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Smokey Point: Explosion of homes, shops, 4

Growing trend Women own more farms than ever in county, 5-7 SEPTEMBER 2015 | VOL. 19, NO. 6

Supplement to The Daily Herald

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Looking for a business loan? We’re looking for ways to say yes. DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Cheryl Dillon started her Be Well Farms in Lake Stevens as a second career .

COVER STORY

Fashionable dog-collar makers get discovered on social media . . . . . . 15

More women than ever before own farms in Snohomish County, 5-7

Job fair aims to help connect jobseekers with careers . . . . . . . . . 16

BUSINESS NEWS

BUSINESS BUILDERS

New developments reshape Smokey Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Vietnam refugee builds beauty college powerhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Lynnwood Convention Center general manager keeps momentum going . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

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Sven Mogelgaard: Microsoft’s Windows 10 a hit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Monika Kristofferson Tackling your desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

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James McCusker: Lessons to be learned from the Wright brothers . 19

McMenamins hires cadre of artists for Bothell project . . . . . . . . .11-12

BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Everett immigration laywer helps businesses in U.S. and Canada . . . 14

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 24-25

• • • • •

PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . 22

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 26-27

Manufacturing Commercial Construction Commercial Real Estate Residential Construction Professional Practice (Attorneys, Accountants, Dentists, etc.)

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Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

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Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, John Wolcott, Deanna Duff, Jocelyn Robinson Contributing Columnists: James McCusker, Monika Kristofferson, Sven Mogelgaard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Be Well Fams owner Cheryl Dillon uses a 1957 Massey Ferguson tractor to plow her leased fields in Lake Stevens. Dan Bates / The Herald

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425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal.

Helping small business fight to win. 1396818


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Building boom hits Smokey Point Shops, hundreds of apartments opening this fall By John Wolcott

For The Herald Business Journal

The same developers who built the Mill Creek Town Center and Snohomish Station are building a 1.6 million-squarefoot project in the Smokey Point area that will bring a new wave of shops and apartments. The project includes a 910,000-squarefoot shopping center called The Marketplace and 723,000 square feet of mixed use space that will include multifamily apartments called The Lodge. The development is expected to open this fall on the north side of 172nd Street NE. Bellevue developers Steve Malsam and Len Evans are teaming up on the project. “We are very excited with our newest center, following our Mill Creek Town Center and Snohomish Station developments,” Malsam said. “With our highend multi-family projects at Lakewood, we will be creating a unique mixed-use project that the Marysville community will be proud of. The city of Marysville has been very helpful in putting all of this together.” Malsam declined to place a monetary value on the entire development. Tenants for the The Marketplace include Dick’s Sporting Goods as a major anchor, along with Party City, Hop Jack’s restaurant, Outback Steakhouse and Bonefish, which will share the same grill in a single building, plus a Hobby Lobby, T-Mobile, Aveda Hair Salon and a Qdoba Mexican restaurant. City inspectors are expected to give approval in September for the Dick’s Sporting Goods to open, but it will likely take a couple more months for staff to be hired and trained. The Lodge includes 182 apartments that are leasing now; a second phase with another eight buildings and 160 apartments will undergo construction in the spring. Another developer, The Island

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Several new stores and restaurants are expected to open in a 910,000-square-foot shopping center at Smokey Point, including Dick’s Sporting Goods, Outback Steakhouse, Hop Jack’s, Bonefish and Qdoba. The project is on the north side of 172nd Street NE across from Lakewood Cross shopping center.

The Vintage, a 55-and-older community, is one of two large apartment projects opening at Smokey Point adding hundreds of new homes to the area.

Group in Spokane, is building The Vintage, 187 apartments adjacent to the shopping center. Those units are aimed at people 55 and older. The Vintage will provide needed diversity in housing for north Snohomish County, said Sydney Parmalee, senior

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community director for the project. “There’s no other independent senior living building in the area,” she said. “We’re already pre-leasing space ahead of the completed construction. The first units should be available in late September in both one- and two-bedroom styles.” The Vintage will include common areas with a mini-mart, theater, social room library and other facilities. The development has four-story buildings. The Lodge Apartments are due to be ready in late September. The development consists of one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments, with contemporary conveniences in a lodge environment, including a pool and a community center with a fireplace. Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring said he welcomes the innovative major retail and housing development at Smokey Point. “People want to shop locally so we continue to diversify to give them more commercial opportunities to shop in Marysville and keep spending in town,” Nehring said. “We have a vibrant community and the new housing here will

serve seniors as well as families. ” Nehring noted that the new development is across the street from the well-established Lakewood Crossing shopping center, anchored by Best Buy, Costco, Target and a variety of other stores. “We’re very cognizant of the fact that this development will create more traffic and that has to be dealt with,” he said. “With the state, we’re planning an Interstate 5 interchange where an overpass was built a few years ago at 156th Street NE and we may eventually add a new road south of 172nd Street NE but these projects are years away yet.” In the meantime, the city will be doing some traffic signal improvements at 27th Avenue and along the Highway 531 frontage road and the developer will be installing a roundabout on 172nd Street NE, Nehring said. Marysville planning manager Chris Holland said plans call for re-routing 25th Avenue to move its intersection with 172nd St. NE farther from the congested entrance to Lakewood Crossing. Malsam and Evans have a highly successful history in commercial and housing developments in the Puget Sound area as well as Snohomish County. Malsam launched Malsam Development Corp. in 1991, developing multi-family housing projects in Redmond, Kirkland and Issaquah. Evans is president of The Evans Co., which owns or manages 530,000 square feet of office space and more than 120,000 square feet of commercial space in Bellevue, Redmond and Woodinville. He’s also involved in ownership of a variety of companies, including Bellevue Helicopters, Evans Films, Evans Energy and Evans Center, a 30,000-square-foot retail and industrial complex in Bellevue. In 1996, the developers formed Wakefield, a real estate company that built the Mill Creek Town Center, Snohomish Station and 500 apartments in Marysville for the U.S. Navy.


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COVER STORY

Cheryl Dillon comes in from the outer fields on her tractor, a 1957 Massey Ferguson. Not all the plants Dillon grows on the farm are for the marketplace. The plants are grown for their value to the soil, attraction to desirable insects such as ladybugs and bees, and other such reasons.

The joy of farming

One in three Snohomish County farms are now owned by women, after years of steady growth

B

rown grasses of winter cover County run by women in 2012, accordmuch of the 7 ½-acre patch ing to the USDA Census of Agriculture. of land in Lake Stevens that is That’s up from 31 percent in 2007 and 26 Cheryl Dillon’s Be Well Farm. percent in 2002. Closer inspection Nationally, the reveals hidden wealth number of women — a bright-green row Story by Jennifer Sasseeen farmers has also been of mustard greens rising, but at a much • and the darker, purslower rate and with ple-green leaves of a slight dip between Photos by Dan Bates kale. There are sun2007 and 2012. Fourchokes and leeks, parsnips, carrots and teen percent of 2.1 million U.S. farms onions. were run by women in 2012, with higher Dillon bends and plucks a flower from numbers on the East and West coasts and the tip of a mustard green at her knee, lower in the Midwest. popping it in her mouth and inviting her Like their male counterparts, women visitor to do the same. It tastes of spring- farmers are increasingly older. The avertime — fresh and crisp, with a lingering age age of women farmers in Snohomish sweetness. County was 54.1 years in 2007 and 56.5 In her fourth year of farming, Dillon, in 2012, compared to 60.1 nationwide in 55, is part of a growing wealth of women 2012. who seem to be embracing farming as a For women, that upward trend in age second career. may be partially a result of coming to Locally the number of women respon- farming as a second career. Some women sible for day-to-day farm operations has in the 55-plus age category, retired from been increasing for more than a decade, white-collar careers, may have dreamed with 33 percent of farms in Snohomish about farming as a form of retirement,

On her Be Well Farm at the west edge of Lake Stevens, Dillon cuts some flowery tops from early kale plants. If eaten soon after cutting, they’re surprisingly sweet and tender.

speculated Paul Gleason, resource conservationist with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service in Lake Stevens. “These are people who kind of want to step back from the rat-race,” he said, “and do something more romantic.” Dillon voiced a similar sentiment.

“You do what you do to support your family and then you get to a point where you do what you’re passionate about,” she said. “And that’s kind of where I’m at.” A country girl who’d often “wished I could have been born in pioneer days,” Continued on Page 6


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Continued from Page 5

Dillon grew up in Oregon and moved to this area as a young woman, working for years in real estate and raising three daughters. Now single, she lives in Edmonds and leases her farmland off Lake Stevens’ Sunnyside Boulevard from Joseph Heineck, who bought the land 50 years ago and with his wife, Peggy, still lives in the farmhouse. Dillon uses an old shipping container for storage, which, along with a porta-potty, perches on the slope below Heineck’s bright-red barn, listed on the state’s site of historic barns. Bales of hay can be seen through the windows; Dillon met Heineck buying hay for her horse, pastured in a neighboring farmer’s field. How she came to farming is the story of a series of unpredictable events. First she lost her mother to cancer, Dillon said. Then she had a cancer scare of her own, with tumors that led to a hysterectomy; the tumors proved benign, but Dillon had six weeks off work and a lot of time to think and read. Though she’d always eaten a lot of fruits and vegetables, Dillon said, “I discovered that I was very ignorant, I was very unaware of organics.” The more she read, the more she felt her calling. “I just found I was really passionate about food and wanting to make a difference,” she said. The next step for Dillon was Mother Nature’s Organics, a food-delivery service she started in May 2008, delivering local farmers’ organic produce to customers, with the idea of working in real estate at least part time while running her business. But it was 2008 and the financial crisis was coming to a head. None of her houses were closing, Dillon said, “and I thought, well, I might as well just devote all my time and energy to this.” Heineck had mentioned he was thinking of leasing some land and Dillon took him up on it, first supplementing farmers’ Community Supported Agriculture boxes with some of her own produce, and recently deciding to go it alone as Be Well Farm. “I want to be known as a farm,” she said, “and not as an organic delivery service.” As women like Dillon turn to farming, agricultural programs are becoming increasingly focused on giving them practical information to help them succeed, said Linda Neunzig, Snohomish County agricultural coordinator who also owns and runs the 50-acre Ninety Farms in

On the Be Well Farm, temporary workers, Sarah Hirt (right) and Amanda Wang help with the early spring planting. Wang is from Seattle, and Hirt, along with her husband, Marcos Gallo. who is also working, live in Missouri.

“It was all about how to be the wife of a farmer. I was so insulted by that first conference.” — Linda Neunzig on a farming seminar in Wenatchee 10 years ago Arlington. That’s a big change from just 10 years when Neunzig went to her first women’s agricultural conference in Wenatchee “It was all about how to be the wife of a farmer,” she said, adding, “I was so insulted by that first conference.” Nowadays, women’s agricultural conferences are geared toward such topics as business plans and marketing tools, while outlets like farmers’ markets help feed the “eat local” movement and garner respect for farmers, male and female alike.

“When I started farming on my own, it wasn’t cool to be a farmer,” said the 52-year-old Neunzig. Attitudes have evolved as the farm-totable movement gathers steam; Neunzig credits local chefs with helping to create consumer interest in where food comes from and how it gets there. Neunzig herself has been a leader in the movement and has received national recognition. A farmer since the early 1990s — after a seven-year stint working as a licensed veterinarian technician at

UC Davis — she’s been featured in Gourmet Magazine and won a “Women Who Inspire” award from the Women Chefs and Restaurateurs Organization. She’s also been a three-time U.S. delegate to Terra Madre in Italy, an annual meeting of a network of food communities representing some 150 countries and committed to producing quality food in a responsible, sustainable way. Her short-haired Katahdin Hair Sheep, raised for their meat rather than the wool of more common sheep, supply Seattle-area restaurants and other customers with grass-fed lamb and are shipped around the world as breeding stock. Developed in Maine during the second half of the 20th Century, Katahdin Hair Sheep barely numbered in the thousands when she started raising them, Neunzig said, but are now the fastest-growing segment of sheep population in the country.

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The 150 to 175 lambs born each year at Ninety Farms are born in the winter so they will be at least two months old in the spring and can take full advantage of the lush, nutrient-rich grass of the season, Neunzig said. They are raised hormone- and antibiotic-free and all their manure is composted and spread back on the land. The fields are harvested to provide feed, animals are butchered on-site and consumers can buy meat on weekends at the Ninety Farms’ store. “Everything stays as close to home as possible,” Neunzig said. According to the USDA, farms run by women tend to be not only smaller, but more diverse. Like Neunzig’s, they are more likely to focus on specialized livestock or, like Dillon’s, on a variety of produce items. “I like to grow more unusual things,” Dillon said, “things you don’t always find in the store.” That can range from 10 different kinds of winter and summer squash, to sunchokes, also called Jerusalem artichokes, to purple tomatillos. She prefers heirloom varieties, she said. Snohomish County’s proximity to Seattle, and the proliferation of farmers’ markets throughout the region, has a lot to do with the success of its small farmers. “Farmers are rock stars at the farmer’s markets,” Neunzig said, and it doesn’t take a lot of land to make a difference. “When you’re doing produce,” she said, referring to farmers like Dillon, “6 acres can feed a lot of people.” Like Neunzig, Dillon believes in keeping things natural and close to home. She

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

As the sun sinks low toward the end of another very warm day, Heidi Johnson Sandall, right, and her young daughter help Dillon with some planting.

adds minerals to the soil by spreading lime and kelp, and by rotating cover crops like crimson clover. Though she is not pursuing the “organic” label for now because it costs too much, she believes produce should be grown without pesticides, purchased locally and produced locally throughout the year. “If you go to France, they grow fresh

vegetables year-round,” she said, “and we have a very similar climate.” With that in mind and with the aid of a federal grant, Dillon recently put up a 2,200-square-foot “hoop house,” a type of greenhouse also referred to as a “high tunnel,” on the land she leases from Heineck. Dillon is excited about the hoop house. “It’s really going to help us extend our

season,” she said. Farming is hard work, but Dillon said she is strong and healthy — “probably from all that organic food” — and doesn’t mind. “I love working in the dirt,” she said, “and that’s my passion.” Such passion seems almost a requirement in farming. As Neunzig said, “It’s too hard of work to do it and not love it a bunch.”

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Creating beauty and changing lives ‘Mama Thi’ creates beauty school that now has three campuses By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

Buzzing blowdryers and snipping shears are the daily melody at Evergreen Beauty College. The Everett campus, one of three in the Puget Sound, enrolls around 130 students annually. The 11,000-square-foot space pulses with sounds of instruction, hard work and camaraderie. There is one refrain, however, that rises above all the rest. “Mama Thi!” Thi Trieu is Evergreen’s owner and much-loved matriarch. She sets the tone with unwavering enthusiasm and encouragement. New students are personally welcomed. Some are second-generation and Trieu shares memories of their parents. A steady stream of graduates drops by to say hi. “I am so proud of you. Where are you now, Jessica?” Trieu asks a young woman who shares news about her latest house and 4-year-old daughter. “Good. You can stay home for a week or two more, but then back to work. If you call me Mom, I will act like your mother.” Trieu says with laughter. The school is founded on the idea of family. Trieu and her late husband opened Evergreen’s first outpost in Lynnwood in 1996 with a class of just 16 students. Nearly 20 years later, the school offers four primary curriculum tracks: cosmetology, esthetics, nails and instructor training. Companywide, upward of 300 students register annually. The Everett location opened in 2002 and some individuals commute daily from as far as Blaine, Tacoma and Bremerton. Other locations are in Renton and Bellevue. “What I hear most often is that students see Evergreen as their family. They feel safe here,” Trieu says. “We all bring our strengths and weaknesses and different experiences. It’s that mix that makes our lives better.” Trieu is a role model for navigating adversity. She was one of nine children in her family born and raised in Vietnam. She pursued a career in teaching because “children are the promise for our future.” In 1975, South Vietnam fell to communist North Vietnam and her family was forced to flee. “My parents already immigrated from North to South Vietnam in 1955 because of communism,” Trieu says. “They knew what was coming. They told us (in 1975) that we might only have a 1 percent chance of surviving if we left, but at least it was something.” Barefoot and without belongings, the family landed at a refugee camp in the Guam Islands. Trieu walked on cardboard to protect her feet from the scorching ground. Shortly thereafter, she and her brother were sponsored to attend Oklahoma University and her remaining fam-

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Thi Trieu started Evergreen Beauty College in 1996 and now has locations in Everett, Renton and Bellevue. Her college teaches hundreds of students each year and now some second-generation students.

“This is a beautiful profession. I raised my family doing this and believe it makes a difference.” — Thi Trieu

Students practice their craft at the Evergreen Beauty College in Everett. An estimated 200 graduates of the college have started their own salons.

ily relocated to Everett. They all reunited in 1976 and Trieu continued her studies at Everett Community College. “I was adventurous, so I wasn’t scared at the time. From that (experience) and my parents, I learned to always appreciate things whatever may come,” Trieu says. After initially pursuing nursing, Trieu switched to cosmetology. The dream of owning her own business afforded a sense of independence and more time with her family. Her parents were initially skeptical. “For some, beauty is seen as a second-class career for those who don’t have a good education,” Trieu observes. “I tell the students that we need to carry ourselves and serve the public in a way that earns respect. This is a beautiful profes-

sion. I raised my family doing this and believe it makes a difference.” Students inherit her passion, work ethic and entrepreneurial spirit. Approximately 84 percent find employment soon after graduation and Trieu estimates that more than 200 salons are owned by Evergreen graduates. A special success story is a student whose dream was to become a barber. His obstacle was being paralyzed in one arm from the elbow down. Trieu created a curriculum and used one hand herself while teaching. Using a custom-made clamp attached to his upper arm, he passed his classes, state exam and is nearing 10 years of owning his own shop. “That’s how I count being successful — when we can help someone with little or

no hope,” Trieu says. “We give them an environment where they feel safe, supported and successful.” Evergreen is growing to accommodate more students and services. The Everett location physically expanded in 2014 and added laser skin services in early 2015. They also engage the local community with annual events. Free back-to-school and winter holiday haircuts attract hundreds of local families. “Beauty is about helping people feel good and realize their value. We teach the students that it’s their job to touch people from the outside to help bring out the beauty and confidence on the inside,” Trieu says. “Mama Thi” herself is mother to five children, two of whom departed established careers to work at Evergreen. A third plans to join the family business in a few years. With 12 grandchildren and hundreds of students, Mama Thi has her hands full, but there is always time for one more hug and word of wisdom. “When do I feel most beautiful? When a student like Jessica returns with such confidence,” Trieu says. “I see that and it makes me feel beautiful inside.”


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General manager to build on success By Jocelyn Robinson

Attend an open house

For The Herald Business Journal

Sara Blayne came on board the Lynnwood Convention Center as its marketing director when the facility opened in 2005. As the center quietly celebrates its 10-year anniversary, she’s back — this time as the general manager. Blayne, who returned as director of sales and marketing in November 2014, was appointed to the manager position in April. While the convention center is owned by the city of Lynnwood, Blayne works for SMG, the company that is contracted to operate the center. She takes charge of a convention center that has been on the upswing. The center has hosted 4,133 events with 753,096 guests since it opened in April 2005. Most convention centers require a subsidy to operate, but the Lynnwood Convention Center made enough from

To celebrate its 10-year anniversary, the Lynnwood Convention Center is hosting an open house and artist reception from 6-8 p.m. on Sept. 22. The public is invited. For more information or to RSVP, call 425-778-7155 or email info@lynnwoodcc.com.

JIM DAVIS / HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

New Lynnwood Convention Center general manager Sara Blayne hopes to continue the center’s momentum.

events to eliminate the need for a subsidy in 2013 and 2014. The Convention Center has been successful for a number of reasons, said Grant Dull, the executive director of the Lynnwood Public Facilities District. First, the group has taken a “visionary, yet financially conservative approach to

planning” from Day One. The convention center has relied on in-house food service including a chef and sous chef that have been with the center since it started. And the convention center is in an ideal location, easily accessible from throughout the region and close to 1,400 hotel rooms.

Blayne previously held a similar position with Compass Group, managing internal events for Microsoft. Before that she worked for hotels in the United States and abroad. The global nature of the business appealed to Blayne, who was raised overseas. Although she’s lived mostly in Asia, she also lived in Europe and the Middle East. “I lived in Czechoslovakia in the 1980s, back when it was still a Communist country behind the Iron Curtain,” Blayne said. Blayne graduated from high school in Egypt during the first Gulf War, then earned a degree in hotel management from Les Roches International

School of Hotel Management in Switzerland. She worked overseas for a while, then came back stateside and eventually moved to the Seattle area. She has family in the area and often visited when she was a kid. While at her family’s home in Kingston, Blayne used to see the cruise ships travel up and down Puget Sound and thought it would be fun to work on one of those ships. “Then I realized that reality was not like ‘The Love Boat,’” she said, referring to the TV show. “Not everybody gets to be on the upper deck.” She went to work in hotels instead, eventually managing events for

Microsoft. As general manager of the Lynnwood Convention Center, Blayne wants to provide a great service and experience to the center’s guests. “We’ve gone beyond what was the original expectation of this building and I want to make sure we keep that momentum,” Blayne said. Keeping the center’s repeat clientele is important to Blayne, but she also hopes to build on the center’s success by bringing in more local and regional conventions. “It’s important to keep the community engaged because they’re the people who support us at the end of the day,” she said. Blayne is also excited about Lynnwood’s new City Center project and how the area surrounding the convention center will be developed. “Seeing how the area continues to evolve will help us drive a certain direction as well,” she said. “It’ll be fun to see the new refreshed Lynnwood.”

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

Artists bring whimsy to McMenamins Cadre of artists give unique feel to brewery, hotel By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

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There’s magic in McMenamin land. “The excitement and electricity in the air is quite palpable,” said longtime McMenamins artist Olivia Behm, at Bothell’s historic Anderson School. “You start feeling it on the construction site.” Along with McMenamins artist Myrna Yoder — a mostly-stay-at-homemom and “wizard behind the scenes” in Portland — Behm, 62, is guiding the artists helping to transform Anderson School into the newest McMenamins playland. Set to open Oct. 15, the $26 million project at

brimming with history and quirky artwork, Mike and Brian McMenamin are also known for the rallying cry: “The main thing is to have fun!” And the artists are having fun. Plenty of it. Patty Forte Linna, 55, of Brier, said she can hardly wait to go to work every day and create art. Encountered recently as she painted a tiki-inspired border around bathroom walls, she marveled at the freedom to paint her own vision on walls, bed headboards and panels. “This whole thing is really fun,” she said. “It really is. I feel like I’m in Disneyland every day.” Forte Linna is one of about a dozen artists hired locally to help paint the school McMenamin-style, which gives them a lot of leeway. “Mike McMenamin is a genius because he encourages artists by not telling them what to do,” said


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

Continued from Page 11

42-year-old Damian Zari, one of the few Portland artists onsite. As if to demonstrate the ability to be different, Zari was airbrushing a bathroom border of undulating gray pipes and red faucet handles across the walls. He does it all freehand, he said. That differs from the decorative-painting technique Behm teaches, in which artists make stencils by drawing designs on painters’ masking paper. They cut through the stencils by tracing their designs with sharp-

“The excitement and electricity in the air is quite palpable. You start feeling it on the construction site.” — Olivia Behm

Cleo Hehn plans the border paintings in one of the bathrooms of the McMenamins’ hotel and brewery.

toothed pounce wheels. Then they transfer the designs to the walls with

pounce pads filled with charcoal, which seeps through holes in the sten-

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It’s all done independently of the bedroom artwork, which will include a headboard and wall panel, usually 38 by 48 inches, depicting a local character or group for whom the room is named. The process starts with a meeting with McMenamins historian Tim Hills, who gives artists printouts of stories he’s dug up around Bothell. Artists pick a story that interests them “and then we get to just go and think about it and come up with our own vision,” said Carol Meckling, 50, lately of Shoreline but now in Colorado. “There’s a lot of room for each of us sticking to our own style,” she said. Sometimes that involves borrowing from the style of the past, such as Meckling’s painting of Tom Poll, a Canyon Park Junior High student suspended in 1966 for refusing to cut his Beatles-style hair. Done in the pop-art style of Andy Warhol, the painting features Poll reading a book and looking decidedly Beatle-like against a poster of the Fab Four. A cartoonish Biblical-character Samson, whose strength purportedly “lay in his hair,” helps prop up Poll’s book. World War II ads for Rosie the Riveter “where she’s rolling up her sleeves,” Meckling said, inspired her portrayal of U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, who’s known for her tireless crusade to help working families. Mount Rainier, evergreens, and salmon swimming upstream also figure in the piece. Forte Linna said she gets inspiration from the “child that’s inside of you” and that’s why she chose a whimsical look for her painting of Karen Thorndike, who was in her 50s when, in 1998, she became the first American woman to sail around the world. Friends told her she couldn’t do it, but Thorndike didn’t let that keep

her from her dream. “It just spoke to me,” Forte Linna said. “You know, our dreams that we have, we’re doing our dreams.” It wasn’t always so for Forte Linna. It took having a baby and becoming a new stayat-home mom for her to forsake her marketing career for her childhood dream. She said she told her husband, professional photographer Jim Linna, that she wanted to be a professional artist. “And he said, ‘Follow your heart and the money will come,’” she said. Since then, she said she’s been in art shows up and down the West Coast, from Edmonds to Sausalito, has shown in galleries and won awards. But nothing compares to McMenamins. “I am absolutely overjoyed to be working here,” she said. Meckling, too, said she followed another career, working in the mental-health industry before seriously returning to art a few years ago. She and her husband moved to Colorado last month “for an adventure,” but Meckling said she was sorry to leave McMenamins. “This has been great, just having this professional experience at McMenamins,” she said. “It’s been really great for me.” For McMenamins artists, the magic lies in getting paid to do art all day, said Cleo and Cyrus Hehn, 24 and 21. It’s all in the family for the sister and brother, who were up from Portland last month to help paint bathroom borders; Uncle Lyle Hehn has been a McMenamins artist since 1988 and father Paul Hehn was a company manager until retiring to be a stay-athome dad. “As an artist, there are no other jobs like this,” Cleo said. “There really aren’t.”


SEPTEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

Lawyer bridges local with the global Everett attorney helps businesses navigate immigration law

“Some folks have traveled back and forth for years without incident. They are surprised when they show up one day and suddenly the door is slammed shut.”

By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

Terry Preshaw was 9 years old when she first read “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s iconic novel of individual integrity and legal justice. Preshaw personally identified with Scout, the plucky young heroine, but it was attorney Atticus Finch and his crusade for justice that left an indelible impression. “As a lawyer, I still hold Atticus Finch as the person I most want to emulate. He was my first role model of who I’d like to become,” Preshaw says. Preshaw is an Everett-based attorney who specializes in immigration law. A dual citizen of the U.S. and Canada, she is a rarity in being licensed to practice in both countries. For 20 years, her focus was business immigration. Particularly following 1994’s North American Free Trade Agreement, businesses had increasing need for representation across the border. Preshaw helped open new foreign offices

— Terry Preshaw

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Everett-based immigration lawyer Terry Preshaw saw a demand for her services after the passage of the North American Free Trade Act. Now she offers more counsel for business travelers.

as well as navigate employee transfers. “The more economic integration between our two countries, the better friends we will continue to be,” Preshaw says. In recent years, Preshaw’s emphasis shifted to individual business travelers. Improved computer technology through the National Criminal Information Center allows the Canadian Border Services

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Agency easier access to criminal records. A U.S. traveler with a 30-year-old DUI or reckless driving offense will be denied entry to Canada unless they can prove the sentence was completed. “Some folks have traveled back and forth for years without incident. They are surprised when they show up one day and suddenly the door is slammed shut. It’s becoming a more apparent issue and, in some cases, quite dramatic,” Preshaw says. As one of the few Canadian immigration lawyers residing in the U.S., Preshaw is in the unique position of being allowed to represent American clients at the Canadian consulate and border. U.S.only lawyers cannot. Her international perspective is informed by local involvement. She located to Everett in 1993 and appreciates the “small-town feel of a place that does big business.” Her wide-ranging community service and pro bono work ranges from founding and incorporating the Mukilteo Community Orchestra, in which she plays French horn, to advocating for local residents. “When a business person is involved in their community, they have a better idea of how best they can serve it,” Preshaw

says. “With the orchestra, I was able to meet people from different walks of life. Getting to know them made me realize the need for my services was more widespread than I ever dreamt.” (Preshaw made national news in August when her French horn, which had been stolen from her five years ago, was returned by someone who bought it in a pawn shop.) In 2013, a community member sought Preshaw’s help. The woman, an American citizen, was desperate to evacuate her husband and three children from Iraq. As a girl, her family fled the country as refugees in the 1980s, but she returned after marrying. Under the threat of ISIS, she departed and safely gave birth to her fourth child on U.S. soil last year. The newborn remains with relatives in Everett while she lobbies from Iraq to reunite her family. “I feel emotional about this case,” Preshaw says with tears pooling. “It reminded me of the opportunities people had in Nazi Germany to save people. I heard the call and realized I had to step up to the plate. I’d never done something like this in my entire career.” Preshaw and her husband sponsored the rest of the family to come to the U.S. After years of red tape, Preshaw is confident they will be issued immigrant visas this fall. “I think this is my most satisfying case to date,” Preshaw says. “I’m not just doing the paperwork, I’m providing one of the key pieces (sponsorship) these folks need to come to safety. I feel like it’s my Atticus Finch moment.”

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SEPTEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

Priceless publicity for pet business EVERETT — It didn’t look like a hoax email, but then it did look too good to be true. Heather Cherewaty and Abby Wait own Olive + Atlas, an Everett business that makes hand-crafted, fashionable dog collars, leashes and soon, harnesses and blankets. The pair started the business just a year ago and sell their wares online, at the Everett Farmers Market and plan to sell their items this fall at Paddywack pet store in the Mill Creek Town Center. And then, they received the email. An assistant for television personality Lilliana Vasquez last month wanted a couple of the dog collars — the Mill Creek and Columbia styles — to give as birthday gifts to Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb on the Today Show. “It was one of those things,” Cherewaty said. “Is it too good to be true? It was very professional and she gave us lots of information and lots of points of contact, but we were just shocked. ” Vasquez had found the dog collars on Instagram and wanted the leather collars with fabric overlays for Gifford’s dog Bambino and Kotb’s dog Blake. The show aired on Aug. 5. “We’ve had a lot of Internet traffic coming,” Cherewaty said. “We’ve had a pretty nice response to having the show aired.” It’s a boost for a business that’s still just launching.

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Heather Cherewaty, left, sits with her dog Atlas and Abby Wait sits with Olive. The pair started their dog collar and accesssories business Olive + Atlas, named after the dogs, a year ago.

To learn more Olive + Atlas makes fashionable dog collars and other accessories. The Everett-based business offers wares online at oliveandatlas. co and this fall at the Paddywack pet store in the Mill Creek Town Center.

A pair of collars by Olive + Atlas were featured on the Today Show.

Cherewaty and Wait met while working out at the CrossFit Everett in downtown Everett. Cherewaty, 30, is originally from New Jersey and moved here when her husband got a job at Boeing. (He’s since moved on to

another aerospace company.) She was working as a technical writer at a Bothell biotech firm when she decided she wanted to go into business for herself. She invited Wait to be her business partner. “I think she knew she

wanted to do something dog related and what it came down to is I had a little bit of sewing experience, I think I told her I could make a dog collar,” said Wait, 26, who continues to work as a dental hygienist in Mukilteo. Last August, they started making the collars, experimenting with leather obtained from local stores and fabrics like Pendleton Wool. Together, they came up with11 styles of dog collars and made the

creations in a shop behind Cherewaty’s Everett home. They named the styles after Pacific Northwest locales like Mill Creek, Alki Beach and Nob Hill. “That was an idea that we both had to kind of stick to our roots and where the business is from,” Wait said. And the business was named after their two dogs, Olive, a French bulldog, and Atlas, a Chesapeake Bay retriever, border collie, cattle dog mix.

The motto for the business is, ‘Where the sidewalk meets the trail.’ “My dog Atlas is more of the rough and tumble one,” Cherewaty said. “Oliver is more a sidewalk kind of dog. Atlas jumps straight into the river. Olive takes naps in the sun.” Wait’s sister, Evelyn Kritler, 21, a graphic artist, developed a logo for the company. The metal logo is attached to each collar. In May, they started selling the collars at the Everett Farmer’s Market. “I love it when people whip out their phones and show us pictures of their dogs,” Cherewaty said. “It’s a meaningful way to connect with another human being.” They’ve committed to donating $1 from each collar and leash to nonprofits: the Old Dog Haven in Lake Stevens and Project Canine, in Seattle. Wait put their designs on social mediea sites like Instagram. The pair were just getting their website, oliveandatlas.co, together when they received the message from the Today Show. While their collars was one of several gifts given to the hosts, Cherewaty and Wait were happy about the recognition. “It’s been a lot of fun and it’s been reassuring to both of us,” Cherewaty said. They hope the boost can help the business continue to grow. “We’ve had a phenomenal response,” Cherewaty said. “We’re not growing so quickly that we can’t keep up, but we’re keeping steady.”

1379802

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal Editor


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

Job fair to help people take next step By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal Editor

TULALIP — More than 50 businesses and other employers are signed up for a job fair Sept. 10 at the Tulalip Resort Casino, looking for candidates to fill positions in industries ranging from healthcare to public service to aerospace. People who need jobs or are seeking to take the

next step in their careers are invited to attend the fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Orca Ballroom at 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd., Tulalip. The Snohomish County Career Fair is being organized by The Daily Herald and hosted by the Tulalip Resort Casino. Other partners include the Marysville Globe, the Arlington Times and the Spanish-language weekly

If you go The Snohomish County Career Fair is planned from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 10 in the Orca Ballroom at the Tulalip Resort Casino, 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd., Tulalip. For more, go to www. snococareerfair.com. La Raza. “We’re excited to bring together businesses and professionals, representing a wide array of industries

in Snohomish County provide career opportunities to qualified job seekers,” said Herald Publisher Josh O’Connor.

The Herald organized the job fair after hearing from employers about the difficulty in finding qualified candidates for open positions, said Pilar Linares, the newspaper’s advertising director. The unemployment rate for the state has dipped to 5.3 percent and has fallen to 4.3 percent in Snohomish County, according to the state’s Employment Security Department.

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“This goes hand in hand with the economy,” Linares said. “People are having a hard time filling positions — we’ve seen it here, too — this is just another avenue for companies.” It’s also a valuable tool to connect job seekers with a wide range of employers. Those job seekers could be someone looking for their first job or looking to try a new career path. “People keep asking me what’s the demographic and I say it’s 18 plus,” Linares said. “It’s an opportunity for someone right out of school or maybe it’s someone who’s 50 plus and they’re looking for a change.” Linares has been part of newspaper-organized job fairs at previous jobs in Houston and Beaumont, Texas. She said the newspaper saw a need in the community are attempting to respond. “I think any company will tell you there’s a huge amount of time and energy spent in hiring a person and then training a person and then having them ready to go,” Linares said. “There’s an efficiency in job fairs.” The newspaper plans to market the fair heavily in advertisements and radio spots. As an incentive, The Herald is asking people to upload their resume before the fair; the first 50 people registered who check in at the Sound Publishing Career Booth will receive two free Seattle Mariners tickets. The Herald is hoping that at least 500 job seekers will attend, Linares said. “When we did it in Beaumont, I was expecting 300 and then 1,500 showed up,” Linares said. The Herald also continues to be a sponsor of the biannual Snohomish County Job Fair, which is planned next from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 29 at the Edward D. Hansen Conference Center at Xfinity Arena, 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett. To learn more about the job fair at Tulalip or to upload your resume, go to www.snococareerfair.com. For the job fair in October, go to www.snocojobfair.com.


SEPTEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Microsoft’s Windows 10 a joy to explore I

t’s hard to believe that we’ve been using some form of Windows for more than two decades. The very first versions of Windows weren’t really more than an overlay on top of Microsoft’s DOS operating system. Starting with Windows 95, however, it took on a life of its own and became — for all intents and purposes — an independent operating system. Since then it has become an integral part of our computing life, running on more than 90 percent of computers worldwide. While Windows has been wildly successful, not all versions have been loved by users. It seems that since the release of Windows 98 Microsoft stumbled a bit after each successful version. Remember Windows ME? Windows Vista? Even Windows 8? Now it looks like Microsoft may have another winner on its hands. Windows 10 was released at the end of July. If you have been using recently purchased versions of Windows 7 or Windows 8, you have no doubt seen the pop-ups asking you to reserve your copy of Windows 10. Many of my clients have told me this upgrade process hasn’t exactly been userfriendly, but once upgraded they were

very happy they made the leap. Windows 10 takes the best features of Windows 7 and 8 and merges them into a sleek, responsive operating system that any user Sven can enjoy whether Mogelgaard at home or at work. It even works well Tech Talk on tablets. Let’s take a quick look at the obvious changes. The first thing you’ll notice is the Start button is back! The much-maligned Tiles of Windows 8 have now been moved to the Start window. The colorful 3D Aero interface has been replaced with a sleek and flat look. You’ll also see that Internet Explorer has been replaced by the Edge browser. There are lots of subtle changes,too such as the fact the Control Panel is now simply called Settings. One of my favorite additions to Windows 10 is the ability to create virtual desktops on your PC. It’s a feature I’ve been enjoying on my Mac for a long time. If you find yourself with a lot of applications open at once, the Taskbar gets a

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bit crowded and it can be a bit difficult to find your applications. Now, by clicking the Task View icon on the Taskbar, you can create multiple virtual desktops, each with its own set of applications open and it’s own taskbar. I like to have one desktop for support programs, one for writing and research, and one for email and social media. The beauty is you can set these desktops up just the way you want. The next feature that is entirely new is Cortana. This is Microsoft’s answer to Apple’s Siri. You can type or speak questions and Cortana will search your PC and the Web to find what you’re looking for. You can even have Cortana remind you of upcoming events, read news headlines and update you on sports scores and much more. It can be a little quirky, but it’s still a very powerful tool. The Calendar application has matured as well. In previous versions of Windows you were pretty much locked in to using your Outlook calendar and couldn’t sync with other calendars. Now you can use not only Outlook and Exchange calendars, but Google and iCloud as well. But every silver lining has its cloud. Some privacy advocates have raised alarms at the amount of personal information that Microsoft collects. Their privacy statement is over 12,000

words long, so understanding exactly what Microsoft keeps and shares can be a challenge. You can change these privacy settings and view the privacy statement by clicking on the Setting options from the Start menu. Under Privacy option you can change options in over a dozen categories. How you configure these settings depends on your level of trust or paranoia. Overall, I think Windows 10 will be a big hit with both business and personal users. It has most, if not all, the features you’ll want. It automatically connects you to your favorite cloud services and simply makes it easy to use your computer, tablet or phone and easily share information between everything. Of course, being brand new there are going to be some compatibility issues. But I am pretty impressed. If you have comments regarding this column, suggestions for future columns or just want to talk tech please visit my Facebook page at Facebook.com/ millcreektech. Sven Mogelgaard is the President and CEO of Mill Creek Technology Services. He provides affordable IT services to businesses and individuals locally and around the world. Visit www.millcreektech.guru to learn more about him and his business offerings.

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SEPTEMBER 2015

Prepare for battle with your paper piles Y

ou walk into your office to square off with piles of paper. Just entering the room and looking at the stacks on your desk, the top of the file cabinet and piles on the floor drains you. How are you supposed to work when you feel overwhelmed in your space? This is where you want to be creative, productive and work efficiently. Sift through one pile, you discover a missing client file along with articles to read, expired coupons, meeting notes and a coffee gift card. It would have been nice to have these papers when you actually needed them, right? The coffee would have been nice, too. Are you ready to tackle the paper piles or would you rather just shut the door and leave? Where’s that coffee card? Clients tell me they’d like to do the latter, but sometimes you just have to buckle down and go through the piles. I hope to make this process easier for you today. First, let me explain the four systems that you should have in place.

Sensitive Storage This would be a fireproof safe or a safe deposit box at the bank. Keep in mind, the bank will be the more secure option, but you will be subject to bank hours to access your vital documents. Use a safe for important paperwork that you want to protect such as passports, birth certificates, marriage certificates, Social

Security cards, divorce decrees and vehicle titles.

Archive Storage This is for paperwork that you need to keep for tax or Monika legal reasons. But, Kristofferson you don’t need to store these papers in your prime real Office estate in the top Efficiency file drawer in your office. You can store archive files in a file cabinet in a lower drawer or other space since you won’t access them often.

because you’re actively working on them. Your action system may come in the form of a file box with folders, a step sorter with folders, stacking trays or a wall pocket system. Use a label maker. Even if you have great handwriting, a label will be easier to read and look more professional. Now you’re familiar with the systems, we can move on to how to attack those daunting piles. It’s easier than you think.

Step 1

These are simply your reference or resource files that you can place in a file cabinet. You should store papers you feel you may need to refer to in the future. Your filing cabinet should not contain work in progress. The exception to this is if you set up an ‘old school’ tickler file system in the top file drawer. Tickler files may be old school, but they still work.

Get four boxes and put a big label on the front of each box for each system: Sensitive, Archive, Long-Term and Action. Now you’re going to do a “rough sort.” Take only one pile at a time and separate papers into the correct box. Keep a box for shred and a recycle bin close at hand for papers that you can part with right away. Now here’s the key to the rough sort: Keep moving quickly. You’re not going to stop and fill out a form, make a phone call or pay a bill. Toss information that’s expired, outdated or a duplicate. You will get another opportunity to look at what you’ve sorted.

Action System Files

Step 2

These are the papers and files that you want at your fingertips on your desk

Go through the boxes for each system more closely now. Take one box or

Long-Term Storage

system at a time. Is there more paper that you can purge? It’s time to get down to the paperwork you know you want and need to keep.

Step 3 Create your systems. Gather your vital documents from the box and place them into a safe or safe deposit box. You can use hanging files in some fireproof safes which can be handy. Your archive files can go into the bottom drawer of your file cabinet, a separate file cabinet or bankers boxes. The long-term files in your file cabinet will take the longest to set up. Use new hanging file folders with clear tabs, manila folders and a label maker. Always name files the way you think for easy recall. Don’t get lost in your own file cabinet.

Step 4 Once you have your office organized with these amazing files, you’ll want to keep it that way, right? The key to success is regular maintenance. Take 10 minutes at the end of each day to restore order and file regularly. Don’t let overwhelming piles build back up again. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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BUSINESS BUILDERS

Empathy shows in everyday actions D

avid McCullough’s latest book, “The Wright Brothers,” includes a description of Wilbur Wright’s trip to France in 1908 to demonstrate a flying machine that really worked. Wilbur was naturally an object of great curiosity and, as it turned out, he was unlike anyone else the French had ever seen. The airplane itself had been severely damaged in its shipment from Ohio, and required substantial rebuilding and fabrication of parts. Leon Bollee, an aviation enthusiast and businessman, offered his shop and even some of his workers to help get the job done. The men in the factory had never met anyone like Wilbur, and it appears that they appreciated him as much as they enjoyed being part of the new venture. In one of his frequent letters home, he wrote to his father that, “The men down at Bollee’s shop have taken up a collection to buy me a testimonial of their appreciation. They say that I, too, am a workman.” Wilbur knew how much that would please his father who had brought up the boys to recognize the value and dignity of hard work. Wilber’s willingness to work side by side with the men in the physically demanding work of rebuilding a complex aircraft was something they had

never seen before. His demonstrated respect for them defied the embedded class structure that divided French workmen from the owners and managers who gave James the orders — the McCusker new economic rulers who replaced Business the aristocracy discarded a cen101 tury earlier by the French Revolution. In today’s business vocabulary, Wilbur’s actions and attitude would be called empathy. He knew what the factory workmen did, how hard they worked, and what they were capable of… and appreciated it. And his working alongside them forged them into a team that became as excited about the project as he was. Most business owners and CEOs would love to have a Wilbur-like manager on board — or, even better, a whole bunch of them. That would require their having empathy for their workers, though, and the prospects for that are not looking good. A study led by Sarah Konrath at the

University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research found that today’s college students have 40 percent lower empathy than college students in the late 1970s. The reasons behind the decline in empathy are still being debated, but for business owners and managers, the immediate problem is dealing with it. What can top management do to identify empathy problems in job applicants? The best time to look for empathy-related clues is during an applicant’s interview. It is usually a waste of time to simply ask general questions about how the applicant “gets along with other people.” What you can do, though, is examine his or her resume for activities or employment that involved working with other people — especially people of the skill level that the applicant will be expected to manage. Question the applicant thoroughly about these areas to get an idea of what he or she thought about managers and co-workers. If the applicant has had management experience, look especially for the word “responsible” or “responsibility” being used. The use of these words often indicates a level of respect for workers that neither “boss” nor “in charge” impart. Word usage should be treated as clues, rather than evidence, however, and

prompt further inquiry rather than final assessment. There are lots of successful, empathetic managers “in charge,” or whose team members refer to as “boss.” One very successful method to reveal a candidate’s empathy is to take him or her to lunch at a sit-down restaurant. Watch closely how the candidate interacts with the server. Politeness is not the same thing as respect, but they are close relatives, and respect is the basis of workplace empathy. Take your applicant on a tour of your business and observe how he or she interacts with the people there. That is a preview of how those interactions are going to work out in the future, and you should evaluate the candidate accordingly. Lastly, even after the best screening and interviewing processes, beginning managers often need a lot of help with their skill gaps, and lack of empathy is often at the heart of the problems. Business owners and top management just have to face up to this issue and plan to work up solutions that fit their operations and goals. With today’s crop of new managers that will be no easy task. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

EDMONDS — Landau Associates has promoted Stephanie Renando to staff scientist. She is responsible for coordiStephanie nating and Renando executing field work related to groundwater, soil, and vapor/gas sampling. The company also hired Katie Saltanovitz as a senior engineer at its Edmonds office.

soon starting on a $3.4 million renovation of an existing building at 2702 Colby Ave.

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Long-term includes regularly scheduled vessels only.

SNOHOMISH — Startup Weekend Snohomish is looking for would-be entrepreneurs for its 54 hours of intensive pitching, team-building and product launching, from 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6 until 9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 8 at the Snohomish High School Campus in Snohomish. For more information go to the Startup Weekend Global website and the local Snohomish Startup Weekend website.

Ship port calls 2015 YTD: 87 Barge port calls 2015 YTD: 30 Ship port calls 2014: 105 Barge port calls 2014: 80 Sept. 1: AAL Brisbane, AAL Sept. 2: Vessel TBD, EUKOR Sept. 4: Shengking, Swire Sept. 8: Westwood Cascade, Westwood

MILL CREEK — Becky Porter has taken over as the new president of the Rotary Club of Mill Creek. Former Becky president Jeff Porter Brennan’s successful term ended in June. To learn more about Rotary Club of Mill Creek, see www.millcreekrotary.org. MUKILTEO — The

SEPTEMBER 2015

Sept. 14: BBC Maryland, BBC Sept. 15: Westwood Victoria, Westwood Sept. 22: BBC Luanda, BBC Mukilteo Chamber of Commerce will offer a 10-week series called Leadership: Learn it-Live it-Lead it. Anna Rohrbough, a certified speaker with John C. Maxwell Leadership, will instruct attendees on Tuesday mornings from Sept. 29 to Dec. 8. Class space is limited so early registration is recom-

mended. People may sign up at www.mukilteochamber.org/leadership. EVERETT — Peoples Bank plans to open a flagship financial center in downtown Everett by next summer, indicating there’s a real need in Snohomish County for its brand of community-minded banking. Construction is

MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Company has announced the launch of its newly redesigned website: www.canyoncreek.com. The new website has improved navigation and search functionality, and is compatible with current browsers and mobile devices. ARLINGTON — Shelley Bennett of Arling-

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ton has been honored by H&R Block with the company’s top national client service award. The Henry W. Bloch Award for Excellence in Client Service recognizes extraordinary efforts in client service, exceptional tax expertise and display of company values. EVERETT — Mountain Pacific Bank has added two new members to its board of directors. Maddy Metzger-Utt Maddy Metzger-Utt has been the president/CEO of the Greater Everett Community Foundation since 2005. Prior to that, she spent 12 years as an executive Cameron director of Smock two nonprofit organizations in Snohomish County. Cameron Smock has been president/ CEO of Bonney-Watson Memorial Corp. since

2007. He is a licensed funeral director. EVERETT — Randy Bolerjack has joined Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett as the director of communications and public Randy relations, Bolerjack a newly created position. Bolerjack spent five years as a public affairs and government relations consultant in Edmonds and Seattle. He most recently directed communications and public relations for the Mercer Island School District. MARYSVILLE — The City of Marysville has appointed Dave Koenig as its new community development director. He began work on July 16. In his new role, Koenig will help to responsibly and strategically manage the city’s growth and development. Previously, Koenig managed Everett’s long-range planning and community development.

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June 2, 9

Port Commission Mtgs

Creating Economic Opportunities SEPTEMBER 2015

June 6

July 2015

July 2015the Independent Economic Study Finds July 2015 Port of EVERETT Port of Everett Supports 35,130 Regional Jobs

Marina & Jetty Island CALENDAR Cleanup Day CALENDAR July 7, 14

June July 7, 614 July 7,Life14 Relay for Port Commission Mtgs Lots of Juneof25 Waterfront Lots Summer Concerts Begin Events! Waterfront Visit portofeverett.com Visit portofeverett.com Events! for a for a full full list list of of

REPORT REPORT Port of EVERETT

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Briefly

Visit portofeverett.com waterfront events waterfront for a full listevents of EXECUTIVE Port of The Port of Everett waterfront events EVERETT Port of Port of EVERETT EVERETT Port of of Port EVERETT EVERETT

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

Creating Creating Economic Economic Opportunities Opportunities

Creating Economic Economic Opportunities Opportunities Creating

Port Port of of Everett Everett Builds Builds Our Our Future Future Leaders Internship Program Port ofthrough Everett Builds Our Future First Large Aerospace Ship Arrives in Everett; Leaders through Internship Program Leaders through Internship Port and WestwoodProgram Shipping Lines gram here at the Port,” said Les Reardanz,

ExECutIVE earned an EnvironExECutIVE The Port Award from the The mental Port of of Everett Everett EXECUTIVE earned its 18 of ExECutIVE Washington Public earned its 18 year year of Ports

gram here at the Port,” said Les Reardanz, Mark Decade of Direct Aerospace Shipments CEO/Executive CEO/Executive Director Director of of the the Port Port of of EverEver-

PORT PORT INTERNSHIPS INTERNSHIPS HELP HELP STuDENTS TRANSITION STuDENTS TRANSITION PORT INTERNSHIPS HELP

gram here here at at the the Port,” Port,” said Les Les Reardanz, Reardanz, gram said ett. ett. “Not “Not only only does does it it allow allow us us to to develop develop CEO/Executive Director ofalso theprovides Port of of EverEverCEO/Executive Director of the Port our future leaders, but it our future leaders, but it also provides ThePort Portofhas hired Paul consecutive clean finanThe Everett ett. “Not “Not only only does does itit allow us us to to develop develop The Port of Everett Association for its consecutive clean finanett. allow opportunity Brachvogel as its new opportunity for for the the team team to to grow. grow. Interns Interns cial audits. earned its 18 18thth year year of of earned its fROM COLLEgE TO CAREER cial audits. our future leaders, but it also provides A new study of the economic impacts of • $583 million intolocal purchases Chief of Legal Aff airs. Waterfront Place our future leaders, but itand also provides bring fresh perspective new ideas fROM COLLEgE TO CAREER STuDENTS TRANSITION consecutive clean finanbring fresh perspective and new ideas to consecutive clean finanthe Port of Everett found that Port operations •often Personal wages and local opportunity for the team to grow. grow. Interns Cleanup projects. opportunity for the team to Interns SEAPORT the table that we times integrate cial audits. SEAPORT cial audits. the table that we often times integrate into into fROM COLLEgE TO CAREER supported 35,130 regional jobs in 2014, up 133 consumption related bring fresh perspective and new ideas to The bring fresh perspective and new ideas to to the port-sector our processes.” The Pacific Pacific Maritime Maritime our processes.” SEAPORT jobs from 2012, according to an independent $3.9 billion, Association handed SEAPORT the table table that that we weincreased often times timesto integrate into with the average the often integrate into Association handed out March through June has An internship is aa great way to jump-start The Port received aout aaThe bulk of SAFETY awards An internship is great way to jump-start The Pacific Maritime analysis by Pennsylvania-based Martin annual salary of those directly employed Pacific Maritime our processes.” processes.” bulk of SAFETY awardsbusy our The Port hires two or three interns aa year, $1 million Department of a career; a chance for students and recent been particularly The Port hires two or three interns year, to Everett’s stevedoring Association handed out a career; a chance for students and recent Associates. by port-related businesses equating to Association handed out to Everett’s stevedoring Commerce Grant to improve An internship internship is aatheir greatskills way to to jump-start jump-start typically in months. supporting the logistics An is great way valucompanies, SSA Marine bulk of SAFETY SAFETY awards typically in the the summer summer months. Interns Interns aarail bulk of awards Theout study thegain Port’s Marine Cargo and $86,703. access at the Seaport. grads grads to to test test out theirfound skills and and gain valucompanies, SSA Marine The Port hires two or three interns year, The Port hiresduties two orand three interns year, a career; career; a chance chance for students students and and recent recent take on daily are given aaaaproject chain for energy cargoes and Jones Stevedoring. a a for to Everett’s stevedoring able, on-the-job experience. to Everett’s stevedoring take on daily duties and are given project and Jones Stevedoring. Industrialexperience. Properties support 33,376 direct, In addition to regular activity, the Port of able, on-the-job typicallyownership in the the summer summer months. Interns typically in months. Interns grads to to test test out out their their skills skills and and gain gain valuvaluand a large bridge project companies, SSA Marine Marine to of during their interngrads companies, SSA to take take ownership of has during theirambitious internindirect and induced jobs, while the Marina Everett a very MARINA take on on daily duties duties and are are given given aa project project capital investment MARINA MARINA and Jones Stevedoring. take daily and in Edmonton, Canada.This able,has on-the-job experience. thoroughly at ship. Projects have included development and Jones Stevedoring. able, on-the-job experience. been demonstrated The Marina office has ship. Projects have included development Waterfront Place support at 1,753 direct, strategy that istheir designed to create additional Great weather, This hasand been demonstrated thoroughly The Marina officecombined has to the takePort’s ownership ofTours, duringand intern-of to take ownership of during their internof Harbor creation moved to a new location the Port of Everett. Over the years, our eswith lower gas prices has indirect and induced jobs. economic opportunities and jobs for the of the Port’s Harbor Tours, and creation of MARINA moved to a new location the Port of Everett. Over the years, our esship. Projects have haveSustainability included development development ship. Projects included theMarina Port’s visitors up 30% tablished This has has been been demonstrated thoroughly at an Environmental Report. next to Seas the Day Cafe The Marina office has This demonstrated thoroughly at internship program has recruited The office has This month, the has Port of and an Westwood recent in the State a Port continues torecruited beEverett a significant region, Port success of Everett CEO LesLegislature Reardanz on said. Environmental Sustainability Report. next to2014. Seas moorage the Day Cafe Season is filling tablished “The internship program over of the the Port’s Port’s Harbor Tours, and and creation creation of package will allow the th of in Waterfront Center. moved to aa new new location top-notch Harbor Tours, of the Port Port ofcollege Everett. Over the years, our esmoved to location anniversary ofIn Shipping Lines are marking the 10 transportation investment the of Everett. Over the years, our esstudents from various in Waterfront Center. economic generator in the region and was able the next five years, the Port is expected to up fast. Call the college students from various an Environmental Environmental Sustainability Report. next to to Seas Seas the the Day Day Cafe Cafe top-notch an Sustainability Report. weekly, direct aerospace shipments from Japan to use their next City and the Port to improve freight routes from tablished internship program has recruited recruited Many interns experience to secure tablished internship program has to maintain its economic contribution, despite $134.2 million, fields of study, including communicaMarina office for details Many internsinvest use their experience to$44.5 securemillion this year fields of study, including communicain Waterfront Center. REAL ESTATE Everett with a new, larger vessel calling the Port of the marine terminals to Interstate 5. REAL EStAtE in Waterfront Center. top-notch college students from various jobs right here in our community. Others REAL EStAtE top-notch students from various thecollege economic recession,” said Dr. Johnjobs Martin alone. This construction activity will support tions, studies, athires 425.259.6001. right here in our community. Others Port newCelebraconstruction tions, environmental environmental studies, engineering, engineering, Everett Now, after 10 years, the industry is trending togrand Opening Many interns use their experience to secure Many interns use their experience to secure fields of study, including communicagrand Opening Celebraenjoy their time at the Port so much, they manager to assist with capital of Martin Associates. He noted that “continued approximately 3,300 temporary construction fields of study, including communicaplanning, information technology, records enjoymade their time the Port so much, they In the early 2000s, the Port Commission the inatour ward larger vessels and the Port of Everett is worktion of Waterfront information technology, records REAL EStAtE jobs right right here community. Others tion of the the Waterfront improvement program planning, jobs here in our community. Others tions, environmental environmental studies, engineering, seek employment when jobs become availinvestment in port infrastructure is necessary jobs over the next five years. tions, studies, engineering, management and more. strategic decision to invest more than $50 million ing to meet the Port Commission’s initiative to add Place Project office on seek employment when jobs become availgrand Opening Celebragrand Opening Celebramanagement and more. at Waterfront Place. Place Project office on enjoy their time at1,000-foot+ the Port so much, much, they enjoy their time at the Port so they planning, information technology, recordsand grow able and bring their skill set back to the Port in order for the Port to sustain its Reardanz reiterated that the Martin to improve the Port’s Infrastructure to streamline berths to continue to meet our cusplanning, information technology, records July 9. Register for the tion of the Waterfront The Waterfront Place able and bring their skill set back to the Port tion 9. of Register the Waterfront July for the seek employment when jobs become availand improve the aerospace logistics chain to suptomer’s needs – and those investments seek employment when jobs become availmanagement and more. economic contribution.” Associates’ findings “also show how vitallycan’t come team (see below). event at Economic AlliPlace Project office on management and more. value in our proPlace Project officeAllionOffice “We Central Project has team (see below). event at Economic “We find find great great value our internship internship proport the in world’s largest aerospace manufacturer. soon enough. able and bring their skill set back to the Port ance Snohomish County. able and bring their skill set back to the Port Port activity also contributes: important it is that investment in our ports July 9. Register for the July opened 9.Snohomish Register the at for Waterfront ance County. On August 11, the Port of Everett welcomed This investment included the installation of the team (see below). event at Economic Alli• value $373 in stateproand localteam taxes; and landside transportation infrastructure be the (see below). “We find find great great value inmillion our internship internship proevent at Economic Alli“We in our Center, 1205 Craftsman Westwood Robson, a 686-foot container ship that two, 40-ton capacity gantry cranes at Pacifi c Termiance Snohomish Snohomish County. County. ance $220.8 million was collected at the state a high priority so that the U.S. can remain a th th

SEAPORT

MARINA

REAL ESTATE

Check the Port’s Way, Ste. 107. Stop by nal, the purchase of three, 45-ton reachstackers, the is transporting aerospace parts and other general Website for New pORt StAffERS WhO At pORt ShARE thEIR ExpERIENCE ... level, and $152.2 million atTerminal, the localalevel global competitor, providing theseThe positive cargoes from Japan new, larger vesconstruction of thE Mount Baker custom and check it out. pORt StAffERS WhO INtERNED INtERNED At thE pORt ShARE thEIR ExpERIENCE ... to Everett. sel can only be serviced at Pier 1, because its bow aerospace facility in south Everett and addition of Bus Tour dates pORt StAffERS WhO INtERNED AtExtended thE pORtgantry ShARE thEIR ExpERIENCE ... waterway. Typically, the aeroEverett Farmer’s Market Kicks Season at the canPort extendof intoEverett the a 50-tonOff capacity rail mounted crane. These BRANDON ELISE GRONEWALD BRANDON WhItAkER WhItAkER ELISE GRONEWALD shipments handled at Pacifi c Terminal, but infrastructure investments partnership bespace The EverettWaterfront Farmer’sFall! Market has and generous supportcreated of localthe growers, the biggest yet,arefeaturing farm fresh coming this Environmental Specialist its berth length is only 650-feet. Per the Comopportunity with Westwood Shipping Lines to bring Remediation Waterfront Place Place Project Project Manager Manager Environmental Remediation Specialist

returned for its“My 22ndinternship seasonWhItAkER atlaid the Port of value-added producers and our “I local goodness andI ever homemade wares from BRANDON WhItAkER ELISE GRONEWALD BRANDON ELISE GRONEWALD for so more than expected mission’s initiative, staff is working on implementaerospace of Ever“My internship laid the the foundation foundation for my myshipments directly to the Port “I gained gained so much much more than I ever expected Everett waterfront now thru Oct. 18. artisan entrepreneurs,” Everett Farmer’s more than 80 vendors. Patrons Waterfront Place Place Project Manager Environmental Remediation Specialist professional career. Staff the ropes Waterfront Project Manager Remediation Specialist IIEnvironmental would during internship at the Port. Not ing the Marine Terminals Master can Planexpect (2008) to ett.me Prior this investment, the ships unloaded in my professional career. Staff showed showed me theto ropes would during my internship at the Port. Not On Sundaysand from 11 a.m.laid – 4amongst p.m., Market Owners, Gary Purvis andbarged a strengthen variety of learn goods, ranging from locallyto better “My internship laid the foundation foror my “IKaren gained so much more than than I ever ever expected and enhance South Terminal Seattle Tacoma and the parts were to the networked me our peers. I am “My internship the foundation for my only did I get the chance to in my field of “I gained so much more I expected and networked me amongst our peers. I am only did I get the chance to learn in my field of rain or shine, the Everett Farmer’s Erikson said. “These hard-working farmed fruits and packaged accommodate thevegetables, larger vessels. Port ofthe Everett. professional career. Staff showed showed me the ropes would during my internship at Port. Not thankful for experiences and the profesprofessional career. Staff me ropes study, but II also had the opportunity to learn II would during my internship at the Port. Not thankful for those those experiences and the professtudy, but also had the opportunity to learn The Port and Westwood have worked “These infrastructure investments allowed our Market will fill the South business community members and ready eat foods, arts crafts,together to andPort’s networked meMarina amongstby ourthe peers. amowners are only did I get get the chance toto learn in my field ofand and networked me amongst our peers. II am sional opportunity provided Port.” about all of Port from seaport only did chance to learn in my field of sional opportunity provided by the Port.” about allIareas areasthe ofsuccessfully Port business business from seaport transport all of the oversized comregion to successfully compete for the 787 and thankful for those experiences and the profesPromenade located at 1600 W. Marine whose efforts in their field of specialty flowers and more. study, but but IIto also had the the opportunity to learn learn thankful for those experiences and the professtudy, also had to operations marina and real estate.” operations to marina andopportunity realthe estate.” ponents for 747, 767, 777 and KC-Tanker. 777X airplane programs,” Port of Everett CEO Les View Drive. TheCARmEN 24-week marketprovided openedby serve and A new feature the Market this year The sional opportunity provided by the the Port.”to benefit the greater Everett about all areas areas of of Port Port business fromto seaport sional opportunity Port.” about all business GASpAR Port of Everettfrom nowseaport supports more than 35,000 Reardanz said. “By investing in our infrastructure CARmEN GASpAR one week earlier than lastClerk year and is County population. Know yourORDONA is jobs a nine-week Kidsup Place: Explore, operations to marina marina and real estate.” operations to and real estate.” Accounting NIChOLE in the region, fromLearn, 6,000 in 2005, and supandSnohomish developing this partnership with Westwood Accounting Clerk NIChOLE ORDONA closing two weeks later to provide an Port ofShipping farmer; know yourbetter food.able Come meet and Grow starting June 21. Visit CARmEN GASpAR portsCanopy the largest export custom’s district in the Lines, we are to support our CARmEN GASpAR “My time working at the Everett, from Administrative Assistant “My working at the Port of Everett, from Administrative Assistant extended season fortime itsaslocal vendors. support season.”atORDONA everettfarmersmarket.net. State, and the me third largest district on the U.S. customer andyour job vendors growth inthis the market community.” Accounting Clerk NIChOLE ORDONA starting an intern to now, has been aa wonAccounting Clerk NIChOLE “Interning the Port starting as an intern to now, has been won“Interning at the West Port provided provided me an an opporopporCoast. City of Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson said that “We truly appreciate the broad The 2015 market is anticipated to “My time working at the Port of Everett, from Administrative Assistant derful experience. I’vethe learned much, and “My time working at Port ofsoEverett, from tunity to observe and take part in the complex

derful experience. I’ve learned so much, and starting as an an intern intern to now, has been wonI’m still The Port has been aa tremenstarting as now, been aa wonI’m still learning. learning. Theto Port hashas been tremenderful experience. I’ve learned so much, and derfulschool experience. learned much, and for 17 years I’ve here.” Commissioners dous Director dous school for the theI’ve 17CEO/Executive years I’vesoworked worked here.” I’m still learning. The Port has been a tremenI’m still learning. The Les PortReardanz has been a tremenTroy McClelland/District 1 Commissioners CEO/Executive Director dous school for the 17 years I’ve worked here.” here.” Commissioners CEO/Executive Director Tom Stiger/District 2 school forSOpER dous the 17 years I’ve worked CAthERINE CAthERINE SOpER Troy McClelland/District 1 Les Reardanz Troy McClelland/District 1 Les Reardanz Glen Bachman/District 3 Public Affairs Tom Stiger/District Commissioners CEO/Executive Director Director Affairs Specialist Specialist Commissioners CEO/Executive Tom Stiger/District 22 Public CAthERINE SOpER CAthERINE SOpER “Completing an internship the Port Glen Bachman/District 33 11 Troy McClelland/District McClelland/District Les Reardanzat “Completing an internship at the Port was was Troy Les Reardanz Glen Bachman/District 1379789 Public Affairs Specialist the best career decision I ever made. Public Affairs Specialist Tom Stiger/District Stiger/District 22 the best career decision I ever made. II took Tom took “Completing an internship atfield theof Port wasand Glen Bachman/District Bachman/District the college to myat study, “Completing internship the Port was Glen 33 leap froman

Administrative Assistant tunity to observe and take part in the complex “Interning at the the Port provided me me an an opporopporinner workings of this bustling “Interning at inner workings ofPort this provided bustling organization. organization. tunity to observe and take part in the complex Now in permanent capacity, I’m tunityworking to observe in theConnected! complex Stay Information you would liketake to part Now working in aa and permanent capacity, I’m inininner workings ofwork this bustling bustling organization. credibly lucky to at such a great organizainner workings of this organization. see in next month’s update? Visit www.portofeverett.com credibly lucky to work at such a great organizaConnected! Information you like to Nowand working inStay permanent capacity, I’m intion with people, all to Stay Connected! Information you would would like to Please e-mail Now working in aa permanent capacity, ‘Like’ usI’m oninFacebook; ‘Follow’ tion and with exceptional exceptional people, all striving striving to see in next month’s update? Visit www.portofeverett.com credibly lucky to work at such a great organizasee in nextlisam@portofeverett.com month’shelp update? Visit www.portofeverett.com credibly lucky to work at such a great organizagrow and support our community.” us on Twitter and Instagram Please e-mail help like grow and support our community.” ‘Like’ us Facebook; ‘Follow’ Stay Connected! Connected! Information you would would like to to Stay Information Please e-mailyou ‘Like’ us on onpeople, Facebook; ‘Follow’ tion and and with exceptional exceptional people, all striving striving to tion with all to lisam@portofeverett.com us on Twitter and Instagram see in in next next month’s month’s update? update? Visit www.portofeverett.com see Visit www.portofeverett.com lisam@portofeverett.com us on Twitter and Instagram help grow and support our community.” help grow and support pAuL Please e-mail e-mail ‘Like’ us usour oncommunity.” Facebook; ‘Follow’ ‘Follow’ Please ‘Like’ on Facebook; pAuL hAGGLuND hAGGLuND lisam@portofeverett.com Marine Terminals Manager usCustomer on TwitterService and Instagram lisam@portofeverett.com


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from July 1-31. 15-14152-CMA: Chapter 11, PIC Sentry Rail Inc.; attorney for debtor: Steven C. Hathaway; attorney for special request: Elizabeth H, Shea; filed: July 8; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 15-14298-MLB: Chapter 7, Mariann Grace Danard; attorney for debtor: Craig S. Sternberg; attorney for special requests: Annette Cook; filed: July 15; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 15-14619-MLB: Chapter 7, Michael Woods; attorney for debtor: Latife H. Neu; filed: July 29; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 15-14685-MLB: Chapter 7, Kevin E. Cashmore; attorney for debtor: John L. Hoffer Jr.; filed: July 31; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between July 1 and July 30. They are listed by document type, lien number, date filed, grantor (+ signifies additional names) and address or grantee (+ signifies additional names) and agency.

Federal tax liens 201507010389: July 1; Marquez Cleaning (+), 1124 167th St. SW, Lynnwood 201507010390: July 1; Clark, Donald R., 7303 77th Drive NE, Marysville 201507010391: July 1; Tyson, El Tico J., 6101 71st Drive NE, Marysville 201507010392: July 1; Martin-Taylor, Yvonne (+), 18913 Bothell Everett Highway, Mill Creek 201507010393: July 1; Beianu, Valentin (+), 14010 33rd Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201507010394: July 1; Hardwick, Cheryl R., 3811 Lakewood Road, Stanwood 201507010395: July 1; Mother Nature’s Farm (+), 830 Sunnyside Blvd., Lake Steven 201507010397: July 1; Stephens, Murl C, 3606 99th Drive SW, Lake Stevens 201507010398: July 1; Wired Electric, 13300 Bothell-Everett Highway, PMB 687, Mill Creek 201507010399: July 1; Rogers, Courtney N (+), 207 79th Place SW, Everett 201507010400: July 1; Marsh, Christa R (+), 18106 123rd Place NE, Arlington 201507010401: July 1; Delvecchio, Louie, 2211 101st Place SE, Everett 201507010402: July 1; Guzman Trucking Inc., 5805 6th Ave. NW, Tulalip 201507010403: July 1; Chucks Mechanical Workings (+), 1912 191st St SW, Lynnwood 201507010404: July 1; Prendiville, Kirby E., 17114 29th Drive SE, Bothell 201507010405: July 1; Bradley, Matthew, 9407 50th Ave. NE, Marysville 201507010406: July 1; Lundberg, Venusfe C. (+), 5015 60th Ave. NE, Marysville 201507080613: July 8; Gonzales, David S., 781 16th Place, Mukilteo 201507080614: July 8; Raptis, Nikolaos, 9100 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds 201507080615: July 8; Raptis, Paula, 9100 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds 201507080616: July 8; Mayer, Brian J., 4715 176th St SW, Apt E11, Lynnwood 201507080617: July 8; Goodloe, Janette J., 815 167th Place SW, Lynnwood 201507080618: July 8; Maistrali Inc., PO Box 819, Lake Stevens 201507080619: July 8; Freerks, Patricia J.

Estate Of (+), 1415 84th St SE, Unit 39, Everett 201507080620: July 8; Freerks, Jerry L., 1415 84th St SE, Unit 39, Everett 201507080621: July 8; Rivas-Morales, Juan F, 14500 Admiralty Way, Lynnwood 201507080622: July 8; Roland, Cindy, 11108 Chennault Beach Road, Apt. 1114, Mukilteo 201507080623: July 8; Roland, Dennis, 11108 Chennault Beach Road, Apt. 1114, Mukilteo 201507080624: July 8; Orias, Gloria A, 14421 Ash Way, Lynnwood 201507080625: July 8; Baar, Kimberly A, PO Box 3123, Arlington 201507080626: July 8; Ziskovsky, Joseph, 9307 15th St SE, Lake Stevens 201507080627: July 8; RC Pumping Inc., 19132 Grannis Road, Bothell 201507140320: July 14; L&M Marine (+), 3216 Rockefeller Ave., Everett 201507140321: July 14; Moro, Tina West (+), 6421 Adams Log Cabin Road, Snohomish 201507140322: July 14; Jepson, Jason L., 15415 35th Ave. W, Apt. H103, Lynnwood 201507140323: July 14; Bianchi, Terri A. (+), 8515 State Ave., Unit 15, Marysville 201507140324: July 14; Brown, David L., 19420 28th Drive SE, Bothell 201507140325: July 14; Higbee, Kaylene, 17914 19th Ave. SE, Bothell 201507140326: July 14; Jones, Michael N., PO Box 147, Lynnwood 201507140327: July 14; Yourist, Harry R., 20202 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201507140328: July 14; Sonne, Molly E. (+), 602 Marine View Place, Mukilteo 201507140329: July 14; Langdon, Troy D., 5416 93rd Place SW, Mukilteo 201507140330: July 14; Goempel, Carrie K., 22409 36th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201507140341: July 14; Sharpe, Carrie J., 1515 W Casino Road, Apt. D4, Everett 201507140342: July 14; Artistic Eco Design Inc., 818 175th Ave. NE, Snohomish 201507140343: July 14; Insight Group, 20420 56th Ave. W, Suite 110, Lynnwood 201507140344: July 14; Diversified Northwest Inc., PO Box 4433, Everett 201507170031: July 17; Cement Distributors Inc., 17501 59th Ave. NE, Arlington 201507170032: July 17; Stadium Lodge, 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201507170033: July 17; Perales, Henry P, 12712 Admiralty Way, Apt. D101, Everett 201507210502: July 21; Juniors Construction (+), PO Box 306, Lynnwood 201507210503: July 21; LJL Entertainment Enterprises Inc., 6020 Evergreen Way, Everett 201507210504: July 21; American Painting Systems Inc., PO Box 5297, Lynnwood 201507210505: July 21; Graham, James S., 4921 66th Ave. NE, Marysville 201507210506: July 21; Martin, Lisa M. (+), 1729 145th Place SE, Mill Creek 201507210507: July 21; Brown, Denise M. (+), 3618 176th Place SW, Lynnwood 201507210508: July 21; Air Resources Inc., 17804 48th Drive NE, Arlington 201507210509: July 21; Sangster, Cindy, 23301 Cedar Way, Apt. U201, Mountlake Terrace 201507210510: July 21; Insight Group, 20420 56th Ave. W, Suite 110, Lynnwood 201507210511: July 21; Grant, Mindy R. (+), 7611 13th St SE, Lake Stevens 201507210542: July 21; Johnson, Annette L. (+), 601 122nd Court NE, Lake Stevens 201507210543: July 21; Sonsteng, Cl, Regency Care Center, 1355 W. Main St., Monroe 201507210544: July 21; Shaw, James R. Jr, 1526 Connors Road, Snohomish 201507210545: July 21; Sharpe, Carrie J., 1515 W Casino Road, Apt D-4, Everett 201507210546: July 21; Villaluz, Roman, 21622 Happy Valley Road, Stanwood 201507210547: July 21; Praegner, William C., 212 Old Owen Road, Trailer 8, Sultan 201507210548: July 21; Petersen, Kimberly M., PO Box 231, Edmonds 201507210549: July 21; Swank, Tracey E. (+), 5821 164th St. SW, Lynnwood

201507210550: July 21; Roberts, Natasha M. (+), 428 197th Place SW, Lynnwood 201507210551: July 21; Schlotfeldt, Thereassa L. (+), 10828 233rd St. NE, Arlington 201507210552: July 21; Perelli, Kathleen M., 3333 228th St. SE, Unit 123, Bothell 201507280099: July 28; Infrastructure Synergy Inc., PO Box 781, Snohomish 201507280100: July 28; Bruesch, Shane R., 3330 Gorin Drive, Everett 201507280101: July 28; Bruesch, Jennifer M. (+), 3330 Gorin Drive, Everett 201507280102: July 28; Perez, Martha (+), 2126 61st St SE, Everett 201507280103: July 28; Jackson, Nikki (+), 23814 84th Ave. W Edmonds 201507280104: July 28; Solis Electric Inc., 11124 42nd St SE, Snohomish 201507280105: July 28; American Painting Systems Inc., PO Box 5297, Lynnwood 201507280106: July 28; Lampkin, Kathryn, 23401 Hedlund Ave., Mountlake Terrace 201507280107: July 28; Gorcester, Scott H, 13525 Lost Lake Road, Snohomish 201507280108: July 28; Bowder, Keith T., 12905 10th Drive SE, Everett 201507280109: July 28; Ramos, Deborah, 8431 Madrona Lane, Edmonds 201507280110: July 28; Brown, Rodney L., 211 7th St., Unit B, Snohomish 201507280111: July 28; Longaker, Leslie A. (+), 9210 232nd St SW, Edmonds 201507290127: July 29; Brewer, Russell A., 914 164th St SE, Mill Creek 201507290128: July 29; Hillhouse, Phillip V., 7533 228th St SW, Apt 2, Edmonds 201507290129: July 29; Grutchfield-Whitaker, T. (+), 727 181st Ave. NE, Snohomish 201507290130: July 29; Pro Curb Appeal (+), 526 N West Ave. PMB 3, Arlington 201507290131: July 29; Hansen, Marilyn J. (+), PO Box 474, Snohomish

Release of federal tax lien 201507010396: July 1; Fournie, Brandy E. (+), 10025 333rd Ave. SE, 201507010407: July 1; Hact Construction Corp., 13410 Highway 99, Suite 201 201507010408: July 1; Fox Insulation Inc. (+), PO Box 3293, Arlington 201507010409: July 1; Reimers, Kay A. (+), 2919 127th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201507010410: July 1; La Esperanza Health Counseling, 20815 67th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201507010411: July 1; Kennedy, Michelle, 5422 138th Drive SE, Snohomish 201507010412: July 1; Hact Construction Corp., 13410 Highway 99, Suite 201, Everett 201507010414: July 1; Bob’s Market & Deli (+), 16824 44th Ave. W, Suite 200, Lynnwood 201507080628: July 8; Aeronautical Testing Service Inc., 18820 59th Drive NE, Arlington 201507080629: July 8; Jimmy Jacks Inc., 13428 Highway 99, Everett 201507080630: July 8; Koren-Jutte, V. (+), 15408 257th Ave. SE, Monroe 201507080631: July 8; Hamlin, Justin C., 17031 West Shore Road, Stanwood 201507080632: July 8; Crane, Jana L., 23908 57th Ave. SE, Woodinville 201507140331: July 14; Soley, Michael T., 7532 Lower Ridge Road, Everett 201507140332: July 14; Parker, Curtis E., 12304 5th Ave. SE, Everett 201507140333: July 14; B&E Personnel Services, 4015 Rucker Ave., Suite B, Everett 201507140334: July 14; Johnson, Randal C., 6825 Cady Road, Everett 201507140335: July 14; Custom Cabinet Creations Inc., 28005 44th Ave. NE, Arlington 201507140336: July 14; Herbs Security Inc., 3903 176th Place SW, Lynnwood 201507140337: July 14; Precision Siding Inc., 8211 Masters Court, Arlington 201507140338: July 14; Brian Van Laar Trucking Inc., PO Box 867, Marysville 201507140345: July 14; King, Keith T., 6331 107th Place NE, Marysville 201507170034: July 17; Foggie, Rickey, 2207 Everett Ave., Suite A, Everett 201507170035: July 17; Eddy, Gloria B. (+), 1619 127th Ave. NE, Apt B4

201507170036: July 17; Nelson, Adam D., 7683 SE, 27th St., PMB 197, Mercer Island 201507170037: July 17; Clark, Russell A., 7825 47th Ave. NE, Suite C, Marysville 201507170038: July 17; Clark, Russell A., 5929 Evergreen Way, Suite 101, Everett 201507170039: July 17; Clark, Russell A., 5929 Evergreen Way, Everett 201507210512: July 21; Salo, Ray O., 24570 74th NW, Stanwood 201507210517: July 21; Salo, Raymond O., 19307 95th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201507210553: July 21; Michael Leon Construction, 526 N West Ave., No. 126, Arlington 201507210555: July 21; Williams, Christopher, 17136 Cambridge St. SE, Monroe 201507210556: July 21; Lightner, Edward T., 7822 272nd St NW, Apt 107, Stanwood 201507210557: July 21; Techera, Laura B., 23323 Cedar Way, Apt. H-302, Mountlake Terrace 201507210558: July 21; Northwest Gutters Inc., 5422 138th Drive SE, Snohomish 201507210559: July 21; Ryner, Leah L., 4224 211th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201507210560: July 21; Cloete, Petronella, 6900 282nd Place NW, Stanwood 201507210561: July 21; MacGinnitie, Robert E., 23405 35th Ave. W, Brier 201507210562: July 21; Paull, Marcia A., 14014 Admiralty Way, Apt. 4-I, Lynnwood 201507220164: July 22; Warden, Robert L. 8319 Gallery Lane, Arlington 201507280113: July 28; Brandal, Ruth E., PO Box 12820, Everett 201507280114: July 28; McKee, Brian J., PO Box 3442, Lynnwood 201507280115: July 28; Schaar, Charles, 26910 92nd Ave. NW, Suite C-5 227, Stanwood 201507280116: July 28; Suyurov, Maksim L., 7421 2nd Drive SE, Everett 201507280117: July 28; White, James, 9521 64th Drive NE, Marysville 201507280118: July 28; Maynor, Joseph, PO Box 5891, Lynnwood 201507280119: July 28; Strohschnitter, William G., 12409 Heron Place, Lake Stevens 201507280120: July 28; Yancey, Elizabeth, 13232 44th Street NE, Lake Stevens 201507280121: July 28; Foxy Lady Inc., 11016 Valley Ave., East B, Puyallup 201507280122: July 28; Quinto, George F., 15175 176th Ave. SE, Monroe 201507280123: July 28; Wilson-Rogers & Associates Inc., 2006 196th St SW, Lynnwood 201507280124: July 28; Lord, Catherine A., 12906 66th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201507290132: July 29; Fore, Larry D., 30026 Oso Loop Road, Arlington

Release of federal tax lien-paid for 201507270246: July 27; Gemmer, Jodi L., 4223 Meridian Ave. N, Marysville 201507310808: July 31; Stephens, Roy, 912 Ryan Court, Snohomish

Satisfaction of Employment Security Lien 201507080168: July 8; Modern Siding, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201507080170: July 8; S&B Moto-Sports, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax lien 201507010415: July 1; Klempel, Thomas H., 4918 Seaview Way, Everett 201507010416: July 1; O’Brien, James, 20529 Maplewood Drive, Edmonds 201507010419: July 1; O’Brien, Victoria R., 20529 Maplewood Drive, Edmonds 201507170040: July 17; Ceis, Wendy, 18206 96th Drive SE, Snohomish 201507210519: July 21; Hong, Jae Y., 1411 Madrona Ave., Everett


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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

01/11

938

02/11

1,046

533

9.8

14,391

37,000

14,300

20,200

$4,211,277

226.89

494

10.4

13,175

37,600

14,300

20,500

$5,374,920

03/11

1,375

785

10.2

13,200

38,000

14,300

20,700

$3,392,214

04/11

1,233

734

9.5

12,341

38,800

14,500

21,200

$3,415,252

05/11

1,315

820

9.2

11,974

39,300

14,700

21,200

$4,103,347

06/11

1,279

866

10.1

10,737

40,200

15,200

21,500

$4,202,089

07/11

1,207

851

10.1

10,388

41,100

15,700

21,800

$4,169,784

08/11

1,325

916

9.1

9,443

41,400

15,900

22,100

$4,591,484

09/11

1,161

837

9

8,938

42,100

15,800

22,100

$4,117,816

10/11

1,226

828

8.8

9,342

42,300

15,000

21,900

$4,165,352

11/11

1,041

854

8.7

9,989

43,100

15,000

21,700

$4,317,909

12/11

1,013

846

8

10,433

43,300

14,800

21,600

$4,007,300

01/12

1,150

593

8.7

12,829

43,500

14,100

21,800

$4,030,147

02/12

1,391

698

8.9

11,430

43,800

14,300

22,400

$5,348,753

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,590,957

229.48

231.31

233.25

233.81

235.92

234.81

235.74

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622


SEPTEMBER 2015

Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

01/11

$65.26

659,071,072

231

3,491

$3.23

02/11

$72.01

635,877,009

197

3,115

$3.34

03/11

$73.93

712,625,392

225

4,327

$3.70

04/11

$79.78

637,552,469

217

4,065

$3.92

05/11

$78.03

562,380,445

257

3,972

$3.99

06/11

$73.93

543,602,022

213

4,196

$3.86

07/11

$70.47

446,373,984

241

3,935

$3.78

08/11

$66.86

521,884,745

227

4,181

$3.75

09/11

$60.51

455,591,472

192

3,896

$3.86

10/11

$65.79

493,315,047

214

3,883

$3.80

11/11

$68.69

518,192,703

188

3,334

$3.67

12/11

$73.35

695,279,915

239

3,504

$3.44

01/12

$74.18

676,580,919

246

3,256

$3.44

02/12

$74.95

688,378,176

294

3,496

$3.57

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

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26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA.See the full list of this month’s business licenses at www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington Alpine Artist & Coffee Roasters: 19114 61st Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6383; 360363-4675; Artists-Commercial Cascadia Process Services: 3601 184th Place NE, No. B, Arlington, WA 98223-3709; Process Servers Chipper Gardens: 8618 99th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6456; 360-363-4493 Cotton Candy Quilt Shop: 8021 Crown Ridge Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-4019; Blankets Retail Custom Screen Printing-Us: 5917 195th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6429; 360-386-8363; Screen Printing (Manufacturers) GT Plumbing: 16311 Forty Five Road, Arlington, WA 98223-5469; Plumbing Contractors Northend Performance: 3507 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8457; 360-386-8207; Nonclassified Outlaw Cycle Design: 19114 61st Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6383; 360-386-8079; Nonclassified Pacific Northwest Jewelry Co.: 7516 128th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7553; Jewelers-Retail Pederson Design: 18422 Teeside Lane, Arlington, WA 98223-5086; Nonclassified Place Of Grace Learning Center: 12418 96th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8856; Education Centers Project M: 10906 156th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223; Nonclassified Sandra Kubicki Inc.: 16404 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8417; 360-6532418; Nonclassified Sarah’s: 520 E Highland Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-1629; Nonclassified Simplicity Salon: 23704 13th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6459; 360-435-7965; Beauty Salons Superior Sole Welding: 5919 195th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7859; 360-403-4867; Welding Western WA Medical Group: 875 Wesley St., Arlington, WA 98223-1613; 360-435-3966; Physicians and Surgeons

Brier Shiraz Green Hope Farm: 23540 39th Place W, Brier, WA 98036-8252; Farms

Darrington Whitehorse Farmers Market: 1080 Seeman St., Darrington, WA 98241-9102; 360-436-9757; Fruits and Vegetables and Produce-Retail

Edmonds Atlas Throttle Lock: 616 Fir St., Edmonds, WA 98020-4620; Locks and Locksmiths Barbara’s Bridal Boutique: 18521 76th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-5833; 425-673-7250; Bridal Shops Barota USA Inc.: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Nonclassified Crossroads Job Trailer: 4901 148th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026; 425-967-5327; Nonclassified Diabetes For Newbies: 21813 84th Ave. W, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-7820; Diabetes Information Centers Emergency Plumbers: 21900 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8038; 425-245-9783; Plumbing Contractors FRR Center: 51 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-4111; 425-673-7165; Nonclassified Genesis Healthcare: 21400 72nd Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-7702; 425-582-5195; Health Services Gratia Domini: 23201 84th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-8603; Nonclassified RB Gould Law Office: 51 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-4111; 425-967-3856Stevenson & Sons: 7904 234th St. SW, No. A2, Edmonds, WA 98026-9305; Nonclassified Two Sewing Moms: 19637 80th Place W, Edmonds, WA 98026-6404; Sewing Contractors (Manufacturers) Westgate Clothing Outlet: 22824 100th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98020-5920; Clothing-Retail Zen Massage & Spa: 22315 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8003; Massage Therapists

Everett 76 Gas Station: 7601 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-6424; 425-353-2129; Service Stations-Gasoline and Oil Asset Construction: 2903 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3821; 425-374-8849; Construction Companies Axiom Northwest Construction: 2232 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-2322; 425-4053606; Construction Companies Best Auto Detail: 8823 Holly Drive, No. E206, Everett, WA 98208-1875; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Beyond Genetics: 12404 E Gibson Road, No. E103, Everett, WA 98204-8660 Campos Handyman: 2207 Baker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2513; Handyman Services Choux Choux Bakery: 2609 W Mukilteo Blvd., Everett, WA 98203-1417; Bakers-Retail Classic Cruises: 919 84th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-2008; Cruises Dayton’s Inc.: 1717 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3520; Nonclassified EXCO: 1529 Rainier Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1743; Nonclassified Flowers By Therese: 2122 Virginia Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2447; Florists-Retail Guilt Free: 3616 Colby Ave., No. 722, Everett, WA 98201-4773; Nonclassified

Hair By Kayla Husby: 1724 W Marine View Drive, No. 135, Everett, WA 98201-2088; Beauty Salons Hogenbout & Associates: 2707 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3528; 425-259-9126; Nonclassified Independent Lawyers: 12811 Eighth Ave. W, No. A201, Everett, WA 98204-6300; Attorneys LA Mixteca Del Norte: 7701 Hardeson Road, No. 48, Everett, WA 98203-6251 Mari J’s Highway Pot Shop: 9506 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3801; 425-379-8888; Nonclassified Matrix Enterprises: 311 125th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6414; Nonclassified NNA Ceesay’s: 9918 First Place W, Everett, WA 98204-2751; Nonclassified Nuer: 613 101st Place SE, No. 0-B, Everett, WA 98208-3967; Nonclassified Park Place Apartments Business Office: 3515 Hoyt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4717; 425404-3089; Apartments Promised Land Tutoring: 13027 Bothell Everett Highway, Everett, WA 98208-7226; 425-948-6561; Tutoring Serene Lake Publishing: 2923 York Road, Everett, WA 98204-5489; Publishers Sherry Lynne Floral Designs: 12404 E Gibson Road, No. K301, Everett, WA 98204-8675; Florists-Retail Silverlake Community: 2008 113th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-7415; 425-224-4162 Simply Joyful Inc.: PO Box 4386, Everett, WA 98204-0039; Nonclassified Super Maids: 11225 19th Ave. SE, No. D104, Everett, WA 98208-5185; Maid-Butler Service Travana King Brand: 8408 18th Ave. W, No. 5-203, Everett, WA 98204-7972; Nonclassified Weintraub Inc.: 1207 118th Place SW, Everett, WA 98204-4813; Nonclassified Windshields Etc Inc.: 1606 Rainier Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1746; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc. Xerox: 1710 100th Place SE, No. A, Everett, WA 98208-3806; 425-948-6527; Copying and Duplicating Machines and Supplies Yvette Marie NW Properties: 4922 Black Forest Lane, Everett, WA 98203-3200; Real Estate Management

Gold Bar Stillness Thru Motion: 218 Lisa Lane, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9232; Nonclassified

Granite Falls Green St Marketing: 214 S Alder Ave., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8797; 360-363-4496; Marketing Programs and Services KC Control Panels: 723 Darwins Way, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8466; Control Panels (Manufacturers)

Lake Stevens Bear Creek Products: 1611 114th Drive SE,

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A Plus NW: 15125 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2319; 425-678-8099; Nonclassified Adecco: 18600 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4715; 425-640-5799; Employment Contractors-Temporary Help Bautiz Brothers Contracting Inc.: 3610 176th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7500; Contractors Brickhouse Products: 19410 Highway 99, No. A353, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5102; General Merchandise-Retail Buckingham Performance Systems: 3612 167th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7076 Cake Pop Mama: 2008 Magnolia Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4863; Bakers-Retail First Pacific Law Group: 19101 36th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5759; 425-673-7359; Attorneys General Aerospace: 3500 188th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4716; 425-673-7515; Aerospace Industries (Manufacturers) Getchell Gas Station: 2150 164th St. SW, No. A221, Lynnwood, WA 98087; Service Stations-Gasoline and Oil Goin’ Postal: 202 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8189; Mailing and Shipping JA Hansen Supply Co.: 406 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8114; 425-245-8407; General Merchandise-Retail King & Queen Cleaning & Household: 19410 Highway 99, No. A219, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5102; 425-563-7970; Janitor Service Lechner Medical Billing: PO Box 2336, Lynnwood, WA 98036-2336; Billing Service Limetech: 18923 76th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4115; Nonclassified Mini Einstiens Learning Center: 21020 67th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036; 425-6737156; Education Centers Natural Balance Chiropractic: 16521 13th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8528; 425-7436399; Chiropractors Nguyen’s Insurance & Financial Services: 18823 Larch Way, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4948; Insurance Quinn’s Goaltending: 18919 68th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4106; Nonclassified Robison Engineering Inc.: 19401 40th Ave. W, No. 302, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5600; 206364-3343; Engineers S Nail: 4206 144th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5561; Manicuring Techjoin: 4118 148th St. SW, No. H3, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5569; Nonclassified

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Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2019; Nonclassified Epilogue Home Inspection: 15031 62nd Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8634; Real Estate Inspection Frost Goddess Bakery: 17 83rd Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3386; Bakers-Retail Oilistically Outside The Box: 12905 13th Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9779 Pacific Perk: 13714 74th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9689; Nonclassified Trestle Station: 719 91st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2420; Nonclassified

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SEPTEMBER 2015

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

BUSINESS LICENSES Todos Cellular: 3832 156th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8451; 425-245-7999; Cellular Telephones (Services) Turna: 15008 Old Manor Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2438; Nonclassified Ty Max Properties: 15523 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2324; Real Estate Management Urban Wireless: 3925 196th St. SW, No. B, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5798; Cellular Telephones (Services) Vision Driving School: 16825 48th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6401; 425-835-0029; Driving Instruction Window World: 12407 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1518; 425-374-7608; Windows

ville, WA 98270-7408; Nonclassified Snohomish Lodge 2708 Loyal: 5900 64th St. NE, No. 163, Marysville, WA 98270-4851; Fraternal Organizations Spark Hot Yoga Of Marysville: 7703 81st Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8012; Yoga

Mill Creek Candy Kirby Designs: 2203 140th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1305; Candy and Confectionery-Retail Froyo & More: 4000 138th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8973; Nonclassified Mill Creek Float: 15111 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012-9034; 425-337-5060; Nonclassified North Creek Roofing: 16000 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1743; 425-2256884; Roofing Contractors Proficio Assets: 13506 40th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8924; Nonclassified Supercuts: 13907 14th Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5553; Beauty Salons

Marysville 1AAA Absolute Home Care: 4913 61st Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7552; Home Health Service ABC Learning Center: 9315 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2267; 360-548-3261; Education Centers Big Aloha Coffee: 1202 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-3602; Coffee Shops Cutie Pies & Bow Ties Childcare: 7531 34th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7007 DK Custom Auto Repair: 1100 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4243; 360-925-6693; Automobile Repairing and Service EMK’s Business: 5520 64th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-4846; Business Services Early Bloomers Child Care: 7229 44th Ave. NW, Marysville, WA 98270; Child Care Service Guru Music School Seattle: 922 Union Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4661; Music Instruction-Instrumental Quality Flooring: 4330 125th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8749; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing Simple Venture: 7719 86th Ave. NE, Marys-

Monroe Alamir Auto Body: 320 E Fremont St., No. A101, Monroe, WA 98272-2359; Automobile Body-Repairing and Painting Coin-O-Matic: 500 E Main St., Monroe, WA 98272-1515; 360-794-2908; Nonclassified G&H Enterprises: 16104 179th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2025; Nonclassified Penn Brookside Orthodontic Lab: 16844 Copper Mountain Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2805; Laboratories-Dental Remedy Organix: 507 S Lewis St., Monroe, WA 98272-2324; Organic Foods and Services

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Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4903 Corzec Corp: 6608 216th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2084; 425-697-2111 Esculent Health: 23300 63rd Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2903; Health Services Jean Juarez Salons N Spa: 6007 244th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5427; Beauty Salons MPS Business Services: 4107 236th St. SW, No. M302, Mountlake Terrace, WA 980434318; Business Services PN Westy: 4403 223rd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4131; Nonclassified Professional Consulting: 6912 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2169; 425582-7159; Consultants-Business Velocity: 6017 244th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5400; 425-771-1656

Mukilteo Anuket Commercial Loans: 8050 Mukilteo Speedway, No. 1332, Mukilteo, WA 982757058; Loans Embrace The Journey: 4829 99th Place SW, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4233; Nonclassified Envy Restoration: 4433 Russell Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5483; 425-263-9907; Building Restoration and Preservation Paiwan Tribal Art: 11108 Chennault Beach Road, No. 112, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4904; Arts Organizations and Information Sydney Bakery & Wine Bar: 9047 Hargreaves Place, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3302; Bakers-Retail

Quil Ceda Village Asics Retail Store: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8081; 360-6512332; Shoes-Retail Godiva Chocolatier: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8081; 360-

651-1169; Candy and Confectionery-Retail

Snohomish 2808 Hoyt Ave.: 18202 Fifth St. NE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9686; Nonclassified All Ways Building: 15621 146th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6732; 360-805-6539; Building Contractors Diane’s Treats & Sweets: 3824 195th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7427; Candy and Confectionery-Retail Josh’s Taps & Caps: 6533 65th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-5193; Hats-Retail Sanford Roofing: 20617 Mero Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7313; Roofing Contractors Soccer Shots Seattle: 20532 76th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5166; Soccer Clubs Swish Swash Window Wash: 7901 80th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-5822; Window Cleaning Three60: 18125 102nd Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8028; Nonclassified

Stanwood Carmelite Book Store & Gift: PO Box 1386, Stanwood, WA 98292-1386; Book Dealers-Retail Holboy Entertainment: 31717 3rd Ave. NE, Stanwood, WA 98292-7191; Entertainment KTVS Consulting: 723 310th St. NE, Stanwood, WA 98292-5421; Consultants-Business Sally Kaye Enterprises: 32101B 76th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5802; Nonclassified Shamrock Shower Pans Northwest: 26127 74th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6215; Nonclassified

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28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2015

Dr. Brenda Kodama Cascade Eye and Skin Centers Dermatologist Northwest Master Gardener Pug lover

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Dr. Kodama—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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Herald Business Journal - 09.01.2015  

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Herald Business Journal - 09.01.2015  

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