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Fire blazes in north county

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above, Fires broke out in several locations last Thursday, Aug. 13. It can be seen making it way toward a Chesaw-Oroville Road residence, but was stopped short by retardant and water bombing planes and helicopters. Below, crews from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, as well as the Molson-Chesaw Fire Department, knock down hot spots last Friday at the site of a fatal private airplane crash in which the pilot and a passenger perished The crash resulted in a small fire, but was soon contained to the immediate area and was not responsible for the much larger Nine Mile Fire, according to authorities.

Nine Mile Fires burn more than 4600 acres Fatal plane crash leaves two men dead, but not the cause of devastating fires BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - As many as five fires that started last Thursday, Aug. 13 combined to burn more than 4600 acres and 10 structures, including residences, in the Nine Mile/Chesaw-Oroville Road area about five miles east of Oroville. On Thursday, the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office, along with fire personnel responded to a small plane crash as well as several fires in the highlands above Oroville. Deputies confirmed there was plane wreckage at the scene near where one of the fires began, but said that fire was contained to a small area. Later that day officials said one person had perished in the crash, but after the crash site had cooled on Friday, the sheriff ’s office and FAA investigators increased the number of dead to two men. Although the families were being told of their losss,

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 34

the names of those in the crash had not been released. The site of the airplane crash was near a rutted ranch road in sparse timber off Rise Road. The incident was reported by Brandy Rise, who said the plane crashed about 400 yards from the ranch and started the small fire. “We have several units in the area and at the scene attempting to determine exactly what has happened. We currently have no other information on the aircraft at this time or any other reports of deaths or injuries,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers on Thursday. His office confirmed the two killed in the crash flew out of the Oroville’s Airport on Aug. 13. Reports are one is an American and the other a Canadian living in the area. The aircraft involved was a Cessna T182 and was destroyed during the crash. As many as five fires had been reported in the Nine Mile, Circle Road and Havillah Road areas. Early reports were that some of the fires were man-made, but the sheriff ’s office has not confirmed that -- At this time the cause is still under investigation. Officials closed about an eight-mile stretch of the Oroville-Chesaw Road because of the wildfires, but reopened it on Friday.

SEE FIRE | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

“State Department of Natural Resources and local firefighters responded to the fires which were spread out over a wide area, according to Maurice Goodall, Okanogan County Emergency Manager. In addition to state DNR crews and local firefighters, there were three planes and one helicopter dropping water and retardant on the spreading fires and bulldozers were being used to try and draw fire lines. Electricity was de-energized by Okanogan County PUD crews. Several residents in the Nine Mile Ranch and along the Chesaw-Oroville Road were working to gather animals and possessions from their homes as the fire spread rapidly. Many acres of scrub grass and sagebrush were blackened on the top of the Nine Mile Ranch development. Pines and telephone poles could be seen burning in many areas, however several homes were left undisturbed as of 6 p.m., with fire having burnt all around them. After sunset flames could still be seen on the hillside from Oroville as trees crowned into the night. The Okanogan County Alert System was activated at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday asking people to be aware of their surroundings and to stay clear of the

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PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 20, 2015

NEWS

FIRE | FROM A1 Oroville Chesaw Road. The system was again activated shortly after 3 p.m. with an advisory recommending immediate evacuation of the Nine Mile and Circle Road Areas. By Tuesday, the fire, which was being worked by Incident Management Team 2, was 80 percent contained. A Red Cross shelter for Nine Mile Fire evacuees was set up at the Oroville Elementary School, but later moved to Omak. Oroville High School had been used for a base camp for fire personnel. OKANOGAN COMPLEX The Nine Mile is the largest of the fires in what is now known as the Okanogan Complex. The Lime Belt Fire has burned 3,823 acres, the Tunk Block Fire, 2,744 and the Blue Lake Fire, 843. The three fires will have help from engines that were due to arrive Tuesday. In addition, firefighting efforts are being assisted by helicopters that have been assigned to the fires. Beaver Lake Fire is 723 acres, and located 15 miles west of Omak. There is a small group of firefighters that are looking at access points, clearing indirect fire line and containing spot fires. State fire assistance has been

Gary DeVon/staff photo

A lone house surrounded by the charged remains of scrub grass, sage and pines, sits on top of a knoll in the Nine Mile Ranches development. It was one of many sparred by the Nine Mile Fire which claimed at least 10 structures. The county is seeking further information from residents on the damage.

mobilized under the Washington State Fire Services Resource Mobilization Plan in support of local firefighters working to contain the Okanogan Complex. The mobilization of state resources was approved on Monday, Aug. 17 at the request of Okanogan County Fire Districts #7 and 9 and Conconully Fire Department. As of press time, immediate evacuations had been ordered due to rapidly advancing fire from the Riverside Cutoff Road south across the Omak Flats to the north boundaries of Omak. The fire jumped the river and closed down Highway 97 between the Riverside intersection and North 40 near Omak. Previous to that an immediate evacuation had been ordered from North Pine Creek to Stalder Road to Fish Lake to South Pine Creek An area of notice was also issued for the east side of the Okanogan River from Riverside to the HUD housing areas. “Persons should not wait for door to door notification. Persons should evacuate if needed. This is a precautionary evacuation notice, be aware of fire in your area,” stated the alert. “Persons in all these areas were asked to be aware of their surroundings and evacuate immediately.”

Tonasket quick to set up evacuation center BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATIE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - An emergency Tonasket Evacuation Shelter received residents from Riverside Tuesday, Aug. 17, after fires near Conconully and Tunk Mountain forced them to evacuate their homes. The shelter was established Friday, Aug. 14 at the Tonasket High School by North Valley Hospital staff with beds, food and doctors on call after the American Red Cross had to relocate their shelter in Oroville to Pateros. Six people were served over the weekend, with accommodations made for five dogs and two cats. The Tonasket Comancheros have volunteered the use of the

rodeo grounds for stock animals if necessary. NVH CEO Mike Zwicker called together a Disaster Relief Team meeting Friday evening, Aug. 14, to establish the shelter staffed by NVH employees. Several NVH staff members had to be called away from the Omak Stampede, where they were participating in the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. “We are set up as an Alternate Care Facility like a M.A.S.H. unit,” said Jana Symonds on Saturday, Aug. 15. Symonds is the Patient Finances Manager at NVH. “We’ll care for the “walking wounded” here, and have a doctor on site if need be.” She said no injuries had been reported, with smoke inhalation victims being treated at the hospital to get their oxygen

levels up. According to Symonds, the hospital pays the employee wages, which will later be reimbursed with state emergency funds. “We are lucky to have the support of North Valley Hospital Food Services, which provides three meals a day to our volunteers and to the people that are utilizing the shelter,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “I would like to thank North Valley Hospital Administrator Mike Zwicker for leading this effort, and I would also like to give special thanks to Kim Jacobs for coordinating a lot of the resources on the fly. Kim over the years has been leading NVH in disaster preparedness, and the experience she brought to this was invaluable.” Plumb also expressed gratitude

Information Manager with NVH who was working alongside Symonds and NVH employee Patti Hill Saturday evening. “I am proud of the Tonasket community reaching out to help their neighbors in such a time of need, in particular North Valley Hospital administration and employees staffing the evacuation shelter after the Red Cross was forced to move their shelter in Oroville,” said Plumb. “Thank you to the Gazette Tribune for the coverage, and please stay alert for fires in your area and know that the City of Tonasket and North Valley Hospital hopes and prays that all of our neighbors in the North End of the County stays safe and their property remains protected.”

sleep Saturday, Aug. 15 after helping with the fire and being awake for 36 hours. Hospital employees work in two-hour shifts and plan to take on longer shifts if utilization of the shelter picks up. “If it gets busy, the shifts go out the window and we just stay as long as necessary,” Symonds said. Showers are available at the school, along with 25 beds. The kitchen is available for the hospital staff to prepare meals, and Beyer’s Market has volunteered to donate food. “For now, though, it’s easier to just bring food in,” Symonds. “A crew at Subway offered to make sandwiches if need be.” “We’re hoping we don’t get more people, but we’re ready if we do,” stated Payge Fries, Health

to people in the community who helped by providing kennels for the animals. “North Valley Hospital would like to thank the Tonasket School District for all of their help by using their facilities, and for their staff assistance,” added Plumb, a NVH employee. The shelter opened around 8:30 p.m. Friday evening after being set up by Tonasket School District Maintenance Supervisor John Verbeck and NVH’s Plant Engineer John Sanchez. One evacuee from South Pine Creek sought shelter that first evening for about four hours before her family called to let her know the fire had moved away from her home. A Chesaw resident who was evacuated sought shelter and

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AUGUST 20, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS

Tonasket will pay for repairs to water line Looking for grant for storm water improvements BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Council approved a motion Tuesday, Aug. 11, to pay for the four-inch water pipe and additional parts needed to repair the water line at Chief Tonasket Park. Council Member Scott Olson made the motion, stating, “It is fiscally responsible to be spending this money on a capital improvement project and infrastructure; it is going to be well spent in the long run.” The motion allows up to $10,000 to come from the Capital Improvement Fund if the money cannot be found elsewhere to make the repairs. The water line became an issue when the Water Ranch did a trial run and it was discovered the splash park could not function properly with the three-inch line it was hooked into. The water pressure declined whenever the toilet in the adjacent restroom was flushed. “We need to look at the longterm future of the park,” advised City Planner Kurt Danison. “I think it would be a travesty to get this fair along in this project and the just have to close it,” said Council Member Jill Vugteveen. The water line was still being worked on as this article went to press Tuesday, Aug. 18.

WATER GRANT A public hearing was held to review final project performance of the Storm Water System Improvement Plan. The city received a Community Development Block Grant for

planning purposes only, and the public hearing is a requirement to close out the project. Both Mayor Plumb and Olson said they would like to see a more comprehensive stormwater plan. City Clerk Alice Attwood said she has been working with John Carpeeta of Municipal Research Services to research establishing a storm water utility. She said it would be a separate utility similar to water and sewer fund that would gather fees to help pay for a loan that will fund a more comprehensive stormwater plan. The city has received an agreement from the DOE for water quality combined financial assistance for the plan of $55,000. Half of it would be free, and half of it would be a loan payable over a period of time. Attwood said she got the names of other towns in Eastern Washington that have set up storm water utilities from Carpeeta to further research the process. A committee was formed to discuss accepting a resolution to ban fireworks within the city was formed, made up of Council Members Claire Jeffko and Dennis Brown. They will meet with Police Chief Darren Curtis to decide what kind of resolution will be easiest to enforce. “The simpler the better,” advised Curtis. “If you’re going to ban them, ban them. Do it and give us the teeth to enforce it.” Curtis suggested the ordinance be written so that people would not be arrested for setting fireworks, but rather be fined. “Make the fine an exorbitant amount like $500.” Curtis also suggested making sure any public displays be set up by a company willing to pay a permit fee and insurance on the event. A decision on the fireworks ban is expected to be made at the October 13, 2015 city council meeting. Council Member Brown said

county and state police vehicles have been traveling through town at night at a high rate of speed. “It seems a little excessive again; we had them calmed down for awhile, but do we need to send a letter to them again?” asked Brown. Mayor Plumb said the vehicles were “outpacing their sirens.” Chief Curtis said it all depended on what kind of a call they were going to. “Unfortunately we don’t have a state trooper office in town; it’s further south. So when the sheriff ’s deputies were going to a call last night (Monday, Aug. 10) it was a critically injured person and they had to get there as soon as possible,” Curtis stated, adding, “I am not going to send a letter to these officers about a critical, time sensitive call.” He said it was understood that if officers are going to a call and cause another accident, they are civilly liable; and there were agreements among agencies that if they are on a critical call, to slow down when going through town. Council Member Olson complimented Curtis on the feedback and/or lack thereof he has been receiving from the public since Curtis came on as Chief. Mayor Plumb expressed disappointment that he “wouldn’t be getting my tank.” He reported receiving a lot of feedback when he posted the question on Facebook asking if people would like to see a tank parked at the Veterans Memorial Park at the south end of town. Plumb said he was approached by people at the the Veterans Memorial Park at Chief Joseph Dam wanting to know if Tonasket wanted to take it off their hands. Council Member Rice reported speaking to four veterans who were discussing the tank. “It’s seen as a killing machine for some, a decorative thing for

SEE COUNCIL | PG A12

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Gary DeVon/staff photo

A church group from the west side of the state once again made Oroville a stop as they did community service around town. The group often works with senior citizens to do chores around their homes at no cost. Last Friday found them, with their supervisor, repainting some of Oroville’s fire hydrant.

Tonasket students head back to school Sept. 2 Back to school assemblies planned for the first day

dent enrollment and for updating student information. A school district open house is scheduled Tuesday, Sept. 1 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. which will provide the opportunity for parents and students to visit their classrooms and meet their teachers. A back to school BBQ takes place the same day, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the high school commons. The price of the meal is $3.50 for adults and children. Football practice begins Wednesday, Aug. 19, with all other fall sports practices beginning Aug. 24. Sixth grade orientation is

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The new school year starts Wednesday, Sept. 2 for the Tonasket School District, with back to school assemblies held at 8:30 a.m. in the gymnasiums. The high school, middle school and elementary schools all opened their offices back up Wednesday, Aug. 19 for new stu-

scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 1. Students and parents are asked to meet in the middle school gym at 6 p.m., where they will have the opportunity to meet the sixth grade teachers, school counselor and principal. A short orientation of the middle school will be presented with the chance to have any questions answered. Sixth grade teachers will be in their classrooms until 7:30 p.m. Tonasket High School fees include the following: ASB $25, Sports $50, Art $15, FFA $20, Yearbook $45 and Drivers Ed $393. Picture Day is scheduled for Friday, Sept. 4.

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PAGE A4

Burglars steal all from house, then rent it out THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CONCONULLY – A Cle Elum woman called the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office last week suspecting someone was living without her permission in a home she owned in Conconully. Deputies were to find her house had been stripped of possessions

OCSO photo

Jerry E. Lamb and rented out. On the morning of Thursday, Aug. 13, deputies responded to a residence on West Fork Road in Conconully in reference to a possible burglary. The owner of the residence was told someone was living in her house in Conconully. Also, earlier on the same morning deputies received a call regarding two subjects who were staying at the Creekside Motel in Conconully and that the motel’s owners wanted them removed. The owner stated that the two subjects were Jerry E. Lamb, 57, and Debra Kay WatersLamb, 55, both of Conconully/ Spokane, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. “The owner of the residence at West Fork Road called deputies and said she would meet them in Conconully and she also stated that she had heard that the suspects living in her house were Debra Waters-Lamb and Jerry Lamb,” said the sheriff. Deputy Matt Stewart and the victim from West Fork met in Conconully and then drove to the Creekside Motel to see if they could locate Debra Waters-Lamb and Jerry Lamb. “Once there they located Jerry Lamb who allowed them in the room. When they entered the room the victim from the West Fork residence pointed out several stolen items from her house,” said Rogers. Jerry Lamb was subsequently arrested for Possession of Stolen Property and eventually transported to the Okanogan County Jail and book. “The investigation showed that Debra Waters-Lamb and Jerry Lamb had come to Conconully and found the unoccupied residence on West Fork Road,” said

Rogers. “It appears that the Lambs then stole every single thing out of the residence and in the yard and took the stolen items to three different storage units in Conconully. They stole everything, including beds, washer/ dryers, paintings, etc. every single item in the house and yard was stolen.” The two suspects then apparently went back to the residence, cleaned it up inside and out and then rented the place out to other people to stay there, while they stayed at the Creekside Motel. They had also called the PUD and were attempting to get their names changed over on the power bill.” Deputies obtained search warrants and on Friday, Aug. 14 and executed them on the three storage units recovering hundreds of stolen items. The homeowner stated she was missing over $15,000 in belongings; most of those were recovered by deputies. Other stolen property located in the storage units belonged to other residents in Conconully, according to the sheriff. Deputies are still attempting to identify the property and all the victims. “Debra Waters-Lamb left Conconully before deputies arrived, stealing her nephew’s vehicle to flee. At this time we are looking for Debra WatersLamb. Waters-Lamb could be possibly driving a silver 2005 Chevrolet Malibu, Washington license ASF2751. It is believed she is heading back to the Spokane area,” said Rogers, adding that his office is attempting to get an arrest warrant for Waters-Lamb

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 20, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Jeannette Deann Dudley, 48, Okanogan, pleaded guilty July 20 to three counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Dudley was sentenced Aug. 11 to 16 months in prison and fined $1,150. The crimes occurred Jan. 28, Feb. 5 and Feb. 18, 2014. Alicia Lynn Flores, 36, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 11 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Flores was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 64 days suspended, and fined $600 for the March 25 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Garry Arnold Will Jr., 48, Loomis, with intimidating a public servant and obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 4. The court found probable cause to charge Dustin Cody Smith, 28, Omak, with POCS (heroin), forgery and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred July 23 and Aug. 4. The court found probable cause to charge Larry Fredrick O’Bryan, 34, Omak, with second-degree arson. The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 5. The court found probable cause to charge Robert James Long, 29, Oroville, with seconddegree burglary, seconddegree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 6. The court found probable cause to charge David Donald Allen Jr., 33, Omak, with seconddegree malicious mischief, third-degree malicious mischief and obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 7. The court found probable cause to charge Charmayne Latoya Lazard, 30, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 8.

Okanogan man gets 10 years for child porn

JUVENILE A 15-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Aug. 12 to one charge of minor in a public place exhibiting the effects of liquor. The girl was sentenced to five days in detention with credit for five days served. The crime occurred July 28. A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Aug. 12 to third-degree theft. The boy was sentenced to seven days in detention for the March 11 crime. In a second case, the boy pleaded guilty Aug. 12 to theft of a motor vehicle, second-degree TMVWOP, POCS and third-degree malicious mischief. Those crimes occurred July 15 and 16. The boy was sentenced to 120 hours of community service (converted to 16 days in detention with credit for 16 days served), two days in private confinement (converted to two days in detention with credit for two days served), and 34 days in detention with credit for nine days served. He was fined a total of $550. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 28.

SPOKANE – Randy Zacherle, 55, Okanogan, was sentenced Aug. 13 after having previously been convicted by a jury on Nov. 3, 2014 of Possession of Child Pornography. U. S. District Court Judge Stanley Allen Bastian sentenced Zacherle to a 10 year term to be followed by a life term of court supervision after he is released from Federal prison. Zacherle will also be required to register as a sex offender. According to information disclosed during the court proceedings, in 2009 Zacherle was convicted of Possession of Child Pornography and sentenced to 26 months imprisonment and required to register as a sex offender. In 2013, Zacherle was arrested by the U. S. Marshal’s Service and Spokane County Sheriff ’s Office for failure to register as a sex offender. On Oct, 30, 2013, Zacherle was convicted federally for failure to register as a sex offender. Further investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation determined Zacherle was using a laptop computer with wiping software to receive and possess images of child pornography from 2011 until he was arrested in April of 2013. Law enforcement discovered Zacherle had collected over 1,000 images of child pornography, which included prepubescent

DISTRICT COURT Robert James Long, 29, Oroville, guilty on two counts of firstdegree criminal trespassing. Long was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,001. Warren William Louie, 49, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Louie was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 170 days suspended, and fined $583 Lillian Marisol Luengas, 20, had two charges dismissed: second-degree rendering criminal assistance and making a false statement to a public servant. Laurie Ann Marchand, 62, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Joseph Leroy Martinez, 24, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Martinez was fined $400. Stonechild Moran, 38, no middle name listed, guilty of third-degree theft. Moran was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $608. Darryl Dominic Moses, 65, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Moses received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $468. Dario Orozco Zacarias, 54, Omak, guilty of DUI. Orozco Zacarias was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Submitted by OCSO

Debra Kay Waters Lamb but if anyone does see her or the stolen vehicle please contact your local law enforcement or the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office at 509-422-7232. Waters-Lamb is wanted for residential burglary, theft and possession of stolen property at this time. “Deputies did an excellent job on this case. I can’t say enough about the work done by Deputy Matt Stewart, Deputy Josh Brown and Sgt. Gene Davis,” said Rogers.

female children under the age of twelve. “I commend the tireless efforts of the FBI, United States Marshal’s Service, and Spokane County Sheriff ’s Office in investigating this matter. The United States Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of Washington is, and will continue to be, committed to prosecuting aggressively and seeking appropriate punishment for child pornography crimes. In addition, prosecuting offenders who fail to register as sex offenders is a priority of the United States Attorney’s Office,” said Michael C. Ormsby, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington. This case was prosecuted as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in 2006 by the U. S. Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the U. S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Page This investigation was conducted by the FBI, U.S. Marshal’s Service and Spokane County Sheriff ’s Office. The case was prosecuted by Stephanie J. Lister and Matthew Duggan, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the Eastern District of Washington. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, visit www.usdoj.gov/psc. For information about internet safety education, visit www.usdoj.gov/psc and click on the tab “resources.”

suspended, and fined $1,381. Marvella Pioquinto Basa, 40, Oroville, guilty of fourthdegree assault and interfering with reporting (DV) (both deferred prosecution revoked). Pioquinto Basa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,283. Erin Lynn Reyes, 26, Omak, guilty of obstruction and disorderly conduct. Reyes was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,176. Alexander Reyes Ramirez, 32, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

911 CALLS/JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, AUG. 10, 2015 Weapons offense on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Assault on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Oak St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Dayton St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on S. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on 21st Ave. in Oroville. Edward Keller, no middle name listed, 44, booked for seconddegree DWLS. Clint Michael Griffin, 39, court commitment for DUI. Richard Joseph Cobos, 22, booked on an OCSO warrant for DUI. Harlan Curtis Thompson, 27, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for seconddegree theft. Nathan David LaFountaine, 36, booked on an OCSO warrant for third-degree DWLS. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault and second-degree criminal trespassing. Aaron Pfaltzgraff-Miller, 22, booked for fourth-degree assault and on a DOC secretary’s warrant. TUESDAY, AUG. 11, 2015 Malicious mischief on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on River Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Drugs on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. DWLS on N. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Injuries reported. Threats on 22nd Ave. in Oroville. Brandt Riedy McDonough, 26, booked for DUI. Shala R. Fitztthum-Schellert, 24, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: theft of a motor vehicle and POCS. Matthew Thomas Llewellyn, 32, booked for drive-by shooting and DUI. Jeanette Deann Dudley, 48, booked on three counts of delivery of a controlled substance. Jelvis Elton Sherman, 59, DOC hold. Klaudia Rose Marie Dick, 19, booked on five Omak Police Department FTA warrants: three for third-degree theft and two for first-degree criminal trespassing. John Leon Thomas, 63, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. WEDNESDAY AUG. 12, 2015 Warrant arrest on Index Ave. in Omak. Threats on Patterson Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Fraud on Sinlahekin Rd. near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Nealey Rd. near Oroville. Injuries reported. Harassment on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Edmonds St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Asotin St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.

Theft on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Joseph William Cook, 28, booked on an FTA bench warrant for unlawful possession of a firearm. Justin Travele Hinton, 30, booked for DUI. Angelica M. Valle-Galvan, 38, booked for POCS, possession of drug paraphernalia, obstruction and a DOC detainer. Justin Rogers, no middle name listed, 25, booked for firstdegree burglary and two counts of first-degree assault. Robin Lynn Frazier, 45, DOC detainer. Jose Dionicio Perez Garcia, 32, booked for third-degree theft and resisting arrest.

THURSDAY, AUG. 13, 2015 Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Jasmine St. in Omak. Aircraft crash on Rise Rd. near Oroville. Fatalities reported. Arson on Nine Mile Rd. near Oroville. Custodial interference on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Automobile theft on N. Main St. in Conconully. Attempted escape on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Automobile theft on S. Fir St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Threats on S. Elm St. in Omak. Theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Found property on N. Ash St. in Omak. Wallet recovered. Harassment on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Shane Lee Rich, 35, booked for DUI, an ignition interlock violation and third-degree DWLS. Kristen Ann Bob, 33, booked on an FTA bench warrant for firstdegree robbery. Delitha Gail Hahn, 37, DOC detainer. Aaron Randy Dyke, 39, DOC detainer. Duane Emery Hall, 36, booked for second-degree malicious mischief and first-degree attempted vehicle prowl. Ryan Eugene Bass, 35, booked on two DOC detainers. Jerry Everette Lamb Jr., 57, booked for second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. FRIDAY, AUG. 14, 2015 Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Burdett St. in Okanogan. Wildland fire on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on Eleventh St. in Omak. Mikeal Ryan Tomatich, 29, booked for second-degree burglary, first-degree trafficking in stolen property, second-degree theft, thirddegree possession of stolen property, second-degree theft and four counts of unlawful issuance of a bank check. Cassandra Jo Vandeveer, 23, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Evelyn A. Charlie, 59, booked for indecent exposure. Mark Sidney Juarez, 48, booked for indecent exposure. Kyle Allen Magana, 19, booked for third-degree theft, thirddegree escape and a Snohomish County FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Joseph Alex Martinez, 36, DOC detainer. Brian Kristopher Boyd, 34, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: first-degree negligent driving and thirddegree DWLS. SATURDAY, AUG. 15, 2015 DUI on Shumway Rd. near Omak. DUI on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Omak. One-vehicle crash on Nine Mile Rd. near Oroville. No injuries

reported. One-vehicle crash on Van Der Schelden Rd. near Tonasket. Utility fire on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Threats on N. Lemanasky Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on Omak Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Fir St. in Omak. Drugs on E. Stampede Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Threats on N. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on Columbia St. in Omak. Fuel spill on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Robert Harris Thomas, 48, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Justin Jay McClellan, 35, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Bennett William Myrall, 46, booked for DUI. Erin Leslie Speiser, 30, booked for DUI. Daniel Lee Lucero, 27, booked for second-degree malicious mischief, third-degree theft and four counts of seconddegree vehicle prowl. Ethan Jay Pfitzer, 19, booked for DUI.

SUNDAY, AUG. 16, 2015 Domestic dispute on Temby Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on N. Lemanasky Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Drugs on N. Main St. in Conconully. Burglary on Woods Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Kruse St. near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Ferry St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. DUI on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. First Ave. in Omak. DUI on Ferry St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. DUI on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Stampede Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Gary Ray Raub, 26, booked for felony harassment and fourth-degree assault (DV). Lorenzo Sebastian Nicolas, 25, booked for DUI. Miguel Angel Solorio, 25, booked for attempted to elude, second-degree escape, hit-and-run (attended) and third-degree DWLS. David Ocean Williams, 20, booked for DUI. Ryan Renae Pakootas, 18, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for no valid operator’s license without ID. Monty Ray Ford, 29, booked for DUI. Ryan W. Louie, 31, DOC detainer. Eli Paul Van Brunt, 30, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing, second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement


AUGUST 20, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Remember lives are what matter most

I don’t need to tell you it has been bedlam here in the north county ever since last Thursday and we first heard about “five fires,” including one started by a plane crash in the Nine Mile and Chesaw-Oroville Road Areas. While many of us think we know who the pilot and passenger in the Cessna T-182 were, the names have not been released as of press time. We do know now the fatal plane crash was not the cause of the devastating fire that burned over 4600 acres, destroying several structures and some homes. We don’t know, as of yet, what did cause those fires. For most the fire miraculously missed some homes, burning everything around them, but leaving the houses virtually untouched. Others weren’t so lucky and many in the Nine Mile/ Chesaw-Oroville Road Area will be without services, like power and phone for awhile – especially as fires continue to burn elsewhere in the county. By Friday, Okanogan County PUD crews were already out replacing poles and tryOut of ing to get power up and running again. My Mind But also by Friday there were reports coming Gary A. DeVon in from all over the county of new fires and as I write this the areas around Riverside, north to Omak are burning and have closed large portions of the highway. All these fires are now called the Okanogan Complex and FEMA has already promised money to the state to help pay for the cost of fighting it, as they have in other hot spots in Eastern Washington. The Chelan area has gone through hell and Pateros, not fully recovered from last year’s Carlton Complex of fires has been threatened by this year’s out of control fire season once again. When the county came up with their new Emergency Alert System we were quick to sign up. We get texts to our mobile phones and emails every time there is a fire spotted somewhere, an evacuation order, potential flood even dust storms. My phone hasn’t stopped buzzing since Thursday and it’s starting to feel like there will be no end to it. We’ve been doing our best to pass on the alerts through our website, FaceBook and Twitter. many others have been doing the same, including Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb, who gleans information from several sources and passes them on. There was an evacuation center at Oroville Elementary and the high school was serving as a base for the firefighters. There are already six Red Cross Evacuation Centers operating in the state, with another opening in Omak. North Valley Hospital opened a shelter at Tonasket High School. People are pulling together to do whatever they can to help and that’s the bright spot among the smoky gloom this fire season. No one seems to be immune. Washington, like states throughout the west, Oregon, California, Idaho and Montana, have all been affected. If weather patterns continue the way they have, whether from Climate Change or a natural cyclical event, things don’t look like they’re going to get better soon. It appears to be a phenomenon affecting the western states, but we aren’t alone. Europe has had their own fires in the past and it wasn’t so long ago that it felt like all of Australia was on fire. Living with fire is something we may have to do for awhile. Here’s to hoping everyone stays safe, keeping lives upmost in our minds and remembering no matter how valuable possessions may seem, nothing will replace your life. If the word comes to evacuate, go! Let’s be careful out there.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Ambulance Memorial Fund is where it’s supposed to be

Dear Editor, Where is the Memorial Fund money? I have been with Oroville Ambulance for seven years. I was elected Secretary/Treasurer of the organization approximately five years ago so I am familiar with these funds. There was approximately $25,000.00 in this account seven years ago. Over the years we have spent approximately $10,000.00 of these funds for tuition, purchasing textbooks and associated expenses to train existing EMTs and training new EMTs. This training enabled us to provide a higher level of care to our patients and increased the number of our crew. We also purchased two sets of transport devices for transporting pediatric patients safely. As of Aug. 17, 2015. These funds are in a bank account controlled by the former Oroville EMTs and this account has a balance of $15,299.57. Sincerely, Jackie Daniels, Advance EMT Oroville

Just because my name was associated with it

Dear Editor, People in our community are labeling me as the cause of the ambulance and EMT issues. I am asking those who have ill will towards me to set those feelings aside and look at the facts. 1. Taxpayers are paying twice for ambulance service. The agreement that the City and County signed on Aug. 6, 2015 with Lifeline Ambulance agrees to pay Lifeline all of their costs including wages, fringe benefits, fuel and insurance plus ten percent. In addition the agreement allows Lifeline to use city owned ambulances. After paying all the costs plus profit the same agreement guarantees that lifeline can collect ambulance transport fees. This means that taxpayers are paying all Lifelines costs, profit and then get an ambulance bill when they are transported in a city owned ambulance. 2. Lifeline is staffing the Oroville ambulance with two providers when the volunteers staffed the ambulance with three providers. With a serious patient and long transport times it is better to have two EMTs in the back with the patient and a third to drive. If the patient needs CPR a minimum of two providers are needed to provide all the necessary care. The volunteer staffed ambulance had three people, the Lifeline Ambulance is only going to have two -- one to drive one to help the patient. No matter how good the Lifeline EMTs are, having two on duty versus the three that responded before Lifeline means the community is receiving less service. 3. LifeLine is only staffing one city-owned ambulance even though there are two city owned ambulances at the ambulance station. The reason we have two ambulances is when the first one is out of the area on a transport or there is a bad accident requiring two ambulances you have one. With local ambulance volunteers the community had the ability to mobilize the back-up ambulance. That is gone now. Again the community is receiving less service. 4. The City and LifeLine ambulance have signed an agreement that says they plan on making this permanent. The Lifeline agreement says it is for 90 days. However, the actual contact says “While operating under this temporary contract, the parties shall endeavor to enter into a long term contract.” 5. This contract is much more expensive than the previous method of providing service. LifeLine is a for profit company. Without knowing the exact pay scale for EMTs, I am going to use minimum wage to demonstrate my point. Two EMTs being paid the state

minimum wage scale of $9.47 an hour plus Social Security, Medicare, unemployment and L&I is at least $11.10 per hour. Adding the ten percent the contract allows for profit, the minimum amount the contract will cost taxpayers for just the labor portion of the 90 day contract will be $52,730.76. The volunteers received ten dollars per twelve hour shift. That means the hourly rate for labor is .83 cents. Instead of having two people on duty, the volunteers had three people. That means the 90 day cost for labor was only $3,879.62. No matter how you do the math, it is costing taxpayers at least $44,057.43 more for the next 90 days. You cannot dispute that it is going to cost more money for fewer people to be one duty. 6 The yearly Lifeline Contact cost will exceeds the annual levy amount. Using the $52,730.76 figure for 90 days of labor means the LifeLine contract will cost taxpayers a minimum of $213,852.62. According to the budget tax revenue is $ 145,000. The levy pays for fuel, insurance, training, buildings, new ambulances and all the other costs associated with providing service. Yet the Lifelines bill for just labor is going to be over that by $68,852.52 for just labor. How is this sustainable without raising taxes? 7. The Mayor has been planning since Jan. 14, 2015 to get rid of the volunteers. I made a public records request of the City pertaining to this agreement. According to the emails that I have received the Mayor was meeting and negotiating with LifeLine since Jan. 14, 2015. While the volunteer EMTs were asking for help, the Mayor was ignoring them and negotiating with LifeLine. Now that I have stated the verifiable facts I would like to express my opinion. While some people may not agree with me, I certainly hope you consider my opinion. 8. Janet Allen, Jackie Daniels, Paul Bouchard and Lisa Bordwell are extremely dedicated and committed people who have donated countless hours providing ambulance service for their community. They have done an outstanding job and saved countless lives. I think they deserved better treatment. They didn’t deserve to be treated like criminals. According to the copy of the email I received from the City Police Chief regarding security for the Lifeline ambulance crew from the “old EMS crew.” The volunteers gave the city 30 days notice after years of trying to solve problems. Their resignation letters offered positive solutions. The mayor fired them all with 16 hours of notice. I am sure everyone can agree that it is a sad way to treat people who volunteer to help. 9. Having local responders is better than strangers from out of town. Janet, Jackie, Paul and Lisa are our friends and neighbors. They know the area and the community. I would rather have them show up at a medical emergency than strangers. 10. The non-profit solution offered by the volunteers is more cost effective and solves all the issues. Unfortunately because my name is associated with it, it hasn’t ever

been considered. I have had the opportunity to share my facts and opinions, I sincerely hope you will ask your elected officials for solutions. Sincerely Chris Allen

Mayor and Council have failed community

Dear Editor, The mayor and city council have failed in their responsibility to be community leaders in regards to the ambulance service. First they failed to listen to the EMT’s concerns about the need for additional EMTs. Then they ignored the proposal the EMTs provided at a city council meeting several months ago. Then they tried to blame the EMTs for being frustrated at their lack of action. When the EMTs gave the city thirty days’ notice, the mayor blamed them. Then the Mayor fired them. Now the taxpayers are being forced to pay a huge bill for a for-profit private ambulance service and a group of former EMTs who have been given nothing for their service except disrespect. Instead of having a local back-up ambulance, we are going to have to wait for an ambulance from much farther away. Instead of having three EMTs on an ambulance, we are only going to have two. Instead of being a community that values volunteers, we are now known as a community where the mayor and city council allow their petty differences to threaten our safety. Sincerely Gail Frazier Oroville

Mayor needs to do the math regarding Lifeline Dear Editor, The mayor needs to review his basic math skills. We used to have three volunteers on our local ambulance. According to my math it is better to have three EMTs on duty than two EMTs. The mayor using new math decided to pay Life line Ambulance for only two EMTs. I thought maybe the mayor wants to save money. But then I learned that the city had been paying$ 60.00 for the three EMTS and the new contract is costing the City at least$ 500.00 for two EMTs. This dollar figure is for just 24 hours of service. Well then I thought maybe the mayor is getting more ambulances since we used to have enough volunteers to staff two ambulances. However, according to the mayor’s math he thinks that one ambulance is better than two. I am confused but it seems that having more EMTs on duty, an ability to staff two ambulances and saving money makes both financial and common sense. The mayor should go back to math school so the rest of us can get the help we need during a medical emergency Rita Emry Oroville


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 20, 2015

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Things different when we were in school I’ve been seeing articles in magazines and on TV about getting kids ready for “back to school.” Fancy backpacks, lunch pails, organizers for keeping their shoes in, etc. My thoughts went back a long ways. We didn’t have to worry about shoe organizers because we only had two pair of shoes. School shoes and “Sunday shoes.” School supplies were a 5¢ Big Chief tablet, lead pencil and away we went - in my case walking two and a half miles to a one-room schoolhouse, holding up to 60 students, grades one to eight, all drinking out of the same dipper at the water pail. I dare say I finished school with a better education, than some do now, from the fancy schools with thousands of dollars poured into them. And yes, I had homework and yes I did it because my parents expected me to. Studies are reporting that kids have too

More donations needed for parking lot sale, Round II SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Due to the positive response to our Parking Lot Sale we will repeat the performance one more time in September. Donations of quality goods for the sale, before hand, are most appreciated. (No clothes, please.) See Betty Steg, Raleigh Chinn, or myself if you have something of value to donate. We are soliciting donations, and looking for an installer, for the task of installing new dining room ceiling acoustic tiles. Lunches next week are as follows: Tuesday, Aug. 25, Pork Chops with Apples; Thursday, Aug. 27, Hungarian Goulash; Friday, Aug. 28, Country Fried Steak. For Senios age 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.

much homework, these days. Baloney! They have plenty of time to text friends and have no chores to do. Do I want things to be like they were “way back when?” No, of course not, but there is a happy medium and money isn’t the answer. One of the best things about being an adult... we don’t have homework! Big “doin’s” in Omak last weekend with the Stampede and “stuff” going on. Lots of sales for cowboy clothes and how nice that marijuana was on special. Good news that Don Rounds is home, after a stay in Wenatchee hospital. Was reported to me that Gary Sorenson is having some serious health issues. More smoke in the valley from fires on the east side of the valley, this time. At the Senior Center last week we had some of the best, huge, cinnamon rolls. Peggy Doyle, the new cook, is a real

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS On Tuesdays, 11 a.m., we normally have speakers, except the third Tuesday set asside for Business meetings. Jackie Daniels spoke at our last Tuesday meeting regarding our local ambulance services. According to Jackie, the recent temporary switch to out of town “Professionals” is approximately three times more expensive. In addition, we presently have only one, instead of two ambulances on call. Three times the price, with half the service. What gives? And, who wants to wait for backup from Tonasket? I have seen our local volunteers in action. They are professional, personable, and dedicated to serving our community. The county commissioners, city council and mayor have the final say concerning emergency services. On the other hand, we citizens must pay the bill. And, well, you all know

Grateful to all the HILLTOP firefighters and COMMENTS volunteers SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

A big “Thank You” goes out to all of the Awesome Fire Fighters and volunteers that joined in to help with our recent fire scares on our Hilltop and all over the rest of the state. That includes the local firefighters from Molson, Chesaw, D N R, the coffee and sandwich makers and those that kept others advised of what was

going on. There were others that moved cattle to safety and out of harms way. The fire sight is devastating. We need to be very thankful to all of them. People, people, people we must be more careful. The land is so dry it does not take much to start a fire. I am happy to report that we have some “new kids on the block.” That is, on our Hilltop. On Saturday, Aug. 8 th we have Averie Lee Stanley at 7 pounds, 7 ounces and 20 1/2 inches long.

Auditions for ‘The TONASKET Best Christmas COMMUNITY Pageant Ever’ SUBMITTED BY SARAH KEISER DIRECTOR, TONASKET COMMUNITY

TONASKET – The Tonasket Community Theater will be holding auditions for this year’s live production. The name of the play is “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” It is a comedy about a small church that intends to present their annual Christmas Pageant in the usual fashion. This plan is disrupted wildly when a group of young siblings (poor, rowdy and uncensored) show up to join the cast. This funny, family-friendly play will be performed Dec 10,11,12,13 at the CCC. We need: four men, six women (ages 25-70+) also eight boys and nine girls (ages 5 to 14). You do not need to sing or dance. Auditions will be held Wednesday Aug. 26 at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center at 4 p.m. for the kids, 5:30 p.m. for the adults. I do ask all the kids to memorize a very short poem or joke or paragraph so I can hear their voices at the audition. Adults will just be asked to read from the

THEATER

script. Rehearsals will start Sept. 23 and generally held once a week on Wednesdays 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. People with small parts may not have to attend all the rehearsals. We will have time off for Thanksgiving but then we will hold dress rehearsals on Sunday Nov. 30 and Sunday Dec 6. This play is sweet, short and

bread maker! should be from the “coffee group” that If you can chew a big wad of bubble he faithfully met with each morning, gum, spit, have a tattoo, maybe you as long as his health permitted. He could be a baseball player. told many tall tales and his Last Friday, a special memory will live on and on. friend of many was laid to After the ceremonies were rest in Oroville’s Riverview over at the cemetery and we Cemetery, in a simple cerwere waiting for clearance to emony with military rites move, a magnificent, huge, included. That being Bob golden eagle flew over the Irwin, longtime resident of area, as if to say, one more Oroville and grandson of farewell to Bob. What a fitthe legendary “Okanogan ting tribute! Smith,” one of the first On Saturday a large gatherAmerican settlers of the ing of family and friends met Pacific Northwest and a pio- THIS & THAT at the Molson Grange Hall to neer of the Washington apple Joyce Emry bid farewell and remember industry. the good times with Wally I first knew Bob when he Loe. To have lived ones life was employed in the post office, which making the many friends along the way, was located in the north portion of what is the best legacy a man can leave. Yes, is now the Oroville pharmacy, then he there will be an empty chair at the table moved to the new brick building located but the many memories of the special across the street from Wells Fargo bank, husband, uncle, grandpa, etc. will carry then he moved on, still employed by the on. post office, and returned at the time of The recent fire took the Loe Ranch, his retirement. He was always friendly that Wally dearly loved and Ruth said and undoubtedly the biggest tease in the she was so glad Wally didn’t have to world. He had a host of friends and it endure that. was only fitting that his casket bearers How sad for those in the area that lost

who are the servants. l suggest the parties involved resolve their differences. Otherwise, woe is us. Speaking of woe. With the unusually dry weather, the numbers of fires out west are totally out of control. Thursday we were detoured over Mount Hull when we went home, due to a fire six miles east of Oroville on both sides of Chesaw-Oroville Road. Our phone rang with concerned calls. The Nine Mile Fire was still burning Saturday evening, as are fires all over Eastern Washington and Canada. In Seattle the newspaper reported that Oroville was evacuated. Huh? Shows how unreliable the major news media is. Makes one wonder how we can even function with all the misinformation. Woe is us. “I swell when I eat well.” Quoth Frank Grunert. Speaking of eating, join us for fine dining at noon Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. And, don’t forget, all’s swell that ends swell. Please pass the belly fat. This is so, yes I know, round and round the rump roast we go. Pinochle Report: Pinochle, Ed Craig; High Woman, Bev Storm; High Man, Len Firpo. On Thursday, Aug. 13 at 7 pounds 13 ounces and 20 inches long we have JoDee Coletta Leslie. On Sunday, Aug. 16 weighing in at 7 pounds, 8 ounces and 20 1/2 inches long we have Deitrich Wayne Johnson. If you think that is the end of it, you are mistaken, there are at least three more to come by the end of August or early in September. Stand by. Hot August Nights is only days away. Registration starts at 8 a.m. on the Saturday, Aug. 29 in Chesaw. Bring your family, friends and cars. There will be lots of cars, vendors and awards (people’s choice). There is still room for more vendors, so call Bacon at 509-485-2029. See you there. endearing. Acting experience is always welcome but this play also works well for people who just want to stretch themselves and take part in this very vital CCC and community function. If you are interested in participating off stage ( set construction, lights, programs, posters, etc) you do not need to come to auditions but please write Sarah so she can start lining up the staging crew. If there are any questions about the play, the roles, the dates, the auditions...please contact Sarah Kaiser, who will be directing: sarahdrama53@gmail.

Scenic Excursion

Pacific Northwest Trail Days 2015 a big success SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER PRESIDENT, OROVILLE CHAPTER OF THE PNTA

With community support and a little hard work, Oroville had a great Trail Days Celebration on Saturday, Aug. 8. Special Thanks to all our local sponsors, including Clyde and Sandi at Camaray Motel for providing all our posters and handbills, Oroville Party Rentals for the big shade tent, Frontier Foods for the Watermelon, Mike Tibbs for the extra Sani-cans and Jack Hughes for all the Ice. Grateful thanks to the City of Oroville for the cooperation and coordination needed for our use of the soccer fields. Thanks to the Gazette Tribune for getting the word out

Benefit for Helen Small Ray this Saturday SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

There will be a Breast Cancer Benefit Dinner for Helen Small Ray, at the Eagles #3865 on Saturday, Aug, 21 at 6 p.m.Please join us. All money will go to the family to help pay for medical bills and expenses. The menu will be pulled pork, coleslaw, corn on the cob, and dessert. They also will have a silent auction. Any and all donations will be appreciated. You can drop off your dona-

BIRTHS Kayleigh Marie Elias was born to Christine Kiley and Joshua Elias of Oroville, Wash. at 8:30 p.m. on August 15, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She weighed seven pounds, 11 ounces at birth and was 21.5 inches long. She has one sibling, Larissa Nicole Elias, age four. Her grandparents are Tom and Terri Kiley of Benton City, Wash., Brandy and Terry Rise of Oroville and Christopher Witherspoon of Bellevue, Wash.

PNTA NEWS OROVILLE CHAPTER on this first time event and the excellent coverage and photos of last Saturday’s Celebration. Thanks to Rick Braman who was brilliant managing the sound system and stage as our local musicians poured out a fantastic day of music for all of us to enjoy. Special Thanks to “Happy Dog” the rocking band that closed out the evening and brought a crowd to dance the night away. The Pacific Northwest Trail is a big deal for Oroville. Increasing numbers of people have hiked through this year. As their experiences go out on social and print media more and more folks will be trekking through Oroville on their way to the Pacific coast each year. Hiking, biking, pad-

EAGLEDOM AT WORK tions at the Eagles at 1319 Golden St. in Oroville. The cost will be $10 for dinner. By the time you read this our election for Worthy Vice President will be concluded, the votes counted, and the best brother will serve until May of next year. Don’t forget Bingo and Burgers at 6 p.m. on Thursday. All your friends will be there! On Saturday, Aug. 28 at 6 p.m. the Auxiliary will draw cards in the Queen of Hearts Game. Be sure you have your member-

Alex Alfredo Ortega Orozco was born to Anjelica M. Orozco and Alejandro Ortega of Tonasket at 12:24 p.m. on August 6, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. He weighed five pounds, 12 ounces at birth.

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MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUMMER SHOWTIMES Oliver, B.C. 7:00 & 9:00PM NIGHTLY (unless otherwise stated)

ROGUE NATION THURS.-FRI. AUG. 20-21. SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:30 PM

TRAINWRECK SAT.-SUN.–MON.– SOUTHPAW WED.-THURS.

-FRI. AUG. 26 - 27- 28. SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:25 PM

OMAK THEATER

TIGER, TIGER

Affair on Main Street - Sept. 5 & 6

ship card on you as only Eagles Members can win. The picnic is coming! The picnic is coming! The Eagles Picnic is at Thorndike’s Beach on Saturday, Aug. 22. It’s always good company, good food and a good time. Come on down! Our Aerie will be closed that day so everyone can enjoy. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw and Tacos. We are People Helping People!

TUES. AUG.22-23-24 25. SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:25 PM

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Sat. & Sun. • 11 am & 1 pm • Train leaves from Metaline Falls Park

dling and outdoor recreation increasingly draw people to visit our area. This is good news for local businesses and the local economy in general. We should all be thinking about increasing the services we offer to this growing numbers of visitors. Locally, we can all enjoy the trails by getting our families out hiking every chance we get. Our local chapter plans a series of fund raisers and community events for this fall and next year to raise money and awareness of the wonderful wild and natural resources accessed by the Pacific Northwest Trail. We hope to fund and support a summer trail crew recruited exclusively from Oroville High School in 2016. Get involved with the Pacific Northwest Trail. Our next Oroville Chapter of the PNTA meeting will be Wednesday, Aug. 26 at 6 p.m. at the Pastime Tavern patio. Trail Days is already being planned for next year. Save the date, Aug. 26.

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buildings, cattle and other items. Next Saturday, Aug. 22, at the United Methodist Church there will be a Memorial Service for Norene Harnasch. As is so often the case she passed away shortly after the death of her husband, Verle, after having been married 73 years. Lunch will follow the 11 a. m. service, at the church. Another Red Cross blood draw will be held, at the usual location of the United Methodist Church, Tuesday, Sept. 8, from 12:00 to 5 p.m. One of our young granddaughters from Issaquah, Wash. was dedicated at the Oroville Free Methodist Church last Sunday, bringing a number of our family together at the Lance and Vicki Haney household. We are so pleased that the little ones like to play cards and board games with us oldies, in spite of all the electronic “gizmos” they all have. Can you believe apples are being picked already? Seems so early. While camping in the Lost Lake campgrounds last week some folks took it upon themselves to steal from numerous campsites, coolers and food supplies. They deserve punishment for doing such deeds!

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OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON 147 min R

BIOGRAPHY / DRAMA / MUSIC - STARRING O’SHEA JACKSON JR, COREY HAWKINS, JASON MITCHELL FRI. 7:00. SAT. *4:15, 8:00. SUN. *3:15, 7:00, MON- THURS. 6:30

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. 116 min PG-13

ACTION / ADVENTURE / COMEDY STARRING HENRY CAVILL, ARMIE HAMMER, HUGH GRANT. FRI. 6:15, 9:15. SAT. *3:15, 6:15, 9:15. SUN. *3:15, 6:15. MON-THURS.: 6:15, 9:15

AMERICAN ULTRA

96 min

R

ACTION / COMEDY - STARRING JESSE EISENBERG, KRISTEN STEWART, CONNIE BRITTON. FRI. 6:30. 9:30. SAT. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30. SUN. *3:30, 6:30. MON-THURS.: 6:30, 9:30

RICKI AND THE FLASH 101 min

PG-13

COMEDY / DRAMA / MUSIC - STARRING MERYL STREEP, KEVIN KLINE, RICK SPRINGFIELD FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45 SUN. *3:45, 6:45,. MON-THURS. 6:45, 9:30. Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


AUGUST 20, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

SAFETY CHECK

COMMUNITY CALENDAR GO Recycle Flea Market TONASKET - Green Okanogan Recycling Center (GO Recycle) will be having Flea Market/Yard Sale spaces for rent this Thursday, Aug. 20 from 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. at their newly opened business at 3 Rodeo Rd. (just south of Tonasket off Hwy. 97-turn at Clarkson Mill Rd--you will see the brightly colored sign). The newly opened Recycling Center will also have a “ReStore” where you can bring your no longer needed building supplies such as lumber, vinyl windows (no aluminum), doors, lighting and electrical items, sinks, counters and cabinets, leftover tile, hardware and tools. No clothes, furniture, or rugs at this time. For information on prices for spaces call Janet Culp at 509-486-2061. Mood Swings Perform at Esther Bricques Winery

OROVILLE – The Mood Swings will perform at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, Aug. 20. Judy Johnston, Betsy Rainsford and Cheryl Ann Crego bring their three part harmonies to a wide range of mid-twentieth century Americana. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or check the Events Page at www.estherbricques.com. Garlic Festival Beer & Wine Garden

TONASKET – The annual Tonasket Garlic Festival will host a beer and wine garden this year featuring beer and wine from Alpine Brewing and Esther Bricques Winery on Friday, Aug. 21 and Saturday, Aug. 21. Friday’s hours will be from 2 to 8 p.m., and Saturday’s hours will be from noon to 6 p.m. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Aug. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096. Back to School Clothing Giveaway

OROVILLE - There will be a Back to School Clothing Giveaway on Saturday, Aug. 29 from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. at the Gold Digger Park across from Frontier Foods. Your donations of clean clothing for the giveaway can be dropped off at Windermere Real Estate in Oroville from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday to Friday. All Sizes needed. Oroville Grange Picnic

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange #985 is hosting a summer

Picnic/Meeting at Deep Bay Park on Saturday, Aug. 2 at 1 p.m. We will barbecue and share potluck dishes. For fun we will swim, and play Frisbee, Bocce, Croquet and Horseshoes. We will also play a game bingo for some fun prizes. We plan to party at the Picnic Shelter on the North end of Deep Bay Park. Members and perspective new members are encouraged to attend. The Grange is a fun way to be part of the Oroville community. For more information on this event please contact Joseph and Dorinda 509-4764072 or email jgenz4@gmail.com. School Celebrates 25 Years

OROVILLE - North Valley Christian School will be celebrating 25 years of community service with 226 graduates on Tuesday, Aug. 25, starting at 5 p.m. at the Oroville Library Annex, then continuing with music into the park. Featured is a student speaker who will tell of his journey out of heroine addiction. Refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. Oroville Chapter of PNTA Meeting

OROVILLE - The Oroville Chapter of the PNTA will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 26 at the Pastime Tavern and Grill, Main St. Oroville. There will be a social hour on the patio starting at 6 p.m. Trail Days 2015, upcoming fundraisers and Trail Days 2016 Aug. 6 and 7, 2016 on the agenda. Impacts of wildfires on the PNT this season, upcoming trail work and a report from our SKY (Student-KnowledgeYouth) Trail Crew working on the PNT in the wilderness this summer will round-out the agenda. This meeting will also be a fond farewell to our departing Chapter Vice-president Dave Tobey and his wife Rita. For info contact Joseph at 476-4072 or email jgenz4@gmail.com. Stroke Support Group

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group will meet on Thursday, Aug. 27 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street. This is a support group for anyone who

Sharing Hometown Recipes, Cooking Tips and Coupons By Janet Tharpe

Basic Ingredients Shine in This Old-Fashioned Banana Cake “This recipe is over 100 years old!”

I

t’s hard to imagine not falling passionately in love with Audra LeNormand’s moist, delicious Banana Cake! All of the flavors blend perfectly... with just the right punch of banana. Depending on how large your bananas are, you may need to adjust the quantity. But to me, the more bananas the better! See step-by-step photos of Audra’s recipe plus thousands more from home cooks nationwide at: www.justapinch.com/familybananacake Audra LeNormand You’ll also find a meal planner, coupons and chances to Liberty, TX win! Enjoy and remember, use “just a pinch”... (pop. 8,397)

-Janet

Banana Cake What You Need CAKE 2 sticks butter 2 c sugar 4 eggs 1 c milk 3 c flour 3 tsp baking powder 1 tsp Mexican vanilla SYRUP 2 1/2 c sugar 1 c water 1 lemon juiced 12 bananas sliced Directions • Preheat over to 350 F.

• Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs; mix well. Add milk; mix well. • Add flour and baking powder; mix well. Finally, add Mexican vanilla; mix well. • Grease and flour two 9-inch round cake pans. • Bake for 30 to 35 minutes. Cool on wire racks. • While cake is baking, combine sugar and water in a medium saucepan.

• Heat until syrupy, then add lemon; allow to cool. • Place one cake on a cake platter and prick holes in it with a fork. • Place half of the sliced bananas on the 1st layer and pour 1/2 of syrup over the bananas and cake. • Place 2nd cake layer on top of the 1st. Prick holes, layer bananas, then use the last of the syrup. • Store leftovers in the refrigerator.

Submitted by: Audra LeNormand, Liberty, TX (pop. 8,397)

www.justapinch.com/familybananacake Brought to you by American Hometown Media

has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments.

The Oroville EMTs sponsored a child car safety seat check in front of the Washington State Drivers Licensing office last Wednesday, Aug. 9. By early afternoon trained personnel, including local EMT Jackie McDaniels, had inspected more than a dozen child car seats and had replaced two, thanks to the Oroville Chapter of the Royal Neighbors, which provided replacement seats, as well as refreshments. In addition to checking to see if the seats were up to standard, people learned about whether they had been properly installing the seat in the vehicle and whether they were appropriate for the child’s weight. More can be learned about child safety seats at www.usa.safekids.org.

Outdoor Movie Night

HAVILLAH - There will be a free outdoor movie night at the Immanuel Lutheran Church in Havillah, on Friday, Aug. 28, at 8:00 p.m. They will be showing McFarland USA, the inspiring true story of underdogs triumphing over tremendous obstacles. This heart-warming drama follows novice runners who strive to build a cross-country team in their predominantly Latino high school, and is rated PG. Bring your lawn chairs, and we will provide the popcorn and lemonade. In case of rain, we will move inside. Nashville Country Star

OROVILLE - The Oroville American Legion brings back Nashville Country Star with the best talent from across the state on Saturday, Aug. 29 starting at 6 p.m. in the American Legion Hall. The show features a mix of classic, country and 50s and 60s rock and roll music. There will also be a desert auction. The public is welcome, admission is $8. Highland Stitchers Fourth Annual Quilt Show

MOLSON - The Highland Stitchers will be presenting their Fourth Annual Quilt Show on Saturday, Aug. 29 at the Molson Grange from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be raffles, drawings, food and a noon lunch. Come Enjoy.Everyone Welcome!

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE

Vacation Bible School

OROVILLE - Valley Christian Fellowship presents “Jungle Jaunt,” a unique summer VBS program. Come explore the rainforest and get to know God through Bible stories, music, games, crafts and more! Jungle Jaunt will be held each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins July 5 and continues through Sept. 20. Open to kids age 4 to 11. For more information, or to arrange a ride for your child, call 509-5600228. Valley Christian Fellowship is at 142 East Oroville Road. Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386. Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

LOOMIS

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 20, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • August 20, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Help Wanted Lee Frank Mercantile Tonasket, WA We are accepting applications for a FULL-TIME SALES POSITION. Experience preferred. Some lifting required. 324 S. Whitcomb Ave Tonasket, WA 98855 509-486-2105

Health General

Houses For Sale Tonasket. OPEN HOUSE SAT 8/22, 9am- 2pm, 120 South State Frontage Rd. Spacious 4 BR, 2 BA home! Bright, sunny great room with many windows. 2400 SF open concept. 4 acres features 3 car garage, loafing shed. $240,000. FSBO 509-486-2451.

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS $1,495 4BR 3BA Lake Osoyoos 1 level home, family rm, garage w/shop. $810 2BR + Den, 2BA Open Concept. $795; 2BR Sonora Shores deluxe condo. $825; 3BR, 2BA Lake Osoyoos Apt. $425; Cute 1BR Apt.

Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004. Oroville Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bth with washer & dryer, dishwasher, 3 bonus rooms and carport. No pets, no smoking. 1 month and deposit. Includes water and septic, fenced and view. Call (509)476-3303

Commercial Rentals Business/Office space for lease. Prime spot downtown Tonasket. $375/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873.

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

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Garage & Yard Sale CHESAW.

HUGE STORAGE SHED SALE NEXT WEEKEND Indoors and Outdoors Chesaw Hot August Nights Weekend August 29th & 30th, 9 pm - 4 am. Antiques, Collectibles, Vintage, Kitchen Appliances, Oak Entertainment Center, Tupperware, Melmac Burlap Raffiaware, electric appliances, Collectible Tins, Canning Jars, Kitchenware, furniture, VHS Movies, canning jars, Bev Doolittle paintings and much more. 2043 Chesaw Road. Okanogan 3 FAMILY YARD Sale. 2.5 Miles South of Oroville Hwy 97. Fri & Sat. Aug. 21st & Aug. 22nd. Clothes, Tools, household. 8am - ?.

We have the following opportunities available:

Proceeds Benefit Okanogan Wildlife League Info: 509-560-0963

OKANOGAN DENTAL: Dental Assistant One part time on an as needed basis, bilingual preferred and one full time, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics

Public Notices

Public Notices

Hall located at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 until 11:00 a.m. on September 10, 2015, and will then and there be opened and publicly read aloud. The improvements for which bids will be received are generally described below: -Clearing and grubbing including removal of existing concrete flatwork, concrete sidewalk and curbing, asphalt, gravel, native vegetation, landscape rock, bark and border material -Roadway excavation and haul -Installation of concrete sidewalk, curb and gutter -Installation of driveway approaches and ADA ramp -Removal and replacement patching of asphalt -Installation and removal of erosion control fencing -Excavation for cast-in-place concrete bridge abutments -Construction of cast-in-place reinforced concrete bridge abutments -Furnishing and installing a prefabricated 65-foot span aluminum pedestrian bridge -Landscape and surface restoration including furnishing and installing cover crop seeding, lawn seeding, gravel driveways, asphalt patching; salvaging and replacing landscape rock, bark, plantings Plans and specifications may be viewed at the following locations: 1. City Hall, City of Tonasket, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 2. Varela & Associates, Inc., 601 W. Mallon Ave., Spokane, WA 99201

(509) 328-6066 3. Various Plan Centers – call Varela & Associates or go to www.varela-engr.com for a list. All bid proposals shall be accompanied by a bid proposal deposit in cash, certified check, cashier’s check, or surety bond in the amount equal to five percent (5%) of the amount of such bid proposal. Should the successful bidder fail to enter into such contract and furnish satisfactory performance bond within the time stated in the specifications, the bid proposal deposit shall be forfeited to the City of Tonasket. Contract documents may be obtained from Varela and Associates, Inc. located at 601 W. Mallon, Suite A, Spokane, Washington 99201 upon payment of $30.00. Contract documents are on file for inspection at the Tonasket City Hall. For additional information regarding this project, contact Jeff Moran at Varela & Associates, Inc., by phone at (509) 328-6066, or email at jsmoran@varela-engr.com. The project is being funded by Surface Transportation Program (STP) and Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds, Federal Aid Project Number STPR-TAP-0097(167). The City of Tonasket in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of

Statewides particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR EVENT

REGIONAL

for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices CITY OF TONASKET, WASHINGTON ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS US 97 PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT Sealed bids will be received by the City of Tonasket, Washington, at City

Crosswords

STORAGE AUCTION Tabers Storage 909 Bob Neal Rd SAT, AUG 28rd, 10am.

24. Have the ___ for

5. Altercation (hyphenated)

25. Become tiresome

6. Adjusts, as a clock

27. Ditch

7. Partnership

28. Backstabber

8. Argus-eyed

29. “Fiddler on the Roof” role

9. Collar inserts

30. Dressmakers

10. Conflicted

34. Amiss

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37. Chain letters?

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38. Beldam 39. “... ___ he drove out of sight”

13. Anita Brookner’s “Hotel du ___”

40. Works by Monet (2 wds)

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44. Intro

22. Has a mortgage

45. ___ roll, food

26. Level, in London

46. Makes it

28. Doctor Who villainess, with “the”

50. “La Scala di ___” (Rossini opera)

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF AUGUST 17, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a

continued on next page

ANSWERS

Across

31. ___ cheese

53. Man with a mission

32. Lap muscles

54. SOS (2 wds)

33. “You ___?”

57. Campaigner, for short

34. “My bad!”

58. Bow

35. Emergency exit (2 wds)

59. Emissary

36. Small fleet

60. Costa del ___

41. Exemplars of twinship

61. Somewhat, in music

42. Restaurant for tea and light meals

62. ___ acid 1. Kitchen gadgets

63. Bank offering, for short

7. Actors

64. Cashless deal

11. Amigo

65. Least

14. Park, for one 15. A chorus line

Down

16. Biochemistry abbr. 17. Forwarded 18. Try, as a case 19. Abbr. after a comma 20. Payment agreement (2 wds) 23. Astronomer Hubble

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

1. Flowering plant’s reproductive organ

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

43. Walk unsteadily 47. Congenitally attached 48. Free 49. Blue-ribbon 51. Cupid’s projectile 52. Pilgrimage site 53. Allotment 55. A little night music

2. Cook too long

56. Brickbat

3. Scatter seeds again

57. Telekinesis, e.g. (abbrev.)

4. Foes

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www.gazette-tribune.com

29. Burglar

51. Asian nurse

BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

Found

North Valley Hospital is looking for a Community Outreach Liaison This is a part time position. Bachelor’s Degree and 2 years experience in healthcare desirable. For more details please call (506)486-3185.

DUMP TRUCK and PUP DRIVER with maintenance skills needed. Must have Class A CDL and be able to pass background check and DOT screening. Experience with water trucks and lowboy a plus. Wages and hours vary. Please call 509-4222326 M-F, 8am to 4pm for more information.

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. Patient Accounts Rep. Full time position

Help Wanted

Employment Education

1420 Main St.  P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602  866-773-7818

www.gazette-tribune.com


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VENDOR LIST OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT As authorized under RCW 87.03.437 and Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Resolution No. 2010-03, the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is advertising for vendors who desire to be placed on the vendor list for materials, supplies, or equipment which cost less than $40,000.00. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is an equal opportunity employer and seeks participation from women and minority vendors. Vendor list application must be submitted to the manager of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844. Inquiries and requests for applications may be directed to the manager at 509-476-3696. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette - Tribune on August 20, 27, 2015 #OVG651835

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Did you know?

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Think Green!

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We use...

l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper

recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.54

ANSWERS

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Sponsored by

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509-476-3602

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Okanogan County Cemetery District 4 Board that a special Board meeting will held for a Public Hearing on Monday, August 31, 2015 beginning at 1:00 pm, at the American Legion Hall 314 14th Ave, in Oroville, WA. This hearing is to consider a supplemental budget adjustment in the amount of 40,000 dollars from the endowment fund to the general fund for the 2015 Budget expenditures. This supplemental is for the general

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of PHILLIP D. ROTH, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00051-8 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Craig A. Roth as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW

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Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. The City of Tonasket is an equal opportunity employer and encourages women and minority-owned businesses to submit bids. The City of Tonasket has the right to reject any or all bids. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 6, 20, 2015. #OVG649359

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each Puzzle 34 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54) column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: August 20, 2015. /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Craig A. Roth, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 20, 27, September 3, 2015. #OVG652345

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care, maintenance and in the best interest of the Cemetery District 4 in Oroville, Washington. Persons wishing to comment may attend the hearing or submit their comments in writing to Cemetery District 4, PO Box 764, Oroville, Washington. The Public is welcome to attend. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 20, 27, 2015 #OVG652422

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Sudoku

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

PAGE A9 9

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AUGUST 20, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE August 20, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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REAL ESTATE Guide 9

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509/476-3378 2

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Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

SUN 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA LAKES 509-476-2121 REALTY Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

LAKE OSOYOOS HOME, sandy beach, oak floors, Master Bedrm on lakeside, 2 baths, double garageOozes Charm & Wonderful Location

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Puzzle 25 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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Puzzle 28 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

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Beautiful views from this well cared for manufactured home. Approximately 8 acres of barley and approximately 25 acres of timber and pasture land. 50x50 barn, bunk house, guest house and green house. Additional acreage available. NWML#829010 $234,950

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

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Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

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You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

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Missed out on that dream home?

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Cut the cord and move here! This 2 story home has a lot going for it: creek-front paradise, second outdoor kitchen, county approved septic, Russian stove, generator and full-solar system! Easy access off Chesaw Rd, last property on the street! Not in the mood for off-grid? Power is nearby so with a little work this home could be everything you are looking for in no time! MLS#700541 $65,000

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Looking for sustainable, off-grid living?

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

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www.windermere.com

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LAKE AND COUNTRY

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

HILLTOP REALTY

$358,900

ANOTHER NEW LISTING

11 ACRES W/HOME Between Omak & Tonasket. 3-bdrm, 2-bath. Over 1800 sqft. Open Living Concept. Nice Home. Country Kitchen w/Appliances. Deck w/Hot Tub. 1200 sqft Metal Garage/Shop w/ Large Overhead Door. Looped Driveway around Garage. Lots of room for big vehicles. See to Appreciate - Price is Right - $182,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

WATERFRONT LOT

on Golden Beach in Oro Beach Resort, 2 lots Included, both Lots have All Services Installed! Call on $98,900

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

Check them out today!

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Building Supplies

MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

Quality Supplies Since 1957

Midway Building Supply Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149  Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

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Storage

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A Secure Mini Storage

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Tonasket

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Paint Sprayers n Bobcat Bobcatexcavators, Excavators excavators,n scissor lifts, Bobcat excavators, scissor lifts, Bobcat scissor lifts, n All Contractor n Scissor Lifts Z booms, reach forklift, forklift, Party booms, Party ZZ booms, reach forklift, Party n Z Booms Rental, tents,tables, tables, Equipment chairs, Rental, tents, chairs, paint Rental, tents, chairs,paint paint n Call Today! n Reach Forklift sprayers allcontractor contractor equipment. sprayers all contractor equipment. sprayers all equipment. PARTY RENTALS: 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tents, Tables, Chairs & More!

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Installed Fiberglass Insulation / Blown & Batt Ask about our spray foam  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced, Professional Service 

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

Marylou’s

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

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509-476-3602 888-838-3000

RENTAL RENTAL RENTAL

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Credit Cards Accepted!

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Looking for something?

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 20, 2015

PAGE A10

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Rising Appalachia: more than 200 people attend inaugural event BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Circles were widened and connections strenthened when Rising Appalachia made their first-ever appearance in Tonasket Thursday, Aug. 13, and folks traveled from Seattle, Wenatchee, Spokane and the Methow Valley

Mama’ before dedicating their third song to her, a traditional Appalachian tune called ‘Fall on My Knees.’ Song said as kids, they thought the music they were raised around was cool, but as teenagers thought it was embarrassing to pull up to the house and realize, ‘Oh no, is that banjo music coming from our house?’ to take in the show. “But we came back around to The group is on tour with the love it again as adults,” said Song, release of their latest CD, ‘Wider reminiscing about falling asleep Circles,’ and took time out from as a child in empty banjo cases play dates in B.C. to appear at while their mother made music the Community Cultural Center, onstage. where they ‘ W i d e r were greeted by Circles’ is coman enthusiastic piled from a crowd. “Our new album, ‘Wider melting pot “Our new of genres with Circles,’ represents album, ‘Wider influences of Circles,’ reprecoming to these com- folk, soul, roots, sents coming music munities and connect- world to these comand poetry. munities and It showcases ing in a meaningful connecting in the alchemy way.” a meaningof sibling harful way; startBiko Casini, monies paired World Percussionist ing a dialog so with banjo and people in the fiddle duets; community can with full-time connect and get band members to know others who feel the same Casini on world percussion and way about certain issues,” said David Brown on stand-up bass percussionist Biko Casini. and baritone guitar. The album All four members of the group was inspired by folk standards grew up and live in Appaalachia. and traditional hymns, old mounSisters Leah Song and Chloe Smith tain odes, and activist anthems grew up in Atlanta, Georgia, but that “pull equally from the “snuck up into the mountains all swampy sounds of the bayou and the time to study the music,” after the contemporary twang of the being raised by musical parents; Appalachian mountains. including a fiddle-playing mother “All four of us are Southerners, Song referred to as ‘Appalachia and all four of us are trying to

figure out what that means, to paced entertainment, but instead ducing and creating, and directbe Southerners; what part of that influence the cultural shift as ing their own work. we want to keep, and what part troubadours, activists and cataDespite it being their first visit we wanna just let go,” said to Tonasket, the comSong before launching in munity embraced to ‘Lean In’ as a tribute to them like old friends. “It’s an effort to take the glitz and glam Miss Etta James. “Their perforPart of being ‘Rising mance was nothing out of the music industry and bring Appalachia’ includes short of amazing,” performance back to its roots.” embracing a new, ‘Slow said BlueJay Hankins, Music Movement’ who hopes to bring Leah Song, approach to tourism in an the group back for Rising Appalachia effort to promote sustainConscious Culture able touring practices and Festival 2016. “I’m to be immersed in local com- lysts of justice,” said Song. sure the locals as well as the many munities. Voted “Green Album of the out-of-towners would agree, judg“It’s an effort to take the glitz Year” by the Huffington Post, ing by the eruption of applause

the show; it was so energetic and different for this area,” said Tonasket’s Melanie Thornton, adding that she would have liked to dance, but the dance floor was too crowded. Indeed, the center of the floor was packed with all ages dancing; from toddlers to retirees. “I had multiple people tell me that it was definitely the fullest they had ever seen the community center, and one of the best shows they had seen in recent memory,” Hankins said. “Having Rising Appalachia come through our little town was

“Their performance was nothing short of amazing.” BlueJay Hankins, Tonasket, Event Promoter

and glam out of the music industry and bring performance back to it’s roots. A place where musicians are not just part of fast-

and Atlanta’s Best Folk Act by the Creative Loafing, Rising Appalachia maintains autonomy by self-managing, recording, pro-

and cheering that followed every song.” “They were amazing! I’m so glad I got to see them. I loved

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an honor and a blessing!”said Heather Straub. “It was exiciting to see so many faces I didn’t recognize come into the community center. Big thanks to Harvey Swanson for being the man behind making this happen.” “We are honored to be taken in so well by the community,” Casini said after their show. “It’s a beautiful community center, and we were very warmly received by the community,” Smith said, adding, “Good luck fighting those fires. Hopefully some of the water songs we sang will put the energy out there to calm things down.” PHOTOS BY KATIE TEACHOUT

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AUGUST 20, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SCHOOLS

ARTS &

ENTERTAINMENT Money being raised for new sound system

PAGE A11

Submitted photo

Steve Thompson, head of maintenance at the Oroville School District, along with Jaime Santana, work on the project which will fill in the gaps for Oroville’s stadium bleachers. The measures were taken to try and avoid a potential safety hazard that could occur if a young child was accidently fell through the front of the bleacher.

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Performance artist Spencer Sinner created this painting during the ninety-minute Rising Appalachia performance at the Community Cultural Center Thursday, Aug. 13. Sinner, originally from Vashon Island, said he began doing art in 2008 and started doing live art two or three years ago. Starting with a blank canvas at the beginning of the show, Sinner completed the painting as Rising Appalachia sang their encore song.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Thursday’s Rising Appalachia show was part of a fundraising project for a new sound system at the Community Cultural Center. About $400 was raised above the cost of the show, thanks to dinners purchased prior to the performance. Volunteer chef Buffalo Mazetti said about 110 people were fed a vegetarian meal, but

“I feel very blessed to be part of this community and look forward to helping bring more musical acts to the valley that we would not otherwise get the pleasure of seeing live.” BlueJay Hankins, Event Promoter

many others had to be turned away. “Because of the the fire up by Havillah, I had to fight fire first,” said Mazetti. “Consequently the meal didn’t turn out as expected; I was not able to go to the Tonasket Farmers Market, where I was planning to purchase more vegetables.” Event organizer Harvey Swanson said when he booked

Oroville HS football stadium safety improved OHS Bleachers modified to prevent possible hazards to young children SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT

The Oroville School District has just completed a major safety project on the football and track stadium bleachers. When they were installed many years ago, they left large

the group five weeks ago, he knew they were popular with younger people on the internet, but wasn’t sure how well it would be attended. “The turnout was great!” said Swanson. “Dinner was what helped us go over our expenses; without that we would have just covered costs.” A lot of the groceries were donated, and Mazzetti and his assistants volunteered their time. “I feel very blessed to be part of this community and look forward to helping bring more musical acts to the valley that we would not otherwise get the

FUN FOR EVERYONE!

Thursday, September 10, 2015 11:00am - Raptors/Birds Demo 12:00pm - L-Bow The Clown 3:00pm - Raptors/Birds Demo 4:00pm - L-Bow The Clown 5:30pm - 6:30pm - Banner Days L-Bow the Clown 7:00pm - Fair Queen Pageant 7:30pm - 9:00pm - The Wicks 10:00pm - Close Friday, September 11, 2015 11:00am - Owens family 12:00pm - L-Bow The Clown 1:00pm - Raptors/Birds Demo 3:00pm - 4:00pm - Gideons Daughter 4:30pm - 5:30pm - L-Bow The Clown 6:00pm - 7:00pm - The Wicks Check Mutton Bustin’ 7:30pm - 8:30pm - Sam Platts & Kootenai Three out... Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. - Sun. 9:00pm - 10:30pm - Jessica Lynne 10:00pm - Close

The Wicks

Gideon’s Daughter

Lace & Lead

Sunday, September 13, 2015 8:00am - Cowboy Church 10:00am - Parade of Champions 11:00am - 12:00pm - Nicole Unser 12:00pm - Raptor/Birds Demo 1:00pm - 2:00pm - Dayton Edmonds 2:00pm - Queen Coronation 3:00pm - Fair Closes Sam Platts & Kootenai Three

and getting hurt. The Oroville School District invites the entire community to come out and check out these new bleachers this fall season by supporting the Hornet football team. The season opener is Friday, Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. against White Swan. If football isn’t your thing, we have girls soccer and volleyball home games starting up shortly thereafter in September. For complete schedules for both Junior High and High School and the school calendar, please visit our school website at Oroville.wednet.edu.

pleasure of seeing live,” said event promotor BlueJay Hankins. “We made a decent amount of money Thursday that will go to helping fund a new sound system for the center. We made about $400, and got people to donate another $150.” There is also a raffle currently going on to raise money for the sound system. The winning prize is five nights at a resort in Hawaii, and the drawing will be held this weekend, August 21-22 at the Garlic Festival in Tonasket’s History Park. Tickets are available at the Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op.

Entertainment Schedule

Saturday, September 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm - L-Bow The Clown 12:00pm - Raptors/Birds Demo 1:00pm - Pie eating contest/ watermelon eating contest 2:00pm - 3:00pm - Hippies On Vacation 3:00pm - Raptors/Birds Demo 3:30pm - 4:30pm - Nicole Unser Nicole Unser 5:30pm - 6:30pm - Good4U 7:00pm - 8:30pm - Lace & Lead 9:00pm - 11:00pm - Olson Bros 10:00pm - Close

gaps under each row of seating, which allowed enough space to be able to crawl down through the bleachers; creating a major safety hazard. Young children often attend games and events here, and have had to worry about their children falling down when sitting in the bleachers. No longer is this an issue, as wide aluminum planks have been installed to bring the bleachers up to code, which does not allow a small child to be able to fit down through the bleachers anymore. Parents should be able to watch games and not stress about the possibility of a child falling down

Good4U

Jessica Lynne

Low Rider Races

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The Head & Horn Show is an exciting new catagory happening at this year’s Fair. Open to youth & adults! Go online or see page 43 in the Premium Book for details! Much More!

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Banner Days

Olson Brothers


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE AUGUST 20, 2015

OBITUARIES

COUNCIL | FROM A3 them don’t want to see it,” said Rice. “If they want to see something like that they can go to the military base.” “We have a memorial to people that served, not to the military industrial complex,” stated Olson.

IN OTHER BUSINESS: The city council approved a Tonasket Airport Land Lease for a hangar on site purchased by Paul and Vicki Lewis Aug. 6 for $11,000. The land the hangar is on is leased for $102 per month. City Superintendent Hugh Jensen reported he was impressed

with how clean the USFS left the airport after using it as a helipad for fighting the Newby Lake Fire. No bids were received on the surplus police vehicles. Ordinance #758 allowing non consumptive wells for geo thermal projects is on the agenda for adoption at the next city council meeting scheduled for Tuesday, August 25 at 7 p.m. A special meeting scheduled for Monday, Aug. 17 had to be cancelled when Melissa Carpenter was not able to make it to Tonasket due to involvement with fire activity else-

where in the county. Carpenter is the new Governor’s Eastern Washington representative and was going to meet with council members and the public to discuss issues of concern. Carpenter was to be accompanied by Michael Guss, the new Executive Director for the NCW Economic Development District; Roni Holder-Diefenbach, Executive Director of the Okanogan County Economic Alliance; and City Planner Kurt Danison. The meeting was rescheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 19.

Similkameen River stories sought Short story contest part of World Rivers Day BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Friends of the Similkameen invites contestants to enter a short story contest by submitting a Similkaeen River story in recognition of World Rivers Day, celebrated the last Sunday of September. World Rivers Day in the Similkameen Valley will be cel-

ebrated from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Kobau Park in Cawston, B.C., and will include live music, displays, a river walk, awards for the short story contest and a sharing of river stories. Submissions must be received by September 18, and include the Similkameen River’s name at least once. Submissions must be original, and can be either fiction or non-fiction. Submissions should be on single-sided pages only, with pages numbered and the title at the top of each page. Only one story submission can be accepted per person. Enclose a cover sheet with your name, address, email, telephone number, story title and whether it

Dixie Jo Elgin LeMay

DIXIE JO ELGIN LEMAY Dixie Jo Elgin LeMay pas-

is fiction or non-fiction. Place in a sealed envelope. Entrants under 16 years of age must have a cover page signed by a parent or guardian. Submissions can be emailed to Arlene Aarlow at aarlow@telus.net. Winners will be contacted by phone or email, with prizes presented at Kobau Park September 27. For more information about the contest, contact Arlow at the above email address or at (250) 499-5121. For more information about World Rivers Day in the Similkameen Valley, contact Lee at mariposaorgf@hotmail.com or (250) 499-5404.

sed away on July 26, 2015 in Kona, Hawaii. She was born on December 2, 1931 to Virgil (Dick) and Frances Elgin in Omak, Washington. Dixie grew up on the family ranch near Nighthawk. She moved to Oroville and lived on Lake Osoyoos with her mother and sister, after her daddy passed away in 1950. Dixie graduated from Oroville High School in 1949. She then attended Yakima Valley Community College. She worked for many years as secretary for Valley Evaporating Company and Web Hallauer. She enjoyed gardening, sewing and crafting. She also liked to play bridge with her club for many years. She was an avid bowler and even bowled a couple of 600 series games. She was a past member of the Oroville Eagles Lodge.

Dixie is survived by her children Michelle (Grant) Rice, Spokane, Wash.; Jen (Eli Whitney) Irving, Girdwood, Alaska.; Roberta (Raymond) Lahm, Kona, Hawaii.; Richard (Kalena) LeMay, Kona, Hawaii.; and Rebecca Pierson, Kona, Hawaii.; 11 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her parents, Virgil (Dick) and Frances Elgin, one grandson, Jeremiah Allstot. Her sister, Sally Ann Smith Campbell passed away two weeks after Dixie, on August 9, 2015. A memorial celebration of Dixie’s life will be held in May, 2016 in Oroville, Wash. Memorial donations in Dixie’s name may be made to Hospice of Kona, P.O. Box 4130, KailuaKona, HI, 96745-4130.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 20, 2015  

August 20, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 20, 2015  

August 20, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune