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Thank You To Our Firefighters SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Largest Fire in State History Okanogan Complex burns 258,399 acres Tonasket mayor applauds firefighters, local efforts to help evacuees and those who lost homes well. Unfortunately, the fires could burn for several more months, according to Fire spokesman Rick Isaacson. Since the first of the fires, Nine Mile, OKANOGAN COUNTY – The Okanogan Complex Fire has grown to started on Thursday, Aug. 13, there be the largest wild fire in Washington have been several evacuations declared, including of the State History, even surtowns of Tonasket, passing last year’s devastating record break“I’d rather have people Conconully, Twisp and in the Aeneas Valley, ing fires in the Methow alive to gripe than Pine Creek and Tunk and Pateros areas dead because we areas. Currently the known as the Carlton Level 3 evacuation, Complex. didn’t evacuate” which was declared on The Okanogan Patrick Plumb, Mayor, Thursday, Aug. 20 in Complex which City of Tonasket Tonasket, has dropped includes fires in the to a Level 1, accordLime Belt, Blue Lake, ing to Tonasket Mayor Tunk Block, Beaver Patrick Plumb, who Lake and Nine Mile areas in Okanogan County, encom- has been keeping his town updated passes some 258,399 through the Facebook page, Tonasket, acres, more than Washington, Stuff You Should Know. “There’s been some grumbling about 400 square miles, and is being said to the Level 3 evacuation of town, but I’ve be only 10 percent talked to the DNR and many of them contained, accord- said the fire outside of Tonasket was acting to the Northeast ing in a way they’d never seen before,” Washington Fire said Mayor Plumb. “When you get fireUpdate. Fire officials fighters with this kind of experience and Mayor Plumb say more than 1200 the reports they were getting, you underpeople are battling stand why the call was made. “The EOC was prudent... I’d rather the fire which has threatened as many as 5000 homes. Among the crews battling have people alive to gripe than dead the fire are US Forest and DNR fire- because we didn’t evacuate. We lost no fighters, 200 Washington State National homes in Tonasket, but the numbers Guardsmen, local fire departments, fire lost elsewhere, if you heard them they’d departments from all over the state and make you cry. I believe this is going to be citizen volunteers. Sixteen of the fire- much worse than the Carlton in terms of fighters from Australia who came to homes lost.” Plumb added, “I think the Tonasket battle the fires raging across the Western United States have joined the fight firefighters and heavy equipment operaagainst the Okanogan Complex Fires as BY GARY A. DE VON editor@gazette-tribune.com

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, EMS Director Michael Greene and his family were among the lucky ones as his North Pine Creek Road residence was spared by fire, although most of the land around the home looked like scorched earth. Right, Okanogan County Emergency Management ordered State Highway 20 closed and a Level 3 immediate evacuation of Tonasket last Thursday, Aug. 20. The highway reopened the next day, but fire fighting was still intense as fires burned in many areas of the county. The Level 3 has been lifted for Tonasket, but other areas remain in immediate danger from the flames.

SEE FIRES | PG A12

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Resources in place for victims of recent fires BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Community members as well as concerned citizens far and wide have stepped up to offer assistance to those affected by the Okanogan Complex wildfires and the firefighters working hard to prevent further losses. Rhonda Hinkley has been named General Public Liaison, as there are so many grassroots efforts springing forward it’s hard for people seeking assistance or offering helping hands to know exactly where to turn. Hinkley can be reached at 509-429-1865. The Tonasket Distribution Center, located next to the Tonasket Visitor and Business Information Center at 215 S. Whitcomb Ave. is taking donations for firefighters as well as for the shelter set up at the Community Cultural Center (CCC) in Tonasket. Small donations can be taken directly to the Distribution Center, but large donations need

to be coordinated with Hinkley. The Distribution Center is open daily from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Donations of building materials can be taken to the Green Okanogan Recycling Center (GO) at 3 Rodeo Road, off Highway 97 at Clarkson Mill Road. GO is open Tuesdays noon to 6 p.m. and Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The only place free meals are being served right now to evacuees and volunteers is at the CCC, so anyone seeking a meal or wanting to cook, serve or donate food should contact the shelter coordinator Laurel Sylvan at (509) 322-6254. Accounts have been set up at Grants Market and Beyers Market for donations to purchase milk and other perishable items. The CCC is set up with cots, hygiene items and some clothing; and is serving three meals a day. People with animals seeking shelter can camp for free at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds, in either tents or self-contained RVs. The rodeo grounds has stalls avail-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 35

able for horses and crates available for dogs and cats. For information, contact Eli Rampley at (509) 846-5028 or Roger Sawyer at (509) 429-8036. Emergency crews, DNR and anyone else fighting fires in need of a shower can take one at Maximus Fitness and Training Center, 224 W. Fourth in Tonasket. Contact Christa Levine at 509-322-2946 or 509-486-4548 for the entry code. For structural and property losses, people are advised to contact the following: Okanogan Assessor, (509) 422-7190; Red Cross, (509) 422-3440 or 1-800733-2767 (1-800-RedCross); FEMA in Brewster, 202-646-2500 or 1-800-6213362; and Washington State Emergency Center 253-512-7000. For shelter needs, contact the CCC at 411 Western Ave, 509-486-1328 or Sylvan at 509-322-6254; the Home Depot in Omak 509-826-5459; or Brewster High School 509-689-3418, where Red Cross has established a shelter. A firefighter/fire victims fund has

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Community Cultural Center at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket is now open 24/7 as an evacuation shelter. Meals are served at 8 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. and there’s a pot of soup on the stove to feed the hungry any time of day. Face masks and other supplies are available. been set up with the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club at PO Box 120, Tonasket, 98855. The Lions Club is a non profit 501 (c) 3, with 100% of donations to the Fire Relief Fund going to victims. Other organizations with specific fire funds are Okanogan County Community Action, Community Foundation of North Central Washington located out of Wenatchee and the American Legion.

SEE RESOURCES| PG A12

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

An online community resource matching donations of goods and services to unmet needs called Co-op Corkboard Classifieds is available at www.tonasketcoop.com/corkboards/. “If ever there was a way a horrible disaster like these wildfires could have

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Calendar Classifieds

A6-7 A6 A8-9

Real Estate Fire Photos Obits

A9 A10-11 A12


PAGE A2

NEWS

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

Locals shine with strength and steadfastness in wake of chaos NVH. “We felt we were in the to come to Oroville after being position to support our commu- evacuated from Tonasket. So I got nity, and more chaos ensued when ahold of school officials and we “We served over 50 meals yester- we were asked to evacuate the opened up the elementary school An evacuation shelter and soup kitchen has been established at day, and 13 people spent the night,” shelter. Now others in the com- for them.” Booker said the community the Community Cultural Center said shelter volunteer Maureen munity are opening up shelters, so we are going immediately kicked in with dona(CCC) in Tonasket, 411 Western Phillips Tuesday, to support tions of supplies and volunteer Ave. The shelter has cots for Aug. 25. Plans for “We will be here as long them in their support. sleeping and the soup’s on for a shelter efforts.” “About 70 people stayed hot meal anytime, as well three the as we are staffed and to “When they Thursday night, and Frontier meals a day being served around started come together the Foods came first thing Friday 8 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. the CCC can continue evacuated shelter, it was morning with breakfast for everyThe CCC has wireless inter- Aug. 23, after to afford to host us.” evacuapretty devastat- one,” Booker said, adding that the net for those needing to connect the ing and people Red Cross called around 9 a.m. with friends and family, and a list tion shelter set Laurel Sylvan, were blown to Friday morning and instructed of resources for people without up by North Coordinator, Tonasket Evacuation Shelter and Soup Kitchen the four winds,” them to shut down and send Facebook or internet; including Valley Hospital at Sylvan said. everyone to Brewster. emergency contact information (NVH) She said she “We had people there to run for structural and property loss. Tonasket High was was receiv- the shelter and volunteers willing People can also receive vouchers School ing supplies from Kim Jacobs, to stay and help, but we had to for showers and to do their laun- evacuated Aug. 20. “We were just starting to get Safety and Disaster Preparedness tell everyone to head out,” Booker dry at the Junction. “We still need volunteers to things smoothed out and able Officer with NVH, leftover from said. “We got another call back keep this place staffed 24/7. We to take care of the community their shelter; and coordinating ten minutes later, and they said, will be here as long as we are when were ordered by Okanogan with Kim Cline to receive supplies ‘Don’t send them to Brewster. staffed and the CCC can continue County Emergency Management from the Tonasket Distribution We are full. But it was too late. Everyone had left except for ten to afford to host us,” said shelter to evacuate,” said Kelly Cariker, Center. “Kim (Cline) was starting to or 15 people who didn’t have the coordinator Laurel Sylvan, add- Chief Information Officer with inventory items needed for fire- means to get anywhere. Then we fighters and fire victims, so she heard about the Havillah Road had a pipeline of resources,” said evacuation, and they were told to Sylvan. “I told her we could start go to Oroville, and we thought, setting up here so we could cook ‘Where are they going to go?’ and serve food and have a place so we thought, ‘We are here to for people to land and get out of help.’ By that time the damage the smoke.” was done.” Cariker said over 100 people Booker said they had further were registered inside the shel- conversations with the Red Cross, ter when they and they finally were evacuatagreed that ed, along with ‘That’s great “We felt we were in the you are there.’ people parked in RVs in the “Friday position to support our high school evening, the community, and more parking lot. Border Control “Emergency chaos ensued when we came in and Incident the were asked to evacuate.” staffed Command told shelter overKelly Cariker, us to send peonight along ple to Brewster, Chief Information Officer, North Valley with school Hospital but the local staff members radio station so other voluntold people teers could go to go north to Oroville,” said home, and the Oroville Police Cariker. “We knew they would stopped in periodically for secuneed supplies up there, so we rity checks. The American Legion took up the food that had been cooked dinner for all the evacprepared by the hospital; sand- uees and brought it over,” said wiches, snacks and drinks.” Booker. “Talking with the Red Oroville had a Red Cross Cross Friday night, they said, ‘Go Shelter in place earlier at the ele- ahead and stay open.’ We got four mentary school, but that one had or five new people Friday night.” Booker said they decided to close been closed down and relocated to Brewster—the inspiration for the shelter Saturday, Aug. 22. “We got donations for people to NVH to set up the shelter at THS. “I was headed to Ellisforde to have gas money to get to Omak, see if my daughter needed to as we heard a shelter had opened evacuate last Thursday, when I up there and they wouldn’t have Katie Teachout/staff photo saw some people outside school,” to go all the way to Brewster. We Corrina Karrer of Aeneas Valley helps prepare breakfast Tuesday morning, said Oroville High School sec- made sure they left with at least a Aug. 25, along with her parents Dan and Mary Kerrer. “It was either sit retary Daphne Booker. “I spoke blanket and a pillow because they there in the smoke or come here and help,” said Dan Kerrer. to them and was told they were didn’t have anything when they showed up.” Booker said the Osoyoos Holiday Inn donated a bunch of bedding, along with toiletries such as shampoos and soaps and “all the things you don’t think about until you don’t have them.” She said there were about 35 BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

ing, “They will need monetary donations also, to keep this place running.”

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Brothers Steven and Mark Morris enjoy an early morning cup of java before heading to work for Smith and Nelson. They said they would probably set up a tent at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds, where they would be able to have their animals with them. local volunteers of all ages pitch- parking lot Wednesday, Aug. 19, ing in over the course of the two before being evacuated from the days. shelter the next day. “We started out with just four “They told us to go to Brewster, or five volunteers, but pretty but I stayed with a friend in soon there were a lot of school Omak for two days. Then I called staff and comemergency munity memservices, and bers; includthey said this “We got another call ing teenagers place was who all wanted open again, back ten minutes later to become so I came and they said, ‘Don’t involved in helpback up,” said ing out,” said send them to Brewster. Zimmerman Kally Berlinger. Sunday, Aug. We are full.’ But it was 23. “It’s not “Daphne did an amazing job really open, too late.” getting everyone but the police Daphne Booker, registered and have come Oroville High School secretary and set up. We have through and shelter volunteer an incredible no one has little communisaid anything; ty here. Hughes and I’m hopDepartment ing to go Store and Akins stayed open until home tomorrow. But a number of about 1 a.m. as they had a bunch people have come by and asked if of people coming in. Everyone there’s a place to sleep.” really pulled together and did a Zimmerman said he apprecigreat job.” ated the efforts of everyone postAccording to Bill Fortune of ing information on social media. the Red Cross Public Affairs “They’ve been doing a Team in Wenatchee, they origi- very good job of updating on nally opened an evacuation shel- Facebook, and I have been able to ter at Oroville Elementary School stay informed,” said Zimmerman. on August 14, “but it wasn’t even “There’s no real radio station open for a day. We had to close it or TV station except out of down real fast and send the mate- Spokane, so how else do you stay rials and staff to Brewster where informed?” we could serve more people.” “In a chaotic situation, you can Fortune said the shelter in only trust the information you Brewster is still open, with five personally verify,” Cariker said. residents in place Sunday, Aug. “When we evacuated, we put up 23. The highest population count notices at THS to go to Brewster, was 136 on August 22. Other Red as that’s what we were told to Cross shelters are open in Loon do. I called down there to make Lake, Chelan, Sterling, Hunter, sure the Brewster shelter was still Coulee Dam and Colville. The open.” Red Cross is supporting the CCC Cariker said Okanogan shelter as well as the shelter at the County Emergency Management Cornerstone Christian Church asked NVH to evacuate the hosin Omak with cots and materi- pital and Extended Care Unit as als. Fortune said one person was well last Thursday. available at the shelter in Omak “We met as a group at the hosfor disaster mental health. pital, and after looking at all the Aeneas Valley resident and information, we made a group decievacuee Bill Zimmerman parked his self-contained RV in the THS SEE SHELTER | PG A3


AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS Dads MOVE moved to help local fire victims BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

A nonprofit out of Tacoma called the Gazette-Tribune wanting to donate to local fire victims who lost their homes. “We want the money to all go directly to the fire victims; do you have any idea where we should go from here?” asked a man identifying himself as Steve Williams. I didn’t, but I knew who would. I called Mayor Patrick Plumb. “Any Lions club can take money to go to the Tonasket/ Okanogan Valley Lions Club Fire Relief fund. One hundred percent of proceeds goes to fire victims for their short and long term needs,” said Plumb. “Sounds like a plan,” said Williams. “The Lions Club will be perfect.” The non profit is a group called Dad’s MOVE that work with families who have children with behavioral health issues. “John Bodkins lives up in your

area, just outside of Tonasket. He is a member of Dad’s MOVE, and he lost everything but his house. So we got some donations coming in, and we’re asking for more. We just felt like we wanted to help with all the people over there,” Williams said. Dad’s MOVE has been active locally in the past, partnering with PAVE (Partnerships for Action Voices for Empowerment) to conduct trainings for parents of children with mental health issues. Williams said the all-volunteer organization provides services all over the state, and all the money they raise goes out to families. “The families in your area who have lost their homes, these kids have nothing to go back to school with, absolutely nothing. That’s a tough situation for the kids,” he said. “I see this whole thing will have been a traumatic event for them, and kids risk suffering from a level of PTSD that might not show up for six months to a year. We can work with the families

and help them through this.” “I don’t think people will understand the devastation of it all until it’s over,” said Bodkins. “Then they feel the release of emotion and the power of stress. The emotional and psychological aspects I am sure will last for years to come.” “Most of us in Dad’s MOVE live in the big cities with lots of services available. In Auburn we have three large mental health agencies, and they’re all on a bus route. But where you’re at it’s not always so easy,” said Williams. “So we like to go to Okanogan and Island County and other outlying areas where there’s not a lot of services and we can give support.” He said the members are all fathers who have raised kids with behavioral health problems, and now want to help other families. “If we can all do just a little bit for others, we’d all make the world a better place,” said Williams.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket Distribution Center volunteers (back row, l-r) Paul Turner, Jerod Williams, Katie Woods, Daniel Pratt, Kymi Pratt, Taylor Kalma; and (front row, l-r) Brenda Turner, Kim Cline, Lisa Hollister and Derrek Hollister work Sunday, Aug. 23, to distribute donated items to firefighters in camps and people in the CCC evacuation shelter.

Local distribution center receiving donations they aren’t looking for that,” said Cline. “They are looking for ‘I will do.’” Pratt said he was amazed at how people had come together to help those in need.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

SHELTER | FROM A2

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Gimme shelter, gimme soup. Find CCC between Wells Fargo Bank and Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op.

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

decision to shelter in place and to keep our hospital open for anyone injured in the north county; not knowing if people could get to another hospital because of road closures. It would have been very traumatic to evacuate people in the long term care division unless absolutely necessary,” Cariker said. NVH administration, local EMS, Safety Officer Jacobs and a County Emergency Management liaison were all involved in the decision to stay put. “We did come up with a plan just in case anything changed and we did have to move,” said Cariker, citing outside support being offered from DSHS, the Veterans Administration, District 7 Disaster Preparedness, MidValley Hospital and Lake Chelan

Community Hospital. “We were well prepared to evacuate if the need arose,” said Cariker, adding, “Our heart goes out to the community, and anyone who is displaced or impacted by the fire. We are here if you need us.” At the CCC, Sylvan is looking to meet not just people’s immediate needs; but their long-term ones as well, supplying them with phone numbers for the Okanogan Assessor’s Office, Red Cross, FEMA and the Washington State Emergency Center. “People who have had losses need to let the people know. If they don’t get on the lists, they won’t get the help that is available now,” Sylvan said. Contact the CCC at 509-4861328 or contact Sylvan at 509322-6254.

Out on the Town...

The Tonasket Distribution Center came together quickly Sunday, Aug. 23. “I saw a need and it all came together today,” said Daniel Pratt. “We originally started it to take donations for firefighters, but there are so many needs out there we didn’t want to turn any donations away. So we found people who can store things.” Pratt said the center is supporting local volunteer fire districts who don’t receive funding from the DNR, as well as displayed people seeking shelter at the Community Cultural Center. Paul Turner is the liaison with the fire districts; with runners distributing items to the different districts and fire camps. “We’re filling a niche that wasn’t filled,” Pratt said. “Kim (Cline) stepped up this morning, and this is really working.” “I kept saying, ‘I will help.’ But

“They weren’t looking for ‘I will help.’ They were looking for ‘I will do.’” Kim Cline, Tonasket Distribution Center

“Everyone is so loving and supportive. I want to focus on keeping the unity going and keep the community engaged together, even when this is all over,” Pratt said. He said for next winter, he was hoping to pull together some firefighter training for volunteers and locals.

DINING & Entertainment

“If we follow the rules, sometimes we are left without a choice. I understand their point of view, but they need to understand I am going to stand up and fight to defend my property,” Pratt said. Items needed for firefighters include the following: jerky, granola bars, water, gum, Gatorade packet drink mix with electrolytes or Emergency C packets to add to water, 100% cotton white socks, t-shirts and underwear, gallon size ziplock bags, Chapstick, Visine, baby wipes, ibuprofen, Tylenol, bandanas and feminine hygiene tampons/pads. One suggestion made was to pre-package items for firemen in a large ziplock bag, including: one pair white socks, one white t-shirt, one granola bar, one electrolyte drink packet and a pack of gum. Anyone able to volunteer with sorting or delivering items is asked to contact Cline at (509) 560-3238.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Scott Joseph Girard, 51, Oroville, pleaded guilty July 21 to failure to register as a sex offender (third or subsequent conviction), unlawful possession of a firearm and first-degree unlawful hunting of wild birds. The court dismissed several charges: three counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, one count of making a false or misleading statement, four counts of first-degree unlawful hunting of wild birds and 14 counts of second-degree hunting of wild birds. Girard was sentenced to 57 months in prison and fined $600 for the March 1, 2014 crimes. Richard Wayne Verbeck, 54, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Aug. 18 to POCS (methamphetamine) and fourth-degree assault (DV). Verbeck was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $2,210.50. The crimes occurred April 3 and 9. Michael Anthony Eisen, 26, Oroville, pleaded guilty Aug. 18 to residential burglary, thirddegree possession of stolen property, having or making burglary tools and thirddegree malicious mischief. The court dismissed a charge of POCS (methamphetamine). Eisen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 90 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50 for the May 28 crimes. Kyle William Nicholas Johnson, 18, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 18 to possession of a stolen motor vehicle. Johnson was sentenced to 25 months of community supervision with the state Department of Corrections and fined $1,110.50 for the June 12 crime. Benjamin Allen Paul Zimmer, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 18 to POCS (heroin). The court dismissed a charge of POCS (methamphetamine). Zimmer was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $2,210.50 for the March 12 crime. Kristen Ann Bob, 33, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 18 to attempted second-degree robbery (lesser included of attempted first-degree robbery). Bob was sentenced to 12.75 months in prison and fined $600 for the Aug. 29, 2014 crime. The court found probable cause to charge Justin Shane Rogers, 25, Okanogan, with first-degree burglary and second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crimes allegedly occurred July 22. The court found probable cause to charge Robert James Long, 29, Oroville, with two counts of second-degree burglary and one count of thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 2. The court probable cause to charge Iaian W. Turpin, 20, Red Deer, Alberta, with POCS (LSD), POCS (ecstasy) and possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 8 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Daniel Lee Lucero, 27, Okanogan, with seconddegree malicious mischief, four counts of second-degree vehicle prowl and three counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 14. The court found probable cause to charge Gary Ray Raub, 26, Okanogan, with harassment (threats to kill) (DV) and fourth-degree assault (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 15. The court found probable cause to charge Marcos Buenaventura Moran, 22, Omak, with second-degree assault (strangulation or suffocation) (DV) and second-degree assault (intentional assault) (DV). The crimes alleged occurred Aug. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Eli Paul Van Brunt, 30, Omak, with seconddegree burglary and thirddegree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 18.

Juvenile A 16-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to third-degree theft. In a second case, the same boy pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to an additional charge of

third-degree theft. The boy was sentenced to a total of eight days in detention and assessed a total of $35.55 in restitution to Wal Mart. A 14-year-old Tonasket boy pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to second-degree malicious mischief (DV), harassment (DV) and possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The boy was sentenced to 12 days in detention with credit for 12 days served. The crimes occurred July 3. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 28. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to second-degree burglary, third-degree theft and fourthdegree assault. The boy was sentenced to 60 days in detention with credit for nine days served, and 52-65 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration. The crimes occurred July 26. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to theft of a motor vehicle. The boy was sentenced to 90 hours of community service and 10 days in detention. He was fined $400 for the July 14 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 28. In a second case, the same boy pleaded guilty to two counts of third-degree theft. The boy was sentenced to four days in detention and assessed $57.16 in restitution to Wal Mart. Those crimes occurred June 27 and 28.

Civil The state Department of Revenue assessed the following business for unpaid taxes, penalties and interest: Northwest Floor and Finishes Co., Oroville, $7,608.39. The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed the following business for unpaid workers compensation taxes, penalties and interest: Sapp Inc., Okanogan, $6,160.68.

DISTRICT COURT Wayne Dale Rieb, 28, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Rieb was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Michel Louis Savoie, 60, Riverside, had a first-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Shannon Tawny Simpson, 30, Okanogan, guilty of obstruction and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of third-degree DWLS and DUI. Simpson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined a total of $4,597. Taylor Marie Smiley, 24, Omak, guilty of second-degree criminal trespassing and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of two counts of third-degree theft. Smiley was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,429. Esteban Valdovinos Martinez, 58, Oroville, had a thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Valdovinos Martinez was fined $200. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, Omak, guilty on two counts of thirddegree theft. Watson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,616. James Dean Wilson, 59, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Wilson had a charge dismissed: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Wilson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Wesley Paul Wirth, 38, Tonasket, had an obstruction charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Aug. 17, 2015

Domestic dispute on Henry Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Automobile theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on N. Country Vue Rd. near Omak. Disorderly conduct on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Lost property on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Wallet reported missing. Harassment on Gooseberry Way near Tonasket. DWLS on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Koala Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on Henderson Way near Tonasket. Martel Christine Benson, 24, booked for DUI and seconddegree DWLS. Jesus Hernandez Garcia, 19, booked for third-degree DWLS. Randy Lee Timentwa, 34, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: fourth-degree assault (DV) and violation of a no-contact order (DV).

Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015 Sex offense on Rose St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Nickell St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Panorama Point near Omak. Evacuation on Conconully Rd. and Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Vehicle prowl on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Wildland fire on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. Arson on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Sour Dough Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on N. Birch St. in Omak. Rape on Jasmine St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Window reported broken. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Cynthia Ann Bellamy, 49, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Marcos Buenaventura Moran, 22, booked for second-degree assault (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV). Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 51, booked on an OCSO warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Donald Joe Sutton Jr., 33, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: first-degree negligent driving and obstruction. Dylan Jay Mulligan, 28, court commitment for third-degree child molestation. Dustin Hale Jones, 40, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI. Benjamin Allen Paul Zimmer, 25, court commitment for POCS (heroin). Jonathan Leroy Stotts, 22, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree criminal trespassing and thirddegree malicious mischief (DV).

Wednesday Aug. 19, 2015 Wildland fire on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Riverside. Wildland fire on S. Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Evacuation on N. Main St. in Riverside. Wildland fire on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Malicious mischief on Elgin Way

ATTENTION Wells Reservoir Users

Douglas PUD will lower the Wells Reservoir about 8 feet to 773 feet above sea level for the month of September. This is necessary to repair the Methow River sedimentation control groins near Pateros. The river level is being coordinated with work at Chief Joseph Dam and area recreation sites.

Use CAUTION on the Reservoir!

near Oroville. Sailboat reported on shore. Malicious mischief on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Wildland fire on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Disorderly conduct on N. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. DWLS on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Mark Dee Penley, 57, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Gary Steven Waters, 28, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Ryan Wade Marchand, 31, DOC detainer. James Carl Walker Jr., 47, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Miguel Angel Dominguez Santana, 19, DOC detainer.

Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015 Malicious mischief on Seven Lakes Rd. near Riverside. Escape on Jasmine St. in Omak. Wildland fire on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Evacuation on Five Mile Rd. near Tonasket. Wildland fire on Pleasant Valley Rd. near Okanogan. Evacuation on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Wildland fire on Sinlahekin Rd. near Loomis. Automobile theft on Index St. in Omak. Threats on Koala Ave. in Omak. Threats on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Automobile theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Recovered vehicle on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Assault on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Trespassing on 19th Ave. in Oroville Disorderly conduct on 19th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Illegal burning on Main St. in Oroville. Kjell Ray Lester, 49, booked for DUI.

Friday, Aug. 21, 2015 Burglary on E. Riverview Rd. near Tonasket. Weapons offense on Penny Lane near Oroville. Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Tools and antlers reported missing. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Candy reported missing. Malicious mischief on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on W. High Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on Edmonds St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Pine St. in

Omak. Burglary on Ironwood St. in Omak. Silver and bonds reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Burglary on W. Fourth St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Columbia St. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Omak. Jose Dionicio Perez Garcia, 32, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Gregory Scott Lester, 43, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for disorderly conduct.

Saturday, Aug. 22, 2015 DUI on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Soren Peterson Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Rehmke Rd. near Tonasket. Structure fire on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Two reports of automobile theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Pine St. in Omak. Assault on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Automobile theft on Ironwood St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Recovered vehicle on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Graffiti reported. Trespassing on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Marcos Pino Hernandez, 43, booked for DUI. Jeffrey Vaughn, no middle name listed, 45, booked for DUI, felon in possession of a firearm and fourth-degree assault. Darla Lucille Larkin, 28, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: DUI and first-degree DWLS. Moriah Michelle Harry, 19, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Holli Nicole St. Clair, 31, booked for third-degree theft.

Sunday, Aug. 23, 2015 DUI on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on N. Main St. in Conconully. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Spring Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Sinlahekin Rd. near Loomis. Vehicle prowl on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Birch St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on Garfield St. in Omak. Alcohol offense on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Ironwood St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Hwy. 20

near Tonasket. Alyss Ann Williams, 23, booked for DUI. Nicole Ashley Geddes, 23, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for third-degree theft. Tommie Bernard Tucker, 46, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Cleyber Ernesto Ruiz Magdaleno, 32, booked for DUI. Alexander James Mills, 23, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Edgar C. Martinez Chavez, 27, booked on three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Daniqua Jo Stensgar, 24, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

New OPD officer catches burglary suspect THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – Oroville’s newest police officer, Frank Koutelier, investigated a complaint of burglary at Spence’s Laundry Mat on Aug. 06, 2015. “Officer Koutelieris arrested Robert Long in connection to the burglary. Long was charged with second degree burglary, second degree malicious mischief and third degree theft,” said Oroville Police Chief Todd Hill. Officer Koutelieris also linked Long to a burglary at Global Gifts and Gallary and a burglary at Two Brunettes Day Spa on Main Street in Oroville. Long was also charged with burglary, and malicious mischief in connection to those burglaries, according to Chief Hill. “However, there has been no progress on the burglary of the food bank,” said Hill.


AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Bright eyed and bushy tailed at 7 a.m. last Tuesday morning, Brenda Turner loads donated food at the Tonasket Distribution Center.

Give yourselves a well deserved pat on the back

The outpouring of help being provided by the people in the north county is amazing. Even when the national aid agencies got involved in confusing the issue, the people in the Tonasket and Oroville area soldiered on. We had a shelter set up in Oroville after the Nine Mile Fire and again when things started getting hot in the Tonasket area, leading to the evacuation of the whole town last week, as well as many of the areas in the surrounding highlands to the east and the Pine Creek area to the southwest. Churches, businesses and just ordinary people have been lending a hand to their neighbors. This is what an emergency management plan should look like. And the outpouring doesn’t stop at the county’s borders, many people from across the state and across the nation have called up asking how they too can help. While sometimes big politics can make you start to doubt your fellow man, it’s times like these that make you remember your humanity. Katie has done a good job this week covering the human side of the fire and we’ve had contributions from many other sources – including our former reporter/photographer Brent Baker and our courts reporter Zach Van Brunt. Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb has done an excellent job of keeping his constituents and many others aware of the constantly changing situation that is the Okanogan Complex. He gleans, or as he puts it “steals” every bit of information he can and passes it along via the Tonasket, Washington Stuff You Should Know News Network on Facebook. If there is one thing that can be said about today’s emergencies, as long as there is a cell tower or wifi connection, we can all stay up to date through social media. The county’s emergency alert system seems to be a great tool for keeping people aware of the constantly changing situation – it seemed like there was a new text for an evacuation order every five minutes for awhile there. Most of us in Okanogan County have family and friends that these fires have touched – whether it was an evac notice, the loss of homes, property or something like the loss of grazing land that might affect future business. Keep up the good work North County, your contributions to helping your neighbor ranks right up there with those amazing men and women on the front lines fighting the fire.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Untruthful statements about ambulance Dear Gary, I continue to find it totally frustrating that there are people that continue to give inaccurate, untruthful and/or “hearsay” statements about the City of Oroville Ambulance service and feel it necessary to try to clarify a few things. Mr. Allen, you are implying to the community that the volunteers only get $10 per on call shift, and that there is no other pay! That’s the same figure that you use when you try to compare LifeLine’s cost to the Ambulance Department cost. And where did you get that tax revenue figure? The budget amount for 2015 Special EMS levy tax for Oroville $26,899. I think our citizens deserve the truth! So, here are a few facts: In 2013, total actual wages and benefits paid to Ambulance Dept. personnel was $78,846 and there were 311 calls. 2014 figures were $76,726 for 313 calls. The city’s Ambulance Dept. members are paid $9 per meeting/drill; EMS members receive $14 per hour per call and AEM Tech’s receive $19 per hour per call. They are compensated $10 per on call shift (which means they have signed up to be available to take calls for particular period). Yes, they have made the commitment to be available should there be an ambulance call, but they can certainly take showers (referencing a statement made on the Oroville Friends Group Facebook page) and go about their daily routine until if/when there is the need for them to actually respond. When they do respond, then they also get paid wages as listed above. They even get $7.00 per hour when they stand-by for special events. In essence, they are always paid for their time, understanding that the pay may not be equivalent to a full-time position. You also

need to keep in mind that there is a fine line in what the Fed’s consider to be a “volunteer” stipend and &ldqu o;paid” employee. The “North Star” group requested (after the 2015 Budget had already been adopted) an increase from the $10 on call pay to $36. By my calculations, that would mean an increase of roughly $57,000 to the 2015 Budget.... Where would those dollars come from? So now we’re talking about a wage and benefits package of possibly $136,000… add to that all the operating expenditures, such as fuel, tires, operating and medical supplies and equipment for the ambulance; liability, facility and vehicle insurance, dispatching fees, etc. Approving their request would have made the 2015 Budget around $235,000. And for all of you that believe our citizens will be paying TWICE by entering into an agreement with LifeLine, well, guess what - Oroville bills too! Always has, because the city’s special EMS levy is roughly only $27,000 and the EMS District’s levy is $139,500……. Together, the levy monies collected do not cover all expenses, let alone providing the necessary dollars to save up for the next new ambulance or large equipment purchase. The city bills your insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, whatever. In most cases, they have to write off what isn’t covered, but people do get bills! So, what could possibly be more “non-profit” than our local government agency? It is terribly sad that a department that was established by the city in 1982 has now been totally destroyed by a few people… not everyone in the department resigned but enough did that the City had to take actions necessary to keep ambulance service available. And, how can anyone say that those that submitted their resignations were fired???? Instead of taking a bit more time to work out an equitable resolution, the City was given an ultimatum, backed into a cor-

ner, whatever you want to call it. Because Council has had to deal with so many personnel issues in that department throughout the years, I understand and totally support the City Council in their decision. And remember, when you are pointing arrows at the Mayor, you are pointing the wrong way…. City Council makes these decisions. Chuck is just the messenger. Thank you for reading! Kathy M. Jones Oroville

Wondering about the cost for donut run Dear Editor, I just watched the new Oroville ambulance drive into Frontier foods. One person got out and went in. The other had a conversation with another person in the parking lot. After 15 minutes or so they loaded up and went to the donut shop. Then around the block and back to the ambulance building. I wonder what that donut run cost the people of Oroville? I have not heard what our 90 day contract with Lifeline is costing. Could someone tell us? Let me run the numbers that I see. I can’t imagine an EMT working for less than $15 so with benefits that has to be over $20. Lets use that figure. 24 hours in a day times 30 days in a month comes to 720 hours. Have to have 2 people so that is 1440 hours. At $20 per hour that is $28800 per month bare minimum for employee cost. At that rate if there are 2 calls that is just too bad. The second call can wait for Tonasket if they are not busy. I think if we made $345,600 available annually for the volunteers for their wages we would have a lot of volunteers. Probably enough to run 2 ambulances. And they wouldn’t take the ambulances for donuts. Brian Thompson Oroville

Firepocalypse 2015 OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIO-ECONOMIC WRITER

During the Tri-pod Fire of ‘06, my friend the contractor asked me to drive his fourteen-wheel dumper pulling a trailer-born trac-hoe on a firefighting contract. His regular driver had been waylaid by a family emergency, and my friend knew I had a commercial driver’s license and experience in big trucks. Thus did I first observe wildland firefightBill Slusher ers. Sheeee-zus, I remember thinking, watching the young men and women carrying equipment up steep terrain in intense heat, chin deep in ash, dust and smoke. Last I saw anybody working that hard, I was flying Grunts in Vietnam. Then there was last week at Rancho Slusho on the Okanogan River north of Riverside. The Beast had lain brooding Tuesday night, glowing orange in the cliffs above my home, licking its wounds from water-bomber hits the previous day. “This ain’t over, human,” The Beast seemed to be saying in a course tongue on the smoky night air, “come tomorrow, we’re going to settle this.” No sleep that night, watching the orange glows like War of the Worlds, waiting for alien movement. Late Wednesday, The Beast made good on its promise. It rose up from relative dormancy, blew flames up to twenty feet high in a raging orange roil a thousand yards wide, and down the cliffs it came for me. I’ll never forget the awe I felt. It was what some Japanese beach comber must have felt in 2011 when he looked easterly out to sea at a limitless,

onrushing cascade of ocean, a stunning sense of utter personal insignificance. That Wednesday afternoon, The Beast charged roaring to within yards of my home and other buildings. It seemed to rage and thrash at the barriers it ultimately confronted. All along the eastern edge of my property it clawed frantically to find a some way over the firebreaks or past the water cannons. At last it seemed to tower and scream in hysterical frustration, then, ever contemptuously, it soared up the cliffs to the north leaving nothing but blackened, smoking rock in its wake. It torched a few thousand dollars of my wooden horse fencing as a sort of departing flip-off, but it abjectly failed to so much as smudge my home or outbuildings. We were to be on the short list of lucky Okanogan Countians who drew a long straw for Firepocalypse 2015. Oh. I did leave out a couple of details, didn’t I? Late that Wednesday morning, I had stared up the cliffs wondering if my irrigation water cannons would be up to the task, wishing I had had the tree firm I hired three weeks ago cut away yet more of the foliage behind the house. Then a man in a dirty yellow shirt, green Nomex pants and a hard-hat just appeared at my elbow. “You done good, cutting all that fuel back,” Yellow Shirt says, “those irrigation sprayers back of the house, they gonna help big time. How ‘bout we get a cat up there, cut a firebreak, have some of the guys cut that sage away from your workshop?” Like I was going to say, oh no you ecooutlaw, you might traumatize my petunias? I wanted to tell him he could cut that whole damn mountain off and throw it in Lake Roosevelt. I said help yourself, Senor Yellow

Shirt. He wagged his finger over his head and trucks streamed in off the road. A dozer roared and clanked up the hill. A chorus of snarling chainsaws lit up behind the shop. For two non-stop hot, smoky, dusty hours, Yellow Shirts dug Custer’s Last Stand behind Rancho Slusho. Then they left for other assignments. I couldn’t thank them enough. But, just as magically, they reappeared right before the five p.m. Charge of The Beast. As the blaze assaulted in frustration, the wildfire crew staged between my home and the flames, but due to their fantastic preparation all they needed to do was lean on their shovels and watch as The Beast bounced again and again off their firebreak and my wet ground. Some laughed and slapped hands as The Beast bellowed and fled up the cliffs. Adios Beast, I said. Not this year. On Thursday I would post a picture on FaceBook of those fabulous wildland firefighters casually leaning on their shovels watching The Beast fail at destroying my home. Misunderstanding, someone commented on the post: “You’d think those firefighter ‘heros’ would at least fight the fire.” Rest easy. They ... did ... fight The Beast, and for me they won, and they are, for me, far more than cliche ‘heros’. They fight wildfire only partly for the money, for they earn every dime of it. They do it for the ... fight. They do it because they want to seek out a crucible upon which to try their character. They are ... Wildland Firefighters. William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to atwilliamslusher@live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Things different when we were in school Fires and deaths, very scare business. Another month about to come to a close and what a hot and smoky one it has been. Homes and other farm buildings lost, and as of Friday, three firefighters lives were recorded as dead and of course the plane crash and the two fellows in it, which was not associated with the forest fires. Very scary business! Syd Hardenburgh and Harry Rhoads, both former residents, were visiting last week, had to take quite a detour to get back to Moses Lake, going by way of Curlew, Wilbur etc. Many couldn’t go where they wanted to due to road closures. Pastor Leon Alden and his wife were evacuated from their home in Tonasket, and have been living in the Oroville United Methodist Church. That’s what

Looking for donations for Parking Lot Sale SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Due to the positive response to our Parking Lot Sale we will repeat the performance one more time in September. Donations of quality goods for the sale, before hand, are most appreciated. (No clothes, please.) See Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or myself if you have something of value to donate. We will be having another Pancake Breakfast, the same day, on Saturday, Sept. 12. Mark your calendar. We are soliciting donations, and looking for an installer, for the task of installing new dining room ceiling acoustic tiles. Lunches next week are as follows: Tuesday, September 1, Cabbage Patch Stew; Thursday, September 3, Spinach Lasagna; Friday, September 4, BBQ

Quilt Show on Saturday, Aug. 29 SUBMITTED BY VICKY DIDENHOVER HIGHLAND STITCHERS

A little about our group. The group started out with 7 women. They started making charity quilts but were financing the fabric and batting themselves. During this time they made 12 quilts that were donated to Ruth’s House of Hope (a half-way house for women in Oroville) so each woman would have a quilt on their bed and could take it with them when they completed the program if they wanted. They also adopted them during Christmas and donated food and personal care items for the women. They also donated quilts to Care Net for the babies. After a year of doing that they realized they needed to make money somehow to offset the costs because it was too expensive for them to keep going...... so the quilt show was born. The first year they filled half the Grange with a variety of items for sale. After the sale, they were able to buy the supplies needed to make quilts for area veterans. Marylou Kriner heard what they were doing so she decided to sell their items year round in her store because it was such a good cause. This helped get a better funding stream and allowed them to make even more items. The second quilt show they displayed 37 patriotic quilts and displayed memento’s of veterans of the area. It has always been important to them to show the community what they were accomplishing with the support they gave them by purchasing their items. During this year they also made quilts to donate to local families that had lost everything in fires and to the Grange church for the families they were supporting for the holidays. The next year, they decided to donate quilts to a Native American Missionary that works with children on the reservations in the Pacific Northwest. They donated 67 quilts. Just before the quilt show, the worst wild fire in state history occurred in

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000

could be called,“Getting close to your work‚“ Some days, last week, the mail truck did not make it through, due to smoke, fire and road closure. Also some didn’t have TV, phone service or internet service. The sun looked like a big orange beach ball, due to smoke. Even in Seattle at the baseball game, they used the lights during the day, due to smoke from Eastern Washington. And just when I was going to give up on the Mariner’s because it seemed such a waste of time watching a bunch of “losers,” they won another game, and now I’m hooked again. Some of the homes that had to be evacuated have been looted by some very “sick minded” people. How low can one

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Chicken. For Seniors age 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. Repas la semaine prochaine sont les suivants: le mardi, Septembre 1, Cabbage Patch Stew; Jeudi, Septembre 3, lasagne aux épinards; Vendredi, Septembre 4, poulet BBQ. Pour les personnes âgées de 60 ans et plus, le don suggéré est de 3,50 $, ou comme on peut se permettre. Le prix pour les moins de 60 est de 8,00 $. Seems like the largest thing on everyone’s mind is the devastating fires in Okanogan County and throughout the West. The Governor and the President have declared a state of emergency. Homeland Security is designated to deal with the emergency. What does that mean? It means that what we have in Okanogan County is very serious. The shel-

HIGHLAND STITCHERS the Pateros area. During the quilt show they asked for donations to help them make quilts for the families that lost everything and that the proceeds from the quilt show would be used to make quilts for them. In September, they donated 37 quilts to the Pateros Quilt Guild to be donated to the families in need. The Vanessa Behan Children’s Crisis Center came to their attention. The Center needed donations to help the kids during the winter. In March they donated 67 quilts to the Center. The Molson

crisp... 5 or 6 cups sliced, tart apples. get, to add “insult to injury?” Caleb Haney, after having finished two 1 and 1/2 sticks butter. 1 cup oatmeal years in junior college, is trying his wings (quick cooking or old fashioned), 1 cup brown sugar. 1/2 tsp. Salt and and traveling, by himself, to 3 tsp. cinnamon. Colorado, perhaps giving (Anything with that much thoughts along the way, to butter has got to be good). “now what do I want to do?“ Spray the inside of a slow I’m pretty sure he doesn’t cooker with cooking spray. want to be a career cherry Place apples in the cooker. line worker. Melt butter in small pan and Our daughter, Vicki Haney, place remaining ingredients has retired from teaching, but and stir well, and scatter topnot totally, as she taught three ping over the apples. Cover of her grandsons to sing a and cook 3 hours, on high. song, for the dedication of THIS & THAT Turn off the power and let her granddaughter, Mia Faith stand for about a half hour Chryst, at the Free Methodist Joyce Emry before serving. Now doesn’t Church. It was exceptional, that sound good and easy? considering that the little boys are aged 6, 8 and 10 and had four And a scoop of ice cream couldn’t hurt I’m sure. On second thought maybe I’ll days to learn the song. My husband has been on kitchen duty, put in an order to my cook. My pinochle club went to Wannacut again, as I had to revert back to crutches. Lake, last week for lunch and cards, but (Many other duties too). As soon as I am back in the kitchen, I I missed out. The memorial service that was schedwant to try this crock pot recipe for apple

ter in Republic is housing over 300 people as this is being written. I’d say this is serious indeed. But, don’t forget, its not too late to pray. And, why doesn’t the Senior property tax exemption keep up with inflation? In 1966 the $60,000 exemption allowed just about any self-respecting Senior a home exemption. My father, at that time, paid no property taxes on his home on Mercer Island. It’s time for bold legislation in Olympia to correct this situation. Pray for this, too. We still have lots of good food, interesting fun activities, and friends at the Senior Center. If you are dismayed, or bored, sitting at home waiting for the fires to go out, and the smoke to subside, and the end to come, then, come on down and join us for food, fun, and friendship. Food is good for thought. Fun is fleeting. But, yes, friendship. Now that really is Something. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Barbara Cline; Pinochle, Evelyn Dull; High Man, Clayton Emry; High Woman, Dolly Engelbretson.

Grange also donated a bag of stuffed animals and the Wool Co-op ladies donated knitted hats and a couple of blankets. The Center was amazed that the small group and a community so far from Spokane could accomplish so much. The groups membership has changed over the last couple of years, but they are still making quilts to donate to our community and people in need. This years quilt show will be held at the Molson Grange on Saturday, August 29th from 9am to 3 pm. The group will be donating this years quilts to people impacted in our community by area fires. Thank you for supporting our quilt show.

Come Live & Work as a

Utilization Review RN on the beautiful scenic coast of Washington State!

Harbors Home Health & Hospice is currently seeking a UR Nurse for its clinical team. This position is responsible for reviewing patient documentation to ensure compliance with state and federal Home Health and Hospice guidelines. Responsible for ensuring appropriate ICD-9 and ICD-10 coding and sequencing while working directly with clinical staff to clarify documentation and data integrity, as well as, the integrity and consistency of OASIS documentation. Position requires an Oasis certification, as well as, experience with Medicare/Medicaid and private insurance regulations. Harbors offers competitive salaries with an excellent benefits package. Harbors Home Health & Hospice has been a part of the Pacific Northwest for over 30 years!

We Want Your Photos! Attention Military Families we are beginning to put together the 2016 Hometown Soldier Calendar and want your son or daughter to be a part of it! Submit up to three photos of your soldier, airman, sailor, marine, or guard IN UNIFORM: formal, at work, or working

out! We’d really love to see a photo with both YOU and your MILITARY member together. To participate, either the family’s or soldier’s hometown must be in North Central Washington and the soldier must be currently serving in a branch of the U.S. Military. You do not have to be a member of the NCW Blue Star Mothers (WA3) to participate but

Big ‘thank you’ to fire fighters

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUSIE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Would like to start out by thanking all the Fire Fighters for all their hard work keeping us all safe. Our prayers go out to the people that have lost homes, animals, and anything else. (Be safe) There will be Bingo this Friday and the Pick-8 is over $15,000.

Say a prayer for the firefighters SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

As I sit here at my computer this morning (8/24/15) and wondering what to do. Our minds and thoughts have been on nothing but smoke, fire, pack up a

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

www.gazette-tribune.com

Come in and play starting at 7 p.m. The Kitchen will be open for burgers also and several other items, opening at 5:30 p.m. Joker Poker is growing again, it’s up to $947. Come in and get your tickets, they are $1.00 each and the drawing is on Saturday at 6:45 p.m. You could win half (must be present to win). Saturday is also Karaoke at 9 p.m.

HILLTOP COMMENTS few things, wind, where to go if necessary. Do we go or do we stay??? With all of these thoughts running through our minds and friends and relatives calling to “see what’s happening.” We are going in circles. Sandy and Bill at the Mercantile

BIRTHS

we do ask you to stand up with us and become a member today by going online at www.bluestarmothers.org or contact ncw. bluestars@yahoo.com. This invitation to participate in the calendar extends to ALL. Be sure your neighbor knows about this opportunity! We work hard to make your soldier’s page the best it can be. The higher the resolution of the photos the better. Please keep them above 640x480 pixels in size. The last day we can receive photos will be on Constitution Day, Sept. 17, 2015. with Linda Wood. Thank you to everyone that brought desserts and salads for the Memorial last week. If you brought a bowl, it has been washed and ready to pick-up. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Ted Zachman, second place Carol Ross, low score went to JoAnn Michels, and last pinochle to Ted Zachman and Ken Cook. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. have been taking messages for many here on the Hilltop. Others are caring for neighbors and friends and making sure all are well. We all hope and pray that things go better this week. To my knowledge neither the Molson Quilt Show or the Chesaw Hot August Nights events that are scheduled for August 29th have NOT been cancelled. So the Lord willing we will see you on Saturday. The Car Show starts at 8 a.m. and the Quilt Show starts at 9 a.m. Say a Prayer and a “Thank You” to all of the Firefighters.

Alex Dale Ekenes-Ward was born to Kristine Ekenes-Ward and Jay Ward of Tonasket, Wash. at 5:05 a.m. on August 19, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. The baby weighed nine pounds, nine ounces at birth and was 22 inches long. The grandparents are Patricia Ekenses of Seattle, Wash. and Sabine and Rick Temby of Tonasket and Jeff and Cora Ward of Tonasket. 312 S. Whitcomb

509-486-0615

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 Oliver, B.C. REGULAR SHOWTIMES Sun.–Mon.–Tues.–Thurs.....7:30p.m. Fri.–Sat....7:00 &9:00p.m. (unless otherwise stated)

SOUTHPAW THURS.-FRI.

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

A Heart

Felt

Thank You to All Firefighters!

You’re Our HEROES!

AUG.27- 28. SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:25 PM

PIXELS SAT.-SUN.–MON.–TUES.AUG. 29-30–31, SEPT. 1. SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:25 PM THE GIFT THURS. - FRI. SEPT 3-4

SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:10 PM

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON 147 min R

Work as a

Registered Nurse

Harbors Home Health & Hospice is an equal opportunity employer.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Email resume to: Melissa@myhhhh.org Or mail to: HR Dept., Harbors Home Health & Hospice, 201 7th St., Hoquiam, WA 98550.

SUBSCRIBE

uled for Norene Harnasch, was canceled, due to travel conditions caused by the fire and has been postponed until November. Further notice reminders will be posted. Was surprised to learn of the death of Dixie LeMay, in Hawaii, just two weeks prior to that of Sally Smith Campbell. The ladies were sisters and grew up in the area. There is still unrest with the ambulance and EMT folks. Hopefully things will level out. As I said before they are all good folks who have difference of opinions and it must be worked out, in a satisfactory manner. Rumors were going about that Sally Eder, while traveling in Alaska, had an accident. She did fall, injuring one wrist and one elbow, but is very much alive. Maybe extreme heat has caused some garden items to be damaged, but watermelon and corn on the cob have been superb. Red Cross blood draw will be September 9th, noon to 5 p.m. at the United Methodist Church. ‘Til next week.

on the beautiful scenic coast of Washington State!

BIOGRAPHY / DRAMA / MUSIC - STARRING O’SHEA JACKSON JR, COREY HAWKINS, JASON MITCHELL FRI. 7:00. SAT. *4:15, 8:00. SUN. *3:15, 7:00, MON- THURS. 6:30

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

MAX

PG

111 min

ADVENTURE, FAMILY - STARRING THOMAS HADEN CHURCH, JOSH WIGGINS, LUKE KLEINTANK. FRI. 6:15, 9:15. SAT. *3:15, 6:15, 9:15. SUN. *3:15, 6:15. MON-THURS.: 6:45

Harbors Home Health & Hospice, a leading agency committed to providing Grays Harbor with a variety of in-home healthcare services, is currently seeking full-time Registered Nurses. Harbors offers competitive salaries with a great benefits package. Individuals will be responsible for working with a team of health care providers in the coordination of skilled nursing care in a home setting. Come join the leading team! Home Health, hospice, acute care, and/or skilled nursing facility experience preferred. Requires current Registered Nursing license, driver's license, auto insurance and reliable transportation.

SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE 85 min

Email resume to: Melissa@myhhhh.org Or mail to: HR Dept., Harbors Home Health & Hospice, 201 7th St., Hoquiam, WA 98550.

ACTION / COMEDY - STARRING JESSE EISENBERG, KRISTEN STEWART, CONNIE BRITTON. FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45 SUN. *3:45, 6:45,. MON-THURS. 7:00

Harbors Home Health & Hospice is an equal opportunity employer.

PG

ANIMATED ADVENTURE/COMEDY FROM THE MAKERS OF WALLACE AND GROMIT. FRI. 6:30. 9:30. SAT. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30. SUN. *3:30, 6:30. MON-THURS.: 6:30

AMERICAN ULTRA

Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

96 min

R

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Highland Stitchers 4th Annual Quilt Show MOLSON The Highland Stitchers will be presenting their Fourth Annual Quilt Show on Saturday, Aug. 29 at the Molson Grange from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be raffles, drawings, food and a noon lunch. Come Enjoy. Everyone Welcome!

Outdoor Movie Night

Cancelled

Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group will meet on Thursday, Aug. 27 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments.

NVH Board Meeting

will perform at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, Aug. 27. Blues, rock, dancing tunes all make up the play list. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or check the Events Page at www. estherbricques.com.

TONASKET - The North Valley Board of Commissioners announce that the regularly scheduled Board meeting Thursday, Aug. 27 has been canceled. The next Regular Board meeting will be held on Thursday Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. in the Administration Board Room, North Valley Hospital, 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket.

Slippery Slope to perform at Winery OROVILLE – Slippery Slope, comprised of Chuck Oakes, Ron Champagne and Jim Attwood,

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago Friday, August 16 - 23, 1940: At a meeting of the County Commissioners held last week, a resolution was passed calling for a special election to vote on an additional 3 mil levy for the erection of a county hospital, the proposed site of which would be between Omak and Okanogan. Residents of the outlying areas of the county that they wouldn‘t approve such a hospital to serve only the mid-county area. A deal was completed during the week whereby Joe Larson, of Oroville, purchased the Oroville Pharmacy and stock from L. W. Lamoreaux, taking possession immediately. Joe is a former Oroville resident graduating from Oroville high school in 1933. During the past couple of months, the rooms of the Peerless Hotel have undergone an almost complete transformation. A number of the rooms have been completely remodeled while others have been kalsomined and painted, new carpets and numerous other amenities. Two bedrooms have been entirely changed over into eight rooms with a bath for each room. The cherry brining crew of Kelley, Farqular and Co., of Salem Oregon, which has been busy here in Oroville for the past several weeks, will complete their work of sorting and pitting and will move on to either Wenatchee or The Dalles. Over two hundred tons of cherries were processed here this season. Recently, the town had Stanley Kray, licensed and civil engineer lay out ten new survey monuments in order that those wishing to locate property lines might have definite point from which to start. Some score or more years ago, a blueeyed 12 year old Spokane school boy, was playing Indians and Cowboys shouting, “bing, bing, bing” as he picked of imaginary Apaches. That “bing” business stuck to him as his playmates started calling him “Bing” Crosby. On Tuesday, September 3 the Oroville Schools will re-open for the l940-41 school year. Most of the former teachers will be returning with Lloyd Priebe replacing John Crabb as Superintendent. Oroville’s new City Jail harbored its first real prisoner Monday evening, when Andy LeMay, Town Marshall, took up and held for investigation, a man giving the name of J. V. Girard claiming to come from Carlton. He had in his possession, a number of electrical contracts and checks from various individuals on the Fist National Bank in Tonasket. His car was reported as stolen and the bank had no record of an account under that name.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago August 19 -26, 1965: The last session of the legislature approved additional 150 troopers for the Washington State Patrol. Qualifications are: 22 1/2 through 29 years of age; 6 feet to 6 feet 6 inches in height; High school graduate; U.S. Citizen a resident of the State of Washington; good reputation and excellent physical condition. Starting salary as a trooper cadet is $424.00 per month, $450.00 per month when they enter the academy. The top salary is $634.00 per month for troopers. The Molson Grange Community Service Committee has consented to work on the historical site at Molson. Financial aid is needed at this time. Fixtures from the old bank have been located and funds are

HAVILLAH - Join the Immanuel Lutheran Church in Havillah, on Friday, Aug. 28, at 8 p.m. for a free outdoor Movie Night. They will be showing McFarland USA, the inspiring true story of underdogs triumphing over tremendous obstacles. This heart-warming drama follows novice runners who strive to build a cross-country team in their predominantly Latino high school, and is rated PG. Bring your lawn chairs, and we will provide the popcorn and lemonade. In case of rain, we will move inside. For more information call Linda Kuhlmann at 509485-2544.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Aug. 29 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors are welcome

needed to help secure the fixtures and move them to the building. Occasionally, as space is available, Pictures of “The Citizens of Tomorrow” are presented. This week’s selection includes Dwayne, age 5 and Sharron, age 7, children of Mr. and Mrs. Jackie Morris; Tammy Noreen, age 4 and Laurie Ann, age 3, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Teas; Brian McDougall, age 10 months, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Mc Dougall; Joe, age 3, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Finsen; Beverly, age 8, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Verbeck and Diane Jo, age 2, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Duane Ward. The Oroville Schools opened on Monday, August 23, with a total of 925 pupils enrolled from Kindergarten through grade 12. The Oroville Grade School enrollment jumped from 482 a year ago to 507; in the Junior-Senior High group was six less than a year ago. A short program to dedicate the new Beth Lake Road will be held next Tuesday afternoon, August 31. It will be held at the boundary of the Okanogan National Forest and Okanogan County. Stafford Lewis, Chairman of the Timber and Roads Committee of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, stated that “this new road is a big mileage saver for people traveling Oroville to Spokane, with a distance of 180 miles, only 33 of which are not on pavement.” Grocery Prices: 6 to 8lb. turkeys, $.39 per lb.; Sliced beef liver, $.29 per lb.; 1 1/2lb. Cheese, $.99; Local garden tomatoes, $.10 per lb.; Lemons, 5 for $.19; Locally grown corn, $.39 per doz; Cinnamon rolls, lots of raisins and cinnamon, $.39 per doz;

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago August 16 -30, 1990: Councilman Dennis Wilder announced that after more seven years with the Oroville City Council, he will be stepping down to devote more of his time to his many business interests. Wilder’s seat will no remain empty for long as a smooth transition should take place as Jimmie Dale Walker agreed to take his place. Cliff ’s Tire of Republic has opened a branch store in Tonasket. Situated in the Dennison Radiator building one half mile south of Tonasket and the store manager is Elmer Field. Mr. Field formerly managed the Cascade Tire Center for a number of years. Ted Christensen, Oroville Youth Soccer President, received a $250.00 donation from Hans and Helen Bergh, a donation from the Sons of American Legion member Dustin Christensen for $150.00 and a further donation from the Oroville Kiwanis Club for $300.00 from President, Clayton Emry. The Fourth Annual “Sagebrush Loggers” Tourney gets under way Saturday, Aug. 25 at 10 a.m. It began in 1986 when a demonstration of logging skills was added to the fall Mardi Gras. We had only six contestants that first year. The Tonasket City Council heard a report that the approval of a $280,000 grant for the renovation of Fourth Street has been granted by the Transportation Improvement Board. The Town has been seeding the TIB grant since 1986. After much debate, the Oroville City Council decided to go with the recommendation of the local Library Board and re-annex the Oroville Library. The unanimous decision will empower the library district to levy a tax of 50 cents per thousand of assessed property values on the residents of Oroville. In a Letter to the Editor, Don James, Administrator of the North Valley Hospital, has the pleasure of announcing that the NVH had passed the annual DHSH survey of July 1990 with excellent results. With remarks like “excellent patient care” and “excellent facility” the DHSH team leader said‚ “My mother was ready for a nursing home, I would want her here”. Real Estate for Sale: Drastically reduced, 2 bdrm house with basement, single garage, wood and electric, on large corner lot, $23,500.00; Own a Home/Rent a Home, 2 houses on the large property ‚Äì live in one and rent the other, wood stoves, all appliances, extra outbuildings, fenced yard, $36,500.00; 16x24 cabin on 9 plus acres with 300 plus feet of creek frontage, Super buy at $10,900.00, low down and owner contract.

and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more information call 509-4762096.

Nashville Country Star OROVILLE - The Oroville American Legion brings back Nashville Country Star with the best talent from across the state on Saturday, Aug. 29 starting at 6 p.m. in the American Legion Hall. The show features a mix of classic, country and 50s and 60s rock and roll music. There will also be a desert auction. The public is welcome, admission is $8.

Oroville Rural EMS Meeting OROVILLE There will be an Oroville Rural EMS meeting on Thursday, Sept. 3 at 7:30 p.m. in the Oroville Firehall (please note, this is a change of location).For more information contact 509476-2817

OROVILLE - Valley Christian Fellowship presents “Jungle Jaunt,” a unique summer VBS program. Come explore the rainforest and get to know God through Bible stories, music, games, crafts and more! Jungle Jaunt will be held each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins July 5 and continues through Sept. 20. Open to kids age 4 to 11. For more information, or to arrange a ride for your child, call 509-5600228. Valley Christian Fellowship is located at 142 East Oroville Road.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30

Vacation Bible School

a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • August 27, 2015

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale TONASKET. OLD ORCHARD ESTATES SUBDIVISION 2 bedroom, 2 bath, full basement, expressive looking home. Home to have fresh outside paint, new lower level carpet, new bushes and ready to move in soon. $145,000. Call Jan at 509-486-1397.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Tonasket. OPEN HOUSE SAT 8/22, 9am- 2pm, 120 South State Frontage Rd. Spacious 4 BR, 2 BA home! Bright, sunny great room with many windows. 2400 SF open concept. 4 acres features 3 car garage, loafing shed. $240,000. FSBO 509-486-2451.

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS $1,495 4BR 3BA Lake Osoyoos 1 level home, family rm, garage w/shop. $810 2BR + Den, 2BA Open Concept. $795; 2BR Sonora Shores deluxe condo. $825; 3BR, 2BA Lake Osoyoos Apt. $425; Cute 1BR Apt.

Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Hillside Park Senior Apartments 515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Light Manufacturing Space. 3000 SqFt. High Ceiling Secure Facility $2000/Mo Ellisforde. 509.486.4310 OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004. Oroville House for rent Available now. lake front 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Includes fridge, stove, washer/dryer, fireplace. $700/mo suitable for 1 or 2 people security deposit $700. 1 yr lease req. Call 788 437 2079 / 509 476 2121

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN DENTAL: Dental Assistant One part time on an as needed basis, bilingual preferred and one full time, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. Patient Registration Rep. Full time BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Help Wanted North Valley Hospital is looking for a Community Outreach Liaison This is a part time position. Bachelor’s Degree and 2 years experience in healthcare desirable. For more details please call (506)486-3185.

Business/Office space for lease. Prime spot downtown Tonasket. $375/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873.

Statewides

ES Outreach Program Paraeducator

$10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a part-time ES Outreach Program Paraeducator. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position will remain open until filled. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Garage & Yard Sale CHESAW.

HUGE STORAGE SHED SALE NEXT WEEKEND Indoors and Outdoors Chesaw Hot August Nights Weekend August 29th & 30th, 9 pm - 4 am. Antiques, Collectibles, Vintage, Kitchen Appliances, Oak Entertainment Center, Tupperware, Melmac Burlap Raffiaware, electric appliances, Collectible Tins, Canning Jars, Kitchenware, furniture, VHS Movies, canning jars, Bev Doolittle paintings and much more. 2043 Chesaw Road.

Gold Digger Apples, Inc Apple & Pear Warehouse Packers Needed Apply at main office 1220 Ironwood Oroville, WA

EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR EVENT

REGIONAL

for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4,397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In Stock, ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: w w w. N o r w o o d S aw m i l l s. c o m 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N EMPLOYMENT SEEKING AREA COORDINATOR. Manage successful tutoring program in your area. We will provide all back room expenses/payroll. Great business opportunity for dedicated entrepreneur.1-800-293-3091 AcademicTutoringService@gmail.com

Public Notices Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Okanogan County Cemetery District 4 Board that a special Board meeting will held for a Public Hearing on Monday, August 31, 2015 beginning at 1:00 pm, at the American Legion Hall 314 14th Ave, in Oroville, WA. This hearing is to consider a supplemental budget adjustment in the amount of 40,000 dollars from the endowment fund to the general fund for the 2015 Budget expenditures. This supplemental is for the general care, maintenance and in the best interest of the Cemetery District 4 in Oroville, Washington. Persons wishing to comment may attend the hearing or submit their comments in writing to Cemetery District 4, PO Box 764, Oroville, Washington. The Public is welcome to attend. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 20, 27, 2015 #OVG652422 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 4/30/2015 1:56:21 PM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D

Public Notices

Public Notices

eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-15-659236-SW APN No.: 20130330700 Title Order No.: 150027239-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): RANDELL CRAMER, DEBRA CRAMER Deed of Trust Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3104237 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 9/4/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 7 AND 8, BLOCK 33, MAP OF OROVILLE, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK “A” OF PLATS, PAGE 46, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 502 CENTRAL AVE, OROVILLE, WA 98844 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/7/2006, recorded 8/12/2006, under 3104237 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from RANDELL CRAMER AND DEBRA CRAMER, HUSBAND AND WIFE , as Grantor(s), to BAINES TITLE COMPANY, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $19,594.62 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $101,426.39 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 11/1/2013 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 9/4/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 8/24/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 8/24/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 8/24/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the

terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address( es ): NAME RANDELL CRAMER AND DEBRA CRAMER, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 502 CENTRAL AVE, OROVILLE, WA 98844 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 3/27/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/of-

Crosswords

Continued on next page

24. Glut

9. Butt of jokes

28. “Malcolm X” director 29. Curb, with “in”

10. Railway coach with reserved seats (2 wds)

33. More inexplicable

11. Victorian, for one

34. Representations of Mary mourning Jesus

12. “A jealous mistress”: Emerson

36. Dog command

21. Type of poem, e.g. an ode

37. 1973 triple crown winner

22. “___ moment”

40. Live wire, so to speak

25. Brawl

42. Hungarian

26. Beauty

43. Aimless

27. “... ___ he drove out of sight”

46. Rich soil mixture

30. Always, in verse

47. Bean counter, for short

31. Any thing

50. Childhood disease with red spots

32. Area of South Africa

52. Diamond stat

35. Kind of palm

909 Bob Neal Rd

54. Contiguous

37. “Buona ___” (Italian greeting)

58. Burning

38. Scandinavian shag rug

SAT, AUG 29th, 10am.

61. ___ vera

39. Poets’ feet

62. Box office take

40. Beaver’s work

63. Brownish gray

41. “___ to Billie Joe”

64. Absorbed

44. Blossom

65. Sean Connery, for one

45. Big ___ Conference

66. Moth larva that spins tent-like webs

47. Invertebrates’ posterior intestines

67. “Trick” joint

48. Igneous rock formed below the earth’s surface

STORAGE AUCTION Tabers Storage

Proceeds Benefit Okanogan Wildlife League Info: 509-560-0963

Statewides

HOUSE FOR RENT IN OROVILLE. Available September 15th, 2 BD, possible 3, 1 BA, pellet stove, stove & fidge, A/C. You pay utilities, $675/MO. $400 deposit, no pets or smoking. Must have references. (509)560-9032

Commercial Rentals

Help Wanted

WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF AUGUST 24, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus

ANSWERS

Across 1. “Drat!” 5. Demoiselle 9. Asparagus unit 14. The America’s Cup trophy, e.g. 15. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g. 16. Dawdle 17. Perlman of “Cheers” 18. Atomizer output 19. Be bombastic 20. Grades five through eight (2 wds) 23. Back street

68. Beach shades

13. “The Catcher in the ___”

34. Submarine’s viewing device

49. Holdings Down

51. Utter 53. Anxiety

1. Skin-related

55. Brio

2. For some time

56. Catch, in a way

3. Bug

57. Allocate, with “out”

4. Mark

58. Absorbed, as a cost

5. Charades, e.g.

59. Joke

6. Western blue flag, e.g.

60. Big galoot

7. Reduced instruction set computer (acronym) 8. Carpenter’s machine


AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE August 27, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE Contractors and Vendors Lists As authorized under RCW 35.23.352(2), and RCW 35.23.352(8), the City of Oroville is updating their Small Works Roster, consisting of contractors interested in performing work for the City of Oroville which is estimated to cost less than $100,000 and their Vendor’s List, consisting of vendors interested in providing supplies, materials, equipment or services between $7,500 and $15,000 through telephone and/or written quotations. In awarding contracts for such projects, the City of Oroville shall invite proposals from all appropriate contractors or vendors who have requested to be included on the Small Works Roster and/or Vendors List, and shall select the lowest responsible bid. All contractors and vendors, where required by law, must be properly licensed or registered in this state. The City of Oroville actively seeks participation by minority or women owned firms who otherwise qualify. Individual Assurity Bonds acceptable. Forms may be secured at the Oroville City Hall or by calling 509-4762926. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 27, September 3, 2015. #OVG653887

eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-14-614661-TC APN No.: 3528170002 Title Order No.: 140045979-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): WALTER BUECHNER Deed of Trust Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3132265 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 9/4/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: A STRIP OF LAND 28 RODS WIDE OFF OF THE EAST SIDE OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 28 EAST, W.M., MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SUBDIVISION TO THE NORTH BANK OF TUNK CREEK; THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH BANK OF TUNK CREEK TO A POINT 28 RODS WEST OF THE EAST LINE OF THE SAID WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER; THENCE SOUTH ON A LINE PARALLEL TO THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SUBDIVISION; THENCE EAST A DISTANCE OF 28 RODS MORE OR LESS TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 3 ARMITAGE HILL RD, RIVERSIDE, WA 98849-9672 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/2/2008, recorded 5/7/2008, under 3132265 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from WALTER BUECHNER, A SINGLE PERSON , as Grantor(s), to PRLAP, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of BANK OF AMERICA N.A. , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by BANK OF AMERICA N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $30,361.15 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $149,429.44 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2013 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title,

possession or encumbrances on 9/4/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 8/24/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 8/24/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 8/24/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME WALTER BUECHNER, A SINGLE PERSON ADDRESS 3 ARMITAGE HILL RD, RIVERSIDE, WA 98849-9672 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 3/27/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and le-

gal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been dis-

charged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/29/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Lauren Esquivel, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-614661-TC IDSPub #0082180 8/6/2015 8/27/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 6, 27, 2015. #OVG633926

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 35 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.55) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

7

5

8

6

4

8

8

9

1

1

5

7

2

5

2

4

1

2

6

8

4

2 1

5

3

9

4

2

Medium, difficulty rating 0.55 7 1

7

2

5

6 4 9

9

4 2

8 1

9

3 8

1 7 6

1 8 2 4

4 8 7 9 5

5

6

9 7 3 6 1

7

4

2

9 4 5 3

1

9 3

8 6 7

1

2

3

2

8

2

2

8

6

1

5

8

5

4

5

7

509-476-3602

3

6

Sponsored by

2

3

ANSWERS

7

6 3 9 8 2

5

4 6 1 7

Puzzle 34 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

8

9

9

5 3 9 4

3 1 5

9 8 4 6 7 2

4 9 2

7 3 6 8 5 1

7 3 1

6 2 5 9 4 8

2 8 4

1 9 3 7 6 5

9 5 6

8 4 7 2 1 3

5

1

4

2

9

3

3

5

6

7

8

9

1

4

2

8

7

6

6 7 8 4

1 2 5 3 9

Puzzle 35 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.55)

2 8 4 9

9 5 6 1

8

6

4

1

7 3 5

3 7 2

3 7 1 5

4 2 6 9 8

6 4 3 7

5 1 2 8 9

5 1

8 2 9 4

7 6 3

7 9

2 6 3 8

5 4 1

8 3 5

4 2 6

9 1 7

1 6 9

3 7 5

8 2 4

4 2 7

8 1 9

3 5 6

Puzzle 36 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.48)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 4/29/2015 2:33:23 PM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D

Sudoku

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of PHILLIP D. ROTH, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00051-8 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Craig A. Roth as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: August 20, 2015. /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Craig A. Roth, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 20, 27, September 3, 2015. #OVG652345

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www.gazette-tribune.com

Public Notices

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VENDOR LIST OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT As authorized under RCW 87.03.437 and Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Resolution No. 2010-03, the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is advertising for vendors who desire to be placed on the vendor list for materials, supplies, or equipment which cost less than $40,000.00. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is an equal opportunity employer and seeks participation from women and minority vendors. Vendor list application must be submitted to the manager of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844. Inquiries and requests for applications may be directed to the manager at 509-476-3696. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette - Tribune on August 20, 27, 2015 #OVG651835

Public Notices

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fices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/30/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-15-659236-SW IDSPub #0082182 8/6/2015 8/27/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 6, 27, 2015. #OVG633933

Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE 3

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

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A great place for many opportunities for you. This home has been cared for and has recent touch ups to make it ready for the market. There is main floor bedrooms and baths as well as a small finished attic space for additional bedroom, hobbies, or just use full storage. The rear of home has a covered porch and there is a detached 2 car garage as well as covered carport area. The home has been retrofitted with some ADA assistance ramps and rails, it is suited for residential or a small business. NWML#829261 $123,000

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11 ACRES W/HOME Between Omak & Tonasket. 3-bdrm, 2-bath. Over 1800 sqft. Open Living Concept. Nice Home. Country Kitchen w/Appliances. Deck w/Hot Tub. 1200 sqft Metal Garage/Shop w/ Large Overhead Door. Looped Driveway around Garage. Lots of room for big vehicles. See to Appreciate - Price is Right - $182,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

PAGE A10

OKANOGAN COMPLEX FIRE

Submitted by Zachary Van Brunt

Some of the air equipment used to fight the Okanogan Complex wildfires are stationed out of the Omak Airport.

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Friday’s (August 21) fire along the ridge near McLaughlin Canyon approaches Dustin Silverthorn’s home (left) and two other houses while ground crews fight to keep the homes from being destroyed. Silverthorn (center photo, left) and Hood River’s Steve Jackson confer on their next move as seconds tick and temperatures spike. Jackson was on scene with his Tanker 55, purchased from the Cowlitz County Fire Department. Right, ground crews continue to stand by in defense of the homes while a K-Max drops water gathered from the Okanogan River near the Janis Bridge. “It was amazing,” said Tonasket’s Robert Welborn. “Deanna and I were watching the fire from our parents’ home, and the flames grew really fast. It was surprising to see the how the fire came over the ridge from the east, even though the wind was blowing from the north. That little helicopter was fascinating to watch; the fire had spread across much of that ridge, but they had the fire put out in about a half an hour.” The K-Max, in high demand, was soon sent elsewhere and the job was finished off by another helicopter.

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AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

OKANOGAN COMPLEX FIRE

Surviving the Fire Storm

Submitted by Brent Baker

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Charred remains speak of the Okanogan Complex Wildfire’s voracious appetite, but Chuck Weller’s house was still standing when Brent Baker grabbed this photograph.

This home on North Pine Creek Road was left standing after the fire raged through on Wednesday, Aug. 19. The field across the street (below, left) was left unburned. When the fire raged back through Friday, Aug. 21, it burned the field across the street (below, right) and took down other structures, but once again left the home of Michael (head of Tonasket EMS) and Barbara Greene safely standing.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

A helicopter dips out of the Okanogan River while fighting the fire Saturday, Aug. 22, just south of Tonasket.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Firefighting forces from the coast pull into the Tonasket School District, to make plans before taking off for a staging area in Havillah Thursday, Aug. 20, just minutes before Tonasket was put on level 3 evacuation orders.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Firefighters confer on their next move right after arriving in Tonasket and before heading out to attack the Okanogan Complex in Havillah and elsewhere Thursday, Aug. 20.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE AUGUST 27, 2015

FIRES | FROM A1 tors who did the back burn a couple of days ago eliminated the danger to our town.” The mayor went on to applaud the efforts of the firefighters, both on hand lines and local citizen volunteers, as well as all those that have been helping with those that had to evacuate from the areas around Tonasket, as well as local businesses in Tonasket,

“The national organizations have done little to help, but the locals have really come through” Patrick Plumb, Mayor City of Tonasket

Loomis and Oroville who have opened their doors to help the community. He wasn’t so charitable with the traditional national aid organizations. “Our local people, some of them put their health on the line driving through smoke to lend a hand to people who lost homes. The national organizations have done little to help, but the locals have really come through,” Plumb said. As of Tuesday, Stage 3 evacuations are still in effect for all of Aeneas Valley. The area northeast of Nespelem is still under Level 3 evacuations with the addition of South Nanamkin Creek north to the... A Level 1 evacuation order is an alert to people about the potential danger and evacuations are voluntary, Level 2 means to get ready and evacuate to friends or a shelter outside the fire danger area; those choosing to stay should be ready to leave at a moments notice and Level 3 means to leave immediately. Suppression efforts in the Okanogan Complex made good progress Monday even though

LOST 9 MILE HOME heavy smoke impaired visibility and air support was unable to operate. While the high level inversion kept fire activity somewhat subdued there were many areas of high fire activity. FIRE SUMMARIES Tunk Block Fire: The fire was active on the north end where work was done on an indirect line along the northwest side. On the northeast side efforts were successful in keeping the fire out of the Aeneas Valley. A spot fire along the Omak Lookout Road was successfully lined; crews patrolled the road throughout the day. Direct line construction around the south end tied lines together and crews started to strengthen them and patrol. Highway 155 is open, we ask the public to be cautious when driving as fire crews are still operating in the area. The Lime Belt, Blue Lake, and Beaver Lake Fires: There continues to be active fire, particularly in the northeast corner and the Wright Mountain area where the fires continue to merge. Crews worked to construct indirect line between the two fingers west of Wright Mountain; other crews looked for ways to go direct and minimize fire growth. Direct line was constructed in the Conconully area as structure protection continued. Twisp River Fire: Lines on the north, east, and south, continue to hold. Crews and dozers tied the line together on the west side and began burnout operations to solidify the line. Nine Mile Fire: The fire is 95 percent contained and remains in monitor status. Night Shift: The fire is expected to have pockets of active burning. Priorities for the night shift are focused on structure protection at numerous locations around the fire. Particular attention will be paid to structures along Highways 20 and 155, the B&O and Columbia River Roads,

Tonasket, and along Salmon Creek. The Red Flag warning is still in effect; and active fire may occur where valleys are aligned with the winds. Smoke will continue to be heavy throughout the night as the high level inversion persists. Winds will be variable. Firefighters and the public are cautioned to be aware if they experience difficult breathing and take steps to minimize exposure and seek medical help. The public is encouraged to contact the Okanogan Emergency Operations Center to learn how to register for automated phone messages in the event of evacuation notices being issued for particular neighborhoods. Contact emergency staff at 509-422-7348 or the Colville Tribal Emergency Management Center at 507-6342105. North Star Fire: The nearby North Star Fire, located 12 miles north of Nespelem on the Colville Reservation is listed as three percent contained and 150,000 acres. The fire showed little growth Monday as it expanded to 150,000 acres. Fire behavior was variable throughout the day, generally backing, flanking and occasional torching within the perimeter. Helicopters continued providing water drops for crews around Nespelem to strengthen fire perimeter lines. An anchor point has been established on the southeast edge of the fire, near Owhi Flats, using direct line tactics to protect communities to the south. Fire managers assessed road systems and conducted burnout operations where feasible. Crews continued protection of critical communications sites and reinforced firelines to enhance community protection. Structure assessment continued in the surrounding areas in the surrounding areas. For current information on the fires and evacuation alerts follow the Gazette-Tribune on Facebook and Twitter.

Submitted photo

Brent Blanchard took this picture of the home he and Ashley Nelson shared off Nine Mile Road just minutes before in burned to the ground on Thursday, Aug. 13. While several structures burned in the Nine Mile Fire, Blanchard believes his is the only home that was lost to the fire. “I’ve heard there may be another one, but I haven’t been able to verify whether it was a residence or something used for storage,” he said last week. Blanchard and Nelson have been staying at the Camaray Motel in Oroville, while they wait for the insurance adjuster to figure out what they will be paid for their loss. Blanchard says he knows he is “under insured” and that whatever they do get won’t pay for the home or things like his cherished Honda CRB motorcycle that went up in the fire. He said he spotted the fire with binoculars originally, after hearing a “vroom, vroom” sound and walking outside and smelling smoke. Within a half hour it was at his doorstep, giving him only about four minutes to pack up a few things and grab the dog. The couple has little more than the clothes on their backs, but are happy to be alive.

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ALBERT LOSVAR Albert Losvar, age 88 of Loomis, Washington, died on Thursday, August 13, 2015. He was born July 14, 1927 in Mukilteo, Washington. Memorial Services are pending and will be held at a later date. A complete obituary will follow. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is in care of arrangements. Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

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RESOURCES | FROM A1 state. In some small way, I believe these things can be a blessing in disguise. Natural disasters keep us in mind of what’s truly important.” “Everybody’s doing a little, and it’s making it a lot,” said Levin, who has been making sack lunch-

es to send out to fire camps. “The fire fighters want jerkey and Red Bull,” Levine said with a laugh. “We’ve been sending ham and turkey sandwiches with full lunches, and including wet wipes, Visine and Chapstick.” Visine and Chapstick.”

Other nearby fires THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

THE KETTLE COMPLEX: The Kettle Complex includes three fires in northern Ferry County, the Stickpin, Roy Road and Renner Lake fires. The Stickpin Fire is at 47,544 acres and is burning on the Kettle Crest between Curlew and Orient. The fire is 12 percent contained. Fire lines constructed along the western edge are holding. Crews continue to strengthen the lines. On the southern perimeter, dozer lines are being constructed but are indirect (meaning there is unburned fuel between the line and the fire edge). Three helicopters are supporting firefighting efforts as conditions allow. Public and firefighter safety is a significant concern. Incident management personnel are looking at all options for suppression. Fire crews from across the state are in place to assist Ferry County Fire District 14 and Ferry County District 3/ Stevens 8 with structure protection under the State Mobilization Act. These resources are dedicated to structure protection and free up additional firefighters for wildland fireline construction. Two hand crews, two dozers, and management personnel arrived from British Columbia, Canada yesterday to work in partnership with existing fire suppression efforts on the northeastern perimeter. The fire has burned into the Togo Fire (2003) burn area and crews are working to construct line to keep the fire from progressing toward Grand Forks and Christina Lake, BC. Roy Road is 120 acres burning west of Republic and is 60 percent contained. Firefighters continue to mop up, locate and extinguish pockets of interior heat. Renner Lake Fire is approximately 8,544 acres and is zero percent. Firefighters continue to be shifted off of other areas to assist local fire district personnel. No homes have been lost. Good progress was made Monday to secure the eastern edge of the fire. CHELAN AREA FIRES: Wolverine: The north side of the fire was active along Castle

Creek, near Stehekin, Sunday, and helicopter water drops were used to hold the fire in check. The southern flank of the fire continued to grow into the Entiat drainage, with extreme fire behaviour in Garland and Snow Brushy Creeks. Work continues on constructing an indirect line along Tommy Creek as well as implementing structure protection in the Silver Falls area. As a precautionary measure, the Wenatchee River Ranger District has closed access to the Chiwawa Valley, west of the Entiat River. The fire is approximately five miles east of the Chiwawa Valley. Crews will continue to mop up hot spots and construct contingency lines. First Creek: The north end of the fire continued to be active Monday afternoon, with air support providing water drops to keep the fire in check along Slide Ridge. The fire continues to grow to the north with short uphill runs exhibiting extreme fire behaviour. Crews continue to provide structure protection along South Lakeshore Road and along First Creek Road. Today crews will continue to secure hot spots on the ridgetop, construct direct containment lines where possible, and mop up and patrol to strengthen containment lines. Chelan Complex: Sunday crews conducted burnout operations along the northwest flank of the fire removing unburned fuels and strengthening containment lines. Work also continued on dozer line along the FS 600 Road near South Fork Gold Creek. The fire continues to grow to the northwest towards Fisher Creek and South Fork. Due to low humidity last night, extreme fire behavior resulted in a 50 acre spot fire along the northwest portion of the fire. Dozers secured the spot fire and crews continue to mop up hot spots. Portions of the Chelan Complex within three miles of Chelan and all areas east of the Columbia River are completely contained. Monday crews began to mop up and patrol along the western perimeter of the fire and continue to tie in dozer line to the north. Mop up and patrol will continue along the southwest perimeter.

TESTALINDEN CREEK NEAR OLIVER, BC Increased fire activity is expected on the Testalinden Creek wildfire near Oliver B.C over the next few days due to extremely dry conditions and gusty southerly winds. The fire is now estimated at over 3100 hectares in size and has been growing in a northerly direction. It crossed containment lines previously established on the north side of Testalinden Creek due to the cold front and winds which came through on Aug. 20. The fire has spilled over onto the steep south slopes of Hester Creek, however the fire perimeter remains 50 percent contained. The north and west flanks continue to be the most active and are therefore top priorities for fire crews. Over 160 firefighters, 12 helicopters and 20 pieces of heavy equipment are working hard to enhance fireguards and protect the community. Experts are continually assessing the best methods for firefighting in this terrain and that could include further burning out of forest fuels within and adjacent to the Hester Creek drainage in the coming days. Prior to this occurring, additional information will be provided as smoke and open flame could be visible to the community. Weather forecasts are predicting southerly winds which could result in further fire growth. These winds will likely also push smoke into the valley from large fires burning in Washington State. If this happens, air operations on the Testalinden Creek wildfires could be restricted for safety concerns. An expanded Evacuation Alert remains in effect for residents in the Oliver area within the Regional District of OkanaganSimilkameen. Visit www.rdos.ca for more information. A restricted area closure also remains in affect over the Testalinden fire and for safety of all firefighters the public is asked to respect this closure and remain clear of the fire area. Visit www.bcwildfire.ca for more information.

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2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

Queen Alexee Howell welcomes you to the Fair Welcome everyone, to the 68th Okanogan County Fair: Blue Jeans and Country Dreams. My name is Alexee Howell and I am your 2015 Fair Queen. Hopefully, everyone has recovered from the devastating fires this past year. The theme I chose

is a reflection of the amazing people who call Okanogan County home. My hat’s off to you all. I am from Tonasket and am now a senior at Tonasket High School. I am currently involved with our school’s ASB, FFA and Range Riders clubs. I feel honored

to have been able to represent our Fair this year at parades and community events across our county. I enjoyed meeting people and visiting and encouraging everyone I could to come to our Fair and have the best time. Okanogan County Fair has

been bringing our communities together since 1947. Our Fair has always been the place for farmers, ranchers, bakers, sewers, craftsmen, photographers and youth to come together once a year to showcase their wares. There is something for everyone at the Fair, no matter what your age. The animal barns showcase the best livestock that Okanogan County has to offer. You can also shop to your heart’s content in the Commercial and Agriplex buildings, as well as learn what’s new in the latest building materials or take a ride on the Tilt-A-Whirl

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or even try your luck at dart balloons. Don’t forget to stop and support our community service organizations and buy a raffle ticket! Come on in and boogie down to some great music or just sit a spell and visit with friends, old and new. The fair truly is for all of us, from young to old. You don’t have to be in FFA or 4-H to participate; pre-junior to adult and even professionals all may enter. Get your entry submitted today! I am so excited for this year’s fair and hope to see you there!


AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Tonasket girls running for 2016 Fair Queen

3

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Two girls from Tonasket are hoping to be named 2016 Okanogan County Fair Queen: Serenity Poletti, age 16; and Brisa Leep, age 19. Serenity will be a junior at Tonasket High School in the fall, and is involved in the ASB. She also serves as a District 7 Officer for FFA, and a volunteer firefighter at the District 7 department. “My father, Rob Poletti, is the Fire Chief in Riverside, so I have been around it all my life,” said Poletti. “But I had to wait until I was 16 before I could begin volunteering with the fire department.” She said she would be busier as a District 7 Officer for FFA this year, since the other officers are from Chelan; and many of them lost livestock in the fire. “A lot of the District Officers will be raising money for people who lost livestock,” Serenity said. Serenity, who grew up in Riverside and Loomis and now lives in Tonasket, said she has also volunteered at the Omak Stampede and alongside her grandmother with the Elks Foundation. She is in the process of applying to work at the Extended Care Facility in Tonasket, and hopes to find work at pet shelters in Tonasket. Another project she hopes to complete is to hold an auction to raise money for cancer awareness. “I think a lot more people will attend and help out with the event if I hold it for all types of cancer; not just for one person or one type of cancer,” she said. Serenity said she gained public speaking skills through FFA events and trying out for the Okanogan County Junior Rodeo Queen last year. “With my love of volunteering, I have gained many public speaking skills. I love the outdoors, and have a passion to help others,” Serenity said. “I am honored to be running for Miss Okanogan County Fair Queen 2016. The Fair represents the whole community. I have a lot of love for my county; I’ve lived here all my life. I would love to be the face for the county and make sure the younger generations realize how great a county Okanogan is.” Serenity showed a horse at the Fair last year, and while she wasn’t sure if she would be showing a horse again this year, she knew she would be submitting some pictures of Palmer Lake, horses and fires into the photography exhibit. Brisa Leep, daughter of Bryce and Teri Leep, graduated from Tonasket High School in 2014 after being born and raised in Tonasket. She is currently taking online classes for graphic design after attending Spokane Falls Community College for one quarter. “I decided to come home and take classes online. Everyone else was working at a slower pace in the college classes, so now I

Madison Shellenbarger/submitted photo

Serenity Poletti (left) and Brisa Leep have thrown their hats into the ring for the right to be named 2016 Okanogan County Fair Queen. can work at a faster pace on my own. Plus, showing horses and perhaps a craft entry through her 4-H group, the Range Riders. I’m not a city kid,” Brisa said. Brisa was the 2014 Miss Tonasket Rodeo She was involved with the FFA all four years in high school, and served as ASB Queen. “I’ve always been a part of representing President after serving as VP of Publicity her junior year, where responsibilities my town,” said Brisa. “ I am very passionate included making flyers and taking care of about the Fair, and love being a role model.” She said she thought at age 19, she the bulletin board at U.S. Bank. Brisa was also the cheerleading captain her senior wouldn’t be able to run for Fair Queen and was delighted when her friend, 2015 year. Okanogan County Fair Queen Lexee “It’s weird not to be in high school, where I was so active in so many different things,” she said, “so I’ve had to step it up and become involved in Blue Jeans & Country Dreams a lot of these activities at the adult level.” Brisa is an active member of the Athletic Booster Club, helping out by taking pictures at sporting events and keeping up their Facebook page. She will also help out with the cheer squad during football season. She said her biggest hobbies are riding horse in rodeos and on the trail, along with photography. “When you’re involved with horses, it’s all horses,” she said, emphasizing the amount of time involved. Her Fair projects this year include entries in the photography exhibit,

e Okanogan County h t Fai joy r! En

Howell, told her she was eligible up to age 19. “I hope to see lots of people at the Okanogan County Fair this September!” said Brisa. Both girls said they were excited, yet somewhat nervous, about the four days of pageant that running for Fair Queen involved. “Someone will always be watching us; watching what we do,” said Brisa.

Fun for the entire family! We wish all exhibitors the best of luck! For all the hard work and dedication that goes into your projects in the summer, it all comes down to a few highly anticipated minutes in the showing. The memories, however, last for a lifetime.

North Valley Hospital District 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org


4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27 2015

What’s happening at your county fair? New events include Heads and Horns Exhibit OKANOGAN – While the familiar things you love about the fair will still be there this year – kids showing their prize winning animals, adults exhibiting their blue ribbon fruits and vegetables, horse racing, the rodeo, music and the carnival – this year’s fair has a few surprises, including a Heads and Horns Show. “The Heads and Horn Show is open to anyone who lives in Okanogan County – any type of taxidermy entry, fur or fish, no matter where it was from, anything from around the world,” said Ila Hall, an Okanogan County Fair Advisory Board member. The Fair Queen Pageant, a chance to get to meet the candidates (see page B3) for next year’s fair, will take place at 7 p.m. at the Rotary Stage. Something new for 2015 is an outdoor movie. Fun Flix, will present a family-friendly movie will be shown at 7 p.m. at the south end of the fairgrounds. Also will be the Comperos Dancing Horses which will perform on Sunday at 1 p.m., said Hall.

“Of course we will have the raptors show every day, as well as L-Bow the Clown and the carnival and live bands. A couple of the bands that are pretty well known are Lace and Lead and Hippies on Vacation, they both will be performing,” said Hall, who added, “There’s the rodeo every night at 7 p.m. and we have the horse racing, which is very popular. This year the fair will also be holding a contest for the tallest cornstock and the tallest sunflower, according to Hall.

“That’s something that isn’t in the fair book,” said Hall. A pie, corn and watermelon eating contest is scheduled for Saturday at 1 p.m, so bring your appetites, suggests Hall. There’s also a photography contest for all ages. Take your favorite photo to the fair, encourages Hall. There are prizes for several different divisions. “Lastly, we’d like to see more Native American and Hispanic entries as the fair tries to become more diverse and appeal to all people in the county,” she said.

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AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Fair participants ‘pay it forward’ Sharing their expertise BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Malia Whitmore (left) with her sheep ‘Marley’ and Johnna Terris with her sheep ‘Bob.’ The sheep share their pen with Chloe McFarland’s sheep ‘Ziggy.’

Dave’s Gun & Pawn

Local Okanogan County Fair livestock participants are not only discovering the joys of animal husbandry, but the joys of sharing their knowledge and experience; of mentoring friends willing to try something new. Johnna Terris got into raising sheep when a friend asked her if she would like to give it a go. Terris got her first sheep five years ago and raised it under the tutelage of her friend. And now Terris, age 16, is paying that experience forward, mentoring Malia Whitmore, age 12, this year after mentoring Chloe McFarland last year and Larson sisters Hayley and Alyssa the previous year. “It’s nice to be able to show others; now Malia will be able to show others and it just keeps going,” said Terris.

“The sheep don’t like to be alone, so it’s good their friends keep theirs here,” added Johnna’s mom, Jody Terris. Whitmore said her favorite part of the project is walking the sheep every day. She rides her bike over to Terris’s house and they give their sheep a snack before taking them for a stroll, after which the sheep are given their evening meal. “If I walk mine, the rest will follow,” said Terris. “Mine is always out in front like the leader, and they all follow.” They are raising Suffolk cross sheep, and when asked about different personalities Terris said they were “each a little different, but kind of all the same.” “They usually wake us up in the morning; they act so hungry and so needy,” said Terris. “Sometimes we feed them by hand, but usually just put their feed in their own separate pans,” added Whitmore. Terris said McFarland’s sheep barely made weight last year. “It didn’t like to eat, so we added molasses to the feed. Fortunately

the fair people bumped down the weight last year because of the fires. If not for the fires, it wouldn’t have made weight and she wouldn’t have been able to sell it. This year her sheep is big and has no trouble eating.” All fair exhibitors present an educational poster about their animals, and Whitmore said she would be doing hers on sheep’s vision. “I want to know if they can see as good as us, or better,” Whitmore said. “Also, if they can see straight, since their eyes are on the sides of their heads.” Terris said she did her poster last year on sheep’s teeth, but hadn’t picked a topic yet for this year. “We pick a day for a group of girls to come over and do their posters all together and make a day of it,” said Jody Terris. She said a group of 15 shepherds from Tonasket would congregate at their place on August 21, so a sheep shearer could shear them all at once and the fleece would

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

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Okanogan County PUD “Powering Our Community” for 70 years! Yep, your local PUD has country roots that go all the way back to 1945! From the days of our very first customer to today where we serve more than 16,000 customers, we have evolved from simply distributing power to providing both electrical and broadband services and being the go-to source on electrical safety and energy conservation. Today we are committed to promoting energy conservation in your homes and businesses by providing:  Free home energy audits  Rebates and loans for residential insulation and window upgrades  Incentives for utilizing renewable energy sources  Irrigation Incentives

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Stop by our booth inside the Annex Building to learn about the programs that can help you reduce your energy usage and ultimately save you money!

See you at the Fair!

AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2015

Kids’ Day and Nursing Home/Assisted Living Day 9:00 am Fairgrounds open to the public All Day Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building 9:00 am Market Steer Judging – Steer Barn 9:00 am Market Swine Judging – Swine Barn 9:00 am Rabbit Judging – Rabbit Barn 9:00 am-3:00 pm Horse Intermediate Fitting & Showing – North Arena Adult Riding & Halter Classes – North Arena Intermediate Riding Classes – North Arena Senior and Junior Fitting and Showing (Horses) – North Arena Youth Halter Classes – Rodeo Arena Senior and Junior Riding Classes – Rodeo Arena Throughout Day Horse Demonstrations: barefoot trimming, nutrition, tension release – Horse Barns Throughout Day PUD Youth Pole Climb 10:00 am FFA/4-H Produce Judging – Horticulture Barn 11:00 am Raptors – Rotary Stage 11:00 am Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Noon L-Bow the Clown – Roaming 1:00 pm Bottle Baby Calf Show – Beef Show Ring 1:00 pm Market Lamb Judging – Sheep Barn 1:30 pm Grade and Purebred Breeding class – Beef Barn 3:00 pm Raptors – Rotary Stage 3:00 pm Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens 4:00 pm L-Bow the Clown – Rotary Stage 4:30 pm Sheep Fitting & Showing Demonstration – Sheep Barn 5:30 pm Banner Days – Rotary Stage 5:30 pm Little People Fitting & Showing – Sheep Barn 6:00 pm Lads & Lassies (sheep) Competition – Sheep Barn 6:30 pm Cat Type Classes followed by Cat Fashion Show – Cat Barn 6:00 pm Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds 6:30 pm Youth Horsmanship Class sponsored by Sam & Racie McKee – Rodeo Arena 7:00 pm Fair Queen Pageant – Rotary Stage 7:00 pm Fun Flix – south end of fairgrounds 7:00 pm Ranch Rodeo – Rodeo Arena 7:30 pm The Wicks – Rotary Stage 10:00 pm Fairgrounds closed to Public

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2015 9:00 am All Day 9:00 am 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

11:00 am 11:00 am 11:30 am Noon 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 pm 9:00 pm 10:00 pm

Fairgrounds Open to the public Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Livestock Fitting & Showing – all barns Horse Trail Classes (all ages) – North Arena Youth Western Classes – Rodeo Arena English Classes – Rodeo Arena Driving Classes – Rodeo Arena Owens Family – Rotary Stage Poultry Fitting & Showing – Poultry Barn Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds L-Bow the Clown – Rotary Stage Bottle Baby Calf Show – Beef Show Ring Raptors – Rotary Stage Gideon’s Daughter – Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds L-Bow the Clown – Roaming Dynamic Duos Competition – Sheep Barn Adult Fitting & Showing (sheep) – Sheep Barn The Wicks – Rotary Stage Cat Fitting & Showing classes – Cat Barn Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Bulls & Barrels – Rodeo Arena Rabbit Agility – Rabbit Barn Sam Platts and Koutenai Three – Rotary Stage Jessica Lynne – Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

* PUD events subject to crew availability due to regional disaster response efforts

To contact Okanogan County Fairgrounds: fair@co.okanogan.wa.us Phone: (509) 422-1621 Fax: (509) 422-1203 Message Phone: (509) 422-7109 PO Box 467 175 Rodeo Trail Rd. Okanogan, WA  98840

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2015

8:00 am – noon 9:00 am All Day Throughout Day 10:00 am 10:30 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am Noon Noon Noon 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:30 pm 5:00 pm 5:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 9:00 pm 10:00 pm

Horse Games – North Arena and Rodeo Arena Fairgrounds open to the public Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Horse Demonstrations: barefoot trimming, nutrition, tension release – Horse Barns Round Robbin Fitting & Showing Contest – Small Animals – south end of fairgrounds Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds L-Bow the Clown – Rotary Stage Best Dressed Rabbit Contests – Rabbit Barn Round Robin Fitting & Showing Contest – Large Animals – south end of the fairgrounds Kids’ Races/Games – south end of fairgrounds Raptors – Rotary Stage Spuds in a Bucket Contest – Horticulture Barn Team Roping – Rodeo Arena Pie, Corn & Watermelon eating contests – south end of fairgrounds Horse Races - Grandstands Low Rider Races (in between horse races) – Grandstands Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Poultry Costume Contests – Poultry Barn Hippies on Vacation – Rotary Stage Market Livestock Sale – Berg Pavillion Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Raptors – Rotary Stage Nicole Unser – Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ – south end of fairgrounds Good4U – Rotary Stage Lead & Lace – Rotary Stage Truck & Tractor Pull – Grandstands Olson Brothers Band – Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2015 8:00 am 8:00 am 9:00 am All Day Throughout Day 10:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am Noon Noon Noon 12:30 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm

Cowboy Church services – Rotary Stage Rabbit Barn Awards – Rabbit Barn Fairgrounds open to the public Head & Horns Show – Commercial Building Horse Demonstrations: barefoot trimming, nutrition, tension release – Horse Barns Parade of Champions – Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Horse Races – Grandstands Beef Team Showing Contest – Beef Show Ring Nicole Unser – Rotary Stage Kids Horse Playday – Rodeo Arena Raptors – Rotary Stage Sign-ups for Mutton Bustin’ Belt Buckle Finals (55 lb weight limit) – south end of fairgrounds Mutton Bustin’ Belt Buckle Finals – S. end of fairgrounds Camperos Dancing Horses – Grandstands Fur & Feather Auction – Berg Pavillion Dayton Edmonds, Storyteller – Rotary Stage Royalty Coronation – Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed, Fair over!

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

EXPERTISE | FROM 5

be grown out a little in time for fair. Suffolks are a breed favored for meat as opposed to fleece, but Jody Terris said she was able to donate the fleece last year to someone who wanted it. When asked if they would have sheep again next year, both girls nodded enthusiastically. “I thought about doing pigs one year, but I figured I may as well keep doing sheep, as I already know how to do this,” said Terris. At the Larson residence, Hayley and Alyssa still raise Suffolk Cross

sheep while middle sister Madi sticks to raising a Hampshire pig. This is the third year of raising livestock for Haley, age 15, and Madi, age 14; but just the second year for nine-year old Alyssa. The girls spoke of the different personalities observed in the animals they’ve raised. “This pig is not as good as the last two I had,” said Madi of her current pig, LaBron James. “Last year my pig would have been out here in the grass running around, but this one doesn’t like to come

out of his pen.” Perhaps that’s why a diet of sorts is in place. “The pig’s too big right now, so I’m holding him back,” said Madi August 7. “There’s a weight limit of 290 pounds. He was 217 pounds last week, and we still have another month to go before fair. They used to have a free feed, but now I just feed them two times a day.” Alyssa’s sheep, Patchouli, is described as calm and laid back. He likes people and likes to be

petted. Alyssa said she liked both get“My friends and I decided to ting to know the sheep over the do a Hippie theme at the fair this summer, and taking it to the fair year, so I looked up hippie names and showing it. “It’s just all fun.” with my mom,” said Alyssa. “We “I like the responsibility of saw ‘Patchouli’ taking care and I liked that of something one the best.” else instead of Ha y l e y ’s just me,” said sheep, named Hayley. “Plus, it ‘Alabama’ for makes me more the song ‘Sweet a part of FFA;” Home Alabama’ a class she “thinks he’s all said she really that and a bag enjoyed. of chips,” said The girls said his owner. “He that while they bucks a lot.” were too busy in “They get the winter with bucking someschool activities times in the to miss the livepen,” said stock, “When Alyssa. “I always it comes to say ours are the end of the ‘Circus Sheep.’” school year I’m “They all have Madi Larson’s Hampshire Pig ready for my great personali- named La Bron James enjoys cool- animal,” said ties and are fun ing down on a hot summer day by Hayley. to watch,” said sticking his face in the mud. “I was very Hayley. excited to get The different my sheep at personalities of the end of the the girls shows up a little in their school year, because it was such a answers to what they like best good experience last year,” Alyssa about raising an animal for fair. said, adding, “When I was little “It’s fun, and you learn a lot of I liked to visit friends at the fair responsibility,” said Madi. “Plus, I who had goats and I would hang really like pigs.” out with them.”

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AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Community pitches in to help Chelan students who lost livestock in fire BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

When the Chelan High School Agriculture teacher lost his home Aug. 14 in the fires blazing in and around Chelan, Matt Debach set up a Go Fund Me account to help FFA and 4H students recoup loses spent on livestock for the upcoming Chelan County Fair. “Mr. Rod Cool, the agriculture teacher at Chelan High School, is one of the most thoughtful and compassionate teachers in the state, so he was letting students who did not have a place to have a fair animal at their own home keep fair animals at his home,” said Deebach. “In this tragedy, many of the animals were lost.” Deebach, the agriculture teacher and FFA advisor for Tonasket, said he set the account up Saturday, Aug. 15, and within 11 hours they had reached their goal of raising $5,000 to help the kids. “It’s pretty amazing, we are flooded with emails and phone calls of people still wanting to donate,” said Deebach. The funding account was shut down after reaching it’s goal, but

Deebach and Cool are waiting to see what other needs are out there, before either opening that account back up or establishing a new fire relief fund. Deebach said that many kids who were able to save their livestock, lost pens that will have to be rebuilt. “We still don’t know what all the needs will be, and that area is still in danger,” Deebach said Monday, Aug. 17, adding, “The Manson 4H and FFA kids were evacuated last night, and Pateros might be evacuating. So basically, right now we are waiting to see what all the needs are.” Deebach said the National FFA had gotten in touch with him, as well as other area agriculture teachers, wanting to know what they could do to help. “It’s quite a sad deal. Rod Cool had animals at his house that he lost, because he was helping other people at their homes to get their animals out, and there just wasn’t time for him to go back to his house,” Deebach said. “Rod said he had insurance, so he knows there are a lot of people worse off than him.”

Check out our

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Tonasket and Chelan FFA students. Several Chelan students lost their animals in the Chelan Fire.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 27, 2015

No more ‘stupid’ chickens This year it’s dwarf goats for Reagan and Rayan BY GARY A. DEVON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - For this year’s fair project, Reagan Whiteaker and Rayan Sarmiento have decided to raise Nigerian Dwarf Goats. It appears Reagan, 11, has had enough of fowl creatures, admitting this year she wanted to raise something other than “stupid chickens.” Rayan, five, said the goat’s

names are Lucy and Tarzan and that they are a handful. “We feed them hay and grain,” said Reagan, the daughter of Danny Whiteaker. “And rotten peaches,” chimes in Rayan. The two say the goats pretty much have the run of the place, out at the lake side home of Reagan’s grandparents, Clyde and Joanne Whiteaker. They are fairly well-behaved they say, although Tarzan was a little camera shy. “We have to be careful though, we’ve seen a cougar and two kits out here,” said Rayan’s mom, Kristin Sarmiento. Why goats?

“You can walk them,” said Reagan, who adds that Tarzan has a tendency to pull and drag you if you let him get away with it. “One time I had both of them pull me,” she said. “I like to walk them, too,” adds Rayan. While some goats are raised for their fiber or milk and cheese, Nigerian Dwarf Goats are usually raised for their meat. However, the kids say they are fine with raising the pair because they aren’t going to the butcher. “This is a new experience for them,” said Rayan’s mom, who said this is the first year he has entered an animal at the fair.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Reagan Whiteaker, 11, and Rayan Sarmiento, and their Nigerian Dwarf goats, Tarzan and Lucy. Tarzan proved to be a a little camera shy. Located at 16-A Hwy 7 (5 mi S on SR 97) Tonasket, WA

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AUGUST 27, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

11

SISTERS HEADING TO THE FAIR Among the items Mylee, 7, and Baylee Taber, 8, plan to exhibit at this year’s Okanogan County Fair are pears from the family orchard near Oroville. The girls also will be exhibiting other items from the garden, including watermelon. They say making things grow takes a lot of care, lots of sunlight and water, as well as making sure the fruits and vegetables are protected from pests. The two said they really enjoy going to the fair, seeing all the exhibits and appreciate coming from a multi-generational farming family, which includes their parents, David Jr. and Jaden Taber, aunt Angela Taber and grandparents, David Sr. and Judy Taber, owners and operators of Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Barn and Copper Mountain Winery.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 27, 2015  

August 27, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 27, 2015  

August 27, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune