods to tax these “snowbirds” so that we How would you guarantee might ensure everyone helps our that the comprehensive plan city preserve its infrastructure. update is as comprehensive as it should be? Smith: The city should develop a matrix to determine Rice: The comprehensive which repairs are seen as most planning process usually includes pressing by the public and weigh predictive land use, transportathat with staff input. tion and housing, so if we’re covI believe a public that is havering those topics, we’re “offiing its needs met is more likely cially” comprehensive. to allow city government to At a recent Planning Commisstretch beyond the traditional sion meeting, Commissioner Jack methods that haven’t kept pace Range pointed out that the only with current demand for develop- goal of the comprehensive plan ment. that has yet to become truly New revenue streams must be actionable is preserving and creidentified, and existing sources ating affordable housing. must be utilized and leveraged. I can guarantee that this facet of the plan will be addressed in What would you do to stim- detail during my term. ulate development of affordable housing for renters and Smith: City staff must conbuyers? tinue to work with and adapt the new online public input Rice: As part of the council, I process, as it is important that will help create a public develop- constituents are able to effecment authority to focus on in-city tively communicate with their housing solutions. elected officials.

EXITED RACE Tobi McEnerney filed for the Port Townsend City Council Position 4 seat held by Robert Gray, who also filed for the position. McEnerney dropped out of the race after the withdrawal deadline. I would like to see more town hall meetings organized by city staff, hopefully to reach a broader demographic. In order to be comprehensive, it is necessary to get input from as many sectors of the population as possible. How should the city coordinate economic development with the port, hospital district and school district? Rice: These districts should not exist in separate vacuums. We should be attending each other’s meetings and staying briefed on each district’s activities. How to coordinate is easily answered once all of the stakeholders are in tune with a single purpose. Our hospital, port and schools are essential to the continued existence of Port Townsend. In specific, the city should do everything in its power to ensure the school district’s capital projects are funded next year. Smith: The long-term success of Port Townsend is intrinsically tied to the success of its schools. Economic development of the port and hospital district would also be successes for the city. PLEASE

TURN TO NEXT PAGE

Paul S. Rice

Amy Smith

Residence: Port Townsend

Residence: Port Townsend

Phone: 206-595-5441

Phone: 360-550-0978

Email: paulriceforcity council@gmail.com

Email: amyforcitycouncil@ gmail.com

Campaign website: www.facebook.com/groups/ RiceforCityCouncil

Campaign website: amyforcitycouncil.nation builder.com

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 33

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 33

Education: High school, University Preparatory Academy, Seattle; bachelor’s degree, Emerson College, Boston, 2001-05

Education: High school diploma, Tonasket High School, Tonasket; studied business administration, Peninsula College; studied culinary arts, Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts, Portland, Ore.; Clemente Courses through Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y.; certified youth mental health first-aid provider through the National Council for Behavioral Health

Occupation: Production assistant for Workin’ Man Creative, Rock Fish Group, visual design and creative services Have you ever run for or held elected public office? No

Occupation: Nonprofit administration, executive director, the Boiler Room, Port Townsend Have you ever run for or held public office? No


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Jefferson County

Port Townsend City Council, Position 7 transportation needs. Lastly, the city should consider shifting funds to expand public and nonmotorized transportation to decrease unnecessary wear and tear on our city streets and decrease our carbon footprint when and where possible.

fled, sometimes these funds aren’t used effectively. Having said all that, I don’t feel that the conditions of local streets should elicit panic but instead a need to set aside future funds for repairs.

dwelling units, look at ways to support water and sewer connections for affordable housing development to decrease development costs, and consider pursuing market-based Candidates’ biographies solutions to turn current vacation appear on next page. rentals into long-term rentals. Additionally, by improving living-wage jobs, we can make curWhat would you do to Given limited state funding, rent real estate more affordable Keena: Funds for large street- stimulate development of how should the city fund badly improvement projects are someaffordable housing for renters for locals. needed repairs to streets? times received from the state as and buyers? Keena: I am not sure there grants. is too much more the city can Faber: By seeking state and They don’t usually fund the Faber: There is no “silver do. federal grants and by focusing on entire project and sometimes bullet” for affordable housing, Either by design, by climactic repairs that will serve to benefit come with strings attached. but the city has tools at its dischange or by nature itself, more the largest number of people. Regular street maintenance posal. people are moving here. We should also prioritize proj- and repairs should be funded by We should look at slackening PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE ects that will serve our future the city. When priorities get shuf- zoning restrictions for accessory

David Faber, Travis Keena

Port Townsend City Council, Position 6/ CONTINUED

The city should assist in communicating the issues behind each need, such as building maintenance and facilities improvements. Economic development in these sectors could create more living-wage jobs, which would attract more young families. Will you serve your full term in office? Rice: Yes. Smith: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Rice: Unlike my opponent, I have attended nearly every City Council meeting, Planning Commission meeting and county Board of Commissioners meeting peninsuladailynews.com

for the past seven months, working hard to be as prepared as possible to work at the utmost of my ability. I’ve been out in the neighborhoods, talking to my constituents and making myself available to anyone who has questions about city government. I’m ready to learn even more and to serve you well. Smith: My continued commitment to Port Townsend can be seen in my job and extensive volunteer work. I have lived and worked in Port Townsend for 15 years, renting a home, going to college, getting married and building a community. I am confident in my ability to create positive change while respecting and maintaining Port Townsend’s unique culture and impressive heritage. I would be honored to create this change from a seat on City Council.

About the job PORT TOWNSEND CITY COUNCIL POSITION 6 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Election boundaries: City of Port Townsend Voters: 7,146 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: First and third Mondays of the month; work session on the second Mondays Compensation: The mayor, appointed by council members, receives $750 a month. Other council members receive $500 a month. Council duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2015 is $7.2 million; hire a city manager who is responsible for supervising a work force of 100 full-time-equivalent positions; adopt all ordinances, approve all contracts and serve on city, county, regional and state boards, commissions and subcommittees; and levy taxes.

Pick from the Money Tree! EVERY TUESDAY! Every week’s Money Tree is ripe with exclusive discounts — 35 percent off! — from North Olympic Peninsula businesses. It’s easy and fun. ✔ Check the Money Tree page on Tuesdays for the bargain you want. ✔ Phone the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 360-417-7684 and use your credit card to claim your purchase. We’ll mail the certificate to be redeemed to you . . . at no extra cost. ✔ Or if you’re in the neighborhood, drop by the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 305 W. First St. to pick up your certificate. (It’s not available at our Port Townsend or Sequim offices.)


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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend City Council, Position 7/

CONTINUED

In a bidding war, those with the most money always win. Attempts to create high-density housing areas have not materialized on their own. Better wages and more housing options would help. More large “McMansions” will not. How would you guarantee that the comprehensive plan update is as comprehensive as it should be? Faber: The city has done a good job of engaging locals to ensure our community is as involved in the comprehensive planning process as is possible. This engagement must continue up through the final stages of the comprehensive plan to make sure all have a chance to speak their minds. We also have to recognize the ways in which our various priorities are interrelated, such as resiliency, affordable housing, jobs, environmental stewardship and transportation. Keena: Public input, public input, public input, follow-through.

and school district? Faber: Yes. Faber: The port, hospital district and school district are some of our largest and most important local employers. When possible, the city should assist their efforts at improving services, infrastructure and other aspects of economic development where practical to do so. The city should also serve to facilitate the already fantastic interconnectivity of our major employers to ensure that their efforts have the broadest possible success. Keena: The hospital, the school district and the greater marine trades are some of the biggest employers in the county. Jobs are the basis for all economic activity. The hospital, however, should focus on patient care, and the school district should focus on teaching our future. The port, on the other hand, is an economic and industrial hub. Marine trades using past and future technologies should see Port Townsend as their home and be encouraged.

How should the city coordinate economic development Will you serve your full with the port, hospital district term in office?

Keena: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Faber: I am a highly educated local with years of experience interacting with government officials. I am skilled at negotiating mutually agreeable solutions to complex and difficult problems. I am the vice president of the Boiler Room board of directors, the vice president of the Jefferson County Bar Association, a director of the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, a member of the Port Townsend Rotary Club and am endorsed by Progressive Majority Washington. Keena: I pledge to give all issues an open mind and am willing to see more than one perspectives. I want more “outside-the-box” thinking from the council, and I hope you do, too. My experience at the port should help me know the right time to ask the right questions. I will do my best, and that is all I can offer.

Extra! Extra! You can place your classified ad 24/7! Try our classified wizard! at www.peninsuladaily news.com

David J. Faber

Travis Keena

Residence: Port Townsend

Residence: Port Townsend

Phone: 360-821-9374

Phone: No response

Email: vote4faber@gmail. com Campaign website: None

Email: traviskeena@yahoo. com Campaign website: None

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 32

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 39

Education: High school diploma, Port Townsend High School, 2001; bachelor’s degree, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, 2007; law degree, Seattle University School of Law, 2012; Legum Magister (LL.M), or Master of Laws, University of Washington School of Law, 2013

Education: Port Townsend High School, Running Start program; associate degree from Peninsula College

Occupation: Attorney, Faber Feinson PLLC, Port Townsend Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Occupation: Maintenance, Port of Port Townsend Have you ever run for or held public office? No


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FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

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Jefferson County

Quilcene School District, Position 1 What are the educational strengths and weaknesses in the district? Apeland: There’s a good core of teachers and para-educators on staff. Student achievement needs to increase.

EXITED RACE

Quilcene School District, Position 1

Kathy Lawley filed for the Quillayute Valley School Board position representing District 5 held by Mike Reaves, who also filed for the position. Lawley dropped out of the race after the withdrawal deadline.

About the Job outline appears on next page.

Davis: Strengths are staff, the backbone of our school, our biggest strength; we have a lot of really great kids in our district who want to learn; and parents/ community who get involved and communicate with staff. Our finance department also into the school. knows how to stretch those dolCommunication is the key. lars, and in this time of unfunded state mandates, that’s a great What are your three overall thing to be able to do. education priorities that, in a I don’t think our district has a perfect world, you would lot of educational weaknesses. accomplish during your time in office? How will you engage the community to improve public Apeland: ■ Improve student schools in the district? achievement. ■ Adopt fiscally sound budApeland: Through communication at public meetings such as gets and manage finances School Board meetings, levy com- responsibly. ■ Working together with mittee meetings, community board members and staff to fairly functions and the Quilcene negotiate contracts. School District Web page (www. quilcene.wednet.edu). Davis: ■ On the state level, Communicate with the comhigher pay for teachers and supmunity to ensure the public has port staff. a clear understanding of the ■ In my own district, our needs of the school, the successes of students and faculty, and clear school is getting old. I would like to see a newer short- and long-term goals. school facility or a dramatic overDavis: Keep the lines of com- haul of our existing structures (some). munication open. Because hey, let’s face it, Have an open-door policy. if the buildings fall down, Invite groups/organizations

where is the education going to take place? ■ Continue to support McCleary. Make the state follow through with fully funding education. If the School Board decides to run a replacement levy in February, how would you convince the increasingly older population to approve it? Apeland: By being an advocate of our school district and by providing a clear understanding of what the needs of students, faculty and building maintenance are. Also, to ensure a safe environment for our students and community, our buildings must be kept in good repair and have necessary improvements throughout the years. Davis: I don’t know how much convincing I would have to do. We have a huge amount of support for our school, for our kids. There is longevity in our community. Many generations have gone through this school and have great-grandkids attending now. PLEASE

Mark L. Apeland

Shona Davis

Residence: Quilcene

Residence: Quilcene

Phone: Unlisted

Phone: 360-774-1705

Email: markapeland@ gmail.com Campaign website: None

Email: quilbillymom@ gmail.com Campaign website: None

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 50

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 51

Education: High school diploma, Bremerton Christian High School, Bremerton

Education: Some college (Peninsula College)

Occupation: Patrol sergeant, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Occupation: Part-time deli server; office manager for my husband’s business, Davis Masonry

Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Have you ever run for or held public office? I am currently the incumbent for the position I’m running for.

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FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

Jefferson County

Quilcene School District, Position 1/

Quilcene School District, Position 3

CONTINUED

The community, all ages, they just love our kids. Will you serve your full term in office? Apeland: Yes. Davis: Yes. Why should voters choose you over your opponent? Apeland: That’s up to the voters to decide.

Davis: Here’s where you should ask “In a perfect world . . . ?” Because in a perfect world, voters wouldn’t have to choose. We’d both be there, but it doesn’t work that way. The past 13-plus years on the School Board has given me patience to listen before acting (or reacting), boldness to speak out and up when needed and the experience needed to continue to do a good job.

About the job QUILCENE SCHOOL BOARD Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Quilcene and areas of Coyle and Crocker Lake Voters: 1,296 as of Sept. 23 Term: Four years Meetings: Third Wednesdays Compensation: Eligible for $50 a day for attending School Board meetings and performing other services on behalf of the school district, not to exceed $4,800 annually Duties: Approve a general fund budget of $5.5 million for 2015-16, including 48 full-time equivalent employees; hire a superintendent, who hires all school district employees; approve polices and procedures for students and employees; and levy taxes.

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What are the educational strengths and weaknesses in the district? Kuehl: Quilcene’s status as a small, rural district gives it both strength in its vibrant sense of community and weakness in its ability to provide wider programs. Like all things, however, strengths and weaknesses are a matter of context, and Quilcene has an excellent track record of addressing problems. We need to work together to solve problems in the best way possible, using our strengths to address our weaknesses. How will you engage the community to improve public schools in the district? Kuehl: I led the effort to establish Quilcene’s first community-driven 10-year strategic plan, and I am a strong proponent of working with the community to meet the needs of our students. I enjoy reaching out to people and discussing concerns and options, and find we have better ideas and solutions when we put our heads together in service to the school.

NO RESPONSE Candidate Bonnie Hitt did not respond to this questionnaire. I would like to keep the district accountable to the students, parents and the public. The board works as a team, so my individual goal is to be effective on the team and to help implement what makes sense in the changing circumstances that the district will inevitably face. If the School Board decides to run a replacement levy in February, how would you convince the increasingly older population to approve it?

Viviann Kuehl Residence: Quilcene Phone: 360-765-4321 Email: viviann.kuehl@ gmail.com Campaign website: None

Kuehl: Our children are our future. We need to invest in their education, but the board needs to be scrupulous with public money. We must recognize the need and convey it clearly so the public can make an informed decision.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, Western Washington University; master’s degree, City University; Washington state teaching certificate

Will you serve your full term in office?

Occupation: Preschool teacher, writer

What are your three overall Kuehl: Yes. educational priorities that, in a perfect world, you would Why should voters choose accomplish during your time you over your opponent? in office? Kuehl: I am eager to Kuehl: The school should contribute my extensive experilead, not only in preparing ence with education and the comevery student for life, but also munity for the ongoing developas the center of a vibrant ment of the Quilcene School District. community.

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: No response

Have you ever run for or held public office? Quilcene School Board member, 1992-2003


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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

33

Jefferson County

Port Ludlow Fire District No. 3, Position 3 How would you address budgetary issues surrounding increased calls for service and static staffing levels? Gregory: International Association of Firefighters Local 3811 controls the budget and the operation of the district, not the commissioners. The 2015 collective bargaining agreement is 65 pages long. Taxpayers in Port Ludlow’s master planned resort paid $1.9 million to the district this year. The commissioners need to refocus on their constituents. Helmonds: The increase is not enough to be of concern. If we maintain our current levels of staffing, we can handle more than our current level of calls for service. Our recent maintenance-andoperations levy, which was overwhelmingly approved by our voters, has allowed us to maintain our staffing and continue to supply our firefighters and paramedics with the necessary equipment and training to continue the service levels our residents have asked for. With it being harder for people to commit their time, what would you do to increase the number of fire department volunteers? Gregory: I would encourage participation with forums and demonstrations. Helmonds: The challenges of finding and keeping volunteers is a concern for most fire agencies throughout the state. Our resident training program has been essential for us to maintain sufficient staffing levels at our two manned stations. We advertise for volunteers on an ongoing basis. Our staff attends regional

About the job PORT LUDLOW FIRE DISTRICT 3 Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan General election boundaries: Port Ludlow, including Port Ludlow Master Planned resort; Shine, Bridgehaven, Paradise Bay, Mats Mats Bay, Olele Point Voters: 3,890 as of Sept. 23 Term: Six years Meetings: Second Tuesdays

Ron Gregory

Compensation: Eligible for $114 per day for each day or portion of a day in performance of district duties up to $10,944, or 96 days Duties: Approve a budget that in 2015 includes $2.4 million for the general and emergency medical services funds and 14 full-time-equivalent positions and seven volunteer firefighterEMTs; and levy taxes.

Residence: Port Ludlow Phone: 360-344-2058 Email: plconcerned taxpayer@gmail.com Campaign website: None

meetings and seminars on volunteer recruiting and retention.

Gregory: Focus on all costs, particularly employee benefits.

What would be your biggest Helmonds: I believe the board accomplishment after six should approach the concept of years in office? reserves to include more longterm planning for future expenses Gregory: Significantly reduc- that our district will face over the ing the tax liability of the disnext five to 10 years. trict. Will you serve your full Helmonds: Certainly, keeping term in office? the district in solid financial standing and maintaining our Gregory: Yes. level of services to our community members is what we are Helmonds: Yes. tasked to do and what I believe we have done. Why should voters choose As commissioners, our primary responsibilities are finance you over your opponent? and policy. Gregory: I am a fiscal conserThis is where I have focused vative. most of my energies as part of the finance committee throughHelmonds: I have nearly six out the past five-plus years. years of service with our fire district and have a considerable knowledge What, if anything, would you change about how the dis- of our financial workings, staffing trict is run? needs and operational services.

Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 79 Education: Bachelor’s degree, University of California, Berkeley, 1965 Occupation: Retired as a pharmaceutical representative in 1992 Have you ever run for or held public office? No

Ronald Helmonds Residence: Port Ludlow Phone: 360-531-2072 Email: ronh2011@gmail. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 3, Election Day: 62 Education: West Valley College, Saratoga, Calif.; San Diego State University, San Diego, Calif. Occupation: Last 12 years as a Realtor and property manager in Jefferson County Have you ever run for or held public office? Port Ludlow fire commissioner for the past 5½ years

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34

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Washington state

Initiative 1366: Concerns state taxes and fees Initiative Measure No. 1366 Initiative Measure No. 1366 concerns state taxes and fees. This measure would decrease the sales tax rate unless the legislature refers to voters a constitutional amendment requiring two-thirds legislative approval or voter approval to raise taxes, and legislative approval for fee increases. Should this measure be enacted into law? { Yes { No

not be changed by a regular law. This means that neither the Legislature, nor the people through the initiative process, can pass a law that requires more votes in order for certain types of bills to pass. The only way to increase the number of votes needed for a bill to become a law is to amend the constitution. The constitution can only be amended if two-thirds of the members of each house of the legislature vote to propose the amendment. The amendment must then be approved by a majority of the voters at the next general election.

Effect of proposed measure

This measure would cut the state retail sales tax from 6.5% to 5.5% on April 15, 2016, unless the Legislature first proposes a Law as it presently exists specific amendment to the state Washington law charges a constitution. The proposed sales tax on most retail sales amendment must require that made in the state. Generally, a for any tax increase, either the retail sale is the sale of goods or voters approve the increase or services, but there are certain two-thirds of the members of exceptions defined by law. There each house of the Legislature are also certain goods and serapprove the increase. It must vices that are exempt from the also require the Legislature to retail sales tax, such as most gro- set the amount of any fee ceries, over the counter and preincreases. scription drugs, and newspapers. If the Legislature proposes the The state retail sales tax is curconstitutional amendment before rently 6.5% of the selling price on April 15, 2016, then the state each retail sale. This rate does retail sales tax would stay at not include local sales taxes that 6.5%. may also be charged by cities, If the Legislature does not counties and other taxing jurispropose the constitutional dictions. amendment and the state retail Another state law provides sales tax is reduced to 5.5%, that that most fees charged by the would cut the amount of taxes government are allowed only if that individuals and businesses they are approved by more than pay for goods and services. It half of the members of each would also lower the state’s revehouse of the Legislature. nue for government services. The Washington state constiThe measure would also tution states that no bill may define “raises taxes” and “majorbecome law unless it receives a ity legislative approval for fee yes vote by more than half of the increases” as those phrases are members of each house of the used in state law. legislature. The Washington state Supreme Court has explained — SOURCE: Secretary of that this voting requirement can- State’s website

Argument for

Argument against

Five times the voters have approved initiatives requiring either a two-thirds vote of the Legislature or majority vote of the people to raise taxes. Five times. In 2012, 64% of voters approved it. Voters clearly want tax increases to be an absolute last resort. Nonetheless, Olympia won’t listen to the people unless we pass I-1366. Recent history shows why. With I-960, tax increases were a last resort and Olympia balanced its budgets without raising taxes. In 2010, they suspended I-960 and increased taxes a whopping $6.7 billion, a huge betrayal of the public trust. KING 5’s poll: 68% thought it was the wrong thing to do. This year’s Legislature, without the two-thirds requirement in effect, increased taxes a jawdropping $17.5 billion. Passing I-1366 sends a clear message: we need protection from Olympia’s insatiable tax appetite. We need an economic climate where families feel confident, employers expand and job growth is positive. I-1366’s protections provide a stable future, giving families and employers the certainty they need to prosper. Olympia faces another big deficit because unsustainable spending has once again outstripped revenue. We simply can’t afford to have it all. When voters pass I-1366, Olympia will be prodded to reform government, prioritize spending and reevaluate existing programs. If voters reject I-1366, Olympia will resort to job-killing, familybudget-busting tax increases. Hold Olympia accountable for your tax dollars — vote yes.

Tim Eyman’s I-1366 forces lawmakers to either change our Constitution — allowing a handful of ideological legislators to dictate the agenda for all of our state — or face $8 billion in unnecessary cuts to essential services over six years. It’s a false choice that takes Washington backward. Washington has the most regressive tax system in the nation, unfairly harming middle and lower income households, startups and small businesses. Under 1366, as few as 17 ideological legislators from either party, out of 147 total, can block reforms that could make state government work better for us all. By holding lawmakers — and taxpayers — hostage to a constitutional change, 1366 would force deep, unnecessary cuts to K-12 schools, higher education, public safety and health care. Our kids would lose from rolling back bipartisan gains in school funding with increased class sizes, out-of-date textbooks and technology, and fewer good teachers. I-1366 is so flawed it will likely be found unconstitutional, wasting millions in legal fees that could be better spent on law enforcement, health care and other basics. Let’s reject the politics of hostage taking, and protect our constitutional tradition of passing legislation by majority vote, by saying no to 1366. Washington State Democrats; retired Republican Secretaries of State Sam Reed, Ralph Munro; Washington Education Association; Washington State Labor Council; League of Education Voters; Washington Council of Fire Fighters; Washington Conservation Voters; NAMI of Washington; League of Women Voters.

Argument prepared by Erma Turner, retired hairdresser, businesswoman, our favorite supporter, Cle Elum; Darryl Ehlers, farmer, husband, father, poet, gathered 1255 signatures, Lynden; Jack Fagan, retired policeman, retired navy, grandfather, bowler, fisherman, hunter; Jerry Klingele, retired small-business owner, active in community, Yakima; Brad Carlson, family small-business owner, Evergreen Memorial Gardens, Vancouver; Suzie Burke, businesswoman, Fremont’s biggest small-business advocate, Seattle.

Argument prepared by Ann Murphy, president, League of Women Voters of Washington; Kelly Fox, president, Washington Council of Fire Fighters; Sam Reed, retired secretary of state; Kim Mead, Washington Education Association president and middle school teacher; Andrew Villeneuve; Bellevue College business student; Tami O’Marro, Spokane registered nurse

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FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

35

Washington state

Initiative 1401: Concerns trafficking of animal species near extinction Law as it presently exists An international treaty called the “Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species” identifies many species of animals and plants that are at risk of extinction worldwide. Among the species this treaty addresses are species of elephant, rhinoceros, tiger, lion, leopard, cheetah, pangolin (also called a spiny anteater), marine turtle, shark and ray. The United States agreed to this treaty in the 1970s. Federal law makes it illegal to sell, import or trade in endangered species listed by the treaty, or in parts or products made from animals that are listed as endangered (with some exceptions). Washington state law does not prohibit the purchase, sale, trade or distribution of parts or products made from endangered species of elephant, rhinoceros, tiger, lion, leopard, cheetah, pangolin, marine turtle, shark or ray.

Initiative Measure No. 1401 Initiative Measure No. 1401 concerns trafficking of animal species threatened with extinction. This measure would make selling, purchasing, trading, or distributing certain animal species threatened with extinction, and products containing such species, a gross misdemeanor or class-C felony, with exemptions for certain types of transfers. Should this measure be enacted into law? { Yes { No

the endangered animal makes up less than 15% of the item; (2) aniEffect of proposed measure mal parts or products distributed If adopted, this measure would for educational, scientific or prohibit any person in Washington museum purposes; (3) when items are distributed under a will, estate from selling, buying, trading, or or trust after death of the owner; distributing parts of certain (4) musical instruments if the endangered animal species, or products containing or made from endangered animal part makes up less than 15% of the instrument; those animals. Specifically, the and (5) where trade in the item is measure would apply to parts or allowed by federal permit or law. products made from elephants, A violation of the law could be a rhinoceroses, tigers, lions, leopards, state crime. The violations would cheetahs, pangolins, marine turtles, sharks and rays. But it would be either a gross misdemeanor or a class-C felony, depending on the apply only to species of those animarket value of the illegal animal mals that are listed in either parts or products. If a person is Appendix I or II of the “Convenconvicted for violating the measure, tion on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora the person would also be ordered to pay a criminal wildlife penalty of and Fauna,” or listed as critically endangered, endangered or vulner- $2,000 or $4,000. The measure able in the lists of endangered spe- would also modify the power of cies compiled by the International state law enforcement officers to Union for Conservation of Nature, include authority to seize and dispose of illegal parts and products which is an international conserfrom the endangered species that vation organization. The measure also includes five are covered by the measure. exceptions when it would not — SOURCE: Secretary of apply. These exceptions include: (1) State’s website sale or trade of antique items if

Argument for

Argument against

Initiative 1401 will help save endangered wild elephants, rhinos, lions, tigers, leopards, cheetahs, pangolins, marine turtles, sharks and rays — all at risk of disappearing from Earth forever. The scale of the poaching crisis is immense. In one recent case, poachers poisoned a watering hole with cyanide, killing 300 elephants at once. Every fifteen minutes, on average, poachers kill another elephant for black-market ivory — sometimes even sawing off the animal’s tusks while it’s still alive. By penalizing those who traffic in these and other illegal animal products, I-1401 will help put an end to such cruelty and save these iconic animals from extinction. The United States is the world’s second-largest market for products from endangered species, and the Ports of Seattle/Tacoma are major entry points. Since 2010, there have been more than 50 seizures of elephant products entering Washington state alone. I-1401 will give state authorities new tools to choke off this illegal trade before these endangered animals are driven to extinction. I-1401, written in close consultation with leading wildlife scientists and law enforcement experts, is supported by many respected organizations including the Humane Society of the United States, Sierra Club, National Wildlife Federation, Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle Aquarium, and Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium. By voting “yes” on I-1401, we can do our part to help save endangered animals from extinction.

We all love elephants. This initiative doesn’t protect them. Proponents provide no evidence this ban will stop trafficking or poaching in other countries. Poaching and trafficking in poached ivory is already a felony under international and federal laws and has been for decades. Poaching has increased because of demand in Asian markets not because of the purchase and sale of ivory from before the ban on importation into the United States. This initiative targets legally purchased, legally crafted, legally owned ivory. It targets antiques. In section 3(2)(a) of the initiative an antique is exempt only if it is more than 100 years old, is less than 15% ivory and you have all the paperwork to prove it. If this passes you could be charged with a felony and fined $14,000 for selling your grandmother’s elephant ivory necklace for $250. Chess sets, jewelry, figurines, poker chips, buttons and beads, anything more than 15% ivory would become worthless. All your investment would be gone If you legally “own” something but cannot sell it or give it away do you have anything left of value? All this initiative would let you do is donate it to a museum or pass it through a will to heirs who couldn’t sell it or give it away either. Most people who have family heirlooms or collections are not billionaires. Property owned legally should continue to be legal.

Argument prepared by Sam Wasser, director, UW Center for Conservation Biology; Jennifer Hillman, director, outreach & engagement, Humane Society of the United States; Guy Palmer, senior director, global animal health, WSU; Fred Koontz, Ph.D, vice president of field conservation, Woodland Park Zoo; Margie Van Cleve, chair, Washington chapter of the Sierra Club

Argument prepared by Stuart Halsan, Legal Ivory Rights Coalition, former senator, Democrat, Centralia; Casey Kelley, president, Pautzke Bait Co., collector, Wenatchee; Mark Pidgeon, president, Washingtonians for Wildlife Conservation, Kent; Pete Lange, scrimshaw artist, Seattle; Tim Regan, owner Star Center Antique Mall, Snohomish; Dean Takko, representative, Democrat, chair of House Local Government Committee, Longview

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North Olympic Peninsula VOTER GUIDE

FOR THE ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 3, 2015

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Washington state

Advisory votes Advisory Vote No. 10

Advisory Vote No. 11

Advisory Vote No. 12

The legislature imposed, without a vote of the people, oil spill response and administration taxes to apply to crude oil or petroleum products transported by railroad, costing $17,000,000, for government spending.

The legislature imposed, without a vote of the people, the marijuana excise tax on medical marijuana sales, costing an amount that cannot currently be estimated, for government spending.

The legislature imposed, without a vote of the people, additional taxes on motor vehicle and special fuels costing an estimated $3,707,000,000 in the first ten years, for government spending.

This tax increase should be:

This tax increase should be:

This tax increase should be:

{ Repealed

{ Repealed

{ Repealed

{ Maintained

{ Maintained

{ Maintained

Advisory Vote No. 13 The legislature increased business and occupation tax revenues and excluded certain software manufacturers from a retail sales tax exemption, without a vote of the people, costing $1,449,000,000 for government spending. This tax increase should be: { Repealed { Maintained

Unopposed candidates in Nov. 3 election The following offices and candidates are unopposed on the Nov. 3 ballot. Unless facing write-in candidates (who must file to declare their write-in candidacy by Oct. 16), these candidates are automatically elected.

City of Port Angeles City Council, Position 6 Sissi Bruch City Council, Position 7 Cherie Kidd (Dan Bateham is on the ballot but has dropped out of the race.)

City of Sequim

Clallam County Hospital District 1 (Forks Community Hospital) Commissioner, District 3 Donald Lawley (Patty Birch filed as a write-in candidate but has dropped out of the race.)

Hospital District 2 (Olympic Medical Center) Commissioner, District 2 J. Thomas Oblak Commissioner, District 3 Jim Cammack Commissioner at large Jim Leskinovitch

City of Forks

City Council, Position 6 Ken Hays

Crescent School District Director, Position 3 Trisha Haggerty Director, Position 4 Susan Hopper

Cape Flattery School District Director, District 2 Gregory Colfax Director, District 4 Donald R. Baker Director, District 5 Tracey Rascon

Fire District No. 2 (unincorporated Port Angeles area)

City Council, Position 1 Juanita Weissenfels

Commissioner 2 David R. Whitney

City Council, Position 4 Kevin Hinchen

Fire District No. 4 (Joyce area) Commissioner 4 Donna Kay Buck

Fire District No. 5 (Clallam Bay-Sekiu area) Commissioner 2 Glen McDaniel

Fire District No. 6 (West End) Commissioner 1 Scott Horton Commissioner 3 Tom Rosmond

Parks and Recreation District No. 1 (Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center) Commissioner, Position 3 Melinda Griffith

Clallam and Jefferson counties Quillayute Valley School District Director, District 1 Val James Giles Director, District 3 Bill Rohde Director, District 5 Mike Reaves (Kathy Lawley is on the ballot but has dropped out of the race.)

Fire District No. 1 Commissioner 4

James Lew McGill Commissioner 5 Lowell P. McQuoid

Jefferson County City of Port Townsend City Council, Position 4 Robert Gray (Tobi McEnerney is on the ballot but has dropped out of the race.)

Queets/Clearwater School District Director at large, Position 3 David A. Atkinson Director at large, Position 4 Rowland G. Mason

Brinnon School District Director at large, Position 2 Ron Stephens Director at large, Position 3 Joe Baisch Director at large, Position 4 Bill Barnet

Quilcene School District Director at large, Position 4 Gena D. Lont

Chimacum School District Director, District 3 Maggie Ejde Director, District 4

Robert Bunker

Port Townsend School District 50 Director, District 3 Nathanael L. O’Hara Director, District 4 Laura Tucker Director, District 5 Keith White

Chimacum/Cape George Fire District No. 1 (East Jefferson Fire-Rescue) Commissioner, Position 2 Rich Stapf Jr.

Quilcene Fire District No. 2 Commissioner, Position 2 Melody M. Bacchus

Brinnon Fire District No. 4 Commissioner, Position 2 Ken McEdwards

Discovery Bay Fire District No. 5 Commissioner, Position 2 Ford Kessler

Brinnon Water District 2 Commissioner, Position 3 Wayne Schlaefli

Special Sections - North Olympic Peninsula Voter Guide, 2015 General  

i20151014105522784.pdf

Special Sections - North Olympic Peninsula Voter Guide, 2015 General  

i20151014105522784.pdf