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Firefighters making good progress on Okanogan and Chelan Complexes

LABOR DAY CLEAN-UP

North Star and Tunk Block fires still a priority BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Okanogan and Chelan fire complexes continue towards containment with work completed in many areas to increase the fire perimeter on both complexes, according to the California Interagency Incident Management Team 5 (CIIMT 5). So far firefighting efforts have cost nearly $55 million for both fires, with the loss of 123 residences in the Okanogan Complex and 23 in the Chelan Complex. Sixteen injuries have occurred during the battle, with three firefighters giving their lives in the Methow. Katie Teachout/staff photos

Oroville-Tonasket Scout Troop #27 offered to help anyone wanting assistance getting their property fire-wise. Above: Zach Clark throws some branches onto a brush pile while Carson Timm and Michael Green work on clearing a trail from the house to the river. Left: The Scouts took a break from their Labor Day work party just long enough for a photo. Left to right are Carson Timm, Myles Timm, Conner Timm, Michael Green and Zach Clark.

For stories and more photos, see page A2.

OKANOGAN COMPLEX In the Okanogan Complex, the Lime Belt Fire, which encompasses the Beaver Lake Fire, is 132,634 acres as of last Tuesday, with 75 percent containment. Containment on northwest tip of the fire is almost complete, and firefighters expected to finish mopping up the area Tuesday. Portions of the western side remained uncontained because crews were unable to conduct firing operations between an indirect dozer line and the fire perimeter near Forest Road (FR) 42. However, the fire is not threatening to escape the fireline, which is secure. Crews are prepared to conduct the defensive firing operation when weather and fuel conditions are favorable. Firefighters continue to remove fire-weakened hazard trees along FR 42. On the northeast side, firefighters are mopping up and patrolling the canyon rim to keep the fire from spreading into the Sinlahekin WildlifeArea. Crews on the southern end are mopping up, patrolling, and assisting the suppression-repair group. CHELAN COMPLEX In the Chelan Complex the fire con-

tinued to be minimally active on the northwest tip near Saint Luise Creek and was being monitored by air. Aircraft were also monitoring the southern half of the fire. On the northern half, firefighters continued to mop up the fire perimeter and repair areas affected by fire suppression efforts. The CIIMT 5 was scheduled to transfer command of the Okanogan and Chelan Complexes on Wendesday to a Type 2 Incident Management Team – Pacific Northwest Team 3, while the CIIMT 5 assumes command of the Tunk Block and North Star Fires.

TUNK BLOCK & NORTH STAR The Tunk Block and North Star Fires are at 162,423 and 209,536 acres respectively as of press time. The North Star fire near Nespelem on the Colville Reservation was at 37 percent contained and the Tunk Block was 70 percent. On Monday, firefighters continued working to ensure that their containment lines were secure as the weather warmed up. Major portions of the Tunk Block Fire and areas of North Star Fire including the southern edge, Warwick Road in Aeneas Valley and Scatter Creek are in mop-up and patrol. The primary focus along the eastern edge of the Tunk Block Fire included continuing line construction and strengthening containment lines in preparation for burnout operations should it be necessary to protect Aeneas Valley. Along the western edge of the North Star fire along Highway 155 north near Moses Meadows then east to Trail Creek, burnout operations took place to strengthen fire lines. Steep rocky slopes along Highway 21 are making it difficult for firefighters to construct containment lines. Hot Shot Crews continue line construction and prepare to burn-

SEE FIRE | PG A8

Okanogan County Fair delayed to Sept. 24 Incident Management Team will move to Stampede Grounds BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Fair has been delayed to September 24 through 27. After meeting in special session, the Board of County Commissioners moved to postpone the fair based on a recommendation by the Fair Advisory Committee. “I am sure this was not an easy process, and I hope we all can work to make this a great celebration of our Okanogan County community,” said Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb. “I hope we can all attend for the sake of our kids, and show a little normalcy for their sake.” “The good news is, people now have extra time to get in non-animal exhibits,” said Okanogan County Fair Advisory Board member Ila Hall. “This gives them an extra two weeks to get last-minute

entries in. We would really like to see place. Cal #5 came in Thursday, Sept. 3 some people enter taxidermy exhibits after the Rocky Mountain Team headed into the Head and Horn Show.” by Dan Dallas timed out. New to the fair this year, the Head and “We will move to the Omak Stampede Horn Show is open to Grounds in time for all anyone who lives in the pre-fair activities Okanogan County and to be completed,” said “This fire season is can include any type of Public Information taxidermy entry of fur Officer (PIO) Nick not a sprint race, it’s or fish from anywhere Mickel. “The Cal Fire a marathon” in the world. engines will need to go The entry deadline Nick Mickel, USFS Public home soon, because Information Officer is now September now their fire season 18. Entries can be is about to take off.” registered online at Mickel was called in Okanogancounty.org or by mailing in by the Rocky Mountain team while they to Okanogan County Fair, PO Box 467, were still managing the fire. Okanogan, Wash., 98840. Registrations He said at it’s peak, the camp held must be received by the fair office no between 1800 and 1900 personnel. later than 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18; at “Some went to the North Star fire, and which time the online registration will then we absorbed some from Chelan,” also be closed. Registration is free, and said Mickel. “We are supporting 650 perthere are no exhibitor fees. sonnel on the Chelan Complex fire and 1110 on the Okanogan Complex.” Mike Minton is the Incident CAL #5 HARD AT WORK The California Fire Team called Cal Commander. The Cal #5 Team travels #5 is occupying the fairgrounds as the with 56 personnel. “They always have trainees with them current Incident Management Team in

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 37

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Incident Management Team California Fire #5 will be moving from the Okanogan County Fairgrounds to the Omak Stampede grounds in time for pre-fair activities to take place before the fair’s new dates of September 24-27. also. We always have to bring new people up through the ranks in this business,” said Mickel. “Our footprint here at the fairgrounds is the same as it has been all along; we just moved some stuff around , including the kitchen.” The kitchen is run by inmates from the Larch Mountain Correctional Facility out of Clark County. “They are supervised by DNR, with the Department of Corrections here for

SEE DELAYED | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

evening and off-time supervision. They are working long hours, so there are quite of few of them here,” Mickel said, adding that in other instances, DNR inmate crews are out on the fire line. “Back home, they do trail cleaning and other work on state lands and government projects as agreements can be made. They plant trees and run chainsaws. If they do get out on the fire line,

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

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PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

NEWS Power restored to most PUD customers THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Carson Timm throws some branches onto a quickly-growing brush pile Monday, Sept. 7. “The Scouts achieved more in a couple of hours than I ever could have in a couple of years,” said homeowner Laura Griffith.

Scout troop eases worries with some hard labor BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Early this spring, the TonasketOroville Boy Scout Troop #27 offered to help anyone who needed assistance getting their property fire-wise. The announcement was made at a Tonasket City Council meeting, but no one had taken them up on their offer until Monday, Sept. 7. It may have been a holiday for many, but the local boy scout troop was taking it at face value; putting lots of labor into making a piece of property on the Okanogan river more fire-wise. The property is the home of Laura Griffith and her 80-yearold father, Martin Silverhawk. Silverhawk, a Korean War Marine veteran and his daughter realized just how much work needed to be done to make the property safe for themselves and their neighbors during the recent Toansket level 3 evacuation, and asked for help. Help came in the way of Brent Timm and his sons Myles and Conner; his nephew Carson; and their friends Michael Green and Zach Clark. Brent Timm began the project by assessing the situation with Griffith. Pretty soon a pile of branches and deadfall was growing larger by the minute. “We figured we could have a bonfire here in the winter,” Brent Timm said with a laugh. In just a couple hours the work crew had a trail down to the river cleared off and a clear-out begun of deadfall located next to the home Silverhawk and Griffith share.

“My father and I have truly experienced why we settled in this area,” said Griffith Tuesday morning, Sept. 8. “Yesterday our struggle to make this our paradise came true when the troops arrived at our home and started digging into our jungle. Deadfall piles surrounded our house, but they cleared it out for a burn this winter. They achieved more in just a few hours than I ever could have in a couple of years. These Boy Scouts have made my heart weep at the beauty of what they have done for us. We were physically unable to do this work. This has put our minds and bodies at ease. This area was such a danger for us, and now we will be able to live our lives knowing this fire hazard has been removed not only from our jungle yard, but from our worried hearts.” Troop #27 is led by Scout Leader Steve Quick.

Caught being good: Zach Clark is dressed appropriately for a Labor Day work party in this THS t-shirt that lists perseverance, respect, integrity and discipline as desirable traits.

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County PUD announced that all the utility’s customers that lost power in the fires would have their power restored by Thursday of last week. “We have confirmed that 785 poles and 216 miles of distribution line have been burned by the Okanogan Complex Fire. We believe those numbers will increase as we finalize our assessment,” said the PUD in a recent press release. Okanogan PUD has released Okanogan Complex fire related maps of the Okanogan PUD electric system and outages

they get a red card, so that gives them the opportunity to be called out on fires in the future,” Mickel said. Mickel said the goal was to have fire fighters work a 12 hour day, but that wasn’t always possible. “They get up early to gear up before a 6 a.m. briefing, then work from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. In some cases, they’re out there longer if they need to finish something up they are working on in the evenings,” Mickel said. “They are on ten-person crews, and we try and work them just 14 days and send them home for two days of rest because it is such hard labor. Some folks get extended out another seven days. We like to keep them 14-21 days to make the best use of their

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tomers that have been affected by the fire or to report outages or downed lines, please call 509422-3310. “Okanogan PUD line crews and support personnel, along with line crews from Douglas PUD and Pend Oreille PUD, have worked tirelessly to make sure power is restored as fast and as safely as possible,” said the release. The Okanogan PUD would like to thank everyone for their unwavering support of our crews and support staff through these devastating fires. We are proud to serve the citizens of Okanogan County.

DELAYED | FROM A1

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involved within their service area. Additionally, these maps include an outline of the fire in relationship to the transmission and distribution lines within the electric infrastructure. Conditions, borders and data change daily and these maps may not contain all the systems within our boundaries, but display the general infrastructure involved. These maps are available at their website at www.okanoganpud.org. “We are still experiencing an active fire situation. Please be aware of your situation, monitor evacuation levels and check on neighbors who may not have received notification. For cus-

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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS

Councilman Neysa Roley receives award from Association of Washington Cities

Submitted photos

Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth presents Councilwoman Neysa Roley with an Advanced Certificate of Municipal Leadership from the Association of Washington Cities at the council’s Tuesday, Sept. 1 meeting.

Ecology recognizes Williams for work at Wastewater Treatment Plant BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Oroville City Councilwoman Neysa Roley was presented an Advanced Certificate of Municipal Leadership (CML) from the Association of Washington Cities (AWC) and was recognized at the council’s Tuesday, Sept. 1 meeting. Roley completed over 60 hours of training credits to earn the distinction and demonstrated valuable service to her community, according to the AWC. The CML

program is designed to enhance the ability of elected municipal officials by providing knowledge and skills to effectively operate within the law, plan for the future, secure and manage funds and foster community and staff relationships.  To earn this certificate, the official attends a variety of AWC sponsored municipal workshops. The courses help the mayors and council members learn the essentials of municipal service and improve their ability to work with council colleagues, city staff and citizens. AWC is a private, non-partisan corporation that represents Washington’s cities and towns before the state legislature, the state executive branch and with regulatory agencies. Membership is voluntary; however, AWC maintains 100 percent participation from Washington’s 281 cities

and towns. The goal of AWC is to create and maintain livable cities and towns throughout the state. In addition to Roley receiving the certificate from Mayor Chuck Spieth, the mayor also presented Ted Williams with the Outstanding Performance Award from the state Department of Ecology for his work at the city’s wastewater treatment plant.

EASTLAKE SEWER FRANCHISE Okanogan County Public Works has informed the city that the franchise agreement for the Eastlake Sewer System was about to expire. “Some of the language in the agreement was of concern as the city has not taken over ownership of the franchise and wants to wait until it does. The council decided to table it at this time,” said JoAnn Denney, Oroville City Clerk.

Marchand added that the Visitor Information Center also felt the fires’ impact. The city gave approval to Police Chief Todd Hill and Civil Service Chairman Richard Werner to change the patrolman testing policy. The two feel that not enough people are applying for officer positions when they come up. “Right now the Civil Service is doing all the testing -- written, physical and oral and there

OTHER BUSINESS The council reviewed a draft of changes to the litter ordinance presented by Chris Branch, director of Community Development. “Chris made the changes to help address the issue of people dumping their garbage in dumpsters and cans at businesses and in the city’s parks,” said Denney. The council had concern about people who live outside the city using garbage receptacles paid for by businesses and at city parks, rather than paying for their own services wherever they live. Councilman Ed Naillon made a motion to approve the changes, which was seconded by Councilman Jon Neal and passed unanimously. The city has renewed a rental agreement with the Department of Ecology for ambient air monitoring equipment. Denney said that the state would be conducting a special audit as Oroville received more than $500,000 in federal funding for its Central and Cherry Street improvements project, as well as improvements to Dorothy Scott Airport in 2015. “A law was passed this year that actually raises the limit to $750,000 in federal funding in one year. I’d love Oroville to have a project that would require another audit because we received that much funding in the future,” said Denney. Branch also updated the council on a Disaster Recovery meeting he attended. He said that groups were forming due to the aftermath of the Okanogan Complex Fire. The group discussed evacuation plans, shelters and other future needs that might develop from another disaster. There was also a discussion on the economic impact of the recent fires, he said. Rod Noel, head of the city’s parks department, said the fires definitely had an impact on the number of people staying at Veterans Memorial Park. Arnie

is a lack of applicants. Now they are looking outside of doing what they’ve always done,” said Denney. The council agreed to change to the Public Safety Testing board where applicants do the written and physical testing at a centralized location and then pick what region of the state they want to go to. The city can pick names off a list and continue to conduct their own oral boards, according to Denney.

Ted Williams is presented with an Outstanding Performance Award from the Washington State Department of Ecology for his work at the city’s wastewater treatment plant. Williams has won several of the awards.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Jennifer Louise Ballesteros, 44, Omak, pleaded guilty April 24 two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Those crimes occurred March 26 and April 7, 2014. In a second case, Ballesteros pleaded guilty April 24 to POCS (methamphetamine). That crime occurred March 2. Ballesteros was sentenced Sept. 3 to a total of 20+ months in prison and fined a total of $4,221. The court issued an arrest warrant Aug. 28 for Mistia Alicia Clark, 27, Omak, for first-degree burglary and two counts of first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crimes allegedly occurred July 22. Casey James Lawrence Brender, 26, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Sept. 1 to POCS (methamphetamine). The court dismissed charges of POCS (oxycodone) and use of drug paraphernalia. Brender was sentenced to seven months in jail and fined $2,360.50. Mark Callen Lynch, 65, Oroville, pleaded guilty Sept. 1 to firstdegree reckless burning (lesser included of first-degree arson). Lynch was sentenced to 29 days in jail and fined $600 for the Aug. 3 crime. Lois Elaine Perez, 54, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 1 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Perez was sentenced to 51 months (4.25 years) in prison and fined $600 for the Jan. 31 crime.

DISTRICT COURT Tiffany Grooms, no middle name listed, 26, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Grooms was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 340 days suspended, and fined $733. Krista Kay Herman, 55, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Anthony Robert Jolly, 37, Tonasket, guilty on three counts of third-degree DWLS and one count of third-degree possession of stolen property. The court dismissed two additional charges of thirddegree DWLS and one of third-degree theft. Jolly was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,162. Nathan David LaFountaine, 37, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Patrick Vincent Louie, 44, Omak, guilty of DUI, first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle

without an ignition interlock device. Louie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,686. Adam Charles Luntsford, 40, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS, operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and fourth-degree assault. Luntsford was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,576. Kyle Allen Magana, 19, Omak, had a third-degree escape charge dismissed. Laura Ann McCraigie, 44, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS, operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and fourth-degree assault. McCraigie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,594. Anthony Ray McFarlane, 46, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. McFarlane was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Tommy Eugene Moore, 48, Tonasket, had a seconddegree trespassing charge dismissed. John L. Mournahan, 33, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Kyle Anthony Nicholson, 29, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of first-degree DWLS. Nicholson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,076.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Aug. 31, 2015 Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Lost property on Elmway in Okanogan. Wallet reported missing. Threats on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Nealey Rd. near Oroville. Vehicle prowl on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Conconcully. Illegal burning on Elmway in Okanogan. Littering on Columbia St. in Omak. William Lee Pearcy, 30, booked for third-degree malicious mischief and two counts of felony harassment (threats to kill). Jose Luis Escalera, 45, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Patrick Glenn Ogilvie, 62, booked for DUI and reckless driving.

Aaron Randy Dyke, 39, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS.

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015 Burglary on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds near Okanogan. Assault on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Theft on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Chainsaw reported missing. Illegal burning on Eighme Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Blackler Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Tom Dull Rd. near Oroville. Two telephones reported missing. Burglary on Lone Pine Trail near Riverside. DWLS on Ellisforde Bridge Rd. near Ellisforde. Malicious mischief on S. Birch St. in Omak. Vehicles reported egged. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Birch St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Omak Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. First Ave. in Omak. Vehicle reported egged. Two reports of public intoxication on Omache Dr. in Omak. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Fraud on Sixth Ave. in Oroville. William Keaton Jr., 72, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for DUI. Breanna Lee Carpenter, 19, booked for POCS, first-degree criminal trespassing and an FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Wednesday Sept. 2, 2015 Domestic dispute on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Theft on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Mailbox reported missing. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on Sunrise Rd. near Wauconda. Warrant arrest on Shirley Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Ellisforde Bridge Rd. near Ellisforde. Warrant arrest on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Vehicle prowl on N. Elm St. in Omak.

Vehicle prowl on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Skyview Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Alcohol offense on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Theft on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Raymond C. Rhodes, 23, DOC detainer. Ernesto Eduardo Mendez Leon, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Billy Joe Rosenkilde, 36, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Albaro Lopez, no middle name listed, 30, booked on four FTA warrants: DUI, an ignition interlock violation and two counts of third-degree DWLS. Brandy Marie Summers, 39, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree defrauding of a public utility and an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree possession of stolen property.

Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015 Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on Sand Dust Rd. near Omak. Theft on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Domestic dispute on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication at Civic League Park in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Kay St. in Oroville. Trespassing on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Robert O’Dell Peterson, 32, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree possession of stolen property and third-degree DWLS; and a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tyler Lee Shelton, 25, DOC detainer.

Christine Marie Mix, 49, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Dallas Michael Sanchez, 22, booked for third-degree DWLS. Friday, Sept. 4, 2015 Assault on Copple Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Nealey Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. Theft on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Drugs at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. Custodial interference on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Cash reported missing. Theft on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Fraud on E. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Fraud on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Fraud on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on Kay St. in Oroville. DWLS on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Elayne Louise Andrew, 54, booked on an FTA warrant for hit-and-run (unattended). Trevin David Manthey, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jose D. Perez Garcia, 32, booked for third-degree assault, thirddegree theft and obstruction. Mayra Covarrubias Ibarra, 28, booked for second-degree malicious mischief. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, booked on a DOC warrant. Dylan James Rise, 22, booked for third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation.

Saturday, Sept. 5, 2015 DUI on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Theft on Third St. in Loomis. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Tire reported slashed. One-vehicle crash on Fancher Lake Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Senna St. in Omak.

Malicious mischief on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. Justin Michael Willy, 26, booked for POCS. Mistia A. Clark, 26, booked for first-degree burglary and two counts of first-degree assault. Gary Austin Vaughn, 47, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Kelsie Lynn Kalma, 20, booked for DUI. Joseph Kenneth Shawl, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Laura Ann Iukes, 44, court commitments for DUI and two counts of fourth-degree assault (DV). Jake Wayne Smethers, 30, booked for possession of a stolen vehicle. Tanner Jay Eiesland, 26, booked for possession of a stolen vehicle. Sunday, Sept. 6, 2015 Domestic dispute on River Loop Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fatality crash on Conconully Rd. near Conconully. Assault on Jackson St. in Omak. DUI on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Sean Sullivan, no middle name listed, 43, DOC detainer. Marcos Florentino Rosas, 30, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: POCS and possession of drug paraphernalia.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

ATTENTION Wells Reservoir Users

Douglas PUD will lower the Wells Reservoir about 8 feet to 773 feet above sea level for the month of September. This is necessary to repair the Methow River sedimentation control groins near Pateros. The river level is being coordinated with work at Chief Joseph Dam and area recreation sites.

Use CAUTION on the Reservoir!

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS

The Oroville Cooperative Preschool admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Will you help or be a grasshopper? OPINION BY PATRICK PLUMB MAYOR OF TONASKET

So I’m hearing so much about people that are not even remotely affected by fire going to our distribution centers in the area and “collecting up supplies” and then even worse the people that are looting and stealing from burned out residences. Let me tell you a story..... There once was an ant that lived somewhere in Okanogan County. This ant works hard for the colony, and stores food and supplies all summer long. Meanwhile, a ladybug is also working hard, but mainly eating pests such as aphids, and doing work benefitting society in general. Both lost their homes in a devastating fire that hit Okanogan County in 2015. There was also a honeybee that worked hard Patrick Plumb all year, who managed to not lose their house, but instead lost all the flowers that supply the nectar that made the honey back in the hive. The bee was devastated, and the honey that would feed Okanogan County would now not be replenished. Butterflies came into Okanogan County, working with local Butterflies, with the support of many relatives near and far, and started distributing supplies and money to what they all thought were ants and ladybugs and bees that had actually lost things to the Okanogan County Fires. Meanwhile, there was a scorpion that didn’t even live in Okanogan County that came up and started taking things from ant colonies, ladybug houses and bees nests, because no one was watching, and that is what scorpions do. The Scorpions also came up and used supplies designed for the ants, the ladybugs and the honey bees, and tried to blend in with the survivors. Then, there were flies, that didn’t lose anything, but still lived a pretty rough life in Okanogan County, they surrounded themselves around the Butterfly Supply Zones and buzzed around and took things that were not designated for them, slept in the beds for the survivors, ate the food, not that they really lost anything, but have lived a tough life, so they thought they deserved to eat some too. And then there were the slugs. They lived in Okanogan County for a long time, hadn’t really ever suffered anything, but saw free stuff being handed out, and they too felt they deserved stuff, and a lot of it. Some of these slugs felt offended that the butterflies wanted proof of their loss, and it slowed the relief process that was really designed for the ant, the ladybug and the bee. Then there was the grasshopper, generally making a lot of noise, but not doing anything to help the butterflies. They had a lot of suggestions, and liked to play music, and wondered why the ant and the bee and the ladybug were so worried. Then winter hit. The ant and the ladybug, that really needed the help, and the bee, who couldn’t ever find flowers to replenish the supply of honey, were hampered by the slug, the flies, the scorpions, and the grasshopper who didn’t do much to help anything. Many ants and ladybugs had to leave, and it was wintertime, so a lot of butterflies had to leave. Some bees got extra honey delivered from the Butterflies, but not all were able to be helped. Some of the ants and ladybugs didn’t make it, because there wasn’t a process to deal with the Slugs, the Flies, the Scorpions, and with no help from the Grasshopper. Which of these really represents your role in the Recovery of Okanogan County? What do you think we should do to the Slugs Flies and the scorpions? If you see someone abusing or misusing or stealing, will you sit back and watch, or are you going to help the butterflies? Or will you be a grasshopper?

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Inspired to become a firefighter Dear Editor, Dear firefighters thank you for all you have done. You fight, save, and protect us all. You ROCK! When I grow up I want to be a firefighter, you have inspired me! Thank you again. Tapanga Mendoza, age 10 Oroville

Clothing Bank can use some help with bills Dear Editor, The Clothing Bank will close if you good Christians do not see fit to put money on the PUD or water bill. You can send us your yard sale leftovers, which is fine and your people in need which is fine, but what are you really doing to help? I have been paying $300 a month, do the math for the several years I have had this Christian Clothing Bank open! I am no longer able to pay the bills without help. Pat Kunsman-Castro Oroville

Time wasted trying to report outage

Dear Editor, Sunday morning we lost power around 7 a.m. I attempted to report it to the PUD. No one answered at the emergency dispatch office in East Wenatchee. I, along with a neighbor kept trying until finally the phone was answered at noon. The neighbor who made the contact was told that the outage had not been previously reported. After that report, the outage was restored in one hour. I feel that five hours were lost merely trying to report the outage. Vic Bunn Oroville

Planned Parenthood needs to go

Dear Editor, Why do many Americans continue to support abortion as birth control when modern non-abortive birth control methods (i.e. the birth control pill, IUD’s, the patch, etc.) are available in so many forms and places these days? Abortion is far more dangerous to the mother than modern birth control methods, and is cruel to the unborn. It’s time for abortion to be abandoned as birth control. As a society we have made it cheap and easy for women to obtain other birth control methods.

Planned Parenthood, which receives large amounts of our tax dollars and performs huge numbers of abortions, should have ceased to exist decades ago, yet our society in general continues to support it. And Planned Parenthood certainly does not respect the body of the aborted baby as revealed in the recent video tapes of Planned Parenthood employees munching their food while discussing the distribution of dead baby body parts for profit. This is the result of treating unborn babies as nothing more than blobs of cells. Believing that, it becomes easy to treat their bodies as a commodity, to be sold to the highest bidder. This is a vile practice and should stop immediately. For those who claim we need embryonic stem cells for scientific research, read the literature on stem cell research. Adult stem cells found in fully developed living people are now being used to treat disease. In fact, in 2012 two scientists working in this research area received the Nobel Prize in Medicine. As for the women’s health services Planned Parenthood provides, many if not all of these services are now available through low income community health clinics. Planned Parenthood was begun by Margaret Sanger, a nurse. Even Ms. Sanger advocated the use of contraception as a safer alternative to the higher risk and less acceptable procedure of abortion (see Margaret Sanger on Wikipedia). Continuing to promote abortion and then using the bodies of these babies as a revenue source must stop NOW. As a society, we cannot continue to condone these actions. Abortion, selling dead babies’ bodies, and Planned Parenthood, it’s time for you all to go. Chrystal Perrow Winthrop

One-two punch for iconic Pacific salmon Dear Editor, Our region’s salmon are in hot water. While many people may welcome this summer’s prolonged hot and dry weather, salmon – symbol of the Northwest – are gravely threatened. The lack of snowpack and spring rain, combined with sustained high summer temperatures, have reduced the amount of water and increased temperatures in our streams and rivers to lethal levels for salmon. Under these conditions, far too many will die before reaching their spawning grounds to reproduce. Area rivers support five species of native salmon and three types of trout, with Chinook salmon, steelhead, and bull trout listed as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act. Regional watershed councils have worked tirelessly for two decades, with a

significant investment of public resources, to protect and restore salmon habitat, improve water quality, and create conditions that allow salmon to return to spawn in our local rivers and streams each year. And yet, this year’s conditions are truly alarming for recovery. Many of our creeks and rivers are experiencing the lowest flows and highest water temperatures ever recorded. Low flows and warm water are wreaking havoc in areas throughout our watersheds that are important for spawning, where salmon lay eggs, and for rearing, where baby salmon grow. Sustained water temperatures above 68 degrees Fahrenheit can stress young salmon, increase disease and keep adult salmon from reaching their spawning grounds. Water temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit can be lethal. For most of the summer, water in the Cedar, Sammamish and Snoqualmie Rivers has approached or reached these dangerous temperatures, and conditions in other rivers are almost as dire. An already hard journey for salmon has been made even more challenging by these conditions, which have limited the number of adult fish able to make it into the rivers and creeks around Lake Washington. The Muckleshoot Tribe counted only 3,100 adult Chinook salmon and fewer than 34,000 adult sockeye salmon entering the Lake Washington watershed through the Ballard Locks as of Aug. 24. This is about 41 percent of the Chinook and about 27 percent of the sockeye that should have returned by now, compared to the last 10 years. And of these already low numbers of returning fish, current river conditions mean that even fewer are likely to reproduce. Recognizing the effects of worsening drought conditions on salmon and drinking water storage, Seattle Public Utilities, Tacoma Water and Everett have activated their Water Shortage Contingency Plans, moving to “voluntary status,” which asks that customers reduce consumption by 10 percent. The utilities’ conservation efforts are essential to maintaining the clean water and flow conditions needed to support healthy salmon populations in the Snohomish, Cedar, Green/ Duwamish, Tolt and Snoqualmie rivers. Given the unprecedented combination of low river flows and continuing high water temperatures, local utilities should broadly communicate conservation messages to partners and the public, with an emphasis on how much additional water we need to save. They should consider moving quickly to more robust conservation measures if conditions warrant. Climate scientists tell us that this summer’s conditions may become the new normal. Now more than ever, we must act to reduce the impacts of a changing climate, not only for ourselves, but for our prized fish and wildlife species. We need to lower stream temperatures by planting more trees on stream banks, reconnecting streams with cold groundwater sources, and each of us needs to think about how we can use less water. We need to consider salmon in stream flow management decisions. Failing to do these things means salmon will find it harder and harder to return to our local streams each year, and may eventually be only a memory in a place they once served to define. The weather forecast into the fall is for more sunny days. Please join us in hoping for rain—and conserving water in the meantime! - Duvall Councilmember Jason Walker Snoqualmie Watershed Forum Chair - King County Council Chair Larry Phillips WRIA 8 Salmon Recovery Council Chair - Covington City Councilmember Marlla Mhoon WRIA 9 Watershed Ecosystem Forum Co-Chair


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE It’s been a summer to remember Into September, kids back in school, some off to college, apples being picked and hauled to various warehouse, earlier than normal, and so it goes. Still a few fires smoldering, but surely the worst is over. It’s been a summer to remember in more ways than one. And I’m, told that apples are being trucked from Kelowna, B.C. to Chelan warehouses. Reason? I don’t know.Chit-chat was still prevalent about last summer’s Carlton fires issues and now we have the many devastating new ones to add to the conversations. Some don’t think “things” are handled correctly and others believe that great jobs were done. All I know is that it is scary, dangerous and extremely hard work and a vote of thanks go to those that did the jobs as best they could. I’ve been told there was an earth quake... but it missed me. I knew that Garry Sorenson was ill, but it still was a shock when I saw his photo on the obituary page. That, once again shows us to make the most of each day, as we don’t know how many we have left. Sincere condolences to the family and the host of friends they had made, as they were members of the community for a lot of years, being active in

community and church as well as many school activities, as both Garry and Ester were former teachers. Also, another long time resident of Oroville, Marilyn Haskell, was taken by death. The late John and Marilyn raised their family here, had apple warehouses, and continued to live in Oroville, then moved to be closer to children in the Seattle area. We enjoyed more than 25 years, living in the house they built on the lake. Condolences go to their family. Louie and Mary Lou Barnett family are to be remembered as they lost their son, Dennis. Sympathy goes to all of the family. Al Robinson will have a party this Saturday, celebrating the fact that he has lived 90 years. After high school, being a star basketball player, he joined the Marine Corps, returned safely, married Mary Alice Holcomb. They had some girls and boys, raised some apples, sold some real estate, and a lot of stuff in between. He’s a tough guy to have survived some of the situations he’s been in and I’m sure he’ll be very happy as he greets his many friends and relatives at

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago: Friday, September 6 - 13, 1940: When the registration books for Oroville precincts No. 1 & 2 were closed to registration Saturday night, August 24, for the primary election. There were 669 voters registered within the city limits. Of this number, 272 are in precinct 1, south of the railroad tracks and 397 in precinct 2, north of the tracks. Quite a number had failed to register and will not be able to cast their vote in the primary. The Oroville Town Council, at their regular first of the month meeting, many items of business were discussed including the receiving of approval from the state highway department, it was decided to advertise for the purchase of a second hand motor grader, the cost not to exceed $600.00 and to be demonstrated here. Oroville fruit warehouses started packing Red Delicious apples the first of the week, although it is a little early. The first cars to roll being September 4th. It is stated that the Okanogan Valley has the largest block of Red Delicious trees of any district in the United States. Extending its service to include children from war torn Europe, the Washington Children’s Home Society will help find homes for refugee children, coming here from the British Isles and perhaps from other countries. Notice is given that restrictions on hours of using irrigation water are lifted for this season in the Town of Oroville and water may be used at any time of the day. In one of the most topsy-turvy elections in along while, the voters went to the polls on Tuesday and selected candidates for the general selection. They also voiced their sentiments in regard to the special three mill levy for a county hospital in this county in no uncertain terms, turning down the proposition by a vote of around two to one. This follows a meeting with the County Commissioners last week when they asked for the levy for $1,000 to pay for this election that they had already order the printing of the ballots containing the request for this levy. Nearly 1400 unemployment compensation benefit warrants, valued at $14,665 were paid to eligible workers under the Washington Unemployment compensation act in this area during August. Grocery Prices: All candy bars, 3 for $.10; Mother’s Cocoa, 2 lb. $.15; Kraft cheese, 2 lb. box, $.40; Sunset prunes, 2 lb. pkg, $.15; 46 oz. can of tomato juice, $.19; Fancy U.S. honey, 5lb. can, $.39.

The Oroville Gazette

50 years Ago: September 2 - 9, 1965: Dedication ceremonies on the new Beth Lake Forest Road were held last Tuesday afternoon of this week. A ribbon stretched across the road was cut by County Commissioner Walt Turner and Fritz Molsio, Manager of the Okanogan National Forest. The road is just over four miles and replaces the Pontiac Ridge Road. Okanogan County built 2.3 miles of the road at a cost of $76,000 while the Forest Service Road was for about 2.6 miles and a cost of $68,000. Head Coach Bill Grunst, in his first year as Hornet Mentor, and Jim O’Conner, in his first year as assistant coach, are directing 31 enthusiastic young men in preparation for this year’s upcoming football season. Ten returning lettermen will lead the Hornet squad this season. The graduating class of 1977, consisting

of 88 anxious first graders. The returning teachers are: Mrs. Peggy Howell, Miss Grace Thorndike and Mrs. Emma Job. School Superintendent, Robert Drummond, said this week that the probable dates for all school apple harvest vacation would be September 27th through October 8th, subject to change by the school board at their September 14th meeting. Finishing touches are going on at the Thayer Fruit Co. new warehouse at Ellisforde. President Darrell Thayer and Manager Glenn Cox said the new warehouse will be in operation around September 15th. Vern Ritter, Okanogan PUD Chief Engineer, has been appointed as Assistant Manger of the utility and will continue in his engineering capacity. He came to Okanogan PUD as an engineer in 1959 and was named Chief Engineer in 1963. A meeting of the North End Water Users Association will be held at the high school library September 16 at 7:30 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to acquaint those interested in the latest plans for a water system to serve this area. Four years have gone into developing the plans and figures and now is the time to do something. Congress has just made it possible for the group to get a grant for 50 percent. Weather Wise by Marge Frazier, official observer: Sept. 1, 1965, 84 degrees maximum and 46 degrees, minimum; Sept. 2 – 75 and 43; Sept. 3 – 70 and 50; Sept. 4 -74 and 36; Sept. 5 – 74 and 44; Sept. 6 – 79 and 42 and 9/7 – 81 and 39.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 years Ago: September 6 - 13, 1990: “We, the residents of the Oroville Garden Apartments, do petition and request the Oroville Police Department to take any necessary steps to actively reduce the late night (11 p.m. and later) noise emanating from the East Alley, 1500 Block of Main Street, Eisen’s parking lot and the First Bank parking lot, which is also used by Don Ernesto’s Restaurant” reads the petition signed by 16 residents of the apartment complex. Virgil Bedient, resident of Ellisforde, reports having seen signs of a grizzly bear in the South Fork Toats Coulee area. He turned what information he had over to the state Department of Wildlife in Olympia. “It has a 15 inch paw print and two and one-half claws and other signs, such as scat”. Lois Spalding and her husband Jim have the Cariboo Trail Llama Ranch and have 10 Llamas with “one due any day.” Mrs. Spalding said, “There are several Llamas ranches in our area and they are being raised for packing. They are gentle creatures with pronounced personalities but are easy to raise and care for” and will be featured at the Okanogan County Fair. A joint reunion of the Bonaparte and Havillah Schools was held Sept. 2 with over 100 of the two grade schools students were in attendance. Walter Wildermuth, nearly 88 and Nola Visser Barz, 28, of Spokane, were feted as being the oldest and the youngest in attendance. Signs of the times. Three and a half full pages of tax delinquency foreclosures listed for Okanogan County. The Oroville Chamber of Commerce reports increased usage of the Visitor Information Center. During May, the center served 1299 travelers, an increase of 35 percent over 1989. June saw 3,654 tourists entering the premises, an increase of 27 percent over 1989 and July, a whopping 8,730 visitors signed in, a 79 percent increase over last year. August figures have not yet been released. Real Estate for Sale: 4 bdrm, 2 full baths, 2 car basement garage on a large lot at the end of the street in Tonasket; All rooms are spacious, $89,500.; 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on Boundary Point with southerly view and excellent beach, heat pump, $125,000; 20 acres on Pontiac Ridge with well and 3 room cabin, $24,000.00; 2 bdrm, 1 bath home, full basement, carport, large garden spot, soft fruit trees, oil & wood furnaces, ¼ mile north of Tonasket on ½ acre, good well and septic, $36,500. Oroville, well easement, 30 apple trees, $12,500.00; On a large city lot, new vinyl siding and metal roof, walking distance to business district, $39,500 on owner contract: Close to National Forest, lots of nice trees, super recreation site, $6,000 on owner’s terms of $3,500 cash.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

his celebration. The area was filled with Forney’s and 90 seems like a lot of years to live, Roberts, all growing apples. Thus the but how about 100? Merlin Forney many aunts, uncles and cousins by the was honored on his 100th dozen. Eventually, Merlin birthday last week, with a came West, but folks in this gathering of friends and famarea didn’t now him as well ily, in Leavenworth, Wash. as the above mentioned. His which has been his residence daughters, Valerie and Karen for several years. In the and granddaughter, Karma, mid 1920’s Albert and Dora hosted his birthday celebra(Roberts) Forney arrived in tion, and attending were Oroville making their first some of the descendants of home, in a tent, at Deep Bay. Merlin’s brothers and sisters, They came, by cars, from as well as local friends in Colorado, on the advice Leavenworth. from a friend in Wenatchee, THIS & THAT Floyds’s family was who told Albert he thought Joyce Emry represented by Sydney it would be a wise move, (Hardenburgh) and her as the apple industry was brother Keith and Marie just getting started. Eventually, most of Forney. Sister Eula Kuntz, by Mark and the Forneys followed the advice of said Marcia Kuntz, youngest brother, Virgil’s, friend. two sons Kevin and Merlin Forney. The family consisted of Harold, Floyd, Virgil and Merlin are the last of the eight Merlin, Freida (Johnston) Eula (Kuntz) children and health reasons prevented Lois, Marvin, and Virgil (maybe not in Virgil from attending. Merlin’s wife, that order). Merlin, however, did not Marie, mother of his children died a come at that time of the migration, but goodly number of years ago, and Ardice went to Philadelphia, where he went into died quite recently. a different trade. I believe he is an elecWouldn’t you think that a deer with trical engineer. It was said, by family, two saucer sized eyes could see somethat Merlin was a walking encyclopedia thing as large as a big diesel, bright red and knowledgeable on MANY subjects, pickup truck and not run into it? Maybe that on asking him a question about that’s not exactly the way it was. For fursomething, you often wished you hadn’t ther details you could ask Lance Haney. ask because he told you by far more than It is said that more and more deer and you wanted to know. At one time there other wildlife are coming down out of were numerous relatives, thus the name the mountains, looking for something to Forneyville, was given the community, graze on, that isn’t burnt, so be extremelocated south of Riverview cemetery. ly careful when driving.

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Steak Night is back at Oroville Eagles SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

Steak Night is back! ‘Tis the season and the guys are ready to serve up the good stuff, hot and fresh! We look forward to seeing you Friday at 6:pm for a whopping good dinner. Meat Draw and Joker Poker will be happening and Jeannie Riggins will be in at 8:pm with her Star Connections Karaoke Show. Our season for good food, good friends, and

Times getting more interesting all the time

The announcement on TV is that gasoline is down a dollar a gallon as compared to prices a year ago, during this past holiday. Encourage more participation in your local American Legion. They are shorthanded and need some backup help. Have been told that the Les Schabb Tire store has changed ownership, but will still be managed by the same capable person. It is said that Americans are strange people. They take nice piece of yardage, cut it up into little pieces, then sew them back together and call it a quilt. They take a nice picture, cut it into funny shapes, spend hours trying to fit it all back together, and call it a jigsaw puzzle. Yeah! That’s what we do – and call it fun! Mentioning quilts...the Methodist Church ladies recently raffled off a hand embroidered and hand quilted quilt and the winner was Jack Hughes... and it wasn’t a “put-up” job. He is just an avid supporter of their projects... or either his mother, Doris Hughes, says, “Here, Jack, buy some more tickets.” More pancakes at the Oroville Senior Citizens, will be served Saturday, Sept. 12, starting at 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and on that same day another parking lot sale will be in session. Proceeds will be used for installing ceiling tile in the dining room to try and cut down the noise level. Those senior citizens can get real rowdy, sometimes. Til next week.

EAGLEDOM AT WORK good fun is on again! Come join your brothers and sisters, friends and family. There will be a Pot Luck at noon on Saturday, Sept. 12 for Dennis Barnett. This is a time for his friends and family to join in remembering him. Don’t forget Bingo and Burgers at 6 pm on Thursday. All your friends will be there! The Joker Poker pot is over

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Confucian curse found in a fortune cookie: “May you live in interesting times.” We are having a Parking Lot Sale fund raiser this Saturday, Sept. 12, 8 AM to noon. Donations of quality goods for the sale are most appreciated. (No clothes, please.) See Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or myself. Pancake Breakfast, will be served Saturday, also, from 8 a.m. to 10

BIRTHS Macy Rae Timmerman was born to Heather and Sean Timmerman of Tonasket, Wash. at 12:40 p.m. on August 26, 2015 at North Val-

a.m. Mark your calendar. Lunches next week are as follows: Tuesday, September 15, Chicken Cordon Bleu; Thursday, Sept. 17, Ham and Au Gratin Potato; Friday, Sept. 18, Baked Fish. Our September Business meeting is on Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 11 a.m. Speaking of uncertainty, it seems that more of us are suffering from knee pain, back pain, bee stings, stomach aches, you name it. Yes, these are uncertain

ley Hospital in Tonasket. She weighed seven pounds, one ounces at birth and was 19 inches long. Her grandparents are Chris and Jill Almont and Mark and Tina Timmerman, all of Tonasket.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

$1000 and the Queen of Hearts pot is over $300. Come in and play or you can’t win. Be sure you have your membership card on you as only Eagles Members can win. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 pm to 7: pm every day. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker, and Meat Draw. Saturday is Queen of Hearts Night. We have free pool every Sunday. We are People Helping People! times. The smoke has subsided and we have had a little rain, but the fires are not totally out. And, yet, the Oroville Senior Center just keeps on. Our Bingo numbers are up, Tuesdays and Thursdays after lunch. There is a waiting line of Pool players, 4 days a week, at 1 p.m. Pinochle still draws a crowd Saturdays at 7 p.m., and Sundays at 1 p.m. Potlucks still occur the second Sundays at 1 p.m. Good times and friendship. The Senior Center. It’s a good place to meet, eat and have fun. When confusion goes exponential, then chaos follows. Interesting. (I know that the Senior Citizens article last week was somewhat confusing. Somewhere between e-mailing and printing it got scrambled. I think it made sense before that.)

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SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR OROVILLE CHAMBER TO MEET AT LOCAL WINERY OROVILLE - The next Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting will be at Esther Bricques Winery Thursday, Sept. 10 at 6 p.m. Every Thursday night Esther Bricques features local musicians along with wine and a bite to eat, starting at 6:30 pm. This week’s featured artist is Ruby Scene. Feel free to stick around after the meeting, enjoy a glass of wine and nibble on some food that is appetizer in nature and “potluck” (so bring something along to add to the mixture), said Chamber President Clyde Andrews.

Ruby Scene to perform at Esther Bricque OROVILLE – Ruby Scene will perform at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, Sept. 10. Composed of Denny Richardson, Steve Bell, and Ruby Collins, this group provides keyboard, percussion and guitar-accompanied vocals in a wide range of styles. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at 509-476-2861 or check the Events Page at www.estherbricques.com.

Family Fare Board Location Change TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire board will be meeting at the faire grounds, rather than their normal meeting place, on Wednesday, Oct 7 at 6 p.m. For more information call 5090486-2173.

Senior Center Parking Lot Sale OROVILLE - Join the Oroville Senior Citizens for bargains at the Senior Center Parking Lot Sale, fundraiser, this Saturday Sept. 12 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Donations of quality goods for the sale, before hand, are most appreciated. (No clothes, please.) See Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or myself if you have something of value to donate. And, don’t forget to stop by for bargains Saturday.

Oroville Farmers’ Flea Market OROVILLE: The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Sept. 5 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through October 31. The Labor Day Weekend market will feature a Flea Market and Yard Sale as well. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more information call 509-429-3310.

Oroville Booster Club OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club which supports youth programs, both academic and athletic, meets on Monday, Sept. 14 in the High School Teachers’ Lounge (or a nearby room) at 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome. See them on facebook at: http://oroville.wednet. edu/~fancherb/site/booster_club. htm.

Tonasket School Board TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board meets on Monday, Sept. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the School Director’s Board Room at the District Office. For more information or to get on the agenda call 509-486-2126.

Oroville City Council OROVILLE - The Oroville City Council Tuesday, Sept. 15 in the council chambers at 7 p.m. For more information or to get on the agenda contact 509-476-2926.

Vacation Bible School OROVILLE - Valley Christian Fellowship presents “Jungle Jaunt,” a unique summer VBS program. Come explore the rainforest and get to know God through Bible stories, music, games, crafts and more! Jungle Jaunt will be held each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins July 5 and continues through Sept. 20. Open to kids age 4 to 11. For more information, or to arrange a ride for your child, call 509-5600228. Valley Christian Fellowship is located at 142 East Oroville Road.

Apple Pie Fundraiser

OROVILLE - The Immaculate Conception Catholic Church is hosting their eighth annual Apple Pie Fundraiser. Orders for the pies, which are $7 each, mut be put in by Sept. 20 for delivery on Sept. 28 after they are freshly

baked. Part of the proceeds will be donated back to the community. The pie bakers recommend folks order as many as they like as they will freeze well for baking when you’re ready. For more information call Jane Lynch at 509-476-2177 or Jo Mathews at 509-476-3819.

Okanogan Family Faire OKANOGAN - The 42nd Annual Okanogan Family Faire will take place this year, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9-11. Day passes are $10 and kids 17 and under are free when accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Camping passes are $60. For more information on becoming a vendor or on the faire in general, see www.okanoganfamilyfaire. net. The faire grounds are located at 76 W. Cayuse Mtn. Rd., about 12 miles from Tonasket off Hwy. 20. No dogs, guns, drugs, alcohol, fireworks or generators allowed.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

A Big Thank You... The Highland Stitchers would like to thank everyone for making our 4th Annual Quilt Show a Success! Taber’s Taste of Summer Camaray Motel Napa Auto Parts - Oroville Harvest Foods Subway-Oroville America’s Family Grill Trino’s Mexican Restaurant Brown Jug Gazette-Tribune Frontier Foods Nulton Irrigation 76 Gas Station Four Seasons Oroville Pharmacy Windermere Real Estate Brunettes Hair and Nail Salon Expressions World of Gaia Rocks, Gifts & Gallery Appleway Video, Books and Gifts Community Auto Repair Terri’s Hair Repair Rancho Chico

Whistler’s Family Restaurant Shannon’s Place Cafe and Deli Bell, Hook, and Spindle Subway – Tonasket The Napa Store - Tonasket The Kuhler MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures Beyers Market Tonasket Natural Food Co-op Grant’s Family Foods The Split End Needlelyn Time Lee Frank Mercantile Highlandia Co. Jewelers The Molson Quilt Show Esther Bricques Winery Gene’s Native Smokes Sheila’s Shoppe & Oroville Transit A.J. Barber Shop The Junction Midway building Supply

See you next year!

Grange to launch new board game as fundraiser SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER OROVILLE GRANGE

Members of the Oroville Grange had a fun picnic meeting at Deep Bay Park on Saturday, Aug. 22. We had a great potluck, a meeting and a fun game of Bingo with prizes, thanks to the idea and efforts of grange member Grace Hughes. Our fundraiser board game” North Country-opoly” launches this week. Cindy Nelson is leading our effort to create a fun board game based on the community in which we live. Cindy and other grange members will be calling on businesses, organizations and individuals to fill the board with names familiar to us

OROVILLE GRANGE NEWS all. Don’t miss the chance to be on “the board.” The Grange is an important local institution. Our new fundraising will be used to make improvements to our building and offer a wide range of community activities and programs that should be of interest to many. The list includes: 1 ) Fresh paint inside and out 2) Improve our certified kitchen 3) Re-instate our graduating Senior Scholarship Program 4) Host regular Dances and music venues at the Grange Hall, contra, square , rock n’ roll, sock hops, local musicians from classical to folk and more. All types for all ages. 5) Host new informative workshops, panels and discussions on a wide range

of interesting topics, backyard bee keeping, organic farming, pesticides and health, community gardens, youth activities, local improvements and more. The County Fair is coming up Thursday, Sept. 24 and we will be planning our Grange Booth Entry at the next Meeting. It is an annual ritual of creativity that can be a lot of fun if shared by many. The theme is “Blue Jeans and Country Dreams”. Our next membership meeting is Wednesday, September 16 at the Grange Hall 622 Fir St. The potluck will be at 6 p.m. followed by our monthly business meeting at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20 we will hold our monthly indoor fundraiser Flea Market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Grange Hall 622 Fir St. Oroville. For more information please contact Joseph Enzensperger at 509-476-4072 or Betty Steig at 476-3878. Get involved with the Grange. We are seeking new energy and membership.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all

You can upload your own community events.

Try our new calendar at...

www.gazette-tribune.com


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

FIRE | FROM A1

Okanogan Complex and Chelan Complex will be turned over to a Type 2 team, while California Interagency Incident Management Team 5 will take over North Star and Tunk Block fires. out a section at Nineteen Mile Creek to connect two fire stringers. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell visited the fire yesterday and spoke with firefighters, county commissions, tribal leaders and other stakeholders. She is a red card holder and took the opportunity to visit the fire line to work beside Australia/New Zealand and BIA Firefighters to put out a spot fire. The plan for Tuesday was burnout operations to secure firelines which were a priority if weather permited. There are now multiple containment lines in place on the southwest portion of the North Star Fire. Burnout operations are planned between Armstrong Mountain and areas near Moses Meadows. There will

The most recent map of the Okanogan and Chelan Complex Fires as of Tuesday morning.

also be aerial and hand ignition burnout operation near Swan Lake Road west around the north side of Cornell Butte contingent on weather. On the northeast portion crews will continue mopping-up and holding the successful burnout along Highway 21 at Nineteen Mile Creek. In the Highway 21 corridor, crews will try to keep the fire on the higher slopes above the road in the Nanamkin Creek area. They will construct line along the fire edge from North Nanamkin Creek to Bear Creek. On the Tunk Block Fire crew will continue line construction, mop-up and patrol. Repair of damage caused during suppression activities (frequently referred to as ‘rehab’) is beginning.

Quick appointed to PNT Advisory Council THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Time is running out to see the exhibit “The Beaver Tells Their Story” at the Depot Museum in Oroville. The exhibit is being put on by the Borderlands Historical Society and is a follow up to last year’s exhibit on the Okanogan Indians. This year the story picks up after settlers arrived in what was the Okanogan’s traditional homeland. The exhibit is scheduled to close on Saturday, September 12. Above, a handcrafted beaver statue made by an Oroville student. Left, one of the many displays depicting life after the settlers came to the Okanogan area. The photos and displays include artifacts from both sides of the border. Several displays were also contributed by five native schools.

THE EFFECTS

Let’s face it, living with hearing loss can be frustrating, even dangerous. Hearing aids can allow you to function better in all areas of your life:

Your Safety

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Your grandson’s silly secrets. Your wife’s soft “I love yous.” These are sounds you definitely don’t want to miss.

Your Work

PORTLAND, Ore. - Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack recently appointed 23 members to the inaugural Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail Advisory Council, including Steve Quick, the superintendent of the Oroville School District. Secretary Vilsack made the appointments under the authority of the National Trails System Act. The council will advise the Secretary, through the Chief of the Forest Service, on management of the Pacific Northwest Trail in Montana, Idaho, and Washington. One of America’s 11 National Scenic Trails and designated in 2009, the Pacific Northwest Trail is only the second such trail – alongside the Pacific Crest Trail – to traverse Washington State. “We’re excited to assemble such a diverse group of volunteers to collaborate with us in developing a plan designed to improve recreational opportunities and experiences, and support our unique mix of gateway communities,” said Matt McGrath, Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail Program Manager. “The strong interest in the council demonstrates the significance of the Pacific Northwest Trail as a truly national resource.” Quick echoed McGrath’s sentiments, “I’m very excited to be involved with the PNT as it continues to develop. Our first meeting is scheduled to be held in Sandpoint, Idaho in mid-October.” The council is composed of citizens with diverse backgrounds chosen for their expertise in recreation-related issues, and ability to represent a balance of stakeholder perspectives and geographic areas. The council also includes representatives of the USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land

A car horn. An ambulance siren. The fire alarm. Hearing loss can cause you to miss important signals that alert you to danger.

Your Happiness

If you’re missing important information on phone calls or in meetings, you may not be working at the level you want to be.

Do you feel uncomfortable at social gatherings? Are you missing the rewarding sounds of nature or your favorite music? Don’t let hearing loss affect your quality of life.

For your complementary consultation call 509-422-3100

Moomaw Hearing Center, Inc. 5 W. Central Ave., Omak • 509-422-3100 • Toll free 800-898-HEAR (4327)

Management, which manage sections of the trail. First proposed in 1970, this 1,200-mile route from the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park to the Pacific Ocean

“I’m very excited to be involved with the PNT as it continues to develop” Steve Quick, Superintendent Oroville School District

at Cape Alava in the Olympic National Park is a unique pathway traveling through some of the most spectacular and scenic terrain in the United States, and connects people and communities of the Pacific Northwest. As directed by the National Trails System Act, the Pacific Northwest Trail and other National Scenic

Trails are sited to provide for maximum outdoor recreation opportunity as well as the conservation and enjoyment of the surrounding scenic, historic, natural, and cultural resources. Establishing the council is a major milestone in the trail’s short history. The Forest Service is cooperating with many other federal, state, and local agencies as well as private landowners to develop a trail-wide comprehensive plan. Over the next three years, the council will provide recommendations on trail uses, signage, establishing a trail corridor, and prioritizing projects. The Pacific Northwest Region consists of 16 National Forests, 59 District Offices, a National Scenic Area, and a National Grassland comprising 24.7 million acres in Oregon and Washington and employing approximately 3,550 people. To learn more about the U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest, please visit http:// www.fs.usda.gov/r6.

Phone and Internet Discounts Available to CenturyLink Customers The Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local service rates for residential voice lines are $18.00 per month and business services are $32.00 per month. Specific rates will be provided upon request. CenturyLink participates in a government benefit program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and families. Eligible customers are those that meet eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if they participate in certain additional federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount is available for only one telephone per household, which can be either a wireline or wireless telephone. A household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to obtain Lifeline telephone service can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can be barred from the program. Lifeline eligible subscribers may also qualify for reliable home high-speed Internet service up to 1.5Mbps for $9.95* per month for the first 12 months of service. Please call 1-866-541-3330 or visit centurylink.com/internetbasics for more information. If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call 1-888833-9522 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline program. *CenturyLink Internet Basics Program – Residential customers only who qualify based on meeting income level or program participation eligibility requirements, and requires remaining eligible for the entire offer period. First bill will include charges for the \first full month of service billed in advance, prorated charges for service from the date of installation to bill date, and one-time charges and fees described above. Qualifying customers may keep this program for a maximum of 60 months after service activation provided customer still qualifies during that time. Listed High-Speed Internet rate of $9.95/mo. applies for first 12 months of service (after which the rate reverts to $14.95/mo. for the next 48 months of service), and requires a 12-month term agreement. Customer must either lease a modem/router from CenturyLink for an additional monthly charge or independently purchase a modem/router, and a onetime High-Speed Internet activation fee applies. A one-time professional installation charge (if selected by customer) and a one-time shipping and handling fee applies to customer’s modem/router. General – Services not available everywhere. Have not have subscribed to CenturyLink Internet service within the last 90 days and are not a current CenturyLink customer. CenturyLink may change or cancel services or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice. Offer, plans, and stated rates are subject to change and may vary by service area. Deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions – All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a carrier Universal Service charge, carrier cost recovery surcharges, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates.


SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS Hornets defeat White Swan 32 - 12 in season opener

SCHEDULES SEPT. 10-19 Schedules subject to change

FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC - Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Sept. 10 GSC - Manson at Tonasket, 4:30 pm VB - Manson at Tonsaket, 6:30 pm Friday, Sept. 11 FB (Var) - Lake Roosevelt at Tonasket, 7 pm Tuesday, Sept. 15 GSC - Tonasket at Chelan, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 6:30 pm XC - Tonasket at Bridgeport Invitational, 3:30 pm

Photos by Melissa Mills

The Oroville Hornets rolled over White Swan in their season opener at home 32 - 12. Oroville ran 13 yards to put the first points on the board with safety for two. Oroville followed with 8:10 on the clock in the first -- Nathan Hugus completed a pass to Seth Miller for a 12 yard touchdown. Hugas repeated in the first with a completed pass to Andrew Mieres for nine yards, bringing Oroville score to 12. A successful two-point conversion made it 14. Hugus passed to Miller for another 12 yard touchdown to finish out the first quarter with a 20 to 2 lead. In the second quarter Hugas completed a pass to Stetson Spears for 30 yards and the touchdown, making it 26 after a failed two-point conversion attempt. White Swan put some points on the board with a touchdown pass, but no extra points, making it 6 to 26. They again scored in the fourth for their last points of the game. Oroville’s Logan Mills (above) ran for for yards and a touchdown to finish out the game.

Thursday, Sept. 17 GSC - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm VB - Tonasket at Brewster, 6:30 pm Friday, Sept. 18 FB - Hawaiian FB-Intersquad at Tonasket, 7 pm Saturday, Sept. 19 GSC -Brewster at Tonasket, 11:00 am XC - Runner’s Soul at Plant’s Ferry, 11:00 am

Tonasket drops season opener to Warden BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tigers lost their first game of the season 50-6 Friday, Sept. 4 when they traveled to Warden and discovered several members of last year’s force back on the Cougars’ playing field. “They had quite a few of their guys back from last year’s team, and we put a brand new team on the field Friday for the most part,” Tonasket Head Coach Jay Hawkins said. Tonasket beat Warden in the regional play-offs last year after losing the season opener to them. Both games were close. The September 5, 2014 game saw the Cougars scoring two touchdowns in the final five minutes of the game to edge over Tonasket 39-35. This year, senior Christian Garcia-Herrera scored the Tigers only touchdown of the night on a 40-yard run in the third quarter. Vance Frazier-Leslie, a junior, played quarterback. “We have a lot of inexperienced players on our team, so the chance to get our feet wet in live action Friday was great,” Hawkins said. “We got great effort out of the guys; they mesh really good together as a group, and that’s an important ingredient.”

The Tigers put that ability to mesh good together to work during Labor Day’s practice Monday, Sept. 7. “We really thought we were able to accomplish quite a bit in just a little bit of time at practice. We really made some strides tonight after reviewing the game tape, and seeing some of the things we need to improve on,” Hawkins said after practice. “The first game always gives you a good idea of what you need to do to improve. That’s what we do on a weekly basis, but tonight we really felt like we made some positive strides in our overall game.” Hawkins is assisted by coaches Shawn Radar, Tyler Thrasher and Clint Duchow. Hawkins said the team struggled with things in Friday’s game they knew they would struggle with from lack of experience, but felt they made real progress during practice afterward. “We get that as a team, we have a lot of room for improvement. The players see that, and they are really coachable guys. We agreed, the more practice we have, the more games we get to play in, the better this team is going to get,” said Hawkins. The Tigers play another non conference game Friday, Sept. 11 when they host Lake Roosevelt. The game begins at 7 p.m. Katie Teachout/staff photo

Midfielder Ashlynn Willis scrambles to keep the ball in play and away from the Bulldogs during Saturday’s (Sept. 5) jamboree game against Okanogan.

Tigers win one, lose one at jamboree BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Vance Frazier-Leslie practices throwing the ball Thursday, Sept. 3. Frazier-Leslie was the quarterback in the Tigers game at Warden Friday, Sept. 4. Also pictured are, left to right, Head Coach Jay Hawkins, assistant coach Shawn Radar and assistant coach Clint Duchow.

Tonasket traveled to Okanogan for a soccer jamboree Saturday, Sept. 5, coming away with a 2-0 win over Omak and a 1-0 loss to Okanogan. “The game was real competitive, with possession of the ball equal throughout,” said Okanogan Coach Dean Klepec. “That’s what we expect to see all season; we will have some real competitive games with Tonasket all season long.” Okanogan junior Alexis Jones scored the goal for the Bulldogs. “We had possession of the ball more, we just didn’t get a lot of shots,” said Tonasket goal keeper Madison Gariano. The audience applauded Gariano,

a sophomore, several times for consistently keeping the ball out of the net. In the game against Omak, eighth-grader Heidi Cruz, playing forward, scored the first goal with an assist by senior Rose Walts. Midfielder Ashlynn Willis, a junior, scored the second goal. In the third game of the jamboree, Okanogan beat Omak 3-0; with goals scored by Rachelle Hamilton, Keanna Egbert and Brianna Cox. “We’ve only been outside a week, so it’s nice to get out and see how the game is going to go,” said Omak Head Coach Chris Werner. “Tonasket is going to be one of the tougher teams in the B league.” The Tigers are led by Head Coach Darren Collins and Assistant Coach Todd Mathews.

Katie Teachout/staff photo Katie Teachout/staff photo

Christian Garcia-Herrera practices a rushing play Thursday, Sept. 3 before going on to score the only touchdown the next day in the first game of the season, at Warden. Garcia-Herrera scored with a 40-yard run.

Eighth grader Heidi Cruz (jersey #8) gets the ball past several Pioneers and into the net with an assist from Rose Walts (far right) during Saturday’s (Sept. 5) jamboree game against Omak.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

BUSINESS

Gary De Von/staff photos

Stockpiles of lumber at Oroville Reman & Reload. The company’s footprint in Oroville has grown by 11 acres in the past two years and continues to grow with a recent purchase of more land that they hope to develop for their wood products production.

Oroville Reman & Reload looking to grow its business in Oroville

Left, sorting boards by hand, however, most of the sorting is done automatically by machine. Remain and Reload employs between 80 and 100 people, but the company is always looking for more good employees. The machine above sorts and grades wood using the latest in computerized equipment as it travels along a conveyer belt. BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Oroville Reman & Reload is not only looking to grow its business in Oroville, it continually is striving to hire more local people. They’d like to be around 100 people, a number they’ve come close to recently, according to Will Verner, operations manager. However near the beginning of summer they were at 89 employees. The company, which is part of the B.C-based Gorman Brothers Company, has grown in volume of the timber products they produce, as well as in size, said Verner. “We have purchased 11 acres of land in two years, including two warehouse buildings on the north side of the tracks that we have put machines in,” said Verner. The company does things like take two inch rough boards and plane or saw them into one inch boards for their parent company and Gorman Brothers does the marketing. They also take boards and run them through their molder. Company-wide 40 percent of their products are sold into the U.S. domestic market, for Reman

and Reload, it’s more like 80 percent, according to Verner. “Gorman Brothers has some overseas sales, they sell into about 28 countries,” he said. Some of the boards are used

“Obviously we are looking for more people to hire, it is difficult to find people who want to come to work five days a week.” Will Verner, Operations Manager Oroville Reman & Reload

for decking and some are used for rig matting in the oilfields. Other products the company makes include chipping for animal bedding, the shavings from Reman and Reload go to Princeton to a co-generator and some come back on trucks for animal bedding and wood pellets and the company loads them on to railcars for shipment. The company also does edge gluing and finger joining to make larger boards

from pieces that otherwise would be scrapped. The company is diversified and has to be because things can change in a hurry, according to Verner. “The housing crisis didn’t have an affect on us, we didn’t see a big drop off because we don’t do dimensional lumber, we do special, custom cutting,” he said. Located along Oroville’s railhead, Reload and Reman sends out 11 railroad cars a week. The company runs two eight-hour shifts, from 6 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and from 3:00 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. “Obviously we are looking for more people to hire, it is difficult to find people who want to come to work five days a week. We’ve grown from 50 employees to nearly 100,” he said. Recently they have been doing a test project with Zosel Lumber, also located in Oroville. Zosel has been milling pine logs and running custom cuts for the company. “Last year they also did some stuff for us that they got from the Colvilles. It created employment for them and gave us additional customers. They are local in Oroville and we are excited about it,” he said.


SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NORTH COUNTY-OPOLY New book listens for echoes of railroad’s past Elva Helm takes Floyd Rise’s collection of stories and photos and compiles into new Highland history BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Elva Helm, local historian and author, has added to the several Okanogan Highland-themed books that have been coming out from various authors since 1962, with the release of Highland Railroad Echoes: Great Northern Railway 1905-1936. The book brings together many

“I’m glad it’s done.... Floyd had all the stories, but I had to do a lot of research to bring them all together.” Elva Helm, Author Molson Museum Association

of the stories and photographs collected by Floyd Rise over the years. Helm said he had a lug full of old notebooks and she sort of got volunteered to put them together in book form. It is a pictorial history of the railway line between Marcus, Wash. (now under water, she says) and Princeton, B.C., with the focus on Molson, west to Chopaka and east to Curlew. It is presented by the Molson Museum Association, which will use any profits to fund the Schoolhouse Museum and Old Molson Museum. “I’m glad It’s done,” said Helm, “It took me most of June,

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Dolly Englebretson and Cindy Nelson show off the cover art for a board game they will be selling as a fundraiser for the Oroville Grange Club. Nelson said the artwork is not quite complete, but features a prospector, a hornet, Okanogan Smith, orchards, Lake Osoyoos, Highways 97 and 3 (in Canada) and even Number Mountain. Nelson will be selling spaces or properties on the board to local merchants and groups, similar to the classic board game Monopoly. Once completed, the board games will feature the businesses and groups from Oroville and Tonasket and the surrounding areas. Nelson, who hails from Newport, Wash. did a similar game in Pend Oreille County. “I sold $7250 worth in 11 days. These are great advertising and the boards will be around for years,” she said. Sales start Thursday. The fundraiser will help the Grange do things like fund student scholarships, buy turkeys at Christmas for the food bank and fix the heating and cooling at the Grange Hall.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Highland Railroad Echoes: Great Northern Railway 1905 - 1936, written by Elva Helm from the collection of Floyd Rise and presented by the Molson Museum Association. Sales of the book will go toward the upkeep of the Molson Schoolhouse and Old Molson museums. July and August. Floyd had all the stories, but I had to do a lot of research to bring them all together.” Helm said she used information from the sources in front of her and online. “Floyd lives in Tonasket and he had this collection and I bet it took him three years to get it done. He had taken the collection to Molson, and someone offered to help, but that didn’t work out and I got a call from Barbara Dart saying she would help me – she got me going and gave me some good ideas,” said Helm. Not only did Helm put the collection together as a book, but she used online tools including word processing and photography programs, to actually do the

publishing herself. After it was all put together she took it to Havillah Road Printing to turn it into an actual book. “We made 100 and they are for sale for $20 at the Molson Schoolhouse Museum,” she said. Since the museum closed after Labor Day, Mary Louise Loe said she would also take orders if you call her at 509-485-3292. She said Dick’s Pharmacy in Oroville has also agreed to stock the book. On the back cover are images of other Highland area publications, including the Okanogan Highland Echoes from 1962, which covered the Molson, Chesaw and Knob Hill Communities as did, Okanogan Highland Families from 1975 and the Okanogan Highland Album from 1987.

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PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 10 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • September 10, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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Houses For Sale

For Rent

TONASKET. OLD ORCHARD ESTATES SUBDIVISION 2 bedroom, 2 bath, full basement, expressive looking home. Home to have fresh outside paint, new lower level carpet, new bushes and ready to move in soon. $145,000. Call Jan at 509-486-1397.

Oroville Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bath with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Hillside Park Senior Apartments

For Rent

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

OROVILLE LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $435 per month. 509-476-3145

Auctions HUGE RANCH EQUIPMENT AUCTION SATURDAY OCT. 3, 2015 @ 10:00 a.m. 2470 Glenmore Rd North, Kelowna BC Tractors, Forklifts, Haying Equipment Grader, Back hoe, Pick up truck Shop full of Welding equipment Cattle handling equipment Check out our website for full listings @ www.bclivestock.bc.ca FMI phone 250-573-3939

Crosswords

AVAILABLE RENTALS $1,495 4BR 3BA Lake Osoyoos 1 level home, family rm, garage w/shop. $810 2BR + Den, 2BA Open Concept. $795; 2BR Sonora Shores deluxe condo. $825; 3BR, 2BA Lake Osoyoos Apt. $425; Cute 1BR Apt.

Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 24. It has points in Arizona

8. Most unhappy

25. Approval (hyphenated)

9. Donnybrooks

27. Less inept 28. Carve in stone

10. Printed sheet of paper folded three times

29. Nipper

11. This (pl.)

32. Flat highland

12. Personnel director

34. Endocrine gland secretion

13. Mails

37. Undertake, with “out”

15. Fox hunt cry (hyphenated)

38. Advocate

20. Put off, as a motion

40. Red fluorescent dye

21. Ceremonial splendor

41. Mel Gibson, e.g.

22. “Let it stand”

43. Aimless

24. Beanies

44. Hitchcock classic

26. Advil target

47. Galore

28. 100 cents in Belgium

49. Polar cover

29. Place

50. Clip

30. Ally

51. Spuds

31. Confined, with “up”

52. Person to whom a promise is made

33. Postmortem

57. Emotionally attached 58. Knowledgeable about books 59. Dispatch

ANSWERS

Across

60. Put off

1. Single-mast sailing vessels

Down

15. Computer whiz

2. ___ king (cooking, 2 wds)

16. Secured with wood strips

3. “Sesame Street” watcher

17. Acting by turns

4. “Wanna ___?”

18. Go through

5. Instrumental introduction in an opera

Think Green!

39. Wrestle 41. Highlight

44. Spiel

1. Hack

23. Simple tools utilizing a fulcrum

36. “September ___” (Neil Diamond hit)

43. “Jo’s Boys” author

14. Burn treatment (2 wds)

20. Having a will

35. One who buys back promissory notes

42. Battlefield shout

9. Similar to butterflies

19. Let

Health General

45. La ___, Italian opera house 46. Abominable snowmen 48. Romeo’s rival 53. Bank offering, for short 54. Gabriel, for one

6. Lover of Dido, in myth

55. .0000001 joule

7. Milk-Bone biscuit, e.g.

56. Vision organ

Did you know?

We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper recycled for

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee / supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: We have the following opportunities available: OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred Patient Registration Rep. Full time. OMAK MEDICAL: Patient Accounts Rep. Full time BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: Patient Registration Full time, Bilingual required. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

TWISP MEDICAL: MA-R Full time Roomer Full time. Bilingual required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer. Subscribe to the...

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Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

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Help Wanted Carrier Wanted: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract delivery route. Please call 509-476-3602, ext 5050 / 3050 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

FREE NAC Class North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning October 5, 2015. This class will be completed in November. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human resources office or online at www.nvhospital.org. This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be accepted after September 18, 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185.

Garage & Yard Sale OROVILLE. ~HUGE YARD SALE~ Trinity Episcopal Church 604 Central Ave (in alley). Friday, Sept 11th ~ noon to 6pm Saturday, Sept 12th ~ 9am to 4pm NO EARLY SALES!

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Garage & Yard Sale Oroville Fall Clearance sidewalk sale 20% to 30% off selected items. Thurs. Sept. 10th and Fri. Sept 11th. Four Season Thrift 1420 Main St. 10am to 6pm

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 7, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4,397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In Stock, ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N EMPLOYMENT Seeking Area Coordinator. Manage successful tutoring program in your area. We will provide all back room expenses/payroll. Great business opportunity for dedicated entrepreneur.1-800-293-3091 AcademicTutoringService@gmail.com HELP WANTED RN’s up to $45/hr; LPN’s up to $37.50/hr; CNA’s up to $22.50/hr; Free gas/weekly pay $2000 Bonus AACO Nursing Agency 1-800-6564414 Ext. 4 HELP WANTED CHS-CONNELL GRAIN, Connell, WA, is seeking a qualified General Manager. This successful cooperative is a multi-location grain, feed, and seed cooperative serving members in SE Washington. Successful agricultural business management and grain experience desired. To apply (www.CHSInc.com): For more info contact Larry Fuller, 701-2209775 or email larry.fuller@chsinc.com-CHS is an EO/AA/M/F/V/D employer. HELP WANTED LEWIS AND CLARK TERMINAL at Lewiston, ID is seeking a qualified General Manager. This is a river grain loading facility offering grain storage, blending, and barge loading. Grain handling as well as financial and personal management experience required. Apply to: http://tinyurl.com/nbek97t - For more information contact Dave Lemmon, 320-283-5938 or Email david.lemmon@chsinc.com.

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Puzzle 40 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

ANSWERS

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Sponsored by

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509-476-3602

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Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

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Puzzle 45 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.63)

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Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 44 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

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Puzzle 47 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

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Puzzle 42 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.69)

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Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.38)

www.gazette-tribune.com

8

1420 Main St.  P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602  866-773-7818

4

PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 845 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington, adding Chapter 8.10 to Title 8 of the Oroville Municipal Code regulating littering within the City and setting an effective date.

2

Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

9

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 9/15/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1975 Ford F250 Lic# C36750A Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 10, 2015. #OVG655634

1

The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the September 1, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 10, 2015. #OVG656000

3

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 9/15/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1993 Subaru Loyale SW Lic# AVG8959 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 10, 2015. #OVG654381

Sudoku 9

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 9/15/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2013 Volkswagen TRG Lic# K498047 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 10, 2015. #OVG655777

Public Notices

8

Continued from previous page

Public Notices

PAGE B5 5

4

Public Notices

7

SEPTEMBER 10 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE September 10, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS Home Staging Tips

If you’re putting your home on the market, home staging is an important element in preparing your home for sale. The idea is to spruce up inside and outside and pack away personal items that may distract a buyer. One family’s keepsakes are another family’s clunkers, so pack away cute photos, unusual artwork and accessories, and replace tired towels, bedding and curtains. Clean out overstuffed closets so they look roomier.

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Very nice home on 1.12 acres! This 2 bedroom home features a bright and cheerful kitchen, master bed with walk-in closet, ceramic tile and ceiling fans! Spacious fully-fenced yard with OTID irrigation, sprinkler system, RV parking and 2 car detached garage. Close to town, views of Lake Osoyoos and city water...this home has it all and is move-in ready! MLS#735699 $200,000

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

SUN 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA LAKES 509-476-2121 REALTY Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

LAKE OSOYOOS HOME, sandy beach, oak floors, Master Bedrm on lakeside, 2 baths, double garageOozes Charm & Wonderful Location

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

$358,900

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee Panoramic spectacular view of the river and hills. One level living,3 bedroom 2 bath home with open floor plan. Glass French doors open up to office with built in desk. Garden tub in master bath. Main bathroom remodeled with new countertop and backsplash.. New tile floors in kitchen, laundry room and bathrooms. Hardwood floor in main living area. Fenced backyard with playhouse/swing set in sandbox area. 2 storage sheds, 10X16 and 8X12. Private driveway shared with neighbor. NWML#800155 $184,900

WATERFRONT LOT

on Golden Beach in Oro Beach Resort, 2 lots Included, both Lots have All Services Installed! Call on $98,900

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Building Supplies

Concrete

Equipment Rental

MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

Quality Supplies Since 1957

Midway Building Supply

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RENTAL RENTAL RENTAL

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149  Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

Hidden Treasures Bridal Registry  Kitchen Gadgets Candles  Gifts  Collectibles

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Marylou’s Something for Everyone!

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Oroville Building Supply

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11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Paint Sprayers n Bobcat Bobcatexcavators, Excavators excavators,n scissor lifts, Bobcat excavators, scissor lifts, Bobcat scissor lifts, n All Contractor n Scissor Lifts Z booms, reach forklift, Z booms, reach forklift, Party Z booms, forklift,Party Party n Z Booms Rental, tents,tables, tables, Equipment chairs, Rental, tents, chairs, paint Rental, tents, chairs,paint paint n Call Today! n Reach Forklift sprayers all contractor sprayers all contractor equipment. sprayers all contractorequipment. equipment. PARTY RENTALS: 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tents, Tables, Chairs & More!

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Tonasket Tonasket Tonasket 509-486-2888

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140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory


PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

OBITUARIES

Dennis Neil Barnett

DENNIS NEIL BARNETT

Dennis Neil Barnett, age 58 of Oroville, died on August 28, 2015 at home in Oroville. He was born February 13, 1957 in Tonasket to parents Louis and Mary Lou Barnett. Dennis never had a dull moment in his life and had numerous jobs including; logging, orchard work, installing cabinets, selling boiled peanuts and lemonade and his favorite, working on the shrimp boats out of Georgia. He had many crazy stories to tell about each and every one of them. Dennis loved his home, family, children and grandkids. His hobbies included fishing, hunting, camping, riding bikes and generally anything outdoors. No one ever saw Dennis without a smile on his face. He enjoyed making people happy and was very generous to every-

one he knew. Dennis is survived by his parents Mary Lou and Louie Barnett of Oroville, his children Jennifer Barnett, Jacob Barnett, Johnny Barnett, Justin Barnett, Jerimiah Barnett all of Spokane and Taylor Davis of Oroville, sister Ruth Wick of Springdale, Wash., brother Charles Barnett of Oroville and 11 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by one sister Carol Cockle. A Celebration of Life with potluck will be held on Saturday, September 12, 2015 at 12:00 noon at the Oroville Eagles. Please bring a dish and come with memories and pictures. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements.

BEVERLY A. HUNT

Secretary of the 9 Mile Ranch HOA. Surviving relatives are her husband Eldon Hunt, her mother Agnus Lizama, children Marcella Hunt, David Hunt, Lisa Melville, John Halligan and Michelle Halligan, brother Gary Lizama and sister Sandy Nash, six grandchildren and five great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her father, Andrew Lizama At Beverly’s request no services will be held. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements.

Beverly A. Hunt, age 72 of Oroville, died on Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She was born January 27, 1943 in San Diego, Calif. Beverly and her husband moved to Seattle in 1980. She retired and moved to Oroville in 1998. She was a loving and caring wife and mother. She helped many troubled teens during her life. She will be missed by many. God bless Beverly, Rest in Peace. Beverly was Past Treasurer and

Beverly A. Hunt

Out on the Town...

DINING

Manuel Garcia Jr.

Manuel Garcia Jr. Manny was born on Sept. 19, 1941 in San Diego, Texas. He attended Grade School in Banquette, Texas and High School in Alice, Texas. He joined the Army in 1960 and received an Honorable

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OKANOGAN – The Okanogan County PUD is warning its customers to be on alert for new phone scams targeting Okanogan PUD customers and businesses in Okanogan County. “Threats come from aggressive

number of 509-422-3310 to verify your account information. Report suspicious calls to the lead agencies investigating nationwide scams: The Washington State Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-551-4636 or the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-3824357. “Keeping our ratepayers safe is of the utmost importance. As scams are discovered, the Okanogan PUD will post current information on our website at www.okanoganpud.org,” they write.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Prime Rib every Sat.

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Ph. 509-486-2828

1307 Main Street, Oroville 509.476.3007

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Restaurant

HOURS:

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

Bar

12 noon - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. ——— CLOSED ——— ——— CLOSED ——— 12 noon - 9 p.m. - 10 p.m. 12 noon - 9 p.m. - Close 12 noon - 9 p.m. - Close 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. - 8 p.m.

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

THURSDAY SMOKED RIBEYE SPECIAL $17.50 Served from 6 p.m. until gone

Please allow 30 - 40 minutes for your order Check “PASTIME BAR AND GRILL - Oroville” on Facebook for upcoming specials!

Dine on the Veranda overlooking Lake Osoyoos

Fabulous Burgers, Fresh Cut Fries & Shakes

DINER

Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday from Noon to 7 p.m.

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Healthcare Services Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 OPTICAL

Toll free: 866-826-6191 www.okbhc.org

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

 Behavioral

Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

CLINIC

 Radiology

• Mental Health • Chemical Dependency • Developmental Disorders • Psychiatric Services • Therapeutic Housing

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Physician-owned and patient-centered

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Services

In Tonasket & Oroville

OMAK

Join us for Sunday Brunch

Bloody Mary Bar & Mimosas 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. PASTIME to go call 476-3007

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

Advertise your specials and events here!

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

callers stating they are from the Okanogan PUD and that immediate payment is needed with a credit or debit card to avoid a service disconnect. Please be advised that these calls are not from the Okanogan PUD,” writes the utility in a recent press release. The utility advises protecting oneself from high pressure, aggressive scam artists by not giving out any personal financial information. If you receive a suspicious phone call regarding your power bill, hang up and call the Okanogan PUDs main phone

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Easter at the VA Hospital in Spokane, Wash. after a short illness. There will be a celebration of his life in Oroville, Wash. at the American Legion 1105 Apple Way Ave. on Saturday, September 19, 2015 from 1-4 p.m. Music and a light snack will be provided.

PUD warns of phone scam

& Entertainment Bonaparte

Discharge in 1963. Shortly after that he met Wanda Kitterman and her daughter Holly Burke. When they married in 1965 the three became a family and began their life together in Oroville, Wash. They soon welcomed the twins Michael and Mitchel Garcia in 1966 and 1971 they had another son Kory Garcia. Manny worked for many years at the Post Office in Oroville. He played Base Guitar in the evenings at many local events and music halls to support his family. He also worked in many of the Apple Sheds driving truck and delivering apples all over the Pacific Northwest. Later in life he worked for the US Border Patrol in Calexico, Calif. where he received an Outstanding Performance Rating for discovering drugs being smuggled into the U.S. He passed away the day before

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Advertise In The

Eastlake Road, Oroville

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

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826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050


Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 10, 2015