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FALL SPORTS SEASON

Benefit for Helen Ray

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Helping to raise funds for medical expenses - Oroville Eagles, Saturday, Sept. 26

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Water forum returns to Osoyoos

BIG WORLD OF FLIGHT

Drought, mussels, climate at top of agenda “With climate change and population growth, the management of water is OSOYOOS, B.C. – With a drought still going to be critical. We will sink or swim gripping parts of B.C. and Washington, based on the strength of our relationconcerns over the possibility of a costly ships.” Osoyoos Mayor Sue McKortoff agrees, mussel invasion, and more, community members and agencies on both sides of pointing to the lake that defines her community and straddles the Canada-U.S. the border are coming together to talk. The Okanagan Basin Water Board border. “We must look after our lake. It (OBWB), the Town of Osoyoos and the is the lifeblood of our community and we International Joint Commission (IJC) have to be vigilant in protecting it.” Reviewing the topics are organizing the at the forum, includOsoyoos Lake Water Science Forum, Oct. “The drought, invasive ing toxic blue-green algae blooms which 7-9, at the Sonora species, making sure have been an issue Centre in Osoyoos, B.C. This is the third there is enough water in Osoyoos Lake in the McKortoff noted such forum, with prefor fish, are key issues past, that she will be attendvious events held in 2007 and 2011. we need to coordinate ing as the mayor, but as a concerned “The drought, invaon with Washington also citizen. Hearing from sive species, making State,” those who are leading sure there is enough research on these topwater for fish, are Anna Warwick Sears, Exec. Director, ics will certainly help key issues we need to Okanagan Basin Water Board as a decision maker, coordinate on with both at her council Washington State,” said OBWB Executive Director Anna table and as an OBWB Board Director, Warwick Sears. “These three issues alone and as a resident. “The drought this year has had everyrepresent millions of dollars for our one sit up and take notice about not economies. “This is a really important gather- using water indiscriminately,” she said.  ing,” Sears added, saying that although Also, the recent presentation on invasive the meeting is in  Osoyoos, it relates zebra and quagga mussels at the OBWB’s to the entire Okanagan watershed from Annual Meeting was a wake-up call, Armstrong to the Columbia River, since added McKortoff. “We all have to start the waters are all connected. “We rarely looking at water differently.” Among those attending will be U.S. have a chance to talk with our counterparts in the U.S. and this is an opportu- IJC Commissioner Rich Moy of Helena, nity to meet with senior decision mak- Mont. “The last science forum was an outers, and also hear from First Nations and grassroots – residents, farmers and standing opportunity to learn about the business people – from both sides of the valley, the people who live there and the critical water management issues,” he border. “It’s about building relationships, and said. “I’m looking forward to receiving having a shared understanding of prob- updates on a number of topics, parlems so when a crisis hits you can work ticularly the cooperative management through them effectively,” said Sears. THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Gary De Von/staff photos

Oroville fifth-graders from John Ragsdale and Kelly King’s classes participated in the Big World of Flight for Education event at Oroville’s Dorothy Scott International Airport last Tuesday morning. The volunteer group of civilian pilots use aviation as a tool in motivating students to learn. Above, students learn about lift and what it takes to make an airplane fly. Right, Victoria McClun, from Mrs. King’s class learns how to target a signal mirror.

SEE FORUM| PG A3

Ambulance: Oroville Council hears concerns about ‘level of care’ from community Lifeline Ambulance Service meets city’s qualifications BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – While no one could point to a situation where the “level of care” was less now that the Emergency Services District has gone to Lifeline for ambulance service, the phrase continues to come up at Oroville City Council meetings. That concern was emphasized by Mark Bordwell, a vocal opponent of the switch to the private ambulance service. Bordwell’s wife served as a volunteer EMT for the EMS District for several years. Lisa Bordwell and her fellow volunteers gave the city an ultimatum when they all submitted their resignation letters to the city stating they would resign at the end of August if, among other

things, something wasn’t done to allevi- they have to retone for a volunteer fireate the shortage of qualified EMTs avail- fighter to drive the ambulance while the two EMTs take care of the patient in the able to respond to calls. Stating the city had been backed back. “For years 95 percent of the time we’ve into a corner, the city council and the Okanogan County Commissioners had three people respond to the scene. hired Lifeline Ambulance Service as an And what happens if we have two injuries, we’d need two emergency measure ambulances to transto fill in while a final port,” said Bordwell. decision was made as “The entire community “The way it is now we to how they felt the will suffer if we go to a can’t run a second unit district could best be ever. We shouldn’t have served. private service.” to rely on Tonasket “My concern is the Mark Bordwell sending a unit to cover level of care being Concerned Citizen for us. That means the provided by the city and Lifeline are ambulance service,” not providing the level said Bordwell at the Tuesday, Sept. 15 council meeting. “The of care we are used to.” Bordwell said the concern about the rural area requires three people on the ambulance, while we have two (through EMS not being able to get enough volunLifeline) it may be legally, but not mor- teers has been going on for several years. ally right. You can try CPR with one He said Chris Allen, who was named the spokesman for the former ambulance person, but you can’t do modern CPR.” Bordwell said that when the two mem- crew, was not the cause, “just the final ber Lifeline team responds to a scene and straw.” He said the concerns of the volunhas to transport someone to the hospital teer crew had been ignored for too long.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 39

“Too bad this much effort hadn’t gone into solving the problems. Not once did you all get together and talk this out. The EMS crew was drowning, Chris Allen threw them a lifeline,” Bordwell said. Bordwell also chided the city’s ambulance committee, Councilmen Tony Koepke and Jon Neal, for not attending Rural EMS meetings. However, Bordwell apologized when Councilman Koepke informed him that he was at nearly all the meetings to which he referred. “The entire community will suffer if we go to a private service,” concluded Bordwell. After Bordwell was done making his statement, Mayor Chuck Spieth said, “If that’s all you have we’re going to move on.” The city and county have made a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) and they received replies from both Lifeline Ambulance Service and North Star Ambulance, a company put together by Allen with the former volunteers as its employees. Chris Branch, the director of

INSIDE THIS EDITION

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Community Development, explained that the city had determined that Lifeline met the qualifications desired by the city, while North Star fell short. He said the new company could not prove that it had the accounting and administrative structures in place, nor insurance to cover liability. While the city may have approved of Lifeline’s RFQs the county, through the Okanogan County Commissioners, still plays a part in any final decisions. If Lifeline is chosen by both parties, representing Oroville and the rural EMS, to continue providing ambulance service, then both parties will decide how they will negotiate with the company for services and at what level, explained Branch. The Emergency Services District is made up of two distinct taxing districts that work in tandem to provide emergency care and transportation – city and rural. The boundaries for the EMS District are the same as the Oroville School District. The city has been administrating the district though and interlocal agreement with the county.

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Sports, Schools

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Classifieds Real Estate Obits

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

NEWS

Okanogan Complex Fire 95% contained

PAWS PRODUCE EXPANDS

Okanogan and Chelan Complex under Management Team 5 BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OMAK - The Okanogan Complex has reached 95 percent containment and the numbers of residences damaged or destroyed has been lowered to 120, from earlier reports of 123. Costs for fighting the fire to date are upwards of $44.5 million. “Firefighters have completed all suppression work on this fire. Smoke will continue to be visible near the fire perimeter and in the interior, as fuels ignite and burn until significant rain or snow falls. Parts of the fire area remain in patrol and mop up status, and most suppression repair work is finished,” according to a recent fire update from the Washington

Gary DeVon/staff photos

PAWS Produce, located on O’Neil Road south of Oroville, has built a new building 30 x 40 with a 10 foot porch and an upstairs. The building was built this spring to house owner Katie Wheat’s fruit stand and fish market. The Fish Market is open year around with wild Alaskan seafood flown in overnight. Produce season is open June through September with produce grown on 35-acres including nine varieties of peaches, two varieties of nectarines, blueberries, apples, raspberries and blackberries, pluots, plums, apricots, Wheat said she also sells Pasta Mama’s products from Richland, as well as McSweet’s pickled products and Bread Dip Company spreads. The spreads can be used for pasta sauces or dips. Wheat also has coffee from Blue Star, makes her own jams, has pure maple syrup from Québec. If that’s not enough, she Creates her own wood products, such as pepper mills and cutting boards and sells stained glass creations from Wild Women Glass in Tonasket. She has seafood that is flown in from Alaska, as well as seafood that is shelf stable including canned salmon and canned smoked salmon In addition she stocks local honey and garlic, and corn from Verbeck’s farm. She also sells Bolga baskets which she says make great gifts and DJL Designs metal art, such as signs, coat hooks, etc. Summer hours the store is open 9 to 6 weekdays, and 10 to 5 weekends seven days a week in October PAWS will switch to winter hours of five days a week, closed Monday and Tuesdays. Check the website for updated hours www.pawsproduce.com

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Interagency Management Team. On Saturday, Sept. 19, the WIIM Team 5 assumed command of the Chelan Complex. All fire suppression is complete on the Chelan Complex. On Monday, Sept. 21, management of both the Okanogan Complex and the Chelan Complex will be assumed by the California Interagency Incident Management Team 1. The fire camp for the Okanogan Complex, which had been at the Okanogan county fairgrounds, has moved to the Omak stampede grounds. The fire camp for the Tunk Block and North Star Fires is also at the Omak stampede grounds. Forest Service roads on the west side of the fire within the area closure are closed to the public. Law-enforcement personnel are enforcing road closures, which are identified with a sign or barricade. Although not every closed road is staffed, fire managers ask the public to respect the closures for firefighter and public safety.

EVACUATIONS AND ROAD CLOSURES Call the Okanogan County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at 509-422-7348 to report primary residences that were damaged or destroyed in this year’s wildfires. The EOC also provides information on evacuations and road closures https:// www.facebook.com/Okanogan. County.Emergency.Management The Okanogan/ Wenatchee National Forest area closure, effective September 4, 2015, for National Forest lands in the fire area has been rescinded and replaced by a new closure order effective September 17, 2015. The new order is available at: http:// inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4534/29987/ or http://www. fs.usda.gov/alerts/okawen/alertsnotices This is the final update for this complex from the Washington Interagency Incident Management Team 5. For additional information about this fire, see: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ incident/4534/.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Above, Pete Olson (see www.peteolsonmusic.com) peformed a concert at Esther Bricques Winery last Saturday evening to benefit fire victims. He is married to Frederika Haskell, who grew up in Oroville and graduated with the class of 1973. “Because they were so anguished over the damage caused by the fires up here, they offered to do a benefit performance to help out with the local needs. The donations for Pete’s performance to the North Okanogan Recovery network,” said Linda Colvin, who owns the winery with husband Steve. Olson plays a very wide range of music on his guitar to accompany his vocals. He has performed throughout the Bay area in a wide range of clubs and punctuates his performances with stories about his various experiences as an entertainer. The donations from his performance gathered in over $600, according the Colvins.

The Veranda Beach Homeowners Association would like to thank the following sponsors for their contributions to this years Charity Golf Tournament. Pastime Bar and Grill Osoyoos Duty Free RPB Hotels & Resorts Cadalack Corporate Marketing Frontier Foods Oroville Les Schwab Tires Oroville Mini Storage Bob & Terry Lotwin Oroville / Midway Building Supply Dan & Kim Nixon The Amey/Prokopich Families

HUB International Insurance Hughes ACE Hardware Kevin’s Funtime Rentals Tidy Welders Ltd. Lafarge Veranda Beach Cellars Paws Produce Oroville Golf Course Chris & Susan Dorr Veranda Beach General Store

Spokane Teachers Credit Union The Brown Jug Kathy Stecyk Golf-Northview Golf Northview Golf Apex Mountain Molson Brewery Image Group Inc. Kelowna Nissan The Tabers IDL Projects Inc.

This year’s tournament raised over $6,000 for local charities, thank you so much to the above noted contributors, live auction item purchasers and volunteers. A SPECIAL thank you goes to Managers Gene and Susie Harnasch, the Board of Directors, and members of the Oroville Golf Club for allowing our use of the golf course for this annual tournament.

See you next year!

Susie and Gene Harnasch

Will LeMaster and Sheldon Cromwell


SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS

World Rivers Day Sept. 27 Similkameen to be celebrated at Cawston event THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CAWSTON, B.C. - The Similkameen Celebration of World Rivers Day takes place Sunday, Sept. 27, from 2-4 p.m. at Kobau Park in Cawston, B.C. World Rivers Day is a celebration of the world’s waterways that grew out of the United Nations launching the Water for Life Decade in 2005. It highlights the many values of rivers, and

strives to increase public awareness while encouraging improved stewardship of rivers around the world. Millions of people in more than 60 countries celebrate their rivers with a variety of activities. Activities scheduled for the celebration of the Similkameen River and its watershed include live music, displays, walking beside the Similkameen, sharing river stories and a presentation of short story contest awards. To learn more about World Rivers Day, visit http://worldriversday.com/about/. For more information, contact Lee at (250) 499-5404 or at mariposaorgf@ hotmail.com.

WATER FORUM | FROM A1 of water flows for salmon, how and drinks from our lakes,” Sears this is affected by drought and concluded. other water supply trends, and Day 1, Oct. 7, begins with an the potential role of climate evening  Welcoming Reception change.” hosted at Nk’Mip Desert Cultural “We have all Centre, folthe hot-button lowed by two issues facing days of preour shared sentations  and “We have all the hot waters pulled discussions. button issues facing together into The theme our shared waters one event,” for Day noted Sears, 2,  Oct. 8  is pulled together into “Drought, cli“Sharing Water one event. Drought, mate change, Science“  and effects of forest climate change, effects will include fires on water, specialists, sciof forest fires on water entists, local blue-green algae, invasive government blue green algae...” mussels and representatives Anna Warwick Sears, Exec. Director, milfoil, water and others Okanagan Basin Water Board for fish, and presenting on more. They topics such as are science-related issues but climate variation, water supply, the event and the information fisheries recovery, water quality, is definitely geared to a public and more. audience,” she added. Indeed, Day 3,  Oct. 9, will look Moy also hopes for strong par- at  “Ensuring Sustainability“  and ticipation by residents on both include presentations on drought sides of the border. A registra- and conservation, local actions, tion discount is being offered as living on the lake, invasive  speincentive to residents of Oliver, cies, and more. Osoyoos and Oroville. For more information and to “These are issues that affect register, go to:  www.obwb.ca/ every single person who plays in olwsf.

Sreedhar Thakkun/submitted photo

Sreedhar Thakkun donated this photograph to the online auction, where a bid of $200 won the print. When another person claimed to have bid $225 right at the closing time of the auction, the artist was willing to donate a second print.

Artists raise $14,000 for fire survivors BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Auction for Survivors of Washington Wild Fires, held online last weekend (Sept. 18-20) raised $14,000 with over 150 artistic submissions of prints from Northwest photographers and other artwork. “It was an amazing group of

people that came together,” said event organizer John Poyner of Ellensburg. “Some big name photographers of the Northwest jumped in and donated prints. The people who bid on the items were great, too. They put their money where it was needed. Some said they couldn’t actually afford it, but it was such a good cause they were bidding anyway.”

uted through the Community Foundation of North Central Washington (CFNCW) Relief Fund. CFNCW can accept checks through the mail at Community Foundation of NCW, 9 S Wenatchee Ave, Wenatchee, WA, 98801. Include the fund name (Okanogan Complex Fire Relief Fund) in the memo line.

Poyner said the same group of administrators came together to raise money for survivors of the Oso mudslides. “One hundred percent of proceeds go to help people in North Central Washington with things where FEMA didn’t help,” Poyner said. Money raised is distrib-

Tonasket city-wide clean-up day, Oct. 3 Tonasket will have a City-wide Clean-up Day Saturday, Oct. 3 for city residents and businesses, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. “We are also going to clean up the last mile of Bonaparte Creek that day to prepare for possible runoff issues that could occur this spring,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “We will need a lot of assistance with this, so please, if you can, come help the City of Tonasket clean up Bonaparte Creek. This an acute need.” There will be several very large dumpsters from Upper Valley Disposal located at the City Shop, 500 Railroad Ave. in Tonasket. Items not able to be accepted

include wet paint, oil, tires, car batteries or hazardous materials. It is not yet known whether appliances will be accepted. In other council business, the City of Tonasket will be requesting from the Town of Pateros the language added to their code after the Carlton Complex to allow recreational vehicles to connect to City Water and Sewer connections in the city with a limit of

two years after adoption of the ordinance so that the conditional variance would then go back to normal zoning rules. “This may need to go before the Planning Commission, but I am hoping to move forward with this by the next meeting to help our neighbors in need,” said Plumb. At the Sept. 8 meeting of the Tonasket City Council, city planner Kurt Danison stated the North

Okanogan communities have “really stepped up and are ahead of expectations on setting up the Long Term Recovery Committee.” The next scheduled meeting of the Tonasket City Council has been moved from Tuesday, Sept. 22 to Tuesday, Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. A public hearing will take place at that meeting for the normal budget process to identify revenue sources.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Devon Lee Goodrich, 22, Tonasket, pleaded guilty July 21 to POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin) and seconddegree rendering criminal assistance. Goodrich was sentenced Sept. 15 to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,860.50 for the May 8, 2014 crimes. Daniel Lee Lucero, 27, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to second-degree malicious mischief, four counts of second-degree vehicle prowl and three counts of thirddegree theft. Lucero was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 330 days suspended and fined $1,260.50 for the Aug. 14 crimes. Breanna L. Carpenter, 19, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to POCS (methamphetamine) and first-degree criminal trespassing. Carpenter was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,260.50 for the Sept. 1 crimes. Shawna Mae Barber, 36, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to second-degree arson, harassment and telephone harassment. Barber was sentenced to 17 months in prison and fined $700. The crimes occurred July 6, July 27 and Aug. 2, 2012. The court issued an arrest warrant Sept. 15 for Albaro Lopez, no middle name listed, 30, Oroville, for first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 13. The court issued an arrest warrant Sept. 17 for Raymond Edward Ballard, 52, Oroville, for first-degree identity theft, second-degree theft and two counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 26, 2013 and March 14, 2014. The court issued an arrest warrant Sept. 17 for Laura Ann Ballard, 53, Oroville, for first-degree identity theft, second-degree theft and two counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 26, 2013 and March 14, 2014. The court issued an arrest warrant Sept. 18 for Randy Benjamin Lepire, 25, Okanogan, with residential burglary, second-degree theft, first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 1. The court found probable cause to charge Ronni Lynn Sandoval, 47, Tonasket, with first attempted first-degree burglary and fourth-degree assault. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 11. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Timothy Wilke, 17, Tonasket, with firstdegree rape of a child and first-degree child molestation. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 10. The court found probable cause to charge Henrietta Alice Wynne, 43, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 11 Civil The state Department of Revenue assessed Kamo Gun Works, Omak, $3,943.77 for unpaid taxes, penalties and interest. The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed Orval Dale Fisher, Tonasket,

$3,417.73 for overpayment of disability benefits, penalties and interest. The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and interest: Home Services Northwest, LLC, Tonasket, $1,723.57; and Okanogan Valley Transportation, Oroville, $10,546.48.

DISTRICT COURT Holli Nicole St. Clair, 31, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of third-degree malicious mischief. St. Clair was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 360 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,426. Joe Richard Stewart Jr., 46, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jeremiah Van Tachell, 24, Omak, guilty on two counts of thirddegree DWLS. Tachell was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,426. John Leon Thomas, 63, Omak, guilty on five counts of thirddegree DWLS, and one count each of DUI and obstruction. Thomas had a resisting arrest charge dismissed. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $3,194. Randy Lee Timentwa, 34, Omak, guilty of violation of a nocontact order. Timentwa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $823. Gerald Floyd Van Hess, 59, Okanogan, guilty of disorderly conduct. Van Hess received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $475. Vanessa Velasco Ortega, 18, Oroville, guilty of second-degree DWLS and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of thirddegree DWLS. Velasco Ortega received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined a total of $1,736. Joshua James White, 32, Omak, guilty of DUI. White was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,641. Mark Anthony Yingling, 32, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order and thirddegree theft. Yingling was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,116. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Sept. 14, 2015 Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Window reported shot out. Theft on N. Fir St. in Omak. Bicycles reported missing. Threats on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on S. Fir St. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on E. Cherry Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on Mill Dr. in Omak. Darcy Kim Edwards, 43, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for firstdegree criminal trespassing and a DOC detainer. Adam Charles Luntsford, 41, court commitments for firstdegree DWLS, third-degree DWLS, DUI and an ignition interlock violation; and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV).

Mauricio Aguilar Casarez, 35, booked for DUI and resisting arrest. Alyssa Ann Descouteaux, 21, DOC detainer.

Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015 Warrant arrest at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds near Okanogan. Theft on Barnholt Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Air compressor reported missing. Trespassing on Hopfer Rd. near Omak. Assault on O’Neil Rd. near Tonasket. Found property on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Cell phone recovered. Harassment on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Sinlahekin Rd. near Loomis. Fence reported damaged. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Found property on Sandflat Rd. near Omak. CDs recovered. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Fraud on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Jewelry reported missing. Domestic dispute on S. Birch St. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Pamela Mae Jones, 50, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV) and (all revoked) fourthdegree assault, resisting arrest, violation of a no-contact order and third-degree DWLS. Miguel Angel Amezcua Mora, 22, DOC detainer. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 21, booked on two counts of violation of a no-contact order (DV). Shawna Mae Barber, 36, court commitments for seconddegree arson, harassment and telephone harassment. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 22, DOC detainer.

Wednesday Sept. 16, 2015 Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Found property on Burton Ave. in Okanogan. Bicycle recovered. Found property on Black Rd. near Omak. Dog recovered. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Edmonds St. in Omak. Hazardous material on Hanford St. in Omak. Diesel spill reported. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fire on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Juniper St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Ronni Lynn Sandoval, 47, booked for first-degree burglary and fourth-degree assault.

gan. Cell phone reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Koala Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Assault on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Jackson St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. DWLS on Main St. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Paul R. Schwartz, 64, booked for 911 abuse. Kevin Joel Ballinger, 46, court commitment for DUI.

Delitha Gail Hahn, 37, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS. Darcy Elwin Tatshama, 62, court commitment for DUI. Ira David Rodriguez, 42, booked for second-degree DWLS. Miguel Angel Dominguez Santana, 19, DOC detainer. George Paul McPeak, 28, booked for unlawful discharge of a laser.

Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015 Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Spring Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Illegal burning on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Threats on Yarnell Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Wildwood Dr. in Omak. Threats on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Shelly Sue Zwieg, 48, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and custodial assault. Brandon Michael Coggins, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Kammie Elizabeth Stanger, 35, DOC detainer. Kevin Eugene Ingalls, 50, booked on four OCSO FTA warrants: harassment, firstdegree criminal trespassing, second-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree malicious mischief; and a DOC detainer.

Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 Assault on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Harassment on Early Sunrise Dr. near Tonasket. Theft on N. Lemansky Rd. near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on E. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-cow crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. No injuries reported. Michael Duane Gideon, 39, court commitment for DUI. Clinton Anthony Conant, 28, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and two counts of reckless endangerment. Jacob Patrick Vincent-Ramsey, 30, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV) and a DOC detainer. Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015 Assault on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Fancher Rd. near Tonasket. Structure fire on Early Sunrise Dr. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Queen St. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket.

Friday, Sept. 18, 2015 Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Fraud on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okano-

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Trespassing on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Dry Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Harassment on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Quince St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Fig Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Wade Allen Reddington, 42, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and fourthdegree assault. Kevin Charles Moriarty, 58, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Joey Steven Nelson-Steiff, 25, DOC detainer. Alyssa Ann Williams, 22, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Victor Allen Antonie, 33, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for firstdegree DWLS and State Patrol warrants for first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Johnathan Charles Von Grote, 24, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

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SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Be especially watchful for wildlife

Bear cubs in the vineyard, cougars strolling by, dead dear up and down the highway. While we’re bound to see more wildlife as we get into fall and winter, there’s obviously been an increase in encounters since this summer’s fires destroyed much of their habitat. After taking the family for a trip down to Enloe Dam, something I can remember doing since I was old enough to drive, we went for a short Sunday drive along the Loomis-Oroville Road. On the way back we stopped to look at a dog that was in the Similkameen. It looked like his owner was dredging for gold. While parked on the side of the road we spotted this buck using the old irrigation canal as his personal highway. He noticed us, but he didn’t seem to be too afraid and just moseyed along as I shot off a bunch of photos. It wasn’t too far Out of from where friends and I had seen a black bear My Mind sauntering down the road a couple years back. at work, showed us photos of deer, Gary A. DeVon Charlene, including a buck, standing amongst her and her husband’s cows. As the weather turns colder we have to start to remember to keep a keen eye out as we travel down the highway, especially in the traditional “high kill” areas like Crumbacher. But we’ve been hearing reports of a lot more road kills in all sorts of places along 97. Be aware. Remember, no place is so important that you can’t slow down a little and keep a watchful eye out for wildlife, especially at night, and especially near Crumbacher. If there’s more than one of you in the vehicle make a game of it and have the kids help you play spot the wildlife. I’ve hit two deer in my life, one near... you guessed it, Crumbacher and one on Steven’s Pass. The first one didn’t even dent my bumper. The second one crumpled the hood and knocked out a headlight on my father’s car. I’m glad he was with me to witness that there’s little you can do when a deer jumps from the hillside right into your path. So as you travel, be safe and give the deer a break – unless of course it’s part of hunting season. Take care.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Volunteer ambulance crew quit the community Dear Gary. As you know there’s an awful uproar with the Senior Citizens over the ambulance service situation. And as I am one of the rural commissioner/advisory board members; I’ve been in it since the very beginning. And it stresses me very much to see how nasty it has become. The very root of the whole thing has been overlooked and given no thought about it’s importance. The EMTs were disgruntled because it was taking so long for the powers that be to get a new program going to help them in their low numbers. We did have a plan on the table to put in motion... but, they handed in their resignations en mass with a very short time for anything else to be done if the area would have any ambulance service at all.... Now we are being blamed for maligning them.... They quit the community! I’m sad to see so much misunderstanding about qualifications.... Never was anything ever said about the EMTs qualifications or abilities.... The whole thing at city council and with the county commissioners was the qualifications to run a business; as is the ambulance service, whether it was our original ambulance service,or what will take its place. It is a business that has to have certain regulations and specific insurances and again qualifications. The new ambulance company just plainly does not have all the qualifications required to serve the community well. Sorry folks, sentiment does not run a business. In God only can we trust, Betty Roberts Oroville

No excuse when people’s lives depending on you Dear Editor, On Aug. 28th a 911 call was placed for help. I had just found my son, Dennis Neil

LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Barnett, deceased in our home. The operator responded that someone would be right there. After several phone calls were made to family and friends, still no response. It wasn’t until a family friend showed up at the home and waited for some time, then drove to City Hall and found them just standing around, and was told what had happened, did they respond. They had NOT received a call from dispatch. Dennis was deceased, but what if it had been a heart attack or stroke or any other major problem. There is no excuse for this, peoples’ lives are depending on you. Mary Lou Barnett Oroville

Meeting with city was a waste of time Dear Editor, What a waste of time attending the city council meeting. What a childish way to end the meeting. You couldn’t get out of the building fast enough. You owe all that were there a public apology. These are people you know and deal with often. They deserve better from you. It doesn’t matter what I think but I expected better from some on the city council. After the meeting I told my wife Life Line is not an option for me personally. Just toss me in the back of the pick up if Tonasket EMS can’t come out our way. If the city council members can’t act like adults then they should resign. Brent Daniels

Freedom of religion This country was founded by people fleeing religious persecution who wanted to pursue their own faith. Our early forefathers/mothers were looking for freedom OF religion in a new world, not freedom FROM religion. They desperately wanted to practice their faith. They fled from countries that demanded allegiance to one faith and did not tolerate those who disagreed. Freedom of religion is promised in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution yet

Anita. At one “moment” of her life she moved to Lynnwood, Wash. City life wasn’t in her soul, so she moved back to her town, the country life of Oroville. Oroville…..she loved HOME. For every one who loved her and absorbed

these days we are seeing people insist that no religion is the only religion they will tolerate, or folks who insist you will assimilate into their religion or they will kill you. Neither one of these is particularly appealing to me, nor are they consistent with our American constitution. If you want to practice the religion of atheism (a belief in nothing is still a belief system or “religion”), Christianity, Mormonism, Islam or whatever, you are free to do so here in America. That choice should remain between you and your god or God. The requirement of a “separation between church and state” arose when state governments began establishing religions. I can’t imagine a bigger nightmare than a government directed and politically motivated religion. “Separation” simply means the government should stick to governing and leave religion alone. As a Christian, I have faith that my God is strong enough, smart enough and holy enough to draw people to Him because of Who He is. He is a God of free will and choices. Everyone in America has the constitutionally guaranteed right to choose to practice their faith without being harassed or intimidated by individuals or by government entities. Chrystal Perrow Winthrop

Great letter to the editor Dear Editor, The letter from Mr. David Wolosik published in the Sept. 17 issue has to be one of the best letters to the editor I have ever read. He gets its, especially in regards to rights. I would like to thank him for his reminder of Constitution Day, and of the educational requirements of our public schools. Alas, my children’s school needed a reminder as well. I dare say Mr. Wolosik is one of the dwindling number of citizens holding the fabric of our republic together. James Curry Lake Stevens, Wash.

her true spirit is “planted” where she passed daily. It is our memory from everyone’s heart and will grow as her memories live on. Thank you, Oroville, for being her friend. From her children, the Manuel’s

In memory of ‘mom’

Dear Editor, I would like to give my deepest “thanks” to Ken Cumbo for his clues on “how to have a tree” planted in memory or our “Mom” (as it came to be, everyone who truly knew her heart …called her “Mom”). My thanks from my heart goes to Mr. Anonymous (Mr. A. Marchand) who did the leg work in cutting the red tape including a direct approach to our Beloved City Planner, Chris Branch. Our thanks for Mr. Walter Arnold, the school’s welder instructor, for the beautiful plaque stand and the Colville Tribe for the creation of the plaque. Our “Mom” was always welcomed with open arms whereever she went. While she did her long walks (whenever the weather provided and cooperated) she was always stopped and asked if she needed a ride. She’d always answer with her smiling eyes and usually with a small chit-chat give her, “no, thanks” and letting them know she’s out for her daily walk. At times she’d walk to Prince’s and enjoy their soup. Always stopping by the “Old Fao’s” restaurant for her cream pie, usually just to visit with friends and her waitress,

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Members of the Mauel Family and friends with the tree planted in Irene Manuel’s memory. According to her son Alvin, “Irene enjoyed walking from her home up town on the side of the road her tree is planted. This was her route! The family would always tease how many people asked you if you wanted a ride today mom? She would laugh and say something like only three today. She would always tell people she just wanted to walk and she liked the exercise. She loved visiting with people along the way.” He said they suggested changing her route and she said that just wouldn’t feel right.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Getting to be soup weather out there Typical fall days, bit of sunshine, some days dreary, cool mornings and evenings and threatening rain, in between. Probably 65 years have passed since my husband last saw his bunk mate and good friend, while serving in the army in Japan. I think I was more excited then he was when he recently located him in Bremerton. Hopefully we’ll get together soon. Good friends are like quilts... they age with you yet never lose their warmth. A message from Mary Ellen Lemmond

Pancake breakfast this Sunday SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Are you ready for the Pancake breakfast that is coming up on Sunday, Sept. 27 in Molson at the Grange Hall. This wonderful event will start at 11a.m. and feed folk until 2 p.m. You can’t go wrong with this meal as you will get pancakes, (buckwheat or buttermilk), ham, eggs, (fried or scrambled), apple sauce, hash browns with bacon bits that are yummy, yummy, yummy, coffee,

was welcomed today. She was sending get well wishes to Myrtle Wood, who had a hip replacement. She had what I thought was a brilliant idea, in suggesting that since Clayton is getting his culinary skills down pat, perhaps he could cook meals for Myrtle and I, since she lives just across the street. Wrong! Reports are that Myrtle is doing well. We stopped to visit her, on the third day and she’d also been discharge. Bill Greene had surgery for removal of a faulty kidney. He was discharged from

HILLTOP COMMENTS tea, or hot chocolate, for your dining pleasure. The Auxiliary Ladies have put together some very nice gift baskets for the raffle drawings. You can purchase a ticket for one dollar or get six tickets for five dollars. The next BINGO night at the Grange will be on Oct. 2. Don’t forget there is an added $25 to the prize fund for the last game of the night. The more players we have, the more the prize pay

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, September 20 -27, 1940: According to a statement made Wednesday of this week, by Dr. S. A. Porter, he is expecting to move his family from Oroville to Omak about October 15, where he will be associated with Dr. T. J. McCain of that community. Dr. Porter came to Oroville about seven years ago from Leavenworth and for a few years, operated the Oroville General Hospital until the new hospital was finished in Tonasket. Under the direction of Don Huber, Washington State Patrolman and Dana Cappa, grade school principal, the school boy patrol at the grade school is functioning again this year. Mr. Huber states that the boys of the patrol are authorized to report motorists who do not heed regulations, who could be subject to arrest. The boys will be easily recognized with the white Sam Browne belt and special badges. First showing of the new 1941 Chevrolet will be made tomorrow at George’s Chevrolet. “Car buyers everywhere are going to get a real surprise when they see the new model” said Mr. George. An accompanied advertisement declares that it has a 3” longer wheelbase with a mighty 90 h.p. Valve-in-Head “Victory” engine and Safe-TSpecial hydraulic brakes. The new 1941 Ford line of cars will be ready for inspection at Scott Motors in Oroville Saturday according to G. M. Scott, local dealer. The running boards have virtually disappeared due to the added width of the body and the 85 HP V8 engine is still unique in the low price field. The Civilian Conservation Corps, (CCC), will enroll 1062 unemployed young men between the ages of 17 and 24 from the State of Washington between October 1 and 31. It is expected that a larger number of young men to join the CCC because enrollees will not be more liable for military service than any other men of that age as they will not be drafted into the army. Oldsmobile launches its 1941 season with six new series with both six and eight cylinder engines in each of the three lines. It also has he exclusive Hydra-Matic Drive that eliminates the clutch and shifts gears automatically. Oroville’s has a light, inexperienced football team, with only two regulars from last years starting eleven but they held the Omak squad to a scoreless tie last week. The Oroville Hornets play their second football game of the year when they tangle with the Okanogan Bulldogs, who were the county champions last year. Grocery Prices: S&W Coffee, two #tin, $.49; Corn Flakes,13 oz. pkg, 3 for $.25; Rolled Oats, 9 # bag, $.39; Pink Salmon, 2 cans, $.25; Grange Pancake Flour, No. 10 bag $.39; Candy, 2#, $.39. Classified Ad: Trucking, will go anywhere, anytime. For particulars, phone 11F4; D. E. Wood, Oroville.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: September 16 - 23, 1965: The Okanogan PUD Monday received official notice from the Federal Power Commission further delaying the Enloe Dam hearing for two months. After earlier delays, the hearing that had been set for September 14 has been postponed until November 16 in Wenatchee. The delay was sought to allow the PUD and the Washington State Fish & Game Department further time to work out the problems of providing fish ladders around thee dam on the Similkameen River. Oroville School Directors voted to start the school apple harvest vacation on Monday, September 20. The vacation period will be for a period of two weeks with October 4 the date set for students to return to school. Pupils will not be excused to engage in harvest work on school days and employers are requested to refuse employment to students on school days. A near record $6,060

the hospital, before we had a chance to to looking like he had a squirrel on top visit him in Wenatchee hospital, so I of his head. I believe that is an insult to guess things went well for him also. a squirrel! The apple trees in some I am told there are still orchards, are looking pretty smoldering fires in the bare. I remember those apple Nespelem area, and probably picking days. I was a good other places. picker in the fore noon and While remembering the then I sorta lost my momenrecent terrible fires, and the tum in the afternoons. That planes filling their water tanks was back when we used apple in the Lake Osoyoos, it brings boxes and got paid 8 cents a to mind the really thoughtless box. people that continue to stay Since I’ve had my sore knee in the path of filling planes. It I have watched a lot of daymakes one wonder just what time TV. I believe if a person THIS & THAT is is going on in their head, tried all the diet foods, used Joyce Emry because it is for sure they all the gym equipment, tried aren’t thinking. hypnosis, lifted weights and The one good thing of the all the other available stuff, you’d soon be cooler evenings is that a big pot of soup back to birth weight. really hits the spot. I guess I’ll have A person likened Donald Trumps hair to give up on garden fresh tomatoes,

out will be. Looks like Fall is here. It is time for you to get your yards in shape so you don’t have to wonder all winter what the lumps in the snow are. It is funny to try and figure out what was left out. Hey, Tony, are you ready for the Pinochle Scores? The games will be starting again on Oct. 12. That is Monday evenings at 7 p.m. Bring a friend or relative and enjoy the evening. We are getting better news about the fires in our area, and last night we had some much needed rain. The hunters that come each year will be here soon. We wish them good luck and “be safe.”

gate, an all time record Fat Stock auction with a $17,469 gross plus premium more than 1000 exhibitors have gone into the history books on the closing of the 19th Annual Okanogan County Fair. The total attendance was estimated in excess of 9,000. A construction worker, from Moses Lake, was killed last Thursday near here when he touched a metal pipe which had been accidentally guided by a crane into a powerline. He was working for the contractor on the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. Officers of the Thayer Fruit Company, Dick Thayer, president, Darrell Thayer vice president and Glen Cox manager reported about 350 people attended the open house for their new warehouse at Ellisforde last Saturday. The warehouse intends to be packing fruit starting today. Two candidates, John Haskell and Art Henderson, have filed for number 5 position on the Board of Education of Oroville School District #405. The position is currently held by Clayton Emry who will not run for another term. Oroville School enrollment jumped from 944 on August 3 to 973 on September 13. It is expected that by October 4, after apple harvest vacation, the number will again jump and could reach the 1000 mark. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: Sept. 15, 62 degrees maximum and 51 degrees minimum; Sept. 16, 62 and 38; Sept. 17, 65 and 33; Sept. 18, 74 and 36; Sept. 19, 74 and 36; Sept. 20, 68 and 40 and Sept. 21, 74 and 45. Total precipitation for the week, .05”. (NOTE: How does this compare to 50 years later?)

The Gazette-Tribune

for this year. We stopped at numerous roadside stands on the way home from Wenatchee, only to find none. Same story most places, “The weather was just too hot”. Now in the valley we have traded smoke for dust and ashes due to strong south winds. In some places between here and Wenatchee the dust is really thick. Does this sound good and easy? A fryer chicken, cut into serving pieces. Layer uncooked chicken pieces in a baking dish. Sauce: I pkg. Dry onion soup mix. 1/4 cup brown sugar. 1/4 cup water. 1/2 cup ketchup. Mix sauce ingredients, pour over chicken pieces and cover with foil. Bake in pre-heated oven, 350 degrees, for 1½ to 2 hours or until tender. Uncover and cook a few minutes longer to brown. ‘Til Next Week

OROVILLE GARDEN CLUB Club doing lots of traveling this summer SUBMITTED BY SONJA MYKLEBUST OROVILLE GARDEN CLUB

submitted photo

This has been a busy summer of fun outings for The Oroville Garden Club. On July 10, they enjoyed lunch at the Sun Cove Resort located on Wannacut Lake. In August, the club traveled to the Bonaparte Lake Resort for lunch. Ginger Miller surprised everyone by wining the Burger Bloater contest. She ate her 12 inch high Burger Bloater within the 45 minutes required to receive her lunch free. Way to go Ginger. Our Sept. 11 meeting was a field trip to the Summerland Ornamental Gardens in Summerland, BC.

Ginger Miller and Hildegard Schmidt at Sun Cove Resort. Situated in Southern Okanagan Valley of BC, Canada, the gardens have existed for almost 100 years. The 15 acre heritage botanical garden is open to the public year round. This was a perfect garden research hike for the Oroville Garden Club. Originally established in 1916 as part of the Agricultural Research Station, the Gardens were designed to help new residents, many from the U.K. and other climates, choose ornamental plants for their

gardens in the dry Okanagan weather. After several hours of enjoying the gardens, Hildegard Schmidt and Sonja Myklebust hosted lunch at Hildegard’s home in Oliver, BC. Next meeting will be on Oct. 9 at the Senior Center in Oroville. We welcome anyone who would like to join our group. For any questions about becoming a member of the Oroville Garden Club please contact Marilyn Perry at 509-476-2584.

TONASKET EAGLES

will be having our first breakfast. Come in and have a great meal for a great price and watch some football and play pinochle. Still no winner on our Joker Poker the pot is up to $1,186. You could win half (must be present to win). Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Neil Fifer, second place Cindy Jones, Low score went to Ken Cook and last pinochle Ward Seim and Marc Phillips. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Demo Derby has been rescheduled for Oct. 3 SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Welcome to Fall, I love this season cooler weather and the beautiful colored leaves. The Annual Demo Derby was postponed due to the fires. It is re-scheduled for Oct. 3. After the derby the Tonasket Eagles will be having their Steak Feed start-

ing at 5 p.m. 8 oz. steak, baked potato, coleslaw, roll and coffee, $15. per person. Also, live music by Barbwire starting at 8 p.m. They play old country and blues. All proceeds goes to the scholarship fund. Time is running out to pay your dues if you haven’t. If you get dropped it will cost a extra $15. to re-join. On Sunday, Oct 18 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. we

25 Years Ago: September 20 - 27, 1990: “It doesn’t even seem like harvest quite yet”, said Regal Fruit Manager in Tonasket, Gerald Alumbaugh, who says that his operation will not be seriously packing apples for another week. (2015 sequel, apple harvest in already over on the earlier varieties of fruit). “It’s too soon to tell yet,” said Bud Clark, Manager of Oro Fruit in Oroville. Supper will be served at the Tonasket High School Cafeteria, for the First Annual Community Scholarship. Proceeds will go to the Tonasket Community Scholarship Fund and was organized and coordinated by Terry Mills and Kathy Michels. Prices are: Adults, $3.50 – Children 6 – 12, $2.50 and Children under six will be free. Like the Seahawks, the Oroville Hornets are now 0 and 2 after two weeks of Caribou League action. This time, the Omak Pioneers were the culprits in a 40 to 7 outcome, while the Tonasket Tigers came out smoking as Ryan Pilkinton dashed 76 yards for a TD. However, the second half belonged to the Okanogan Bulldogs, making the final score 23 -13. Results from summer exploration work on Keystone Gold, Inc.’s Crystal Butte Project, have convinced the mining companies to spend more time and money on this Buckhorn Mountain property. Keystone Gold, Inc. will receive $50,000 in option payments from mining companies during the 1990-91 fiscal year and an estimated $300,000 will be spent on exploration and development of the Crystal Butte property by next June. The Oroville Riverside Cemetery, suffering long suffering lack of funds for maintenance and operations, will run an $11,000 levy in next November’s ballot. The issue will be collected in the amount of 11 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value in approved. New students are coming from Canada to enroll in Oroville schools as B. C. School District 14 is under is under a school board lock-out. The Oroville School Board will discuss the situation before deciding whether to charge tuition fees and to set limits on the numbers of students that can register, most of whom are from Osoyoos, B. C. That’s right, you do not have to move to Hawaii or some other tropical island to grow pineapple, just ask Carmen Duncan of Tonasket. Mrs. Duncan grew a pineapple in her home over a period of five years. “I just cut the top off a pineapple I bought at the grocery store,” said Duncan. She said, “After five years I found that it could have happened a lot sooner. In the wings as this year’ royalty are crowned. Queen Corey Young and her Princesses, Niki Rounds and Jennifer Gee are honored. Also being honored this year, are the Oroville May Festival Senior Royalty, Queen Terrissaee Kuipers and Princess’s Muriel Turner and Ada Curtis.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Grateful for years of service from volunteers SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our parking lot sale was a hit, and it was generally agreed that we would repeat the sale in October, indoors. Look forward to great fun and bargains We, Seniors, express our sincere thanks for 28 years of superior emergency services by the volunteer ambulance crew. I’m speaking of a dedication, care, you know, an attitude for others that surpasses any other kind of measurement. Thank you. Next weeks Menu: Tuesday, Sloppy Joe’s; Thursday, Cheesy Tuna Noodle Casserole; Friday, Scrambled Eggs and Ham. My wise old dog woos me on a walk. Its cooler now. She draws me out the door, and down the trail. When we walk she is a puppy again. She lives for this. As we pass through the aspen glade she hunts. I pause, in awe. There

is not a golden yellow so stunning than standing still in an aspen grove in the fall. Crazy, an eerily inspiring ending. Fall is here. Simple, yet tremendous. And, yet, there is a deeper wisdom to learn. So, other than its beauty, what good is an aspen grove? Well, many years ago, before I knew the difference between straw and hay, I received wise advice from an “old dog” I knew. He told me that where there are aspens there is water. Valuable advice. Its so important to carefully choose, and listen, to wise counsel. I listened. Incomprehensible, beyond measure, the benefit in a dry land. Yes, “old dogs” do have value. I’m still waiting for an answer from Joel Kretz regarding Senior property tax exemption cost of living adjustments. My question is, were there adjustments made, and when? Some have said, “oh, yes.” But I’m not convinced. I have contacted various government agencies, to no avail, as yet.  When I get a response I will pass it on to you all. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Ruth Wick; High Woman, Nellie Paulson; High Man, Leonard Firpo; Most Pinochles, Bev Holden.

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SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR place at 4 p.m., with ducks available for purchase at Thursday’s (Sept. 24) Farmer’s Market. The CCC will have their fall Rummage Sale October 2 and 3 in the back room from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

Helen (Small) Ray Benefit OROVILLE - There will be a benefit for Helen (Small) Ray at the Oroville Eagles on Saturday, Sept. 26 starting at 6 p.m. The benefit features pulled pork sandwiches, corn on the cob, cole slaw and ice cream sundaes, as well as a Silent Auction. Money raised will help with medical expenses for Ray as she fights breast cancer. Donations for the auction are also gratefully accepted.

7th District Democrats

Stroke Support Group

Car Club Challenge

OROVILLE The next meeting of the Stroke Support Group will be Thursday, Sept. 24 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome! There will be refreshments.

OSOYOOS - Wine Country Racing Association hosting annual Car Club Challenge at the Osoyoos, BC airport on Sunday, Sept. 27. Gates open at 9 a.m., racing starts around 11 a.m. Elimination round at 1 p.m. Visit www.winecountryracing.ca for more information.

Braman and Stodola perform OROVILLE - Rick Braman and Chris Stodola will play together Thursday, Sept. 24 at Esther Bricques Winery. Rick performs on guitar and Chris on keyboard as accompaniment to their vocals. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE: The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more information call 509-429-3310.

Art Opening in Twisp TWISP - Opening reception for Jason Briggs, Steve Ward and Squeak Meisel on Saturday Sept. 26 between 6 and 8 p.m. at D*signs Gallery, 109 B Glover Street North, Twisp and Spartan Art Project (parked in front of D*signs Gallery). A rare opportunity to see the work of three acclaimed artists in a unique combination venue… the Spartan Art Project ‘Imperial Mansion’ will be parked on Glover Street and housing Squeak Meisel’s installation piece, while D*signs Gallery exhibits Steve Ward’s paintings and Jason Briggs’ ceramic sculptures. The show goes to Nov. 1.

Oroville School Board Oroville - The Oroville School Board meets on Monday, Sept. 28 at 6:30 p.m. in the School Director’s Board Room at the District Office. For more information or to get on the agenda call 509-476-2281.

Tonasket School Board TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board meets on Monday, Sept. 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the School Director’s Board Room at the District Office. For more information or to get on the agenda call 509-486-2126.

After Burn Party and Duck Race TONASKET - This Saturday, Sept. 26, the Community Cultural Center (CCC) will have an “After the Burn” party featuring a local musician jam starting at 3 p.m. with snacks and beverages provided. Buffalo Mazetti will be serving a dinner of chicken, salad, rice and veggies for $10 at 6 p.m. and at 7 p.m. the Randy Battle Bluz Band begins to play, with refreshments available throughout the evening. In conjunction with this event, the Tonasket Swimming Pool Fundraiser Duck Race will take

GRAND COULEE Democrats of the 7th Legislative District will meet at Grand Coulee on Saturday, Sept. 26. The meeting will start at 10:30 a.m. at Pepper Jack’s Bar & Grill. After a brief business meeting, they will hear Speaker Stan Sorscher, President of the Washington Fair Trade Coalition. After Q & A, they will adjourn for a buffet lunch at Pepper Jack’s. ALL Democrats are welcome. RSVP for lunch to 7thlddems@gmail. com. For further information, phone Secretary Flo Moore at 509-276-7070.

Oroville Library Storytime OROVILLE - There is storytime at the Oroville Library every Wednesday at 10 a.m. for preschool age children. The next storytime will be Wednesday, Sept. 30. For more information contact julesbob1@gmail.com.

North Countyopoly Deadline OROVILLE - The last day to purchase an ad for the new North County-opoly board being made by the Oroville Grange as a benefit is Wednesday, Sept. 30. Spaces are going quickly. Cindy Nelson or contact a local Grange Member.

Fire After-Action Review OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Commissioners would like to invite the public to attend a Fire After-Action Review on Thursday, Oct 1, at 6:30 p.m. in the Agri-Plex Annex at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds, 175 Rodeo Trail Road; Okanogan, Wash. We are looking for your initial impressions on: What went well? What can

509-486-0615

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we improve? Where can we get better? Important Notes: Participants wishing to speak will be limited to five minutes. This is not a problem solving meeting – ideas expressed at this meeting will be utilized to develop an improvement plan in the future to uncover the root causes of identified issues. For more information contact Glenda M. Beauregard, Okanogan County Emergency Management, 509-422-7206

Oroville Library Book Sale OROVILLE - Come enjoy the great selection of books for sale at the Oroville Public Library at great prices in a warm and friendly atmosphere on Friday, Oct. 2 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. There are many beautiful books and sets of books that have been donated this year. All sales benefit the Oroville Public Library

Okanogan Family Faire OKANOGAN - The 42nd Annual Okanogan Family Faire will take place this year, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9-11.

Day passes are $10 and kids 17 and under are free when accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Camping passes are $60. For more information on becoming a vendor or on the faire in general, see www.okanoganfamilyfaire. net. The faire grounds are located at 76 W. Cayuse Mtn. Rd., about 12 miles from Tonasket off Hwy. 20. No dogs, guns, drugs, alcohol, fireworks or generators allowed.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

& Entertainment Bonaparte

Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Prime Rib every Sat.

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist 1307 Main Street, Oroville 509.476.3007

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close Advertise your specials and events here!

HOURS:

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ph. 509-486-2828

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

Loomis Community Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

LOOMIS

Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

FALL Hours Thur. - Sun. 9am- 8pm

Lake Resort & Restaurant

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to two weeks. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows events to be listed for longer periods. I*tems must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

CHURCH GUIDE

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

DINING

MOLSON - There will be a Molson Pancake Feed at the Molson Grange on Sunday, Sept. 27th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Okanogan Valley

Oroville United Methodist

Out on the Town...

Molson Pancake Feed

Restaurant

Bar

12 noon - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. ——— CLOSED ——— ——— CLOSED ——— 12 noon - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 12 noon - 9 p.m. - Close 12 noon - 9 p.m. - Close 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. - 8 p.m.

THURSDAY SMOKED RIBEYE SPECIAL $17.50 Served from 6 p.m. until gone

Join us for Sunday Brunch

Bloody Mary Bar & Mimosas 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. PASTIME to go call 476-3007 Please allow 30 - 40 minutes for your order Check “PASTIME BAR AND GRILL - Oroville” on Facebook for upcoming specials!

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

It’s that time of year... time to start making plans for bagging the big one or reeling in the catch of the day. Watch for our Fall Hunting & Fishing section featuring...

68th Annual

Sept. 24 - 27, 2015

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2015:

Kids’ Day and Nursing Home/Assisted Living Day l WDFW

Hunting prospects l Braggin’ Rights l Hunting Specials!

Advertise your Business in our Fall Hunting & Fishing Section! Call Charlene today 509-476-3602 (ext. 3050)

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., or P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 l www.gazette-tribune.com

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Fairgrounds open to the public Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Market Steer Judging – Steer Barn Market Swine Judging – Swine Barn Rabbit Judging – Rabbit Barn Horse Intermediate Fitting & Showing – North Arena Adult Riding & Halter Classes – North Arena Intermediate Riding Classes – North Arena Senior and Junior Fitting and Showing (Horses) – North Arena Youth Halter Classes – Rodeo Arena Senior and Junior Riding Classes – Rodeo Arena Horse Demonstrations: barefoot trimming, nutrition, tension release – Horse Barns PUD Youth Pole Climb FFA/4-H Produce Judging – Horticulture Barn Raptors – Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds L-Bow the Clown – Roaming FFA Tractor Driving Contest Bottle Baby Calf Show – Beef Show Ring Market Lamb Judging – Sheep Barn Grade and Purebred Breeding class – Beef Barn Legendary Longhorns – Rotary Stage Raptors – Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens L-Bow the Clown – Rotary Stage Sheep Fitting & Showing Demonstration – Sheep Barn Good4U – Rotary Stage Little People Fitting & Showing – Sheep Barn Lads & Lassies (sheep) Competition – Sheep Barn Cat Type Classes followed by Cat Fashion Show – Cat Barn Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Youth Horsmanship Class sponsored by Sam & Racie McKee – Rodeo Arena Fair Queen Pageant – Rotary Stage Fun Flix – south end of fairgrounds Ranch Rodeo – Rodeo Arena Rust on the Rails (Blake Noble & Cody Beebe) – Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to Public

Throughout Day Throughout Day 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am Noon 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:30 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 pm 10:00 pm

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2015: 9:00 am All Day 9:00 am 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

10:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:30 am Noon 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:30 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 pm 9:00 pm 10:00 pm

Fairgrounds Open to the public Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Livestock Fitting & Showing – all barns Horse Trail Classes (all ages) – North Arena Youth Western Classes – Rodeo Arena English Classes – Rodeo Arena Driving Classes – Rodeo Arena Legendary Longhorns – Rotary Stage Owens Family – Rotary Stage Poultry Fitting & Showing – Poultry Barn Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds L-Bow the Clown – Rotary Stage Bottle Baby Calf Show – Beef Show Ring Raptors – Rotary Stage Gideon’s Daughter – Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Olivia de la Cruz – Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds L-Bow the Clown – Roaming Dynamic Duos Competition – Sheep Barn Adult Fitting & Showing (sheep) – Sheep Barn The Banner Days – Rotary Stage Cat Fitting & Showing classes – Cat Barn Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Bulls & Barrels – Rodeo Arena Rabbit Agility – Rabbit Barn Gideon’s Daughter – Rotary Stage Olson Brothers Band – Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

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8:00 am – noon 9:00 am 9:00 am All Day Throughout Day 10:00 am 10:30 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am Noon Noon Noon 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:30 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:30 pm 5:00 pm 5:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 9:00 pm 10:00 pm

Horse Games – North Arena and Rodeo Arena Fairgrounds open to the public FFA/4-H Livestock Judging followed by Agronomy Judging Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Horse Demonstrations: barefoot trimming, nutrition, tension release – Horse Barns Round Robbin Fitting & Showing Contest – Small Animals – south end of fairgrounds Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds The Banner Days – Rotary Stage Best Dressed Rabbit Contests – Rabbit Barn Round Robin Fitting & Showing Contest – Large Animals – south end of the fairgrounds Kids’ Races/Games – south end of fairgrounds Nicole Unser – Rotary Stage Spuds in a Bucket Contest – Horticulture Barn Team Roping – Rodeo Arena Pie, Corn & Watermelon eating contests – south end of fairgrounds Horse Races - Grandstands Low Rider Races (in between horse races) – Grandstands Legendary Longhorns – Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Poultry Costume Contests – Poultry Barn Market Livestock Sale – Berg Pavillion Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Raptors – Rotary Stage Nicole Unser – Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Hippies on Vacation – Rotary Stage Lace & Lead – Rotary Stage Truck & Tractor Pull – Grandstands The Company Band – Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2015: 8:00 am 8:00 am 9:00 am All Day Throughout Day 10:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am Noon Noon Noon 12:30 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm

Cowboy Church services – Rotary Stage Rabbit Barn Awards – Rabbit Barn Farigrounds open to the public Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Horse Demonstrations: barefoot trimming, nutrition, tension release – Horse Barns Parade of Champions – Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Nicole Unser – Rotary Stage Horse Races – Grandstands Beef Team Showing Contest – Beef Show Ring Kids Horse Playday – Rodeo Arena Raptors – Rotary Stage Sign-ups for Mutton Bustin’ Belt Buckle Finals (55 lb weight limit) – S. end of fairgrounds Mutton Bustin’ Belt Buckle Finals – south end of fairgrounds Camperos Dancing Horses – Grandstands Fur & Feather Auction – Berg Pavillion Dayton Edmonds, Storyteller – Rotary Stage Royalty Coronation – Rotary Stage www.okfair.org Fairgrounds closed, Fair over!

2015 GATE TICKET PRICES

TICKET PRICES COVER ALL EXHIBITS, RODEO, ENTERTAINMENT, HORSE RACING AND ENTRANCE TO THE CARNIVAL. (DOES NOT INCLUDE CARNIVAL RIDES). ALL PRICES PER PERSON EXCEPT FOR 1 DAY FAMILY PASS. Daily Thursday thru Saturday ............. $8.00 Sunday ...................... $5.00 Per Person Season Pass (4 Days) ........$20.00 1-Day Pass Per Family (2 Adults, 3 Kids).......$25.00 Kids 5 and Under........................................FREE

To contact Okanogan County Fairgrounds: PO Box 467 175 Rodeo Trail Rd. Okanogan fair@co.okanogan.wa.us Phone: (509) 422-1621 Fax: (509) 422-1203


SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS SCHEDULES SEPT. 24-OCT. 3 Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC -Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Sept. 24 GSC - Oroville versus Tonasket, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 6:30 pm VB - Oroville versus Manson, 5 pm Friday, Sept. 25 FB - Tonasket at Brewster, 7 pm FB - Okanogan at Oroville, 7 pm Saturday, Sept. 26 GSC XC - Tonasket at Manson Invitational, 10:30 am XC - Oroville at Trojan Invitational, 11 am Tuesday, Sept. 29 GSC - Tonasket versus Okanogan, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket versus Oroville, 6:30 pm Brent Baker/submitted photo

Oroville’s Andrew Mieirs received passes of 25, 11 and 13 yards for three of the Hornets’ touchdowns in their win against the Trojans. Mieirs, in his junior year, plays Wide Receiver on offense and Corner Back on defense.

Hornets win on the road Hornets gridiron currently top of the NC2B League

Thursday, Oct. 1. GSC - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 6:30 pm VB - Oroville at Brewster, 5 pm Friday, Oct 2. FB - Oroville at Kettle Falls, 7 pm Saturday,Oct.3

FB - Tonasket versus Kahli High, noon

XC - Tonasket at Colville Invitational, 9 am GSC - Oroville versus Tonasket, 11 am

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Oroville traveled to Manson Friday, Sept. 19 to beat the Trojans 30-22. The first quarter ended with the teams tied 8-8, but the Hornets pulled ahead when they scored 22 points in the second quarter. The Trojans scored six and eight points in the third and fourth quarters but the Hornets held steady with points scored in the first half only. The first touchdown was made on a 25-yard pass from Nathan Hugus to Andrew Mieirs. A twopoint conversion was run in by Caleb Mills. The second touchdown was scored by Stetson Spears in the second quarter on a fifteen yard pass from Hugus. Mieirs then scored another touchdown on an 11-yard pass. Mieirs scored yet again on a 13-yard pass. The twopoint conversion pass was made by Hugus to Logan Mills. Manson possessed the ball a little more than Oroville; 28:46 minutes compared to 19:14, but the Hornets made their possession time count with 296 passing yards to the Trojans’ 87. The Hornets received 22 completed passes at 13.5 yards per catch while the Trojans received only eight passes at 10.9 yards per catch. Receiving for Oroville were Mieirs with 119 yards, Spears with 112, Miller with 39, Logan

Brent Baker submitted photo

Oroville’s Logan Mills had eight attempts at rushing for a total of 43 yards during Oroville’s 30-22 win at Manson Friday, Sept. 19. Mills is in his senior year and plays both Fullback on offense and Nose Guard on defense. Mills with 22 and Caleb Mills with four. The Trojans were stronger in rushing, with 46 attempts for 320 yards and 7.0 yards per rush; while the Hornets had 38 attempts for 206 yards and 5.4 yards per rush. Rushing for Oroville were Caleb Mills with 105 yards, Logan Mills with 43, Spears with 28, Hugus with 17 and Seth Miller with 13. Manson had twelve penalties called for a loss of 85 yards, while Oroville had just five penalties for a loss of 50 yards. The Trojans also lost nine yards with a quarterback sack. The Hornets threw four inter-

ceptions while the Trojans threw none, but Manson fumbled the ball four times with three losses while Oroville was just one for one. The Hornets had 32 first downs while the Trojans were held to 19. “Manson had some speed, and they caught us flat-footed in the second half of the game,” said Oroville Head Coach Tam Hutchinson. “We had a mental breakdown in the second half and started coasting, thinking we had the game wrapped up. But we rallied at the end to stop them inside the 20 yard line with just two minutes left, and we drove down

the field to their 20 yard line to preserve the win.” Hutchinson is assisted by Brad Scott. The Oroville Hornets were accompanied on the road by the Football Cheerleaders. Cheerleaders Faith Martin, Narya a Naillon, Bonnie Roley, Pie Todd, Zoe Whitaker-Jameson, Jadyn Mieirs, Lena Fuchs, Mikaela McCoy, Deja Moore and Alexis Allenby are coached by Shelly Martin and Shayne Thacker. The Hornets host Okanogan, the 2014 2B State Football Champions; Friday, Sept. 25 with kickoff at 7 pm.

Brent Baker submitted photo

Oroville sophomore Alexia Garcia gets in between Brewster’s Rosa Tinoco (#15) and Kyleee Vargas during Thursday’s home match against the Bears.

Hornets take Bears into OT BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE -Oroville hosted Brewster Thursday, Sept. 17, keeping the Bears from scoring any goals to end the first half 2-0. “In the first half of play the girls had thirteen shots on goal,” said Oroville Coach Tony Kindred. “Lindsay Koepke had six of those with two scores.” Also shooting on goal was Tori Kindred with two, Katie Egerton with two and Yessica Nemecio with two. According to Kindred, Brewster had four shots on goal the first half with no score. “In the second half of play both Oroville and Brewster collided going for a header and controversially Oroville was called for the penalty, giving Brewster their first score,” Kindred said. “Oroville would shoot on goal thirteen times including a penalty kick attempt that just missed the top left corner of the goal. Second half shots came from Koepke with five; Kindred with four, including one that hit the bar and bounced inside the line but

was missed being called official); Bears for the past seven years Katie Egerton with two, Sidney along with Alex Sanchez. Egerton with one and Kambe The Hornets traveled to Ripley with one. Keeper Xochil Okanogan Tuesday, Sept. 15, Rangel had nine saves.” where the Bulldogs beat them Kindred said when the game 6-0. went into over“It was a time it was still good game,” tied 2-2 after said Kindred. five minutes, or “The Hornets played a “Okanogan is the first half of by a great game and defi- coached overtime play. seasoned staff “Brewster nately look forward to and their girls kicked a corworked playing Brewster again.” have ner kick and hard to be Coach Tony Kindred was able to tough. Dean Oroville Hornets Girls Soccer has a great get a short group of athkick inside for letes to work the win,” said Kindred. “The Hornets played with. Our girls have grown since a great game and definitely look last year and played a good game, forward to playing Brewster improving over their play against Okanogan at the beginning of last again.” “We started slow, but the sec- season. I encourage our girls to ond half we settled down and play tough against every team, as started playing. That’s when we each contest allows us to improve scored three goals,” said Brewster our skills and play.” This is Kindred’s nineteenth Coach Rafa Sanchez. Brewster goals were made by year coaching at Oroville. He has Rose Velasco, Marlissa Garcia coached football, basketball and track and field, where he still and Kimberly Nila. Sanchez has been coaching the serves as assistant coach.

Tigers beat Lions BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker photo

Oroville’s Lindsay Koepke goes up against Brewster’s Rosa Tinoco for possession of the ball Tuesday, Sept. 15 “Coaching these sports at both the high school and junior high over the last 18 years has been and still is a very enjoyable part of what I do here at Oroville,” said Kindred. He is currently teaching IT Academy, JH computers, Leadership, RS Computers CWU and Yearbook. He has also been

the Future Business Leaders of America advisor for the past 18 years and currently serves as the North Central Region FBLA Regional Advisor; and serves on the Washington State Board of Directors for Washington State FBLA. Oroville hosts Tonasket Thursday, Sept. 24 at 4:30 p.m.

Tonasket’s volleyball team traveled to Winthrop Tuesday, Sept. 15, beating Liberty Bell 3-2. They won the first game 26-24 before dropping the second 14-25. The Tigers came back to win the third game 26-24, before losing the fourth 20-25. Tonasket won the final game 17-15. Alexa Sutton made seven kills and six aces. Olivia Sutton made three kills and six aces. Kasey Nelson made three kills. Taylon Pilkinton had fifteen assists and seven aces.

Tonasket next traveled to Brewster Thursday, Sept. 17, where they lost to the Bears 3-0 with scores of 25-17, 11-25 and 25-19.

Sutton had six kills, Nelson had three kills and Pilkinton had ten assists.

The Tigers go to Lake Roosevelt September 24; and play in Oroville Tuesday, Sept. 29 at 6:30 p.m.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

SPORTS Tigers win two more on the soccer fields BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket continues to rule the soccer field, beating Liberty Bell on the Mountain Lions’ turf 1-0 Thursday, Sept. 17; and Brewster at home Saturday, Sept. 19, 11-0. Ashlynn Willis, Rose Walts and Kayla Willis all made hat tricks (scoring three goals in one game) in the game against Brewster. This is Ashlynn Willis’ second hat trick of the season so far. Ashlynn Willis made the first goal about fifteen minutes into the game, followed by Walts four minutes later. Willis quickly scored another goal, and Keann Wilson scored the fourth. Kayla Willis put in the fifth goal, followed by her sister Ashlynn. Jaden Vugteveen put in the seventh goal. Walts put in the eighth and ninth goals, and Kayla Willis put in the tenth goal with ten minutes left in the game before scoring the eleventh and final goal of the game. “We were passing good, and the communication was good,” said Head Coach Darren Collins. “We struggled quite a bit defensively,” said Brewster Coach Rafa Sanchez. He and Coach Alex Sanchez have been coaching the team together the past seven years. “We got to put in a lot of girls that hadn’t played yet this season since it was a non-league game,” said Sanchez. “Not that that’s an excuse.” In the league game against the Mountain Lions, Vugteveen scored the only goal of the day on

Brent Baker submitted photo

Oroville’s Mikayla Scott spikes the ball over the net during Tuesday’s (Sept. 17) home game with Liberty Bell.

Oroville VB loses to LR and LB Team struggling in early season BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Jaden Vugteveen keeps Brewster Bear Samantha Rosario from scoring at the end of the 11-0 shutout Saturday, Sept. 19 in Tonasket. a penalty shot. Liberty Bell was second in the State last year. The Tigers were scheduled to

host Bridgeport Tuesday, Sept. 22 and travel to Oroville Thursday, Sept. 24 for a 4:30 p.m. game.

North County cross country teams running hard Tonasket second at Bridgeport BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket and Oroville Cross Country teams attended the Bridgeport Invitational Tuesday, Sept. 15. Brewster took first place with a team score of 45, followed by Tonasket with 49. Okanogan came in third at 76, followed by Bridgeport and Manson with 96 and 102, respectively. The girls’ three mile high school varsity and JV race saw Tigers taking all but one of the first seven places. Johnna Terris took first with a time of 19:34.2, Jenna Valentine came in second at 20:44.8 and Katie Henneman took third at 20:45.3 Okanogan’s Hanna Smith came in fourth with a time of 21:23.1. Tonasket took the next three spots with Victoria Chervinsky in fifth at 22:05.0, Kaylee Bobadilla in sixth at 23:10.7 and Haley Larson in seventh place with a personal best of 24:12.5. The Tonasket boys did well also, with Hunter Swanson taking second place at 16:08.1. Bridgeport’s Oren Cox took first with 15:58. Bryden Hires came in sixth at 17:10.2, followed by Garrett Wilson at 17:38.3. Riley Morris came in fourteenth place at 18:35.3, followed by Oroville’s Matthew Galvan in eighteenth place at 19:09 and Tonasket’s Samuel Flores in twentieth place at 19:20. Tonasket’s Rade Pilkinton pulled a personal best to come in twenty-third at 19:32.5, followed by Oroville’s Javier Castillo with 19:32.6. Tonasket’s Zach Clark came in twenty-ninth at 19:42, and teammate Justin McDonald had a personal best of 19:50 for thirtieth place. Oroville’s Luis Vazquez had a personal best of 21:18 for thirty-ninth place, and teammate Emmanuel Castrejon had a personl best of 21:35.9 for forty-first place. “The Bridgeport Run went well,” said Coach Billy Monroe of his Oroville team that placed sixth with a score of 149. Other North County runners placing in Bridgeport are: 42. Daniel Castrejon, ORO, 21:43; 43. Eric Owsley, TON, 21:43.7, 44. Caeleb Hardesty, TON, 21:51.8, 50. Dakota Haney, ORO, 28:46.4 (personal best), and 52. Mitchell Fitzthum, TON, 37:10.0. Tonasket also participated in

OROVILLE - The Hornets lost a home game to Lake Roosevelt Tuesday, Sept. 15, 13-25, 15-25, 20-25. “I have three returning varsity players, and a lot of my girls are young with not much experience,” said Coach Nicole Hugus. Hugus is in her second year coaching the Hornets, with Shawna Nutt assisting her. “On our second game against Lake Roosevelt, I had one of my starting players, Hannah Hilderbrand injure her wrist. We had a rough game against Liberty Bell since we had to change the line-up and some girls didn’t know the rotation.” Oroville lost Thursday’s Sept. 17 home game against Liberty Bell, 0-3. “We have a couple practices before our next game, and we will work hard to be ready and have everyone know the rotation,” said Hugus. “ We did have some close games last year, and hope to have some more wins this season.” The Hornets were scheduled to travel to Bridgeport Tuesday, Sept. 22; and will host Manson

FOOTBALL Overall L W 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

L 1 0 0 0 1 2 2

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W Kittitas 0 Lk Roosevelt 0 Mabton 0 Soap Lake 0 Warden 0 White Swan 0

Overall L W 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0

Thursday, Sept. 24 for a 5 p.m. game.

GIRLS SOCCER

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W Oroville 1 Brewster 0 Bridgeport 0 Liberty Bell 0 Okanogan 0 Tonasket 0 Manson 0

Brent Baker submitted photo

Oroville freshman Madison Whiteaker sets up the ball for her teammates at Tuesday’s (Sept. 17) home match with Liberty Bell.

L 2 0 1 0 1 3

CENTRAL WA LEAGUE (1B/2B)

League Overall Pts W L W L T Liberty Bell 0 3 1 3 1 0 Okanogan 0 2 0 3 1 0 Tonasket 0 2 0 5 0 0 Bridgeport 0 2 1 4 1 0 Brewster 0 1 3 1 5 0 Oroville 0 0 2 0 2 0 Manson 0 0 3 0 4 0

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tournament matches, including split sets)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League

Overall

The Hornets play in Tonasket Tuesday, Sept. 29, at 5 p.m. W Brewster 3 Okanogan 3 Lk Roosevelt2 Tonasket 2 Liberty Bell 1 Bridgeport 0 Manson 0 Oroville 0

L 0 0 0 1 2 2 3 3

W 3 3 2 2 2 0 0 0

L Sp 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 2 0 3 0 3 0

Central Washington LEAGUE

SO. DIV. (2B)

W Kittitas 0 Mabton 0 Soap Lake 0 Warden 0 Waterville 0 White Swan 0

League Overall L W L Sp 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket senior Rade Pilkinton, seen here at practice, pulled a personal best at the Bridgeport Invitational to finish the three mile high school boys varsity and JV race with a time of 19:32.5. the Runners Soul Erik Anderson Invitational near Spokane Saturday, Sept. 19; where Zach Clark placed fifty-eighth in the 5,000 meters JV race with a time of 20:44.49. For the 5,000 meters freshman race, Eric Owsley took thirtythird at 21:51.42, Caeleb Hardesty took forty-fifth at 23:45.17, and Mitchell Fitzthum took fiftyeighth at 30:23.37. Team scores included Republic/Curlew in first place with 59, and Liberty Bell in sixth with 127. In the 5,000 meters varsity race, Tonasket placed tenth with 264 points. Liberty Bell came in eighth with 214, Omak came in eleventh with 287, Brewster came in twelfth with 325 and Okanogan came in fifteenth with 387. Hunter Swanson placed eighteenth with a time of 17:08.44. Bryden Hires came in fortyfourth at 18:03.28, followed by Garrett Wilson in forty-fifth at 18:06.08. Also finishing were 93. Rade Pilkinton, 20:16.46; 102. Justin McDonald, 21:07.92; and 105. Samuel Flores, 21:53.74. For the girls, Alejandra Avilez took forty-second place with a time of 30:14.04 in the 5,000

meters JV race. The 5,000 meters varsity girls race saw Tonasket in fifth place with a score of 119. Ephrata took first with 32, followed by Moses Lake with 92, Selah with 94 and Eastmont with 117. Prosser came in sixth with 125, followed by Lakeside with 130 and West Valley-Spokane with 177. Individually, the following girls placed: 15. Johnna Terris, 21:17.24; 17. Jenna Valentine, 21:41.42; 34. Katie Henneman, 22:38.18 (personal best); 44. Victoria Chervinsky, 23:23.17; and 58. Haley Larson, 25:32.71. The Tonasket Invitational is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 30 at Tonasket High School. The 1.4 Mile Middle School Boys and Middle School Girls races will begin at 4 p.m. The 2.8 Mile Varsity/JV Boys and Girls races will both begin at 5 p.m. Oroville’s Cross Country schedule has changed; instead of going to the CAN AM October 4, they will go to Curlew October 13. The Oroville Invitational is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 17 and will start at 11 a.m.

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SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SCHOOLS

FFA places at Waterville Fair Produce Judging team takes first

submitted photo

Adams County Fair Board President Anthony Daily presents the winner’s check to the Tonasket FFA Horse Judging Team, who took first place at State Friday, Setp. 18 in Othello. Team members are, left to right: Madyson Clark, Katie Henneman, Lexee Howell, Camille Wilson, Kylee Bobadilla and FFA Advisor Matt Deebach. Wilson won first place in individual competition, and Henneman took ninth place in individual competition.

TONASKET – In other FFA news, Serenity Poletti reports Tonasket took first place in Produce Judging at the Waterville Fair August 28. Nine individuals placed in the top ten, with Garrett Wilson taking first place overall. Also at the Waterville Fair, the Tonasket FFA Livestock Judging team took second place. For Tractor Driving, Tonasket took third place out of six teams. “Tractor drivers take their driving abilities to the max by driving in an intense course, getting timed. Whoever has the fastest time wins,” reported Poletti. “Not only are the members driving a tractor, they have to back a trailer up around cones without knocking down any in the process.” Reporting on the Tonasket FFA Trap team, Brenden Asmussen states the team “has started off this year well with a generous

$1,000 donation from Granite Construction. This donation will allow the trap team to purchase necessary supplies and equipment.” Asmussen, an accomplished trap shooter, said the team “has recently come off a successful season, bringing back multiple individual trophies from state,” and that Tonasket is “eager to begin another season with an older, more experienced team than last year.” 2015 Tonasket graduate Dallas Tyus, who is serving as Treasurer on the 2015-2016 State FFA Officer team had the following to say about his involvement in FFA: “FFA has completely changed who I have become, it has shown me so much about myself and the agriculture industry. I am so grateful for all of the opportunities that this organization has given me to grow and serve,” he said. Tonasket has had an FFA Chapter on campus since 1936, with Matt Deebach serving as advisor since 1996.

Tonasket FFA takes first at State Camille Wilson is State Champion BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket FFA’s Horse Judging Team took first place at State, with team member Camille Wilson named State Champion; and Katie Henneman placing ninth in State. Also on the team were Lexee Howell, Madyson Clark and Kylee Bobadilla.

Only one team from each state goes on to Nationals, held in Kentucky October 27-31.

The Tonasket team is young, with Howell being the only senior. Henneman, Clark and Wilson are sophomores; and

Bobadilla is a freshman. Tonasket competed against 17 teams made up of 77 individuals from all over the state. “It pretty awesome,” said Wilson. “Basically all of our studying took place the night before we went. In Ag II class we practiced oral reasons and judged a couple of horses, but it didn’t prepare us for a competition this intense.” “It was crazy, we all freaked out when we heard we won,” said Howell. “It didn’t really hit us at first; but now we’re like, ‘Wow, we are going to Kentucky.’ It was really close. I think our oral reasons helped a lot, and Camille doing really well by getting first in State and Katie getting ninth really helped our team.” This is Howell’s third year on the team. Henneman said it was “pretty surreal” to place ninth in State as an individual.

“We were really excited to get in the top ten, and to place first as a team. We were pretty happy,” said Henneman, who was on last year’s team that placed seventh. “We did study and prepare the week coming up, but we didn’t expect to do this well. We knew our stuff ahead of time, and were prepared going into the competition. We’re ecstatic. We had one freshman that didn’t know as much, but she grew up on a farm and put in her prior knowledge and helped us win it.” The competition was held at the Adams County Fair in Othello Friday, Sept. 18. In the Horse Evaluation Career Development Event, students evaluate and rank horses in eight different classes based on breed characteristics, conformation and performance. Students do oral reasons and take a written test. “We judge six halter classes with

different breeds and mares and geldings and place them one through four. There’s also a pleasure-riding class and an English-riding class where we judge primarily on how the horse rides,” said Wilson. “I don’t think Tonasket has ever won the horse judging contest in their history since they began in 1936,” said FFA Advisor Matt Deebach. “I’m not completely sure, but I don’t think they have. At least not since I began teaching, anyway, so that’s pretty impressive.” Deebach has been the Agriculture teacher and FFA Advisor in Tonasket since 1996. Wilson said preparation for Nationals would include a lot of studying during school hours, at home and during lunch. “We’ll take a lot of time out of our schedule to prepare. I am really nervous;

the competition is going to be crazy.” She said the team would participate in judging horse classes at the Okanogan County Fair and the fair in Yakima for extra practice. Wilson, a cheerleader and basketball player, has been participating in 4-H since sixth grade. She has been riding rodeo all season, and will show two different horses at the Okanogan County Fair this weekend. Clark said as a young team, most of them “haven’t been doing this for a long time. We did good on the oral reason; we practiced a lot on that. We are planning on going to a lot of fairs; and studying after school, during Ag class and during lunch.” “It hasn’t really hit me yet, but it will when we go to get on the plane,” said Henneman.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 O KANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • September 24, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Houses For Sale OROVILLE. 1 AC HOME 1,048 SF 3 BR to reduced $87,000! Located on A-Highway 97. Lease option. Call 803-832-6051. TONASKET. OLD ORCHARD ESTATES SUBDIVISION 2 bedroom, 2 bath, full basement, expressive looking home. Home to have fresh outside paint, new lower level carpet, new bushes and ready to move in soon. $145,000. Call Jan at 509-486-1397.

For Rent

Help Wanted

AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

ASSISTANT MIDDLE SCHOOL SECRETARY

OROVILLE LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $435 per month. 509-476-3145 Oroville Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no inside smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Carrier Wanted:

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted Okanogan Estate and Vineyards Retail Store Looking for 24 – 32 hrs/wk SALES ASSOCIATE.

Please send resume to Yvaldovinos@gold diggerapples.com or drop off resume at retail store 1205 Main St, Oroville

Crosswords

ANSWERS

An Equal Opportunity Employer

The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract delivery route. Please call The Family of Dennis Neil 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / Barnett would like to Thank 3050 or email each and everyone for your gdevon@gazette-tribune.com help, thought and prayers.

Lots & Acreage Nice Spacious lot for double or single wide manufactured home pads & electric box septic domestice & irrigation water furnished. 1mile S Tonasket Bridge on Hwy 7 West Side John Oakes Rd. 509 486 2594

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for an ASSISTANT MIDDLE SCHOOL SECRETARY, 2 HOURS PER DAY, MONDAY – FRIDAY, NOON TO 2 PM. Position will remain open until filled with a screening date of September 25. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed.

Across 1. Bouquets 7. Prejudices 13. Emissary 14. Cause of hereditary variation 15. Spruce up

Health General

GOOD ALFALFA HAY Large Bales approximately 1300lbs, Bale at $175.00 a ton. There are 200 tons avail. Contact: CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee / supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: We have the following opportunities available: OMAK MEDICAL Pharmacy Technician Full time. Bilingual preferred. Occasional travel to Brewster required. OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred Patient Registration Rep. Full time. BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

Gold Digger Apples Inc, has the following employment opportunities available: PACKING LINE SUPERVISOR Full Time, Experience Preferred CLEAN UP/SANITATION CREW Full Time & Part Time, Night Shift Please apply at 1220 Ironwood, Oroville Email resume to kallie@golddiggerapples.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

23. Pigtail, e.g.

6. Married women (Spanish)

25. Bluster

7. Christian rite involving water

26. Affranchise

8. Down with the flu

27. Fixed

9. ___ king, food (2 wds)

29. After expenses

10. Man of La Mancha

30. Aridity

11. Chic

32. Baton wielder

12. More tranquil

34. Appropriate

15. Almost boil

35. Charge

17. Begin

36. Sack

20. Crash site?

40. ___ Island, TV show

23. Rouses to action

44. Backstabber 45. Vine-supporting latticework

24. Hearing impairment device (2 wds)

47. “So ___ me!”

27. Cache

48. ___ acid, a product of protein metabolism

28. Parenting challenges

50. Lieu

33. Undertake, with “out”

51. “Empedocles on ___” (Matthew Arnold poem)

36. Ancient Celtic priest

52. Data

38. More rigid

53. Sylvester, to Tweety

39. A through Z

54. Ishmael’s people 55. Collapse

40. Freight car without sides or roof (2 wds)

58. Some theater

41. Ancient fertility goddess

60. Farmer, at times

42. Ray of sunlight

61. Sacred Zoroastrian writings

43. Bakery supply

62. Fitting room endeavors

46. Grassland

63. Cash in

49. England Dan and John Ford ___, singing duo

Down

51. Clear, as a disk

31. 40 winks

37. Heartfelt

54. Lying, maybe

16. Power tools for smoothing wood

1. One who distributes charity

56. “Much ___ About Nothing”

18. “Unforgettable” singers

2. That which exists

57. Big ___ Conference

19. Decide to leave, with “out”

3. Baddies

59. “___ Maria”

21. Arch type

4. Foot pads

22. Cuckoos

5. Absorbed, as a cost

Feed Hay & Grain

BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

TWISP MEDICAL: MA-R Full time Roomer Full time. Bilingual required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer. Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Auctions FALL CONSIGNMENT SUNDAY, OCT. 18. 2015

TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS

***************

Already Consigned : Equipment - Vehicles - 2 Estates - Collectibles - CALL By Oct. 2 to get your Item Advertised.

D&D

AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

Ben Adams at 509-681-0181 Joyce Adams at 509-989-0411

Garage & Yard Sale OROVILLE His ‘n’ Hers yard rools furniture shelves counters tor. 6 airport Rd. at 9am

sale. power appliances lawn tracFri and Sat

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 21, 2015 his newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

Public Notices PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 9/29/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1995 Toyota 4Runner Lic# AKD1486 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 24, 2015. #OVG658560 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 9/29/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1986 Yamaha XVZ13D Motorcycle Lic# FHU41 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 24, 2015. #OVG657422 PUBLIC HEARING Tonasket City Council Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held during the regular Council meeting of the Tonasket City Council on Tuesday, September 29, 2015. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm in the City Hall, Tonasket, Washington. The purpose of the hearing is to review the revenue sources for the 2016 budget, including consideration of possible increases in property tax revenues. All interested persons are invited to attend and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact city hall, 509-4862132, prior to the hearing. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, 2015. #OVG657604 PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council has set their schedule for the 2016 Budget Workshops. All Budget Workshops will be held in the City Council Chambers. Budget Workshop dates and times are: -Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 8:30 am (all day workshop) -Tuesday, October 13, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 6:30 pm The public has a right to attend any workshop and make comments. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, October 8, 22, November 5, 19, 2015 #OVG655239

MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4,397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In Stock, ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ADOPTION Stay at home mom & devoted dad, married 11 yrs, long to ADOPT newborn. Financial security, happy home. Expenses paid. Denise & Jason. 1-800-392-2363 ADOPTION Affectionate Devoted Married Caring Lawyers Joyfully await Miracle Baby. Excited Grandparents too. *Expenses paid.*1-800-563-7964 BUISNESS OPPORTUNITY FRUIT STAND Orchard for sale. Coulee Dam. 63 acres. 5 tax lots. 3000 sq. ft. fruit stand. 15 acres irrigated, many fruit varieties, equipment. Inventory included. $485,000. 509.633.0133.

TONASKET City Council Date Change The Tonasket City Council took action to cancel the September 22nd, 2015 regular City Council meeting and move it to September 29th, 2015. At the meeting on September 29th, 2015 the City Council will conduct business as the rescheduled regular City Council meeting, to commence at 7:00 pm. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, 2015. #OVG657600 Notice of General Election Okanogan County, State of Washington Tuesday, November 3, 2015 A General Election will be held in the below mentioned districts for the purpose of submitting to the voters for their approval or rejection the following issues and candidates. Initiative Measure No. 1366; Initiative Measure No. 1401; Advisory Vote No. 10, Advisory Vote No. 11, Advisory Vote No. 12, Advisory Vote No. 13; Hospital District No 4, Commissioner Pos 3; City of Oroville, Council Pos 3; City of Oroville, Council Pos 4; City of Oroville, Council Pos 5; City of Tonasket, Council Pos 2; City of Tonasket, Council Pos 4; City of Tonasket,

Continued on next page

Auctions HUGE RANCH EQUIPMENT AUCTION SATURDAY OCT. 3, 2015 @ 10:00 a.m. 2470 Glenmore Rd North, Kelowna BC Tractors, Forklifts, Haying Equipment Grader, Back hoe, Pick up truck Shop full of Welding equipment Cattle handling equipment Check out our website for full listings @ www.bclivestock.bc.ca FMI phone 250-573-3939


Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Thence West along the north boundaries of Sections 2 through 6, Township 38 North, Range 27 East, and continuing along the north boundaries of Sections 1, 2 and 3, Township 38 North, Range 26 East for a cumulative distance of 8 miles, more or less, to the northwest corner of Section 3, Township 38 North, Range 26 East; Thence South along the west boundaries of Sections 3, 10, 15, 22, 27 and 34, Township 38 North, Range 26 East for a distance of 6 miles, more or less, to the southwest corner of said Section 34; Thence West along the north boundaries of Sections 4, 5 and 6 of Township 37 North, Range 26 East and continuing along the north boundaries of Sections 1 and 2, Township 37 North, Range 25 East for a distance of 5 miles, more or less, to the northwest corner of said Section 2; Thence South along the west boundaries of Sections 2, 11, 14, 23, 26 and 35 of Township 37 North, Range 25 East and continuing along the west boundaries of Sections 2, 11 and 14 of Township 36 North, Range 25 East for a cumulative distance of 9 miles, more or less, to the southwest corner of Section 14, Township 36 North, Range 25 East; Thence East along the South boundaries of Sections 14 and 13, Township 36 North, Range 25 East, and continuing along the south boundaries of Sections 18 and 17, Township 36 North, Range 26 East, to a point of intersection of the south boundary of said Section 17 with the easterly right of way boundary of Hagood Cutoff Road; Thence along the northeasterly right of way boundary of Hagood Cutoff Road in a southeasterly direction through Sections 20, 21, and 28, Township 36 North, Range 26 East to a point of intersection with the easterly right of way boundary of Pine Creek Road; Thence along the northeasterly right of way boundary of Pine Creek Road in a southeasterly direction through Sections 28, 27, 34 and 35, Township 36 North, Range 26 East to the intersection with the southwesterly right of way boundary of State Highway 97; Thence in a southwesterly direction along the southwesterly right of way boundary of State Highway 97 to the point of intersection with the south boundary of Section 35, Township 36 North, Range 26 East; Thence East along the south boundaries of Sections 35 and 36, Township 36 North, Range 26 East to the southeast corner of said Section 36; Thence North along the east boundaries of Sections 36, 25 and 24, Township 36 North, Range 26 East for a distance of 3 miles, more or less, to the northeast corner of said Section 24; Thence East along the north boundary of Section 19, Township 36 North, Range 27 East to the intersection with the thread of the Okanogan River; Thence northerly following the thread of the Okanogan River to the point of intersection with the north boundary of Section 16, Township 36 North, Range 27 East; Thence East along the north boundary of said Section 16 to the northeast corner of said Section 16; Thence South along the west boundaries of Sections 15, 22 and 27, Township 36 North, Range 27 East for a distance of 3 miles, more or less, to the southwest corner of said Section 27; Thence East along the south boundaries of Sections 27, 26 and 25, Township 36 North, Range 27 East for a distance of 3 miles, more or less, to the southeast corner of said Section 25; Thence South along the west boundary of Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 28 East, for a distance of 1 mile, more or less, to the southwest corner of said Section 31 and the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING.; Proposed Tonasket Park and Recreation District, Commissioner Pos 1; Proposed Tonasket Park and Recreation District, Commissioner Pos 2; Proposed Tonasket Park and Recreation District, Commissioner Pos 3; Proposed Tonasket Park and Recreation District, Commissioner Pos 4; Proposed Tonasket Park and Recreation District, Commissioner Pos 5, Proposed Tonasket Park and Recreation District - Levy, Cemetery District No 4, Commissioner Pos 2;Fire Protection District No 1, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire Protection District No 4, Commissioner Pos 2; Fire Pro-

tection District No 4, Commissioner Pos 3; Fire Protection District No 12, Commissioner Pos 3; Ferry-Okanogan Fire Protection District No 13, Commissioner Pos 1; Ferry-Okanogan Fire Protection District No 13, Commissioner Pos 3; Ferry-Okanogan Fire Protection District No 14, Commissioner Pos 1; Fire Protection District No 16, Commissioner Pos 2; Fire Protection District No 16, Commissioner Pos 3; Lake Osoyoos Water District, Commissioner Pos 1; Lake Osoyoos Water District, Commissioner Pos 2; Lake Osoyoos Water District, Commissioner Pos 3; The registration deadline for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is October 5, 2015. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditor’s Office up to and including October 26, 2015. You can register or obtain registration forms at the Auditor’s Office, on line at www.vote.wa.gov, and Department of Licensing. The Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, will be open so voters may obtain replacement ballots, drop off voted ballots, obtain provisional ballots, and use the Accessible Voting Units, at the following times. -Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM October 16 - November 2, 2015 -On Election Day only, November 3, 2015, 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM. Drop boxes are in 3 locations around the county. Tonasket - Tonasket City Hall/Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket Omak - Next to Police Station, 8 N Ash, Omak Pateros -180 Pateros Mall in parking lot, Pateros Drop boxes will close at 8:00PM on Election Day Voters needing additional information or assistance with voter registration forms or voting may call (509) 422-7240. Voters unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditor’s Office. Ballots require sufficient first class postage and must be postmarked by the day of the election. Check with your local Post Office for deadlines to have your ballot postmarked properly. For additional information on the election or regarding voter registration. vote.wa.gov/okanogan myvote.wa.gov, Local newspaper, radio, and TV www.pdc.wa.gov Meetings of the Okanogan County Canvassing Board are open, public meetings and shall be continued until the activities for which the following meetings are held have been completed. Canvass Board meetings are held in the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, in Okanogan. -Friday, November 13, 2015 at 11:00 AM to determine the status of any provisional or challenged ballots -Tuesday, November 24, 2015 at 11:00 AM to canvass the votes cast and certify the election This notice is in accordance with RCW 29A.52. Dated at Okanogan, Washington this 4th day of September, 2015. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections By Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 24, 2015. #OVG656410

Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 10/2/2015 , at 10:00 AM at the main entrance to the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd N, Okanogan, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT “E” OF THE SECOND ADDITION TO HELENSDALE FRUIT TRACTS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK “E” OF PLATS, PAGE 1, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1494 OLD HIGHWAY 97, MALOTT, WA 98829 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/30/2010, recorded 9/8/2010, under 3157751 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from BRUCE O. TURK, A SINGLE INDIVIDUAL , as Grantor(s), to BAINES TITLE COMPANY, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $29,013.95 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $134,155.45 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2013 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 10/2/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 9/21/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 9/21/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 9/21/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address( es ): NAME BRUCE O. TURK, A SINGLE INDIVIDUAL ADDRESS 1494 OLD HIGHWAY 97, MALOTT, WA 98829 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 3/6/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the

sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS – The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/hom e o w n e r s h i p / p o s t _ purchase_counselors_foreclosure. htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington:

http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/29/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-564673-TC IDSPub #0084212 9/3/2015 9/24/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 3, 24, 2015 #OVG641181

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Truly beautiful acreage with great lake views!

Nearly 20 acres with well. Great hunting and fishing in the many lake recreation area. MLS#683232 $49,900

SUN LAKES REALTY

Delightful Cozy Home Newly remodeled w/vinyl windows & Pretty floors. Partial Basement Possible Seller Financing w/Low Down Carport, Furnace $118,000

#1 Top Producer Office in North County

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

HOME ON ACREAGE

Crumbacher Area. 3-4 Bdrm. 2-Bath. 1782 sqft m/l. 1993 Manuf Home w/Updates. 2 Family Rooms. Large Dining/ Kitchen areas. Appliances. Utility Room w/Washer & Dryer. Private. Trees. Fenced. 3.52 Acres m/l. Domestic & Irrig. Water. Motivated Seller - $137,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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One level 3 bedroom house that has just had the inside painted and new carpet installed. Large one car garage with shop and attached carport. Property backs up to the river. Come look at this move in ready house NWML#846031 $112,500

HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS The exterior

Stage the exterior of your home too. Stage the exterior with fresh paint, immaculate landscaping and even outdoor furniture to set up a Sunday brunch on the deck. Buyers often fantasize about enjoying their backyards by entertaining and spending time outside.

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

HILLTOP REALTY

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LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE Guide www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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509-476-3602

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Sponsored by

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Easy, difficulty rating 0.38

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is todifficulty place the numbers Puzzle 39 (Easy, rating 0.38) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-564673-TC APN No.: 5620050000 Title Order No.: 130127637-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): BRUCE O. TURK Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3157751 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

Sudoku

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Council Pos 5; Curlew School District No 50J, Director 1; Curlew School District No 50J, Director 4; Curlew School District No 50J, Director 5; Republic School District No 309, Director #2; Republic School District No 309, Director #3; Republic School District No 309, Director At Large #4; Tonasket School District No 404, Director Pos 2; Tonasket School District No 404, Director Pos 3; Tonasket School District No 404, Director Pos 5; Oroville School District No 410, Director Pos 2; Oroville School District No 410, Director Pos 4; Oroville School District No 410, Director Pos 5; Create Tonasket Park and Recreation District to provide a means of both maintaining an community swimming pool and maintaining existing Tonasket City parks; Boundaries of proposed district: Beginning at the southwest corner of Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 28 East, W.M., Okanogan County, Washington; Thence East along the south boundaries of Sections 31 through 36 of said Township 36 North, Range 28 East and continuing along the south boundaries of Sections 31 through 33, Township 36 North, Range 29 East, for a cumulative distance of 9 miles, more or less, to the southeast corner of Section 33, Township 36 North, Range 29 East; Thence North along the east boundaries of Sections 33, 28, 21 and 16 of said Township 36 North, Range 29 East for a distance of 4 miles, more or less, to the northeast corner of said Section 16; Thence East along the south boundary of Section 10 of said Township 36 North, Range 29 East to the southeast corner of said Section 10; Thence North along the East boundary of said Sections 10 and Section 3 for a distance of 2 miles, more or less, to the northeast corner of said Section 3; Thence East along the south boundary of Section 33, Township 37 North, Range 29 East to the southeast corner of said Section 33; Thence North along the east boundaries of said Section 33 and Section 28, Township 37 North, Range 29 East for a distance of 2 miles, more or less, to the northeast corner of said Section 28; Thence West along the north boundary of said Section 28 to the northwest corner of said Section 28; Thence North along the east boundaries of Sections 20, 17, 8 and 5, Township 37 North, Range 29 East for a distance of 4 miles, more or less, to the northeast corner of said Section 5; Thence East along the south boundaries of Sections 33 through 36, Township 38 North, Range 29 East for a distance of 4 miles, more or less, to the southeast corner of said Section 36; Thence North along the east boundaries of Sections 36, 25, 24, 13, 12 and 1 of Township 38 North, Range 29 East and continuing along the east boundary of Section 36, Township 39 North, Range 29 East for a cumulative distance of 7 miles, more or less, to the northeast corner of said Section 36; Thence West along the north boundaries of Sections 36, 35 and 34, Township 39 North, Range 29 East for a distance of 3 miles, more or less, to the southeast corner of Section 28, Township 39 North, Range 29 East; Thence North along the east boundary of said Section 28 to the northeast corner of said Section 28; Thence West along the north boundaries of Sections 28, 29 and 30, Township 39 North, Range 29 East for a distance of 3 miles, more or less, to the northwest corner of said Section 30; Thence North along the east boundary of Section 25, Township 39 North, Range 28 East to the northeast corner of said Section 25; Thence West along the north boundaries of Sections 25 through 30, Township 39 North, Range 28 East for a distance of six miles, more or less, to the northwest corner of said Section 30; Thence South along the west boundary of said Section 30 to the northeast corner of Section 36, Township 39 North, Range 27 East; Thence West along the north boundary of said Section 36 to the northwest corner of said Section 36; Thence South along the west boundary of said Section 36 to the southwest corner of said Section 36;

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SEPTEMBER 24. 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE September 24, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

OBITUARIES

ROBERT ‘BOB’ JEWETT The world lost one of the most hardworking, selfless and caring men on August 28th, 2015 with the passing of Robert T. Jewett, 49, from multiple unexpected medical issues. While spending most of his time working on the mountain and running his decorative rock business, he was always willing to drop everything and help any

Karl Eric Martin

KARL ERIC MARTIN Karl Eric Martin passed away on September 8, 2015. Karl was born on November 7, 1943 in Ontario, Oregon as the second son to Carl E. and Helen (Scott) Martin. His father was serving as a Naval Flight Instructor during WWII. They returned to Seattle in the mid-1940s, and two more brothers and a sister arrived to round out the family. Karl had an enjoyable childhood of Cub and Boy Scouts, Pee Wee football, Elvis Presley, fireworks, super-fast-tall-hill sledding, and Christmas-housedecorating showmanship. His design and decoration of the Martin family home was one that the people of Seattle would put on their “must see” list during the Christmas holidays. He especially enjoyed summer camp at YMCA Camp Orkila on Orcas Island; a tradition that he passed on to his own children. As a youth, one of his favorite hobbies was building and flying model airplanes (a forerunner of today’s drones?). Early on, it was apparent that Karl had a knack for problemsolving and working on anything mechanical, especially cars. Karl graduated from Seattle’s Lincoln High School in 1962, where he made the junior varsity basketball and the varsity football teams. He was also active in Lynx Club (a service organization), the German Club, and was honored to be part of the Letterman’s Club. After high school, he went to Western Washington State College (now Western

Patricia “Pat” Houpt

PATRICIA HOUPT Pat Houpt (Patricia Grace Wolfe Houpt) 86 of Oroville died September 17, 2015 at North

Kinross, he had many hobbies that he enjoyed. You could spot him cruising around the mountain hunting with his Yellow Lab, Jasper, or fishing down at the lakes. He rarely left the hill but when he did, you would find him down at the golf course with all of his friends. He enjoyed spending time with Brittany hunting, watching her sports events or just driving around the mountain. Bob loved coming home to his wife every evening and relaxing after a long day. He had a great amount of respect and love for everyone he knew and it showed through the way he treated others and the way everyone treated him. No matter who it was, he always greeted them with a huge smile and a kind word. He passed away at Spokane Sacred Heart on August 28th, 2015. Preceding him in death were his mother, aunts, uncles, and cousins. Bob is survived by his beloved wife of 21 years Denise, his pride and joy daughter Brittany, his father Bob, brother Randy (Susan), and sister Christy (Lee). A celebration of Bob’s life will be held Saturday, October 24th,2015 at 2 p.m. at the Chesaw Rodeo Hall.

Washington University) in Bellingham, graduating in 1969 with a degree in Political Science, and a minor in Anthropology. Along the way, he married his high school sweetheart, Carol Perry. Two sons, David, born 1965, and Tod, born 1966, arrived before college graduation, which might explain why it took Karl a few years longer than most to get his degree, as he had a family to support as well. After graduation the family moved to Kirkland, Wash., while Karl managed a Standard Oil Service Station in Seattle. In 1971, Karl purchased the Standard Oil Station (Chevron) in Oroville, Wash. and moved his family to the area that they will always call HOME, especially Karl. After they were settled, Karl and Carol expanded their family to include Craig in 1972, and Polly in 1974. “Karl’s Chevron” was known to everyone in town through the 70’s. Unfortunately, the rationing of gas came with the 1976 oil crisis, and Karl had to give up his station and move on to other endeavors in order to support his family. Wanting to remain in Oroville, Karl built the Little Oasis Car Wash, and worked in a number of jobs including: the local lumber mills, and Seattle’s Todd Shipyard, becoming a certified welder and Boilermaker, working on several of the large irrigation pipeline projects in the Oroville-Tonasket area. In 1985, Karl moved back to the “wet” side of the mountains, returning to Bellingham to pursue a Master’s Degree in Anthropology with a goal of teaching at the college level. Working part-time, studying full-time, that Masters degree was finally completed in 1993, but a teaching job was elusive. Karl then changed direction and applied himself to earning an Information Technology Certification at Skagit Valley Community College in Mt. Vernon, Wash. With this certificate, Karl joined Milestone Information Systems in Bellingham for about nine years. In 2003, unfulfilled by the accounting focus of this firm, Karl looked for yet another change, and landed a position with Clallam County in Port Angeles, with their Information Technology Department. He

began this job in July 2003, and remained there until his retirement in 2010. He thoroughly enjoyed the problem solving and customer service aspects of this position. The spectrum of Karl’s hobbies and interest were wide and deep. He enjoyed hunting for many years, supplying food for his family. He was most proud of his moose, and until recently, that huge moose head could be seen on display at Swain’s General Store in Port Angeles. Karl was renowned for his diligent work ethic. He didn’t know any other way but to apply himself full bore to the job at hand, be it at work or getting firewood for his family. Giving 150% was all he knew how to do. Karl’s interest in music was wide-ranging, from Bob Seger to Elvis Presley to Bonnie Raitt to Charlotte Church and everything in-between. There must be at least a hundred, different and unique, Karl-crafted CD’s made for his loved ones. He also loved photography, kayaking, and riding his mountain bike in the hills around Port Angeles. Karl’s real passion in life was science, from Anthropology to Astronomy to Chemistry and Biology. In the last few years he filled most days in pursuit of higher knowledge. Karl was very proud of the life and successes of his children. He is survived by sons Dave Martin of Chelan, and wife Rachel, Tod Martin, of Richmond, England, and wife Alvia; Craig Martin, Chandler Ariz.; Polly MartinKasch, of Vancouver, and husband Brandon; brothers; Joel Martin and wife Lori Jenkins of Salem, Ore.; Scott (Holly) Martin of Freeland, Wash.; Brian Martin, of Seattle, Wash.; and sister, Linnea Martin of Port Angeles, Wash.; grandchildren Carolyn and Abby, Chelan, Wash.; Brooke and Colton, Chandler, Ariz; Breya and Bianca of Vancouver, Wash.; special decades-long friend, Davell Seversen of Suquamish, Wash., as well a large extended family of aunts and cousins. He was preceded in death by his parents, Carl and Helen Martin, and granddaughter Stephanie Wilhelmi of Chelan. A memorial in Oroville will be planned for a later date, and announced by his family in advance.

Valley Hospital She was born September 21, 1928 at Madera, California to parents Fred S. Wolfe and Grace Hamilton Wolfe Pat was the second of four children, Maudie Lou, Fred Jr. and Betty. The family lived in Lodi, Calif. for many years. After high school, Pat attended college where she became proficient at shorthand and worked as a secretary. The family later moved to Keene, Texas where she met and married Don Houpt. They moved to Nebraska, his home state, and worked on a cattle ranch in the sandhills. They were offered a position working on a wheat farm in South Dakota, which they later purchased. That is where they raised their three daughters, Shirley, Nancee and Kathryn. After 42 years on the farm, they retired and moved to Wenatchee, Wash. When Pat was widowed in 2008, she moved to the Oroville area to live close to her daughter. She was an avid seamstress, and loved to make look alike dresses

for her three little girls. She also loved to crochet and quilt, and had donated many baby quilts to various charities, as well as to the Tonasket Pool fund. One of her greatest joys the last few years was watching the hummingbirds enjoying her flowers. She was preceded in death by her parents, three siblings, husband, daughter Shirley and son-in-law Randy Wheat. She is survived by two daughters, Nancee (Don) Eichberger of Cuba, Missouri, Katie Wheat of Oroville, two grandchildren, Craig Eichberger of St. Louis, Missouri, Laura (Chad) Kempfer of Valmeyer, Illinois and two great-grandchildren, Tyler and Jake Kempfer, as well as several nieces and nephews. At her request, there will be no services and she will be laid to rest with her husband and daughter in Nebraska. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

William “Bill” Mannat

WILLIAM ‘BILL’ MICHAEL MANNATT William “Bill” Michael Mannatt, beloved son, brother, uncle, cousin and friend to many was born in Los Angeles, California on December 10th, 1948. Bill later migrated to

WALLACE MOORE

Boulder, Colorado, where he worked as a master modelmaker. He retired to Oroville, Washington and was a valued employee of the Omak Home Depot. Despite having polio at the age of two, he overcame his disability to become an avid sportsman, archer and lover of falconry. In his early years, he spent a great deal of time hunting, fishing and hiking throughout the High Sierras of California and later in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. With his hunting dogs, he explored much of the West with great curiosity, deep appreciation and a keen understanding of nature. He was also a champion marksman; competing nationally in sporting clays, trap and skeet and held championship titles in Colorado, Nebraska and New Mexico, in addition to being Claythorne A Class World Champion in 2003. In his retirement years, he enjoyed touring the beautiful mountains and valleys of the Pacific Northwest on his beloved Harley-Davidson. He was a happy man the day he left us, for

Wallace “Wally” Hugh Moore, 87, passed away on August 27, 2015 at the To n a s k e t North Valley Extended Care facility, surrounded by his family. A celebration of Wally’s life will be held Wallace Moore on Saturday, September 26, 2015 at the Tonasket High School Commons, 35 Hwy 20 Tonasket Wash. at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers,

memorials may be made in memory of Wally to Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758512 Topeka, Kansas 66675-8512; North Valley Extended Care of Tonasket, 22 W. First St. Tonasket, WA 98855; American Cancer Society 920 N. Washington #200 Spokane, WA 99201, or to a charity of your choice.and Mary. Graveside services were held on Saturday, September 5, 2015 at the Riverside Cemetery with John Newton, officiating and full military honors. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

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he had accomplished much and overcame great challenges. We wish him joy, Godspeed and give thanks for his time with us knowing that the bonds of love are forever. His legacy lives on through his generous organ donation. Bill was preceded in death by his brother Philip Mannatt. Bill is survived by his parents, Gloria and William E. Mannatt; his siblings, Marie Mannatt, Kathleen Sapp and her husband Doug, Wendy Goldmark and her husband Peter and Stephen Mannatt; loving nieces and nephews; his dogs Maggie, Joe and Dixie; his friends Danny Welle, Kent Hardy, John Olthoff and Jenny Gardinier and his A.A. community. A memorial service to honor his life will be held at St. Mary’s Mission in Omak, Washington on Friday, September 25th, 2015 at 11:00am. A reception immediately following will be held at the Old Flour Mill in Okanogan, Washington. PrechtHarrison-Nearents Chapel and the Okanogan Co. Crematory of Okanogan are caring for the arrangements.

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friends or community members when they were in need. His positive and humorous attitude along with his willingness to be of help to anyone gained him an abundance of respect from everyone who knew him. Bob was born at Spokane Sacred Heart on May 24th, 1966. He graduated from Mead High School and then furthered his education at Whitworth University, graduating in 1988 with a degree in geology. As many already knew, Bob was an avid rock hound. After college he was a geologist for Ramrod Gold and soon after, he began running his own Assay lab in Republic with his business partner, Jim Gubler. In 1993 he met the love of his life, Denise, and on May 21st, 1994 they got married and started their new life together in Chesaw. A year later, they were blessed with a little daughter, Brittany. Around the same time, he started his own decorative rock business with his business partner and good friend, Greg Prescott. With his business and rock quarry being so close to home, it made it much easier to be with his new family. Though he was very busy and hard at work between his own business and Water Sampling for

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 24, 2015  

September 24, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 24, 2015  

September 24, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune