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Candidates Forum

SEEN AT THE OKANOGAN

Oroville Chamber Hosts Candidates Forum Oct. 15 at Vicki’s Backdoor Club

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IT on the doorstep at North Valley Hospital District

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ics to get the specifics. It is taking a lot of man hours.” Fries said it costs the hospital a lot TONASKET - Payge Fries, Health of money to re-bill after a claim has Information Manager, reported on been denied, and it’s unknown upfront implementation of the new ICD-10 at if something will be reimbursed when the Oct. 8 North Valley Hospital Board it’s re-billed. She said additional employees are of Commissioners meeting. The ICD-10 is the tenth revision of the needed who have experience and trainInternational Statistical Classification of ing in billing and coding. “It’s not something that’s easily taught,” Diseases and Related Health Problems. ICD codes have been required for reim- said Fries, adding, “It’s pretty difficult bursement of Medicare and Medicaid right now, but we will get through it.” “Payge Fries has championed this claims since 1979. The ICD-9 had 13,000 project to prepare codes but the ICDour organization for 10 has around 68,000; this time of change providing greater “Doctors have been reimbursement,” said specificity in reportCEO Mike ing diagnoses. trained to take care of NVH Zwicker, adding that “The ninth revision patients first, and they the hospital might has been out since the effects of the 1970s, so there will have to transition to see decreased Days Cash are lots of changes taking care of the elec- on Hand over the and lots more codes,” few weeks due said Fries. “The govtronic records. We have next to the conversion. ernment mandated Chief Information to change from being it be put in place Officer Kelly Carriker by October, so we clinical to being techno- and Lori Sawyer, started a group back logical, because that is a former NVH RN in March to get it in works in Health place.” what we are being man- who Information now, According to the presented inforMedicaide.gov webdated to do.” mation on Quality site, one of the bigLori Sawyer , Former NVH RN Reports required by gest concerns in tranHealth Information Specialist Medicade. sitioning from the Sawyer said reports ICD-9 to the ICD-10 is there is no simple mapping or transla- are run weekly with statistics on meeting tion from one to the next; codes from the core objectives based on computer usage. “For example, we have to send a previous ICD don’t usually have one-toone correspondence, but often require certain percentage of prescriptions by one-to-many, many-to-one, many-to- computer or fax to pharmacies,” said Sawyer. Another example she gave was many or no correspondence at all. Fries said one diagnosis in ICD 9 now the requirement of more than 5 perhas two and a half pages of diagnosis in cent of patients to access their medical records by computer from their home or the ICD-10. “We have been working with coders to the hospital. “This one is hard with our demomake sure they are prepared, to prevent graphics; a lot of people don’t have comdenials of billings,” said Fries. Electronic tables and crosswalks have puters or internet, but we are reaching been published to help clinicians and the required percentage,” said Sawyer. The project, started five years ago, is physicians chose the correct codes, including general equivalence tables by currently in Stage 2. Carriker said once the National Center for Health Statistics. it reaches Stage 3, instead of 5 percent “But if they are not specific enough, it of patients accessing records online, 30 will go unspecified, which Medicare will percent would be required. deny,” said Fries. “We are going through each unspecified billing and calling clinBY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above, the Oroville Hornets celebrate last Friday night with the Victory Bell game trophy after several years of defeat at the hands of North County Rivals the Tonasket Tigers. The football game was not only the “bell” game, a rivalry which started several decades ago, but was also the Homecoming Game, as well as Senior Night. Left, Hornet Head Coach Tam Hutchinson was showered with Gatorade by his elated team following the Hornet’s victory.

SEE HEALTH INFO| PG A2

Oroville concerned County Health may close City passes recent federally required audit without any problem BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council was informed that Okanogan County Health may no longer do water sample testing and may even close. “We do a lot of testing in Wenatchee, things they can’t do, but there is talk that the whole department may close. That would be inconvenient,” said Rod Noel, Oroville’s superintendent of public works, at the council’s Tuesday, Oct. 6 meeting. “Not only that it would be inconvenient for the general public,” said Councilman Tony Koepke. Koepke was referring to the fact that Oroville often acts as a drop off for people, especially those living outside the city limits. County Health regularly stops by city hall to pick up both the city’s samples and those dropped off by others. “There can be ten to 12 other samples

waiting here,” said Karen Monroe, depu- service.” ty city clerk. The fees to those using the service are Mayor Chuck Spieth said he thought going up by $4.00. there should be a response to the fact the “It seems like a lot to me and it seems county wasn’t going to do water sampling they will be making a lot more money any more. than we are getting,” said Councilman “I think we should respond, either Ed Naillon. individually or as a city,” said Spieth. Noel said he figured it would balance They also asked out if the city raises the Councilwoman Neysa park fee and the oneRoley, the city’s repretime yearly fee charged “I think we should sentative to the Public by Camis is dropped. Health Board, to relay Clyde Andrews, respond, either indithe city’s concerns to Oroville Chamber of vidually or as a city” Commerce President the county commisChuck Spieth, Mayor sioners and manager of the City of Oroville There was more Camaray Motel sugdiscussion about gested the city conthe increase in fees sult him about future being charged to the city next year for changes. online reservation services for Oroville’s “The service I’m talking about was one Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park. I’ve used and they seemed very reason“Basically the contract from Camis able and reasonably priced,” he said. is the same other than the fee increase. The city also passed a recent audit with However, the one time yearly charge flying colors. The audit was brought on will go away,” said Noel. “We have been by the Central and Cherry Street projects working with them continuously as well and the airport improvement project. as looking for an alternative. We pretty When a city uses more than $300,000 in much have to go with them again for federal funds the audit is automatically another year while we look for another triggered.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 42

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Rod Noel accepts a certificate of appreciation for 30 years of service to the City of Oroville from Mayor Chuck Spieth. Noel serves as the Superintendent of Public Works, as well as the fire chief. Two of the candidates for Oroville City Council, David “Mac” McElheran and Richard Fuchs introduced themselves. McElheran works for the U.S. Border Patrol and moved here eight years ago. He is running for the position being

INSIDE THIS EDITION

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vacated by Councilman Naillon. Fuchs works for Hughes Department Store and moved to Oroville 15 years ago. Both will be at a candidates forum planned for Thursday, Oct. 15 at Vicki’s Backdoor Club.

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Sports, Schools

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PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015

NEWS YEARLY YOUTH BOOST

HEALTH INFO | FROM A1

Gary De Von/staff photo

The Oroville Booster Club held their yearly Live and Silent Auctions last Saturday night at the American Legion Hall. Auctioneer Ken Neal said they had a lively crowd and the auction raised over $9,000 ($844 silent and $8,298 live). In addition, there were two new lifetime memberships to the Booster Club sold. Money raised at this and the annual dinner auction, this year to be held at the Pastime Bar & Grill in November, goes to support youth activities, both athletic and academic, among Oroville’s youth. Items for the annual auction are donated by local community members and businesses, as well as gathering items from around the state. This year’s auction chairperson was Dick Garner, Cedar Young was recorder; Kim Scott, Tammy Field and Dalene Nigg worked the Bidder’s Table and the hostesses, showing off the items up for bids were Jaden Taber, Mary Marchand, Bridget Acord and Lindsay Acord.

“Patients will have to be able to transmit information from home back to the clinic or ER such as blood pressure checks or weight loss as measured from home,” said Carriker, adding that he expected Stage 3 to be required in 2017 or 2018. Sawyer said another example was immunizations. “It will be like a bank of information that will be available as we proceed in technology.” “No matter where you go, your medical record will follow you. That is the goal of Stage 3,” said Carriker. “Everything you do will be electronic, so it forces people to at least get an email address,” added Sawyer. Attorney Mick Howe asked if the requirements would eventually be at 100 percent. “Yes, they are moving the bar up, but giving us a little bit of time to get there,” said Carriker. “Healthcare IT (information technology) is really in its infancy stage.” “Doctors have been trained to take care of patients first, and they will have to transition to taking care of the electronic records,” said Sawyer. “We have to change from being clinical to being technological, because that is what we are being mandated to do.” Larsen asked if the process was expensive, and Carriker replied in

Victims Relief Fund offers help for those affected by fire BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN COUNTY – A fund has been set up to help victims of this summer’s Okanogan Complex Fire by paying one month’s mortgage or rent, according to Rocky DeVon, a director for the North Central Washington Association of Realtors. DeVon said the disaster relief fund is through the national and state Association of Realtors. A similar fund last year raised

$179,000 for victims of the Carlton Complex Fire. “For the Carlton fire we asked if there was anything we could do for people who lost their homes. We looked around and found the National Relief Fund,” said DeVon, who owns RE/MAX Lake and Country in Oroville. He says the same thing is being done this year and there is currently $85,000 in the fund. “There have been some applications, but we know there were 189 homes lost and we don’t have

nearly that many applications. We can pay one month’s mortgage or rent up to $850,” he said, adding, “So many people have been displaced it’s been hard to reach them. We are trying to get ahold of people who need our help through ads, the press and Facebook.” Applications are available at Baines Title Company, an affiliate of the Realtor association. They are also available at RE/MAX in Oroville, as well as the Riverside Store and Dave’s Gun and Pawn

in Riverside and the Junction and the Tonasket School District in Tonasket. In addition, people can call DeVon at 509-476-4444 or email him at rdevon@remax.net or call the NCW Association of Realtors at 509-663-1211. DeVon said the fund has already started cutting checks for the applicants who have applied. He hopes to see more of the fire victims get some relief by having some of the burden of paying the mortgage on homes that were lost or damaged.

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on expectations of NVH’s services and where opportunities exist for NVH to provide enhanced healthcare needs back to the community. In new business, Tina Smith, a board member and RN at NVH, presented information on a product for staff education called Lippincott Professional Development. “Any staff member can use it; it has a lot of nurse education, but also lots of information for the entire facility,” said Smith. She said it contained trainings required of staff members, who could get certification of education right from the website. Smith said the course catalog included management training, nurse training, core measures, crisis intervention and legal aspects of documentation. Smith said the product costs about $5,100 per year. She will present information on similar products at the next meeting. The next board meeting, scheduled for 7 p.m. Oct, 29, will include the public hearing on the 2016 budget.

VOTE McElheran for

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DON KING ~ Benefit Roast ~ November 14, 2015 at Oroville Eagles

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Tonasket Senior Citizens Center 22 W 5th St Tonasket, WA 98855 Wednesday, 10/21 at 12:30 p.m.

the affirmative. “Right now we are setting up the modules, and spending hours and hours on it. All those hours are on us. We get reimbursed for the hardware and software we implement. Right now we get the carrot if we get the stuff in place in time; otherwise we get the stick and get penalized on our reimbursement if it’s not done in time.” “Without team work, you can’t do this,” said Sawyer. “Everybody is together, playing in the same sandbox.” Carriker said the process was started five years ago. In other hospital news, Zwicker said recent community and employee forums sponsored by WSHA (Workplace Safety and Health Act) were well-attended, and he would present information after it was compiled as it would “be a strong part of the strategic planning that is coming up.” A presentation was made on current issues facing critical access hospitals, reimbursement challenges, and the future of healthcare. The forums included the community and employees being given the opportunity to provide feedback

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Health Alliance Medicare is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Health Alliance Medicare depends on contract renewal. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, co-payments and restrictions may apply. Benefits and co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. The pharmacy and provider networks may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. Health Alliance Medicare’s pharmacy network offers limited access to pharmacies with preferred cost sharing in rural, urban and suburban Washington. The lower costs advertised in our plan materials for these pharmacies may not be available at the pharmacy you use. For up-to-date information about our network pharmacies, including pharmacies with preferred cost sharing, please call 1-877-561-1463 or consult the online pharmacy directory at HealthAllianceMedicare.org. This information is available for free in other languages. Please call our customer service number at 1-877-561-1463 (TTY: 711), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily from October 1 to February 14 and weekdays the rest of the year. Esta información está disponible sin cargo en otros idiomas. Para obtener información adicional, llamar a nuestro número de servicio al cliente al 1-877-561-1463 (TTY: 711). Nuestro horario es de 8 a.m. a 8 p.m., los 7 días de la semana, 1 de octubre a 14 de febrero, y lunes a viernes el resto del año. *You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. **Other pharmacies are available in our network. †A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-561-1463 (TTY: 711). H3471_16_37986 Accepted

Don was diagnosed with cancer this past March and started chemo and radiation the middle of May and completed treatment the end of June. The better news is he’s been cleared of cancer for the time being and we hope that ugly evilness does not show its wicked head. The Oroville Fire Department will be doing the cooking and doors will be open at 4 pm, and dinner will start at 4:30. We are also seeking donations for auction items. The auction will start @ 6 pm and the Roast will begin shortly after the auction is complete. The rules for the Roast are as follows: 1. Anyone donation $50 will have a 4-8 minute time limit to Roast Don. 2. No filters, anything goes! 3. We are also setting up a Skype call in number for anyone who cannot make the Benefit Roast and would like to participate in giving him a bad time. All donations can be dropped off at Joey Kings.

Oroville Contact: Annette Rounds at 509-560-0351

Any and all questions can be directed to me, either via email, Martin_Rosale@Hotmail.com or by cell, 206.391.5551 We will be selling pre-sale tickets at a location in town TBD and also through an Events online online pre-sale tickets https://www.eventbrite.com/invite-friends?eid=19052290915


OCTOBER 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN FAMILY FAIRE

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Strong winds and threats of rain showers didn’t dampen the festive atmosphere of the 42nd Annual Family Fun Faire, where vendors lined straw streets that offered local as well as exotic wares.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

John Jones accompanies Reed Engel singing, with Quill Hyde on bass and Tim Alley on drums during Hippies on Vacation’s Saturday afternoon set on the Solar Stage.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Seattle singer/songwriter Olivia de la Cruz models a Mohawk headress she created from peacock, turkey, pheasant and rooster feathers. Cruz just released a new single, ‘Still Standing,’ to benefit Carlton Complex survivors.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Harmony of Primitive Skills helps Jamaali from Montana make leather sandals from a buffalo hide. Harmony said she likes bridging cultures by showing people how to utilize skins she gathered from Native Americans near Yellowstone National Park.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

There’s more than one way to get relaxed at Barter Faire. Taryn Loomis of Alaska massages Scott Shinall of North Bend. Loomis is in the Okanogan on her way to visit her mother in Olympia, and Shinall is here to purchase land on Tunk Mountain.

Megan Bennett dances with her seven-month old son, Phoenix, to Indian Mike singing ‘Louisiana Saturday Night’ during Saturday afternoon’s set on the Main Stage.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Kevin Eugene Ingalls, 50, Burien, pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to firstdegree criminal trespassing, harassment, second-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree malicious mischief. Ingalls was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $500. The crimes occurred May 25 near Tonasket. Tommy Eugene Moore, 49, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to POCS (heroin), resisting arrest and use of drug paraphernalia. Moore was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 75 days suspended, and fined $1,610.50 for the Sept. 26 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Cara Ann Campbell, 28, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 29. The court found probable cause to charge Anthony Robert Jolly, 37, Tonasket, with tampering with a witness (DV) and intimidating a witness (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred between June 1 and Sept. 28. The court found probable cause to charge Harriet LaFawn Abrahamson, 31, Omak, with POCS (marijuana) (with intent) and POCS (marijuana). The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 28. Juvenile A 12-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to MIP/C. The girl was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for three days served. The crime occurred Oct. 4. Civil The state Employment Security Department assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits, penalties and interest: Adam Kohanes, no middle name listed, Omak, $239.70; John T. Snell, Omak, $1,787.04; Devon A. Porteous, Omak, $1,982.07; Johannes R. Lapin. Okanogan, $2,687.09; Byron J. Phillips, Okanogan, $1,571.78; Tracy Wilson, no middle name listed, Omak, $4,230.32; Gregory Noel, no middle name listed, Oroville, $245.17; Alicia Hanson, no middle name listed, Oroville, $420.12; Wayne Donar, no middle name listed, Omak, $278.10; Brandon Brenner, no middle name listed, Omak, $317.10; and James Gard, no middle name listed, Omak, $363.58. The state Department of Revenue assessed Neal’s Auto Body & Glass, Oroville, $4,171.62 in unpaid taxes, penalties and interest. The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and interest: Sapp Inc., Okanogan, $1,562.40; and Omak Bar & Grill, Omak, $2,940.40. DISTRICT COURT Gordon Joseph Harry Jr., 50, Omak, guilty of seconddegree criminal trespassing. Harry was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 83 days suspended, and fined $408. Jonathan Eggert Hawkes, 42, Oroville, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Hawkes was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 81 days suspended, and fined $858.

Jose Hernandez Martinez, 52, Oroville, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Hernandez Martinez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $818. Brandon Matthew Herz, 28, Omak, guilty of seconddegree criminal trespassing. Herz was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 70 days suspended, and fined $408. Jerrold Ronald Hutchins, 63, Oroville, guilty of two counts of DUI and one count of hitand-run (attended vehicle). Hutchins was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 289 days suspended, and fined a total of $3,495. William Jack Louis Jobes, 34, Omak, had two charges dismissed: DUI and seconddegree DWLS. Jobes was fined $1,425. Dale Robert Johnson, 37, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Shyanna Kristine Lanni, 28, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Lanni was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $768. Charmayne Lazard, no middle name listed, 30, Omak, had a first-degree criminal trespassing charge dismissed. Albaro Lopez, no middle name listed, 30, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. The court dismissed an additional third-degree DWLS charge. Lopez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,208. Michael Jay Lynch, 55, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Lynch was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Donald K. Maloney, 64, Riverside, had a second-degree criminal trespassing charge dismissed. Maloney was fined $400. Gale Celeste McMillan, 48, Omak, guilty of obstruction. McMillian had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. She was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $933.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 Warrant arrest N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Threats on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Harassment on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Threats on Mill Dr. in Omak. Laura Ballard, no middle name listed, 53, booked for firstdegree ID theft, seconddegree theft and two counts of third-degree theft. Teresa Mae Tindoll, 47, booked for POCS. Michael Leroy Donner, 26, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Harriet LaFawn Abrahamson, 31, booked on three FTA warrants, all for POCS. Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 Harassment on Cobey Trail Rd. near Tonasket.

Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Illegal burning on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Glover Lane near Okanogan. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Assault on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fire on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Wildwood Dr. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Omache Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Structure fire on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Birch St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Dayton St. in Omak. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Kay St. in Oroville. Burglary on 12th Ave. in Oroville. George Scott Smith, 42, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Santana Jesus Price, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Nichole Briae Porras Martin, 25, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for hit-and-run (attended vehicle). Matthew James Blackledge, 50, booked for violation of a nocontact order. Janice Kimberly Johnson, 29, court commitments for thirddegree theft and two counts each of second-degree theft and second-degree vehicle prowl.

Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015 Theft on Fiker Rd. near Omak. Tire changer reported missing. DWLS on Frosty Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Recovered vehicle on Hanford St. in Omak. DWLS on Fir St. in Oroville. Burglary on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Oak St. in Omak. Drugs on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Shumway Rd. near Omak. TMVWOP on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Deep Bay Rd. in Oroville. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree theft and a DOC detainer. Wesley Paul Wirth, 38, DOC detainer. Brian Kristopher Boyd, 34, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: third-degree DWLS and first-degree negligent driving. Alex G. Martinez Oros, 22, booked for DUI. Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015 Abandoned vehicle on S. State Frontage Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Illegal burning at M-Bar-J Trailer Court in Okanogan. Burglary on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Automobile theft on Vista Vue Dr. near Omak.

Burglary on Vista Vue Dr. near Omak. Illegal fireworks on Lone Pine Lane near Tonasket. Drugs on W. Sixth St. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Window reported smashed. Illegal burning on Ellisforde Bridge Rd. near Ellisforde. Littering on Omache Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on S. Granite St. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Custodial interference on 17th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Littering on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. David Sanchez Hernandez, 23, court commitment for thirddegree theft. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 22, DOC detainer. Brandon Matthew Herz, 28, DOC hold.

Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 Trespassing on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Littering on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Burglary alarm on Engh Rd. in Omak. DUI on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Threats on Linden St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Weapons offense on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Harassment on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on W. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Alcohol offense on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. DWLS on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Public intoxication on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Michael Anthony McClure, 38, booked for possession of a stolen vehicle. Kurtis Bishop, no middle name listed, 28, booked on a DOC detainer, attempting to elude, three counts of seconddegree possession of stolen property, one count each of third-degree DWLS, POCS (methamphetamine), theft of a motor vehicle, two counts of second-degree burglary, two counts of second-degree theft, and one count each of unlawful possession of a firearm, carrying a concealed pistol without a permit and resisting arrest.

James Dale Watkins, 53, booked for third-degree DWLS. Shelley Sue Zwieg, 48, booked for DUI and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Jorge Cervantes Gonzales, 27, court commitment for DUI.

Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 DUI on Hild Lane near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Burglary on N. Fork Salmon Creek Rd. near Conconully. Motorcycle crash on Danker Cutoff Rd. near Okanogan. Injuries reported. Automobile theft on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Assault on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Trespassing on Cow Camp Rd. near Oroville. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Columbia St. in Omak. Abandoned vehicle on N. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Assault on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Fire on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Harassment on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Gregory Charles Maynard, 62, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Harold Richard Michels, 60, booked for DUI. Dona Castillo Reed, 51, court commitments for thirddegree assault and obstruction. Boris Ali Sanchez Hernandez, 22, booked for DUI. Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015 Warrant arrest on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Custodial interference on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Burglary on Fiker Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Elmway in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Hit-and-run crash on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Stolen property on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Two reports of theft on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket.

Trespassing on Senna St. in Omak. Alcohol offense on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Hanford St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Birch St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Hart Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Trespassing on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Assault on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Amy Elizabeth Tatshama, 31, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for DUI. Justin William Nanpuya, 39, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Edgar Alonso Llamas Ramirez, 27, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Kelly Paul Greene, 37, DOC detainer. Randy Benjamin Lepire, 25, booked on two counts of possession of stolen property, second-degree vehicle prowl, an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for third-degree theft, and four OCSO FTA warrants: residential burglary, second-degree theft, firstdegree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree malicious mischief. Margaret Lenore Ferris LaCamp, 59, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Perry Steven Moore, 51, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for seconddegree criminal trespassing.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Allow states, not federal bureaucrats, to set clean water guidelines OPINION BY REP. DAN NEWHOUSE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 4TH DISTRICT-WASHINGTON

In the latest in a string of attempts to impose bureaucratic federal control over Washington state waters, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is threatening to impose its own rules on the state. Despite the fact that the state’s proposal already meets required federal guidance, EPA has issued such as threat. EPA needs to take a step back and follow their own guidelines rather than interfering with states’ authority under the law. Under the Clean Water Act (CWA), individual states have significant authority and the responsibility to establish state water quality standards as long as they follow certain federal criteria. Earlier Rep. Dan Newhouse this year, the Washington Department of Ecology drafted a proposal that would comply with updated CWA requirements. The standards to reduce cancer risks and protect human health were rigorous, while at the same time they were arrived at with input from businesses and municipalities in the state. Washington’s proposal included a Fish Consumption Rate (FCR) and Cancer Risk Level that were even more stringent than required by EPA, but the Agency still criticized the state’s proposed standards, making clear they would be rejected. Then EPA released its own revised proposed rule on September 2 of this year. After the EPA moved the goal post, the Department of Ecology responded by withdrawing its own proposal from consideration earlier this summer. The EPA is now threatening to force burdensome federal water quality regulations on the state unless Washington complies with costly and arbitrary new standards. As a result of similar EPA pressure, Oregon was the first state in the Pacific Northwest to adopt EPA’s preferred standards. A 2013 study showed that if Oregon’s standards were applied in Washington, even with the most advanced technology available, facilities would not be able to meet the resulting CWA permit limits – and would potentially cost billions of dollars – all with negligible health benefits. This is not the first time EPA has tried a water power grab at the expense of states and localities. Earlier this year, the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers proposed a new Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule that would expand the federal government’s authority over waters that have a “significant nexus” with a navigable body of water, which includes streams, ditches, and ponds. The proposed rule would increase the regulatory burden and uncertainty for farmers, ranchers, localities, and small businesses. I supported legislation in the House to force the EPA to withdraw its rule. And just last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit blocked enforcement of the new WOTUS regulation across the nation. Last week, I urged the EPA to respect federal guidelines, and our state’s rights by allowing the State of Washington to complete its work developing protective and achievable water quality standards under the CWA. The EPA should follow its own guidelines and withdraw the proposed federal rule. This Administration continues its bad habit of imposing burdensome and costly regulations. The EPA must respect states’ authority and jurisdiction over their own waters and clean water standards.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR End Narcoterrorism Oroville needs a retail marijuana outlet

Dear Editor, Now that recreational alcohol is regulated by the same authority that controls recreational cannabis, Oroville would be a suitable location for a Liquor Control Board authorized retail outlet for State approved cannabis products. Such a commercial enterprise would generate 4 significant local and national benefits. The first two benefits are local. 1) A new retail outlet produces new revenue streams for the city and all the local enterprises providing goods and services that every brick and mortar operation require. 2) A local retail outlet provides tourists with a convenience and opportunity to make sure they’ve got all of their vacation needs once they get to town. The third benefit is to all law enforcement. The availability of a local, market driven retail outlet, reduces the probability that cannabis consumers will support or protect cocaine or heroin dealers who look to profit where legal commercial enterprises have yet to be established. There is little doubt that in the absence of taxed certified retail outlets, criminal elements, especially those with narcoterrorist ties, will attempt to thwart the Liquor Control Board and distribute uninspected, un-sanctioned, and un-taxed product. Very much related to the third benefit is the fourth: Every Washington State commercial outlet contributes to the destruction of the power of narcoterrorists the Mexican Government doesn’t seem to be able to challenge. An article about the first year of recreational cannabis sales reported that consumers spent $234 million. If everything stays the same, if nothing at all changes; in four years Washington State consumers will have kept a billion dollars from getting into the hands of Mexican narcoterrorists or their cohorts in this country. If this scenario is repeated in Colorado, Oregon, Arizona, and everywhere else in the country, imagine the billions kept out of the hands of the evil-doers who would do us harm. God Bless America. Richard Gideon Oroville

Bad Planning County Commissioners doing a disservice

Dear Editor, The 2014 and 2015 wildfires should be a wake-up call for our Okanogan County Commissioners. Under the direction of Planning Director Perry Huston, they are now finalizing the Interim Zoning Ordinance and map (found on county website under Planning) for adoption in December. Most of the county will be zoned either “rural” high density, one acre, or low density, five acres. Many of the areas heavily damaged by the fires – the Aeneas and Tunk valleys, the Chiliwist, the Lime Belt, Pine Creek, Salmon Creek, Johnson Creek, the lower Methow, etc. are heavily zoned as high density. They lack adequate water for this type of development, let alone for fighting wildfires. By endorsing and even encouraging development in areas obviously unsuited to it, the commissioners are doing the county residents a great disservice. Much of this land is agricultural and is currently taxed as Ag Open Space– 20 acres and up. Why not keep it that way? Ranchers have complained that protecting structures has meant less resources for saving the land, and as a result thousands of acres of pasture have needlessly burned. Yet the urge to favor the real estate and development interests trumps a realistic appraisal of what the land can really handle. The commissioners need to face reality.

Overlay the fire and zoning maps and see how inappropriate your zoning plan is. Better yet, drive over the fire areas with zoning map in hand and see for yourselves how ludicrous it is to parcel out the county in the manner you have. Jessica McNamara Tonasket

No gun control More security at schools, not more gun laws

Dear Editor, I believe that the lack of security is the problem when it comes to school shootings. I think that after the Columbine shooting in Denver in 1999, 16 years ago, would have woken up all other schools in America with better security policies, Common Sense. I would like the superintendants to check into a security systems like they have at the ball games, like the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL, Pac 10 Basketball and College Football, even the PGA... I have not heard of any shootings at any of these events. Seriously, start upgrading the security systems in the schools. Start there first, because after all your public institution should be liable for security and the well being of who is enrolled there and works there. Here are just some of the other statistics of deaths. Got these statistics online: Annual United States Road Crash Statistics • Over 37,000 people die in road crashes each year • An additional 2.35 million are injured or disabled • Over 1,600 children under 15 years of age die each year • Nearly 8,000 people are killed in crashes involving drivers age 16-20 Gun control supporters have been pedalto-the-metal on the subject over time. The Violence Policy Center compared gun-related and vehicle accident deaths in 2011. Michael Bloomberg’s news machine did so in 2012. Mother Jones, the publication once edited by Michael Moore, if that tells you anything, did so in 2013. Last year, the Center for American Progress asserted that “gun deaths are on track to surpass motor vehicle traffic deaths for [people under age 25].” And this year, the ideologically comparable Atlantic repeated that assertion in a hit piece that referred to guns as “America’s Top Killing Machine.” AWR Hawkins reports, “[t]he Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) final report on death statistics for 2013 shows there were 35,369 deaths from motor vehicle accidents versus 505 deaths from the accidental discharge of firearms. . . . Americans are 70 times more likely to die in a vehicle accident than by the accidental discharge of a firearm.” Just as lacking in resonance is the antigunners’ theory that government regulation reduced deaths involving vehicles, so the same ought to be true for those involving firearms. From 1981 through 2013 (the first and last year of data reported by the federal government), deaths due to accidents involving “unregulated” firearms decreased 73 percent, while those due to accidents involving highly-regulated motor vehicles decreased only 31 percent. And, two-thirds of the decline in motor vehicle accident deaths has occurred during the last six years, a half-century after Congress imposed the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act, authorizing the federal government to dictate how cars should be manufactured and roads should be constructed. What’s really resonating with the American people, is that gun control supporters—are wrong about handguns, wrong about the Second Amendment, wrong about Right-toCarry, wrong about semi-automatic rifles, wrong about ammunition magazines, wrong about ammunition, and the list goes on-they aren’t hitting on all cylinders. The only way that the number of gunrelated deaths compares to the number of vehicle accident deaths, is if vehicle accident

deaths are compared to the grand total of suicides, murders, defensive homicides by private citizens, legal intervention homicides by law enforcement officers, and the relatively smaller number of firearm accident deaths. And that math is as slippery as a garage floor mopped with 10W-30. One last tid bit that Gun Control Supporters forget about is, in the USA, where nearly half of pregnancies are unintended and four in 10 of these are terminated by abortion [1] , there are over 3,000 abortions per day. Twentytwo percent of all pregnancies in the USA (excluding miscarriages) end in abortion. There where no guns involved here. All injury deaths • Number of deaths: 192,945 • Deaths per 100,000 population: 60.2 All poisoning deaths • Number of deaths: 48,545 • Deaths per 100,000 population: 15.4 Motor vehicle traffic deaths • Number of deaths: 33,804 • Deaths per 100,000 population: 10.7 All firearm deaths • Number of deaths: 33,636 • Deaths per 100,000 population: 10.6 Mortality: Drug poisoning deaths • Deaths per 100,000 population: 13.9 (2013) I believe that, if they don’t put in better security systems in the schools they need to be closed. I’m sure there is already codes out there that the legislatures have passed and these public schools could be fined for not complying with a safe and secure environment for our children and the people that work there, after all they are public institutions that are regulated by government. Debbie Lorz Tonasket

Really? More Gun Control?

Dear Editor, The recent shootings at a school and on college campuses exposes the falacy of “gun free zones” being safety zones. The mentally ill shooters who target these zones are not stupid. They carefully pick their targets and go where they can create the most havoc and have virtually no resistance. They are not concerned with gun laws or restrictions, so more “gun control” is not going to hinder their plans at all. If we are looking to stop these senseless acts of violence we should look at the people behind the guns. Most have histories of mental illness and many have even boasted of their plans on social media sites prior to actually committing the crimes. There should be at least one person on campus who can and will defend the helpless with lethal force if required. Living in a rural area, my right to own a gun is an important personal safety factor. Calling 911 here will get the police to the scene of the crime in time to do cleanup, but not in time to defend me from an intruder or from a criminal attack. My home is not a “gun free zone” and I do not plan on being a helpless victim. Chrystal Perrow Winthrop

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PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Happy Thanksgiving to our Canadian friends Can you believe half of October is gone? Columbus Day for some and Canadian Thanksgiving for others, and so it goes. The brilliant fall colors are truly showing up, but I don’t believe there has been any frost in the valley, yet. There is a tree at the apartment buildings to the north of our house that is just gorgeous red. Football games have started and so have the scandals in the big leagues. Whatever happened to common sense? Word has been received of the death of Hazeletta Jones, who was raised here and graduated in the class of ‘51. Her mom, Hazel, affectionately known as “Jonsey” in our town, was babysitter to many, and was always happy when Hazeletta would come for a visit and bring her babies. I received a call announcing that the first serving of hamburgers, at the

Lucky to have such great volunteers

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our Sidewalk Sale and Pancake Breakfast is over. We had a lot of fun. Give us a month to recuperate and we can do it all over again. Can you believe it. We had 18 volunteers, 56 plus eaters and myriads of shoppers. Thanks to you all. A special thanks goes to Doris Hughes, who is such a generous giver of her time. Her “Farmer’s Market” earned, as of Sept. 30, $680 towards our costs of utilities, facilities maintenance and miscellaneous expenses. Thank you Doris. This, and our other fundraising efforts, have allowed us to end these recent months in a positive financial position. There are those who quietly give of their time, and efforts, and are easily overlooked. Please recognize, and be thankful for

American Legion, will be Oct. 21, serving time 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. with the same crew as before, with the “M & M’s” in charge. The annual Community Bazaar, now sponsored by the Future Business Leaders of America, will be held Nov. 20 and 21. To reserve a table call Susan Smith, 509-476-2427 and the price is $20. The event will be held in the grade school gym, as always. The Oroville Free Methodist Church had a work day, rebuilding fence for Albert Wilson, that was lost during the recent fires. Small communities and churches do that sort of thing, you know. Our two friends, Myrtle Wood and Jeannie Forney Robison, are both recovering nicely from hip replacements. A memorial for Anna Munds, mother of Wilma Colburn, was held last week end at the United Methodist Church.

Earl, who volunteers, helping in the kitchen, and also Ethel, who keeps our table decorations up to date. As of the end of September we have 147 members. Go, Marge Finley, our membership Chairwoman, and all you others who have encouraged new members. Any Senior who wants to become a member, see Marge Finley. The Membership fee is $10. Jan Harper, our Bingo Chair, is doing a great job. Our numbers are up, and we now have new bingo equipment. Our Bingo schedule is Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m., after lunch. Exciting! Oh, in your bingoing excitement, please be mindful of those lingering lunchers. The space is rented ‘til 1 p.m. by OCTN and one of its primary purposes, other than

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, October 4 – 11, 1940: Young men between the gates of 21 and 35 are now required to register for the draft for military service beginning October 16, 1940. A total of 34 questions will be asked, which will be looking into your background, experience, branch of service, to see what qualifications you have. The County Auditors, in the State of Washington, are requested to supervise the voluntary service of patriotic women in each voting precinct to Act as registrars in taking the registrations of men who come within the age limits of the Selective Service Act, special registrars to visit and register the sick in their homes and hospitals and to distribute forms and supplies and collect the registration cards at the end of the registration period. A. E. Ruthrauff, Deputy Collector of Customs at Molson for the past several months, has been transferred to the station at Blaine, where he expects to take up his duties on Oct. 1. The following list of polling places in this county at which men may register for the draft: Chesaw, Hotel Horning; Ellisford, Earl Fruit Co.; Havillah, Community Hall; Kipling, school house; Loomis I.O.O.F. Hall; Molson, I.O.O.F. Hall; Nighthawk, Nighthawk Hotel; Oroville No. 1, Bartell Building and Oroville No. 2, City Hall. A shipment of extensive laboratory equipment for the Chemistry Class has arrived representing an expenditure of two hundred and fifty dollars. It consists of various flasks, tubes and other complicated metal and glass ware. Tentative County Current Expense Budgets for the year 1941 were set at $138,488.15 at a public hearing held Monday held at the County Commissioners room at the courthouse. No one was present to discuss the budget with the commissioners.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: October 7 -14, 1965: The Oroville Hornets dropped their second game in row Friday, this time to the Chelan Goats, which resulted in a fall in the League standings. The Hornets will travel to Okanogan to face the Bulldogs on their own field Friday evening. State Land Commissioner, Bert Cole, said this week that he has reached an agreement with the Communications Satellite Corporation, (COMSAT) for the rental of some 800 acres of state-owned land for a $6,000,000 project near Brewster. COMSAT will build a global communications system in the Okanogan County area. This week’s pictures of small children under the title of “Citizens of Tomorrow.” Included among them are: Lanny, age 10 and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Morgan; Gordon, 4-years-old and the son of Mr. & Mrs. Roy R. Cockle; Joyce, 3-year-old daughter of

as well as relative. Cousins are many, best friends are few. What a rare delight to have had both in you. We were delighted to receive a phone call last Sunday, from the Boston area, where our Marco Louback, exchange student from long ago lives. He is like the son we never had and since the economy is so bad in Brazil, he and his wife and three sons have finally decided to make America their home and have all their legal papers, finally (not that the economy is so great here, but better than Brazil, at this time). A lot of disappointed patrons last Sunday, when they found America’s closed. An emergency of some sort. We truly could use another restaurant in our little berg! Eva’s was doing double time trying to keep up. Pinochle playing began last Monday night at Molson Grange. If you need something entertaining to do on Monday night, take some snacks to share and head out to Molson and meet old friends or make new ones. Starts at 7 p.m. Be sure and watch for deer while traveling. ‘Til next week.

What a lot of thought Wilma had put for treats. In Missouri we always had lots into the occasion and each person of molasses and she used that for the attending was given a crocheted or knit- syrup Dad grew cane for the cattle feed and we had a molasses makted hat Anna had made, keeping day, when the cane was ing her hands busy, making ready. Grandpa Kensinger was warm winter hats for children the official tender of the huge and adults. vat and was brought to our On these cool evenings place on the designated day some kind of soup is a good to do the honors. A fire was choice and don’t forget how built under the vat, which had simple it is to make a grilled a stirrer in it and hitching up cheese sandwich to accomone of the mules and it walked pany the soup. in a circle around the vat, Thanks to a friend we’ve crushing the juices from the been enjoying Asian pears. I’d forgotten how juicy and THIS & THAT cane stalks, where it cooked Joyce Emry until grandpa deemed it ready crunchy they are. to package. Another of the Has been nice to have some traditions that our grandchilrain to settle the dust a bit. Of course it doesn’t help for the dust that has dren roll their eyes at. I heard it said that this the most popualready attached itself to the furniture. So, Halloween is near. So it’s time to lar Halloween costume this year is the buy some extra “goodies” for the little “Trumpkin.” A phone call from Nebraska brought trick or treaters. I always try and buy something that I like, just in case there sad news for Clayton, telling of the death is some left over. Remember candy corn? of a cousin, Arnold Emry, who was also a I used to really like it but that must have cousin to Gordon Roberts. Arnold, was a retired professor from Wayne University been before I discovered chocolate. My mom used to make popcorn balls in Wayne, Nebraska and a special friend

providing meals, is to provide a much needed place for Seniors to congregate, converse, make new friends, and have fun. Tillie Porter announced that she is firing up the Computer Classes, again. I’ll keep you posted. Our power bills are going up again, in November. That’s just in time for the winter heating season. Figures. That gives reason for one and all to come on down to our Senior Center. Carb up. Enjoy the warmth and the fellowship. The menu for next week is: Tuesday, half a ham and cheese sandwich and corn chowder; Thursday, broccoli chicken bake; Friday, beef stew. For Seniors age 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. Can you believe its the middle of October already? Is time speeding up, or is it just me? Pinochle: Door Prize, Ted Paris; High Man, Ken Ripley; High Woman, Beverly Holden.

Mr. & Mrs. Bud Henneman; Lisa Susan, 2-year-old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ecklor and Kelly Kay, 1-year-old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. James Sterling. Contractors for the Hofert Tree Co. of Seattle, are busy this week cutting Christmas trees on the Pickering ranch. The final 1966 Current Expense Budget for Okanogan County was approved by the commissioners on Monday, Oct. 11. Total expenditures were in the amount of $413,671.04 and total income was estimated to be $396,519.49 which indicates a deficit of $17,151.55. The Oroville Hornets will meet the Republic Tigers for the second time this year on Ben Prince Field. The Hornets, with a resounding win over Okanogan last week with a score of 27 – 0. Grocery Prices: Giant size Hershey Bars, 3 for $1.00; Tomato Soup, 10 cans, $.98; Oyster Stew, 10 oz tins, 3 for $.89; Chuck Steaks, $.59 per lb.; Sirloin Tip Steak, $.89 per lb.; 12 oz pkg Chocolate Chips, 3 for $1.00; Carnation canned milk, 7 for $1.00; Seedless medium size grape fruits, 10 for $1.00. Weather Wise by Marge Frazier, official observer: Sept. 6th, 77 degrees maximum and 54 degrees, minimum; Sept. 7th, 72 and 45; Sept. 8th, 79 and 37; Sept. 9th, 74 and 51; Sept. 10th, 64 and 38; Sept. 11th 66 and 29 and Sept. 12th, 58 and 36. No precipitation for the period.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: October 4 - 11, 1990: Builders of the Hillside Park Senior Apartments are predicting that the 30 unit complex will be finished by mid October. Local residents have rented the majority of the fourteen apartments already spoken for, according to Geneva Reeder, the on-site manager. As part of its ongoing effort to upgraded the Tonasket Airport, the city, with the aid of the state will begin installing a $16,000 lighting system for the facility. Included in the new lighting will be illumination of the runway, a rotating beacon, threshold and approach lights as well as distance to go markers. The City of Tonasket received a grant the Aeronautics Division of the Dept. of Transportation and the City of Tonasket will contribute the remaining $2,600. The Lady Hornets won their first victory of the season as Coulton Auditorium witnessed another match off between the Hornets and their traditional rival, Tonasket Tigers, on the volleyball court. The final scores for the first two sets were 15-13 and 16-14. It took five games to find the final winning score. High speed southern winds wreaked havoc on apple orchardists and power companies alike last week as wind speed reached over 60 miles per hour. Nearly 100 percent of some apple growers remaining crops were affected, according to Ben Copple, Manager of Chief Tonasket Warehouse. Maurice Sawyer, with Gold Digger in Oroville, said their growers did not have a severe bunch of damage but there are some growers with young trees that were uprooted. Oroville Grange members, in regular meeting on Oct. 4, voted to give $500 to the Ambulance Associated drive for a defibrillator. They are also challenging other organizations to get behind this effort also. The official crowning of Miss Jo Meiers as Oroville’s Homecoming Queen at Oroville High School along with Princesses Brandy Beanblossom and Jenifer Gee. Real Estate Bargains in the area: 4 bedroom house, 1 ½ baths, like new condition, wood and electric heat, backyard privacy, $75,000; 10 + acres, 6 miles south of Oroville, with creek, well, electric power and irrigation water, $35,000.

Harvest Supper Saturday, Oct. 24

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

This year’s Harvest Supper at the Molson Grange/ Booster Night will be held at the Molson Grange Hall on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015 starting at 6:30 p.m. This is a potluck supper, however the grange will supply pulled pork sandwiches, ham and scalloped potatoes. The guests for the evening will be the Molson/ Chesaw Fire Department. Please open our hearts and wallets – we will be taking donations to help the Fire Department. Earlier in the day, over in Chesaw on Oct. 24 there will be

Monthly Flea Market Saturday

a Celebration of the Life of Bob Jewett who passed on Aug. 28, 2015. Folks will gather at the Rodeo Hall at 2 p.m. Watch out, here it comes, wait for it, here comes the Pinochle Scores. That’s, right. The games started on Monday, Oct. 12. We will have scores next week. Everyone is welcome to attend. Come on Monday nights at 7 p.m. to the Molson Grange Hall. For more information call Willie Penner at 509- 485-1922. The Annual Christmas Bazaar will be on the Saturday, Nov. 7 in the Chesaw Community Building. Tables are available

OROVILLE GRANGE

SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER PRESIDENT, OROVILLE GRANGE

Oroville Grange will hold its Monthly Flea Market Sale on Saturday, Oct. 17 at the Oroville Grange, 622 Fir St., Oroville. Doors open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Donations and vendors are welcome. New items are in our sale each month. Special Discount Prices in place for this sale only. For additional information please contact Joseph Enzensperger at 509-476-4072 The Grange will hold its regular monthly meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 21 at the Oroville Grange. A shared potluck dinner at 6 p.m. will be followed by a monthly membership

meeting at 7 p.m. Update on “North Country- opoly,” Winter

for $10. Homemade crafts, gifts, decorations, food and fun. Starts at 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Contact Beth at 509-485-2397 or Marianne at 509-485-2103. Come play BINGO on Friday night at 7pm at the Molson Grange. The last game of the evening has added money each Friday. Fall Festival for Kids. Family, food and fun. Saturday in the Chesaw Memorial Building on Oct. 31 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Soup and bread for all. Let’s give our kids a Halloween alternative, like some fun games, fun food, fun games, fun craft and a special Christian story. Did we mention candy? Fun, non -scary costumes are a must. For more information give Mike or Beth a call at 509485-2397.

Activities planning, Building Committee Organization and wholesale Organic Vegetable buying will be on this month’s agenda. Interested persons are always welcome to participate in Grange activities

Junk-tiquen in the Burg 2015 FALL VINTAGE SHOW

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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR TIME CHANGE FOR FARMERS’ MARKET TONASKET - Tonasket Farmers’ Market, which next meets on Thursday, Oct. 15, is changing its hours for the month of October. The market will begin and ending one hour earlier — 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. every Thursday. There is plenty of healthy, fresh, local grown produce available. Cheatgrass to Perform

Brown Bag Book Club

OROVILLE - Cheatgrass, a combination of the Hyde family and Steve Pollard, will perform Thursday, Oct.15 at Esther Bricques Winery. Banjo, sax, guitar, bass, and of course vocals are performed to present their wide range of musical styles. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library Brown bag Book Club is reading, “The Mockingbird Next Door” by Marja Mills and discussing this book and, “To Kill a Mockingbird” on Thursday, Oct. 22, at 1pm at the library. Come join us as we compare and contrast these two books. This is in conjunction with NCRL Columbia River Reads; where the patrons from the entire north central regional library read and discuss the same book. NCRL is sponsoring an evening with Marja Mills at the Wenatchee public library, Thursday, October 29 at 7 p.m. This free presentation is followed by a book signing. The Oroville public library Brown Bag Book Club is open to new members. Call the library at 509-476-2662, or Erin Johnson, 509-560-0017 for more info.

Horse Crazy Cowgirl at CCC

TONASKET - Tonasket Community Cultural Center hosts the Horse Crazy Cowgirl Band for dinner and a show at 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16. Horse Crazy won 2014’s Best of the Best Harmony Group of the Year. Tickets for the dinner and show are $20, and $15 for show only. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE: The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Oct. 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Public Library. For more information call 509-429-3310. Spiritual Movie Night

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Oct. 17 at 6 p.m.. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200. OVOC Season Opener

OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus 2015 Season Premiere Concert will be on Sunday, Oct. 18 at the Omak Performing Arts Center at 3 p.m. Tickets available at the door.

Nuance to Perform at Winery

OROVILLE - “Nuance,” made up of Sam Howell, Walt Gilbert and Scott Tegarden, will perform Thursday, Oct. 22 at Esther Bricques Winery. Their jazz ensemble style is supported by bass clarinet and guitar. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861, check out the website – www.estherbricques. com or checkout Esther Bricques Winery’s Facebook page. Tillers Folly Concert

OSOYOOS - Tiller’s Folly will perform on Thursday, Oct. 29 at the Osoyoos Community Theatre, 5800 115 St. Advance tickets $23 at Imperial Office or Sundance Video, $25 at door. Students $15. Concert at 7:30 p.m. School Retirees Assoc.

OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 30 for

312 S. Whitcomb

a general meeting/ no-host lunch at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. Okanogan High School’s small group chorus, under the direction of music teacher, Kathy Bryson, will sing. Information: Jennie Hedington: 509-422-2954. Benefit Roast for Don King

OROVILLE – A benefit “Roast” and Auction for Don King, who was diagnosed with cancer this past March, is planned at the Oroville Eagles on Saturday, Nov. 14. The fundraiser, to help with medical expenses, includes a dinner cooked by the Oroville Fire Department. Doors open at 4 p.m., dinner starts at 4:30 p.m. and auction at 6 p.m. The Roast starts after the auction. King started chemo and radiation in the middle of May and completed treatment the end of June. The rules for the Roast are as follows: 1. Anyone donating $50 will have a 4-8 minute time limit to Roast Don. 2. No filters, anything goes. 3. Organizers are also setting up a Skype call in number for anyone who cannot make the Benefit Roast and would like to participate in giving him a bad time. All donations can be dropped off at Joey King’s. Any and all questions can be directed to Martin Rosales, either via email, Martin_ Rosale@Hotmail.com or by cell, 206-391-5551. Community Christmas Bazaar

OROVILLE - The Oroville FBLA Community Christmas Bazaar will be Friday, Nov. 20 and Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Oroville Elementary gym. Those that would like to reserve a booth ($20) should contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427. Tonasket Food Bank

The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

509-486-0615

Oroville Library Storytime

OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Oct. 21. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com.

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Cloth, Paper & Steel—

Japanese Boxes Elegant & Simple!

Benefit Ride and Dinner Auction SUBMITTED BY SUSIE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

You know its fall when the leaves are definitely falling and what beautiful colors. This last Friday Bingo we had 25 players which put the packet into the second level of payouts. Our special games pay out between $40 and $50 each. Pick 8 is still growing and is up to $16,134.00. We are still in need of help in calling and walking the floor selling cards. On Saturday, Oct. 17 we are having our Membership Drive all day long. So come in and join

TONASKET EAGLES the Eagles, we are people that help people. At 1 p.m. we have the registration sign-up for the Samaritan Riders benefit motorcycle ride, bring a gift card or donation. All riders are welcome, 2 p.m. is the leisurely backroads ride. The benefit dinner and dessert auction put on by the Tonasket Eagles and Samaritan Riders for the displaced children of the Okanogan Complex Fires starting at 5 p.m. by donation. Serving several varieties of chili and corn bread. Dessert auction starting 7 p.m. (if you can please bring a dessert). The entire day is open

OKANOGAN VALLEY SOROPTIMISTS Education Award SUBMITTED BY RAE JEAN KELLEY OKANOGAN VALLEY SOROPTIMISTS

OMAK - A cash award of $1,000 is available to an Okanogan County woman for the Soroptimist Live Your Dream Education Award. To be eligible, you must (1) be a woman with primary financial

responsibility for yourself and your dependents; (2) be attending an undergraduate degree program or a vocational skills training program; and (3) have financial need. This cash award can be used for any necessary expenses. The Live Your Dream Award exemplifies Soroptimist’s mission to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities and throughout the world. Our Okanogan Valley Soroptimist Club winner’s appli-

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

DINING

& Entertainment Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

FALL Hours Thur. - Sun. 9am- 8pm

Prime Rib every Sat.

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Ph. 509-486-2828

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

LOOMIS

Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

Advertise your specials and events here!

cation will be forwarded on for additional judging/consideration for region level awards of $1000 - $5000. Application forms are available at Wenatchee Valley College in Omak or online at siokanoganvalley@soroptimist.net. The completed application must be post marked (or emailed) to Okanogan Valley Soroptimist on or before November 15, 2015. For questions, please contact Erin @ 826-5109.

Okanogan Valley

Oroville United Methodist

Out on the Town...

PAGE A7 to the public. Joker Poker is at 6:45 p.m. (members only) and 100 percent of all proceeds goes to the children. On Sunday, October 18 will be the first breakfast of the year from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The ladies do a great job and a wonderful start of the day meal. We are saddened by the passing of brother Leonard Hedlund a long time Eagle member, he will be missed. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Cindy Jones, second place Neil Fifer, low score went to Nellie Paulsen and last pinochle Neil Fifer and Gib McDougal. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015

October National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

History of mammogram technology M

ammography remains one of the most popular and well-known diagnostic tools for breast cancer. It is estimated that 48 million mammograms are performed each year in the United States and many others are conducted all around the world under the recommended guidance of doctors and cancer experts. Mammography can be traced back more than 100 years to 1913, when German surgeon Albert Salomon attempted to visualize cancer of the breast through radiography. By the 1930s, the concept of mammography was gaining traction in the United States. Stafford L. Warren, an American physician and radiologist, began his own

work on mammography, developing techniques of producing stereoscopic images of the breast with X-rays. He also championed the importance of comparing both breast images side-by-side. Raul Leborgne, a radiologist from Uruguay, conducted his own work on mammography and, in 1949, introduced the compression technique, which remains in use today. By compressing the breast, it is possible to get better imaging through the breast and use a lower dose of radiation. Also, compression helps spread the structures of the breast apart to make it easier to see the individual internal components. Compression helps to pull the breast away from the chest

wall and also to immobilize the breast for imaging. Advancements in mammogram technology continued to improve through the 1950s and 1960s. Texas radiologist Robert Egan introduced a new technique with a fine-grain intensifying screen and improved film to produce clearer images. In 1969, the first modern-day film mammogram was invented and put into widespread use. The mammogram process was fine-tuned in 1972 when a high-definition intensifying screen produced sharper images and new film offered rapid processing and shorter exposure to radiation. By 1976, the American Cancer Society began recommending mammography as a

screening tool. Through the years, mammography became a great help to women looking to arm themselves against breast cancer. Thanks to improvements in early detection and treatment, breast cancer deaths are down from their peak and survival rates continue to climb.

Preparing for your mammography visit A

nnual mammograms are widely recommended for women beginning at age 40. Some estimates suggest that more than 48 million mam-

mography screenings are performed in the United States every year. Whether it is a woman’s first mammography or her twentieth, preparing for the appointment can ease anxiety and make the experience go more smoothly. The following are some guidelines to consider when preparing for a mammography visit. • Choose a reputable and certified facility. Select a radiology center that is certified by the FDA, which means it meets current standards and is safe. Many women also prefer to select a facility that is covered by their health insurance. Plans usually allow for one mammogram screening per year. • Time your visit. Schedule the mammogram to take place one week after your menstrual period if you have not reached menopause. Breasts are less likely to be tender at this time. Also, schedule your visit for a time when you are not likely to feel

rushed or stressed. Early in the day works best for many. • Dress for the occasion. Two-piece ensembles enable you to only remove your shirt

mogram appointments typically last around 30 minutes. The technician will mark any moles or birthmarks around the breasts so they can be ignored on the imaging. You’ll be asked to hold your breath as the images are taken. If the images are acceptable, you are free to go. But new images may be needed in some instances. Mammograms are now a routine part of women’s preventative health care. The procedure is simple and appointments are quick and relatively painless.

• Performing Mammograms 5 days a week in October (Monday-Friday). • Our Imaging Center has the leading technology in Digital Mammography. • Get your mammo before October 31st and you will be entered into a drawing for 1 of 3 prize baskets! To schedule your appointment call 509-486-3124 North Valley Hospital 203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket www.nvhospital.org

and bra for the examination. A blouse that opens in the front may be optimal. Some facilities require you to wear a paper gown for the exam. • Watch your grooming practices. You’ll be advised to abstain from wearing powder, perfume, deodorant, ointment, and lotions on the chest or around the area. These substances may look like an abnormalities on the mammogram image, potentially resulting in false positive diagnoses. • Take an OTC pain medication. Mammograms are not necessarily painful, but they can put pressure on the breasts, which creates discomfort. Breasts are compressed between a plastic plate and the imaging machine. This spreads out the tissue and helps create a clearer picture. If your breasts are tender, medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen taken an hour before the appointment may ease discomfort. • Expect a short visit. Mam-

W

e have all been touched in some way or know someone who has been affected by breast cancer. Because of this, it is important to offer support to those in every stage of this disease as well as those who are beating the odds and now stand as survivors.

Early detection...

through self-exams and mammograms, is your best chance in overcoming the disease. Do yourself and those you love a favor. Make an appointment with your doctor to have a mammogram and find out what you can do to decrease your risk factors.

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BEATING CANCER JUST GOT SHORTER.

If you’re battling cancer, you shouldn’t have to sacrifice quality of care for convenience. At Confluence Health, you don’t. We have a highly experienced cancer care team in a state-of-the-art facility. We’re also a Network Member of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, which means you get streamlined access to SCCA’s pioneering research, consultations with SCCA doctors and educational support. It’s world-class cancer care, close to home. For more information, visit confluencehealth.org or call 509.826.1800

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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Hornets reclaim the ‘bell’ from Tigers

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Oroville Hornets had Tonasket QB Rychy Cruz number last Friday nights under the lights at Ben Prince Field. Oroville’s Jackson Blackler was just one of several defenders who rushed in and thwarted the Tiger quarterback’s attempt to go to the air with a pass.

Homecoming brings Bell home after 12 year absence

The extra point was kicked in by Alex Palomares, ending the first half 25-7.

Tonasket made the first touchdown of the second half, late in the third quarter. Smith ran it in

13 yards, and Palomares kicked in the extra point. Oroville scored the final touch-

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Oroville hosted Tonasket Friday, Oct. 9, to win their homecoming football game 31-20 and bring home the Victory Bell from their longtime rivals. The Hornets made their first touchdown early in the first quarter when Nathan Hugus rushed for one yard. Hugus made a seven-yard pass to Andrew Mieirs for the second touchdown in the first quarter. The Tigers scored their first touchdown early in the second quarter with a four-yard run by Jesse Ramon. The Hornets scored next, with Logan Mills running for 10 yards. Mieirs kicked for the extra point. Oroville scored again, with Mieirs taking a 38-yard pass from Hugus. Tonasket scored again in the second quarter, this time with a 50-yard run by Ethan Smith.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The 2015 Oroville Homecoming Royalty are (L-R) Senior Class Princess Faith Martin, escorted by her parents Brian and Shelly Martin; Homecoming Queen Kayla Layata, escorted by her father Joe Yocundo; Senior Class Princess Mikayla Scott, escorted by her uncle Brad Scott; Junior Class Princess Lena Fuchs, escorted by her dad Robert Fuchs; Sophomore Class Princes Tylynne Watkins, escorted by her dad Steve Watkins; Freshman Class Princess Angela Viveros, escorted by her parents Cruz and Silvia Viveros.

Standings FOOTBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W Okanogan 2 Oroville 2 Brewster 1 Manson 0 Tonasket 0

Overall W 5 3 4 1 1

L 0 1 0 2 2

L 1 3 1 4 4

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Andrew Mieirs runs for a Hornet touchdown off a pass from Oroville’s Nathan Hugus. Hugus and his receivers teamed up for several completed passes defeating the Tiger defense. down of the evening early in the fourth quarter with a 12-yard run by Hugus. “Oroville grabbed the early momentum,” said Tonasket Head Coach Jay Hawkins. “They controlled the field position in the first half.” Oroville had 53 offense plays, averaging 6.1 yards per play; and Tonasket had 298 with an average 4.7 yards. The Hornets completed 12 of 16 passes with an average of 12 yards per pass; and Tonasket completed seven of 10 with an average of 0.7 yards. Tonasket rushed the ball for 53 yards, while Oroville rushed just 37 yards. The Tigers had nine penalties for a loss of 75 yards, and the Hornets lost 35 yards on five penalties. Tonasket had a defensive sack for a gain of two yards, and Oroville had three sacks for a gain of 23 yards. The Hornets possessed the

ball 17:09 minutes and earned 15 first downs, while the Tigers possessed the ball 30:51 minutes and earned 17 first downs. Hugus completed 12 passes for 144 yards, and Tonasket quarterback Rycki Cruz completed three passes for 19 yards. Rushing for Tonasket was Ramon with 28 carries for 117 yards and one touchdown, Smith with nine carries for 149 yards and two touchdowns, and Cruz with eleven carries for 20 yards. For Oroville, Mills had 11 carries for 67 yards; Caleb Mills had 17 for 56; and Seth Miller had one for 54. “We had to really battle to get back in the game. We gave ourselves a chance when we cut the lead to one score late in the 3rd Quarter,” said Hawkins, adding, “We need to get better at limiting our mistakes.” This Friday, Oct. 16, the Hornets travel to Brewster and the Tigers host Manson.

Liberty Bell 4 Bridgeport 2 Oroville 0

W Warden 4 Kittitas 4 White Swan 2 Soap Lake 2 Waterville 2 Mabton 0

5 7 9

5 2 0

6 8 9

Central Washington LEAGUE

SO. DIV. (2B)

League Overall

0 0 0

L 0 1 2 3 3 5

W 7 4 2 3 5 2

SCHEDULES

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W Mabton 2 Warden 2 Soap Lake 1 Kittitas 0 White Swan 0 Lk Roosevelt 0

Overall W 5 5 4 1 0 2

L 0 0 0 1 2 2

GIRLS SOCCER

Gary De Von/staff photo

Oroville Hornet Girls Soccer went up against league powerhouse, Okanogan last Thursday. Despite stopping the Bulldog attack many times, Oroville’s goalie, Xochil Rangle couldn’t stop them all and the Hornets lost 8-0.

Tonasket Demo Derby 2015 Demolition Derby Results First Heat: 1st - #44 Brandon Weller 2nd - #21 Alli Hill 3rd - #55 Scott Kuntz 4th - #00 Keith Montanye Second Heat: 1st - #44 Brandon Weller

2nd - #69 Jordan Montanye split: 3rd - F711 Darryl Ortune 4th - #36 Nick McCallum Third Heat: 1st - #44 Brandon Weller 2nd - #21 Alli Hill 3rd - #00 Keith Montanye 4th - Jordan Montanye Main Heat: 1st - #36 Nick McCallum

2nd - #44 Brandon Waller 3rd - #69 Jordan Montanye 4th - #21 Alli Hill Powder Puff: #00 April Webber Machinics: #87 Dave Herrman Farthest Traveled: #87 David Brown Best Appearing: #36 Nick McCallum Most Wrecked: #87 David Brown

You can upload your own community events.

Try our new calendar at...

www.gazette-tribune.com

L 1 1 0 3 5 3

CENTRAL WA LEAGUE (1B/2B)

League Overall Pts W L W L T Okanogan 0 8 0 10 2 0 Tonasket 0 6 1 9 1 0 Liberty Bell 0 4 3 5 3 0 Bridgeport 0 5 3 7 3 0 Brewster 0 2 6 2 10 0 Oroville 0 1 6 1 6 0 Manson 0 0 7 0 9 0

CENTRAL WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League Overall Pts W L W L T Warden 0 2 0 9 2 1 Mabton 0 0 2 3 8 0

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tournament matches, including split sets)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League

W Okanogan 9 Brewster 8 Tonasket 5 Manson 4 Lk Roosevelt4

Overall

L 0 1 4 5 5

W 9 8 5 4 4

L Sp 0 0 2 0 4 0 5 0 5 0

OCT. 15-OCT. 24 Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC -Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Oct. 15 GSC - Oroville at Manson 4:30 pm GSC - Tonasket at Bridgeport 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Okanogan 6 pm VB - Oroville vs. Bridgeport 6 pm Friday, Oct. 16 FB - Tonasket vs. Manson 7 pm FB - Oroville at Brewster, 7 pm Saturday, Oct. 17 XC - Oroville Invitational, 10 am Tuesday, Oct. 20 GSC - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket vs. Lake Roosevelt, 6 pm VB - Oroville at Manson, 6 pm Thursday, Oct. 22 GSC - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4 pm GSC - Oroville vs. Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Oroville, 6:30 pm Friday, Oct. 23 FB - Tonasket at Okanogan 7 pm Saturday, Oct.24 XC - CW B League Championships

L Sp 1 0 3 0 3 0 4 0 3 0 6 0


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015

SPORTS

Oroville wins first set

Hornets fight hard against Brewster BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Lady Hornets continue to work hard on the volleyball court, and the young team finally saw a payoff when they won their first set of the season against the Raiders October 8. They traveled to Brewster October 1, losing 0-3 to the Bears. “Although we lost, I felt we had a really good, hard-fought game,” said Oroville Head Coach Nicole Hugus. “The girls continue to

improve, and I am proud of how they are playing together.” Courtnee Kallstrom served 11/13 with four aces; Mikayla Scott 6/8 with two aces; and Jennifer Cisnerso 5/7 with two aces. Passing, Hannah Hilderbrand was 15/18; Cisneros 12/13; and Kallstrom 9/10. Hilderbrand hit 10/11 with three kills and two blocks; and Scott hit 6/7 with one block. Oroville hosted Okanogan October 6, losing 0-3. The Bulldogs are first in the league, with nine wins and zero losses. “We really struggled against a very good Okanogan team,” said Hugus. “It was a lot of little things that added up to us making too

many mistakes.” Cisneros served 7/7 with one ace and Scott served 5/5. Hilderbrand passed 16/20; Kallstom 13/17 and Wendy Ortega 11/12. Hitting, Hilderbrand went 8/9 with one kill; Scott went 10/12 with one kill and Havannah Worrell was 4/6. The Hornets traveled to Lake Roosevelt October 8, where they lost the match 1-3 but took joy in winning their first set. “We had a really good game against Lake Roosevelt. I was really proud of how the girls played and how they are working together,” said Hugus. “We still haven’t gotten a win yet, but we are close and I have high hopes

for next year.” Scott served 15/16 with one ace; Worrell 12/13 with one ace and Cisneros 12/16 with two aces. Passing, Scott was 28/31; Hilderbrand 26/29; and Kallstrom 20/33. Someone hit 19/19 with four kills and six tips; Hilderbrand hit 9/9 with three kills and three tips; and Kallstrom hit 7/9 with two kills and one tip. “We continue to improve and are working hard every day. They are a great group of girls to work with,” Hugus said. The Hornets will host Bridgeport Thursday, Oct. 15, with the varsity game scheduled to begin at 6 p.m.

Tigers place at Leavenworth BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, Oroville sophomore Hannah Hilderbrand pops the ball over the net during last Tuesday’s (October 6) second set against Okanogan. Above, right, Oroville freshman Jennifer Cisneros sets the ball up for teammates Havannah Worrell (#3, a sophomore) and Hilderbrand during the third set against Okanogan while Oroville Head Coach Nicole Hugus watches closely. This is just Hugus’ second year coaching the Oroville Lady Hornets.

Tonasket’s Cross Country Team ran at the 29-school Leavenworth Invitational Saturday, Oct. 10. The boys’ varsity team was led by Hunter Swanson, who finished third among 170 runners with a personal record of 1:37. The boys’ varsity team placed 11th, and the boys’ JV team placed 13th. “After a hard week of practice, everyone raced well,” said Tonasket Head Coach Bob Thornton. “Though several of the girls are sick, they gave it what they had and I am proud of them

for racing; not just running.” Out of the 210 runners in the girls’ race, Johnna Terris took 30th, Katie Henneman came in 62nd, Kaylee Bobadilla placed 99th and Hayley Larson came in 112th. For the boys, Swanson’s third place finish was followed by Bryden Hires (43), Garrett Wilson (56), Riley Morris (98), Justin McDonald (116), Zion Butler (136) and Rade Pilkinton (151). Samuel Flores placed first for Tonasket boys in the JV race in 54th place, followed by Zach Clark (108), Eric Owsely (115), Calaeb Hardesty (128) and Mitchell Fitzhum (189).

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OCTOBER 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN COUNTY FAIR in sand, Blue Victoria Zambrano, Methow, Madison smiles, Blue 02 - Landscape (scenic views, architecture, etc.) Stephanie L. Bedard, Omak, Adult, Waterfall, Blue Brenna Busching, Brewster, Silo and clouds, Blue Brenna Busching, Brewster, Tree over the water, Blue Sims Danielle, Carlton, Adult, Palace of Fine Arts, San Fran, Blue Sims Danielle, Carlton, Adult, Battery Pt Lighthouse, Blue Carey Dewitt, Riverside, Adult, Molson Windmill, Blue Teresa Dumas, Omak, Movie Night, Blue Teresa Dumas, Omak, Sunset Ablaze - Clouds on fire, Blue Teresa Dumas, Omak, Warpspeed Milky Way w/ running man, Blue Katie Teachout/staff photo

Commrades celebrating Brisa Leep being crowned 2015 Okanogan County Fair Queen are (l-r) Miss Methow Valley Rodeo Queen Makhala Fox, 2014 Okanogan County Fair Queen Lexee Howell, Leep, Omak Stampede Queen Menze Pickering and Junior Miss Rodeo Washington Riata Sage Marchant. This week we continue to bring you fair results from the Okanogan County Fair.

PHOTOGRAPHY b 01 - Portrait (people posing or in action) Sydney Breshears, Loomis, FFATonasket, Blue Addey Christmann, Okanogan, 4-H Mid Valley Rangers, Self-Portrait, Blue, Grand Champion Bethany Corson, Omak, Brother (age 4), Blue Delaney Lester, Omak, FFA-Omak, Boy throwing sand, Blue Aubrey Miller, Pateros, Junior Open, Portrait 1, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 02 - Landscape (scenic views, architecture, etc.) Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, Blue Lake Trail, Blue Delaney Lester, Omak, FFA-Omak Light and tunnel, Blue Aubrey Miller, Pateros, Junior Open, Landscape 2, Blue Serenity Poletti, Tonasket, Simplicity is beauty, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 03 - Abstract (whatever catches your eye and doesn’t belong in any other category) Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, questions, Blue Delaney Lester, Omak, FFA-Omak, Starbucks cup, Blue Aubrey Miller, Pateros, Junior Open, Abstract 2 Blue, Grand Champion Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 04 - Animal (any living creatures except for people and plants) Bethany Corson, Omak, ducks (age 4), Blue Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, Explore the Unknown, Blue Caleb Davison, Omak, Junior Open, bird in winter, Blue

Faith Davison, Omak, Junior Open, turtle at Conconully Lake, Blue Faith Davison, Omak, Junior Open, Swallowtail Butterfly, Blue, Reserve Champion Emily Grunert, Oroville, Junior Open, Find the rooster, Blue Claire Ives, Okanogan, Blue Claire Ives, Okanogan, Blue Aubrey Miller, Pateros, Junior Open, Animal 1, Blue Aubrey Miller, Pateros, Junior Open, Animal 2, Blue Mihayla Phillips, Twisp, Junior Open, Sammy Senior Photo, Blue, Grand Champion Sarah Roach, Omak, 4-H River Ridge Kids, Animals on the farm, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Kim Tostenrude, Brewster, Junior Open, rabbit and goat together, Blue 05 - Floral (flowers or any other type of plant) Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, cherry blossom, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 06 - Sunrise/Sunset Delaney Lester, Omak, FFA-Omak, Sunset Blue, Grand Champion Aubrey Miller, Pateros, Junior Open, Sunset, Blue Sarah Roach, Omak, 4-H River Ridge Kids, Ocean sunset, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 07 - Sports (action shots, team photos, giant fish, anything sports) Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 08 - Series, 2 or more (group of photos that belong together and can’t

tell the same story alone) Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 09 - Atrtistry (Although basic digital enhancements are allowed for all categories, this category is for those that have been altered dramatically, such as a colored black-and-white or special filter) Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, New Life, Blue, Grand Champion Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, funky chicken, Blue Myles Davis, Winthrop, bitter root, Blue Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, Ancient Lakes, Blue Myles Davis, Winthrop, Junior Open, never leave master, Blue Delaney Lester, Omak, FFA-Omak, Black and white, Blue Delaney Lester, Omak, FFA-Omak, Edited beyond normal, color enhancement, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue 711 - Photography-Adult 01 - Portrait (people posing or in action) Stephanie L. Bedard, Omak, Adult, family, Blue Kelly Buchert, Tonasket, Adult, Cowgirl, Charlee, Blue Pooty Dagnon, Loomis, Adult, Horse and rider, Blue Pooty Dagnon, Loomis, Adult, horse and rider, Blue, Reserve Champion Sims Danielle, Carlton, Adult, KanDee & Mihayla 30 Mile, WA, Blue Breanna Howell, Tonasket, Adult, Brisa, photoshoot (adult), Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, Musician singing, Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, Birthday girl, Blue, Grand Champion Angie Richards, Omak, Kids holding burnt sign, Blue Anya Tugaw, Okanogan, Adult, Fire fighter watching plumm of smoke, Blue Elise Walker, Okanogan, Reflections

Teresa Dumas, Omak, Cosmic Rider Starry Cyclist, Blue Teresa Dumas, Omak, The Boathouse - Dilapidated Boathouse, Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, Blue Lake Reflection, Blue, Reserve Champion Leslie Plum, Omak, Smoky Okanogan, Blue, Grand Champion Anya Tugaw, Okanogan, Adult, Fire picture plumm of smoke, Blue Elise Walker, Okanogan, Adult, To be determined, Blue Elise Walker, Okanogan, Fisheye grape arbor, Blue Karla Walker, Omak, Grand Prismatic Yellowstone, Blue Victoria Zambrano, Methow, Maui backroad, Blue 03 - Abstract (whatever catches your eye and doesn’t belong in any other category) Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue Roy Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Brenna Busching, Brewster, Lichen covered post, Blue Sims Danielle, Carlton, Adult, Glass Beach @ Ft Bragg, Blue Carey Dewitt, Riverside, Adult, Molson Bank Doors, Blue Reserve Champion Kathy Duchow, Tonasket, Waiting for Grammi, Blue Breanna Howell, Tonasket, Adult, Vintage John Deere (adult), Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, water drops on red leaf, Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, Water drops on yellow leaf, Blue Elise Walker, Okanogan, Abstract, Blue 04 - Animal (any living creatures except for people and plants) Roy Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Roy Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Brenna Busching, Brewster, Butterfly on flower, Blue, Grand Champion Brenna Busching, Brewster, Sassy cat, Blue Pooty Dagnon, Loomis, Adult, puppy, Blue Pooty Dagnon, Loomis, Adult, horse, Blue Brenda Davison, Omak, Adult, kitten in flowers, Blue Breanna Howell, Tonasket, Adult, Twylite silhouette (adult), Blue Melinda Ives, Okanogan, 711, Blue

Leslie Plum, Omak, blue eyed cat, Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, Dog on rock, Blue, Reserve Champion Elise Walker, Okanogan, Wood duck, Blue Victoria Zambrano, Methow, Black birds on a tree, Blue 05 - Floral (flowers or any other type of plant) Kelly Buchert, Tonasket, Adult, Black Eyed Susans, Blue Brenna Busching, Brewster, Orange flowers, Blue Brenna Busching, Brewster, Little bug on flower, Blue Sims Danielle, Carlton, Adult, Blue Berries & Birch Trees, WA, Blue Shannon Hampe, Methow, Lone sunflower, Blue Breanna Howell, Tonasket, Adult, White Tulip (adult), Blue Elise Walker, Okanogan, Floral, Blue Victoria Zambrano, Methow, White orchid, Blue, Reserve Champion Victoria Zambrano, Methow, Pink plumaria, Blue 06 - Sunrise/Sunset Shirley Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Shirley Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Sheila Corson, Omak, fiery sunset, Blue Brenda Davison, OMak, Adult, Sunrise on the farm, Blue Carey Dewitt, Riverside, Adult, Fresh Morning Hay, Blue, Grand Champion Carey Dewitt, Riverside, Adult, Morning River Mist, Blue Steffi Fuchs, Oroville, 4-H, last vacation, sitting on the balcony and watching the sea gulls fly by, Blue, Reserve Champion Shannon Hampe, Methow, Harvest sky, Blue Leslie Plum, Omak, sunset over river, Blue Karla Walker, Omak, Sun worshiper, Blue 07 - Sports (action shots, team photos, giant fish, anything sports) Kelly Buchert, Tonasket, Adult, Rodeo, Blue Kelly Buchert, Tonasket, Adult, Rodeo, Blue, Grand Champion Melinda Ives, Okanogan, 711, Blue 08 - Series, 2 or more (group of photos that belong together and can’t tell the same story alone) Roy Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Kelly Buchert, Tonasket, Adult, Hummingbird on clothesline, Blue Vivian Larsen, Omak, 2 or more group photos of windmill, Tells same story, Blue 09 - Atrtistry (Although basic digital enhancements are allowed for all categories, this category is for those that have been altered dramatically, such as a colored black-and-white or special filter) Stephanie L. Bedard, Omak, Adult, Black and white Maternity pic, Blue Pooty Dagnon, Loomis, Adult, horse, Blue Breanna Howell, Tonasket, Adult, Smoke and boats (adults), Blue, Grand Champion Breanna Howell, Tonasket, Adult, Brisa (adult), Blue

Thank You... Everyone for your support!

Silver Nickel Logging - Chaps DeTro’s - Hat & hat cleaning/shaping, clothing discount Rawson’s - Dress Boots and clothing discount Bug’s Photography - Photo shoot and picture package OK Chevrolet - Trophy Buckle Winfrey Smith - Horse trimming and shoeing Kristany Fitzthum - Mary Kay products Madison & Brannon Shellenbarger - Tiara, flower bouquet and beginning Advisor Bob & Sandy Rogers - Parade Banners and Sash ProStitch Embroidery - Jacket embroidery Katie MacLean - Royalty Advisor

2015 Thank you! Thank You... Gamble Sands Golf Course

Sincerely, Lexee Howell

2015 Okanogan County Fair Queen

Thank You...

Ty & Kathy of Ty Olson Construction for supporting me and my market hog at the Okanogan County Fair! I love you guys!

~Hattie Buchert

Thank You...

for supporting my market hog at the Okanogan County Fair!

Kent & Lana of the Double R Ranch for supporting my lamb at the Okanogan County Fair!

Clay 68th Buchert

Love, Charlee Buchert

Annual

PAGE B3

Victoria Zambrano, Methow, Watercolor Seattle skyline, Blue

2015 HEAD AND HORNS

400 - Okanogan County - Youth 02 - Intermediate - 12-15 years old Clay Buchert, Tonasket, Junior Open, Black Bear Mount and Skull, Blue, Grand Champion 03 - Junior - 8-11 years old Hattie Buchert, Tonasket, Junior Open, Mule Deer European Mount, Blue, Grand Champion 4000 - Okanogan County - Adult 05 - Adult Jerry Barnes, Loomis, Bear Rug, Blue Juan Carson, Omak, Adult, white tail buck, Blue, Grand Champion Trampas Stucker Tonasket, 3 point Whitetail buck on iron mount, Blue Rich Welton, Omak, Whitetail deer, Blue, Reserve Champion Rich Welton, Omak, Whitetail deer, Blue Rich Welton, Omak, Mule deer, Blue 4011 - North American - Adult 05 - Adult Jerry Barnes, Loomis, European elk mount, Blue Jerry Barnes, Loomis, European mule deer mount, Blue Jim Barnes, Tonasket, Mule deer mount, Blue, Reserve Champion Jim Barnes, Tonasket, Elk horn mount, Blue, Grand Champion

2015 GIRL SCOUTS

802 - Photography 03 - Junior Elisabeth D.M. Bedard Omak, wa Girl Scouts Butterfly in flower Blue Grand Champion 04 - Cadette Sarah Roach, Omak, Girl Scouts, Animals in the Wild, Blue Lyndsi Streeter, Okanogan, Girl Scouts, Tossa De Mar, Spain, Blue, Reserve Champion Lyndsi Streeter, Okanogan, Girl Scouts, Mirador Del Bac de Divi Spain, Blue 803 - Canned Goods 03 - Junior Jasmine Sutton, Oroville, strawberry rhubarb jam, Blue Joanne Sutton, Oroville, red hot jelly, Blue 804 - Sewing Crafts 03 - Junior Kaylee Sullivan, Omak, Girl Scouts, Small quilted wall hanging, Blue 805 - Painting, Drawing, Paper Craft, Cards, Etc. 03 - Junior Cheyenne Kane, Omak, Girl Scouts, Drawing, Blue 806 - General Art 03 - Junior Joanne Sutton, Oroville, rubber band bracelet, Blue 04 - Cadette Sarah Roach, Omak, Girl Scouts, Hair accessories, Blue Sarah Roach, Omak, Girl Scouts, Jewelry, Blue

CONTINUED NEXT WEEK


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • October 15, 2015

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Come Join our Team of Hero’s Apply in person or through our website at www.nvhospital.org NVH Human Resources Department 203 South Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509)486-3185. hr@nvhospital.org

AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard. 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR www.gazette-tribune.com Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Subscribe to the... Nice 3 BR home $850. Sono- 2 - A.K.C teacup yorkshire terrier puppies for free (Male / ra Shores $695. Sun Lakes Female) CONTACT : my Realty 509-476-2121 email address Oroville fmoss1464@gmail.com Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with www.gazette-tribune.com DID YOU FIND AN ITEM washer & dryer, dishwasher, 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 AND WANT TO FIND 3 bonus rooms and carport. Oroville, WA 98844 THE OWNER? No pets, no inside smoking. 1 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 Found items can be placed gtads@gazette-tribune.com month and deposit. Includes in the newspaper for one water and septic, fenced and OROVILLE-TONASKET week for FREE. Limit 15 view. Call (509)476-3303 IRRIGATION DISTRICT words, or prepay for words OROVILLE DIRECTOR POSITIONS over the 15 word limit. Call Nice 1 BD Upstairs. No OPEN 509-476-3602 before noon pets. $425 per month. 509on Tuesdays. he Oroville-Tonasket Irriga560-3145 tion District has two (2) direcOroville tor positions open for elecSenior Apartment for rent on tion. Currently these www.gazette-tribune.com lake, N. Oroville, 3 mile, positions are held by Director Boundary Point Rd., 2 bdrm, Dan Tibbs and Director Marc good shape, no smoking, no Egerton. Help pets. Taking applications, Wanted $675/month, first and last. Persons interested in running (509)476-2449 for one of these positions Carrier Wanted: may pick up a Declaration of The Okanogan Valley Ga- Candidacy and Petition of zette-Tribune is seeking an Nomination from the independent contract delivery District office at 516 11th St., Oroville WA. These forms driver to deliver one day per must be completed and reweek. A reliable, insured veturned no later than 4:30 hicle and a current WA drivLotions Powders ers license is required. This p.m., Monday November 2, Oils Gag Gifts is an independent contract 2015. Creams Adult Toys delivery route. Please call Hours: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / 509-826-5486 3050 or email www.gazette-tribune.com East Side 831 Omak Ave., Omak gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Found

Announcements

Sweet Dreams

Crosswords

23. Rectangular paving stone

8. Big ___ Conference

24. Navigational aid 25. Do away with

9. Movie theater showing foreign films (2 wds)

28. Guarded

10. Dwarfed, ornamental tree

31. Artistic creations

11. Intended to ward off evil

32. Aplomb

12. Cleanse

33. Ace

13. Brio

34. Ashtabula’s lake

18. “Smart” ones

35. Combine

22. A chip, maybe

36. Get-out-of-jail money

24. Goat-like antelope of Eurasia

37. 50 Cent piece

25. Decorative jugs

38. “M*A*S*H” setting

26. A quick raid

39. Buckwheat pancakes

27. Pretentious, showy fineries

40. Al Capone’s cause of death

28. Centers

42. Mild expletive

29. Kidney waste product

43. Artist’s stand

30. 100%

44. Vermin

32. Danger

45. Local church community

35. Make a mountain out of a ___

47. Largest city in New Zealand

36. Statutes regulating Sunday business

51. Arabic for “commander” 52. Director of an opera 54. Lying, maybe 55. Doofus 56. Mental keenness

ANSWERS

Across 1. Dog sound 5. Ziti, e.g. 10. Bundle 14. ___ de Paris, millennium Ferris wheel

57. Comme ci, comme ca (hyphenated)

42. Devices for cubing food

47. ___ line (major axis of an elliptical orbit)

16. Girasol, e.g.

2. Bang-up (hyphenated)

17. Expression of affection

3. “How ___!”

19. ___ Scotia

4. Token

20. Secretly and carefully planned (hyphenated)

5. Plagiarist

21. Hurry

7. Coaster

6. Confess

We are looking for YOU to join our team!

Feed Hay & Grain

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction Excellent Feed Straw Very and take pride in providing a short in length, no waste. place to work that encourag- Will deliver. Call / leave es growth, teamwork, com- message 360-380-5055 munication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is Grey TV stand $50 exc. conwelcome. dition to call 509 476 2526 We have the following OROVILLE. opportunities available: DOWNSIZING SALE this OKANOGAN ADMIN Sat, 9:30 am - 4 pm. Quality Grants Accountant/ furniture, dishware, desk Internal Auditor chairs, household and lots Full time more! 916 Elm Street, between 9th and 10th Streets. OMAK MEDICAL Pharmacy Technician Full time. Bilingual preferred. Occasional travel to Brewster required. WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS Roomer – WEEK OF October 12, 2015 Full time. Bilingual required This newspaper participates in a

Garage & Yard Sale

Statewides

OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Part time, 10 hrs/week. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Patient Navigator Full time, 32 hrs/week, Bilingual required BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

TONASKET MEDICAL Lead RN Full time See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer. Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 10/20/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1988 Chevrolet K1PU Lic# B38781U Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 15, 2015. #OVG661773

Council Meeting Date Changed/ Public Hearing The Tonasket City Council meeting scheduled for October 27th, 2015 has been canceled and changed to Thursday, October 29th, 2015 at 7:00 pm. This meeting will be conducted as a regular City Council meeting. The Tonasket City Council will be holding a Budget Workshop Hearing on Thursday, October 29th, 2015 during the Council meeting scheduled for that evening. All those with special hearing, language or access needs should contact City Hall, 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the meeting. The City of Tonasket is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 15, 22, 2015. #OVG662853 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: ROBERT L. PFEIFER, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00091-7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: September 22, 2015 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: October 1, 2015. /s/Eric Michael Pfeifer ERIC MICHAEL PFEIFER Personal Representative /s/Roger Castelda Roger A. Castelda, WSBA #5571 Attorney for Pfeifer Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 1, 8, 15, 2015. #OVG659680 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 10/22/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1986 Dodge Ram Lic# C34788D Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 15, 2015. #OVG662846 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 10/22/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1992 Chevrolet Corsica Lic# ABG5986 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 15, 2015. #OVG662848 Notice of Application and Threshold SEPA Determination CUP 2015-7 “Verizon Tunk Tower” An application has been submitted by Verizon Wireless for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) to construct an unmanned telecommunications tow-

Continued on next page

45. Exemplars of twinship 46. Early pulpit

1. Born and ___

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

For more details, visit www.rabin.com or call (415) 522-5700.

Public Notices

44. Angling equipment

59. Back talk

15. Do-nothing

PUBLIC ONLINE AUCTION Producers of High Quality Canola Oil & Expeller-Pressed Canola Meal Formerly of Carbon Cycle Crush

Featured equipment include French screw press (rebuilt in 2014), Bliss ER-2615 hammermill, Brock cone bottom hoppers, Bobcat S185 skid steer, and much more.

39. Creeks (British) 41. Bob, e.g.

Auctions

October 20th – 22nd. Inspections October 19th – 20th.

38. Smooch

58. Fertile soil

Down

Health General

48. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g. 49. Pesky insects 50. Makeshift bed (British) 53. ___ juice (milk)

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com


OCTOBER 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

Fans and racers pack Richter Pass Motorplex Creek, BC - 1982 Mustang) Super Pro: Rae Caswell (Lower Nicola, BC - 1927 Ford Roadster) took the win over Brad Heppner (Malakwa, BC - 1989 Dragster) Bike/Sled: Warren Brown (Oliver, BC - 2002 Kawasaki) took the win over Terry Soluk (Ok Falls, BC 2007 Kawasaki) Reaction Time: Brad Heppner (Malakwa, BC - 1989 Dragster) grabbed up the best reaction time with a PERFECT .500 light. If your family missed this event, don’t fret. WCRA has one more race this year. Sunday October 11, you’ll get your chance to take in the action at Richter Pass Motorplex. Gates open at 9 a.m. Racing starts around 11 a.m. Elimination round starts at 1 p.m. Go to www.winecountryracing. ca for more details.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Oroville Reman & Reload, Inc. requested review at conceptual stage in accordance with WAC 197-11-055(4)(a) to expand the Oroville Reman & Reload Facility, scope includes three additional Wellons Kilns and control room, Biomass Burner/Boiler, 80 unit shavings/hog fuel silo, Cyclone feeder and Electrostatic Precipitator, and 167,000 Sq/Ft. Lumber Storage Yard. Oroville Reman & Reload, Inc. will file for the related construction permits from the City of Oroville and development authorizations from the Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development and air quality permits from the Washington Department of Ecology for the expansion and continued use of the facility. The proposal site is the Reman & Reload Facility. The main office is located at 301 9th Avenue, Oroville, Washington. The new kilns and control building will be located adjacent to the existing kilns and control building at 66 Jenning’s Loop Road, the burner/boiler and silo will be located adjacent to the existing burner/boiler and silo behind the Mill Line building at 1001 Dogwood Street, and the Green/Dry Lumber storage yard will be located on Bob Neil Rd. 16 & 18 The complex is a cluster of several properties which are as follows: West Yard 1: Tax 66 part of the NE SE and tax 7 part of the Adrian C Anson 196 patent Mill Lines: Tax 70 part of the Adrian C Anson 196 Patten and N47.92’ Lot 2, Lots 3,4,5 part of vacated Street and Alley, Block 62 An Addition, Oroville Central/South Yard: Tax 72 & 57 both part of the Adrian C Anson 196

Patten and Tax 71 part of the NE SE Office & Planner Line: Tax 58 part W1/2 SW of Section 27 and part of the E1/2 SE of Section 28 Southwest Yard: Lot 1, S2.08’ Lot 2, part of vacated 9th Ave, Dogwood St and Alley, Block 62, an Addition, Oroville. Southeast Yard Tax 20 part of the SW SE Section 27, Lot 11 Section 28, Tax 3 Lots 5 & 6 Blackler Acres Tracts, Tax 4 Lot 5, Blacker Acres, Tax 5 Lot 5 Blackler Acre Tracts South Yard: Tax 2 PT Lots 1,2 & 3 Hardenburgh TR, Tax 1 Lot 2 George Rodgers Short Plat North Storage Building: Tax 33 PT SE, PT VAC RD, PT NW SW Section 27 Grunert Storage Yard: Tax 1 lot 4 Blackler Acre Tracts, Tax 2 Lot 4 Blackler Acre Tracts The lead agency for this proposal, which is the City of Oroville Planning Agency, has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after a review of a completed environmental checklist provided by the Applicant and other information on file with the lead agency. This DNS has been issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will act on this proposal until after 10/29/2015. The public is invited to attain a party of record status to ensure notification of subsequent actions and/or have standing in an appeal of the final decision by providing written comment on the application or requesting a copy of the decision once made.

The completed application once filed, SEPA Checklist, drawings and related Municipal Codes are available for inspection and/or purchase during normal business hours at the Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, Oroville. Written comments must be filed no later than 4 p.m. 10/29/2015 to be part of the record local decision. Any person desiring to express their views or to be notified of the action taken on this application should notify the undersigned responsible official at P.O. Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844 at (509)560-3534 or cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com. Dated this October 12, 2015 (signature on original) Christian D. Johnson, Permit Administrator This notice is given pursuant to Section 17.100.050 OMC, appeals under SEPA shall be processed under Chapter 8.24 OMC and appeals of the final decision on this application may be filed by a party of record with standing in Okanogan County Superior Court within 21 days of issuance of the decision as provided by Chapter 36.70C RCW. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 15, 2015 #OVG662964

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Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

Colville  Spokane  RepublicLic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

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www.orovilleministorage.com

Systems

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11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

 Free Water Analysis  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

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Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

Credit Cards Accepted!

Check us out!

Since 1981

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Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Inc.

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n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power / Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

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Ferry & Okanogan County

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7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

– Pumping Truck Available –

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

800-845-3500

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Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates!

.49)

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Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Chelan & Kittitas County

Fogle Pump & Supply,

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Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

“The Water Professionals”

)

Puzzle 47 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

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n Civil

OROVILLE

509-782-5071

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n Felony / Misdemeanor

Well Drilling

Bridal Registry  Kitchen Gadgets Candles  Gifts  Collectibles

Law

n Criminal

Storage

MINI STORAGE

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Attorney at Law

n Family

Hidden Treasures

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www.osoyoosreadimix.com

Marylou’s

.59)

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Gifts

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Concrete

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BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

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If you’re putting your home on the market, home staging is an important element in preparing your home for sale. The idea is to spruce up inside and outside and pack away personal items that may distract a buyer. One family’s keepsakes are another family’s clunkers, so pack away cute photos, unusual artwork and accessories, and replace tired towels, bedding and curtains. Clean out overstuffed closets so they look roomier.

CHESAW ACREAGE

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Home Staging Tips

Approx 163 Acres of gently sloping hillside pasture. Open Green Meadows. Perimeter Fenced. Some interior fencing. 1995 3-bdrm, 2-bath Large Manuf Home in Good Condition. Big 2-car Garage with extra room attached. Large 34x80 sqft Equipment Shed (built 2007). Other outlbldgs. Dead End County Road. Current Use Ag Tax Class for low taxes. 5-6 miles to Chesaw w/2 stores and a tavern/ restaurant. Views and Privacy. Foreclosure Sale for $300,000.00. Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS

HILLTOP REALTY

.59)

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Well-kept home on DNR leased land.

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Beautifully Remodeled Home

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Adjacent to the river. Architectural roofing. Heat pump. Very nice home! $104,900

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Additional acreage on leased land provides extra privacy! MLS#810797 $72,000

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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509/476-3378

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE www.windermere.com

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Notice of Issuance of a Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) Under SEPA Oroville Reman & Reload 2015 Improvements Official Date of Notice: October 15, 2015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to difficulty place therating numbers Puzzle 42 (Hard, 0.69) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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er and related ground equipment. The tower will be 120’ tall and will be constructed within a 50’ x 50’ square of land leased to them by Gjendem Family LP. The project site is located at 60 Seven Lakes Rd, Riverside on tax parcel number 3526261002. According to Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) regulations, the office of Okanogan County Planning and Development issued a threshold environmental determination of non-significance (DNS) for this proposal. The public hearing for this project has not yet been set. The public is welcome to comment on this project. Project comments may be submitted in writing up to the hearing or be presented at the hearing. SEPA comments must be submitted in writing by October 28, 2015. Direct questions and comments to: Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, Anna Randall, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7117 or arandall@co.okanogan.wa.us. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 15, 2015. #OVG662862

Sudoku

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Ken Mickey’s classic-styled, front engine dragster was a special events car at Richter Pass Motorplex Sunday, Sept. 27. 5

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Public Notices

Dan Hodson D9 Photography

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OSOYOOS - This past weekend the Osoyoos airport was transformed by the volunteers of Wine Country Racing Association (WCRA) into Richter Pass Motorplex. The valley-wide Car Club Challenge saw its sixth year draw in four car clubs, 94 drivers and over 600 fans. The Kelowna Kustoms, the Okanagan Rodtiques and Oliver’s Coachmasters welcomed the Cam Jammers from Vernon into the mix-up on Sunday. Oliver’s Cliff Meeds was able to even up the score for the Coachmasters. The Kustoms, Rodtiques and Coachmasters all boast two wins. I’m sure next year the Cam Jammers will be back to see what kind of upset they can cause in the ratings. Meeds snatched the trophy and prize money in his 1949 Ford pick-up to victory over Kelowna October 15, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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WINE COUNTRY RACING ASSOCIATION

Kustoms’ Darren Williams’ 1937 Buick coupe. The winner of the “Fast Eight” challenge among the car club members is Reg Krutom. Krutom and his 1958 Yeoman station wagon take a cool hundred bucks back home to Kelowna. The Rumble in the Valley is always a delight to fans and racers alike. Results for brackets are as follows: Street Warrior: Trevan Zimmer (Kelowna, BC - 1988 Mazda RX7) took the win over Kevin Clarke Penticton, BC - 1973 Camaro) Street Bracket: Glenn Taylor (Osoyoos, BC - 1951 Mercury pick-up) took the win over Tyler Sopel (Lumby, BC - 1965 Beaumont) Pro Bracket: Ron Carlson (Kelowna, BC - 1970 Nova) took the win over Lee Orsborn (Rock

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SUBMITTED BY SHANA CACHOLA


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 15, 2015

OBITUARIES

ALBERT E. LOSVAR

Albert E. Losvar passed away on August 13, 2015 as the result of injuries received in an airplane accident. He was born on July 14, 1927 in the family home at Mukilteo, Washington to parents George and Anna Losvar.

Lucile Adrienne Ames

BIRTHS Martin Castro Jr was born to Maribel Alvarez and Martin Castro of Tonasket, Wash. at 4:32 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 31, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. He weighed seven pounds, nine ounces at birth and was 21 inches long. He joins sisters Isabel and Camila Castro. His grandparents are Marylou Andaya and Martin and Isabel Castro, all of Tonasket. Henry Raymond Dart was born to Sasha Prib and Randy Dart of Molson at 3:47 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. He weighed seven pounds, eight ounces at birth and was 20 inches long. His grandparents are Dawn Heath of Winthop, Doug Prib of Methow, Phil Dart and Linda Thomas of

He is survived by children Gretchen (Mike) McMillan of Tonasket and Blair Losvar of Palmer Lake; grandchildren John (Mersine) McMillan (Ballard), Mark McMillan (Tonasket), Blake (Erica) Losvar (Orting), Erik (Toni Hoberecht) Losvar (Wailuku, Hawaii); four greatgrandchildren; brother Art Losvar (Mukilteo), three nephews, and special friend Kris Kauffold. He was preceded in death by his wife of 59 years, Isabelle, in 2011, two brothers and one sister. A celebration of Albert’s life will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Oct, 23, at the Tonasket Community United Church of Christ, 24 East 4th Street in Tonasket, Washington. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to: Washington Pilots Association (WPA) Youth Aviation Scholarship Fund, 227 Bellevue Way NE, PMB 397, Bellevue, WA 98804-9721 or Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation, P.O. Box 5371, Seattle, WA 98145. Bergh Funeral Service Oroville/Tonasket is in care of Arrangements

LUCILE ADRIENNE AMES

branch library where she especially loved her role as Story Lady. She was woman of faith, active in the Okanogan United Methodist Church where she was a Lay Leader, Liturgist, Treasurer, Church Delegate for annual conferences, Church Camp organizer and active United Methodist Woman. She also sang with the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus . Lucile is survived by her siblings, Elizabeth Anderson, of East Lansing Michigan, James Lathrop of Plainville Connecticut, Jonathan Lathrop of Riverdale Maryland,her foster daughter C’Ann Kariores, Okanogan, and foster grand daughters Jolene Lazard, Bremerton, Marisa (Missy) Peoples, Everett, foster great grandchildren and many nieces, nephews, as well as great nieces and nephews.

Lucile Ames, of Okanogan died Saturday October 3, 2015 at Mid Valley Hospital from complications of a stroke. Born in New London and raised in Plainville Connecticut, Lucile and her husband of 47 years Curtis Ames moved to Okanogan in 1965. She worked for the Head Start Program for many years both with children and with parents. She also took in foster children. While working at Head Start she earned an Associates degree in Early Childhood Education from Wenatchee Community College. In 1989 she became the Librarian at the Okanogan

Molson and Anita and Ray Cole of Fairbanks, Alaska. Jessica Marie Kinney was born to Megan Kinney of Harrington, Wash. and Boyd Kinney of Tonasket, Wash. at 2:18 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 5, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She weighed six pounds, one and a half ounces at birth and was 19 inches long. She joins brother Arlin, five and sister Jamie, 5. Her grandparents are Jason and Tonay Houck of Harrington, Wash and Les and Karen Kinney of Wauconda, Wash. Jayden Mae Cline was born to Ashley Nicole and Robert Christopher Lee Cline at 7:49 a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. She weighed seven pounds, two ounces at birth and was 19 1/2 inches long. She joins siblings Joseph, age three, Tegean, age

six and Kendra, age six. Her grandparents are Rod and Denise Mohr and Brad and Laura Calico and Robert and Cindy Cline. Elana Rose Calus was born to Kim Blakeslee and Joseph Calus of Tonasket, Wash. at 8:41 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She joins siblings, Ethan, age 14; Savana, age 11 and Aspen, age 13 months. Her grandparents are Ruben and Debbie Blakeslee and Joe and Barbra Calus. Madalyn Jade Bertelsen was born to Justine C. Bertelsen of Republic, Wash. in a home birth with delivery by Kayla McKenzie, the baby’s aunt. She joins siblings Aurora A. Hearrean, age six; Tony R. Hearrean, age five; and Jethro S. Hearrean, age two.

Sue Pitts is new Oroville fourth grade teacher SUBMITTED BY SUPERINTENDENT STEVE QUICK

Tonasket Comancheros Pony Express Ride, the list is endless. If you needed it call Leonard. Our community and our world is a better place because of him. He will be missed by all. Surviving Relatives include his wife, Donna F. Hedlund; children: John (Jack) Laurence Hedlund, Jean; Janet Leeann (Hedlund) Wahl, Loren; Annette Farver, Dave; Shannon McKinney and Janet Hedlund; brother: Virgil Hedlund, Delores; sister-inlaw: Joyce Hedlund; numerous nieces and nephews; grandchildren: Jennifer Hedlund, Jackie (Hedlund), Tyler and Keith, Jamie Hedlund, Jeri (Hedlund) Timm, and Carson, Jessie Hedlund, Nick Farver and (Isabel), Tyler Farver, Jason McKinney, Jeremy McKinney, Grant and (Erryn) Leavell, Lee and (Rebecca) Leavell; great grandchildren: Landon and Lauren Farver and Paisley Tim. Leonard was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers, Don and Ed; a sister, Virginia; two sons, Jim Hedlund and Duane McKinney and a dear uncle, Reimon (Ray) Hedlund. Graveside services will be held on Saturday, October 24, 2015 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Cemetery. Memorial Services to follow at 3 p.m. at the Oroville Trinity Episcopal Church with the Reverend Marilyn Wilder and Aurora Lodge #201 officiating, this will be followed by a luncheon and gathering at the Tonasket Eagles. In lieu of flowers, donations could be made in his honor, to the Tonasket Pool Project or the charity of your choice. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is in care of arrangements.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Leonard Hedlund

LEONARD HEDLUND

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Healthcare Services Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

509-826-1800

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

MASSAGE

OPTICAL

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Su Ianniello

Submitted photo

Susan Pitts has joined the staff of the Oroville School District as the district’s newest fourth grade teacher. Pitts, is a 23 year veteran of teaching. believes all students are capable of being highly successful in their learning. She has high expectations for all her students and believes hard work and responsibility coupled with good planning

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will all lead to her students being successful in her classroom. She is super excited to work with this year’s fourth grade students, their parents and the staff in the District.

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

Toll free: 866-826-6191 www.okbhc.org

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

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17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

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OMAK

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OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT

The Oroville School District is excited to report that Susan Pitts was hired over the summer to be the new fourth grade teacher. She comes to the district as a veteran elementary teacher of 23 years from another state as well as having earned her masters degree in Education in 2001. Pitts is extremely excited to be living here in Oroville near her son’s family and to be able to work with her new students. She and her husband have four adult children and seven grandchildren. Among her many hobbies and interests are reading, walking, playing games, but at the forefront is her love and passion for teaching. In speaking with Pitt, her passion for teaching is obvious as she stressed several times that she

Leonard Hedlund, age 79 of Tonasket, died on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at his home in Tonasket. He was born in Burke, South Dakota on June 8, 1936, the youngest of five children to parents Edna and Emil Hedlund. During the war time they migrated west working various jobs along the way to end up in Renton, Wash., where Leonard started the first grade. At the age of seven his father passed away. As a young teenage boy, because of problems with asthma, he moved back to Nebraska to live with Ed and Joyce Hedlund, his brother and sister-in-law. While there he worked for Mr. Purdy at his service station, which later led to his passion for automobiles. After a couple of years he came back to attend Kent Meridian High School. He then went to work for Boeing, worked

as a lineman for the telephone company and became an electrical contractor. He then started searching for a way to move to the east side of the mountains, which lead to Republic as he had heard there was a Chevrolet Dealership for sale. Upon arriving in Republic he learned it had sold, but was told about a dealership in Tonasket owned by Bynum Robbins. In 1973 he sold his electrical company, loaded up the truck and moved the family to Tonasket, becoming a Chevrolet Dealer. Throughout the years he raised his family, enjoyed a large circle of friends, built up a successful business, and was a huge supporter of the community. On May 2, 1981 Leonard married Donna blending two families together, sharing his love and his humor with not only his family but all of his friends. His wit and wisdom is legendary. In 1973 he opened the doors of Hedlund Chevrolet, Inc. in his new home in Tonasket thus beginning his zest for community involvement. Leonard was a member of Washington State Auto Dealers Association. He was Santa Claus for many years always amazing children by knowing their names and possibly something about them that Santa wasn’t supposed to know. He served a Civil Service Chairman for many years, was a member of the Masons, Shriner, Kiwanis and Eagles. He was always supportive of school activities, buying basketballs, dinners for the teams that went to State, a vehicle to take kids to the Math Olympiad, as well as a chaperone, arranged a bus to take fans to the State Championship Football Game in Tacoma, the

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Albert E. Losvar

Albert spent his childhood in Mukilteo and graduated from Everett High School. Following graduation he joined the U. S. Navy. After being discharged he attended Everett Junior College where he met his future wife, Isabelle Brown. They were married on June 16, 1951. Albert and Isabelle’s first home was in Mukilteo, Wash., where he was involved in the Losvar family business, Mukilteo Boathouse. Their children, Gretchen and Blair, were born during this time. The family moved to Palmer Lake in 1962, where he managed the family orchard until his retirement. Albert was an active member of many community organizations, including Sitzmark Ski Club, Okanogan County Horticulture Association and the Okanogan and Ferry County Chapter of the Washington Pilots Association. He enjoyed entertaining friends at his home on Palmer Lake, boating in the San Juan Islands, skiing and flying.

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 15, 2015  

October 15, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 15, 2015  

October 15, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune