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Post 23 is having a golf tournament to raise funds on Saturday, Sept. 19

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Tonasket Airport serving as a helibase for fire fighting efforts

HELP FROM ABOVE

Four helicopters based at Tonasket since August BY KATIE TEACHOUT

“We are not the end of all ends in firefighting; we are just one part of the process,” said Sky Crane Pilot Don TONASKET - Tonasket Municipal Anderson. “Any heroes are the ones on Airport is serving as a helibase for four the ground; out there in the dirt. We are helicopters this summer as firefight- flying in clean air, and they are down ing efforts continue on the Okanogan there in the dirt putting life and limb at Complex of fires. risk.” The helicopters are a Type-1 Sky Anderson has been flying 28 years and Crane and K-Max used for initial attack started working with Siller Helicopter (IA) and extended this summer. He said attack air support; the helicopters were a Type-2 Bell 205 ““Any heroes are the at the beck and call “huey” for IA, deployof Incident Command ones on the ground. and ground crew. ment of Rappellers, troop transport, over“We are just one We are flying in clean all logistics of moving small part of a very big air, and they are down and complex problem. people and gear, and water drops; and a there in the dirt putting We are noticed more Type-3 Astar used for we are so vislife and limb at risk.” because IA, logistics support, ible, but we are just aerial recon and air Don Anderson, pilot, part of the process; Siller Helicopter resource coordination and a fire this big has and water drops. so many players,” said “The Type-3 Astar Anderson. serves as an eye in the sky,” said Andrew California Fire Team #1 just transiHastings. “It is such a really big help to tioned in, led by Incident Commander give us an overview of what is going on.” Mike Minton. The Incident Command Hastings is a USFS employee ordered base is set up at the Omak Stampede to the helibase as a helicopter manager of Grounds. the Sky Crane helicopter crew and to act The Sky Crane is a Sikorsky CH54A. as a liaison between them and the USFS. Designed and built in the 1960s as a The helicopters are privately owned military aircraft, it saw action in the by companies around the nation, and Vietnam War. contracted by the USFS, BLM and State “It was designed by Sikorski and first fire management departments. flown in 1962 under a Department of The Sky Crane is under a 90-day Defense contract for lifting heavy cargo,” contract of 14-hour days with Siller Anderson said of the ship that has a Helicopter, whose headquarters are in max gross weight certification of 42,000 Marysville, California. Based in Grant’s pounds. “This one is modified and Pass for the duration of the fire season, adapted specifically for USFS service, the Sky Cranes go anywhere in the U.S. working firefighting. It has a 2,500 galIt arrived in Tonasket August 31, and lon tank, and has hoverfield capabilities has been here since, with two eight-man to collect from streams, rivers and lakes.” crews working shifts of twelve days on SEE HELIBASE| PG A2 and twelve days off. KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, crew members with the Sikorski CH54A include co-pilot Dave Lane, Helicopter Manager Andrew Hastings, Crew Chief Ryan Sarver, truck driver/mechanic’s helper Bud Snodgrass, pilot Dan Anderson and electrician/mechanic Joe Breazeale. Left: K-Max Pilot Phil Melton of Priest River, Idaho, was instrumental in preventing the fire from overcoming homes near McLaughlin Canyon August 21. For story and more photos, see page A2.

Oroville and county looking at a long term private sector ambulance services contract Not planning on going back to a volunteer ambulance crew BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Rather than going back to an all volunteer ambulance crew, it looks like Okanogan County and the City of Oroville will be choosing a long term service provider. Currently Lifeline Ambulance Inc., a private emergency services provider, has been under contract to the city and rural EMS district after the volunteer crew resigned en masse over differences with the city. The county commissioners head up the rural portion of the EMS and city council the part of the district that lies within the city limits. Both groups decided they were through negotiating with the volunteers and hired Lifeline on a emergency basis. Now they have decided to continue with a private agency going forward. A Request for Qualifications (RFQ)

has been sought by the county and city The deadline for submittals of RFQ and was published in August and were was Sept. 3 and the city and county plan specifically sent to Lifeline Ambulance to begin discussions regarding the review Inc. and North Star Ambulance Service. and selection of submittals and subseNorth Star Ambulance Service was quent contract negotiations this month. formed shortly before “The ambuthe volunteer crew lance committee resigned and is made (Councilmen Tony up primarily with “...Lifeline was the most Keopke and Jon Neal), former EMTs from the mayor an I decided qualified because of that crew. In a white that Lifeline was the their track record as a most qualified because paper titled “Oroville Ambulance Service of their track record company” Update,” North Star is as a company,” said Chris Branch, Director described as an “entity Branch. Oroville Community Development of uncertain status.” Branch doesn’t know Chris Branch, which private sector Oroville’s director of company the county community development, said the city commissioners will choose. However, he and county are using a process of select- says the city feels they should remain in ing who they think is most qualified and charge of administration of the ambuthen will negotiate the types of services lance service. and costs after that selection has been “We’ve asserted to the county commismade. sioners to let us remain in charge because “Decisions like level of service and the city has been in the business a long costs will be negotiated after the city and time and the ambulance hall is just across county make that selection,” Branch said, the street,” he said. adding, “The process is similar to when Much concern has been voiced the city hires an engineering firm.” about the current emergency contract

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 38

because there are only two Lifeline EMTs assigned to Oroville. While the volunteer crew had the ability to man both of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) District’s ambulances, currently Lifeline can only man one and relies on Tonasket to provide additional coverage if multiple emergencies occurred at once requiring a second ambulance to roll out on a call. Other concerns have been voiced about the cost to the taxpayers for a private service over the volunteer service. Oroville EMS had been operated by volunteers for 28 years with the city providing the ambulance service using a “paid volunteer arrangement.” According to the White Paper Oroville officials began investigating the option of contracting with the private sector for ambulance/emergency medical services several months ago. This was prompted, according to the city, because the ambulance coordinator, Debra Donohue resigned, and “because of a shrinking volunteer force, part of which included volunteer employees that have been dissatisfied with the existing program.” The paper goes on to say, “The city’s inquiry was disrupted by com-

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INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

plaints to the Okanogan County Board of Commissioners who discovered in implementing their agreement with the city that they do not have legal authority to relinquish their contracting authority to their representatives (Oroville Rural EMS Commissioners), acknowledging that by law they (the county commissioners) must execute agreement updates directly with the city. While this discovery hampered and delayed the efforts of the city in studying the private sector alternative, it motivated the governing parties to review the current arrangement resulting in a cooperative effort to seek alternatives that may better serve their constituents.” They list several reasons for making the change from a volunteer service to a private sector service. Some of the primary reasons include: • Responsible governance. It is incumbent upon elected officials to periodically review and evaluate public programs for efficiency and value. • Safety. The governing bodies have

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community A6-A7 Sports, Biz, Schools B1-3 Classifieds B10-11

Real Estate Obits

B11 B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

NEWS

HELIBASE | FROM A1 “Water drops are a gamechanger for guys on the ground,” said Hastings, who also works fires as a rappeller. He said parameter studies done on how effective different approaches were in fighting fires, found fires with zero to four foot flames to be effectively fought by ground crews; fires with four to eight foot flames by dozers with the ability to spray water; and flames over eight feet tall by helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. “Fire can sometimes have flames that reach over 200 feet in the air, and they can also throw burning material so high and far into the atmosphere that it can start other fires, called spot fires;

many of them ten to twenty miles in front of itself. When this type of fire behavior is happening, Incident Command Teams usually take a ‘Big Box’ approach,” said Hastings. “Fire fighter and public safety are number one, and protecting anything important in the area. Weather changes are great, but we also work off large natural fuel breaks and terrain; sometimes performing burn out and back burns to eliminate fuel out in front of a fire. Establish these lines in the right places, and you can stop a large, very active fire. During these types of fire fighting tactics is where hardworking ground forces and water drops/retardant drops from heli-

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Phil Melton, flying the Team HeliQwest K-Max, dumps water over a ridge of flames close to homes near McLaughlin Canyon Aug. 21.

copters and fixed wing air tankers play critical roles.” “A contained fire is different than a controlled fire,” said Andrews. “With a contained fire, you put a line around the fire; either a hand line dug with hand tools, or a dozer line. Then you back-burn towards the fire to get rid of fuels so it can’t burn further. It’s another effective tool.” A weather change can allow a ground crew to get in, and save money on not having to fly the helicopter. According to Hastings, the Sky Crane runs about $7,600 per hour, and is also one of the more expensive helicopters on contract. “With the Sikorski and the K-Max, ground crews will work areas along a hot edge of a fire where they are cutting fuel breaks. A helicopter can get in there to put out spot fires and cool the hot edge enough to allow ground crews to get in and extinguish it further,” Hastings said. He said ground crews were often on firelines where the ambient temperature was 95-100 degrees. “Then you put them next to what is basically a large campfire, and they can only stand it for so long. The water drop changes the local environment on the ground. It increases the humidity and leaves water dripping off the trees.” Hastings said while the ground crews weren’t effective against the large flames, the helicopters weren’t completely effective against everything either. “The helicopters need the ground crews, and the ground crews need the helicopters. It’s a team effort.” K-Max pilot Phil “Spanky” Melton, flying for HeliQwest, has been assigned to the Okanogan Complex since mid-August; working shifts of twelve days on and twelve days off. “The K-Max and a FireHawk were the first planes to arrive in Omak,” said Melton, who has over 5,000 hours of flight time on the K-Max. The K-Max is contracted through Team HeliQwest, an international Helicopter Charter Company that special-

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, Andrew Hastings, left, and Phil Melton hold up the sides of a water bucket that is carried under-slung below the K-Max. Below, Hastings points to a hydraulic-driven pumphead that pushes water up the hose to fill the 2500-gallon tank of the Heli-tanker. A 5/8” steel cable inside the rubber hose bears the weight of the pump, which can work in as little as 30 inches of water. izes in operations such as forest fire suppression. Melton said so far, only 36 K-Maxes were built in the 1990s; but six more are scheduled to be built at a cost of $6.5 million each. Melton said he was in Afghanistan when three of the K-Max helicopters were converted to remote and used to provide supply drops. He is one of just three pilots who checked out to be a safety pilot on the remote. “I was inside the K-Max while it was hooked up to a computer, but only for maintenance. When we fired it up, we got out,” said Melton. “To fly it, you just picked up a playstation remote and started driving it. It’s really simple; you build a flight plan and it flies autonomously. It’s the perfect platform for that, because it lifts so much weight.” The max gross weight is 12,000 pounds, with a hook weight of 6,000 pounds. The water bucket holds up to 690 gallons. “It’s nice because it’s designed to do multiple partial drops,

and you don’t have to let all the water out at once. Which is good; because if I miss, I can fly back over with a little bit left and it doesn’t look so bad,” Melton said with a laugh. He recalled one firefighting assignment this summer was dropping water on the McLaughlin Canyon fire August 21 as it crept westward over a ridge and came very close to several homes. “That was fun, there by the Janis Bridge; because it was such a short, fast run,” said Melton, who was dipping the water bucket in the Okanogan River. “This machine really shines in the short distance.” Melton had to leave the fireline when he came close to running out of fuel. He said the K-Max is dispatched when ground support teams say they need air support, and contact the helibase. A fire team is put in place through Incident Command, and Helicopter Manager Kim Knox, a USFS employee and COR with

HeliQwest, gets the order and ground contacts. “We answer to her, and she answers to helibase,” said Melton. “But the first morning we were here, we showed up at the Omak Airport and there were flames all around the fuel truck. We didn’t wait for orders. We did what we had to do to protect our stuff.” “It was ‘Game On,’” said Knox.

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SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS Disaster relief chaplains fill in where needed

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Disaster Relief Chaplains from the Westgate Chapel of Edmonds spent two days sifting through the ashes at George and Patti Hill’s home. Pictured left to right are Valerie and Greg Carlson, Bob Horne, Kriss Richardson, Gerre Gustafson, Les Crossfield and Gary and Sharon Evans. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Several Disaster Chaplains with the Westgate Chapel of Edmonds traveled from their homes near Seattle to provide assistance to people suffering fire damages from the Okanogan Complex. They arrived in Chelan Aug. 31, where they worked for two days sifting through the ashes of two burned down homes before coming to Tonasket to sift through the ashes of three burned-down homes. They worked for two days with George and Patti Hill, who lost their home in the Five-Mile fire. The team found most of a collection of 50-cent pieces that had been stored in three or four plastic gallon jugs. “We kinda knew where they were, so we showed them were to look,” said Patti Hill. “George’s mom gave us twenty-five silver

dollars for our 25th wedding anniversary, and they found most of those, too. We haven’t started looking for jewelry yet.” George Hill said the fire that wiped out ¾ of his car collection was “a terrible wall of flames. The wind must have been blowing 30 or 40 miles per hour. It just came in nothing flat. Earlier in the day there was nothing you could see, but once it came over the ridge it was just like a bullseye for us.” The Disaster Relief team was led by Greg Carlson, and included his wife Valerie, Kriss Richardson, Gary and Sharon Evans, Gerre Gustafson, Les Crossfield, Bob Horne, Carrie Knight, Josi Jones, and Doug and Barbara Syring. All of them funded their trips themselves, with some taking vacation time from work to make the trip which lasted almost two weeks for many of them. Prior to coming to the Okanogan

Complex, the team spent two weeks working at the Wenatchee fire. Everyone on the team is trained through the International Association of Community Service Chaplains out of Cleveland, Tennesee; and all but one have completed Community Emergency Response Training, or CERT. “So not only do we get our boots dirty, but we also talk to people,” said Greg Carlson. “We aren’t certified counselors, but sometimes they just need a listening ear or a hug.” The CERT training involves knowing how to work with FEMA, do triage, search for people and perform first aid. Some of the volunteers are also Ham radio operators. Carlson said after arriving in Chelan to work on a couple of jobs arranged by a church in

Cashmere that has a chaplain division, he sent a small team up to Tonasket to look for jobs to do. Members ended up volunteering for the Tonasket Distribution Center (TDC), both at the warehouse and at the Visitor Center location; where they met people and started finding more work. “We took a trailer and a truckload down to the Okanogan Distribution Center. After stopping by and seeing they were running out of stuff, we got a two-page list of things they needed. We brought the list here and the TDC was able to fill it,” said Carlson. Tonasket resident Elwyn Loner took a horse trailer down to deliver the goods, taking three more loads down September 10; and delivering a load to a Nespelem fire camp. “We also took a load of 50 hygiene kits from Cashmere and some warm clothes up to Republic,” said Carlson. “There

were fire fighters there from New Mexico, and they were getting cold.” One of the essential roles the team was able to play came about by chance. “We delivered a load of dog and cat food from the TDC to an animal shelter in Oroville called N.O. Paws Left Behind,” said Carlson. “The community had purchased a trailer for the owner to house the dogs in over the winter. She had a trench dug from the electric pole to the trailer over 200 feet away, for electrical conduit to supply the heat. But the PUD was too busy to get out there, and she was worried about the horses falling in the trench. So I volunteered our crew to do it. She was really hesitant, but I told her, ‘don’t worry, I used to lay electrical conduit.’” Carlson works for Seattle City Light. “They came in to help bring in dog and cat food to distribute

Animal Relief N.O. (North Okanogan) Paws Left Behind is an animal shelter located in Oroville. Carol Richardson, who has been rescuing dogs for a number of years, opened the shelter about a year ago. She started out with three kennels, and the operation has grown to 18 kennels. She said she had 63 dogs in residence when the Disaster Relief Team showed up with the food from the TDC. “We’ve maybe gotten 15 dogs off and on from the fire; people bring them in until they get resettled. We took in another ten that we had to find new homes for,” Richardson said. “We don’t charge anything for that service for the fire victims. The fire was a terrible thing. A lot of these dogs have been lost and running from the fires. They are stressed; and some have picked up distemper and fleas and tics, so we try to get them fat and happy and settled for their people to pick up when they are ready to go back home again.” Richardson said she has gotten donations of crates, kennels and medical supplies; and cash donations purchased the trailer to house the dogs in for the winter. “Last year the dogs came inside at night, so it will be good to have a place for them to go

to pets of fire victims, and they saw we were trying to put in some electricity for an animal shelter to keep the dogs warm in the winter,” said owner Carol Richardson. “He said ‘I am a lineman, and I can do that for you.’ So I put the money into an account at ACE Hardware for the conduit, and they went and picked it up. It took them just two days, so now we are all set up for power and air conditioning for next summer. We’re just waiting on the PUD to come out and hook it up. They were an awesome bunch of guys. Absolutely awesome.” Richardson said her nonprofit operates strictly off of donations. “We do as much as we can, as we get donations in; and sometimes it takes a while to get stuff done. This was a godsend. Literally. Their timing was excellent. We were up against winter before the PUD would have been able to get out here and get this done.”

and stay warm other than my house. We get donations from as far away as Alaska and the coast, and people in Okanogan County have gotten behind us 100 percent. We’ve had a lot of support from the Canadians also, and we’ve been able to adopt a lot of dogs up into Canada. They’ve come through with some nice donations and money-making projects to help us. We have been very fortunate.” Richardson said donations are used to spay and neuter stray dogs, and find them healthy and happy homes. Paws is also a resource for people who go into Hospice care or assisted living facilities and other housing situations where they can’t have pets. “The most I’ve taken in in one day as a rescue was 23; all from different situations. I wouldn’t have believed it if I hadn’t seen it,” Richardson said. “We also take in pets in cases where people have passed and the family can’t take them. They’ve got someplace to go with them.” Richardson said she has a Facebook page with 3200 people on it, so when she has dogs that need homes “we post them there and people pass on the word. They find awesome homes for awesome dogs.” N.O. Paws Left Behind is a nonprofit that operates solely on donations. “As long as people keep helping us, we’ll keep doing this,” Richardson said.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal The court found probable cause to charge Alex Bibian Rodriguez, 22, Omak, with two counts each of third-degree rape of a child and thirddegree child molestation. The crimes allegedly occurred March 1- Sept. 1. The court issued Sept. 4 a criminal summons for Teresa Mae Tindoll, 50, Omak, with distribution of a controlled substance (marijuana). The crime allegedly occurred June 12. The court issued Sept. 4 an arrest warrant for Kurtis Camron Pugsley Bishop, 28, with addresses in Tonasket and Republic, for attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle, second-degree possession of stolen property and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 10-25. The court issued Sept. 10 a criminal summons for Eli Paul Van Brunt, 30, Omak, for theft of rental, leased, lease-purchased or loaned property. The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 6 The court found probable cause to charge Allen Jacob Strausser, 32, Tonasket, with theft of rental, leased, lease-purchased or loaned property; and obtaining hotel, restaurant or lodging accommodations by fraud. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 11-15. The court found probable cause to charge Scott Thomas Hilke, 21, Okanogan, with seconddegree burglary. The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Russell Christopher Arndt, 48, Riverside, with 11 counts of intimidating a public servant and one count each of disorderly conduct and unlawful possession of a loaded rifle in a vehicle. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Vicente Garcia Cruz, 41, Omak, with fourth-degree assault (DV) and four counts of harassment (threats to kill). The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Joseph Nathanael Bowers, 23, Tonasket, with harassment (threats to kill) and violation of a no-contact order. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Tosh M. Mason, 27, Tonasket, with POCS (with intent to deliver) (marijuana) and POCS (usable marijuana). The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 28. The court found probable cause to charge Bill Cephus Bedard Jr., 25, Omak, with seconddegree assault (strangulation) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 28. The court found probable cause to charge William Lee Pearcy, 30, Loomis, with two counts of harassment (threats to kill) and one count of thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 30. The court found probable cause to charge Troy Ryan Gilge, 19, with addresses in Okanogan and Oroville, with residential burglary, second-degree burglary, second-degree theft and two counts of thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 1. The court found probable cause to charge Breanna Lee Carpenter, 19, Okanogan, with POCS (methamphetamine) and first-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 1. The court found probable cause to charge Justin Michael Willy, 26, Yakima, with POCS (hydrocodone). The crime allegedly occurred Sept. 4 at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds. The court found probable cause to charge Eugenia Earlin Camelin, 42, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 6. Juvenile A 16-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Sept. 2 to theft of a motor vehicle, seconddegree TMVWOP and thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred July 15. In a second case, the same boy pleaded guilty Sept. 2 to second-degree

attempted escape. That crime occurred July 17. The boy was sentenced to a total of 51 days in detention with credit for 23 days served, 15-36 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration, and fined $550. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 28. A 15-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Sept. 9 to obstruction. The boy was sentenced to 10 days in detention for the Aug. 30 crime.

DISTRICT COURT Gene Charles Olson, 41, Riverside, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Larry Lee Peasley, 61, Omak, had a harassment (gross demeanor) charge dismissed. Conchita D. Perez Velasquez, 34, Okanogan, guilty of introduction of contraband. Perez Velasquez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $568. Aaron Justin Conrad PfaltzgraffMiller, 22, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Pfaltzgraff-Miller was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended, and fined $808. Nichole Briane Martin Porras, 25, Omak, guilty of use or delivery of drug paraphernalia and hit-and-run (attended vehicle). Martin Porras was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,136. Stuert Frank Provstgaard, 38, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 32, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault and two counts of second-degree criminal trespassing. Renion was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 353 days suspended; and fined a total of $1,466. Shane Lee Rich, 35, Oroville, had two charges dismissed: second-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. David Martin Roland, 39, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Roland was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Joseph Albert Rowe, 62, Riverside, guilty of physical control. Rowe had a resisting arrest charge dismissed. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended, and fined $1,721. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Sept. 7, 2015 Trespassing at the Okanogan County Corrections Facility in Okanogan. Burglary on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Bentham Rd. near Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Elmway in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. DWLS on W. Winesap St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Bull Run Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Tools reported missing. Disorderly conduct on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Dog reported missing. Threats on Hubbard Rd. near Riverside. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Gasoline reported missing.

Theft on Miller Rd. near Omak. Food reported missing. Domestic dispute on Dayton St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Omak Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Loitering on N. Oak St. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Illegal burning on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. Assault on 10th Ave. in Oroville. Ira Leo Frank, 20, booked for third-degree theft and thirddegree malicious mischief. Eugenia Earlin Camelin, 42, booked for POCS (methamphetamine). Jerry Lee McIntosh, 24, DOC detainer. Chace Kenneth Clarence Taber, 23, booked for POCS and a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for seconddegree vehicle prowl. Antonio Rafael Fuentes, 41, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Janet Lynn Charley, 48, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: DUI, operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and third-degree DWLS.

Wednesday Sept. 9, 2015 Warrant arrest at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds near Okanogan. Theft on Barnholt Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Trespassing on Hopfer Rd. near Omak. Assault on O’Neil Rd. near Tonasket. Found property on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Cell phone recovered. Harassment on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Loitering on S. Main St. in Omak. Found property on Sandflat Rd. near Omak. CDs recovered. Warrant arrest on Quince St. in Omak. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Troy Ryan Gilge, 19, booked for residential burglary, seconddegree burglary, third-degree theft and two counts of thirddegree malicious mischief. Jose Arturo Gonzales, 44, booked on an FTA bench warrant for POCS. Joseph Alexander Felix, 20, DOC detainer. William Christopher Taylor, 21, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants: third-degree theft and two for fourth-degree assault (DV). Alex Rodrigo Bibian Rodriguez, 22, booked for third-degree rape, third-degree child molestation and a USBP detainer.

Drugs on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Fraud on Juniper St. in Oroville. Tyler James Best-Parisien, 22, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: reckless endangerment and DUI. Laurie Ann Marchand, 62, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Billy Dale Anderson, 47, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 27, DOC detainer. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 32, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants: two for second-degree criminal trespassing and one for fourth-degree assault. Gale Celeste McMillan, 48, booked for obstruction and disorderly conduct.

Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 Malicious mischief on Kendall St. in Riverside. Assault on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle fire on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Jasmine St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Weapons offense on Jerry Way near Tonasket. Harassment on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Assault on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Custodial interference on S.

Granite St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Granite St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Assault on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. Trespassing on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on W. First St. in Tonasket. Henrietta Alice Wynne, 43, booked for second-degree burglary, second-degree criminal trespassing, thirddegree theft and two FTA warrants, both for thirddegree theft. Dustin Hawk Chambers, 24, DOC detainer. Christina K. Galloway, 41, DOC detainer. Jeffrey Allan Bob, 28, booked for first-degree assault (DV).

Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015 DUI on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Weapons offense on Lumm Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Gold Hill Rd. near Loomis. Illegal burning on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Malicious mischief on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Weapons offense on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct at Civic League Park in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Derrick James Charley, 22, booked for third-degree theft and furnishing liquor to minors. Ashlyn Darice Goodwin, booked for DUI. Kelly Edward Warbus, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft.

Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015 DUI on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Custodial interference on Wood Hill Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Fatality motorcycle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. DUI on Copple Rd. near Omak. DUI on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Gaudencio Perez Santiago, 34, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and no valid operator’s license without ID; and a USBP hold. William Martin Shawl, 31, booked for DUI and hit-andrun (unattended). Sidrac Mendoza Orozco, 30, booked for DUI. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 Malicious mischief on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Drugs at East Side Park in Omak. Warrant arrest on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on S. Granite St. in Omak. Harassment on Wildwood Dr. in Omak. Three-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. Injuries reported. Threats on Jasmine St. in Omak. Theft on N. Douglas St. in Omak. iPad reported missing. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak.

ATTENTION Wells Reservoir Users

Douglas PUD will lower the Wells Reservoir about 8 feet to 773 feet above sea level for the month of September. This is necessary to repair the Methow River sedimentation control groins near Pateros. The river level is being coordinated with work at Chief Joseph Dam and area recreation sites.

Use CAUTION on the Reservoir!

09/11/15


SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER Volunteer crew on ambulance will be missed in future Oroville and the county have decided to keep a private sector ambulance service and not go back to an all volunteer service like the one that served us so well for nearly three decades. We’ve all had family, friends and neighbors and perhaps yourselves, who were well served by the volunteer EMTs and ambulance drivers who put in countless hours. All this with little or no compensation other than the good feeling they got from helping out their fellow man. That went away when the volunteers and the city came to an impasse over how the crew was going to be run in the future. This led to the discovery that no, the county commissionerappointed Rural EMS board did not have the right to sign a new interlocal agreement with the city over services. Something that had been going on for 28 years. Instead that job fell by law, to the county commissioners themselves. Out of some on the ambulance crew said the My Mind While city was stalling, they were just waiting for the Gary A. DeVon commissioners to get up to speed before they re-entered an agreement with the city. It wasn’t the city’s fault or the county’s fault, it was just the way it was. However, the volunteer ambulance crew got tired of waiting and tried to force the city’s hand. They submitted their resignations and after a couple weeks the city accepted them. This put the city and the county in an emergency situation and they hired Lifeline – hiring someone to fulfill the ambulance service was their responsibility and that’s what they did, it was just the way it was. Now we are looking at having Lifeline full time – we have nothing against the company and other than some letters questioning some of the crew member’s dietary choices in the letters to the editor – like a donut, we’ve heard few complaints about their services. Several letter writers have penned their concerns about the costs of going with a private company in the future and that’s where our concerns mirror theirs. Right now we have two Lifeline employees housed at the ambulance hall. When they go out on a call they need to get a hold of one of our volunteer firefighters to act as driver while the two EMTs keep tab on their patient in the back. Will this remain the same, or will we have at least three private ambulance service personnel in the future? While we have great respect for Tonasket’s EMTs, can we truly pencil them into the equation to be available at all times when Oroville gets multiple calls or if there’s a big accident requiring two ambulances? If not will we have two more private sector EMTs on staff 24/7? The costs seem to be adding up quickly. While some might accuse certain people of rocking the boat as far as the ambulance crew was concerned, there obviously was tension that existed with or without one disgruntled individual. There may be no going back, but the costs of a private service may turn out to be too high – either way, whether they’re shorthanded with only two EMTs or have enough personnel to run both ambulances. Lastly, we’d like to say there are good people on both sides of the issue – our city leaders and the former Oroville Ambulance crew. We hope we’re wrong, but after the service goes private we might just wish we could go back in time to when things were simpler and our family, friends and neighbors not only were aided by the ambulance, but served as the crew as well.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Future depends on the U.S. Constitution

Dear Editor, To commemorate the September 17, 1787 signing of the Constitution of the United States of America, in 2004 Congress designated September 17th of each year as Constitution Day and September 17th to the 23rd of each year as Constitution Week. The law establishing the present holiday was created with the passage of an amendment by West Virginia Democrat Senator Robert Byrd to the Omnibus spending bill of 2004. He was quite a contradictory character. In his younger days he brought the KKK to West Virginia and was probably a life long member. He was also an adamant defender of the Constitution, carried a copy of it in his shirt pocket and frequently used it while on the Senate floor as a guide. He pointed out violations of it by Democrats or Republicans. Public Law 108-447, Section 111 requires: “Each educational institution that receives Federal funds for a fiscal year shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on September 17 of such year for students served by the educational institution. ...each Federal agency or department shall provide educational and training materials concerning the United States Constitution to each employee, on September 17 of each year.” The intent was that children learn the history and content of the Constitution they have inherited so they know without a doubt whether or not their public servants are following it and know the letter of the law that they pledge to uphold and defend. So if your children attend a federally-funded school, did they learn about the Constitution? If you are in a gederal agency or department, were you given educational materials and training? This is a federal law we are talking about! The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties. It only guarantees them. “We the People” had all our rights and liberties BEFORE we made the Constitution! The

Constitution was formed, among other purposes, to make the people’s liberties secure. Not only as against foreign attack, but against oppression by their own government. It sets specific limits on the national government and upon the states and reserves to themselves all powers they did not grant. The Ninth Amendment declares: “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.” In a previous letter I quoted Daniel Webster, “It is hardly too strong to say that the Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions. There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but THEY MEAN TO GOVERN. They promise to be good masters, but THEY MEAN TO BE MASTERS.” For this reason, EVERY public servant, from the President to your local public servants, takes an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution! However, one can legitimately raise the question based on their actions that they either have no clue what they are swearing an oath to uphold and defend, or, they are well versed in the Constitution and are disregarding it with impunity which makes the situation much more insideous! George Washington advised, “The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their Constitutions of Government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, ‘till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole People is sacredly obligatory upon all.” The most recent example of our public servants in the Executive and Legislative Branches total disregard and disrespect of their oaths is the sarcastically named Iran agreement, which is really a horrifically written treaty. In the Oxford Dictionary, the definition of a treaty is “a formally concluded and ratified agreement between countries.” In Article II, Section 2, paragraph 2 of the Constitution, it states, (the President), “shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present

concur.” The Secretary of State, John Kerry, (who served in Viet Nam), a former Senator, ACTUALLY testified before Congress that the reason he and Obama were calling this an agreement and not a treaty is because it would have no chance of passing in the Senate as a treaty which is also why they refuse to present all the details! Yet the gutless, worthless majority leader of the Senate, Mitch McConnell, will not do his duty and insist that a proper treaty vote be taken in the Senate, and if not ratified by at least two thirds present is null and void period, without the ridiculous premise that Obama has veto power over their vote! As for the judiciary, in the case concerning the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court majority astoundingly ruled that where the law specifically stated ONLY THE STATES could create exchanges, the SPECIFIC words didn’t matter as long as the “spirit of the law” was followed! Federalist No. 78 notes, “[The Judicial Branch] may truly be said to have neither FORCE nor WILL, but merely judgment… liberty can have nothing to fear from the judiciary alone, but would have everything to fear from its union with either of the other departments.” In no uncertain terms, Federalist No. 81 makes abundantly clear, “[T]here is not a syllable in the [Constitution] which directly empowers the national courts to construe the laws according to the spirit of the Constitution….” I hope by now I have made my point of the absolute importance of your knowledge of the Constitution, that you make sure your children learn it, and that our public servants know it, and the penalties it provides for their disregard of it. You can borrow a copy from your local library, get it on line, or find sites on line that will even provide you with a free copy! No more excuses! Your future and your children’s future depends on it! David Wolosik Oroville

Things that go Trump in the night OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIO-ECONOMIC COMMENTATOR

Trump. Now hang on, I’m not here to disparage or champion Donald Trump, just to reflect on the unparalleled phenomenon he has brought to all of American politics. There is still too much I don’t know about him for me to paste his sticker on my Tahoe, let alone my tractor. Hillary will almost certainly be the Democrat candidate for president, and her proposal for record high taxes is only the first of countless reaBill Slusher sons this would extend the Great American Affirmative Action Disaster. Electing an oligarch queen for her womanhood will necessarily compound the already abysmal folly of having twice elected an earlier presidential cancer for his black skin, absent any other ‘qualification.’ And beating Hillary will be tough given that her base cares naught for any scandal she may be complicit in nor what her policies are. They will elect her if she converts to Islam and drowns refugee kids on YouTube. Nothing factual matters in PC America, she is simply The Woman who paid her dues as Mrs. Slick, was cruelly robbed of election in 2008, and 2016 is the year of ‘the first woman president!’ Amen. Republicans clearly have their work cut out for them. In addition to most women and liberals going for Hillary out of blind political correctness reflex, nearly half the country lives off the other half and the former are certain to elect the liberal candidate they think will re-stamp their free-ride ticket by further taxing the remaining working citizens. Beating Hillary will thus be a tough row to

hoe. Luckily, the weakest of the 2016 Republican presidential candidates, drunk, could not possibly fail to do better than the Obama Debacle that has fractured America on so many levels from foreign policy that has reduced us to an international joke to the domestic... increase... in American black poverty (US Census Bureau). Many Republican candidates, including the only woman so far, would make superb presidents and have the chops to prove it. Then there’s... Trump. Clown, fool, Caesar, ego-maniac, selfobsessed idiot, maniac, brat, buffoon, numbskull are all among merely the printable labels heaped in panic on Trump and those are but the slurs from Trump’s own party officials. Candidates and pundits from all sides have been driven in a Red Bull frenzy to the outer reaches of sometimes pornographic invective to smear Trump as a pretender at best, a Republican party wrecker at worst. Yet blood fairly squirts from his critics’ ears as, the more vituperatively they smear him, the maddeningly higher Trump climbs in polls. So bare with me as I wonder, is Trump this boogeyman? Or is he possibly the vanguard of a bellwether shift in American politics? Is the scale quivering as it tips past voters fed up with the status quo in both parties to a new day in American political acceptability? I don’t pretend to know yet, but I ask myself, what about all those people (SurveyUSA) who just Sept, 4th polled Trump at 45 percent over… Hillary... at 40 percent (still farther over Jeb Bush at 20 percent)? As recently as June, CNN/ORC had it Clinton 59 percent, Trump 35 percent. What’s happening? Who knows? Are those polls to be casually dismissed, or do the voters in those polls know something both camps of the establishment don’t? That terrifying unknown has Trump’s Republican and Democrat enemies trembling

in apoplexy. I also wonder: Trump was born into a moderately wealthy family but not even his worst critics deny that he made himself a multibillionaire through ruthlessly shrewd dealings with some of the toughest, most vicious and dangerous competitors in the greater business world, competitors who can buy and sell whole countries irrespective of any rule but profits. So I wonder, if this can be achieved by a ‘fool’ or a ‘clown’, then why aren’t we all self-made multi-billionaires? Does Trump’s flat refusal to talk the standard politically correct (say-nothing-definitive, offend-no-one) talk mean he somehow can’t walk the leadership walk in the big leagues? What’s he been doing all this time if not walking that walk rather well? I don’t know, but neither does anyone else, because there has never been anyone like Trump in American politics, a candidate who can afford to run his campaign his own way, win or lose, beholden to no ideology but ... success. I admit to still suspecting that Trump is running on a limited supply of sheer novelty, and he will peak at some point between now and a year from November, to be superseded by good if more conventional candidates like Carson and Fiorino. America could do a lot worse; regrettably it has for nearly seven years now. Regardless, I appreciate ‘The Donald’ for providing the pleasing spectacle of establishment candidates and pundits of both parties flinching and going bug-eyed... whenever things go... Trump... in the night. William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

It’s time to put away the summer clothes On the down side of September and there is definitely a feel of fall in the air, especially mornings and evenings. Fall is one of my favorite seasons except that I know what is coming next and that isn’t one of my favorites. It’s time to put away the summer clothes and get out the warmer ones, so away go the white pants ‘til next year. Already the TV is reminding us that Christmas is just around the corner. Are you ready for that? Knowledge is knowing that tomatoes are fruits... wisdom is knowing not to put them in fruit salads. Many of our ancestors did put sugar on tomatoes, but not at my house. Salt and some dried dill weed are best, in my opinion. The people growing gardens were unhappy with their tomatoes this season... splitting and not ripening, perhaps from the extremely hot weather. We had some really pretty hanging

Volunteers at the heart of a good organization SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

It’s time to thank all our volunteers for the good works they did all summer. We need to remember that volunteers are the beating heart of our organization and be ever ready to step up with love and loyalty when called upon. Now let’s give ourselves a big pat on the back and move on to a great fall and winter. That being said, Steak Nite last Friday was a real success. You all turned out to support your Aerie. The food was just right and the

Parking lot sale a success for Center SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

We had a jolly good time at our Parking Lot Sale fundraiser last Saturday. Donations of quality goods for the sale were most appreciated. Betty Steg and Marilyn Perry headed up the effort, spending countless hours pricing and sorting items for sale. Betty Bair sorted through the voluminous numbers of books that were donated. Kevin Buzzard, Raleigh Chinn and Spence Higby helped with heavy lifting. Penny Cole “tellered.” Thank you to them, and to all the others who helped, donated items, and contributed their hard earned dollars towards purchases.

baskets of flowers this past summer and they lasted a long time, even battling high winds but they’re all gone now. And our bird seed is coming out even with the birds as there are only a few that are determined to eat the last seed but I’m afraid the majority of them have flown to warmer places. However there were some pretty high temps last weekend, then the forecast is for cooler days. I guess we’ll take what we get and be happy. The program at the Free Methodist Church last Saturday night was excellent, in my opinion, with a varied program, with the Owen’s family from Omak, taking the limelight. What a talented bunch of kids, with a devoted dad urging them on. And he had every right to be proud. Of course, they played my kind of music, you know the kind that you can understand the words with melodies that are the kind that don’t screech, and a with a bit of humor thrown in for good mea-

EAGLEDOM AT WORK company was at least congenial. Thank-you Steak Nite Crew. (All volunteers!) It looks like we will have a new karaoke show in on Friday, Sept. 25. It sounds good. More details later.Watch this space! Breast Cancer Benefit for Helen Ray, please join us. All money raised will help the family with medical bills and expenses. On Saturday, Sept. 26, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., at the Oroville Eagles #3865. Cost $10. Menu: Pulled pork, corn on the cob, cole slaw, and sundae bar. They will have a Silent Auction with lots of

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS What a wonderful, event. Our Pancake Breakfast was also served Saturday. Many thanks to Mary Lou, Ruth LaFrance, Roberta Cole, Doris Hughes, Evelyn Dull, Janice Higby and Barbie Fremuth, who helped, and to Harvest Foods for discounting the spectacular ingredients. And to all you eaters. Well, come back again next month. Such a great cast of assorted characters. We still are planning on installing ceiling acoustic tiles in the dining room. Thank you for your contributions towards that effort. Like I always say. Some of us have character, and then there are those who are characters. Characters. Hmmm. Now, that’s

sure while dad tuned the banjo. The the saying, (if you haven’t used it for over program was for the benefit of Habitat a year, then you don’t need it any longer). for Humanity and since there was a nice The Lutheran Church was filled to attendance it should help fill capacity for the Memorial the piggy bank a bit, from the service of Garry Sorenson A offering. most touching effect was the So, the Okanogan County playing of Amazing Grace at Fair has been postponed the beginning and closing of until later in the month, the special service. September 24th thru 27th. Dean Gerken, Spokane, If I had been in the deciwas in Oroville last weekend, sion making process I would attending the Memorial of probably voted to cancel it Dennis Barnett. Dean’s wife for the year, due to “circumis Marylou Barnett’s sister but stances beyond our control” she was busy (grand motherbut since I wasn’t I surely THIS & THAT ing). Isn’t it so often the case, hope all goes well. It is so Joyce Emry when one person leaves this much work and there are so earth, another arrives. I guess many things to be considered that is the plan. I surely hope it works. I know there were John Hilderbrand and his daughlots of varied opinions and it was a seri- ter Hannah each shot a bear, recently. ous matter. Maybe they eat the meat or maybe they A Memorial for Anna Mund (mother have trophy throws made from the hides, or Wilma Colburn, retired teacher) will but I’d rather see one alive and let them be held Saturday, Oct. 10 at the United do the shootin’. Methodist Church. I’m a bit of a sucker for buying things A yard sale will be held at the United advertised on TV (or usually waiting for Methodist Church, Sept. 18 and 19, WalMart so there’s no shipping and hanFriday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 9 dling), Anyhow I got the egg peeler that a.m. to 5 p.m. It’s a good time to do some makes it look so simple. After five eggs fall cleaning and take some usable items and then looking for the instructions, it for people to choose from. Remember really does work.

great items. The theme for the Auxiliary Raffle Basket this month is, (drum roll), the Seahawks! Come in, take a look at a great prize, buy a ticket or five, and the drawing will be Sunday, Sept. 27 after the football game. Don’t forget Bingo and Burgers at 6 p.m. on Thursday. All your friends will be there! Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker, and Meat Draw. Saturday is Queen of Hearts Night. We have free pool every Sunday. We are People Helping People!

something I can relate to. Great friends, great fun, great food. Oroville Senior Citizens. Here’s to friends! Lunches next week are as follows: Tuesday, Sept. 22, Ginger Cocunut Chicken; Thursday, Sept. 24, Salisbury Steak; Friday, Sept. 25, BBQ Chicken. I just heard that the Seattle School Teachers are on strike for higher pay. You know, cost of living. Speaking of COL. I e-mailed Joel Kretz last week regarding inflation adjustments for Senior property tax exemptions. I’m waiting for a reply. My question: when and where has that occurred? I’ll let you know when I receive a response. Pinochle Report: Aug.29, Door Prize, Bev Holden; Pinochle, Nellie; High Man, Ted Paris; High Woman, Nellie. Sept. 5, Door Prize, Ed Craig; Pinochle, Jim Frye; High Man, Ted Paris; High Woman, Danny Weitrick.

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ing the first and third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. Come join a meeting and share your thoughts. Thursday: The Ladies Auxiliary meet the first and third Thursday of every month at 6:30 p.m. Friday: We have open kitchen with lots of good food starting at 5:30 p.m. and then at 7 p.m. Bingo starts. Saturday: there is Joker Poker drawing is at 6:45 p.m. The pot is up to $1,128, you could win half (must be present to win). Then at 8 p.m. we have Karaoke with Linda Wood.

TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Well it is officially fall, soon it will be time to start raking leaves. Hear is a lowdown on some of what goes on at the Eagles. Monday Night Football we have three TVs and two of them are big screens. Tuesday: Taco’s from 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. you can’t beat the price (good stuff). Also all day free pool. Shake and sign in, lots of pull tabs and bottle raffle. Wednesday: Aerie meet-

Pancake breakfast HILLTOP starting back up COMMENTS Sunday, Sept. 27 SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Here we are in the third week of September already. Time seems to just fly by these days. Our high temperatures have calmed down some to the seventies with overcast skies and some showers on their way. It would be nice to have some rain. The smoke from the many fires we have been surrounded by has moved off, for now. Just in case you have not heard our County Fair has been postponed for a couple of weeks. You all know what happens in September... that’s right, the school busses are out picking up the School Children, so, please drive carefully. There will be a Pancake Breakfast at the Molson Grange on Sunday, Sept. 27 starting at 11 a.m. and going to 2 p.m. This will be the first of the season. The Auxillary Ladies are busy putting together new baskets for the raffles, and making apple

sauce for your enjoyment. With that said, you know what goes along with pancakes and apple sauce, that’s right, stand by for Pinochle, starting soon. I know that most of you that have raised gardens this past summer are just about to the end of the crops and are sharing the bounty with others. The product I see being shared the most is the zucchini. I do not do the gardening but we like to share with others the delicious bread it makes. The following was also shared with me by a friendly gardener. Ode to Zucchini.... Zucchini, oh Zucchini.... It’s not that I’m ungrateful when I think of all your vitamins.... There must be loads in every plateful! But for days my kitchen’s been a mess, and it’s all because of you, I guess. I’d vowed I would not waste a single one of you. ...I baked you and fried you, pickled, froze and dried you, I made every Zucchini recipe I knew.... And now as I tucked the last of you in a quaint

509-486-0615

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Sunday: Seahawks football. Draw a ticket and you could win a halfprice drink, also at 1 p.m. there is Pinochle (lots of fun). The District meeting is this Sunday, Sept. 20 in Twisp at 1 p.m. Would like to see a good turn out. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place: Neil Fifer, second place: JoAnn Michels, Low score went to Wanda Sutherland and last pinochle to JoAnn Michels and Ken Cook. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. new bread called “Branzini...” My proud little boy is telling me, “look mom, I found 13 more Zucchini”.... So, Zucchini, O Zucchini, though I think you’re quite terrific,... could you please, just try to be, a little less prolific? Author Unknown Attention all you Friday Night Bingo Players in Molson. Bingo is played on the first and third Fridays of each month. Starting Sept. 18 there will be an additional $25 added to the last game of the night. The cost of bingo is $10 for 10 games. You can purchase additional cards for $1 each. Bring a friend or relative and have fun. You could be a Winner! Saturday is “Ladies” day at the Mercantile in Chesaw. Come and enjoy the afternoon with others. Last week I met two ladies I did not know. One will remain the Mystery Lady and the others name is Judy. We had some laughs and told stories of our past. Come and enjoy.

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Didja’ ever have an MRI to look inside you, to see what is (right or wrong) or giving you pain that can’t be distinguished any other way? They are a noisy thing that sounds like it might take off into space at any given moment. In my case I finally have been able to convince people that I have not been on crutches six weeks just for sympathy. It takes a bunch of phone calls, forms to sign, visits to the office’s etc. to finally get the okay, and after some more waiting, I will have knee surgery for a torn meniscus. Happy Day! And I’m sure my dear husband second’s that motion. He is getting to be efficient in the kitchen, but what will we do when the corn, cukes and tomatoes run out? I read that Reman and Reload needs 50 more workers... why aren’t some of the unemployed signing up for that? Could it be that doing nothing is much easier than working a hard job? Also heard that another 5,000 Border Patrol workers are needed. Are you ready for the football season? Already I’m hearing guys say to their wives, “Hurry up so we can get home by the time the game starts”. How long has it been since you saw the gas prices $2.99 per gallon? Til’ Next Week

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SEPTEMBER 17 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OROVILLE - There will be a free outdoor movie on Friday, Sept. 18 at 7:30 p.m.” When the Game Stands Tall” at Oroville Assembly of God, 623 Central Ave. (East Parking Lot), Bring a lawn chair, blanket, and a snack. Public restrooms will be available. Contact Pastor Dwayne Turner at 509-476-2924 for more information. Pollard, Bell to Perform

OROVILLE - Steve Bell and Steve Pollard will play together Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015 at Esther Bricques Winery. Bell and Pollard perform on a wide range of percussion, as well as guitar and banjo. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861. Explorer Golf Tourney

OROVILLE - The 2015 Explorer Post #0023 Golf Tournament at the Oroville Golf Club will take place Saturday, Sept. 19 at 11 a.m. $65 Entry Fee (Green Fee /Cart and Steak Dinner). Prizes, raffles, contest, competition. All proceeds benefit Explorer Post #0023. Exploring is for local youths interested in law enforcement, leadership and community service. For more information contact John Tafolla at john.tafolla@dhs.gov or 509476-3622 Fire Benefit at Winery

OROVILLE - Pete Olson, renowned guitarist from California, will be performing vocals and guitar at Esther Bricques Winery Saturday, Sept. 19 to benefit those affected by the fires in the North Okanogan. Contributions will be funneled through the North Okanogan Recovery Network to stay within the region. Music begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 pm. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861, check out Pete’s website at www.peteolsonmusic.com, or check the winery’s Facebook page, Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE: The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Sept. 19 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more information call 509-4293310. Spiritual Movie Night

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200. Wildlife League Benefit

OKANOGAN - Give A Hoot! The Okanogan Wildlife League Benefit will be on Saturday, Sept. 19 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Smallwood Farms, at Okanogan.

Enjoy a buffet style dinner provided by Smallwood Farms, a presentation of raptors by Okanogan Wildlife League and peruse an assortment of auction items. Dinner $25 per person. All proceeds benefit Okanogan Wildlife League. For more information please call Lisa at 509-560-3828 or Melissa at 509-322-0588. Jam Session at Esther Bricques

OROVILLE - Esther Bricques Winery is hosting its monthly musician jam session on Sunday, Sept. 20. All musicians and audience who would like to listen and/or participate are welcome. The stage will set up at 2 pm and continue into the evening. Food is potluck. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861 or check Esther Bricques Winery’s Facebook page. Benefit for Helen Ray

OROVILLE - There will be a benefit for Helen (Small) Ray at the Oroville Eagles on Saturday, Sept. 26 starting at 6 p.m. The benefit features pulled pork sandwiches, corn on the cob, cole slaw and ice cream sundaes, as well as a Silent Auction. Money raised will help with medical expenses for Ray as she fights breast cancer. Donations for the auction are also gratefully accepted. Art Opening in Twisp

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board meets on Monday, Sept. 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the School Director’s Board Room at the District Office. For more information or to get on the agenda call 509-486-2126. Apple Pie Fundraiser

OROVILLE - The Immaculate Conception Catholic Church is hosting their eighth annual Apple Pie Fundraiser. Orders for the pies, which are $7 each, must be put in by Sept. 20 for delivery on Sept. 28 after they are freshly baked. Part of the proceeds will be donated back to the community. The pie bakers recommend folks order as many as they like as they will freeze well for baking when you’re ready. For more information call Jane Lynch at 509-476-2177 or Jo Mathews at 509-476-3819. 7th District Democrats

GRAND COULEE Democrats of the 7th Legislative District will meet at Grand Coulee on Saturday, Sept. 26. The meeting will start at 10:30 a.m. at Pepper Jack’s Bar & Grill. After a brief business meeting, they will hear Speaker Stan Sorscher, President of the Washington Fair Trade Coalition. After Q & A, they will adjourn for a buffet lunch at Pepper Jack’s. ALL Democrats are welcome. RSVP for lunch to 7thlddems@gmail. com. For further information, phone Secretary Flo Moore at 509-276-7070. North County-opoly Deadline

OROVILLE - The last day to purchase an ad for the new North County-opoly board being made by the Oroville Grange as a benefit is Wednesday, Sept. 30. Spaces are going quickly. Cindy Nelson or contact a local Grange Member.

TWISP - Opening reception for Jason Briggs, Steve Ward and Squeak Meisel on Saturday Sept. 26 between 6 and 8 p.m. at D*signs Gallery, 109 B Glover Street North, Twisp and Spartan Art Project (parked in front of D*signs Gallery). A rare opportunity to see the work of three acclaimed artists in a unique combination venue… the Spartan Art Project ‘Imperial Mansion’ will be parked on Glover Street and housing Squeak Meisel’s installation piece, while D*signs Gallery exhibits Steve Ward’s paintings and Jason Briggs’ ceramic sculptures. The show goes to Nov. 1.

OKANOGAN - The 42nd Annual Okanogan Family Faire will take place this year, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9-11. Day passes are $10 and kids 17 and under are free when accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Camping passes are $60. For more information on becoming a vendor or on the faire in general, see www.okanoganfamilyfaire. net. The faire grounds are located at 76 W. Cayuse Mtn. Rd., about 12 miles from Tonasket off Hwy. 20. No dogs, guns, drugs, alcohol, fireworks or generators allowed.

Car Club Challenge

Tonasket Food Bank

OSOYOOS - Wine Country Racing Association hosting annual Car Club Challenge at the Osoyoos, BC airport on Sunday, Sept. 27. Gates open at 9 a.m., racing starts around 11 a.m. Elimination round at 1 p.m. Visit www.winecountryracing.ca for more information.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville School Board

Oroville - The Oroville School Board meets on Monday, Sept. 28 at 6:30 p.m. in the School Director’s Board Room at the District Office. For more information or to get on the agenda call 509-476-2281. Tonasket School Board

Okanogan Family Faire

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence.

Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Shelter in Place at NVH the Nursing Home COMMUNITY

Place and the Contingency Plan. Staff continued to develop a Contingency Plan to evacuate from 9:00-9:30 p.m. Staff were assigned duties to prepare for the Contingency Plan. Along with regular staffing, Bernice Hailey, Sandy Vaughn, Dixie Brown, Dianne Moser and Kimberly Rampley stayed in house that night. The Contingency Plan was: 1) Notify all family members/POA of Shelter In Place and to reassure them that their loved ones were safe, 2) Notify the medical Director, 3) Provide one large personally labeled bag for each resident that could hold their chart, medications, medical records, 1 day’s supply of clothing, briefs, bedding and any personal items necessary for their well being, 4) hearing aides, glasses, teeth and other medical supplies. In addition, a small emergency kit was created along with a supply of snacks, fluids and bulk food. The Hospital Staff performed similar duties and developed a Contingency plan for the patients there. Both of these departments of your North Valley Hospital District were on the job and ready to evacuate if needed and took excellent care of the residents and patients. There were 8 patients in the Hospital and 38 residents in the Nursing Home. All involved staff deserve kudos for all they did during this period of time. Bob Hirst says “Please come and have lunch with me so we can talk”, and there is plenty to talk about.

generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar

SUBMITTED BY KAREN SCHIMPF

“They kept their cool and did their jobs. We were all dressed and ready to go in the dining room with our stuff ” stated Andy Brownlee when he was asked about what happened at the Nursing Home during the preparations for the pending evacuation of the residents there on August 20, 2015, in response to the advance of the nearby wildfires. Bob Hirst stated “I felt very secure and wanted to help where I could. I felt like we all were part of the team. Everyone was ready to help and it all worked out.” At 6:50 PM that day Bernice Hailey, Resident Care Manager at the Nursing Home, was summoned to report to the emergency department of the Hospital. A directive had been received from the Emergency Operation Center to evacuate the patients at North Valley Hospital and North Valley Extended Care. She immediately initiated the Fire Evacuation Plan for the Nursing Home, the best plan of action to be taken at the time. Off duty Nursing Home and Hospital staff heard of the level 3 upgrade via Facebook, radio and word of mouth and began coming in to help. Phone lines were down by this time. By 8:15 PM the Incident Command System was

being established at the Hospital and Bernice Hailey and Sandy Vaughn attended the initial meeting, representing the Nursing Home Staff. The pros and cons of Shelter In Place versus Physical Evacuation of the campus were discussed. After all information was shared and weighed there was an overwhelming consensus to 1) Shelter In Place and 2) Develop a Contingency Plan. By 8:45PM three ambulances and two school buses were outside the facility prepared for physical evacuation. In the Nursing Home, all residents were accounted for, in their designated locations and ready to evacuate. While the staff had been waiting for further directives the residents were provided with attention, snacks and fluids, and their choice of TV or a movie. The atmosphere was calm and anticipatory. There were questions about what was going on. Bob Hirst stated that he tried to help and told residents “not to worry, just keep smiling, we are in good hands”. After the directive to Shelter In Place was given, the staff was directed to put the residents to bed in their clothing in a state of readiness. A briefing was held for in house staff to explain the leadership plan for Shelter In

DENTISTRY

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OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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PAGE A8

Long Term Recovery group moves forward Volunteers needed KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Emergency Management is attempting to obtain damage assessments on primary residenc-

Check out NEW Fair Dates and Entertainment Schedule!

Sept. 24-27

Check Mutton Bustin’ out... Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. - Sun.

Patrick Plumb/submitted photo

Ashley-Jo Armstrong Pfuleger of Central Washington Home Builders Association and Tonasket’s Peter James brainstorm ideas together at the September 9 meeting of the Oroville/Tonasket School District Long Term Recovery Meeting. Public Infrastructure/Assistance funding for fixing roads, power, and non-private loss. It is based on a dollar figure and Individual Assistance Declaration numbers, but there isn’t yet enough data to submit. People are advised to contact the Okanogan County Emergency Operations Center at (509) 4227348 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. to report losses. “Everyone in this entire county needs to help with this, or we can’t get help,” said Plumb. The Small Business Administration can help people obtain low interest loans to get back on their feet, and help find loans for people that don’t have insurance or can’t get funding anywhere else. The Small Business Administration can work with not only small businesses, but also with people who were receiving income from such things as rent, selling eggs, homebased cottage industries, and selling arts and crafts from home or at farmers’ markets. A Disaster Management Team from FEMA will be going to fire damaged areas to get an initial sweep for data collection to determine eligibility for individual assistance. “They need our help identifying and getting eyes on damage. We need all hands on deck for this,” said Plumb. “They have a team of four or five people with assistance from the Okanogan County Assessors office to do a damage inventory, but they are already realizing it may be impossible to reach everyone.” The need to register the losses by property owners who do not live here full time was also dis-

cussed. Michael Buffalo Mazetti suggested identifying fire assessment canvassing areas as follows: Pine Creek, Bannon Creek, Talkire Lake, Chewiliken Valley, NineMile, Coco Mountain and Lyman Lake. The need to get sandwich boards up with “real estate plastic boxes” attached into those areas was discussed for people to pick up flyers on the LTRC information and for letting people know what agencies may be coming to assist them. The MidValley LTRC held their first meeting Monday, Sept. 14. Plumb attended the meeting and said he was “floored at the new numbers of damage and impact.” “The impact to our neighbors is going to be long term, and the impact to our local governments is going to be larger than I expected,” said Plumb. “The types of impacts could be the loss of up to 15 percent of the valuation of our school districts, hospital districts and the economic loss of the ag producers; not only currently but for the next year could be staggering.” Plumb said an update from Kimberly Cline with the Tonasket Distribution Center showed initial reports of approximately $260,000 of physical donations and $90,000 worth of goods have already been distributed by volunteers. “I am truly humbled by the outpouring of support. If you have time or resources, we still need help,” said Plumb. “Don’t let frustration or confusion stop you from helping people. They are in desperate need and I just ask that you find something you can contribute to if you are able.”

Call to report fire loss

County emergency management is seeking information on damaged homes

LOOK...

L-Bow the Clown

FUN FOR EVERYONE!

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

TONASKET – The Oroville/ Tonasket School District (North Okanogan) Long Term Recovery Committee (LTRC) met Wednesday, Sept. 9 at Tonasket City Hall to continue to establish committees and goals in recovery efforts from the Okanogan Complex wildfires. Twentyfour people attended, including Ashley-Jo Armstrong Pflueger from the Central Washington Home Builders Association and Kristy Ray, representing FEMA. “I really feel like we are starting to be able to brainstorm and make teams that are really going to help people at the local level get immediate and long term recovery,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. An information-sharing system has been established for the LTRC at www.basecamp.com for committees to report back on progress made. Items discussed include the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club receiving a grant to help with more fire relief. The Community Cultural Center can help with some immediate needs, so fire survivors are advised to check with them. Shane Barton with Community Action and a Veteran Advocate spoke about processes and resources for Small Business Administration and Housing Needs. Armstrong Pflueger, who drove up from Wenatchee to attend the meeting, spoke briefly about what the Central Washington Home Builders Association is, and wanted to know how they can be of assistance. A discussion on the importance of data gathering and how critical those numbers will be to recovery funding led to the committee making it their number one priority of the week. “If we can get demographics and needs via multiple sources gathered together, we will have data to present for making a case for Individual Assistance with FEMA,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. FEMA Representative Kristy Ray said she would be working with both the North Okanogan Committee and Mid Valley’s (Omak/Okanogan School Districts) Committees. A discussion on FEMA funding sources focused partly on the

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

es damaged or destroyed in this year’s fires. Individuals who lost their primary homes during the recent wildland fires are asked to please call to report damage information. This is important whether homeowners had insurance or not. This damage assessment is vital for obtaining federal assistance for county residents. The Federal Emergency Management Agency requires a “Minimum Threshold”

of damage to have occurred before they can begin detailed assessment and offer assistance. Reports can be completed by calling the Okanogan County Emergency Operations Center at 509-422-7348 between 8:00am 5:00pm. Help spread the word by advising neighbors, families, or friends who have experienced losses to contact Okanogan County Emergency Management.

Nicole Unser

Entertainment Schedule Thursday, September 24, 2015 9:00am 11:00am 4:00pm 5:30pm 7:30pm 

Fairgrounds Open to the public L-Bow the Clown - Roaming L-Bow the Clown - Rotary Stage Good4U - Rotary Stage Rust on the Rails (Blake Noble & Cody Beebe) Rotary Stage 10:00pm Fairgrounds closed to Public

Friday, September 25, 2015 9:00am 11:00am Noon 1:30pm 3:00pm 4:30pm  6:00pm  7:30pm 9:00pm 10:00pm

Lace & Lead

Low Rider Races

Fairgrounds Open to the public Owens Family - Rotary Stage L-Bow the Clown - Rotary Stage Gideon’s Daughter - Rotary Stage Olivia de la Cruz - Rotary Stage L-Bow the Clown - Roaming The Banner Days - Rotary Stage Gideon’s Daughter - Rotary Stage Olson Brothers Band - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

Sat., at 1 p.m.

Banner Days

Saturday, September 26, 2015 9:00am Noon 2:00pm 3:30pm 7:00pm 9:00pm 10:00pm

Fairgrounds open to the public Nicole Unser - Rotary Stage Hippies on Vacation Nicole Unser - Rotary Stage Lace & Lead - Rotary Stage The Company Band - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

Good4U

Sunday, September 27, 2015

9:00am Fairgrounds open to the public 11:00am Nicole Unser - Rotary Stage 3:00pm Fairgrounds closed, Fair over!

* Schedule times and acts are subject to change Gideon’s Daughter

Hippies on Vacation

Olivia De La Cruz

Notice of Public Meeting International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control The International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control is holding its annual public meeting regarding the regulation of Osoyoos Lake water levels and the related operation of Zosel Dam by the State of Washington under the International Joint Commission’s Orders of Approval. The Board will provide an overview of 2015 lake levels to date and invite comments, concerns and questions from the public.

Olson Brothers

Please plan to attend

Thursday, October 8, 2015, 9:15 AM – 10:10 AM Sonora Community Centre 8505 68th Ave, Osoyoos, BC

International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control Bruno Tassone Chair, Canadian Section

Cynthia Barton, Ph.D. Chair, United States Section

The Company Band

Rust on the Rails (Blake Noble & Cody Beebe)

For additional information, please visit http://www.ijc.org/en_/ or contact: in Canada: in United States: Gwyn Graham Marijke van Heeswijk (604) 664-4052 (253) 552-1625 Please note: The public meeting is held in conjunction with the Osoyoos Lake Water Science Forum, for which the 2015 theme is “A Watershed beyond Boundaries: Stewardship of our Shared Waters.” The Science Forum will provide the most up-to-date information about the status of Osoyoos Lake and both U.S. and Canadian public participation is encouraged. The public may attend the Science Forum free of charge and without registering until 10:30 AM on Thursday, October 8. Registration is required to participate in the remainder of the Science Forum. Registration fees for residents of Oroville, Osoyoos, and Oliver are reduced and students may attend free of charge. The welcoming reception on Wednesday, October 7, is free for residents of Oroville, Osoyoos, and Oliver. Please visit http://www.obwb.ca/olwsf/ for registration and other Science Forum information.

NEW Department...The Head & Horn Show is an exciting new catagory happening at this year’s Fair. Open to youth & adults! Go online or see page 43 in the Premium Book for details! Much More!

www.okfair.org


SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS SCHEDULES SEPT. 17-26 Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC -Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Sept. 17 GSC -Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm GSC - Brewster at Oroville, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Brewster, 6:30 pm VB - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 5 pm Friday, Sept. 18 FB (Var) - Hawaiian FB-Intersquad at Tonasket 7 pm Saturday, Sept. 19 FB - Oroville at Manson (Chelan) 7 pm GSC -Brewster at Tonasket, 11:00 am XC - Tonasket at Runner’s Soul, Plant’s Ferry 11:00 AM

Tuesday, Sept. 22 GSC - Bridgeport at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Manson, 4:30 pm VB - Okanogan at Tonasket, 6:30 pm VB - Oroville at Bridgeport, 5 pm XC - Tonasket at Bridgeport Invitational, 3:30 pm Thursday, Sept. 24 GSC - Tonasket at Oroville, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 6:30 pm VB - Manson at Oroville, 5 pm Friday, Sept. 25 FB - Tonasket at Brewster, 7 pm FB - Okanogan at Oroville, 7 pm Katie Teachout/staff photo

Manson defender Alma Portillo attempts to keep Tonasket Forward Rose Walts away from the ball during Thursday’s (Sept. 10) game.

Tonasket dominates Manson 12-0, takes Omak 6-0 BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket played their first two games of the season at home, shutting out Omak 6-0 and Manson 12-0. The Tigers hosted Omak Tuesday, Sept. 8. “It was a non-league game, so it was pretty mellow,” said Coach Darren Collins. Ashlynn Willis had two goals and three assists. Vugteveen, Walts and Kayla Willis each had one goal. Manson traveled to Tonasket Thursday, Sept. 10. “The girls are happy they got another shutout,” said Collins. “ A lot of younger girls got some playing time today.” Freshman defender from the JV team Ellie Alberts made her first goal of the season, and varsity freshman Madilynn Larson also scored. “Maddy plays defense, but she scored a goal from outside the box,” Collins said. “I only played my varsity players the first half, then put seven JV players out there. The JV players put up four of the goals.” Varsity players Kayla Willis and Rose Walts scored the first two goals, followed by Ashlynn

Willis putting in two. Jaden Vugteveen scored the fifth goal, and Keann Wilson put one in to end the first half 6-0. JV forward Maria Polito put in the first goal of the second half, and Ashlynn Willis scored the eighth goal. Vugteveen next scored, followed by Larsen. The eleventh goal was kicked in by Manson off an assist by Polito, and Alberts scored the final goal of the game. “Tonasket has a great team. Every position out there had some really talented girls in it. To a girl, they were phenomenal. In fact, we had to take our best girl; a midfielder, to come in and take goal kicks,” said Manson Coach Jared Mumley. “We didn’t have enough girls last year to have a team. This year we have the numbers, but they’re really young. So we’re going to have an experience for these girls,” said Manson Coach Gabby Lopez before the game started. Mumley said for every one of his players, this was their first time playing a full-field game. “This year, we’ve got four juniors, no seniors, three sophomores, twelve freshmen and two eighth-graders. So we’re very bottom heavy and we’re starting from scratch,” said

Mumley. “The girls have a great attitude. We feel good about what we got going.” This is Mumley’s first year, co-coaching along with Gabby Lopez who has coached the team the last three or four years. “We’ve been there,” said Collins. “When I first started, we would go down and play Cashmere and get beat 10-0, 15-0. So we know how it feels. And Manson has been at the top before, so they know how that feels, too.” This is Collins’ seventh year coaching the team, assisted by Todd Mathews who has been coaching for ten years. “The last twenty-five minutes of the game was all JV, except the goalie and defense. If I take the defense out, I get in trouble with my team because they don’t get credit for the shut-out,” said Collins, adding, “This team is expected to go to the state tournament, so they have to be conditioned and ready to go.” The Tigers were scheduled to travel to Chelan Tuesday, Sept. 15; and to Winthrop for a game against Liberty Bell at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17. They host Brewster Saturday, Sept. 19 for an 11 a.m. game, and Bridgeport Tuesday, Sept. 22 for a 4:30 p.m. game.

Saturday, Sept. 26 XC - Tonasket at Manson Invitational, 10:30 am XC - Oroville at Trojan Invitational, 11 am

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket midfielder Ashlynn Willis keeps the ball away from Manson’s Marisol Mendoza. Willis controlled the ball during much of the game.

Tigers take Trojans BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket opened their volleyball season Thursday, Sept. 10, hosting Manson. The Trojans won the first two games, 25-18 and 25-11. The Tigers got their game on and won the next three games 25-20, 25-23 and 15-11 to win the match. “The girls played with outstanding teamwork,” said JV coach Johnna Sutton. “They persevered mentally and physically until the last point.” Sophomore Taylon Pilkington had one kill and eight assists, and junior Alexa Sutton had one kill and three aces. Sophomore Olivia Sutton had four kills and senior Kasey Nelson had three kills. The team is coached by Pam Leslie, along with assistant coach Arcelia Carroll.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Sophomore Olivia Sutton (#12) sends it up and over the net while senior Vanessa Pershing and freshman Faith Lofthus back her up during Thursday’s (Sept. 10) first game against Manson.

The Tigers were scheduled to travel to Liberty Bell Tuesday, Sept. 15 and to Brewster Thursday, Sept. 17. They host Okanogan Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 6:30 p.m.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

SPORTS

Tonasket girls take fifth, boys place ninth BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Toansket’s cross country teams traveled to the Moses Lake Invitational, where the girls’ team placed fifth and the boys’ team placed ninth. “It was a good early season meet for us, as we had some success and showed what we have to work on,” said Head Coach Bob Thornton. “It’s going to be a great cross country season.!”

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket cross country teams head uphill at practice one day before their home invitational. Heading the pack is Jenna Valentine, followed by Katie Henneman, Johnna Terris, Kylee Bobadilla, Victoria Chervinsky and Hayley Larson.

Brayden Hires------29th Garrett Wilson------30th Riley Morris----------58th Rade Pilkinton------66th Justin MxDonald---84th Zach Clark----------93rd JV results: Samuel Flores----33nd Eric Owsely-------47th Caeleb Hardesty--50th Mitchell Fitzhum--79th

Girls results: Jenna Valentine--13th Johnna Terris-----18th Katie Henneman--41st Kaylee Bobadilla--43rd Victoria Chervinsky--47th Hayley Larson-------54th Alejandra Avilez----37th--jv Boys results: Hunter Swanson---11th

Lake Roosevelt surprises Tigers Raiders turns game over in fourth quarter run. Sophomore Rycki Cruz had 14 carries for 112 yards, including a 35-yard run and a 15 yard Tonasket had a halftime lead fumble recovery for the Tigers’ of 35-14 when they hosted Lake second and third touchdowns. Roosevelt Friday, Sept. 11, but Freshman Ethan Smith had four they faced a different opponent carries for 25 yards, scoring a touchdown on a ten-yard run in the second half of the game. The Raiders scored twenty- the second quarter. Hawkins said the turnover lesthree points in the fourth quarter, son would be held close at hand. to beat the Tigers 37-35. “Who’s to say; L a k e in October, we Roosevelt was could be at halfat the one-yard time and we’re line with 1:50 “We’re working on one ahead by three left on the clock and the Tigers thing: Self Respect.” scores. They’re going to know ahead 35-29 Gary Oliver, better than to when Jesse Head Football Coach say things can’t Louie ran the Lake Roosevelt Raiders change,” said ball in for the Hawkins. “I tie. He then ran feel strongly it in two yards the kids on this for the winning two points. A senior, Louie didn’t team are the types of kids that will understand the message, and play the first two quarters. “He came in for the second keep pushing forward. There’s a half of the game only, and he lot season left.” Friday’s (Sept. 11) game was made a big difference for them,” said Tonasket Head Coach Jay the first high school game Lake Roosevelt Head Coach Gary Hawkins. The Tigers lost quarterback Oliver ever coached, and the Vance Frazier-Leslie to an injury, Raiders’ first game of the seaeight seconds into the second son after a bye last week. Oliver coached middle school football half. “I told the kids after the game, for eight years starting in 1993, there’s the thrill of victory, and and just returned to coaching. “I’m so glad you’re my coach,” the agony of defeat. They played really hard, and didn’t get a pay- Lake Roosevelt’s Hernan Garciaoff,” Hawkins said. “We held Atchison told Oliver after the them really hard the first half, but game. A sophomore, Garciathey came back and really had Atchison sacked quarterback Frazier-Leslie in the third quarter. momentum.” “That felt great. That was one Hawkins said a challenge was the Tigers getting the ball but not of my first sacks ever,” GarciaAtchison said. being able to hold it. “We’re working on one thing: “Every game is an experience, and you learn along the way; self respect,” said Coach Oliver. especially when you have a young “I ask the kids two things: ‘Are we on track?’ and ‘Are we having team.” Tonasket Sophomore Jesse fun?’” The Tigers play Liberty Bell Ramon had 23 carries for 154 yards. Ramon scored a touch- at home Friday, September 18 down in the first quarter on a at 7 p.m, and travel to Brewster three-yard run, and another in Friday, Sept 25. the second quarter on a 5-yard BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Kyle Huber, Rycki Cruz and Wyatt Pershing take down a Lake Roosevelt runner during the first quarter of Friday’s (Sept. 11) game. Above, Coach Jay Hawkins confers with his team between the first and second quarters,, with the Tigers ahead 21-0.

Oliver car club looks to even the score Kelowna Kustoms: 2 Okanagan Rodtiques (Penticton): 2 Coachmasters (Oliver): 1 SUBMITTED BY SHANA CACHOLA WINE COUNTRY RACING ASSOCIATION

Osoyoos, BC - By looking at the scores, one would have to assume that the home team down at Richter Pass Motorplex (Osoyoos airport) may have an axe to grind.

The volunteers of the Wine Country Racing Association (WCRA) are busy getting set to host the sixth annual Rumble in the Valley car club challenge on Sunday, Sept. 27. Any club interested in joining the excitement brings their best cars and brightest drivers in an attempt to drag home the coveted trophy and prize money. The day is filled with things car enthusiasts live for: side by side 1/8 mile drag racing, loads of beautiful vehicles, friendly people and never-ending good natured competition. Dalin Haryett of Red Deer, AB drove his black 1941 Ford to the winner’s circle on behalf of the Kelowna Kustoms. Certainly the

other two car clubs have different plans for this year’s outcome. The gates open at 9 a.m. Any fully licensed driver can come register. Their vehicle must pass through a safety technical inspection. Show up early to avoid missing any runs down the track. Racing starts around 11 a.m. Final elimination round begins at 1 p.m. Concessions are available on site. Fans can fill the grandstands or bring their own lawn chair. Go to www.winecountryracing.ca for more information. The next scheduled race day to wind up WCRA’s 2015 season is Oct. 11.

Dan Hodson/submitted photo

Darrell Kendall’s 1930 Ford Coupe warms up his tires at Richter Pass Motorplex in the Osoyoos airport. Kendall traveled from Kelowna to go head to head against other drivers and car clubs from all over the Okangan Valley.


SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS/SCHOOLS

THS recognized by Newsweek BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Kim Scott/submitted photo

While Oroville made short work of White Swan, one of their usually tough 2B opponents in their game opener, they didn’t fair so well when going against 2A Mount Baker, dropping the game 14-69 on the Mountaineers home field. Above, Oroville Hornet Caleb Mills, number 20, signals a hand off from quarterback Nathan Hugus, number 11, while the line keepsMount Baker busy during play action last Friday against the much bigger school. Mt. Baker was able to run their score up 56 to nil in the first half with eight touchdowns. Oroville put its first points of the game on the board in the third quarter on a pass from QB Hugus to Andrew Mieirs for one yard. Mieirs put in the extra point kick and it was Oroville 7 to Mt. Baker’s 62. The Hornets held Mt. Baker to just one more TD in the fourth and scored themselves with a Hugus run of 11 yards for a second touchdown. The game ended 14 to 69.

Lions Club offers free screenings TONASKET - The Tonasket/ Okanogan County Valley Lions Club, with the help of Safeway Stores, is sponsoring a free vision and hearing screening at Tonasket School District September 21, 22 and 23. The screenings are

done through the Lions Health Screening Unit (LHSU) which is staffed by volunteer health professionals and Lions Club members. Since 1997, the professionally equipped mobile unit has traveled throughout Washington

and Northern Idaho, providing vision, hearing, glaucoma, diabetes and blood pressure screening to more than 22,000 people annually, including 19,000 school children. The LHSU is able to keep its

service free through the efforts of civic-minded volunteers, local Lions Club sponsorship and the Northwest Lions Foundation. For more information, call President Tracie Utt at (509) 826-9534 or Kris Bailey at (509) 486-9966.

TONASKET - Tonasket is one of five schools in Washington State listed in Newsweek’s Beating the Odds 2015: Top High Schools for Low-Income students. “I appreciate what we are doing to help our economically-disadvantaged kids,” said Tonasket School Board member Catherine Stangland, who brought the article to the board’s attention. “Tonasket is being recognized for preparing students for college despite having to overcome financial odds.” According to their website, Newsweek’s “Beating the Odds” list seeks to identify schools that do an excellent job of preparing their students for college while also overcoming the obstacles posed by students at an economic disadvantage. Tonasket is listed in the 281st position, and Bridgeport in the 494th position. Criteria include college readiness, graduation rate, college bound and poverty. In other district news, Tonasket’s Maintenance Supervisor John Verbeck announced his retirement effective October 31, 2016. The board approved Verbeck’s request for a third employee. “John’s been asking me for more help in maintenance ever since my first day on the job,” said TSD Superintendent Steve McCullough. “Looking around at other school districts, we are way behind them in full-time employees in maintenance.” McCullough said there is $75,000 allocated in the budget for capital improvements, but Verbeck convinced him of the logic in hiring another person to do the work to keep things maintained, rather than replacing things with capital funds. Also, by

hiring another person now during Verbeck’s last year with the school, it provides the opportunity for training. “I got an email of 15 things that needed to be done before school started, and I just didn’t have the staff to complete the projects,” said Verbeck, whose staff was faced with extra responsibilities over the summer by having first the Newby Lake Fire crew and communications staff stationed at the middle school, and then the evacuation shelter set up at the high school. “When the buildings were all new, we could get by with just two staff, but 20 years out things are starting to break down,” said Verbeck. “This maintenance crew has done an outstanding job, but there is going to be a lot more breaking down. It’s pay now or pay later,” said board member Lloyd Caton. The board renewed the contract with North Central Educational Service District External Business Manager Trisha Schock. “This contract is for the entire year, but the ESD is happy to make modifications throughout the year,” said McCullough. “I am going to try and include someone doing public relations work within this also,” McCullough said. School will be held Thursday and Friday, Sept. 24 and 25th, despite the Okanogan County Fair being rescheduled for September 24-27. People are asked to contact their child’s building secretary to let them know if students need time off for the fair before noon on Tuesday, Sept. 19. “Thank you for your flexibility and patience as we continue to work through the impacts of the fires on our community,” said Superintendent Steve McCullough.

Okanogan County Farm Bureau Commends The Okanogan County Commissioners Job Performance Okanogan County Farm Bureau commends Commissioners Sheilah Kennedy, Ray Campbell and Jim DeTro for their tireless efforts in safeguarding and promoting the health, safety and welfare of their constituents and Okanogan County. Their outstanding leadership before, during and after two of the most devastating firestorms ever to befall our state is above reproach and sets the standard for elected offices everywhere. The current Okanogan County Commissioners have challenged state and federal agencies to acknowledge that Washington RCWs trump status quo policies and procedures. Commissioners Kennedy, Detro and Campbell have demanded state and federal coordination with Okanogan County from their first day in office. The people of Okanogan County actually have had an impact and influence on what happens in their county at the local, state and federal level. Their efforts have borne fruit and received high praise from the state and federal incident command teams and private citizens battling the flames that consumed our county and agricultural lands for two years in a row. During both fire storms the commissioners have been the boots on the ground from day one, personally following through on any issues or problems until they had a solution or answer for the people of Okanogan County and have often been the first to step forward and lend a hand before it was even requested. Commissioner Campbell even pulled and rolled fire hose to assist the fire departments as they were in such need. The Commissioners have always prioritized Okanogan County citizens and the County itself above themselves. Commissioners Kennedy and Campbell have never taken the in-county travel pay that is in their benefits package. Furthermore, all three of the Commissioners opted out of the salary increases for their positions that was voted in prior to Kennedy and Campbell’s election to office. They have spent countless hours in Olympia and meetings across the na-

tion fighting for the needs of Okanogan County and our agricultural lands and natural resources. Some of these battles included: -Ensuring funding was included in the state capital budget to rebuild local water systems and 911 infrastructure damaged during the Carlton Complex fire. -Compiling testimonies and supporting documentation for legislation that would have brought control and oversight of wildfires back to the local level. -Attending daily fire briefings in Chelan and Okanogan every morning at 6 AM and 10 AM and at 8 PM; all while crisscrossing back and forth across the entire county addressing citizens’ needs and getting direct input from them on how best to address the fire issues. -Instantly starting the legal process and working with state and federal legislators on legislation and government programs and policies to get our county’s citizens back in their homes and their livestock out on the lands as soon as possible. Not only have the commissioners done a great job during the fires, but they have also tackled some very difficult issues that the county has been facing for a number of years due to limited budgets. As all of us in Okanogan County know, budgets are very tight and we all have to watch what we spend and save. This is no different for the County Commissioners who ran for election on the fact that accountability and managing the county like a business would return. In so doing, the commissioners and other elected officials have: 1.) Accounted for positions that have been budgeted for but never filled. 2.) Asked departments to justify employee pay increases within budgets that have already run through their reserves. 3.) Asked departments to justify why rates for services should be raised to pay for employees’ pay increases when the taxpayers (who fund the paychecks and pay the increased rates) are already struggling and do not

OKANOGAN COUNTY FARM BUREAU

ANNUAL MEETING O CTOBER 3, 2015

Funding Education for McCleary and Rural Schools/Communities:

What Can Teachers and Citizens Expect and How it Impacts Agriculture.

Cost

Pre-registration $25/person - Dinner will be Pork Ribs, Chicken, Baked Potatoes and salad. Must RSVP by Wednesday September 30th by calling 509-433-7260.

Special Guest Speaker:

State Rep. Matt Manweller Representative - Washington Rep. Matt Manweller will discuss the McCleary decision and what it means. Are we looking at a state income tax, capital gains tax, or others.

The event is open to the public and will be held at the 12 Tribes Casino

Fee at door without RSVP $30/person

Payment

Send check to: Okanogan County Farm Bureau Attn: Trinity Stucker PO Box 1387 Tonasket, WA 98855

Questions

Phone: 509-433-7260 Fax: 509-486-1012 Email: secretary@ okanogancountyfarmbureau.com

28968 US-97, Omak, WA 98841 • • • •

Social hour starts at 5 PM Business meeting for voting members 5:30 PM Dinner - 6 PM Program

receive those same benefits themselves. 4.) Asked departments to justify why and how the county departments can complete jobs cheaper, better and more efficiently than the private businesses— since the county depends on those businesses and their

employees to provide a large portion of the county budget. 5.) Asked departments to justify why public inclusion and process have not occurred over the years regarding public assets. 6.) Balanced the county budget without taking the

PO Box 1387 • Tonasket, WA 98855

allowed levy shift of $500,000 (which is legal) from the Public Works account. 7.) Balanced the county budget without increasing property taxes by 1% annually as allowed by law. 8.) Passed the comprehensive land use plan that had not been updated since 1965

that started over 10 years ago. While not all decisions of the commissioners have been popular, this set of commissioners had done a great job in the opinion of the Okanogan County Farm Bureau Board who represents 900 member families.


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • September 17, 2015

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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Houses For Sale TONASKET. OLD ORCHARD ESTATES SUBDIVISION 2 bedroom, 2 bath, full basement, expressive looking home. Home to have fresh outside paint, new lower level carpet, new bushes and ready to move in soon. $145,000. Call Jan at 509-486-1397.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Real Estate Wanted DELTA LAND IS LOOKING TO BUY YOUR LAND! (509) 429-7280

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS 2 BR, 2 BA house $795. Nice 1 BR Apt $495. Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Apt 3 BR, 2 BA $765. Nice 3 BR home $850. Sonora Shores $695. Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 Light Manufacturing Space. 3000 SqFt. High Ceiling Secure Facility $2000/Mo Ellisforde. 509.486.4310 OROVILLE LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $435 per month. 509-476-3145 Oroville Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no inside smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee / supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: We have the following opportunities available: OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred Patient Registration Rep. Full time. BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Registration Full time, Bilingual required. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

TWISP MEDICAL: MA-R Full time Roomer Full time. Bilingual required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Help Wanted

Statewides

Statewides

Carrier Wanted:

WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 14, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

expenses/payroll. Great business opportunity for dedicated entrepreneur.1-800-293-3091 AcademicTutoringService@gmail.com

The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract delivery route. Please call 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / 3050 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

FREE NAC Class North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning October 5, 2015. This class will be completed in November. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human resources office or online at www.nvhospital.org. This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be accepted after September 18, 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185. Okanogan Estate and Vineyards Retail Store Looking for 24 – 32 hrs/wk SALES ASSOCIATE.

Please send resume to Yvaldovinos@gold diggerapples.com or drop off resume at retail store 1205 Main St, Oroville

ADOPTION Stay at home mom & devoted dad, married 11 yrs, long to ADOPT newborn. Financial security, happy home. Expenses paid. Denise & Jason. 1-800-392-2363 ADOPTION Affectionate Devoted Married Caring Lawyers Joyfully await Miracle Baby. Excited Grandparents too. *Expenses paid.*1-800-563-7964*

Subscribe to the...

Okanogan County Notice of Final Decision Project: Buddha Amitabha Pure Land Retreat CUP 2015-3 Decision: Approved Reconsideration Deadline: September 16, 2015 Appeal Deadline: October 7, 2015 The Okanogan County Hearing Examiner approved the above-noted project. Within 14 days of the publication date, aggrieved parties or agencies may make a written request for a motion to reconsider pursuant to OCC 2.65.130 Within 21 calendar days of the publication date; parties with standing may appeal this decision pursuant to RCW 36.70 C. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 2015. #OVG657530

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Continued on next page

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

Auctions

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

HUGE RANCH EQUIPMENT AUCTION SATURDAY OCT. 3, 2015 @ 10:00 a.m. 2470 Glenmore Rd North, Kelowna BC Tractors, Forklifts, Haying Equipment Grader, Back hoe, Pick up truck Shop full of Welding equipment Cattle handling equipment Check out our website for full listings @ www.bclivestock.bc.ca FMI phone 250-573-3939

MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4,397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In Stock, ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N EMPLOYMENT Seeking Area Coordinator. Manage successful tutoring program in your area. We will provide all back room

Think Green!

Feed Hay & Grain

Did you know?

We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper recycled for

GOOD ALFALFA HAY

gardens, fire starter & more!

Large Bales approximately 1300lbs, Bale at $175.00 a ton. There are 200 tons avail. Contact: Ben Adams at 509-681-0181

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

Joyce Adams at 509-989-0411

www.gazette-tribune.com Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

Crosswords

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 1420 Main St. l P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844

www.gazette-tribune.com

Public Notices

Phone: 509-476-3602 Toll Free: 866-773-7818

www.gazette-tribune.com

20. Look into again, as a cold case

2. Excite

22. Cable network

3. Relating to teeth

23. Thomas ___, “Look Homeward, Angel” author

4. And others, for short (2 wds)

26. Blackberry dupes

6. The “p” in m.p.g.

27. “To thine own ___ be true” 29. Do watercolors

7. “Gimme ___!” (Iowa State cheer) (2 wds)

31. ___-Altaic languages

8. Equal

32. “Act your ___!”

9. Baffled (2 wds)

34. Nothingness

10. Dishearten

36. Thoughtless of others

11. Drive off

39. Of deep igneous origin

12. In an appealing manner

40. “___ the fields we go”

14. 10 kilogauss

41. A chorus line

17. Of very little value

42. Bumpkin

21. Eyepieces

44. Ad headline

24. Excessively particular

48. Sensational

25. “Idylls of the King” character

50. Hose material

28. Sidebar item

52. ___ DeLuise, actor and comedian

30. Study of religion

53. Organic compounds with CONH2 radical

35. Anger

55. Order of business

ANSWERS

Across

58. Harmless outlet for pent-up feelings (2 wds)

38. Utopia

6. Perry Como’s “___ Loves Mambo”

62. Jack

14. Article of faith 15. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 16. Retreats 18. Anger, e.g. 19. Makes illegal

36. Light up 37. Substances absorbed by plant roots

61. Setting for TV’s “Newhart”

13. Sharp, narrow ridge in rugged mountains

33. Baby’s first word, maybe

57. Conk out

1. Chemical dye remover

10. Apply gently

5. Further shorten, maybe

63. Flip 64. After expenses 65. Arid 66. Advises Down 1. Widely known and esteemed

39. Defender of a cause 43. Carry away, in a way 45. Confused 46. Paris art museum 47. Ants (British) 49. Office stations 51. “Well, I ___!” 54. All there 56. Church part 59. ___ cry 60. “The Three Faces of ___”


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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 38 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 2

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TONASKET City Council Date Change The Tonasket City Council took action to cancel the September 22nd, 2015 regular City Council meeting and move it to September 29th, 2015. At the meeting on September 29th, 2015 the City Council will conduct business as the rescheduled regular City Council meeting, to commence at 7:00 pm. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, 2015. #OVG657600

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Puzzle 38 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45)

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Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

PUBLIC HEARING Tonasket City Council Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held during the regular Council meeting of the Tonasket City Council on Tuesday, September 29, 2015. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm in the City Hall, Tonasket, Washington. The purpose of the hearing is to review the revenue sources for the 2016 budget, including consideration of possible increases in property tax revenues. All interested persons are invited to attend and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact city hall, 509-4862132, prior to the hearing. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, 2015. #OVG657604

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PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 9/22/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2001 Chrysler PT Cruiser Lic# ASF2361 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 2015. #OVG656053

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PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council has set their schedule for the 2016 Budget Workshops. All Budget Workshops will be held in the City Council Chambers. Budget Workshop dates and times are: -Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 8:30 am (all day workshop) -Tuesday, October 13, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 6:30 pm -Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 6:30 pm The public has a right to attend any workshop and make comments. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 17, 24, October 8, 22, November 5, 19, 2015 #OVG655239

Sudoku

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Continued from previous page

Public Notices

PAGE B5 5

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Public Notices

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SEPTEMBER 17 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE September 17, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE HILLTOP REALTY HOME ON ACREAGE

11 ACRES - 3-bdrm, 2-bth. Over 1800 sqft. Big Kitchen w/Appliances. Lots of Cupboards. Open Living Concept. 6-Person Hot Tub on Back Deck. Easy Care Yard. 1200 sqft Metal Garage w/overhead Auto Door. Circular Drive. Lots of Parking. Home Lives Bigger than it Looks.Trees. Private. This is a Nice Place. Between Omak & Tonasket. $182,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855 #1 Top Producer Office in North County

SUN LAKES REALTY

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

The views from this cabin will take your breath away!

HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS The exterior

Beautiful rolling hills with wide open spaces but also beautifully treed! Nearly 40 acres with hunters cabin featuring wide windows of your views, wood stove, and loft. Additional adjoining acreage also for sale: MLS#703059 MLS#703121 $70,000

www.windermere.com

Stage the exterior of your home too. Stage the exterior with fresh paint, immaculate landscaping and even outdoor furniture to set up a Sunday brunch on the deck. Buyers often fantasize about enjoying their backyards by entertaining and spending time outside.

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

53 Horizon Drive

Nice level lot with a beautiful views of the mountains. Plenty of room for your horses on 3 irrigated acres. Good hunting and fishing are close by. NWML #843392 $39,900

Country Home -

8 Acres of Private Okanogan Riverfront. Wonderful Floorplan - 3 Bedrooms + Den, 2 Baths & Breakfast Nook Carport, too. Has 4 acres OTID Riverloop Rd $137,900

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

Law

n Criminal

n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil

Litigation Planning n Probate n Estate

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Building Supplies

Equipment Rental

Concrete

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Hidden Treasures Bridal Registry  Kitchen Gadgets Candles  Gifts  Collectibles

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Marylou’s Something for Everyone!

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Oroville Building Supply

Fabrication

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11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Paint Sprayers n Bobcat Bobcatexcavators, Excavators excavators,n scissor lifts, Bobcat excavators, scissor lifts, Bobcat scissor lifts, n All Contractor n Scissor Lifts Z booms, reach forklift, booms, reach forklift, Party ZZ booms, forklift,Party Party n Z Booms Rental, tents,tables, tables, Equipment chairs, Rental, tents, chairs, paint Rental, tents, chairs,paint paint n Call Today! n Reach Forklift sprayers all contractor sprayers all all contractor contractor equipment. equipment. sprayers equipment. PARTY RENTALS: 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tents, Tables, Chairs & More!

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D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory


PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

OBITUARIES WILLIAM ‘BILL’ LAWLER, JR

William (Bill) Lawler, Jr went home to be with his Lord September 6, 2015 at his home in Tonasket surrounded by his family. He was born April 17, 1942 on the family farm in Paul, Idaho. Bill’s life was blessed with family and many friends. His love for Jesus touched everyone’s life. Bill is survived by his beloved mother Edna Lawler, his wife and partner in Christ for 28 years Brenda, his best friend and brother Ron and wife Christie, his children Michael and wife Patty Lawler, Patricia and husband Nazir Julian, Laura and hus-

William “Bill” Lawler Jr.

band Eric Hevland, Rob and wife Cheri Lawler and Vickie and husband Dana Evanger, niece Becky and husband Roger Bianchi, 22 grandchildren and five great grandchildren. “If I could reach up and hold a star for every time you’ve made me smile the entire evening sky would be in the palm of my hand.” See you at the house. A Celebration of Bill’s life will be held on Saturday, October 17, 2015 at 2 p.m. at the Foursquare Meeting Place in Tonasket with Pastor George Conkle, officiating. In lieu of flowers memorials may be made to the Foursquare Church Building Fund. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements.

An online auction will be held to benefit Washington State fire survivors through the Community Foundation of North Central Washington. Over 115 items have been doanted by a group of talented professionals. This same group raised over $20,000 for survivors of the Oso mudslides. The online Facebook auction runs from 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18 through 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20. Go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/Auction4SurvivorsofWAFires/.

Manuel Garcia Jr.

Manny was born on Sept. 19, 1941 in San Diego, Texas. He attended Grade School in Banquette, Texas and High School in Alice, Texas. He joined the Army in 1960 and received an Honorable Discharge in 1963. Shortly after that he met Wanda Kitterman and her daughter Holly Burke. When they married in 1965 the three became a family and began their life together in Oroville, Wash. They soon welcomed the twins Michael and Mitchel Garcia in 1966 and 1971 they had another son Kory Garcia. Manny worked for many years at the Post Office in Oroville. He played Base Guitar in the evenings at many local events and music halls to support his family. He also worked in many of the Apple Sheds driving truck and delivering apples all over the Pacific Northwest. Later in life he worked for the US Border Patrol in Calexico, Calif. where he received an Outstanding Performance Rating for discovering drugs being smuggled into the U.S. He passed away the day before Easter at the VA Hospital in Spokane, Wash. after a short illness. There will be a celebration of his life in Oroville, Wash. at the American Legion 1105 Apple Way Ave. on Saturday, September 19, 2015 from 1-4 p.m. Music and a light snack will be provided.

Tonasket cleans up BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket will have a City-wide Clean-up Day Saturday, Oct. 3 for city residents and businesses, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. “We are also going to clean up the last mile of Bonaparte Creek that day to prepare for possible runoff issues that could occur this spring,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “We will need a lot of assistance with this, so please, if you can, come help the City of Tonasket clean up Bonaparte Creek. This an acute need.” There will be several very large dumpsters from Upper Valley Disposal located at the City Shop, 500 Railroad Avenue in Tonasket. Items not able to be accepted include wet paint, oil, tires, car batteries or hazardous materials. It is not yet known whether appliances will be accepted. In other city council business, the City of Tonasket will be requesting from the Town of Pateros the language added to their code after the Carlton Complex to allow recreational vehicles to connect to City Water and Sewer connections in the city with a limit of two years after adoption of the ordinance so that

the conditional variance would then go back to normal zoning rules. “This may need to go before the Planning Commission, but I am hoping to move forward with this by the next meeting to help our neighbors in need,” said Plumb. At the September 8 meeting of the Tonasket City Council, city planner Kurt Danison stated the North Okanogan communities

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Out on the Town...

DINING

& Entertainment Bonaparte

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Prime Rib every Sat.

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist 1307 Main Street, Oroville 509.476.3007

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close Advertise your specials and events here!

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ph. 509-486-2828

HOURS:

Loomis Community Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

LOOMIS

Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

FALL Hours Thur. - Sun. 9am- 8pm

Lake Resort & Restaurant

615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

have “really stepped up and are ahead of expectations on setting up the Long Term Recovery Committee.” The next scheduled meeting of the Tonasket City Council has been moved from Tuesday, Sept. 22 to Tuesday, Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. A public hearing will take place at that meeting for the normal budget process to identify revenue sources.

Restaurant

Bar

12 noon - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. ——— CLOSED ——— ——— CLOSED ——— 12 noon - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 12 noon - 9 p.m. - Close 12 noon - 9 p.m. - Close 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. - 8 p.m.

THURSDAY SMOKED RIBEYE SPECIAL $17.50 Served from 6 p.m. until gone

Join us for Sunday Brunch

Bloody Mary Bar & Mimosas 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. PASTIME to go call 476-3007 Please allow 30 - 40 minutes for your order Check “PASTIME BAR AND GRILL - Oroville” on Facebook for upcoming specials!

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


SEPTEMBER 2015 |GAZETTE-TRIBUNE OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE OKANOGAN17, VALLEY | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

PAGE B1 C1 PAGE

SPORTING OUR SCHOOL SPIRIT Good luck to all of our student athletic teams in the new school year! We salute our local players’ dedication to success in their sport and in the classroom!

2015

Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE High School Fall Sports Special Section

Catch all the action this season!

TONASKET CHEERLEADERS

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket cheerleading team includes (front row, l-r) Teigan Field, Rose Walts, Camille Wilson, Noni Alley, (back row) Savanna Drew, Shiann McCallum, Katie Henneman, Morgan Tyus, Jannelle Catone, Shelby Gilreath and Olivia Sutton.

Enjoy the season Hornet and Tiger Athletes!

OROVILLE CHEERLEADERS

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Oroville cheerleading team includes (front row, l-r) Pie Todd, Deja Moore, Narya Naillon, Mikaela McCoy, (middle) Bonnie Roley, Faith Martin, Alexis Allenby, Lena Fuchs, (top) Zoe Whittaker and Jadyn Mieirs.


PAGE C2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

OROVILLE FOOTBALL SENIORS Churape

Hickman

Weaver

Walkins

Reyes

Mills

Rise

Aubin

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Oroville football team includes Jesus Churape, Ben Hickman, Brandon Watkins, Blaine Weaver, Louie Reyes, Logan Mills, Blake Rise, Matt Aubin (second row) Zane Scott, Jerry Milholland, Nils Fassbender, Hunter DeVon, Nick Clase, Klinton Flowers, Max Turner, Bailey Spencer, David Iniguez (third row) Adolfo Delgado, Connor Godwin, Caleb Mills, Nathan Hugus, Jaxon Blackler, Andrew Mieirs, Gilberto Delgado, Seth Miller and Stetson Spears. Not Pictured Charlie Arrigoni.

Hornets plan to step up their offense BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Hornet football head coach Tam Hutchinson plans on upping the tempo on offense this year to improve on last year’s record. Assisted by Brad Scott, Hutchinson is entering his sixteenth year as coach of the Hornets. They have a roster of 28 players, which the coaches say is small compared to past seasons. Hutchinson describes his coaching style as “positive” and sees team cohesiveness and a competitive attitude as the Hornet’s greatest strength. If there is a weakness, he says it is “lack of depth.” Oroville is not without experience, but overall they are a

young team. There are five returning seniors leading the Hornets – Logan Mills (LB), Blake Rise (DT), Charlie Arrigoni (OL), Brandon Watkins (OL) and Blaine Weaver (WR). Mills was chosen for First Team All League for defense last season. Players to watch, according to Hutchinson, include juniors Nathan Hugus (QB), Andrew Miers (WR), Jaxon Blackler (DE), Stetson Spears (WR) and Connor Godwin (LB) and sophomores Caleb Mills (RB), Seth Miller (RB) & Zane Scott (NG). Jerry Milholland (OT), is among the young players showing promise. Last year the Hornets entered the CWL North Division playoff in fourth after bringing their record up 3-7 in some late season upset victories. The underdogs took on the White Swan Cougars and came tantalizingly close to another upset victory, but finished behind 20-28. The

OROVILLE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Sep 4 * White Swan 7:00 pm Sep 11 at Mt. Baker 7:00 pm Sep 19 * at Manson 7:00 pm Sep 25 * Okanogan 7:00 pm Oct 2 at Kettle Falls 7:00 pm Oct 9 * Tonasket 7:00 pm Oct 16 * at Brewster 7:00 pm Oct 23 Connell 7:00 pm Oct 30 at Liberty 7:00 pm Nov 6 # League playoff * League Game # If qualify

Thanks to the Advertisers...

Cougars were the first challengers against the 2015-16 Hornets and Oroville got payback, coming out victorious 32-12. The only big change in strategy to improve over last year’s 3-7 come from behind record Hutchinson sees is to change to a more “up tempo offense,” he said

OROVILLE FOOTBALL ROSTER # Name 10 Andrew Mieirs 11 Nathan Hugus 12 Seth Miller 20 Caleb Mills 22 Blaine Weaver 25 Connor Godwin 32 Maxwell Turner

Pos. Gr WR/DB 11 QB/DB 11 WB/OLB10 RB/OLB 10 WR/DB 12 RB/DB 11 WR/FS 10

34 Drake Fox 38 Stetson Spears 40 David Iniguez 44 Logan Mills (C) 45 Gilberto Degado 50 Nicholas Clasé 54 Ben Hickman 55 Adolfo Delgado 62 Jerry Milholland 64 Zane Scott 65 Nils Fassbender

WR/CB 10 RB/DB 11 WR/OLB10 FB/MLB 12 WR/OLB 9 OL/DL 10 OL/DL 12 OL/DL 11 DL/OL 9 C/DL 10 OL/DLK 11

66 Charlie Arrigoni G/DT 12 70 Louie Reyes OL/DL 12 75 Jaxon Blackler OL/DL 11 76 Blake Rise G/DT 12 79 Brandon Watkins OL/DT 12 80 Matthew Aubin WR/CB 12 82 Hunter DeVon WR/DB 9 84 Benton Greene WR/OLB12 88 Klinton Flowers WR/DB 10 Head Coach: Tam Hutchinson Assistant Coach: Brad Scott

Coach Tam Hutchinson

P.T. WORKS

INC.

PHYSICAL THERAPY Diane MacFarland, P.T.

Wishing athletes a healthy, successful season! Have Fun

Warm Up Play Hard

Cool Down

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

509-486-1616

The High School Sports Special Section is made possible by the advertisers who have placed ads in this special pre-season edition. They have advertised here because they care about the youth in our valley and want to encourage them in their dedication and hard work. By placing an ad here they are saying “good job...we’re proud of you and we care that you succeed, not just in sports, but in life.” You can return that support by patronizing their businesses. Together we can build a storong and healthy community—a community that our kids will be proud to represent in whatever sport or activity they participate in.


SEPTEMBER 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE C3

TONASKET FOOTBALL SENIORS Garcia

Freese

Loftus

Kiely

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket football team includes (front row, l-r) (first row, l to r) Jesse Ramon, Spencer Gariano, Chris Freese, Alex Palomares, Joe Ogborn, Jack Montowski, Connor Timm, Christian Garcia-Herrera, Tim Freese, Lloyd Temby, Jeffrey Luna, Chase Reid (second row) Chad Bretz, Tanner Anderson, Devin Kiely, Rycki Cruz, Destin Sphar, Jon Freese, Dylan Kalma, Sesar Saldana, Joe Schell, Wyatt Pershing, Kyle Huber, Zach Lofthus, Austin Rimestead, Ethan Smith, Garrett Thomas

Tiger team full of young guys working hard

Tyler Thrasher, a former football player for the Oroville Hornets, is back for his second year coaching the Tigers. New this year is assistant coach

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

assisted by Tyler Laurie. “We have a smaller turnout than past years, but we’ve got 30 players who really care about Tiger football,” said Hawkins. “This is exciting for the coaching staff.” Returning players this year

TONASKET FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket football coach Jay Hawkins is back for his fifteenth year as head coach of the Tigers, ready for the second season in the Central Washington B League. Also returning this year is assistant coach Shawn Rader, who has been with the team for twelve years. Rader is the offense and defensive line coach for the Tigers.

Sep 5 Sep 12 Sep 19 Sep 26 Oct 3 Oct 10 Oct 17 Oct 24 Oct 31 Nov 7

Warden 35-39 L at Lk Roosevelt 7:00pm * at Liberty Bell 7:00 pm * Brewster 7:00 pm * at Bridgeport 7:00 pm * Oroville 7:00 pm * at Manson 7:00 pm * Okanogan 7:00 pm Omak 7:00 pm # League playoff

* League Game # If qualify

HAIR DESIGNZ Good Luck Tiger Athletes!

TONASKET FOOTBALL ROSTER

Coach Jay Hawkins Clint Duchow, who coaches running backs and linebackers. The coaching staff is also

# Name Pos. Gr 1 Christopher Freese RB/DB 9 2 Alex Palomares WR/DB10 3 Vance Frazier-Leslie QB/DB 11 5 Austin Rimsead TE/LB 11 6 Christian Garcia-Herrera RB/DB 12 7 Jordan Thrasher QB/DB 9 14 Rycki Cruz QB/DB10 18 Tim Freese WR/DB11

include seniors Jon Freese, Zach Lofthus, Christian GarciaHerrera and Devon Kiely. “We are a team full of young guys that are working hard to be the best they can be,” Hawkins said, adding, “We will work together in practice and play the

20 Tanner Anderson 22 Jeffrey Luna 31 Ethan Smith 43 Jesse Ramon 48 Jack Montowski 50 Conner Timm 52 Spencer Gariano 53 Lloyd Temby 55 Wyatt Pershing 58 Joe Ogborn 59 Joe Schell 63 Devon Kiely

Have Fun! Lee Frank Mercantile SCHOLZ

509-486-8201

Sporting Goods

316 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2105

9 W. 4th St., Tonasket

Smith & Nelson, Inc.

64 Garrett Thomas 68 Sesar Saldana 73 Chad Bretz 74 Jonathan Freese 85 Kyle Huber 86 Zach Lofthus

Head Coach: Jay Hawkins Assistant Coaches: Shawn Rader, Clint Duchow, Tyler Thrasher, Tyler Laurie.

 Commercial  Farm  Life

& Health

 Crop

We wish all athletes the Best of Luck! OROVILLE: 815 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

One Stop Grocery Shopping!

 Groceries  Cold Pop  Produce  Snacks  Meats  Chips  Beer

Tonasket, Washington

It’s Game Time. Have a Great Season Tiger Athletes!

"CHECKED FOR QUALITY" By applying the most up-to-date technology, our experienced, dedicated and hard working crew continues to provide the best possible service to both growers and consumers.

We have all your game time favorites! 7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183

302 S. Western, Tonasket  486-2104 We support our athletes and wish them all

GOOD LUCK!

We Believe in High School Athletics...

Our WINTER Sports Section will be coming out in December!

Don’t miss out...reserve your space now!

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Contact Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712

We Support our North County Teams!

GRANT’S Home Owned 4 , Tonasket MARKET 18 W.486-2127

WINTER SPORTS OKANOGAN VALLEY

OL/DL 11 OL/DL 11 OL/DL 10 OL/LB 12 WR/DL 11 TE/DL 12

 Personal

We wish our North County athletes the best of luck this season!

Shannon, Cheree, Johnna, Lisa & Heather

WR/LB 9 WR/DB11 RB/LB 9 RB/LB 10 RB/DB 9 OL/DB 11 OL/DL 10 OL/LB 11 OL/LB 11 OL/DL 10 OL/DL 9 OL/DL 12

game together. And with that, we will reach our best together.” Hawkins said there were great voices on the team. “Although we are inexperienced, we have the understanding of the importance of togetherness. It will allow us to reach our best.”

— Friendly Service — th


PAGE C4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

TONASKET GIRLS SOCCER Bringing experience to the field BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET GIRLS SOCCER SCHEDULE Sep 8 Sep 10 Sep 15 Sep 17 Sep 19 Sep 22 Sep 24 Sep 29 Oct 1 Oct 3 Oct 6 Oct 13 Oct 15 Oct 20 Oct 22 Oct 27

Omak * Manson at Chelan * at Liberty Bell Brewster * Bridgeport * at Oroville * Okanogan at Brewster at Oroville * at Manson * Liberty Bell * at Bridgeport * Oroville * at Okanogan * Brewster

SENIORS

6-0 12-0 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm

Head Coach Darren Collins has been coaching the boys and girls high school soccer team for seven years, and coached a recreational league for a few years before that. “I played a bunch before that on club teams and adult league teams. We didn’t have a team when I was in high school,” said Collins, a Tonasket High School * League Game alum. # Playoff schedule TBA, if qualify Assistant Coach Todd Mathews has been with the team for ten years. He said this will be his last year assisting the soccer team, as his daughter will be in high adding, “I’m not about win/lose so much as where school next year we are going to be and he has already at the end of the seamissed too many of son.” her games. Tonasket has five “When she was seniors this year; in little league, we midfielder Jaden would talk on the Vugteveen, forward phone to discuss Rose Walts, defense how our games player Myra Gaytan, went; we were each defense player on different busses,” Esmeralda Flores Mathews said. and JV midfielder He used to coach Lesli Guzman. three sports per year; Four juniors join both boys and girls the varsity team Coach Darren Collins high school soccer along with four as well as junior high sophomores, two boys basketball. “I love teaching the game, espe- freshmen and forward eighth cially to younger kids. You get grader Heidi Cruz. Four freshman play on the JV to see the light bulb come on team, along with five eighth gradwhen they understand something for the first time,” Mathews said, ers.

Flores

Vugteveeen

Guzman

Gaytan

Walts

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket girls soccer team includes (front, l-r) Heidi Cruz, Amanda Padilla, Morgyne Hjaltason, Leslie Guzman, Maria Garcia, Rubi Capote (second row) Grace Cory, Kayla Willis, Megan Bolich, Ashlynn Willis, Keann Wilson, Natalie Gomez, Jamie Wilson Jennifer Cosino (keeper), Madilynn Larson, Lisa Kudlik, Maria Polito, Jaden Vugteveen, Rose Walts, Ellie Alberts, Cassidy Caddy, Esmeralda Flores, Madison Gariano (keeper).

OROVILLE GIRLS SOCCER Hornet soccer taking it ‘one game at a time’ BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Tony Kindred is joined in his second year as head Oroville Girls Soccer Coach by Whitney Massart and they plan on their girls playing tough and taking each competitor one game at a time to improve on last season’s record. The coaches feel it is very important to give guidance and to encourage their 21 team members to be fully involved in both practice and on game days. “It is important that all of our athletes understand individual leadership in both practice and games, yet are fully involved in giving to a team agreement,” said Kindred. “Incorporating an interactive and cooperative approach to training is important. We want our girls to understand the importance of goals and the drive that they are Gary DeVon/staff photo responsible for, to meet those goals.” The Oroville Hornet Girls Soccer Team is (front, L-R) Early Dawn Mendoza, Vivana Sanchez, Kambe Ripley, Jennifer Vazquez, Itzel Castillo, Yessica T. While the team is fairly young, Nemecio, Tylynne Watkins, Catherine Alarcon, Alexia Garcia (back row) Liliana Nava, Keyla Layata, Xochil Rangel, Paz Lopez, Areli Ocampo, Marissa with mostly sophomores and Aubin, Tori Kindred, Hannah Sauer, Katherine Egerton, Sydney Egerton and Lindsay Koepke. Not pictured Arin Reger. freshmen, the coaches feel they have a great turnout of girls this All leaguer Kambe Ripley great teamwork so far in prac- Sanchez-Pajarito and Cathryn where it takes them. year. In the past the team has makes a return for the Hornets. tices. Alarcon, say the coaches. Great teamwork, hard work numbered in the low teens and She is a tough player with a ethic and camaraderie come to “Koepke is a seasoned AAU “The girls are working hard was only 12 last whole lot of energy player with one year of varsity and have had three weeks of prac- Kindred’s mind immediately year. all over the field play, however and we are look- tice. They are ready to get on when asked about the team’s “We are still a and Xochil Rangel ing to see great things from her the field. Ready to get to work,” strong points. fairly young team, is back at goalie and but have multiple this year. These and others who said the head coach. They are in As far as weaknesses, he said, is an exceptional athletes that are “You might say a weakness could have turned out such as Syndney agreement that we are focusing player in this posinow into their third be that we have several new playEgerton and Hannah Sauer who one game at a time and look fortion, according to year of play. The will see varsity play, ” said Kindred. ward to some great competition. ” ers and we are young, but we have the coaches. girls are showing All of the young Hornet ladies Being a young team the varsity experience with the larger Tori Kindred, great promise. They Yessica Nemecio, show promise, including Jennifer Hornets have set their goals to part of the team and the young are dedicated to one Marissa Varney, Vazquez, Areli Ocampo, Early work together and play hard. players are learning fast.” another and have a Alexia Garcia, Dawn Mendoza, Liliana Nava, They plan on playing tough and While the girls went winless last great work ethic,” Tylynne Watkins, Itzel Castillo, Arin Reger, Viviana the coaches say they will see year, Kindred sees great improveKindred said, addPaz Lopez, Katie ing there is only one Egerton and returning senior – Lindsay Koepke are Coach Tony Kindred Keyla Layata. all back with all but Layata is joined Koepke with two by senior Viviana years of varsity play experience Sanchez-Pajarito, who is new to and are showing tough play and the team this year.

DOUBLE “A” LOGGING

We wish all the athletes the best of luck this season!

Smile...have fun and enjoy the Sports Season!

Oroville Dental Center

AMERICA’S FAMILY GRILL

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

Great Service & Atmosphere!

509-476-4500

1518 Main St., Oroville

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

476-2907

Oroville Pharmacy PHOTO KIOSK 9:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m., Mon. - Fri.

 Unique Gift Items & NEW Jewelry Good  GREAT GUY GIFTS!  Leanin' Tree, Borealis & Hallmark Cards Luck  Russell Stover / Whitman's Chocolates

& Abdallah Caramels

 Physician’s Formula Cosmetics

1416 Main St., Oroville

Keyla Layata

OROVILLE GIRLS SOCCER SCHEDULE Sep 15 Sep 17 Sep 22 Sep 24 Sep 29 Oct 1 Oct 3 Oct 8 Oct 13 Oct 15 Oct 20 Oct 22 Oct 27

* Okanogan 4:30 pm * Brewster 4:40 pm * at Manson 4:40 pm * Tonasket 4:30 pm * at Liberty Bell 4:40 pm * at Bridgeport 4:00 pm * Tonasket 11:00 am * Okanogan 4:30 pm * at Brewster 4:30 pm * Manson 4:30 pm * at Tonasket 4:30 pm * Liberty Bell 4:30 pm * Bridgeport 4:30 pm

* League Game # Playoff schedule TBA, if qualify

ment in skills and maturity. He sees a better overall season is possible this year through tough practices, fundamental work, and good conditioning. Last year’s highlights included improving from the start of the season playing tough and then in second half of the season going from no scores and hard losses to tough play, scoring and reducing the number of goals scored by opponents significantly and “seeing these young ladies make great improvements.”

Tonasket

Athletic Booster Club

Supporting Tiger Athletes!

P.O. Box 2207 Oroville, WA.

Check out our

SENIOR

Hornet Teams! 476-3411

We wish all athletes the best of luck! l Pizza l Calzones l Subs l Lasagna l Salad Bar l Wraps

TONASKET PIZZA COMPANY Open: Tue. - Sat., 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.

15 West 4th St., Tonasket

509-486-4808


SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE C5

TONASKET CROSS COUNTRY State tournament runners back on the trails, building on experience

SENIORS Hires

Valentine

Pilkington

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – Longtime Coach Bob Thornton is back to head the cross-country team this year, along with his assistant coach Chad Portwood. Also returning are several runners from both the boys’ and girls’ teams who went to the state tournament last year. “With both teams making it to state last year, we are building on the experience they gained from last year and continuing to emphasize running as a team,” said Thornton. “We return almost everyone from last year on the girls team, so we are looking strong as a team and individually. We lost a few boys, but have some good runners turning out for the first time; and with the experienced runners from last year we should be good.” Seniors Rade Pilkington, Jenna Valentine and Bryden Hires all competed at state last year; along with juniors Hunter Swanson and Johnna Terris and sophomores Justin McDonald and Katie Henneman. Terris, Hires and Swanson all pulled off season personal bests at the state tournament.

Coach Bob Thornton

TONASKET CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE

Sep 8 Sep 15 Sep19 Sep 26 Oct 3 Oct 6 Oct 10 Oct 17 Oct 24

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket cross country team includes (first row, l-r) Eric Owsley, Samuel Flores, Javier Hernandez, Adam Steinshouer, Curtis Wilson, (second row) Kylee Bobadilla,Victoria Chervinsky, Hayley Larson, Johnna Terris, Katie Henneman, third row: Riley Morris, Justin McDonald, Hunter Swanson, Zach Clark, Garrett Wilson, Caeleb Hardesty (back row) Rade Pilkington, Jenna Valentine, Bryden Hires. Not pictured: Mitchell Fitzthum, Zion Butler, Alejandra Avilezz.

TBD Nov 7

Tonasket Invitational 3:30 pm at Bridgeport Invitational 3:30 pm at Erik Andersen/Runner’s Soul, Plants Ferry, Spokane Valley 11 am at Manson Invitational 10:30 am at Colville Invitational 9 am at Omak Invitational 3:30 pm at Cascade Invitational 12:30 pm at Oroville Invitational 4 pm at CWB League Meet (site TBA) TBA at League Meet (site TBA) TBA # at State Tournament (site TBD)

# If qualify

OROVILLE CROSS COUNTRY Hornets running, getting motivated for new season

SENIORS Castillo

BY GARY A. DEVON

D. Castrejon

E. Castrejon

Haney

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – In his second year as Hornet Cross Country Coach, Billie Monroe likes to lead by example, getting out and run-

“...if I am right there doing it with them, I am hoping this motivates them to push themselves harder...”

Coach Billy Monroe

OROVILLE CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE

Coach Billy Monroe, Oroville Hornet Cross Country

ning with his team. “I like to get out there and run with the kids and motivate them by example. When we are running hills, I know that it sucks but if I am right there doing it with them, I am hoping this motivates them to push themselves harder especially when they see that their coach is hurting too,” he said. There are ten kids turning out this year, but no high school girls, which the coach hopes he can change in the future. The team has a mixture of experience, with half the team having run two or more years and the rest all new runners. There are four returning seniors – Javier Castillo, Emmanuel Castrejon, Daniel Castrejon and Dakota Haney. Among the young team mem-

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Oroville cross country team includes (front, l-r) Andrew Del Rosario Elijah Burnell, Yohnney Castillo, Luis Vasquez (back row) Javier Castillo, Daniel Castrejon, Dakota Haney, Mathew Galvan, Emmanuel Castrejon and Sheridan Blasey.

JUNKIE

bers showing early promise Monroe includes freshmen Elijah Burnell and Matthew Galvan. “They have good potential

because of their competitiveness,” he said. “Sheridan Blasey is an eighth grader and if she contin-

ues to improve she should have a good shot at making it to state next year as a freshman.”

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# If qualify

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Sept 8 at Tonasket Invitational 3:30 pm Sept 12 at Moses Lake Invitational Sept 15 at Bridgeport Invitational 3:30 p.m. Sept 26 at Tojan Invite (Manson) 11:15 am Oct 3 at Can Am Kettle Falls 3 pm Oct 7 at Omak Invitational 12:00 pm Oct 17 Oroville Invitational 4 p.m. Oct 24 at CWB League Meet (site TBA) TBA TBD at League Meet (site TBA) TBA Nov 7 # at State Tournament (site TBD)

Cool Down

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PAGE C6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

TONASKET VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball team looks forward to second season with Coach Leslie

SENIORS Montenegro

Nelson

Karrer

Whiting

Gronlund

Pershing

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – Pam Leslie returns to coach Tonasket’s volleyball team for her second year this season, and also returning is C-squad coach Arcelia Carroll. New to the team this year is JV coach Johnna Sutton. Thirty-one players turned out this year, including six returning seniors along with a seventh senior new to the team. Seniors Kasey Nelson and and Vanessa Pershing played varsity last year as juniors, and are joined on the varsity squad this season by classmates Samantha Keller, Kyra Whiting, Alyssa Montenegro, Melanie Gronlund and Corrina Karrer, who didn’t play last year. Freshman Faith Lofthus; sophomores Taylon Pilkinton and Olivia Sutton; and junior Alexa Sutton round out the varsity team. Coach Leslie said the team would continue to build on fundamentals after winning their first league match last season since 2008. “Defensively, we are not yet where we need to be,” said Leslie, adding that she expected the team’s performance to run in about the middle of the league. Leslie said the team’s strengths included their ability to serve and willingness to work on conditioning. “The sophomore class has a number of good athletes in devel-

Coach Pam Leslie Connection, a uniform and athletic supply vendor. “They generously donated practice gear for the girls as well as the Spanx, and discounted volleyball shoes for all the players,” Leslie said. “They have been awesome!”

TONASKET VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Tonasket volleyball team includes (front row, l-r) Brooklynn Ward, Tylee Caddy, Julie Bello, Yamilet Nunez, Missy Martinez, Alexia Gavin (middle row) Corrina Karrar, Sarah Rhodes, Madison Clarke, Ally Mershon, Nicole Juarez, Olivia Sutton, Megan Powell, Carmella Salazar, Sandra Magdaleno, Emily McCullough, (back row) Faith Lofthus, Anna McCullough, Melanie Gronlund, Kyra Whiting, Alyssa Montenegro, Cordelia Muth, Kasey Nelson, Vanessa Pershing, Taylon Pilkingon, Alexa Sutton and Sierra Camiso. Not pictured: Chelsea Vasquez, Vanessa Gronlund. opment,” said Leslie. A challenge faced this year among team members was

Assistant Coach Johnna Sutton and her family losing their home in the Okanogan Complex wild-

fire. Sutton’s daughters Alexa and Olivia are both on the varsity team, and a third daughter plays

volleyball for the middle school. A blessing for the team this year was donations by Team

Sep 10 *Manson Sep 15 * at Liberty Bell Sep 17 * at Brewster Sep 22 * Okanogan Sep 24 * at Lk. Roose. Sep 29 * Oroville Oct 1 * at Bridgeport Oct 6 * at Manson Oct 8 * Liberty Bell Oct 13 * Brewster Oct 15 * at Okanogan Oct. 20 * Lk. Roose. Oct 22 * at Oroville Oct 27 * Bridgeport *League match

3-2 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm

# Playoff schedule TBA, if qualify (preceded by JV)

OROVILLE VOLLEYBALL High expectations for Hornet team BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Lady Hornets volleyball team is under the tutelage of Nicole Hugus for a second season, with Shawna Nutt serving as assistant coach. “I see myself as a teacher for these girls helping them to be better players and learn and have fun as they do,” said Head Coach Hugus. This year the Hornets have 18 girls turning out, a somewhat smaller team than they’ve had the last couple of years, but still a pretty good turnout, according to the coach. The girls are young,

SENIORS

Scott

Burnell OROVILLE VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE Sep 10 * at Okanogan Sep 15 * Lk Roosevelt Sep 17 * Liberty Bell Sep 23 * at Bridgeport Sep 24 * Manson Sep 29 * at Tonasket Oct 1 * at Brewster Oct 6 * Okanogan Oct 8 * at Lk Roos. Oct 13 * at Liberty Bell Oct 15 * Bridgeport Oct 20 * at Manson Oct 22 * Tonasket Oct 27 * Brewster *League match

7:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 6:30 pm

# Playoff schedule TBA, if qualify (preceded by JV)

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Oroville volleyball team includes (front row, l-r)Yaneli Aoalos Cazares, Estifenny Carrilo, Stephanie Ravacaba (back row) Jewel Vanderwaal, Marcela Ocampo, Mikayla Scott, Hannah Hilderbrand, Havannah Worrell, Madison Whiteaker, Katie Rawley. with about one-third being freshmen and just two returning seniors – Mikayla Scott and Ellamae Burnell. The team has two others from last year’s varsity squad Hannah Hilderbrand and Courtnee Kallstrom. “I have talented young players

Oroville

Booster Club Supporting Hornet Athletes!

coming up with a new setter this year in Jennifer Cisneros, a freshman,” said Hugus. Last season Oroville had a lot of close games, but only won two and the coaches really hope to improve on this season. “I have another year experience and have

worked with these players last year. In prior years these girls have had a different coach every year,” she said. If the team has a weakness, it is that it only has a few returning varisty and a lot of inexperienced players.

“My change in strategy will be for the team to be more versatile and able to change our offense/ defense depending on the opponent. I am excited about this years team and have high expectations,” said the coach.

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Coach Nicole Hugus

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509-486-2921

We would like to take this opportunity to wish our North County athletes the best of luck with their upcoming

FALL SPORTS SEASON!

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 17, 2015  

September 17, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 17, 2015  

September 17, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune