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TONASKET INVITATIONAL

Oroville Booster Club

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Oroville to increase park camping fees

TIGER HOMECOMING

Council looking at new animal ordinance vegetation management. “An ordinance this broad is likely to create some misunderstanding... like OROVILLE – The company that pro- where it talks about animals for vegetavides reservation services for Oroville’s tion control as temporary. Animals ‘such Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park as goats,’ I don’t know what that means, a is increasing rates and that will be passed horse is an animal,” said Naillon. Chris Branch, who presented the draft along in the form of higher camping fees. “Camis will be raising their reserva- ordinance, said animal ordinances can tion fees. Staff recommends increases to be controversial, especially concerning the camping fees,” said City Clerk JoAnn things like chickens. “I didn’t find the ordinance overly Denney at the city council’s last meeting restrictive in any way,” where she presented said Naillon. “Just the a draft resolution to definition of animal as update park fees. An ordinance this it relates to the definiIn addition, Denney broad is likely to cre- tion of temporary. asked to discuss the you’ll boat launch fees. ate some misunder- end“Otherwise up with peoCurrently the annual standing... like where ple telling you ‘I’ve permit fee for those these cows here living within the 98844 it talks about animals got because I’ve got a real zip code is $25 and for those outside the zip for vegetation control grass problem.” asked that code it is $40. She sugas temporary. Animals theNaillon ordinance clargested the fee be set at $25 annual, no matter ‘such as goats,’ I don’t ify temporary use and what type were where the permit purknow what that means, allowed before it be chaser lived. The council agreed a horse is an animal,” approved. In addition, he with the increases Ed Naillon, Councilman questioned issues for the camping fees City of Oroville relating to the feedand at the Riverside ing of wild animals. Retreat at Veterans Branch said that could Memorial, as well as the one rate for everyone for the boat be addressed as a separate issue. Branch also gave an update on the launches at the city’s Veterans Memorial franchise agreement for the Eastlake and Deep Bay parks. Rod Noel, head of the city’s parks Sewer System which serves people livdepartment, said the city has also ing along Eastlake Road and was conreceived several requests for wi-fi and structed by the county using a Public cable television to be installed at the Trust Fund low interest loan. He told the city’s Riverside Retreat. The retreat is two council that he had contacted the county rental properties the city owns that used regarding the fact that although the city to house staff when Veterans Memorial operates the sewer line and it and wastewas a state park. The city transformed water is treated at the city’s treatment them into vacation rentals - wi-fi and plant, the city does not own the sewer line. Therefore, he told the county, the cable will be installed for next summer The council was also presented with franchise agreement would not apply to a draft animal ordinance. Councilman the city. He said the county agreed that Ed Naillon asked that a couple issues be the creation of an interlocal agreement clarified, especially concerning the tem- regarding the sewer line would be more porary use of animals such as goats for appropriate. BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, Tonasket’s 2015 Homecoming Royalty included (left to right) Laura Escatel, Freshman Princess, Hayley Larson, Sophomore Princess, Serenity Poletti, Junior Princess, Alyssa Montenegro, Senior Princess and Janelle Catone, Homecoming Queen. Left, the senior class claimed the trophy for Homecoming week activities. Pictured left to right are Rachel Silverthorn, Alyssa Montenegro, Corrina Karrer, Jordan Hughes, Shayane Lewis, Kyra Whiting, Janelle Catone, Rose Walts, Kasey Nelson and the Tiger Mascot.

Conservation District offers free services City grapples with abandoned RVs and barking dogs BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Craig Nelson, District Manager of the Okanogan Conservation District (the District) appeared at the Tonasket City Council meeting Tuesday, Sept. 28 to offer assistance in helping landowners recover from the Okanogan Complex wildfires. Nelson said the District helped over 300 individual property owners in the Carlton Complex with things like grass seeding and repairing/replacing fencing after last year’s fires. The District also protected 14 homes from flash flooding by installing rock dikes, at a cost of about half a million dollars. Nelson said the District used funding from the Washington State Legislature and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (for the rock dikes) to complete the activities for the Carlton Complex fire. “We are using some of the residual funds from this account to fund this

year’s activities,” said Nelson. assistance of the District to monitor high The District also coordinated State levels of rainfall, as the National Weather Burned Area Emergency Response Service doesn’t reach the area. The tem(BAER) Teams, working with the Forest porary rain gauges will remain in place Service and Army Corps of Engineers for three to five years. to assess damage to The District has state and private lands requested the Federal and reporting on areas Natural Resources “Their analysis will help Conservation Services most severely burned to protect human life Watershed us all better under- Emergency and critical public Protection Program to infrastructure. The stand the post-fire risks come and do an evaluBAER teams have ation to identify homes and evaluate what been working since at risk of flooding. mid-September to “The fires this year steps we may need to assess severity of soil are a first, in that they take to protect lives, have areas burned burns on private and state lands burned in out up above waterhomes and crucial Okanogan Complex, sheds,” said Nelson. infrastructure.” Tunk Block and North “We’ll start evaluating Star fires. Kirsten Cook, Education Coordinator the burn areas around Okanogan Conservation District “Their analysis October 13. We don’t will help us all better look at just the burn understand the postarea, but areas downfire risks and evaluate what steps we stream as well.” may need to take to protect lives, homes Nelson said last year the Benson Creek and crucial infrastructure,” said Kirsten area had a 10-year rain event that resultCook, Okanogan Conservation District ed in a 1,000-year flood event. Education Coordinator. The District has received over 100 Nelson said last year the Washington requests for site visits for property ownDepartment of Ecology installed 14 ers affected by the Okanogan Complex. emergency rain gauges with guidance There are no charges for the site visits. from the National Weather Service and According to the District website, all dis-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 41

trict services are provided free of charge without discrimination. The District is a local governmental entity formed as a sub-division of Washington State under RCW 89.08. It formed in April of 1940, the fourth one in the state of Washington. Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb said the conservation district originated in Loomis, and said Nelson’s visit to the city council meeting provided “the opportunity for us to mitigate to have the town join the conservation district.” Council member Scott Olson asked the District consider a different way of taxing landowners. Nelson said that will come up for renewal next year. As it stands now, landowners are taxed at $2.40 per parcel per year and four cents per acre per year, with low income senior citizens exempt. Nelson said the difficulty in structuring variance into the tax assessment was with the county’s software program; but that he would be discussing it with Okanogan County Assessor Scott Furman in the near future. “The beauty of the Okanogan Conservation District is we are made up of community members,” said Nelson. Anyone with fire losses is encouraged to contact the Red Cross at (509) 6633907, then contact a Room One Disaster Case Manager at (509) 997-2050. Next, contact the Okanogan Conservation

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District to report any natural resource and/or agricultural losses. The District will provide site visits to landowners to help evaluate options for recovery. For more information, visit www.okanogancd.org/fires. In other city council business, Resolution 2015-14, an emergency exemption for the use of recreational vehicles as dwellings for the next two years was discussed at length. It was determined in order to pass, the resolution would have to require RVs to be properly hooked up to water and sewer facilities, and the owners be paying customers of city utilities. The RVs would have to be sited in a location that would allow a house, or otherwise permitted as a stand-alone structure; rather than set up next to someone’s house. The RV owners would need validation they lost a home in the fire. Council member Jill Vugteveen asked why the city was considering the resolution, when no one within the city limits lost a home. “We don’t have empty lots in the city where people can hook up water and sewer, so this will make people think they can have their friends park an RV on their property,” said Tonasket Police

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Sports Fair Results

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Classifieds Real Estate Obits

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015

NEWS

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submitted photos

Tory Shook demonstrates how to make sauerkraut, using shredded paper for demonstration purposes.

Seed Library begins food preservation courses his experience as a Nutritionist for Family Health Centers. He demonstrated how the “Pickle it” jar system works to lock air out and safely ferment foods, describing fermentation crocks and units like an “external stomach,” where food is pre-digested for better assimilation of nutrients into the human body. Keener described the differences between prebiotic and probiotic foods, with probiotic foods helping you digest the other foods within your digestive system. Emphasis was placed on the role of good bacteria in developing a healthy balance internally to support growth and immune function.

SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE

SEED LIBRARY VOLUNTEER

OROVILLE - The Oroville Seed library offered its first workshop on food preservation Monday, Sept. 28. Ten community members gathered to learn about fermenting foods at home. The workshop was led by LaVonne Hammelman, Tory Shook, and Randy Keener. Hammelman and Shook spoke about personal experiences in fermenting a variety of vegetables, and Keener shared both fermentation suggestions and nutritional information, drawing on

Root vegetables and cabbage are popular choices for fermenting this time of year, and Shook walked the group through the steps of how to make sauerkraut, using shredded paper for demonstration purposes. Hammelman brought in kimchi in her crock as an example of a healthy and tasty ethnic food that can be made at home, and demonstrated the process of making kimchi; also using the shredded paper. Community members left the workshop with recipes, informational handouts, and a fresh inspiration for creating delicious and nutritious fermented foods with the bounty of the harvest season.

Oroville Chamber plans candidate forum questions from the audience. Candidates for Oroville School Board are Ryan Frazier and Rocky DeVon, the incumbent, for Position 5 and Kolo Moser and Becky Lewis for Position 2, which Amy Wise has decided to vacate. Both are at-large positions. For Oroville City Council, Robert Fuchs and David “Mac”

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – At their last meeting, the Oroville Chamber of Commerce decided to hold a candidates forum on Thursday, Oct. 15 at Vicki’s Backdoor Club. Starting at 7 p.m., each candidate in a contested race will have an opportunity to share and take

McElheren are running for Position 3, the seat currently held by Ed Naillon, who decided not to run. Incumbent Neysa Roley faces a challenge from Chris Allen for Council Position 5. For more information, contact Chamber President Clyde Andrews at 509-476-3684 (Camaray Motel).

Chief Darren Curtis. Concerns were also expressed that persons already living within the city in dwellings outside of compliance with the city code were not being forced to comply. The motion to pass the resolution failed 3-2. AD VALOREM TAX A public hearing was held on Revenue Sources for the 2016 Budget. The council considered a possible increase in property tax revenues of one percent. No one appeared from the public to offer any input, so the public hearing was closed. The Ad Valorem tax (a tax based on the value of a transaction or assessed value of real estate) of one percent over the amount received in 2015 will be discussed at a Budget Workshop to be held Wednesday, Oct. 14. The Budget Workshop Hearing is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 29. CIVIL SERVICE BOARD The council voted to approve the mayor’s nomination of Aaron Kester to replace Leonard Hedlund on the Tonasket Civil Service Board. “We appreciate Leonard for his many years of service and everything he has done for the city,” said Plumb. “His will be huge shoes to fill.” The Civil Service Board is an independent commission set up as an appeals board to handle police issues. Curtis said with the commission able to do independent investigations, it allows for protection of police department personnel. OTHER BUSINESS In other council business, Councilwoman Claire Jeffko reported addressing the request of a Fourth Street Business to change parking on Fourth to diagonal. It was decided the issue had already been discussed at length and was not practical. Council member Lois Rice reported concerns had been expressed about unoccupied RVs parked at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds, as well as horses left there that weren’t being fed. Because the rodeo grounds is outside the city’s jurisdiction, Chief Curtis suggested the Sheriff ’s office could go in to address the problem. Councilman Dan Brown said North Valley Hospital had requested an additional six

months to solve the problem of their dumpsters blocking the sidewalks, after already being given a full year to address the issue. City staff was directed to draft a letter stating the council

“We appreciate Leonard (Hedlund) for his many years of service and everything he has done for the city. His will be huge shoes to fill.” Patrick Plumb, Mayor City of Tonasket

does not approve the request. The draft will be reviewed by Council members and Mayor pro tem Vugteveen, as Plumb is a hospital employee. Vugteveen, a USFS employee, reported the “prescribed burning that we do is critical to restoring our environment back to where it was 100 years ago. But we probably won’t do any prescribed burns this fall, as the public has had enough smoke.” Vugteveen also said the burned soil “incurs turbidity, meaning the water just runs out, so it can take up to 10 years in some areas to grow vegetation again. In some areas it will grow back and be a nice stand of timber, like it was meant to be.” Vugteveen thanked the city for the use of extra barricades when

they had to close so many roads. Councilman Olson reported the Water Ranch at Chief Tonasket Park was finally working wonderfully at summer’s end. “When the kids found out it was turned on again, they came out and had a lot of fun. We are really looking forward to next spring,” said Olson. “Thank you again, Hugh (Jensen) for all your hard work.” Jensen, superintendent of Public Works, reported needing to get quotes for the new pump needed for Well #7; as cost of the pump, along with installation, was going to exceed the $20,000 proposed limit. Concerns were expressed that the city’s reserve funds would be depleted. Plumb suggested the need to build the reserve back up should be included at the budget workshop. Plumb reported being able to “step down” to Vice Chair of the Long Term Recovery Group meetings. The meetings will still be held at city hall, “but we’ve done a lot, and gotten to the point now where other community leaders can take over,” said Plumb. Plumb also reported a citizen was given a verbal warning about a barking dog. Chief Curtis said it used to be required to give three warnings, but now it is just one. “We give them a warning, and if it continues we give them a ticket,” said Curtis. “The nuisance code is written so that it can be any time of day. But we do have to hear the dog barking before we can do anything about it.”

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OCTOBER 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS Fall prescribed burning planned areas, fires were historically fre- reduced tree mortality and soil quent and burned with gener- heating and helped limit overall ally low intensity. They effectively fire growth in the area. limited understory tree growth “Crews also had improved and eliminated options for ground debris safe and effecon a regular tive firefightbasis. We now ing in the “After a century of use prescribed Squaw Creek actively suppressing fire and thinand McFarland ning to repliCreek area fire in our national cate this natuwithin the forest, the amount of Black Canyon ral process.” Previously said debris on the ground fire,” treated areas Trebon. “They in many of these units used recent were integral in this year’s is uncharacteristically treatment areas firefighting as safe anchor high.” efforts. On points for supMeg Trebon, Assistant USFS Fire the Tonasket pression and Management Officer R a n g e r were successDistrict, burnful with burnout operaout operations tions were successful for the because prior fuel treatments Tunk Block and North Star Fires reduced fire intensity. This sucbecause thinning and prescribed cess helped reduce the spread of burning had already occurred. the wildfires onto private, State On the Methow Valley Ranger and National Forest lands.” District, crews were able to safely Burning this fall will only take construct direct fireline in the place when conditions such as Little Bridge Creek area because humidity, wind direction, speed, similar treatments helped to and fuel moistures make it safe lower fire intensity, which also and effective to burn and when

SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN USFS INFORMATION OFFICER, OWNF

OKANOGAN - Plans for fall prescribed burning are underway on the Methow Valley and Tonasket Ranger Districts. Fire Managers plan to treat about 500 acres across the Wolf Creek, Fawn Creek, and Eightmile Creek drainages by underburning. In addition, there are brush piles to be burned in the Cub Creek, Chewuch River, Mt. Hull, Bonaparte Lake, Bailey Mountain, and Lost Creek areas. Some units include debris created by thinning projects, as well as areas of debris that have accumulated in the absence of fire. “After a century of actively suppressing fire in our national forests, the amount of debris on the ground in many of these units is uncharacteristically high, and one of the important tools for getting them back to a healthy state is prescribed burning,” said Meg Trebon, Assistant Fire Management Officer for Fuels on the Methow Valley Ranger District. “In these low-elevation

approval for burning has been granted by Washington State Department of Natural Resources. That agency regulates smoke management and must approve all controlled burns on National Forests within Washington State. Even after receiving burn approval, fire specialists continuously coordinate with Washington State’s air quality managers about the best timing and locations for conducting prescribed burning. Individuals interested in getting involved or learning more about the prescribed burning program are encouraged to contact Meg Trebon or Shawn Plank, Assistant Fire Management Officers for Fuels on the Methow Valley and Tonasket Ranger Districts at 509-996-4032 or 509486-5150  respectively.  Ignition updates are also posted on twitter at twitter.com/OkaWenNF. Campfires continue to be allowed in developed campgrounds but are not at dispersed campsites. Firefighters continue to respond to new fire starts. Tonasket Ranger District had two new fires last week and one of those fires was over 20 acres.

Forest road closures remain in place The closures associated with the North Star and Tunk Block fires, in the Bannon, Tunk, Dugout and Coco Mountain areas are expected to remain in place at least through the 2015/2016 winter. Likewise, the closure associated with the Okanogan Complex in the Bobcat and Beaver Mountain area as well as the Funk and Schallow Mountain area will remain in place at least through the winter. “We know these closures come as unwelcome news to many who are anxious to get back out and enjoy their National Forest,” said Matt Reidy, Tonasket District Ranger. “Unfortunately, there are just too many hazards in place to safely re-open the forest; at least until the winter snows and spring run-off have helped things settle back into place.” “Root systems of trees have

SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN USFS INFORMATION OFFICER, OWNF

OKANOGAN - Hazards left in the wake of this summer’s fires necessitate keeping some of the area and road closures in place until next spring on National Forest Lands in Okanogan County. Fire weakened trees, hidden stump holes, loosened boulders and the potential for debris flows are all safety concerns on National Forest Lands burned by the Tunk, North Star, and Okanogan Complex Fires. Updated closure information is available online at www.fs.usda/ gov/main/okawen/ or at Forest Service Offices in Okanogan 509-826-3275, Tonasket 509-4862186 or Winthrop 509-996-4000.

burned out beneath the ground creating hidden holes for those who may be walking through the forest to unsuspectingly step into. Rocks and boulders that have held firmly in place for years have yet to re-settle after having the vegetation that was holding them in place burned away. Green and blackened trees are weakened by fire and can be heard falling throughout the burned areas and the moisture that comes with fall, winter and spring is likely to set off debris flows, blocking roads and changing the landscape,” he said. In addition to the area closures, there are some road closures likely to remain in place. • Black Canyon will likely remain closed through the fall to facilitate road work associated with Burned Area Emergency Response efforts.

LAST CHANCE CAMPOUT

• South Fork of Gold Creek will remain closed until there is sufficient moisture to control the portion of the fire that is still burning in St. Luise Creek. • A portion of South Fork Salmon Road (Forest Service Road 4200) will remain closed due to hazards from falling trees as will the West Fork of San Poil (Forest Road 3115-100). “With more than a million acres burned across Washington State this summer, opportunities for hunting and other forest activities are reduced,” said Reidy. For current information about forest closures and recreation opportunities, call either the Methow Valley or Tonasket Ranger District at 509-996-4000 or 509-486-2186 or visit the Forest website at www.fs.usda. gov/goto/okawen.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Members of the Valley BMW Riders pack up Sunday after spending the weekend at their annual “Last Chance” campout at Oroville’s Osoyoos Lake Veterans Park. Despite some wind the group said they had a good time.

PUD rates to increase THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Public Utility District is responding to an increase to the cost of electricity purchased by the utility from the Bonneville Power Administration with an increase of it’s own. The BPA, a federal agency which is the marketing agent for power from all of the federallyowned hydroelectric projects in the Pacific Northwest, is increasing the cost of power it sells to Okanogan County PUD by approximately $1 million a year.

Effective Nov 1, 2015, the Cost of Power Adjustment (COPA) will increase from $.0040/kwh to $.0056/kwh for the PUD’s electricity customers, according to a press release issued by the district last Monday. COPA is a separate line on the PUD customer’s monthly bill and is calculated by multiplying the number of kilowatt hours (kwh) by the new COPA amount of $.0056. For residential customer using 500 kwh per month, the increase will total $0.80. A customer using 1,000 kwh per month will see an increase of $1.60.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL The court dismissed Sept. 28 two charges against Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, Tonasket: second-degree TMVWOP and third-degree theft. The court issued an arrest warrant Sept. 30 for Richard Lorance Nicholson, 39, Omak, for first-degree burglary (DV), first-degree kidnapping (DV), first-degree rape (DV), second-degree assault (strangulation of suffocation) (DV), first-degree attempted rape (DV) and harassment (threats to kill) (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 21 and 22. Dona Castillo Reed, 51, Oroville, was found guilty (jury trial) Sept. 29 of third-degree assault (of a law enforcement officer) and obstruction (of a law enforcement officer). Reed was sentenced Oct. 2 to 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50 for the April 23 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Jason Leroy George, 50, Omak, with seconddegree malicious mischief (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Sept. 23. The court found probable cause to charge Katherine L. Evers, 27, Kelowna, BC, with POCS (cocaine). The crime allegedly occurred Sept. 26 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Tommy Eugene Moore, 48, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine), resisting arrest and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 26. The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Douglas Heindselman, 36, Omak, with first-degree burglary and two counts of first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crimes allegedly occurred July 22. JUVENILE A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Sept. 23 to seconddegree burglary, third-degree theft and resisting arrest. The girl was sentenced to 20 days in detention with 20 days served, and fined $13.35 in restitution to Wal Mart. The crimes occurred Sept. 1. DISTRICT COURT Dwight Eldon Backherms, 52, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional charge of third-degree DWLS. Backherms was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 75 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,326. Eric Andres Bakken, 51, Omak, guilty of violation of a nocontact order. Bakken was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined $508. Ian Douglas Campbell, 34, Omak, had a third-degree malicious mischief dismissed. Derrick James Charley, 21, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief and two counts of third-degree theft. The court dismissed an additional charge: supplying liquor to a minor. Charley was

sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days in jail and fined a total of $1,749. Cory Stephen Lee Counts, 21, Omak, guilty of resisting arrest. Counts was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 83 days suspended, and fined $608. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 21, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. The court dismissed an additional charge of violation of a nocontact order. Counts was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,048. Franklin R. Dashiell Jr., 53, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of first-degree DWLS and one count of making a false statement to a public servant. Dashiell was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,734. Virginia Winchester Donovan, 62, Omak, guilty of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Donovan received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $468. Jose Luis Escalera, 45, Oroville, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Escalera was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 74 days suspended, and fined $608. Brandie Lee Evenson, 32, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Evenson was fined $500. Juan D. Felix Amarillas, 32, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Felix Amarillas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,681. William Dwayne Gallas, 50, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Gallas was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $818.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, SEPT. 28, 2015 Theft on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Landin Lane near Oroville. Threats on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Knox Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Columbia St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Burglary on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Tiffany Lana Yallup, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Kallie Louann Thomas, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI and a DOC secretary’s warrant. Robin L. Frazier, 46, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Allen Jacob Strausser, 32, booked for first-degree theft of a rental property (revoked). Rodolfo Verdugo Palacios, 44, booked for third-degree theft and a USBP hold. Ernesto Eduardo Mendez Leon, 21, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for residential burglary. Suat Karakoc, no middle name listed, 35, USBP detainer. TUESDAY, SEPT. 29, 2015 Malicious mischief on Loomis-

Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Seven Lakes Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Ladders reported missing. Structure fire on Old Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on Oak St. in Okanogan. DUI on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Deerpath Dr. near Oroville. Weapons offense on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Joshua Douglas Heindselman, 36, booked for first-degree burglary and two counts of first-degree assault.

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 30, 2015 Burglary on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Theft on Stage Coach Loop Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Bull Run Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on 12th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Threats on Main St. in Oroville. Maddesyn Danielle George, 21, booked for first-degree criminal trespassing, an FTA bench warrant for delivery of a controlled substance, an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft and a Tribal warrant. Shelby George, no middle name listed, 25, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin), first-degree criminal trespassing, use of drug paraphernalia and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Cara Ann Campbell, 29, booked for second-degree burglary, obstruction and two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for third-degree theft. Chauncey Montague Rickles, 38, booked for DUI. Katheryn Bigwolf, no middle

name listed, 20, booked on five counts of third-degree assault. Jerry Lee McIntosh, 24, DOC detainer. Ciara Marie LaSarte, 29, booked on two counts of third-degree theft and a DOC detainer. Wendy Dallyn Snook, 59, booked for harassment (threats to kill). Elizabeth Patricia Bauman, 26, booked for a drug court violation. Nannette Lynn Pichette, 50, booked for third-degree theft and a Grant County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Daggon Devoy Chaska, 32, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and an East Wenatchee warrant for third-degree DWLS. Trent Thomas Tatshama, 18, booked on two FTA warrants: DUI and second-degree DWLS.

THURSDAY, OCT. 1, 2015 Domestic dispute on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. Mountain View Rd. near Oroville. Mailbox reported damaged. Malicious mischief on Risingson Dr. near Tonasket. Window reported shot out. Two-vehicle crash on Rose St. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. DWLS on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Trespassing on Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Copple Rd. near Omak. Fire on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Pogue Rd. near Okanogan. Battery and fuel reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Fire on Oak St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Feather Marie Wright, 36, booked for DUI and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Rogelio Ortega Arevalo, 21, booked on an FTA bench warrant for second-degree

assault. Paul Roy Schwartz, 64, booked for non-emergency use of the 911 system. Dominic Alonzo C. Cotton, 18, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Tiffeney Marie Olson, 35, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: POCS, use of drug paraphernalia and thirddegree DWLS.

FRIDAY, OCT. 2, 2015 Harassment on Queen St. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Hwy. 20 near Wauconda. Harassment on Bull Run Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Burglary on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on 10th Ave. in Oroville. Richard Lorance Nicholson, 39, booked for first-degree burglary (DV), first-degree kidnapping (DV), first-degree rape (DV), second-degree assault (DV), attempted firstdegree rape (DV) and harassment (threats to kill) (DV). Peter Michael Racz, 41, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Todd Leroy Kammers, 51, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Maximo Sanchez, no middle name listed, 35, booked for DUI. Anijelna Neff, no middle name listed, 30, DOC detainer. David Thomas Kay, 34, DOC detainer. Jeremy John Lavender, 29, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: both for violation of a nocontact order; and an OCSO warrant for POCS. SATURDAY, OCT. 3, 2015 Theft on Pogue Rd. near Omak. Wallet reported missing. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Ellisforde. Trespassing on Myers Creek Rd. near Oroville. Theft on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Hit-and-run crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville.

Harassment on Spring Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Rodeo Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Vehicle-vs.-cow crash on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Vehicle fire on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Bramble Ave. in Omak. Batteries reported missing. Threats on N. Birch St. in Omak. DUI on 19th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. DWLS on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Warren John Shaw, 54, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Antonio Mercado Jr., no middle name listed, 23, booked for second-degree TMVWOP. Kevin Charles Moriarty, 58, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI.

SUNDAY, OCT. 4, 2015 Custodial interference on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Fire on N. Ash St. in Omak. Harassment on Pine St. in Omak. Threats on Omak Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on N. Locust Ave. in Tonasket. Benigno Mejia Cazares, 39, booked for DUI and resisting arrest. Palmer Gunshows, no middle name listed, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Raymond David Buck, 33, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for second-degree vehicle prowl. Chelsey Renee Applebee, 18, booked on an FTA warrant for POCS. Lisandra May Finley, 21, booked on two counts each of forgery, second-degree possession of stolen property and third-degree theft. Raymond Ballard, no middle name listed, 52, booked for first-degree identity theft, second-degree theft and two counts of third-degree theft.

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OCTOBER 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

County Fair went long way to bringing some normalcy

The county commissioners and the fair advisory board did a great job of overcoming the obstacles created by the fires to present an excellent fair this year. It couldn’t have been easy having to shift fire personnel and equipment from the fairgrounds, but in doing so you went a long way in helping return some sense of normalcy after a trying summer. It just wouldn’t have been the same without everyone coming together to participate in what has to be one of the most anticipated events each fall. While we hear attendance was down and there seemed to be some empty spots in the feather barns, overall it felt just like a fair was supposed to – much to see, do and of course, eat. I can still remember going to my first fair when I was a kid, hopping in an old station wagon and heading down with a friend and his Out of family. In later years, attending with my own introducing them to what a good time My Mind family, you can have just going from exhibit to exhibit, Gary A. DeVon running into friends and lining up for a carnival ride. Like at the Stampede, the rides were always my favorite part of the fair. This year was especially fun as I got to show yet another kid that there’s more to do than sit at home and play on the computer or watch television. He got a chance to see kids his own age who raised their own animals, grew vegetables, painted a portrait, snapped a photo or created something out of Legos. While the county fair is at one end of the spectrum, some might think the Okanogan Family Faire is at the other end. Not so, there’s lots to see and do, lots to eat, at this faire as well. And while it seems to be worlds apart, you see a lot of the same folks at both. This coming weekend is going to be a busy one, with the Bell Game pitting Oroville and Tonasket Football squads against each other for the chance to win the Victory Bell. It also happens to be Oroville’s Homecoming Game and Senior Night. There’s a lot riding on this annual match-up for the Hornets who want a chance to bring the bell back after losing it to Tonasket last year. We used to have a running count on who has won it more times and I’m sure there are those who know the exact number (or think they do), but we’ll save that for a future issue. In addition to Homecoming and Barter Faire (I still have trouble remembering to call it the Okanogan Family Faire), Saturday night is also the Oroville Booster Club’s annual Booster Club Auction. The event takes place at the American Legion Hall and features both live and silent auctions. All proceeds go toward area youth projects, both athletic and academic. There are always some great deals, with prizes donated from local businesses and individuals, as well as sports and resorts stuff to bid on from around the state. So turn off your televisions, set down your mouse and get out this weekend and have some fun. Support the faire, support your team, support our youth and remember these kind of opportunities get fewer and farther between as the weather turns cold.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Looking for effective county leadership

Dear Editor, Represent Okanogan County (ROC) first met as a group on June 28, 2015, to discuss the need for effective County leadership and thoughtful, well-informed decisions for the future. ROC does not represent any political party and remains committed to the election of strong leaders who will truly represent the people in November, 2016. Our mission is to identify, encourage and elect qualified individuals to run as candidates for Okanogan County commissioner. We seek those who are dedicated to transparent and responsive government. Issues such as the increase in wildfires, drought and limited water supply, economic uncertainty, and scientific research call for leaders who are well-informed, committed to the welfare of the county’s citizens and are willing to include the public in a meaningful way. Recently, our county government has spent large amounts of time criticizing state and federal governments, engaging in expensive lawsuits, making illegal decisions they were later forced to reconsider, thwarting public participation, and denying scientific information. We believe our county can do better. We hope you will join us by visiting our Web site at  www.rocon2016.org  where you will find issue critiques we see as important for our government officials to address, as well as articles and Letters to the Editor. We can be contacted on our website or via our email address  rocon2016@gmail.com, or by filling out our surveys “How Can We Contact You” and “How You Can Help” on website. Gay Northrop Winthrop

Regarding Oroville EMT’s resignations Dear Editor, RE: Letter to the Editor from Betty Roberts: In your Letter to the Editor on September 24th, you stated that (the EMTs were dis-

gruntled because it was taking so long for the powers that be to get a new program going to help them in their low numbers). You also stated that (we did have a plan on the table to put in motion….), who are we? Do you mean you (one of the rural commissioner/advisory board members) and the city of Oroville, or just the rural commissioner/advisory board? Back in January when the city had a meeting with the EMTs and rural members, the Mayor stated how important it was to have communication. So I would like to know where all this communication was. The only communication we had with you was at the first Thursday rural meeting after we gave the city our proposal, was that (the city has no intention in considering our proposal because we wanted Michael Green in charge.) I had informed you and the rural board members that this is not our intention. I do not remember the rural commissioner/advisory board or the city ever setting up a meeting with us about putting this plan in motion, or about our proposal. All we would ever hear from the Mayor at the regular city council meeting was (no new information or no update). So tell me Betty, why was it so hard for anyone from Rural or the City to sit down and talk to us? How long where we suppose to wait? I believe this is what is call a one -sided conversation. I think it is time for some changes. Paul Bouchard Oroville

Fix the constitution Dear Editor, Another mass murder episode strikes us, this time in Oregon, my state. This time at a college. I teach at a university in Oregon and this gun problem is way past outrageous. Time to repeal the stupid Second Amendment and start fixing this. No! Umpqua Community College in Roseburg was declared a gun-free zone! Obviously that failed and we need more guns to stop an active shooter, not a completely ineffective “ban” on guns. Of course this is like saying pollution laws should be struck down because a state with stronger air pollution laws will still get pol-

lution from places with lousy pollution controls. No. The fix is to make more and more pollution laws more and more strict. Gun laws should be far stricter, and that can only happen when America finally comes to grips with reality and strikes down the Second Amendment. No! That’s in the US Constitution! That is unchangeable! Um...clearly it is revocable. That’s why it’s called an amendment. We can correct it and, if we love our children, we must. Gun lovers, gun manufacturers, gun dealers, and their biggest political machine—the NRA—are nearly unstoppable as long as we fail to abolish the Second Amendment. The Supreme Court has interpreted that amendment to the satisfaction of the NRA and to the endless detriment of school children and shoppers, college students and innocent bystanders, distraught teens and crime victims. The general failure to control guns, as evidenced by the massive annual mortalities in the US, is a function of the Second Amendment and the dispositive US Supreme Court rulings that interpret it to forbid most states and most local governments from being able to actually reduce and ultimately eliminate guns where they are. No! If you try to take my guns that will be war! It’s already war. Those who count wars classify any conflict more than 1,000 conflict deaths in any year as a war. In the US, people with guns kill others and themselves enough to qualify as 30 wars. Seriously. Guns are used to kill approximately 30,000 of us year in and year out—more than 33,000 in 2013, plus more than 84,000 wounds from guns. So, NRA and all those who love their guns more than they love to protect children, this is war. We get it. Guns v people. So far, guns are winning. The National Rifle Association makes certain of that. Children are losing. Step one: sign this petition to repeal the Second Amendment. The entire process is long, tough, drawn out and complex. Time to start. Tom H. Hastings, Ed.D. Director, PeaceVoice Program, Oregon Peace Institute

Making ‘Sunshine Week’ every week OPINION BY KEVIN GOLDBERG

The Tenth “Sunshine Week” ended about six months ago, on March 21. This annual celebration of open government was created by the American Society of News Editors with a grant from the John L. and James S. Knight Foundation. Now co-sponsored by ASNE and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, Sunshine Week is intended to highlight the importance of open government around the country. All indications pointed to the fact that this year’s Sunshine Week was one of the best yet. In Washington, DC and throughout the country, people found new and innovative ways to make people think about transparency (my personal favorite was the brewing of “Sunshine Wheat” beer – the first beer of Sunshine Week). Even government agencies embraced the spirit of open government for those seven days. One could take a field trip every day to an agency event touting their success with regard to transparency and disclosure of government records and information. Media outlets also were doing great things. Highlights included op-eds on the importance of open government by Associated Press President and CEO Gary Pruitt and by Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the President of the John L. and James S. Knight Foundation. There were also print and online stories on the barriers to access, editorial cartoons and a video segment highlighting some of the most egregious FOIA delays in existence. Fantastic. But now six months down the line, what has been the net effect? Sunshine Week was created because of a perception that people don’t truly appreciate the importance of open government, in part because there was little to no discussion of the issue itself. Sunshine Week was intended

to make people stop taking transparency for granted, but not just for a week. We don’t stop being American when the clock strikes midnight on July 5. So why does it feel like government, media and citizens don’t commit to transparency for the 51 weeks until the next Sunshine Week (which, for those looking ahead, will be held from March 13 to 19, 2016)? In some ways, Sunshine Week undercuts its own success. The Congressional Committees with jurisdiction over the federal Freedom of Information Act, the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and Senate Judiciary Committee, have largely fallen into a pattern of holding one and only one hearing relating to the federal FOIA every year – during Sunshine Week. And that’s if we’re lucky. As processing delays and unnecessary invocation of FOIA exemptions diminish the law’s true utility for those who need meaningful information from government agencies in a timely fashion, Congress should be asking more questions of agencies on a regular basis. Congress, the media and the public need to take note as executive branch agencies increasingly try to “control the message” by limiting unfettered access to staff or by only allowing staff to speak “off the record” or “on background.” Not pushing back against these abuses allows the government to, in effect, manipulate Sunshine Week for its own gain. In fact, many agencies have their playbook down pat. Show up when asked to testify by a Congressional Committee and endure the hot seat for a couple hours and/or hold a public event during Sunshine Week, making sure to say all the right things about transparency and throwing out a few numbers to “prove” that

your FOIA backlogs have decreased. Release a few “high value” datasets (which aren’t really all that high in value at all) to show you are being “proactive.” Make it through the week and then most everyone is off your back until the next Sunshine Week. Quite often it works. Don’t believe me? Look at what the White House did this year. On March 13, 2015, two days before Sunshine Week started, it announced that the White House Office of Administration would no longer be subject to FOIA. Granted, this was not a violation of law, as a federal court had ruled six years before that this office is not subject to FOIA. But the simple fact is that both the timing and the action itself smacked of contempt for open government and should serve as a reminder that no government will ever authentically embrace truly open government, except perhaps within the confines of the one week in which they know all eyes are on this issue. Government agencies tend to act like a boxer “stealing a round” when it comes to transparency. There’s a grand flourish when they know it will score big points. But we need to refrain from giving them the champion’s belt for such tactics; at best, they deserve a participant’s medal. Yes, government agencies need to do a better job of committing to transparency 365 days a year, but so do those pushing them to do better. It’s time to really take what we’ve learned during Sunshine Week and use it the rest of the year. We still have time to accomplish that before next March. Kevin M. Goldberg is a media attorney with the Arlington, VA firm of Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth, P.L.C. and serves as Legal Counsel to the American Society of News Editors, a member of the OpenTheGovernment.org coalition.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Hated to miss out on the funnel cake

Benefit auction for Jewitt Family SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

There will be a Benefit Auction on Oct. 11 at 2 p.m. to raise money for the unexpected expenses accumulated by the family of Bob Jewett who passed away on Aug. 28. The Auction will be at the Jewett Residence in Chesaw, 2012D Chesaw Road. Donations are welcome. Some of the items up for bid will be, a Yamaha 4-seat Golf Cart, 2 1999 Ford F 250 Super Duty Power Stroke 4x4 Pick Ups. Basalt land-scaping rocks and solar lights and basalt rock candle holders. A 10 x 20 portable car port, two nice table and chair sets. There has also been an account set up at Wells Fargo in the name of Robert Jewett Memorial Benefit Fund. The Molson Grange Harvest Supper/Booster night Pot Luck will be held on Saturday, Oct. 24 at 6:30 p.m. Guests: Molson/ Chesaw Fire Department. Please open your hearts and wallets – we will be taking donations to help the Fire Department.

Senior Parking Lot Sale this Saturday SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT

out of here before they get their winged frosted. Mel Gallagher has a good heart, to share the last of his tomatoes. And, he added that it was a bad year for tomatoes... didn’t know what he did wrong. Well, I don’t think he did anything wrong... we’ve heard the same story from many. Dorothy (Roberts) Wagner and her husband, Tom, Kenai, Alaska have been in the Oroville area, visiting family and friends. If you had a college age son and he was living with you in a small apartment, and he had an arsenal of 14 guns and was out to destroy Christian thinking people, wouldn’t you get an inkling that he just

HILLTOP COMMENTS The Grange will supply pulled pork sandwiches, ham and scalloped potatoes. This is always a good potluck with lots of food. Please come. Also on Oct. 24 over in Chesaw there will be a Celebration of Life for Bob Jewett at 2 p.m. in the Chesaw Rodeo Hall. On Saturday, Sept. 26 we attended the Wedding of the Summer at Camp ORTOHA near Lost Lake. The setting was beautiful, the weather warm and sunny. That is until sundown, it cooled down fast. The wedding was really a family affair. The bride was Nanette Leslie and the groom, Nicholas Chapin. Standing up for Nanette were her brothers Michael and Stewart and her sister Kathryn Leslie. Standing up for Nicholas were Melinda De Long, Trevor Kelly and Cassie Starkel. The Ring Bearers were nephews of the bride, Cody and Levi Leslie. Cody was holding a sign that said “Hurry Up, I want Cake.” the wedding colors were royal blue and black with yellow sun-

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Join us for fun and bargains at our Parking Lot Sale, fundraiser, this Saturday Oct. 10, from 8 a.m. to noon. Donations of quality goods for the sale, before hand, are most appreciated. (No clothes, please.) See Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or myself if you have something of value to donate. And, don’t forget to stop by for bargains Saturday. Our Pancake Breakfast is also this Saturday, 8 to 10 a.m. Don’t miss a delicious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, and milk. All for $8, cheap. The menu for next week is: Tuesday, quiche; Thursday, cheese raviole; Friday, baked ham. For Seniors age 60 and over,

the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. Thanks go to the City of Oroville for securing our sign above the front door. Also, thanks to the LDS youth, Sisters Campbell and Pulido, who washed our windows. God bless them. Chris Alan, candidate for the Oroville City Council, will be our guest speaker on Tuesday, Oct. 13, at 11 a.m. I’ve noticed that some of our dinner guests, you know, those kings and queens, have been absent with colds and flu. It’s time to remember to bundle up, and wear more layers of clothing. And, don’t forget to check your heating system filters and such.

Membership Drive starts Oct. 17

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Cooler weather is on it’s way, be sure to clean your filters in your furnace and clean out any chimneys you may have. The Demo Derby went well – a great thank you to those that helped at the beer garden also for our Steak Feed. Pool League will be starting sometime the first week in November so get your team together. On Saturday, Oct. 17 the Membership Drive will go all day starting at 10 a.m. Also on the 17th we are having a Benefit/ Dessert Auction for the Displaced Children of the Okanogan Complex Fires. Chili and corn bread from 5 p.m to – 7 p.m. by donation with des-

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000

sert auction to follow after Joker Poker. Karaoke by Linda Wood will follow auction. Earlier that day there is a motorcycle ride around the valley, starting time is forth coming. Bingo is in dire need for volunteers to help out on Friday Nights. We need three people to learn how to call and two people who will walk the floor to sell cards. If this is of interest to you please call Alan Moore 509-

flowers. Very nice. Taylor Leslie, niece of the bride, was the flower girl. Ryan Stucker was their officiant. Just before dark a fire pit was lit and lights around the dance floor were turned on. Again, a beautiful setting. The bride and groom were joined on the dance floor at a small table by Nick’s son, Izaiah, to enjoy the good dinner that was prepared by friends and relatives. Ronnie McKinney was in charge of the pork tenderloin, Linda Darrow was the kitchen manager, making sure the rest of the dinner was set up for the evening. to go with the tenderloin was baked beans, green salad, potato, macaroni, an Asian and fruit salads, and scalloped potatoes. The wedding cake was made up of “cake pops and cup cakes” with a tent on top. Music for dancing was provided by Karl Rabenold and Melanie Thompson. Both the bride and groom were joined by their parents, Herb and Jenny Chapin and Harry and Mildred Leslie to complete the family affair. Thank you Nanette and Nick for including us on your “Special Day.”

Hypothermia, lack of warmth, causes more health problems than just about anything. The “Okanogan County Community Action Council” will provide home weatherization for qualifying individuals. Their number is 509-422-4041. You may want to check this out. Summer is gone. The winds of fall began to blow. The winter is next with its blanket of frigid snow. Little else am I privy to know. The seasons, of course, like dear, dear friends, tend to come and go. Even so, life is short and uncertain. Keep in contact, and be sure to come and see your friends at the Oroville Senior Center. Remember the three “Fs,” Friends, Fun, and Food. It is certain, I’ve heard, that nothing in this life is free. Except, of course the timely seasons, true friendship, love, and the flight of the birds and the bees. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Ed Craig; Pinochle, Jan Harper; High Man, Len Firpo; High Woman, Bev Holden.

485-2128. Our kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. for burgers and many other good food items. Bingo starts selling cards at 6:15pm, Bingo starts at 7 p.m. The Hot Ball is still alive at over $94 and Pick – 8 is still gowning and over $16,000. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Betty Paul, second place Neil Fifer, Low score went to Jo Porter and last pinochle was Neil Fifer and Gibb McDougal. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Steak night and karaoke this Friday

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

Nate and his Renegade Productions karaoke show will be at the Aerie this Friday! Steak Nite dinner starts at 6 p.m. with the Meat Draw and Joker Poker ticket sales ongoing. The Joker Poker drawing is at 7:30 p.m. Come in with your friends and family, have a good meaL and enjoy the evening at the Oroville Eagles! The Harvest Dinner is planned for Saturday, Oct. 24. DJ Nate

Rotary Club fundraiser has great results SUBMITTED BY OKANOGANOMAK ROTARY CLUB

Okanogan-Omak Rotary Club shares great results of “Wine Down Wednesday” Steak Nights October 2, 2015 On Friday, Oct. 2 the Okanogan-Omak Rotary Club recently announced the results of their five “Wine Down Wednesday” Steak Nights, held over the summer at Rockwall Cellars winery, raising almost $20,000; which surpassed the club goal of $14,000. Steak Night co-chairs Ralph Malone and Gary Carlton are very proud of the results, reminding friends and supporters of Rotary that 100 percent of the net profits goes directly back into the community. The OkanoganOmak Rotary Club decided to partner with several local organizations, naming them as beneficiaries prior to the monthly steak nights. This year, the Steak Nights benefited the Mid Valley Hospital Foundation with the purchase of a MONICA Fetal Monitoring Device; the Omak Performing Arts Center Red Curtain Project for replacement of curtains in the

visit her! Did you know deer eat pumpkins? Judy Beanblossom will vouch for that. People pay more for their kid’s Halloween costumes than they do for Sunday School clothes, these days. A memorial for Wilma Colburn’s mom will be Saturday, Oct 10 at the Oroville United Methodist Church, at 2 p.m. Wilma is a retired teacher from the Oroville school system and her mom had been making her home with her for the past several months. Try and take time to go for drives to view the fall colors. East coast people really drive home the fact that it is prettier there, but you know what? I’ve seen both and I don’t agree with them. Cool weather brought the barbecue lunch at the Extended Care Facility indoors, last week and it was clam chowder and accompaniment’s. Stop in and have lunch with some of your friends who aren’t able to get out. The staff encourages it. Each Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. ‘Til next week.

will be there and the menu is in the works. This is our big fall event and your input is important. Come in with your ideas and offers to help. The ladies have the Halloween/Fall decorations up and they really out did themselves. Great job, girls, it’s good and spooky Your Eagles need volunteers especially in the kitchen! I can’t find anything in our by-laws to prevent the Aerie member from

OKANOGANOMAK ROTARY PAC; local Fire Departments; and various local scholarship funds. Doug Sklar, President of the Okanogan-Omak Rotary Club, announced that by the end of the current Rotary Club year, which will be June of 2016, the club will award $18,000 in scholarships. This includes academic scholarships that will be awarded to deserving graduating seniors from both Omak and Okanogan High Schools; vocational scholarships and grants; and a brand new scholarship geared towards adult learners attending the Wenatchee Valley College North. Okanogan·Omak Rotary Club Treasurer Greg Hamilton will be distributing funds to seven of the local fire districts and has reserved $1,500 to help students whose families were victims of the fires with school supplies and winter clothing. At the Oct. 1 monthly business meeting of the club, the membership approved funds for the Fire Victim Relief Round-Table and has appointed new Rotarian Denise Varner and senior Rotarian Walter Womack as their representatives to the group.

Reach

We’ve Got You Covered

2.7 Million

volunteering their time and talents to the Auxiliary projects. Come on people. Get out there and help! Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Queen of Hearts will be drawn at 6:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker, and Meat Draw. We open early on Sundays when the ‘Hawks play at 10 a.m. We have free pool every Sunday. We are People Helping People!

Sklar also mentioned that “the success of this event is due largely to the momentum the club has as a result from several new members joining.” The OkanoganOmak Rotary Club is very excited about getting close to their interim goal of fifty members by their annual Wine and Cheese Event to be held Nov. l4 at the Agriplex and 60 members by June 2016. This year the Okanogan-Omak Rotary Club has announced that they would like to raise over $50,000 from their annual signature event. The Wine and Cheese Committee recognizes that the only way this will occur is through the generous support of the Okanogan and Omak communities. If individuals would like to support this event they can purchase tickets from any Rotarian and/or contact Bess Derting to donate items to the auction.

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Some of the big news is that water has been found on Mars. How about we just get Earth straightened out first? So, the Okanogan County Fair 2015 has come and gone and me with no funnel cake. I hate missing that. It is said the foot count was lower, but otherwise things went along quite smoothly, even due to the delay and time changes. Better luck next year! I saw a big yellow butterfly a few days ago. Probably a Monarch... I’m no expert on butterflies but I think it better hitch a ride on the back of a goose and head for wherever it is they go for the winter months. Come to think of it, I guess it is humming birds that are supposed to do that. Anyway, it’s time to get

might have a mental problem? College made their annual “apple run.” shootings are so scary and by far too Those that remember “Jo-Jo” Bowen, many of them. will be saddened to learn of his death. And so the EMT controverHe had a lot of artistic abilsy continues. What a shame ity and I’m told he had been that this too got way out of in a care center in Nespelem hand, before something was for quite sometime. He was done about it. buried in the Indian cemetery Liz Grunst shared her behind the Brethren Church musical talents at the Oroville in Ellisforde. Senior’s meeting last week A visit to Dr. Drumm, and it is so good to see her another x-ray, and another having some good days, while shot with a long, sharp needle having big health hurdles to pronounced me ready to set deal with. aside the crutches... did you For the first time, in quite THIS & THAT hear my husband cheer now awhile I joined the pinochle Joyce Emry that his culinary skills can be group at the Oroville Senior demoted to second in charge? Center and the attendance I’m told the Molson Grange was up significantly. will begin the winter series of pinochle, Saturday, Oct. 10 will be another of Monday, Oct. 12, starting time 7 p.m. the good Senior Center breakfasts and Baseball came to an end for the yard sale, outside if weather permits, and Mariner’s on a winning note. Now, bring if not, it will be held inside. on Gonzaga basketball. Vivian Emry and daughter Joannie Irene Freeman, clerk of many years Raymond and David, were in Molson at Roy’s Pharmacy, Tonasket, is now a “winterizing” the properties and also resident of Extended Care. Stop in and

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OCTOBER 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Okanogan County Historical Society Fall Membership Meeting MALLOT - The annual fall membership meeting of the Okanogan County Historical Society will be held Saturday, Oct. l7 at the Malott Grange Hall. The meeting begins at 10 a.m. followed by a potluck lunch around noon and then a special presentation of Frank Matsura self portraits (the original selfies) by OCHS/submitted Richard Ries. This is One of Frank Matsura’s selfies. scheduled for about 45 minutes, ending with a drawing for the winner of the Sally Ward painting. The public is welcome to attend any or all of the scheduled events. Randy Battle Bluz Band

OROVILLE - The Randy Battle Bluz Band will perform Thursday, Oct. 8 at Esther Bricques Winery. A good eight strong, this group presents a wide range of toe-tapping rhythm and blues. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, call the winery at 509-476-2861. Okanogan Family Faire

OKANOGAN - The 42nd Annual Okanogan Family Faire will take place this year, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9-11. Day passes are $10 and kids 17 and under are free when accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Camping passes are $60. For more information on becoming a vendor or on the faire in general, see www.okanoganfamilyfaire. net. The faire grounds are located at 76 W. Cayuse Mtn. Rd., about 12 miles from Tonasket off Hwy. 20. No dogs, guns, drugs, alcohol, fireworks or generators allowed. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE: The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors welcome, your booth fee helps support the Public Library. For more information call 509-429-3310. Oroville Booster Club Auction

OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club Auction will be on Saturday, Oct. 10 at the American Legion Hall. Silent Auction starts at 5 p.m. and the Live Auction is at 6:30 p.m. Auction proceeds go to benefit local youth activities. Jewitt Family Benefit Auction

CHESAW - The Community lost a dear friend on Aug. 28, Bob Jewett, to multiple unexpected

medical issues. A benefit auction will take place Oct. 11 at 2 p.m. at 2012D Chesaw Road (look for sign) to help the Jewett family with unexpected expenses. Come show your support for Bob’s beloved wife and daughter. If you have a donation item you would like to submit for the auction contact Matt or Katie at 509485-2569. Special Music Service

OROVILLE - There will be a special music service at the Oroville Assembly of God Church on Sunday, Oct. 11 starting at 6 p.m. The public is invited to come and hear Pastor Jim and Dena Pomeroy. Known for their close harmonies the Pomeroy’s share through music, testimony and ministry from the Scriptures. For more information contact Pastor Dwayne Turner at 509-476-2924 Transit Authority Board

OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority, TranGO, will hold a public board meeting on Monday, Oct. 12 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 pm. Location will be 307 S. Main #7 in Omak, WA 98841. Please call 509-5576177 or email mcarroll@okanogantransit.com for any questions. Oroville Library Storytime

OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Oct.

14. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com. North Okanogan Pool League

NORTH COUNTY - The North County Pool League is up and running for another year. Their next meeting is Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. at The Kuhler in Tonasket. Team rosters and money will be turned in then. There is a limited number of tables this year so league organizers suggest getting out there and geting your team together and your table nailed down. League play starts on Wednesday, Nov. 4. Any questions, call Jan Hansen at 509-476-3284 or Gai and Ernie Wisdom at 509-476-3310. Cheatgrass to Perform

OROVILLE - Cheatgrass, a combination of the Hyde family and Steve Pollard, will perform Thursday, Oct. 15 at Esther Bricques Winery. Banjo, sax, guitar, bass and of course, vocals, are performed to present their wide range of musical styles. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, call the winery at 509-476-2861. Horse Crazy Cowgirl at CCC

TONASKET - Tonasket Community Cultural Center hosts the Horse Crazy Cowgirl Band for dinner and a show at 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16. Horse Crazy won 2014’s Best of the Best Harmony Group of the Year. The group’s recent recording “All Tickets for the dinner and show are $20, and $15 for show only. OVOC Season Opener

OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra & Chorus 2015 Season Premiere Concert will be on Sunday, Oct. 18 at the Omak Performing Arts Center at 3 p.m. Tickets available at the door.

Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. The Oroville Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386. Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for two weeks prior to the day it occurs. Email to editor@ gazette-tribune.com or send to Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. Our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows events to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. List your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

Community Christmas Bazaar

OROVILLE - The Oroville Future Business Leaders of America Community Christmas Bazaar will be Friday, Nov. 20 and Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Oroville Elementary gym. Those that would like to reserve a booth ($20) should contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427. Food Banks

The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s

312 S. Whitcomb

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

UKUSH FAIR - TRADE hand-loomed Handbags, Scarves & More! 100% Cotton from Guatemala

Do You Know Your Federal Retirement Benefits?

Forest Service  Border Patrol  Army Corps of Engineers  Post Office

FREE Seminar: Old Flour Mill 96 Pine St. Okanogan, WA

Friday, Oct. 23 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Limited Seating: 40 Federal Employees with accompanying spouse

Includes FREE Lunch!

Guest Speaker: Ann Ozuna Founder and primary instructor The Retirement Lady

Ann is a retired Federal Personnel Officer who will discuss how to make the most of your CSRS, FERS, FERS Transfers or CSRS Offset retirement benefits. RSVP required. Call Marcy or Gay at 826-5566 today to reserve your seat.

Doug Sklar, Financial Advisor

646 Okoma Drive, Omak, WA. 509-826-5566  1-800-284-5567 www.edwardjones.com

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE OCTOBER 8, 2015

October National Breast Cancer

Awareness Month

Survivor: Adelene Holbert

The American Cancer Society shares the following statistics:     

1 in 8 women will get breast cancer. Every 3 minutes an American is diagnosed with breast cancer Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women 35-50. With diagnosis, the 5 year survival rate is over 90%. Every 12 minutes a woman dies from breast cancer; many because breast cancer was not detected in time..

WHY WAIT? SET A DATE.

OROVILLE - Survivor: 10 years (Sept. 2006) Interests / Hobbies: Yard Sales and Puzzles

Women ages 40-65 should get annual mammograms because breast cancer incidence increases with age. 8 TIPS FOR A GOOD MAMMOGRAM by the ACS: 1. Facilities that meet the highest standards of safety and quality for mammography have an FDA certificate. 2. Use a facility that benefits from the experience of doing many mammograms. 3. If you are satisfied with the quality of the facility, use the same faculty annually so that the mammograms can be compared from year to year. 4. If you change facilities, ask for your old mammograms so they can be compared with the new ones. 5. If you have sensitive breasts, have mammograms at a time of the month when your breasts are less tender, such as after your period. Avoid the week before your period. 6. Avoid underarm deodorant or cream as they may interfere with the quality of the exam. 7. Bring a list of places and dates for previous mammograms biopsies or other breast treatments you’ve had before. 8. If you do not hear from your provider in 10 days from the date of your mammogram, call them for results. Do not assume that hearing nothing is equal to a negative mammogram.

Understanding Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is an issue that extends

• Performing Mammograms 5 days a week in October (Monday-Friday). • Our Imaging Center has the leading technology in Digital Mammography. • Get your mammo before October 31st and you will be entered into a drawing for 1 of 3 prize baskets! To schedule your appointment call 509-486-3124 North Valley Hospital 203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket www.nvhospital.org

beyond the month of October, and many people might be surprised to learn of breast cancer’s prevalence. In the United States alone, breast cancer incidence in women is 1 in 8, or roughly 13 percent. In fact, among women in the U.S., breast cancer rates are higher than those of any cancer besides lung cancer. With such staggering figures, it’s important for both women and men (who can also suffer from breast cancer) to gain a greater understanding of this deadly disease. What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells. Any type of cancer is the result of mutations in genes responsible for regulating the growth of cells and keeping them healthy. In a healthy body, the cells re-

place themselves in an orderly fashion, as healthy new cells take over as old ones die out. When mutations occur, changed cells gain the ability to keep dividing without control or order, producing more similar cells and forming a tumor.

In the case of breast cancer, cancerous cells gradually invade nearby healthy breast tissue and make their way into the underarm lymph nodes, which are small organs that filter out foreign substances in the body. If the cancer reaches the lymph nodes, it then has a pathway into other parts of the body. Upon diagnosis, a patient will be told what stage of breast cancer they are in, which tells how far the cancer has spread beyond the original tumor. Is Breast Cancer Hereditary? According to BreastCancer.org, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing reliable, complete and current information about breast cancer, only 5 to 10 percent of cancers are due to an abnormality inherited from a parent. While all breast cancers are caused by a genetic abnormality, roughly 90 percent of breast cancer cases are the result of genetic abnormalities that are a result of the aging process and the wear and tear of everyday life. Can Breast Cancer Be Prevented? Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is always an ideal approach, but breast cancer is never the fault of the individual. A balanced diet, a lifestyle that includes abstaining from smoking and drinking alcohol in excess and regular exercise are all ways to stay healthy, but none will guarantee a woman or man will not get breast cancer.

pause, and having more fat tissue means higher estrogen levels, which increases breast cancer risk. * Diet. Many cancers are linked to diet, but studies have yet to show for certain which types of foods increase the risk for breast cancer. In general, it’s good to restrict sources of red meat and other animal fats, such as fats from dairy products. Some studies have shown that eating a lot of red and/or processed meats is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer. Eating a diet low in fat and rich in fruits and vegetables is often recommended to reduce cancer risk. * Exercise. The American Cancer Society recommends engaging in 45 to 60 minutes of physical exercise 5 or more days per week, as evidence continues to mount that exercise can reduce breast cancer risk. * Alcohol and smoking. Alcohol limits the liver’s ability to control blood levels of estrogen, which can increase risk of breast cancer. Similarly, smoking has been associated with a small increase in breast cancer risk. BreastCancer.org also notes additional risk factors for breast cancer can include recent oral contraceptive use, stress and anxiety and exposure to estrogen. While all of the mentioned risk factors are within an individual’s control, there are a host of additional factors beyond a person’s control that can increase risk of breast cancer. These factors include age, family history, personal history, and race among others. For more info. on breast cancer, visit www.breastcancer.org.

Are There Risk Factors for Breast Cancer? BreastCancer.org notes that there are factors a woman or man can control that might lessen their risk for breast cancer. Those risks include: * Weight. Post-menopausal women in particular can reduce their risk of breast cancer by maintaining a healthy weight. Fat tissue is the body’s main source of estrogen after meno-

Schedule your mammogram today. (1) Mammograms can detect lumps in the breast long before they are discernible any other way.

THE JOURNEY TO

BEATING CANCER JUST GOT SHORTER.

If you’re battling cancer, you shouldn’t have to sacrifice quality of care for convenience. At Confluence Health, you don’t. We have a highly experienced cancer care team in a state-of-the-art facility. We’re also a Network Member of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, which means you get streamlined access to SCCA’s pioneering research, consultations with SCCA doctors and educational support. It’s world-class cancer care, close to home. For more information, visit confluencehealth.org or call 509.826.1800

Omak Clinic

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(2) Properly performed by trained technicians, it takes only minutes from your day.

(3) It’s covered by most insurance plans, but if yours doesn’t, special financial arrangements can usually be made. (4) It can save your life.

We can think of several more reasons why women should have regular mammograms. But we can’t think of a single reason not to. Can you?

Early detection...

through self-exams and mammograms, is your best chance in overcoming the disease. Do yourself and those you love a favor. Make an appointment with your doctor to have a mammogram and find out what you can do to decrease your risk factors.


OCTOBER 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Tiger girls nab first and second at Tonasket Invite; team takes first Oroville solo female takes first BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

North County Cross Country teams had a strong showing at the

personal best of 10:14. “This is the worst course I have ever run, with all the hills,” Blasey said of Tonasket’s Cross Country course. Blasey came in seven seconds ahead of second-place finisher Olivia Richards from Okanogan. Tonasket’s Varsity/JV girls

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Jenna Valentine heads to the finish line in first place for Varsity/JV girls. Tonasket Invitational Wednesday, Sept. 30. Oroville’s sole female runner, eighth-grader Sheridan Blasey

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville’s Sheridan Blasey took first place among middle school girls. took first place among 15 middle school girls, coming in at 10:11 on the 1.4 mile run. Tonasket individuals took first and second place on the 2.8 mile varsity/JV girls’ run. Senior Jenna Valentine came in at 20:10; followed by Johnna Terris, a junior, at 20:19. This was the first time Valentine, who has run cross country all four years of high school, has taken first place in cross country. “It was a really good time for me to take first place, because it’s my last home meet ever,” Valentine said. Valentine and Terris have gone back and forth with one another taking first place at District 5 & 6 runs. This is just Blasey’s second year running cross country. She took fourth place overall for junior high girls at the Trojan Invitational in Manson September 26 with a

team came in first place with 31, followed by Chelan with 41 and Omak with 50. Sophomore Katie Henneman came in sixth place at 21:32; Victoria Chervinska, a senior, came in eighth at 21:36; sophomore Haley Larson came in fifteenth place at 24:03; and Alejandra Avilez, a junior, came in twentieth place at 30:00. Larson said she was happy to finish in the top 15, and get a ribbon. “This is definitely the hardest course in the league,” said Valentine. “We could run about one and a half of all the other courses. Leavenworth is the only other one that compares; it has a long gradual hill in the back. But we definitely like this course. It’s our home course, and we are used to running all the hills. Even if we go downtown to run on flat ground, we still have to come back uphill.” Seventh-grade Tigers running were Curtis Willson, who came in seventeenth at 11:10; and Chase McDaniels who came in twentythird out of 30 runners at 12:19. For team scores, Omak placed highest in the 1.4 mile middle school boys race with 33, followed by Okanogan with 41 and Manson with 49.

from Omak who came in at 15:44. Bridgeport’s Oren Cox, a senior, came in third at 16:08; and Chelan’s Dillon Dawson, a junior, came in fourth at 16:14. Bryden Hires, a senior from Tonasket, came in ninth place at 16:58, and Tonasket freshman Garrett Wilson came in eleventh place at 17:00. Riley Morris, a sophomore from Tonasket, came in twenty-first at 18:27. The first runner in for Oroville was freshman Elijah Burnell in twenty-seventh place, at 18:56. “There’s a lot more hills here than other courses,” said Palazzo. Omak freshman Israel Escamilla, who came in second, said “It’s a pretty nice course—it’s a true cross country course with lots of hills, sand and dirt. I will always like this course, because it challenges you with all the hills.” Escamilla ran the course as an eighth-grader last year, taking first place in the middle school race. “I was lucky, and got to coach him two years in middle school,” said Omak’s head coach Sean Kato. “He was my fastest runner. Luckily, I got to move up with him; the varsity coach position came open when he moved into high school.” Kato said Escamilla is ranked fifth in the state for all divisions. “He’s pretty unstoppable right now. Every race we’ve taken him to he’s placed in the top ten, around all these juniors and seniors. It’s not very often you get a freshman boy placing in the top of the league. Sometimes you get a girl who does, but not too often a freshman boy.” Kato said Escamilla took 10th in Spokane at the Eric Anderson meet among “big, big schools. He was the fastest freshman by about a minute.” Swanson said he was happy with his performance at his home meet, thinking he may have pulled a personal record. “I did everything the same as other meets, except for I thrived,” said Swanson. “I got up on the T (on the hill) and got a cramp. Pain—I hate it. But I just kept going.” Hires, who came in second for Tonasket runners, said he felt really good about the race. “The hardest part was staying mentally tough for the entire race,” Hires said. Burnell, who came in first for

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Johnna Terris, Jenna Valentine, Katie Henneman and and Hayley Larson head out for the start of the Varsity/ JV girls 2.8 mile race. Tonasket’s girls team came in first place with 31, followed by Chelan (41) and Omak (50).

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Hunter Swanson, the first Tonasket runner to finish the boys Varsity/JV course, crosses the finish line in fifth place overall and second in league with a time of 16:22. Oroville, said this was his first year running cross country. “I like running this course. It has a lot of uphill, but I like it,” said Burnell. “I like the big hills because

OCT. 8-OCT. 20 Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC -Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Oct. 8 GSC - Oroville versus Okanogan 4:30 pm VB - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt 5 pm VB - Tonasket vs. Liberty Bell 6:30 pm Friday, Oct. 9 FB - Oroville Homecoming versus Tonasket 7 pm Saturday, Oct. 10

XC - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt Invitational 11 am XC - Tonasket at Cascade Invitational 12:30 pm

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Luis Vasquez is Oroville’s second runner to hit the finish line. Vasquez said he likes the big hills of Tonasket’s course because “you push yourself.”

Hornets and Tigers face off BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The North County teams faced off on the volleyball court for a close match in Tonasket September 29, with the Tigers beating the Hornets 25-18, 25-23 and 25-20. For Tonasket, Lexi Sutton had three aces and 11 kills; Olivia Sutton had seven aces and three kills; Taylon Pilkinton had five

aces and 13 assists and Kasey Nelson had four aces and two kills. “This was a very close and exciting game. Unfortunately we lost, but I am excited at how well they are playing together,” said Oroville Coach Nicole Hugus. “Our team is up to full strength again after a two-week injury for Hannah Hilderbrand. We still need to work on our serve receive, but we are looking a lot

19:57; 40. Eric Owsley, TON, 19:58; 41. Javier Castillo, ORO, 20:00; 47. Adam Steinshouer, TON, 20:19; 48. Zach Clark, TON, 20:34; 52. Luis Vazquez, ORO, 21:04 (personal best); 57. Caeleb Hardesty, TON, 21:48; 60. Emmanuel Castrejon, ORO, 22:20 (personal best); 63. Daniel Castrejon, ORO, 23:01 (personal best); 65. Yohnney Castillo, ORO, 23:26; 72. Dakota Haney, ORO, 27:29 (personal best); 74. Mitchell Fitzthum, TON, 33:43.

SCHEDULES

TONASKET TAKES THIRD FOR VARSITY/JV BOYS For the boys varsity/JV 2.8 mile race team scores, Chelan took first place with 65, followed by Omak with 68. Tonasket came in third at 78. Brewster had 92, Bridgeport 108, Okanogan 111, Manson 170 and Oroville 200. Tonasket’s Hunter Swanson, a junior, took fifth place overall and second in league with a time of 16:22. Chelan’s Mereck Palazzo, also a junior, came in first at 15:13; ahead of second-place finisher Israel Escamilla, a freshman

you push yourself,” said Oroville’s Luis Vazquez, a sophomore who pulled a personal best to come in at 21:04. “Our course is pretty challenging, too. These are my two favorite courses.” Vasquez said he enjoyed running cross country because it kept him in shape for his other sports—wrestling and soccer. Other North County runners placing in the boys varsity/JV race were: 32. Rade Pilkinton, TON, 19:15; 33. Justin McDonald, TON, 19:16; 39. Samuel Flores, TON,

better.” Hugus said highlights serving were freshman Wendy Ortega going 10/10, Mikayla Scott 9/9 with one ace, freshman Jennifer Cisneros 8/8 and Courtnee Kallstrom 8/10. Hitting highlights included Hilderbrand 7/9 with four aces and two blocks, Scott 4/5 with two aces and two blocks and Havannah Worrell 4/4. The Tigers traveled to Bridgeport Thursday, Oct. 1, to

beat the Mustangs 3-2 with scores of 25-21, 18-25, 12-25, 27-25 and 15-11. “The girls worked very hard to pull off the win,” said Tonasket’s assistant coach Johnna Sutton. “As a team, our serving was amazing.” Alexa Sutton had eight kills, Pilkinton had five kills and eight assists, Kasey Neslson had six kills and Vanessa Pershing had four kills.

Tuesday, Oct. 13 GSC - Oroville at Brewster 4:30 pm GSC - Tonasket vs. Liberty Bell 4:30 pm XC - Oroville at Curlew 4:30 pm VB - Oroville at Liberty Bell 5 pm VB - Tonasket vs. Brewster 6:30 pm Thursday, Oct. 15 GSC - Oroville vs. Manson 4:30 pm GSC - Tonasket at Bridgeport 4:30 pm VB - Oroville vs. Bridgeport 5 pm VB - Tonasket at Okanogan 6:30 pm Friday, Oct 16 FB - Oroville at Brewster 7 pm FB - Tonasket vs. Manson 7 pm Saturday, Oct.17 XC - Oroville Invitational 11 am

Tuesday, Oct. 20 GSC - Oroville at Tonasket 4:30 pm VB - Oroville at Manson 5 pm VB - Tonasket vs. Lake Roosevelt 6:30 pm


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015

SPORTS

Tonasket wins Homecoming game BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tigers won their first football game of the season 24-0 Saturday, Oct. 3, when they hosted the Ketchikan King Salmon for a noon game. “It’s great for the kids to come and get a pay-off and maybe generate some momentum for the rest of the season,” said Coach Jay Hawkins. “They’ve been out there every day working hard.” Hawkins created the win, in part, to the Tigers scoring off of early turnovers. Rycki Cruz intercepted a pass in the first quarter, and Jesse Ramon carried it seven yards on the next play. He then took it to the one-yard line before being forced out of bounds by a trio of King defense, and Cruz carried it over the line on the next play. The extra point was kicked in by Alex Palomares. The Tigers recovered a fumble, and the second touchdown was made on an eight-yard run by Cruz; with the extra point again kicked in by Palomares. The Kings kept the Tigers from scoring in the second quarter, but Tonasket came back in the third with a 30-yard field goal kicked in by Palomares. According to Wikipedia, the 35-yard line is typically the limit of most NFL kickers’ field goal range. A final touchdown was earned in the third quarter with a fiveyard run by Ramon and the extra point kicked in by Palomares. Ramon rushed for a total of

84 yards over 22 carries, Cruz racked up 50 yards over 13 carries, Christian Garcia-Herrera had 40 yards over nine carries, Jordan Thrasher contributed five yards with two carries, and Tanner Anderson added in two yards on one carry. Ramon received two passes for 21 yards, and Jeffrey Luna had one 17-yard reception. Hawkins said an important part of the win was going against the wind in the second quarter. “We held the ball for nine minutes, and that was a critical part of the game. Even though we didn’t score, we didn’t give them the chance to have the ball when they would have had the wind with them. And they are known for their passing game,” Hawkins said. The Kings are used to traveling great distances for their high school games, although not usually as far as Tonasket. They traveled to Anchorage and Seward earlier this season, and hosted the North Pole team. “We’d love to come back,” said assistant coach Jeff Shelton. The team flew into Wenatchee Thursday, Oct. 1, and immersed themselves in the school community; participating in Homecoming events including the parade. “The hospitality here has been the best we’ve ever seen,” said the Kings’ Head Coach Kepa Wong. “The Tiger players have all been extremely respectful to us, and especially nice. We appreciate them so much. The players, par-

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Jesse Ramon gets help from Vance Frazier-Leslie, Johanthan Freese and Kyle Huber in taking down Ketchickan’s senior fullback Nate Fousel during Saturday’s win against the Ketchikan King Salmon. ents and school staff have all been so nice. We would like to have the Tigers come up to Ketchikan. This is truly the most hospitable place we’ve been. It’s a great group

of people here. The players said, ‘Coach, we want to come back here and play.’ Jay and I will stay in touch.”

The Tigers compete against the Hornets in the Bell Game this Friday, Oct. 9 in Oroville. This is the Oroville Homecoming game.

Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m.

Katie Teachout/staff photo Katie Teachout/staff photo

Running back Jesse Ramon leaves three Kings on the ground as he carries the ball to the one-yard line in Saturday’s game against Ketchikan. Sophomore Rycki Cruz carried the ball over the goal line for the Tigers’ first touchdown .

Hornets drop close match in Kettle Falls BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Oroville lost a close game at Kettle Falls Friday, Oct. 2 when a 14-0 first quarter lead turned into a 14-16 loss. “We had at least five turnovers, all inside Kettle Falls’ 20-yard line going in for scores,” said head coach Tam Hutchinson. The Hornets started strong, scoring the first touchdown on a five-yard pass from quarterback Nathan Hugus to running back Stetson Spears. The extra point was kicked in by Andrew Mieirs. Just sixteen seconds later, Oroville scored again when fullback Logan Mills ran the ball in from the four-yard line. Again, Mieirs kicked in an extra point. That was the end of the Hornets’ victory run against the Bulldogs that night. Halfway through the second quarter, Oroville fumbled on Kettle Falls’ four-yard line. The Bulldogs picked it up and ran it in the 96 yards to score their first touchdown, and they added on a two-point conversion. Next, Kettle Falls intercepted a pass on the eight-yard line and ran it all the way back. “A clip kept them from scoring, but it set up their second touchdown,” Hutchinson said. The Bulldogs scored on a four-yard run with 5:37 left in the fourth quarter, and again they made the two-point conversion. Oroville had four passes intercepted, while intercepting just

one of the Bulldogs’, with Hugus completing five for 20 passes with an average 7.8 yards per pass. Kettle Falls completed two for 14 passes with an average 29.5 yards. Rushing, the Hornets overpowered the Bulldogs with 46 attempts gaining 277 yards, compared to Kettle Falls gaining 136 yards in 41 attempts. The Hornets had just two penalties for a loss of 10 yards, while the Bulldogs were penalized five times totaling a 35-yard loss. Oroville lost two fumbles, and Kettle Falls lost one. Possession of the ball was pretty equal, with the Hornets at 27:43 and the Bulldogs at 20:17. Oroville gained 14 first downs rushing, two passing and one from a penalty. Kettle Falls earned just seven first downs rushing and two passing. Oroville succeeded in two of 11 third down conversion attempts, and two of seven fourth down attempts. Kettle Falls earned four of 15 on the third down, and two of six on the fourth down. Hugus led the Hornets in tackles with eight, followed by Logan Mills with six and a half; and Blake Rise and Charlie Arrigoni with six each. Logan Mills led the team in rushing with 112 yards, Seth Miller with 51, Spears with 50, Caleb Mills with 41 and Hugus with 23. Oroville hosts Tonasket for the Homecoming Bell Game this Friday, Oct. 9, at 7 p.m.

2015 Homecoming King “Mr. T” Christian Garcia-Herrera and Queen Janelle Catone stand with their parents Nadia Herrera and Miayolo Garcia, and Ken and Bobbi Catone during halftime Saturday, Oct. 3.

Soccer teams feel the pain Oroville drops a match in overtime, Tonasket loses first match of season ty kick from deep at the half. Bridgeport scored in the second KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM half, and the game went into Tonasket’s soccer team lost overtime, 1-1. With short time their first match of the season 2-3 left in the second five minutes of to the Bulldogs Tuesday, Sept. 29; overtime, the Mustangs scored for the win. leaving them “The Oroville 5-1 in league “The Oroville Lady Lady Hornets and 7-1 overall. Hornets had great had great comThe Tigers communication, and m u n i c a t i o n , remain secand probably ond in league, probably the best best game topped only by game of their season the of their season Okanogan who so far.” so far,” said has six league Head Coach wins and zero Tony Kindred, Coach, Tony Kindred. losses; and are Oroville soccer “We are excited 6-0 overall. to start the sec“We just gave ond half of the it to them. We were up 2-1 at halftime, but we season, and the girls are anxcame out a little slow in the sec- ious to compete the second time ond half, and they wanted it worse around.” The Hornets are scheduled to than we did,” said Tonasket’s host the Mustangs for their last coach Darren Collins. Jaden Vugteveen scored the game of the regular season, Oct. first goal on a penalty shot, and 27. Earlier last week (September had an assist to Amanda Padilla 29), Oroville traveled to Liberty for the second goal. The Tigers went on to contin- Bell where they lost 0-10. “The girls were hurting and ue a season renown for shutouts when they traveled to Brewster feeling under the weather, and we Thursday, Oct. 1 and beat the had a rough game,” said Kindred. Bears 7-0. Other than the loss to “The girls are anxious to change the Bulldogs and a 3-2 win over the score when Liberty Bell Chelan, all the Tigers games so comes to Oroville.” The Hornets are scheduled to far this season have been shut-out host the Mountain Lions October victories. The Lady Hornets lost a match 22. The Tigers were scheduled to in overtime when they traveled to travel to Manson Tuesday, Oct. 6; Bridgeport Thursday, Oct. 1. Tori Kindred scored the first and the Hornets are scheduled to score of the game on a penal- host Okanogan Thursday, Oct. 8. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

STANDINGS FOOTBALL

Oroville Manson

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) Conference W L Okanogan 2 0 Brewster 1 0 Oroville 1 1 Bridgeport 0 0 Manson 0 2 Tonasket 0 1

Overall W L 4 1 4 0 2 3 0 0 0 4 1 3

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) Conference W L Mabton 1 0 Soap Lake 1 0 Warden 1 0 White Swan 0 1 Kittitas 0 1 Lake Roosevelt 0 1

Overall W L 4 1 4 0 4 1 0 4 1 3 2 2

GIRLS SOCCER CENTRAL WA LEAGUE (1B/2B) League W L Okanogan 6 0 Tonasket 5 1 Bridgeport 4 2 Liberty Bell 3 3 Brewster 2 4

Overall W L T 7 1 0 8 1 0 6 2 0 4 3 0 2 8 0

1 5 0 6

1 5 0 0 8 0

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) Warden Mabton

W 2 0

League Overall L W L T 0 7 2 1 2 3 6 0

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tourney matches, including split sets)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W L Okanogan 7 0 Brewster 6 1 Tonasket 4 3 Lk Roosevelt3 3 Manson 3 3 Liberty Bell 2 4 Bridgeport 1 5 Oroville 0 7

Overall W L 7 0 6 2 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 6 0 7

Sp 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) W Warden 3 Kittitas 2 White Swan 2 Soap Lake 1 Waterville 1 Mabton 0

League Overall L W L Sp 0 6 1 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 2 0 2 2 3 0 2 4 2 0 3 2 4 0

e in h g t e B Let g n i Oct. 10, 2015 d d 5:00 p.m. (silent auction) Bi Doors OpenLive Auction at 6:30 p.m.

AUCTION Oroville Booster Club

American Legion - 305 14th Ave., Oroville

Ken Neal - Auctioneer

Auction proceeds benefit local youth!

 Autographed Russell Wilson

Jersey in Shadow Box!


OCTOBER 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN COUNTY FAIR

submitted photo

Joel Wilson, from Tonasket, with his Grand Champion Feeder Steer. He also won a Reserve Grand for Fitting and Showing, Pre-Junior BEEF CATTLE 100 - Fitting & Showing - Beef 01 - Senior, 16 & over, unmarried, enrolled in school current year Brenden Asmussen, Tonasket, FFATonasket, Blue, Callback Emilee Beetchenow, okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Victor Chacon, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Cameron Daigneau, Omak, FFAOmak, Blue Drew Dezellem, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue, Callback Alexis Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue, Reserve Champion Marquette Miller,Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Cory Predoehl, Omak, 4-H Spear P, Blue, Grand Champion Jesse Ramon, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Bonnie Siegfried, Tonasket, FFATonaske, Blue Conner Timm, Oroville, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Jason Townsend, Keller, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Jill Townsend, Okanogan, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, Blue 02 - Intermediate, 12-15 years Clancy Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Mylan Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue, Callback Logan Bird, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Kaylee Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Maisie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Joe Taylor, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Kacie Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Reserve Champion Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFAOmak,Blue, Grand Champion Jenna Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue, Callback Whitney Wilson, Riverside, Junior Open, Blue Paxton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Callback 03 - Junior, 8-11 years Kaden Beetchenow, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Daisy Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Trace Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue James Dell, Malott, Blue Lindsey Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Tyler Popelier, Okanogan, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue, Call back Jade Ramon,Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Kalli Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Vance Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Grand Brooke Richey, Tonasket, Junior

Open, Blue Jaycie Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Steele Rico, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Quincy Scott, Carlton, Junior Open, Blue Presley Somes, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Tillman Timm, Oroville, Junior Open, Blue Kady Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Reserve Champion Jace Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Johnny Walsborn, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Afton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Darton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Callback 04 - Pre-Junior/Little People, 7 & under Veronica Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Reed Bowling, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Taytem Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Tylee Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Chad Busching, Okanogan, 4-H Mid Valley Rangers, Blue Wes Dagnon, Loomis, Junior Open, Blue Cyrus Kruse, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Joseph Kruse Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Colson Kuchenbuch, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Ryanne Pyper, Ephrata, Junior Open, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Grand Champion Ben Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Olivia Robbins, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Cass Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Raci Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Hudson Somes, Omak, Blue Prairie Somes, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Paisley Timm, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Cale Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Cooper Townsend Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Bettie Wehmeyer, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Bettie Wehmeyer, Tonasket, Blue Alzora Wilson, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Grace Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Joel Wilson, Tonasket, Junior, Blue, Reserve Champion Patsy Wilson, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue 116 - Herdsmanship - Beef Barn 01 - Beef Barn Herdsmanship

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Clancy Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Mylan Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Brenden Asmussen, Tonasket, FFATonasket, Blue Emilee Beetchenow, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Kaden Beetchenow, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Logan Bird, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Ryan Bird, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Daisy Bobadilla Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Kaylee Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Veronica Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Reed Bowling, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Taytem Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Trace Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Tylee Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Chad Busching, Okanogan, 4-H Mid Valley Rangers, Blue Victor Chacon, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Wes Dagnon, Loomis, Junior Open, Blue Cameron Daigneau, Omak, FFAOmak, Blue Damion Dell, Malott, Blue James Dell, Malott, Blue Drew Dezellem, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Rebecca Hawley, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Braden Hennigs, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Alexis Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Lindsey Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Cyrus Kruse, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Joseph Kruse, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Carter Kuchenbuch, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Colson Kuchenbuch, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Ruben Laurie, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Marquette Miller, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Tyler Popelier, Okanogan, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Cory Predoehl, Omak, 4-H Spear P, Blue Cory Predoehl, Omak, 4-H Spear P, Blue Ryanne Pyper, Ephrata, Junior Open, Blue Jade Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Jesse Ramon, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Maisie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Kalli Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Vance Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Ben Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Brooke Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Jaycie Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Steele Rico, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue

Olivia Robbins, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Cass Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Raci Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Bonnie Siegfried, Tonasket, FFATonasket, Blue Hudson Somes, Omak, Blue Presley Somes, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Joe Taylor, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Conner Timm, Oroville, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Paisley Timm, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Raegan Timm, Oroville, Junior Open, Blue Tillman Timm, Oroville, Junior Open, Blue Cale Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Cooper Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Jason Townsend, Keller, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Jill Townsend, Okanogan, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Kolbe Tverberg, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Madilyn Tverberg, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Kacie Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Kady Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFA-Omak, Blue Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFA-Omak, Blue Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFA-Omak, Blue Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, Blue Lexie Wahl, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Jace Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Jenna Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Johnny Walsborn, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Bettie Wehmeyer, Tonasket, Blue Alzora Wilson, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Grace Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Grand Champion Joel Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Patsy Wilson, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Whitney Wilson, Riverside, Junior Open, Blue Afton Wood, Omak,Junior Open, Blue Darton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Paxton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Weston Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue 131 - Educational Display - Beef Cattle 01 - Beef Cattle Educational Display Clancy Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Mylan Andrews Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Brenden Asmussen, Tonasket, FFATonasket, Blue Emilee Beetchenow, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Kaden Beetchenow, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Logan Bird, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue

Ryan Bird, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Daisy Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Kaylee Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Veronica Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Reed Bowling, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Sydney Breshears, Loomis, FFATonasket, Blue Taytem Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Trace Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Tylee Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Chad Busching, Okanogan, 4-H Mid Valley Rangers, Blue Victor Chacon, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Steer Barn Display, Blue Cameron Daigneau, Omak, FFAOmak, Blue, Grand Champion Damion Dell, Malott, Blue James Dell, Malott, Blue Drew Dezellem, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Rebecca Hawley, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Braden Hennigs, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Claire Ives, Okanogan, Blue Cooper Ives, Okanogan, Blue Alexis Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Lindsey Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Cyrus Kruse Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Joseph Kruse Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Carter Kuchenbuch, Okanogan, Junior Open,Blue Colson Kuchenbuch, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Ruben Laurie, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Marquette Miller, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Tyler Popelier, Okanogan, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Cory Predoehl, Omak, 4-H Spear P, Blue Ryanne Pyper, Ephrata, Junior Open, Blue Jade Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Jesse Ramon, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Maisie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Grand Champion Kalli Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Vance Reese, Omak, Junior Open Novice entry, 1st year, Blue Ben Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Brooke Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Jaycie Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Steele Rico, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Olivia Robbins, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Raci Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Quincy Scott, Carlton, Junior Open, ed display, Blue Bonnie Siegfried, Tonasket, FFATonasket, Blue Hudson Somes, Omak, Blue Prairie Somes, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Presley Somes, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Joe Taylor, Brewster, FFA-Brewster,

PAGE B3

Blue Renea Taylor, Malott, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue, Grand Champion Carson Timm, Oroville, Junior Open, Blue Conner Timm, Oroville, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Paisley Timm, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Raegan Timm, Oroville, Junior Open, Blue Tillman Timm, Oroville, Junior Open, Blue Cale Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Cooper Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Jason Townsend, Keller, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue, Reserve Champion Jill Townsend, Okanogan, 4-H Big Goose Kids, Blue Kolbe Tverberg, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Madilyn Tverberg, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Kacie Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Kady Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Kelsey Vejraska Omak, FFAOmak, Blue, Reserve Champion Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, Blue Lexie Wahl, Tonasket, FFA-Tonasket, Blue Jace Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Jenna Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Johnny Walsborn, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Bettie Wehmeyer, Tonasket, Blue Cody White, Twisp, 4-H Methow Valley Cascaders, Blue Shelby White, Twisp, 4-H Methow Valley Cascaders, Blue Grace Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Joel Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Whitney Wilson, Riverside, Junior Open History of WSDA-Brands/ Timeline, Blue, Reserve Champion Afton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Darton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Paxton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Weston Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue 142 - ABERDEEN-ANGUS PUREBRED BREEDING CATTLE-YOUTH 07 - Junior bull calf (5-8 months old) Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFA-Omak, Blue, Grand Champion 11 - Senior yearling heifer (21-24 months old) Cory Predoehl, Omak, 4-H Spear P, Blue, Best overall female Kelsey Vejraska Omak, FFAOmak, Blue, Reserve Champion 21 - Cow and calf Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFA-Omak, Blue, Grand Champion 145 - Grade Beef-Youth 10 - Two-year-old heifer Cooper Ives, Okanogan, Blue, Grand Champion 12 - Junior yearling heifer (17-20 months old) Jace Wallace, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue, Reserve Champion Jenna Wallace, Okanogan, Junior

SEE RESULTS | PG B4

submitted photo

Grace Wilson, from Tonasket, she won a Grand Champion Market Steer.

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PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015

OKANOGAN COUNTY FAIR RESULTS | FROM B3

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Quilts of all styles and colors adorned the Home Economics Barn, including this hand-quilted masterpiece by Lois Hale of Omak, featuring a forest and lake scene bordered by appliqueed families of quail (on the right).

Open, Blue, Grand Champion 27 - Feeder Steer Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Reserve Champion Joel Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Grand Champion 146 - Bottle Babies 01 - All bottle baby calves (9 months and under) Veronica Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Reed Bowling, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Taytem Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Tylee Buchert, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Chad Busching, Okanogan, 4-H Mid Valley Rangers, Blue Wes Dagnon, Loomis, Junior Open, Blue James Dell, Malott, Blue Cyrus Kruse, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Joseph Kruse, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Colson Kuchenbuch, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Ryanne Pyper, Ephrata, Junior Open, Blue Ben Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Olivia Robbins, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Cass Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Raci Rothrock, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Hudson Somes, Omak, Blue Presley Somes, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Paisley Timm, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Cale Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Cooper Townsend, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Bettie Wehmeyer, Tonasket, Blue Alzora Wilson, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Patsy Wilson, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue 147 - Market Beef 01 - Market Steers Clancy Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Mylan Andrews, Okanogan, 4-H Top Guns, Blue Brenden Asmussen, Tonasket, FFATonasket, Blue, Call back Logan Bird, Okanogan, Junior Open, Blue Kaylee Bobadilla, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Victor Chacon, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue, Call back Drew Dezellem, Brewster, FFA-Brewster, Blue Alexis Jones, Okanogan, 4-H F.U.N., Blue Cory Predoehl, Omak, 4-H Spear P, Blue Maisie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Kalli Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Vance Reese, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Brooke Richey, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue Tillman Timm, Oroville, Junior Open,

Blue, Call back Kacie Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Kady Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Kelsey Vejraska, Omak, FFA-Omak, Blue, Reserve Champion Grace Wilson, Tonasket, Junior Open, Blue, Grand Champion Whitney Wilson, Riverside, Junior Open, Blue Afton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Darton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue, Call back Paxton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Weston Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue 1422 - Aberdeen-Angus Purebred Breeding Cattle-Adult 12 - Junior yearling heifer (17-20 months-old) Kacie Vejraska, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Grand Champion

FLORICULTURE 541 - Floriculture Designs 01 - Mass arrangement using mixed summer flowers, any container Shellee Duncan, Okanogan, dahliasmums etc., Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Blue 02 - Any holiday Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue 03 - All one color Claire Ives, Okanogan, Blue, Plaque 04 - Autumn arrangements, silk, fresh or dried Charlotte F. Covey, Omak, Blue 06 - Dried arrangement Sheila Corson, Omak, Blue, Reserve Champion Lori Wood , Okanogan, pussy willows, Blue 07 - Small arrangement not to exceed 8 inches Amanda Angell, Tonasket, Blue Shellee Duncan, Okanogan, Blue Amy Fenison, Okanogan, wildflower bouquet,Blue 08 - Fresh miniature arrangement not to exceed 5 inches Amy Angell, Tonasket, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue, Grand Champion 09 - Abstract design Elizabeth Fry, Omak, Blue 10 - Line design Elizabeth Fry, Omak, Blue 11 - Dried miniature arrangement not to exceed 5 inches Sheila Corson, Omak, Blue, Special award 544 - House Plants 03 - Blooming Diane Robinson, Okanogan, angel Wing Begonia, Blue 05 - Hanging Diane Robinson, Okanogan, Philodendren, Blue, Plaque 06 - Cactus Gemma Reed,Twisp, Junior, Open, Blue, Ryanne Reed, Twisp, Junior Open, Blue 09 - Any plant not mentioned Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue, Lori Wood,Okanogan, Zebra plant, Blue

Thank You...

BEYERS MARKET

for supporting my market lamb at the Fair! “We appreciate all that you do for our community!”

545 - Potted Outdoor Plants 01 - Bonsai Derric Bangert, Okanogan, Blue Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue 02 - Hanging Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 03 - Planter Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue, Grand Champion Sheila Barnes, , Loomis,, Adult, begonias, Blue Amy Fenison,Okanogan, Blue, Patti Harper, Omak, Adult, Blue, Plaque Diane Robinson, Okanogan, 3 Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue, Special Award 04 - Other Craig Harper, Omak, Adult, Blue Linda Harper, Omak,Junior Open, Blue Cindy Kennel, Twisp, Adult, Orange Begonia, Blue Diane Robinson, Okanogan, 3 A Blue Diane Robinson, Okanogan, perennial, Blue Sarah Zoss, Twisp,Adult, Pink and White Impatients, Blue 547 - Cut Flowers 002 - Aster; 3 blooms over 3 in., 1 color Amy Fenison, Okanogan, pink, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 003 - Aster; 3 blooms over 3 in., mixed color Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue Cooper Ives, Okanogan, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 004 - Aster; 3 blooms under 3 in., 1 color Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 005 - Aster; 3 blooms under 3 in., mixed color Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 006 - Aster, dwarf; 1 spray Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 007 - Bachelor buttons; 3 blooms Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue, Special Award 008 - Begonia, tuberous; 1 spray Sheila Barnes, , Loomis,, Adult, orange, Blue, Reserve Champion Sheila Barnes, , Loomis,, Adult, red, Blue 011 - Calendula, double; 3 blooms Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 012 - Claendula, crested, center made up of quills; 1 bloom Charlee Buchert, Tonasket, Junior Open, Calendula, Blue 017 - Cosmos, Bipinnatus, white and pink shades; 1 spray Claire Ives, Okanogan, Blue 018 - Cosmos, Sulphureus, gold and red shades; 1 spray Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, Blue

Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 020 - Geranium, single flower; 1 stem Buzz Berney, Okanogan, Red Geranium, Blue Jean Berney, Okanogan, Pink Geranium, Blue, Elizabeth Fry, Omak, Geranium, Blue Jayson Harper, OmakJunior Open, Blue Linda Harper, OmakJunior Open, Blue Patti Harper, Omak, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 021 - Geranium, double flowered; 1 stem Elizabeth Fry, Omak, Double-flowered Geranium, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, r, Blue 023 - Geranium, Scented Leaf; 1 spray (blossom not required) Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 024 - Marigold, orange, yellow, bicolor, white; 1 bloom over 3 in. Barry Detwiler, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Shellee Duncan, Okanogan, orange or yellow, Blue Shirley Hayse, Conconully, Adult, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, y, Blue Blake Moler, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Mellody Obryan, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Bettie Wehmeyer, Tonasket, marigold, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, yellow, Blue 025 - Marigold, orange, yellow, bicolor, white; 1 bloom under 3 in. Shirley Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Charlee Buchert, Tonasket, Junior Open, Marigold, Blue Linda Harper, Omak, Junior Open, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, orange, Blue Robert Wehmeyer, Tonasket, marigold, Blue 026 - Marigold, miniature orange, yellow, bicolor, white; 1 spray Kathy Duchow, Tonasket, Arrangement in blue and orange, Blue, Plaque Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 028 - Pansy, mixed colors; 3 blooms Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Beth Yarnell, Omak, pansy mixed colors, Blue 029 - Pansy, one color; 3 blooms Elizabeth Fry, Omak, one color Pansy, 3 blooms, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Beth Yarnell, Omak, pansy, one color,Blue 030 - Petunia, single; 1 spray Shirley Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Sadie Clark, Loomis, Junior Open, pastel single petunias, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, b, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, pink or blue, Blue 031 - Petunia, double; 1 spray Elaine Witters, Okanogan, b, Blue 032 - Petunia, single ruffled or fringed; 1 spray Cooper Ives, Okanogan, Blue, Elaine Witters, Okanogan, blue or red, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, unknown,Blue 033 - Petunia, double ruffled or fringed; 1 spray Elaine Witters, Okanogan, pink maybe, Blue 036 - Snapdragon, Rocket single; 1 stem Amy Fenison, Okanogan, multicolor, Blue 038 - Snapdragon, any other; 1 stem Sadie Clark, Loomis, Junior Open, burgundy and cream snapdragon, Blue Amy Fenison, Okanogan, multi color, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, snapdragon, Blue 039 - Sunflower, yellow; 1 stem Shirley Bowden, Okanogan, Blue Amy Fenison, Okanogan, yellow, Blue Jessica Heinlen, Tonasket, Junior Open, Sunflower Blue

THE EFFECTS

Shirley Bowden, Okanogan, Blue 066 - Delphinium; 1 stem Buzz Berney, Okanogan, Delphinium, Blue Jean Berney, Okanogan, Delphinium, Blue 067 - Echinacea; 1 stem Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue 068 - Fall Aster; 1 spray Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, blue, Blue 069 - Gallardia; 3 stems Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 074 - Sedum, any variety; 1 spray Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue 076 - Yarrow, white or pastel; 3 stems of 1 color Nancy Bangert, Okanogan, Blue Amy Fenison, Okanogan, red, Blue 078 - Any perennial not listed Stephanie L. Bedard, Omak, Adult, Kalanchoe, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, u, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, one, Blue 079 - Any perennial not listed Charlee Buchert, Tonasket, Junior Open, Black Eyed Susan, Blue 080 - Any perennial not listed Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 081 - Gladiolus, large spike Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 083 - Rose, bud (hybrid tea); 1 bloom Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, garden party, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, orange, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, yellow, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, Fragrant Cloud, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, American Pride, Blue 084 - Rose, Grandiflora or Floribunda; 1 stem Elaine Witters, Okanogan, orange, Blue 086 - Rose, climber; 1 spray Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, pink, Blue 090 - Dahlia, formal decorative, over 8 in.; 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, Spartacus, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, Envy, Blue Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 091 - Dahlia, formal decorative, under 8 in.; 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, purple, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, dark red, Blue Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Lynne Sullivan, Okanogan, Adult, Salmon, Blue Lynne Sullivan, Okanogan, Adult, yellow/pink tip (Haii), Blue

Thank You ... for supporting my market lamb at the Fair! CJC Farms

“We appreciate all that you do for our community!”

~Jacie Deebach Let’s face it, living with hearing loss can be frustrating, even dangerous. Hearing aids can allow you to function better in all areas of your life:

Your Safety

Your Family

Your grandson’s silly secrets. Your wife’s soft “I love yous.” These are sounds you definitely don’t want to miss.

Your Work

Megan Heinlen, Tonasket, Junior Open, Sunflower, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Afton Wood, Omak, Junior Open, Blue 040 - Sunflower, mixed color; 1 stem Shellee Duncan, Okanogan, brown, Blue, Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Jonas Zoss, Twisp, Junior Open, Multi-color Sunflower, Blue 041 - Sunflower, any other; 1 stem Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, yellow, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Joshua Zoss, Twisp, Junior Open, Teddy Bear, Blue 042 - Verbena; 3 stems Cindy Kennel, Twisp, Adult, Pink and White,Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, red probably, Blue 043 - Zinnia, dahlia type, one color; 3 stems Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue, Special Award 044 - Zinnia, dahlia type, mixed colors; 3 stems Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, r, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 046 - Zinnia, Cactus flowered, mixed color; 3 stems Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, y, Blue 047 - Zinnia, pompom, one color; 3 stems Shellee Duncan, Okanogan, pom, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 048 - Zinnia, pompom, mixed color; 3 stems Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, small, Blue 050 - Zinnia, drf, mixed color; 3 stems Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, o, Blue, Cindy Kennel, Twisp, Adult, Yellow with Red Speckles, Blue, Reserve Champion 051 - Any annual not listed Faith Davison, Omak, Junior Open, Love Lies Bleeding, Blue, Special Award Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, a, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Beth Yarnell, Omak, coleus, Blue 055 - Chrysanthemum, cushion; 1 spray Asher Fenison, Okanogan, yellow, Blue Judah Fenison, Okanogan, yellow, Blue 056 - Chrysanthemum, button; 1 spray Shellee Duncan, Okanogan, button, Blue 059 - Chrysanthemum, decorative; 1 bloom if over 3 in., or 3 stems if under 3 in. Hattie Buchert, Tonasket, Chrysanthemum, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, white, Blue 061 - Daisy, Gloriosa single, mixed or one color; 3 stems

A car horn. An ambulance siren. The fire alarm. Hearing loss can cause you to miss important signals that alert you to danger.

Your Happiness

If you’re missing important information on phone calls or in meetings, you may not be working at the level you want to be.

Do you feel uncomfortable at social gatherings? Are you missing the rewarding sounds of nature or your favorite music? Don’t let hearing loss affect your quality of life.

For your complementary consultation call 509-422-3100

Moomaw Hearing Center, Inc. ~Maia Deebach

5 W. Central Ave., Omak • 509-422-3100 • Toll free 800-898-HEAR (4327)

J


OCTOBER 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

OKANOGAN COUNTY FAIR

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Sewn articles on display in the Home Economics barn included awardwinning bags and aprons. Lynne Sullivan Okanogan, Adult, lavender with white tips, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 092 - Dahlia, informal decorative, over 8 in.; 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, dark red, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, white, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, purple, Blue Lynne Sullivan, Okanogan, Adult, red/ yellow paint, large, Blue

Lynne Sullivan, Okanogan, Adult, Pink dinnerplate, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 093 - Dahlia, informal decorative, under 8 in.; 1 bloom Sadie Clark, Loomis, Junior Open, burgundy dahlia, Blue Elizabeth Fry, Omak, Informal decorative Dahlia, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, Pink/yellow, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, white with lavender tip, pale, Blue

Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, red with yellow tips, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, burgundy, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, Yellow, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, yellow, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, Pink, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, White/burgundy, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, red/ yellow paint/pom type, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, Purple pom type, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 094 - Dahlia, cactus, over 8 in.; 1 bloom Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 095 - Dahlia, cactus, under 8 in.; 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, pink, Blue Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, Burgundy cactus, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, White with pink tips, Blue Lynne Sullivan,Okanogan, Adult, white, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 096 - Dahlia, semi cactus, over 8 in.; 1 bloom Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 097 - Dahlia, semi cactus, under 8 in., 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, dark red, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, Wild Cat, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, purple, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, white, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, red, Blue

Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, yellow, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 098 - Dahlia, incurved cactus, over 8 in.; 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, incurved cactus, Blue Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue 099 - Dahlia, incurved cactus, under 8 in.; 1 bloom Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 100 - Dahlia, lacinated, over 8 in.; 1 bloom Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, yellow, Blue Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue, Special ard Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 101 - Dahlia, lacinated, under 8 in.; 1 bloom Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Lynne Sullivan, Okanogan, Adult, lavender (lacinated?), Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 102 - Dahlia, ball; 3 blooms Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, dark red, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 104 - Dahlia, pompom; 3 blooms Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, yellow/ red, Blue Lynne Sullivan, Okanogan, Adult, mini red, Blue 105 - Dahlia, coralette; 1 stem Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 106 - Dahlia, terlily; 1 stem Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, pink, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, purple, Blue

Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 107 - Dahlia, any variety not listed Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, yellow, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, white, Blue Patti Brown, Omak, flower, Blue Gloriaelaine Jeter, Okanogan, small, Blue Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, fluffy, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Elaine Witters, Okanogan, small under 3 inches, varigated unsure of variety, Blue 108 - Dahlia, orchid type Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, purple, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, yellow, Blue 109 - Dahlia, single Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, Junk Yard Dog, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, Bashful, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, two-

toned pink, Blue Sadie Clark, Loomis, Junior Open, one cut dahlia, Blue 110 - Dahlia, powder puff Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue 111 - Dahlia, peony Amy Fenison, Okanogan, purple, Blue 112 - Dahlia, stellar Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, Crazy Legs, Blue Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, yellow/ red, Blue, Special Award Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult, red, Blue Cora Lee Thompson, Adult, Blue, Special Award 113 - Chinese Lanterns, fresh; 1 spray Sheila Barnes, Loomis, Adult,1 stem, Blue, Grand Champion 118 - Statice, fresh; 3 blooms of any color, Amy Fenison, Okanogan, purple, Blue 122 - Any other fresh not listed, mixed color; 3 stems or blooms Maggie Ramon, Tonasket, Junior Open, anemone, Blue

Thank You...

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PAGE B6 6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • October 8, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale OROVILLE. 1 AC HOME 1,048 SF 3 BR to reduced $87,000! Located on A-Highway 97. Lease option. Call 803-832-6051.

Lots & Acreage Nice Spacious lot for double or single wide manufactured home pads & electric box septic domestice & irrigation water furnished. 1mile S Tonasket Bridge on Hwy 7 West Side John Oakes Rd. 509 486 2594

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

For Rent

Help Wanted

Oroville Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no inside smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303

Carrier Wanted:

The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract OROVILLE Nice 1 BD Upstairs. No delivery route. Please call pets. $425 per month. 509- 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / 3050 or email 560-3145 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Oroville Senior Apartment for rent on lake, N. Oroville, 3 mile, Boundary Point Rd., 2 bdrm, Post your comments on recent good shape, no smoking, no articles and let your voice be heard. pets. Taking applications, www.gazette-tribune.com $675/month, first and last. (509)476-2449

Announcements

Sweet Dreams

Lotions Oils Creams

Powders Gag Gifts Adult Toys

Hours: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.

509-826-5486

East Side 831 Omak Ave., Omak

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

www.gazette-tribune.com

Health & Rehab Clinics Physical Therapist Full Time Occupational Therapist Full Time Physical Therapy Assistant Full Time Nursing Charge Nurse Full Time RN Veteran’s Clinic Full Time Laboratory Lab Technologist Per Diem Come Join our Team of Heroes Apply in person or through our website at www.nvhospital.org NVH Human Resources Department 203 South Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 (509)486-3185. hr@nvhospital.org

Found

Crosswords

Across 1. “Check this out!” 5. Chowder morsel 9. Like a stuffed shirt 13. Diamond Head locale 14. LP player (hyphenated) 15. Put an edge on 17. Arab League member 18. Aardvark fare 19. Be bombastic 20. Entices (2 wds) 22. Small fruit-filled pastry

24. “The Three Faces of ___”

3. Having a pleasing figure

25. “It’s no ___!”

4. Correct pitch

26. “A jealous mistress”: Emerson

5. Light, open horse-drawn carriage

27. “___ fallen ...” (contraction)

6. Small Old World finch

28. “Do the Right Thing” pizzeria owner

7. Astern

29. Causes oneself to move

9. Myopic

31. Barbie’s beau

10. “Beetle Bailey” creator Walker

32. Assignation

11. Dissimilar

34. Feeling remorse for one’s sins

12. Square things (2 wds)

36. Institution for parentless children

16. Hinged catch that prevents backward wheel movement

39. One who makes ready

21. Deductions

42. Draconian

23. “Gladiator” setting

46. Call, as a game

30. In pieces

47. Reach

33. Absorb, with “up”

50. “___ moment”

35. Oolong, for one

51. Santa’s helper

37. Pleased with oneself

52. Male sheep (British) 53. “... ___ he drove out of sight”

38. Persistent naggings, esp. of husband

54. Caribbean, e.g.

39. Fast

55. Shore, esp. a resort area

40. Brush up on

57. Common deer of Europe and Asia (2 wds)

41. Capable of being expressed in words

59. Ban

43. Red skin rash

60. Cat’s scratcher

44. Villain, at times

62. Jerk

45. Listen attentively

63. Acrylic fiber

48. Freshen

64. Sky box? 65. On the safe side, at sea

49. Served aboard an aircraft or ship

66. Brings home

56. Dirty coat

67. Lentil, e.g.

58. June 6, 1944 (hyphenated)

68. Ball material

61. Deception

Down 1. Having the least wealth 2. Russian urn

8. Wrong

PUBLIC ONLINE AUCTION Producers of High Quality Canola Oil & Expeller-Pressed Canola Meal Formerly of Carbon Cycle Crush

Featured equipment include French screw press (rebuilt in 2014), Bliss ER-2615 hammermill, Brock cone bottom hoppers, Bobcat S185 skid steer, and much more.

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Your Family, Your Health, Your Choice

We are looking for YOU to join our team! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OMAK MEDICAL Pharmacy Technician Full time. Bilingual preferred. Occasional travel to Brewster required. Roomer Full time. Bilingual required OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics

BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Public Notices

Auctions October 20th – 22nd. Inspections October 19th – 20th.

BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Patient Navigator Full time, 32 hrs/week, Bilingual required

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

ANSWERS

North Valley Hospital District Employment Opportunities

Health General

TONASKET MEDICAL Lead RN Full time See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

For more details, visit www.rabin.com or call (415) 522-5700.

Garage & Yard Sale Oroville Friday and Saturday, Oct 9th & 10th, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1504 Birch (corner of the alley and Central). Household items, toys, clothes and much more nice clean stuff.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF October 5, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. MISCELLANEOUS Jacuzzi® Hydrotherapy Shower is your own personal Fountain of Youth. Call 1-888-586-5951 and mention code 101162. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ADOPTION College Professor & At-Home-Parent, Music, World Travel, Laughter, LOVE awaits your baby. Expenses paid 1-800-933-1975 *Patti & Andrew*

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE

Think Green!

COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: ROBERT L. PFEIFER, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00091-7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: September 22, 2015 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: October 1, 2015. /s/Eric Michael Pfeifer ERIC MICHAEL PFEIFER Personal Representative /s/Roger Castelda Roger A. Castelda, WSBA #5571 Attorney for Pfeifer Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 1, 8, 15, 2015. #OVG659680 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 10/13/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2010 Harley Davidson FLHR Lic# 2B4191 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 8, 2015. #OVG660827 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 10/13/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1998 Mercury Sable Lic# AQN3475 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 8, 2015. #OVG660828 Public Notice Notice is hereby given that a workshop on the 2016 budget will be held on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 at 4:30 pm in the Council Room at the Tonasket City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA. All interested persons are invited to attend and those with special hearing, language or access needs should contact City Hall, 509-4862132, 24 hrs. prior to the workshop. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Alice Attwood, Clerk/Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 8, 2015. #OVG661618

Continued on next page

Did you know?

We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper recycled for

gardens, fire starter & more!

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


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Sponsored by

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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We’re more than just print!

Visit our website.

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Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

Puzzle 42 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.69)

PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council has set their schedule for the 2016 Budget Workshops. All Budget Workshops will be held in the City Council Chambers. Budget Workshop dates and times are: -Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 8:30 am (all day workshop) -Tuesday, October 13, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 6:30 pm The public has a right to attend any workshop and make comments.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife intends to rehabilitate Rat Lake, Mouse Lake, Big Green Lake, and Little Green Lake in Okanogan County during the week of October 18th-24th, 2015. Lake rehabilitation involves the treatment of the lake water with the pesticide rotenone to eradicate undesirable species of fish. Rotenone is non-persistent in the environment and non-toxic to humans or livestock at levels used to eradicate fish. The undesirable species of fish in Rat and Mouse lakes are bullhead catfish and crappie, and bluegill in Big and Little Green Lakes. These species have overpopulated the respective lakes and have rendered the stocked-trout fisheries ineffective and economically unfeasible. Rotenone is a naturally-occurring and organic compound. The form of pesticide and active ingredient to be used are powdered rotenone at ?8.7% active ingredient and liquid rotenone at 5% active ingredient. The targeted total concentration of rotenone in Rat and Mouse lakes will be less than or equal to 4 parts per million and in the Green lakes will be less than or equal to 2 parts per million. Notices will be posted at public boat launches, and other areas of normal public access to the water. Please obey the following water use restric-

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PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held during the regular Council meeting of the Tonasket City Council on Tuesday, October 13, 2015. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm in the City Hall Council Chambers, Tonasket, Washington. The purpose of the hearing is to review the 2016 Preliminary Budget and for setting the tax levy for 2016. All interested persons are invited to attend and those with special language, hearing and access needs should call City Hall 24 hours prior to the hearing, 509-486-2132. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 1, 8, 2015. #OVG659724

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is todifficulty place the numbers Puzzle 41 (Easy, rating 0.44) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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Wildlife, District 6 Fish Biologist: Ryan Fortier at 509-997-0316. This pesticide treatment is regulated under permit by the Washington Department of Ecology Water Quality Program, Eastern WA Regional Office (509) 456-2926. These pesticides have been approved for this purpose by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington Department of Agriculture. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 8, 2015. #OVG661395

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tions within the posted treatment area: 1) Do not use dead fish for food or feed. 2) Do not use water treated with rotenone to irrigate crops. 3) Do not consume treated water until the Department has notified you that the active rotenone concentration is less than 40 parts per billion (0.04 parts per million). This usually takes four to six weeks. 4) Do not swim in the lake until the application has been completed and the rotenone has been thoroughly mixed in the water. The above list details the water use restrictions applicable to Rat, Mouse, Big Green, and Little Green lakes for the duration of rotenone toxicity. Rotenone toxicity will persist for 3 to 8 weeks. Water use restrictions will be removed when the lake detoxifies. For more information concerning the treatment, contact the applicator, Washington Department of Fish and

1

Continued from previous page

ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, October 8, 22, November 5, 19, 2015 #OVG655239

Sudoku

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

PAGE B7 7

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OCTOBER 8. 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE October 8, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 3 8

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Find The Right

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you. Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

www.gazette-tribune.com 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

816 Golden : Large 4 bedroom 1.75 bath house on corner lot near the schools. This nearly 2400 square foot multi-level home has many updates with new flooring on the upper level, a nice deck / porch at the front door, and a paved driveway from Golden St.

SUN LAKES REALTY

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS De-Cluttering Solutions for Your Home

Well-kept home on DNR leased land.

Additional acreage on leased land provides extra privacy! MLS#810797 $72,000

#1 Top Producer Office in North County

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

Low 10% Down Seller Financing

Delightful Cozy Home. Newly remodeled w/vinyl windows & Pretty floors. Partial Basement Possible Seller Financing w/Low Down Carport, Furnace $118,000

Pack up all your knickknacks, anything that is sitting on top of a countertop, table or other flat surfaces. Anything that you haven’t used in at least a year? Give away what you can, throw away or donate unused items.

HILLTOP REALTY

MOLSON-CHESAW AREA

40 ACRES m/l. Nice 1995 Manuf Home with Outstanding View. Very Private. 3-Bdrm, 2-Bath. Alaska Pak Insulation. Excellent Access. Huge 30x36 Garage.Equipment Shed/Lean-to/Hay. Small Barn. Corrals. Fenced & Cross-Fenced. Well Maintained Property. Mostly Paved County Road. Excellent Value at $229,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory

Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES

Concrete

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

RYAN W. GUNN

Fabrication

n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil

Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

SUPPLIERS OF:

– Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Something for Everyone!

Bridal Registry  Kitchen Gadgets Candles  Gifts  Collectibles

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

Check us out!

OROVILLE

“The Water Professionals”

MINI STORAGE

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates!

Hidden Treasures

Well Drilling

Law

n Criminal

Marylou’s

Storage

Attorney at Law

n Family

Gifts

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power / Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

Serving all of Eastern Washington...  Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems

Colville  Spokane  RepublicLic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory


PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 8, 2015

OBITUARIES

JOHN ‘DAVE’ CERTAIN

John “Dave” Certain passed away on September 17, 2015. Dave was born to Glen and June

CHARLES A. JOHNSON

Charles A. (Chuck) Johnston, passed away September 27, 2015. Born June 1, 1948. Preceded in death by one brother and his parents.

Certain on March 2, 1938 in Wenatchee, Washington. He graduated from Wenatchee High School and immediately entered the Marines. Dave married Sharon Reich in 1956 and they had three children, Mark Certain (Deceased), Shad Certain and Kristine Certain. They resided in the Wenatchee area. Dave was employed in the Wenatchee Valley throughout his lifetime, from construction, delivery truck driver to dump truck driver, working on numerous construction projects, including the Chief Joseph and the Grand Coulee Dams. Dave was a proud member of the Teamsters Union. Dave was also a proud member of 50+ years of the Grand Lodge of Masons #112 and Fraternal Order of Eagles. In 1976, Dave married Lila M. Baldwin of Tonasket, Wash. where they both resided. Dave enjoyed his grand and great

grandchildren, sharing stories of his youth and work experiences. Dave also enjoyed taking long drives around the Valley. Dave was preceded in death by his parents, Glen and June Certain, son Mark Certain. Dave is survived by his wife, Lila M. Certain; Brother, Ron (Melody) Certain of Black Canyon, Arizona; Shad (Shirley) Certain of Moore, Oklahoma; Kristine Certain-Morgan of Bakersfield, California; Marion (Ila) Baldwin of Tonasket, Washington; Lila A Baldwin-Searer of Juneau, Alaska; Nancy (Patrick) Arasmith of Tonasket, Washington and Juneau, Alaska and Rebecca Timboe of Wenatchee, Wash., 16 grandchildren and 19 greatgrandchildren. A military ceremony will be held at the Tonasket Crematory at 1 p.m. sharp on October 10, 2015. A celebration of his Life will follow at The Eagles in Tonasket, Washington, at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Shriner’s Children’s Hospital, Spokane, Wash.

Chuck spent most of his life as a dairyman in the Chehalis, Wash. area. He also worked in sawmills in Chehalis and Oroville, Wash. The last few years he’s worked at North Valley Nursing Home in Tonasket, Wash. He is survived by four children,

Richard, Ann Marie, Charles and Zachary, their spouses and several grandchildren. Also siblings - four brothers and one sister and their spouses. Memorial service will be held at a later date in the Chehalis area.

& Entertainment Bonaparte

FALL Hours Thur. - Sun. 9am- 8pm

Lake Resort & Restaurant

Prime Rib every Sat.

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Ph. 509-486-2828

1307 Main Street, Oroville 509.476.3007

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

HOURS:

MONDAY NEW TUESDAY WEDNESDAY HOURS THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

Restaurant

Bar

4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. ——— CLOSED ——— 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Close 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m.

MONDAY STEAK NIGHT w/ 8 oz. Ball Tip $13.50 THURSDAY SMOKED RIBEYE SPECIAL $17.50 Served from 6 p.m. until gone PASTIME to go call 476-3007

Please allow 30 - 40 minutes for your order

HAZEL ETTA JONES

Hazel Etta Jones

DINING

Hazel Etta Jones, born 1933 in Jordon, Montana to Edgar and Hazel Jones. She passed away suddenly in Long Beach, California. Hazel was a graduate of Oroville High School in Oroville, Wash. in 1951. She is survived by four sons, four daughters and countless grandchildren. She sends her love to all that knew her.

Advertise your specials and events here! INLAND MONUMENT CO.

GIFT CARDS Now Available! Now booking HOLIDAY PARTIES! Check “PASTIME BAR AND GRILL - Oroville” on Facebook for upcoming specials!

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

Monuments & Bronze

CEMETERY MARKERS

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Are you a survivor? On Oct. 1 will will publish our feature page of survivors to help encourage newly diagnosed. We will continue through the month of October to publish helpful information, survivors and more.

There is life after cancer.

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Healthcare Services Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology

Columbia River

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

To be included on the feature page or special sections, fill out the form below or pick one up at our office.

Name: __________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________

10

ACROSS the region

1.800.660.2129

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Email: __________________________________________________________ Days, Months, Years as a survivor: ____________________________________

Locations

& growing

509-826-1800

Toll free: 866-826-6191 www.okbhc.org

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

 Behavioral

Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

CLINIC

 Radiology

• Mental Health • Chemical Dependency • Developmental Disorders • Psychiatric Services • Therapeutic Housing

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Anti

Services

In Tonasket & Oroville

OMAK

For additional information please contact Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 or chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Phone: __________________________________________________________

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

DENTISTRY

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

John “David” Certain

Out on the Town...

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

OPTICAL

________________________________________________________________

Advertise In The

Occupation: _____________________________________________________ Interests / Hobbies: ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ I have approved by signature to have this information published on the above described feature page or special section of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune.

Signed: _______________________________________ Date: _____________

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., or P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 / www.gazette-tribune.com

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 08, 2015  

October 08, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 08, 2015  

October 08, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune