Page 1

Western & Native Art Show

More from the PNT Party

Thirty-fifth annual art show with well-known artists. Omak, Aug. 13 to 15

See B5

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Investors continue looking at power generation at Enloe

TALKING ABOUT HITTING THE TRAIL

Lower Similkameen Band clarifies position

regarding paperwork being drafted that outlines a framework of dam removals where the liability was transferred to a third party; and recent interest in Enloe Dam by private investors. BY KATIE TEACHOUT “As near as we can tell, there was a KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM small hydro electric power conference in OKANOGAN - A special meeting Portland, where the subject of Enloe Dam of the Okanogan County PUD held came up,” said Commissioner Houston, Wednesday, Aug. 5, involved a two-hour “so some developers have been calling up and asking to take tours. We’ve gotten a executive session with no action taken. Commissioner Steve Houston said a lot of interest lately. There have been two groups come out and good-sized group of tour the dam. Both of people who thought them have expressed the PUD would be “.... some developers an interest in making taking action on Enloe have been calling up an offer, but we haven’t Dam showed up for seen an offer yet.” the meeting, so comand asking to take Houston said the missioners met with tours. We’ve gotten a PUD is having to their constituents lot of interest lately.” educate hydro power afterward. developers who have Topics discussed Commissioner Steve Houston only dealt with private Okanogan County PUD included the BLM’s projects in the past, the decision that the differences in dealing Okanogan PUD and with a public utility. its ratepayers were responsible for the “We’re trying to explain how all our removal and cleanup of Enloe Dam if the lease is let go; a message from Rich interactions have to be in the public, and Bowers of the Hydro Reform Coalition SEE ENLOE | PG A8

Above, Thunder Hellum, 12, from Oroville and the Aeneas Valley, get some information on the Pacific Northwest Trail at the PNT Party held last weekend in Oroville. Right, party goers relax under the shade of the big tent while listening to one of the local bands. Below, Trevor, Ariana, Alexis, Hazel and Jazmine, pick out glass beads to make a bracelet, one of the many activities offered to the youngsters on Saturday. Below, right, the food, hot dogs, corn on the cob, watermelon and apple cider were a big hit with those there to support the PNT For more, see B1 .

NV Hospital District beefing up security BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - According to Kelly Cariker, Chief Information Officer at North Valley Hospital, measures are being taken to further ensure the safety of patients and staff at the hospital and extended care facility. “Things have changed over the last couple of years, and schools and hospitals are being looked at as ‘soft targets.’ We have a tendency to be open and friendly, and easy to get into,” reported Cariker. He pointed out that healthcare has a vulnerable population with patients in both long term care and acute care, and said that while staff members were instructed in the past to ‘run and hide,’ “just because we can doesn’t mean we should.” According to Cariker, NVH had one lockdown and one police call in the last month. He said the hospital has the ability to lock off different sections of the facility. “There have been instances in several

Gary DeVon/staff photos

departments over the last six months that demonstrate the need for increased security, while still keeping an open door and friendly facility,” Cariker said. He related an example of a neighboring facility that had a man enter the Emergency Department “with enough ammunition for three bullets for all of the staff on duty.” Cariker said the man chose to end his own life instead of others, but the situation illustrated that “We can’t take an attitude of ‘not in this area,’” Cariker described several policies undertaken at the hospital to make the facility safer, including putting together a volunteer security team. “People really stepped up. We put out a policy that anytime someone feels unsafe, get ahold of someone on the security team,” Cariker reported, adding, “There is a perception in healthcare that dealing with difficult patients or being abused is part of the job, but that is not something we want to promote.”

SEE SECURITY | PG A8

County and Oroville hire Lifeline Ambulance Interim contract for private firm to cover EMS for next 90 days BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Oroville rural and city EMS have hired Lifeline Ambulance Service to provide emergency services for the district on an interim basis as of Friday, Aug. 7. “We have hired Lifeline on an interim contract and accepted the resignation of the present crew early, as of 8 a.m., this morning,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth on Friday. “The county commissioners and the city signed the contract so there will be no lapse in coverage in the community.” The mayor continued, “That’s what

happens when you are backed into a cor- “Without EMTs the ambulance service ner… we were forced into it.” cannot legally operate.” Wayne Walker, General Manager for The volunteer crew agreed to conLifeline, said two EMTs would be at the tinue coverage until Aug. 23 and formed Oroville ambulance station 24 hours a a non-profit service called “NorthStar day for call outs. He Medic One” that they said they would work said would be available on the company’s stanfor hire by the county dard rotational basis of “That’s what happens and city. 48 hours on and 96 Lifeline’s Walker when you are backed said they would look hours off. Citing several grievinto a corner... we were at hiring the former ances, including the Oroville crew. forced into it,” time it was taking for “Our goal is to the county commisreach out to any of the Mayor Chuck Spieth sioners and the city to local EMTs that have City of Oroville come to an interlocal an interest in serving agreement, the voluntheir community and teer ambulance crew resigned en masse, know and understand the local comturning in identical signed resignation munity. We are really going to encourage letters to the city. In the July 22 letter them to apply to serve in Oroville,” said they criticized the mayor’s conduct at a Walker, adding that interested EMTs can recent city council meeting and wrote,

SEE LIFELINE | PG A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 33

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Bob Garrison (left) and Wayne Walker, General Manager of Wenatchee-based Lifeline Ambulance, Inc., give Oroville’s ambulances a quick cleaning on Friday morning.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

News A2-3 Cops & Courts A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community A6-7 Outdoors/Sports B1-2 Business B3

Classifieds Real Estate Obituaries

B4-5 B5 B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2015

NEWS Former Oroville Ambulance crew claims move was ‘retaliation’ BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary De Von/staff photo

Lifeline got their first call on Monday to transport an intoxicated man the police believed could be a harm to himself or others. The man was seen laying in the ditch along the highway and Oroville Police Chief Todd Hill said he feared he might wander into traffic.

LIFELINE | FROM A1 apply with Lifeline online. According to the mayor, the city and county came to an agreement to hire Lifeline on an interim basis, for no longer than 90 days. “We will make our decision on how we will proceed from there, in the period before the holidays,” said Spieth. Among the crew that will be covering Oroville, according to Walker, are Bob Garrison, who was washing the EMS District’s ambulances early this morning;

After the 90 day interim contract with Lifeline... “We will make our decision on how we will proceed from there, in the period before the holidays.” Mayor Chuck Spieth, City of Oroville

Karen Kenyen, Dana Armstrong and Justin McGavin. McGavin lives locally, said Walker. “He has been working for us for some time and knows the area. I’m sure he’ll be glad to have

a shorter commute time,” Walker said. The crew will be making sleeping accommodations at the ambulance station so that they can be on call 24 hours a day.

OROVILLE – Members of Oroville’s now terminated ambulance crew are claiming Mayor Chuck Spieth convinced “Being non-profit we the Okanogan County Commissioners to hire Lifeline are able to provide a Ambulance Services as a way to “retaliate” against them. service that is based on In a response to the interim contract and the acceptance of the resignation letters from the Oroville EMTs, Chris Allen, service, not profit” the group’s spokesman, said they wanted to make sure the Chris Allen, Spokesman community heard their side of the story. NorthStar Medic One “The mayor convinced the County Commissioners to allow an interim contract with Lifeline as a way to retaliate against us. This will cost nearly twice as much of the taxpayer money,” writes Allen in a document he emailed to the Gazette-Tribune Tuesday morning. “This was a very difficult and painful choice for us to make since we have been taking care of our neighbors, friends and family for the past twenty years. Unfortunately we didn’t feel (we) had any other choice after years of unsolved problems,” writes the group about why they offered their resignations, which were to be effective as of Aug. 23, before the mayor and commissioners decided to accept them early. “For us the final straw was the mayor actions at the last City Council meeting. Then we read in the paper the mayor wishes to place blame, rather than set differences aside and work toward a positive outcome for the community it became crystal clear our concerns would once again be ignored.” The document goes on to discuss the formation of a non-profit ambulance service, NorthStar Medic One, and asks for the community’s support so the former crew can continue to serve the community. The new non-profit, which they say is in the process of getting a state ambulance license, has offered their services to the city and county. They say they can utilize existing tax revenue to help pay for the services. “Being non-profit we are able to provide a service that is based on service, not profit,” they write. “We are asking your help by voicing your support of local non-profit EMTs over an out of town for profit company.” The group says the difference between a non-profit and for-profit ambulance service can only be higher rates and “more aggressive collection practices.” They also say continued service from Lifeline would mean having out of area EMTs that are unfamiliar with the community and people. Lastly, they ask that community members attend the city council meetings.

Still time to purchase rubber ducks Ducks race to raise money for pool TONASKET--The Tonasket Swimming Pool Association will be holding their Second Annual Duck Race Saturday, August 22. The little yellow contestants will

hit the water below the Fourth Street bridge at 11 a.m. Ducks are $5 each and can be purchased at the following locations in Tonasket: Split End, Hidden Treasures, It’s Still Good, Tonasket Interiors and the Tonasket Farmers Market, which takes place Thursdays from 3:00

p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Or mail a check to Tonasket Swimming Pool, P.O. Box 1217, Tonasket, Wash., 98855 and indicate “for ducks.” You need not to be present to win, but it is a fun event. Buy your duck, and then cheer it across the finish line at the boat ramp on the South end of the soccer and base-

ball fields at Chief Tonasket Park. Last year’s race netted $2,465 with 493 ducks racing for top honors. KK Young of Shelton donated her winnings back to the pool after taking first and third place. Tonasket’s Dave Mitchell purchased the duck that came in second place.

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AUGUST 13, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NEWS Tonasket School Board Update: Wolverine members working on and Newby Lake Fires three different issues THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Getting ready for levy and bond BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket School District Board members and Superintendent Steve McCullough held a work session during their board meeting Aug. 10, 2015; exploring Team Operating Principles and Protocols, discussing the Levy and Bond Timeline, and examining a Superintendent Evaluation Process. The school board is in the process of developing Team Operating Principles and Protocols, and has been looking at examples from several school districts as they work to create one for the Tonasket School District. McCullough said it was important to develop the protocols as well as revisit them occasionally to make certain “We are all on the same page.” Sample Operating Principles and Protocols were examined from Pateros, Kelso, Snohomish, Prosser, Manson and Curlew. “Those were just examples I chose as a starting point for the conversation,” McCullough said. In the Levy and Bond Timeline work session, a conceptual project schedule addressing added classroom space, safety and security was detailed, with a sample timeline of a resolution filing deadline of December 24, 2015; an approximate date ballots mailed of January 22, 2016; an election date of February 9, 2016; a move-in date to new elementary school classrooms of December 2017; and a move-in date to new middle school classrooms of May 2018. “This is just an example of what we should be doing as

we start to plan our work for a potential bond and levy,” said McCullough. The Washington State School Directors Association (WSSDA) is conducting a Washington Superintendent Evaluation Initiative to develop and pilot multiple superintendent evaluation methods, materials and training for possible recommendation to Washington school boards and superintendents. A steering committee is in place to review progress among five work groups that are piloting potential approaches. Northwest school districts are using a Standards-based pilot, King and Pierce County

“This is just an example of what we should be doing as we start to plan our work for a potential bond and levy” Superintendent Steve McCullogh, Tonasket School District

school districts are using an Outcome-based pilot, the Road Map school districts are using a 360-approach pilot, Southwest school districts are using a Fivestep system pilot and Eastern Washington school districts are using a Continuous Quality Improvement Superintendent Evaluation (CQISE) pilot. The CQISE is designed to provide an annual performance review (June to June) of school district Superintendents. It is intended to promote high levels of leadership effectiveness, professional growth and ongo-

ing dialogue between superintendents and district school boards. There are five steps involved in this evaluation pilot: develop or revisit a standards-based job description; identify annual district objectives and develop work plans; conduct a formative review mid-year; and conduct a summative evaluation at the end of the year. The board also looked closer at the Washington Standardsbased evaluation pilot used in Northwest school districts. This pilot evaluation has five categories of standards: visionary leadership, instructional leadership, effective management, inclusive practice, ethical leadership and socio-political context. The board examined a Superintendent Evaluation document by the North Central Educational Service District used by the Pateros School District that looks at the following seven categories: educational leadership, fiscal management, staff supervision, board relationships, policy governance and planning, community leadership and personal qualities. A rating system is used in each category with ratings of unsatisfactory, basic/emerging, proficient or distinguished. The board also looked at an Outcomes-Based Superintendent Evaluation Through a Year-Long Process model that takes into account the nature of the board of directors, the board’s role, the superintendent’s role, and how the superintendent responsibility, authority, and accountability are defined, delegated and carried out. The school board will continue their work session at the August 24 school board meeting, and have moved the regular school board meeting to 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 31.

CHELAN - The combined acreages of the Wolverine, Blankenship and Goode Fires was at 35,279 acres as of Tuesday, Aug. 11, with fire containment at 20 percent. Helicopters continued their operations on the Wolverine Fire Monday, Aug. 10, dropping Plastic Spherical Devices (PSD’s) in the Railroad Creek drainage to reduce fire intensity and protect Holden Village. After several days of no flights due to technical difficulties, an infrared flight Monday evening indicated the fire had grown to approximately 34,500 acres with fire activity. A weather cell passing between the Blankenship and Wolverine Fires Monday evening caused gusty outflow winds of 20-30 mph, increasing fire activity with extensive perimeter growth on the northwestern flank of the fire in the vicinity of Holden Village. The fire is well established in Ten Mile drainage up to Hilgard Pass and in Wilson Creek, southeast of Holden. The main fire and burnouts have grown together and continue to move around Holden to the northwest, as planned by fire management. Sprinkler systems remain in place, soaking structures and vegetation in and around Holden. Crews in Stehekin continue improving fuel breaks throughout the valley, with all businesses and travel to and from Stehekin remaining open as of Tuesday, Aug. 11. Old containment lines are being reopened on Shady Pass Road (FS Road 5900) from Crow Hill to Lake Chelan that will serve as a contingency line should the fire move south. The southernmost edge of the fire remains 12 miles uplake from 25-Mile Creek and 30 miles from Chelan. Fire behavior is expected to

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Smoke from the Newby Lake and Chelan area fires, as well as from fires in BC has often been visible in Oroville and elsewhere in the county. be minimal on the northern and southern edges of the fire, but officials expect continued fire growth west up Railroad Creek toward Holden where fuels are continuous. Firefighters continued to secure handline on the southern flank of the Goode Fire Monday. The north, east and west sides have been tied into rocky ridgetops and a glacier. Crews will continue to work the southern flank with helicopter support, and begin mop-up efforts in Park Creek. Goode Fire was expected to be transferred back to the National Park Service at 6 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 12. Resources on the fire include 13 crews, nineteen engines, ten water tenders, four bulldozers, and eight helicopters with a total of 579 personnel. The fire is under the jurisdiction of the Forest Service, National Park Service, state DNR, Chelan County Sheriff ’s Office and Chelan County Fire Districts #7 and #10. As of Tuesday, Aug. 11 there had been one residence lost and three minor structures.

NEWBY LAKE Contingency lines built in the early days of the Newby Lake Fire, northwest of Loomis, remain in place, with observers monitoring weather and fire behavior to provide the necessary information for ensuring the strategic burn operation meets objectives. As of Aug. 7, there were still some areas within the fire perimeter that have unburned vegetation, including a 70 acre island near the southwest perimeter. That fire has been slowly consuming the vegetation within that island, as burning material rolls downhill and burns back up. The risk being if humidity, wind and fuels were to align in a certain way, the fire could potentially spot outside the blackened fire perimeter, leading to growth on National Forest or Washington Department of Natural Resources Lands. Trail 340, the Long Draw Trail remains closed with a temporary re-route available. Detailed closure descriptions and a map are available on Facebook at http:// www.facebook.com or online at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2015

COPS & COURTS

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Dustin Hawk Chambers, 24, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 4 to failure to register as a sex offender (felony). Chambers was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $600. The crime occurred June 18 and July 8. Raul Duarte Vela, 34, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 4 to thirddegree assault. Vela was sentenced to 44 days in jail with credit for 44 days served, and fined $1,110.50 for the Jan. 26, 2014 crime. Matthew Russell Carden Jr., 28, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 4 to POCS (methamphetamine) and POCS (heroin). The court dismissed two additional charges: seconddegree unlawful possession of a firearm and alteration of identification marks. Carden was sentenced to four months in jail and fined $3,110.50 for the May 28 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Barry J. Collins, 30, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine), possession of marijuana (more than 40 grams), first-degree criminal trespassing, obstruction, reckless endangerment, first-degree DWLS and firstdegree negligent driving. The crimes allegedly occurred July 28. The court found probable cause to charge Jonathan Lowell Kenyon, 18, Ritzville, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 1 near Crawfish Lake. The court found probable cause to charge Jeremiah Lee Simpson, 24, Ritzville, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 1 near Crawfish Lake. The court found probable cause to charge Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, Tonasket, with second-degree TMVWOP and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred July 30. The court found probable cause to charge Mark Callen Lynch, 64, Oroville, with first-degree arson. The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 3.

of third-degree DWLS. Edenso was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,000. Remigio Flores Rivera, 51, Oroville, guilty of DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Flores Rivera was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,181. Mary Sarah Friedlander, 22, Omak, guilty of seconddegree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional charge: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. She was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Dennis Lee Glover, 47, Oroville, had a second-degree criminal trespassing charge dismissed. Kristina Michelle GroomsSloan, 41, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault and two charges of third-degree theft. Grooms-Sloan was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,574. Darryle Clint Gua, 31, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Gua was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined $1,083. Dusty Mae Hamilton, 34, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Hamilton was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $818. Samantha Ann Harding, 44, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree DWLS and violation of a no-contact order. Harding had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. She was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,626. Mark Allen KinKade, 44, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: aiming or discharging a firearm. Stacee Lynn Lavigueure, 33, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: supplying liquor with minors on the premises. Lavigueure was fined $200. John Michael Leaf Sr., 59, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Leaf was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 358 days suspended, and fined $808. Lisa Kathryn Leber, 54, Okanogan, had a DUI charge dismissed. Leber was fined $1,425. 911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS

Civil

Monday, Aug. 3, 2015

The state Department of Revenue assessed the following business for unpaid taxes, penalties and interest: North Sound Electrical Services Inc., Oroville, $1,212.27. The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed the following business for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and interest: Valley Tire, Tonasket, $949.82.

One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Assault on King Blossom Lane near Okanogan. Arson on Myers Creek Rd. near Oroville. Threats on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Assault on Queen St. in Okanogan. Burglary on Omak Mountain Rd. near Omak. Theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Birch St. in Omak. Threats on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Golden St. in Oroville.

DISTRICT COURT Christopher David Duarte, 27, Riverside, guilty of disorderly conduct. Duarte was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $608. Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, Tonasket, guilty of two counts

THE EFFECTS

Violation of a no-contact order on 19th Ave. in Oroville. Charles Reuben McNeil, 30, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI and firstdegree DWLS. Rosalio Ramirez Esquivel, 37, booked for DUI, no valid operator’s license and a USBP detainer. Nathaniel James Edenso, 33, booked for theft of a motor vehicle and second-degree theft. Eleanor Jean Beach, 67, booked on four counts each of residential burglary and thirddegree theft. Clint Michael Griffin, 39, court commitment for DUI. Marvin Guy Thornton, 52, DOC detainer. Manuel Antonio Perez, 18, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Ryan Wade Marchand, 31, DOC detainer. Jesus Hernandez Garcia, 19, booked for third-degree DWLS. Casey Michelle White, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015 DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Wildland fire on Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Weapons offense near Spectacle Lake. Search and rescue on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on King Blossom Lane near Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Loomis. Assault on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Fraud on Engh Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Golden St. in Oroville. Drugs on Main St. in Oroville. Cody Franklin Webster, 29, booked for DUI and an ignition interlock violation. Willine Lynn Fetterer, 60, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Dustin Cody Smith, 29, booked for third-degree possession of stolen property, forgery, second-degree identity theft and POCS (heroin). Mark Callen Lynch, 65, booked for first-degree arson. Semone Lee Reuben, 27, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Wednesday Aug. 5, 2015 Warrant arrest on W. Second Ave. in Omak. Fraud on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Cigarettes, lighter and ashtray reported missing. Warrant arrest on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on E. Apple Ave. in

Omak. Burglary on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on Airport Rd. near Oroville. Found property on Hoot Owl Lane near Tonasket. Weed eater recovered. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Loomis. Obstruction on Main St. in Loomis. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on E. First Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Koala Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Arson on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Kane McKinsey Searcy, 32, booked on a Chelan County FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tammy Jeanette Cohen, 48, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Kyle Lloyd Campbell, 27, booked on a DOC warrant. Kenneth Wesley Clark, 36, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Nukona Charley McCraigie Sr., 42, booked on four FTA warrants: DUI, operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and two for first-degree DWLS. Larry Earl O’Bryan, 34, booked for second-degree arson. Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015

Domestic dispute on Turner Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Pornography on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on Mill St. in Okanogan. Bicycle reported missing. Theft on Wild Lupine Rd. near Tonasket. Medication reported missing. Theft on N. Country Vue Rd. near Omak. Jewelry and money reported missing. Drugs on Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hanford St. in Omak. Custodial interference on Morris Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Bonaparte Ave. in Tonasket. Automobile theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. First Ave. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Keg reported missing. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. DWLS on E. Seventh Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Alcohol reported missing. Assault on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on 10th Ave. in Oroville. Burglary on 21st Ave. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Lewis Patrick Marchand, 55, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Chace Kenneth Taber, 23,

Let’s face it, living with hearing loss can be frustrating, even dangerous. Hearing aids can allow you to function better in all areas of your life:

Your Safety

Your Family

Your grandson’s silly secrets. Your wife’s soft “I love yous.” These are sounds you definitely don’t want to miss.

A car horn. An ambulance siren. The fire alarm. Hearing loss can cause you to miss important signals that alert you to danger.

booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for drug court violation. Reyes Melchoir Hinojosa, 49, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and firstdegree DWLS. Wahkuna Williamette Bixby, 36, DOC detainer. Charmayne Latoya Lazard, 30, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for first-degree criminal trespassing. Samuel Benjamin Bates, 24, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Robert James Long, 29, booked for second-degree burglary, third-degree theft and seconddegree malicious mischief. Joseph William Cook, 28, booked on four OCSO warrants: two each for violation of a no-contact (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Ernesto Ramirez Palomares, 46, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft and three OCSO FTA bench warrants: first-degree vehicle prowl, second-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree malicious mischief. Friday, Aug. 7, 2015 Malicious mischief on River Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Eighme Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Threats on S. Fir St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Oak St. in Omak. Assault on Edmonds St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Cherry St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Cell phone reported missing. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 21, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Leonard Joseph Abrahamson, 47, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jessica Marie Bagby, 33, booked on a drug court sanction. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, court commitments on two counts of third-degree theft. Adrianne Dena Smith, 32, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015 Harassment on Coco Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle roll-over crash on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Injuries reported. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Wallet reported missing. Theft on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Cell phone reported missing. Drugs on at the Oroville Port of Entry. Illegal burning on Quail Bay Court near Oroville.

Harassment on Lumm Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. DUI on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Window reported smashed. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. David Donald Allen Jr., 32, booked for second-degree malicious mischief and thirddegree malicious mischief (DV). Charmayne Latoya Lazard, 30, booked for second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Robert Esteve Salazar, 21, booked for DUI. Matthew Douglas Jacobs, 28, booked for third-degree DWLS. Shane Michael Heisey, 28, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Devon Tyler Stolz, 23, booked for possession of marijuana (more than 40 grams). Iain William Turpin, 20, booked for POCS (ecstasy), POCS (LSD), possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams) and an ICE detainer. Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015 DUI on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Stabbing on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Mill St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Matts Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on Pine St. in Omak. Clothing reported missing. Domestic dispute on Central Ave. in Oroville. Threats on Central Ave. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Darren Ray Best, 47, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Shyanne Renee O’Bryan, 18, booked for MIP/C. Juan de Dios Felix Amarillas, 32, booked for DUI. Joseph Anthony Arlotta, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

ATTENTION Wells Reservoir Users

Douglas PUD will lower the Wells Reservoir about 8 feet to 773 feet above sea level for the month of September. This is necessary to repair the Methow River sedimentation control groins near Pateros. The river level is being coordinated with work at Chief Joseph Dam and area recreation sites.

Use CAUTION on the Reservoir! Your Work

Your Happiness

If you’re missing important information on phone calls or in meetings, you may not be working at the level you want to be.

Do you feel uncomfortable at social gatherings? Are you missing the rewarding sounds of nature or your favorite music? Don’t let hearing loss affect your quality of life.

For your complementary consultation call 509-422-3100

Moomaw Hearing Center, Inc. 5 W. Central Ave., Omak • 509-422-3100 • Toll free 800-898-HEAR (4327)

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AUGUST 13, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Members of Hippies on Vacation perform for those at the PNTA Party held at the soccer fields near the Oroville Trailhead for the Similkameen Trail.

A great place to live Have you stopped, looked around and thought to yourself, “wow, we live in a great area” lately? Sure, when it’s steaming hot outside and the air is full of smoke from another wildfire, it makes one wonder. But at least we’re not ravaged by semi-annual floods, hurricanes or God-forbid earthquakes and tsunamis. While we try to convince our loved ones that this is the place to be – You tell them things like, “Come home from the west of the Cascades, you know they’re talking about the whole thing sinking into the ocean in the next few years. That they’re overdue for the big one – one that will put anything they’ve had in California to shame. Come home.” Of course that doesn’t work, but sometimes you can tell they’re thinking about it, especially after visiting home. My brothers were home last week – one traveling from the disaster waiting to happen west side of the state, and the other from Guernsey, an island in the English Out of Channel. While it’s great to see them and know My Mind they and there families are doing well, there’s Gary A. DeVon still something in me that wishes they’d move back home. My daughter and her family is home this week and it’s the same thing. Of course I also think that about all my friends and former classmates who moved to places where I just can’t see them often enough. I’m still waiting for Star Trek-like transporter devices to be invented. Of course that would probably open up a whole new can of worms when relatives you don’t want visiting keep popping into town ore your house, literally. I know we live in a great place – when 14 people, mostly visitors to the Tumbleweed Film Festival, were floating down the Okanogan from Lake Osoyoos and having a wonderful time, you just can’t help but smile and think to yourself “Why live anywhere else?” Last weekend I attended part of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association party held near the Oroville Trailhead. What a great bunch of folks were there celebrating a worthy cause and our section of the PNTA, the Whistler Canyon and Similkameen River Trails. Just another reason to live in this wonderful place. My friends from the west side can’t get enough of floating down the river, hiking the trails, listening to local performers and hanging out in the local establishments like Hometown, Alpine, Trinos, the Pastime and the Kuhler. We might not have all the amenities – we still need a movie theater or at least a drive-in, what we do have is great and I count my blessings I can still live such in a great place, surrounded by good people.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5050 Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 5052 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Ext. 3050 (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Marcy Balajadia-Aguigui classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $7.50 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Quick police response Dear Gary, Last Thursday morning (10:15 a.m.) I received a call from a customer at our Laundromat in town. He indicated to me that my ‘camera’ has been taken down from the ceiling and thrown in the garbage can. I asked him to place it near the change machine, but he called back immediately saying there was damage to the change machine. I left home very quickly and found that someone had punched in the bill acceptor causing major damage and taking some money. Upon calling the Oroville Police, our new officer Frank Koutelieris arrived to investigate. Three gentlemen customers shared their knowledge with the officer and he began his investigation. Kelly came over from Atkins grocery warning me that someone has also stolen a cell phone, keys, and tools from a delivery truck. We had already found the keys and sent them to their service center. As I turned in my part of the police report at 1:30 p.m. with damage estimates, Chief Hill and Officer Koutelieris were bringing a local man to the jail in cuffs. Case solved and culprit under arrest. Insurance won’t pay due to deductibles, but I have the satisfaction of caring helpful customers and a very professional police response. All are to be humbly thanked for their efforts. Business owner, Spencer Higby Oroville

Ambulance

Where’s Memorial Fund? Dear Gary, After reading that the majority of the Oroville EMTs have resigned, I’m wondering what has happened to the Oroville Ambulance Memorial Fund. As I remember this fund was formed from the generous donations of our citizens in remembrances of our loved ones that have passed on. In the past, I remember reading, in the Gazette-Tribune, occasional reports that would list who made donations and a summary of what the money was used for. At one time I had heard that there was a substantial amount of money in the fund. I checked with Oroville City Hall and they are not in charge of the account? I have a few questions: Who is in charge of that fund? How has the donated money been used? Does the fund still exist and how much money is in the fun? Do they still take donations? Susan Christensen Oroville

Made the right decision Dear Editor, Thank You Mayor Spieth and the Oroville City Council members for making the difficult decision to sign a temporary agreement with LifeLine for providing emergency aid transport services to our area. I totally trust the Mayor, Council and EMS District #1 reps will continue to work diligently towards a positive permanent solution for our community. I realize that their decision was no doubt a difficult one, but I certainly understand why.... After all, how sound of a decision would the City Council be making by simply agreeing to an ultimatum issued by this group whose spokesman has never even served on the Oroville Ambulance Department! I would have been completely enraged with our city officials if they would have agreed to what appears to be an “our way or the highway” option presented by this group. The news article in the July 23rd GazetteTribune gave me the impression that this group expects the city to just abolish the Oroville Ambulance Service, (which was created by Ordinance #376 in 1982), and to turn over operations, along with all the city’s levy tax money and revenues (expecting the EMS District to do the same) to the “North

Star” Ambulance Service, which is apparently still in the process of being formed. Does this group also expect the City and EMS District #1 to just turn over the ambulances, ambulance hall and all equipment? There was no evidence that “North Star” has retained proper legal counsel; obtained proper insurances (vehicle, general liability, operational, etc.) and all necessary permits; that all attending personnel have the certified training required by state law; that they have fully equipped their “Ballard” donated ambulance; or that they had the qualified experience to administrate such an undertaking. There is a whole lot more to operating an ambulance service than just manning the ambulance. I also got the impression that “North Star” would use the levy monies to pay their salaries... sounds like they are trying to create full time jobs for themselves! More importantly, if in fact they have accomplished all of the above, where did they obtain the necessary funds to pay for it? The article also reported that Chris Allen made the statement that the city misused a donation of $70,000 towards the purchase of the newest ambulance, which is absolutely untrue! But, even if part of that donation had been used towards the purchase of the newest ambulance, so what? That was why the donation was made... to help support the Oroville Ambulance Service! And the decision on how to spend this donation is made by the Oroville City Council during their Budget Process. The public most certainly has the right to make suggestions, but the Council makes the final decision. In all the years I’ve known and worked with Mayor Spieth, not once have I ever seen him behave in the manner as described by Mr. Allen... and apparently, no one else attending this same meeting witnessed Chuck behaving as described either. In closing, I extend a sincere thank you to those Ambulance Department members that served our community throughout the years. Unfortunately, when they resigned, I would expect that they lost any future city contributions towards their BVFF Board for Volunteer Firefighters and Reserve Workers pension that the city has paid on their behalf as part of their compensation throughout the years. But, submitting their resignations was their choice. And Kudo’s to Betty Roberts and Arnie Marchand for also helping to set straight a few facts. I know space is limited, so will close for now. Sincerely, Kathy M. Jones Oroville

Why did this EMT resign?

The Mayor wants the people of Oroville to believe it is because of state and federal guidelines. This is not true. There is a lot more involved than he wants to tell you. In January I had a meeting with the Mayor,

one of the things we talked about was being short-handed and we needed more help with day coverage, and how we can fix the problem. I informed him that some of the EMTs in Tonasket are willing to help us (but not for $10.00 for a 12 shift like we get) and that we needed to increase the standby from $10.00 to $36.00. At a city council meeting the Mayor stated he was ready to increase the standby pay to $36.00, but the county told him he cannot make any decisions at this time (this was in March). During all this we found out that the city was talking to Lifeline. At a council meeting the Mayor stated that they were looking for options for the Ambulance service. The four EMTs and crew wanted to be able to continue to provide service for our community, so we started a non-profit ambulance service, and we presented a proposal to the city. Last month at the city council meeting, the conversation about not being able to make any decision was brought up and he (the Mayor) claims he never said that, and that it was his decision to put everything on hold. The Mayor stated in the paper that “we have the right in an emergency situation to do a temporary hire” why was he not willing to do this six months ago? If you ask me, this emergency situation started back in February. In my opinion, personal feelings impeded a needed timely reaction. The ambulance crew has given up a lot for this community. We did not do this for the money. We did this for our community. We tried to work with the city by doing the best we could with what we had. The Mayor had until the 23rd of this month to fix the problem. Instead of the Mayor working with us and paying $36.00 per stand-by so we could get help, or accepting our proposal, we were given about 12-18 hours notification of termination effective as of 0800 Friday morning the 9th of August 2015, stating that the City and County have decided to execute, and give Lifeline a contract. It is to my understanding that Lifeline has put a two-person crew up here. This means that if the ambulance goes on a call and if there is another call before they get back, they will have to wait for Tonasket to respond. I do not see how this benefits Oroville. Maybe the Mayor will give the people of Oroville some answers, because all he would ever say to us is “there is no new info.” Another reason I had resign is because I no longer know if what was said is the truth. For the people who think that Chris Allen is a troublemaker. Whenever Chris thought that the City did wrong he called them on it. We need more people like him on the city council that is willing to stand up to the Mayor no matter who he or she is. It is time to make changes and that starts at the top. Paul Bouchard Oroville

Continued on Page A6


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2015

PAGE A6

Titanic Tonasket tank tussle OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIO-ECONOMIC WRITER

Everyone knows that the circulation of the world’s smallest excellent newspaper, The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, has burgeoned into seven digits by virtue of my brilliant political observations every other week. Lesser known is that editor Gary would actually like me to touch on some local issues at times. But, alas, what to choose? Enloe Dam? Been there and done that. Besides, the inexhaustible citizen Enzensperger has poured a VLCC (Very Large Crude Carrier - a giant oil tanker) full of ink all over that one telling us how the Okanogan PUD is somehow curiously bent on Bill Slusher economic kamikaze by trying to restore a clean energy source. You know how those power companies are, they love to immolate themselves by providing clean energy... I think. The Great Oroville Ambulance Revolt? I flew a class-III air ambulance for a career and I wouldn’t know where to start there. As the Statler Brothers used to sing: “Life gets complicaaaated... when you get past eighteen ...” So, of course, that brings us to the Titanic Tonasket Tank Tussle. Seems Grand Coulee or Coulee Dam (I can never keep them straight!) wanted to shed themselves of a tank and they offered it to Tonasket. We’re talking a kaboom-style, track-mounted cannon tank, here, not something you put the town’s water in. Friend and Tonasket mayor Patrick Plumb, ever attentive to his constituency, innocently posed the question on FaceBook of ... To Tank Or Not To Tank ... and the roar was on. I suggested we give the tank to Rep. Kretz and Sen. Dansel to use on Governor Enslee the next time that tax-fetish turkey dreams up yet another way to extort the earnings of Washington working people, but there were all the predictable fussy complaints about the cost of artillery shells and that pesky constitution thing. The online issue of the tank brought forth a crescendo of The People’s Voice like nothing since the threat made by Kardashian-fiancee and ‘rapper’ Kanye West to “leave America” because of racism. No other country on the planet, including Africa, has spent more money and legislation trying to help blacks than America, but West wants to leave for some theoretical never-never land where no one exists who fails to think regally of him. Regrettably, as with the equally loud and overrated Alec Baldwin, who promised to leave America if

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, August 2–9, 1940: The United States Remount Service purchased 24 remount horses in Okanogan County during the past week. Threefourths of those purchased were sired by one of the remount stallions which have been located in the county for several years. The Molson-Chesaw Electric Cooperative, Inc., with headquarters in Molson, was formed with the filing of papers with Secretary of State Belle Reeves in Olympia Friday. Incorporators are L. R. Vincent D. H. Dart, L. C. Pickering. Wm. Buckley, S. O. Rise, Ernest Sherling and Walter Wildermuth. The management of the Liberty Roller Skating Rink announces that Sunday, August 4, the rink will open with a Balloon carnival and invites all rink friends to come and enjoy the fun. The rink will be open for regular skating Sunday, Tuesday and Friday from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. for the fall season. Spending $27 million in the last 12 months, the builders of Grand Coulee Dam increased the yardage in the big structure from 6,700,000 cubic yard of concrete to 10,000,000 cubic yards. This years showing is about 75 percent of the total yardage in the whole of Boulder Dam. The Oroville Bowling Alleys will hold the grand opening of their new business in Oroville today, August 9. The alleys are located in the store room formerly occupied by the men’s department of Barmon’s store on the corner of Main and Railroad Ave. NOTE (Now the location of Jerry Krusoff ’s Trading Post). The Oroville Immigration Patrol force has been increased to six men, three new men arriving here the past week to take up their duties. The new patrolmen are William Bartley, coming from Montana, William Stegenga from Spokane and John Gregory from Camas. The Oroville Public Schools will open for the fall term Tuesday, September 3, 1940. The school board, now composed of Everett Easley, Chairman; J. A. Blackler, Clerk; and Walter Hart, passed the following resolution: The Oroville Public Schools will open September 3, 1940 and those students entering the first grade must be sixyears-old by October 1, 1940. The Town Council was informed that the new well had been inspected by authorities and said water is not consumable by the public. It seems that the water contains several elements of minerals and specifically a large amount of lead. Grocery Prices: Watermelon; $.02 per lb. Salad Oil, 1 Qt. $.23; Shredded wheat, $.09 per pkg.;Toilet Tissue, 6 rolls, $.25; 2 lb. box of crackers, $.16.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: August 2–9, 1965: The Okanogan County PUD continued to gain in growth and income during 1964 with a net income increase of near 13 percent. Operating revenues shows $1.83 million with a net income of $414,875. Indebtedness last year was reduced by $143,000 and the total long term debt

Dubya was reelected, I doubt it’ll ever happen. But alas, I digress. Back to the Tank Affair. Many tank debaters on Facebook set new heights of eloquence and erudition. No! Yes! Hell no! Wonderful! One camp came down in favor of Tonasket taking the turned-away tank and either making a new veteran’s memorial out of it or adding it to the excellent veteran’s memorial already in Tonasket. What a great idea! pro-tankers exclaimed, what a wonderful way to honor our veterans, what an appropriate way to show Tonasket’s famed patriotism! Bring on the tank! Another camp was bitterly opposed to tanking Tonasket, possibly because some Tonasketians are often independently tanked. Obscene! A glorification of war! rang this crowd’s vociferous cry. What a terrible message to our youth! I too could envision glassy-eyed hoards of Tonasket’s young citizens driven by a military antique to abandon their X-Boxes and iPhones and break down the doors of recruiting centers all over Tonasket demanding to be sent, bayonets clenched in teeth, to Iraq or Baltimore to quench their sudden new thirst for war. Considering the Great Oroville Ambulance Revolt, I remarked that a tank no more glorified war than an ambulance glorified sickness and injury, but this was as well received as my alternate suggestion that Tonasket erect... um... build... a statue of Ann Margaret in her prime (which was pretty prime - I was there) entertaining troops in Vietnam. I saw this gesture as both a way to honor civilian support for our troops and to get the veteran’s minds off PTSD. Some no-tank-tarnishing-Tonasket! activists had expressed fears that veterans would freak out or go postal at the sight of a General Patton Special on the curb in T-town. Others worried about the logistics of making Tonasket the armor capital of the north county. How do we get the tank here? Who pays for the upkeep? Suppose Al Qaida steals it!? What if the cops get it to take more of our liberties!? Will Governor Inslee impose a tank tax!? I tell you, things got intense over the tank. I floated what I thought was a great alternative. Set the tank up... outside... Tonasket, and use it to fire at Canadian motorhomes being driven 43-mph on clear, dry, daylight, 60-mph stretches of Highway 97 with 20-car backups behind them. Mayor Plumb promised to get back to me on that one. There is nothing like a tank to awake the sober sense of citizenship in us all. William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.

at the end of the year had dropped to $966,000. Members of the Oroville High School graduating class of 1940 had their 25 year reunion last Saturday night. There were 16 of the graduates in attendance plus their former Superintendent of Schools, Robert Drummond, and long time teacher in the Oroville Schools, Effie Coulton. Due to the labor shortage for apple harvest in Oroville, the Oroville Board of Education decided to start the school year on August 23. There will probably be a harvest vacation of two weeks for all students from Kindergarten through Grade 12. It is planned for this to happen in October. “Housing for laborers is just as important to an orchardists as his tractor or sprayer” said Oscar Thornton as he spoke the members of Cariboo Growers annual dinner meeting at the Kozy Kitchen Kafe. Thornton urged better housing to attract family-type labor and better pay and working conditions to encourage the same help to return year after year. A Ghost Town is Born in Molson: Harry Sherling was the planner and development of creating this attraction with the help of the community and the Okanogan County Historical Association. The county historical group holds the title to the property and it is being cosponsored by the communities of Molson and the Molson-Chesaw and Knob Hill. Presently, there are three buildings – a false fronted bank building built in 1900, the Poland China Mine Assay office (1905) and a homesteader’s cabin (1898). All three buildings contain exhibits. Members of the Oroville Lutheran Church held a ground breaking ceremony last Sunday afternoon, at the site where they plan to erect a new modern church. Those involved were: Stan Kosenen, Rev. Winterstein, Ken Gausman, Herb Teas, Al Steinbeck, Joe Lundgren, Mr. Babst, the oldest member of the congregation and Gus Mundt. Grocery Prices: Pancake flour, 4lb. bag, $.49; Fresh local corn, $.59 per dozen; Smoked picnic hams, $.35 per lb.; Large double “A” eggs, $.39 per doz.; Cantaloupes, l7 for $1.00; Salad Dressing, $.39.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: August 2-9, 1990: A general fund operating budget of $3,719,071 for the 1990-91 school year was adopted by the Oroville School Board, according to Superintendent, Jim Gilman. The budget is only a slight increase over the previous budget. The increase of $174,280 reflects state funded teachers salaries and cutbacks in three teaching positions. Enloe Dam, on the Similkameen River. is once again back in the news as the Okanogan County PUD is making another effort to resurrect the hydro-electric generating capacities of the historic structure. The adamant rejection of fish ladders by the Canadian and British Columbia governments may aid in their proposal. The ninth annual Tonasket Invitational Swim Meet will be held this weekend, August 4th and 5th at the renovated and newly heated Tonasket City Pool. Teams from Omak, Okanogan, Methow Valley, Brewster and Cashmere have been invited to the meet which will begin 9:00 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Six of seven would-be County Commissioners were on hand in Wauconda, to discuss the reasons why the people of Okanogan County should elect them to serve us as their op county level representatives. The Republican Candidates are: Dave Demyan, Spence Higby and Ron Weeks, while for the Democrats, Michael “Buffalo” Mazetti, Bob Hirst and Ed Thiele. Ever since the Iraqis invaded the country of Kuwait, the price of gasoline has steadily increased and according to a telephone poll

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Back to school for some It’s back to school for some, to health issues and distance and and in some places they’re been for those who couldn’t attend, going for a few weeks. What hap- maybe next time, okay? pened to summer? Besides being Every family has at least one exceptionally hot and weird relative. If you more than enough don’t know who it is, fires in the forests and then it might be you! dry hillsides. Perhaps our Being in Wenatchee extremely hot temthe past weekend peratures are behind showed where the us, then maybe not. devastation was and We still have the how close to the resiremainder of August dential area. and September to deal The Emry “clan” had with. a get together at Rotary The Justin Park, Wenatchee, last THIS & THAT Haney family, from Saturday, with almost Snohomish, spent the Joyce Emry 40 attending. What a week at Lost Lake, special place to have a camping, continuing a “picnic,” under cover, water and tradition they started a few years electrical outlets, allowing us to ago. And once again they got to have wonderful hot corn on the spend time with the younger gencob and fried chicken and cold erations of the Ripley (Sawtells) salads, with fresh peach short- family, continuing friendships cake, for dessert. that were started a year or so There were cousins, grandmas, before. grandpas aunts and uncles and A quick visit with Don Rounds, young babies, so the generations Wenatchee hospital, found him will continue. The effort for some out of bed and looking forward to to attend was monumental, due returning home, but waiting for

more strength in order to do so. A shock to the OrovilleTonasket community was the sudden death of Sally (Elgin) Smith-Campbell. She was one of the first babysitters we had, years ago and the retired librarian from Oroville Grade School. Condolences go to those survivors and friends she left behind. Another death is that of the mother of Debbie Reynolds, Jo Taber, who passed away in a care center in Moses Lake area. Doreen (Patterson) Davis is having health issues that require some follow up chemo treatments. Prayers and good wishes for a good recovery. Remember the Memorial service for Wally Loe is Saturday, Aug. 15, at the Grange Hall, in Molson at 12 p.m. with a potluck. Spend more time with your family and friends, eat your favorite foods and visit the places you love. You never know how much time you have left.

Roller skating to continue on Friday nights

can mark your calendar now and be ready. The next big events on our Hilltop will be the Hot August Nights on Saturday, Aug. 29 with registration starting at 8 a.m. with awards presented at 2 p.m. The car show will be held in Chesaw. There is room for campers and venders, call Bacon at 509-485-2029. Entry fee is $15 Meanwhile, over in Molson the Highland Stitchers will be having their 2015 Quilt Show from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. They will be serving Taco’s and pulled pork sandwiches at lunch time. For complete details and information your best bet is to call Vickie Didenhover at 509-4853020. One of the reasons for having these events on the same day is the men can do the car thing and the ladies can do the quilting, and nobody gets bored. Please remember to be careful with fire. Everything is soooo dry, it only takes a tiny spark to cause a disaster.

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Well, I am back, and I am sure no one missed me except for maybe the roller skaters on Friday over to Molson from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. There was a good group in attendance. The Skating will continue on Friday nights for your enjoyment. Everyone is welcome, kids and adults. You can also just come to watch. I also forgot to remind the Bingo players of the first and third Friday nights also in Molson for a night of fun playing Bingo. I actually won a game last week. Kaylee Peters won the scholarship from the Grange this year, along with her fouryear Scholarship in an Idaho

Voting for Worthy Vice President SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

On Wednesday, Aug. 18, there will be a special election for Worthy Vice President. From 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. Aerie members will be voting for a WVP to fill the rest of the term until May. This is an important office and members need to turn out and vote for the nominee of their

HILLTOP COMMENTS University. Congratulations! I have been asked if I would advise our Hilltop Folks that someone has borrowed the American Flag and the flag that is blue and has library printed on it from the library. If you see either one of the flags please return them to the library. Thank you. There will be a Celebration of Life for Wallace (Wally) Loe on August 15, 2015. It will be held at the Grange Hall in Molson at noon with a potluck. I had the pleasure of meeting a family that is fairly new to the area. Welcome to our hilltop, Bob, Laura, Rebecca and Sarah. Hope to see you again, soon. The next Pancake Feed will be held at the Grange Hall in Molson on Sept. 27. I know it is early to let you know about this, but you

EAGLEDOM AT WORK choice. Don’t forget Bingo and Burgers at 6 p.m. on Thursday. All your friends will be there! On Saturday, Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. the Auxiliary will draw cards in the Queen of Hearts Game. Be sure you have your membership card on you as only Eagles Members can win. We hope your plans are in place

now to attend the Eagles Picnic at Thorndike’s Beach on Saturday. Aug. 22. It’s always good company, good food and a good time. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m to 7p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw and Tacos. We are People Helping People!

TONASKET EAGLES Hope all had great time at annual Eagles’ picnic SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Well the weather gave us a few cooler days with some mixed hot days. We hope that all have been able to get out and enjoy the nice weather. We would like to thank all that attended our annual Eagle’s picnic last weekend and hope that all had a great time. Just a reminder it is time for dues and you need to get those dues into the club. Starting this Saturday, you will need your new door card to get into the club. This Saturday also come in and celebrate your August birthday with others that were born this month.

Taco Tuesdays is still going on so don’t forget to come in between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. and enjoy a tasty taco. Bingo will be this Friday at 7 p.m., so get those daubers ready and come try your luck at the jackpot. The kitchen will also be open at 5:30 p.m. on Friday for some of those fantastic hamburgers and fries and other items. Karaoke will be Saturday at 9 p.m., throw on those dancing shoes and grab your singing voice and come have fun. Pinochle will be on Sunday at 1 p.m. Pinochle scores for last weekend are as follows: Jo Porter took home first place with Leonard Paulsen grabbing second place and they both also had the last pinochle of the day. Low score went to Ted Paris. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

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AUGUST 13, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

We are soliciting donations, and looking for an installer, in order to install dining room ceiling acoustic tiles. If you want to donate, or know of someone who is a qualified installer, contact one of our Board members. Lunches next week are as follows: Tuesday, August 18, Chicken Tetrazzini;Thursday, August 20, Sweet and Sour Pork; Friday, August 21, Beef Stroganoff. For Seniors age 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. Join us for fine dining. OCTN (Okanogan County Transportation & Nutrition) is in the final stages of an agreement with Washington State Department of Transportation to expand bus commuter routes and door to door services. Actually, I signed an agreement to do just

Discussed alarming decline of bees SUBMITTED BY ALLENE HALLIDAY

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS that, Friday. Raleigh Chinn has been in conversation with the city about our Senior Center sign which needs shoring up, and cable tightening. We hope to have that completed soon. Many thanks go to Marilyn Perry and Betty Steg for supervising our Parking Lot Sale last Saturday. Some people’s service is outstanding, thanks. Also, a heartfelt thanks to all of the other volunteers who contributed goods and time, including the breakfast crew. It’s really heart warming to have so much support. Much appreciation goes to Roberta and Howard Cole for their many hours selling raffle tickets for the quilt donated by Doris Hughes. I know it’s fun meeting all of those generous people, but it’s also a lot of work. Thanks for a job well done, and look forward to another opportu-

OROVILLE GRANGE NEWS

OROVILLE GRANGE #985

Our group is gearing up for the Okanogan County Fair in September with plans to refurbish our booth. At last month’s meeting members expressed growing concern in the dramatic decline of bees across the nation. The principal problem for cultivated honey bees appears to be neonicotinoid pesticides (neonics) which have

been used on crops pollinated by these insects. Also, some plant seeds are treated with neonics, which eliminates the need to spray, but could be problematic because then the pesticide is systemic. A different problem is affecting the bumble bees, which are wild, but also useful pollinators. In that case, loss of habitat is causing the wild bees demise.

nity, as we have another donated quilt, and I understand Roberta is at it again. Don’t forget all the wonderful things we do, at the Senior Center. Bingo, Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m.; pocket billiards on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1 p.m.; pinochle, Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and exercise, Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30 a.m. We have interesting speakers and/or entertainment every Tuesday at 11 a.m., except the third Tuesday, which is our business meeting and potluck, the second Sunday at 1 p.m. There’s also euchre after lunch, see Valerie for times. Puzzles, library, garden club, breakfasts and, much much more. (Special thanks to Ruth LaFrance for organizing speakers for our Tuesday meetings.) Companionship, food, water, warmth, breath, space, time, God. All are essential for life, but the last one determines them all. It’s also nice to be cool, especially during these hot summer days. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Betty Steg; Men’s High, Len Firpo; Lady’s High, Evelyn Dull.

Interestingly, several large airports (including SeaTac) have set up bee hives in open areas between runways. Wild bees use these hives and have provided enough honey for the sale of this airport byproduct. Apparently, these bees are thriving. Our next monthly meeting will be held at Deep Bay Park on Saturday, Aug. 22, instead of on the usual third Wednesday of the month. The time will be 1 p.m. for the potluck (in this case a picnic) with a brief meeting to follow. Members are encouraged to bring board games and to dress comfortably. Questions? Call 509-476-4072.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR TONASKET Green Okanogan Recycling Center (GO Recycle) will be having Flea Market/Yard Sale spaces for rent this Thursday, Aug. 13 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at their newly opened business at 3 Rodeo Rd. For information on prices for spaces call Janet Culp at 509486-2061

free hotdogs and school supplies. (Every student attending Oroville Elementary in grades K through 3 will receive all the school supplies recommended by the Oroville Elementary School’s supply list). This Event is courtesy of Oroville Assembly of God Church. Contact Pastor Dwayne Turner at 509-476-2924 for more information.

Oroville Farmers’ Market

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion

GO Recycle Flea Market

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market and Flea Market will be Saturday, Aug. 15 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096. Western & Native Art Show

OMAK - The 35th annual Western and Native Art Show featuring well known artists from Washington, Montana and British Columbia will be held at the The Courtyard, 28 N. Main, Omak on Aug. 13 through 15 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m and Sunday, Aug. 16 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. There will be a reception from 2 to 5 on Saturday with a live auction at 2. No admission charge. Denny Richardson and Friends

OROVILLE – Denny Richardson and Friends will perform at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, Aug. 13. Richardson’s vocals accompanied by a diverse group of instrumentals brings a wide range of tunes to the stage. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at 509-4762861 or check the Events Page at www.estherbricques.com. Incredible Forces at Work

TONASKET - As part of the NCRL Summer Kids Program Chelan County PUD presents “Incredible Forces at Work!” on Friday, Aug. 14 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Public Library Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509-4762488. Back to School Clothing Giveaway

OROVILLE - There will be a Back to School Clothing Giveaway on Saturday, Aug. 22 from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. at the Gold Digger Park across from Frontier Foods. Your donations of clean clothing for the giveaway can be dropped off at Windermere Real Estate in Oroville from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday to Friday. All Sizes needed. School Celebrates 25 Years

OROVILLE - North Valley Christian School will be celebrating 25 years of community service with 226 graduates on Tuesday, Aug. 25, starting at 5 p.m. at the Oroville Library Annex, then continuing with music into the park. Featured is a student speaker who will tell of his journey out of heroine addiction. Refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. Nashville Country Star

OROVILLE - The Oroville American Legion brings back Nashville Country Star with the best talent from across the state on Saturday, Aug. 29 starting at 6 p.m. in the American Legion Hall. The show features a mix of classic, country and 50s and 60s rock and roll music. There will also be a desert auction. The public is welcome, admission is $8.

School Supply Givaway & BBQ

OROVILLE - There will be a Free School Supply Give-Away to Oroville Students in Kindergarten through Third Grade on Saturday, August 15 from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Oroville Elementary School – North End Playground. There will be fun and games,

SUBMITTED BY JANET CULP

Friday

TONASKET--Hold your breath no longer! The Garlic Festival is almost here. The long-standing Tonasket tradition celebrates all things garlic. Held in History Park along the Okanogan River on Friday, Aug. 21 from 12 noon to 8 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 22 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., this year’s Garlic Fest offers something for everyone. Admission is free for both days. The Community Cultural Center, with support from local businesses and the City of Tonasket, sponsors and organizes the annual festival. Family activities each afternoon from 4-6 pm include a dunk tank, dessert walk, gunny sack races, hulahoop contest, water balloon toss and face painting. Prizes will be awarded to the winners of the games. A pie-eating contest will also occur during family time. For the adults, free classes in garlic growing, braiding and cooking are offered on Fri. 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and again on Sat. from 11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.. The beer and wine garden operates from 2:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Friday and from 12:00 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday. Friday night’s 6 p.m. dance features live music by Chuck Oakes and Slippery Slope. There will be a garlic enhanced Food Booth and local garlic growers available. Over 25 venders selling produce, crafts, and much more will be present. Come enjoy the free entertainment. Bring the whole family to enjoy the Garlic

12:00—Bud McSpadden 1:00—Wes Cunningham 2:30—Steve Kinzie 4:00—Reed Engel & Harvey Swanson 6:00--Dance to Slippery Slope Saturday 10:00—Tyler Graves 11:00—Raptor Display 12:00—Dayton Edmond 1:00—Belly Dancers 2:00—Ruby Scene 3:30—Nuance 5:00—Randy Battle Fest under the shade of the magnificent old trees in History Park. You’ll have a cool time learning all the hot uses for the pungent bulb. For more information on the Garlic Festival, contact the Community Cultural Center, 486-1328, or organizer Jean Pfeifer, 486-0617, or on the web info@communityculturalcenter.org

ITEMS PAST | FROM A6 River Bridge on the approach to Oroville, in the form of Mack’s Home Town Bakery. The owners are Mack and Suzy Richards and the head baker is John Desjardin. John has been head baker at several large bakeries and is happy to be in Oroville. “As I get settled”, said Desjardin, “I’ll be using more and more fresh fruits, berries and nuts grown in the valley.” Real Estate: 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on Boundary Point with southerly view across Lake Osoyoos, $135,000.00; 3 bdrm home on a large city lot in Tonasket, new vinyl siding and metal roof, walking distance to the business district, $39,500.00 on owner contract.

by the Gazette-Tribune, local retailers in Oroville and Tonasket are following the trend. Of the 10 stations responding to the poll, prices increased an average of 9.8 cents per gallon. At the current time, three stations are at $1.31 and four are $1.37, 1 each at $1.38, $1.39 and $1.40. Homemakers, truck drivers, orchardists educators business people and others from Virginia, California and the Pacific Northwest all made up the attendees of the 30th class reunion of 1960 Tonasket graduating class at the Bonaparte Lake Resort on July 31. There were 36 of the graduates plus spouses or friends and one former teacher-class advisor, Wally Moore. A new business has located just north of the Okanogan

OROVILLE - Valley Christian Fellowship presents “Jungle Jaunt,” a unique summer VBS program. Come explore the rainforest and get to know God through Bible stories, music, games, crafts and more! Jungle Jaunt will be held each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins July 5 and continues through Sept. 20. Open to kids age 4 to 11. For more information, or to arrange a ride for your child, call 509-560-0228. Valley Christian Fellowship is located at 142 East Oroville Road.

DENTISTRY

NORTH COUNTY - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2015

NEWS Water ranch grappling with city water issues

ENLOE | FROM A1 trying to bring them up to speed. Some of them are asking if they can deal with us privately, but we have to put everything on the website, including our agreement with the Colville Confederated Tribe,” said Houston. “We can’t isolate anyone. We went through the whole process of the request for proposal procedure, so we’re trying to make that process clear without alienating any private developers. They are used to working in private, and they’re having trouble with the public process.” “The purpose of the special meeting was to discuss an investment firm that wanted details of a negotiated deal with the PUD to acquire Enloe Dam kept secret. Commissioners had to explain to the company that the PUD has to abide by open meetings act regulations and cannot keep any details secret from its customer base,” said Jere Gillespie, one of the many constituents gathered after Wednesday’s August 5 meeting. “We got the feeling the company is not expected to pursue Enloe any further.” Houston said they were looking forward to some follow-up visits from a company in the Midwest who sent out a “numbers man” to look briefly at the dam. “He went back and got his company interested in it, and now they want the engineers to come out and look. The word seems to have gotten out that we have our FERC license. That’s a big hurdle, and when people understand we’ve already got it, it makes the project more feasible and hence more interesting.” “All options are still on the table,” said PUD General Manager John Grubich. “We received notification last week the FERC license is extended for two years, so now 2020 is when the dam would need to be commissioned.” The

license gives two years for design and three years for construction. The FERC license requires the dam be inspected in 2015, so Grubich authorized $175,000 for the inspection, which the board approved. “We are looking at all options and want to be able to do what will be best for the ratepayers,” said Commissioner Scott Vejraska. “At least, that’s how I personally am looking at it.” Also discussed at the meeting was a letter dated July 28, 2015, to the PUD by Chief Keith Crow of the Lower Similkameen Indian Band (LSIB) of British Columbia. “We oppose your proposal to modify the dam for electrical purposes, as it would harm our cultural interests by greatly reducing at times the flow over Simiklameen Falls. We also oppose any means to artificially convey salmon beyond Similkameen Falls, as doing so would violate a covenant conveyed in an important cultural legend, having extreme consequences for our people,” states Chief Crow. He goes on to say, “We support restoration of the river to the conditions preceding alteration of the river, as these are the conditions associated with our history, culture and legends. While we hear people and agencies discuss the possibility of salmon passing the falls under these conditions, our view is that the law of Sinclip (Coyote) applies to the fish as well as to us. We do not believe that fish will pass the falls. But if they do, that is a matter between Sinclip and the fish, without consequence to our people.” “Previously, the tribal members of the LSIB lived in fear that if the fish made it past the Similkameen Falls, they, the People would perish,” said Gillespie. “Commissioner Steve

Houston was particularly pleased that the fish into Canada problem was nicely resolved by this new letter from the LSIB.” “The letter basically said they don’t want fish passages installed, but if the fish make it up their on their own, they’re okay with that,” Vejraska said. He and Grubich met with the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT) July 21 at their Natural Resources Committee meeting. Grubich said they meet with the tribe periodically to give them an update on “where we’re at with the dam.” Vejraska said Colville tribal members were still having discussions amongst themselves, and were “still on the fence” over whether or not they wanted to see Enloe electrified. A letter dated July 9, 2014 to the PUD from the LSIB and signed by Chief Crow along with Councilor Terry Terbasket and Councilor Eliza Terbasket, states the LSIB Chief and Council support CCT in taking on the lead agency role for the purpose of investigating the potential for dam removal and to carry out dam removal management and/ or works, sediment toxicity studies, and other pertinent studies that may be deemed necessary, including the pursuit of hard funding opportunities to support expenses associated with dam removal and associated studies. The Similkameen River is at the heart of the historic territory of the LSIB. The historic territory precedes modern nations and is on both sides of the US/Canada border. “Places along the lower stretch of the Similkameen River are of the highest cultural value to the LSIB for identity, spiritual and subsistence purposes,” stated Chief Crow.

SECURITY | FROM A1 Cariker said staff members have begun to attend GAP training through Force Dynamics, including training on deescalation technics and what to do if someone becomes violent; with a goal of having every staff member attend the training within the next three months and to have the security team go through advanced training. Other measures include participating in a system where facilities throughout the state use the same codes to describe a situation when calling in an emergency. NVH installed panic buttons last year, with calls automatically going to the police. “We have one of the best lockdown policies in the state, and every incident calls for a debriefing afterward,” Cariker stated. Additional safety measures initiated in 2014 include flagging patient records of anyone with a tendency to become combative, and a vendor business policy to ID contractors on the facility “so people know they are supposed to be there.” Cariker said the hospital applied for a $10,000 grant which, if received, will allow for additional training, more cameras and door swipes. He also reported attending a regional meeting in Grand Coulee in July, and promoting a program called Roundtable NVH. “There are fourteen medical

facilities in it so far. We are looking at security audits and evaluating several companies that offer group discounts. People are coming from as far as Klicitat, and Moses Lake is attending as well,” Cariker said. “We share our ideas and tour facilities; we’ve seen five different hospitals now. Everyone has things they are proud of and things they want to improve on. There is a lot more sharing of information than has been done in the past.” In other hospital news, Director of Patient Financial Services Jana Symonds announced she has been selected to speak in Chicago and Mobile, Alabama, about the hospital’s recent financial recovery. “It will be a huge crowd; and I am so excited to tell our story,” Symonds said. The event is coming up in September. Helen Verhasselt reported that while bad debt is running higher than anticipated due to higher insurance premiums, expenses are being kept under budget despite a union contract for higher wages kicking in last pay period. NVH has been assisting the accounts payable department at the Brewster Hospital while they advertise for a new Chief Financial Officer. They are on the same accounting system as NVH, so “it makes it very easy for us to step in and help a fellow hospital,”

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s Water Ranch had to close unexpectedly last month after being open just five days, and it will be another week or two before it is up and running again. Tonasket City Councilman Scott Olson wants the public to understand it is not the fault of the splash park committee. “It is the city water system stopping this from being open right now, not a problem of the park,” Olson said, stressing that City Maintenance Supervisor Hugh Jensen “is bending over backwards to try and get this done.” The water park was designed to be set up on a system of threeinch piping, but because the city’s three-inch system was broken, it was decided to try and save money by setting it up with the two-inch pipe already in place.

“We tried to do it in a way that was cost-effective, but now we will do it in a way that has long-range value to the city; by replacing the three-inch water line that was broken with a four-inch system,” said Olson. Parts have been ordered, including a pressure regulator, a back flow valve and a T to tie into the line. Olson said the parts are expected to arrive Aug. 11, and it “should take about a week to get it up and running after that,” adding, “Hugh will get a crew on this as soon as the parts arrive.” “I feel bad the kids have not been able to have this. Linda Black and Dave Kester have put so much time into this, so it makes me sad,” Olson said. Jensen has had his hands full the last couple of weeks; getting bids for repair of the broken shaft in Well #7, a broken pipe on Whitcomb and preventive maintenance that needs to be done in the

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

said Verhasselt. The hours spent assisting will be billed to Brewster. The board approved a $6,810 equipment request for Surgery Air Controls. “The current controls worked fine until we got into the really hot weather,” said Cariker. “We had to get a cooling vest for the surgeon—it gets pretty hot in there under those lights.” Board member Dick Larson pointed out that surgeons like to keep the operating room at 67 or 68 degrees, as there was less chance of infection. The hospital plans to consolidate all the buildings into one heating and cooling unit, and hopes to move forward with a geo-thermal project that depends, in part, on the city council approving an amendment that will allow for non-consumptive wells to be drilled. Cariker reported the maintenance department making improvements in the system in the longterm care division, resulting in it “working better than it has in years.” “In the past we had to take the lowest bids, as we were still in county warrants. Now we are looking at things that are the best fit for the facility. It’s a balancing act to stay out of warrants and debts, but anytime you delay maintenance it’s usually a little more expensive to catch back up.”

FREE SPORTS PHYSICALS EXAMENES FISICOS GRATUITOS PARA DEPORTES

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

509-486-0114

Omak @ 1003 Koala Avenue August 21st @ 1:00p-5:00p and August 28th @ 1:00p-5:00p

509-422-5700

Brewster @ 525 W. Jay Avenue August 4th @ 1:00p-5:00p

509-689-3455

Brewster @ 520 W. Indian Avenue August 13th @ 2:00p-6:00p and August 20th @ 2:00p-6:00p

509-689-2525

Bridgeport @ 1015 Columbia Avenue August 17th @ 8:00a-12:00p and August 19th @ 1:00p-5:00p

509-686-0603

Twisp @ 541 W. Second Avenue August 21st @ 2:00p-5:00p and August 24th @ 2:00p-5:00p

509-997-2011

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist Tonasket @ 106 N. Whitcomb Avenue July 31st 8:30a-11:30a and August 11th 8:15a-11:30a

summertime. “This is serious work,” Olson stressed. “With the previous set up, we couldn’t provide enough water for both the restrooms and the water park. Using the fourinch line will allow them to have the volume of water they need at a pressure the equipment can accept.” Olson said the new water line would be able to handle any extra demands that could come from future developments at Chief Tonasket Park. “It may have taken longer, but it will be done right this way. This park is a gem and will last years and years, so we have to be careful and not get too shortsighted with a delay of a couple of months. If we do it right it will last a long time,” Olson said. “A ton of volunteer hours of labor has been given to get this park up and running, and they are doing a good job on this.”

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m.

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


AUGUST 13, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

OUTDOOR RECREATION

Party celebrates Pacific Northwest Trail Oroville Chapter of the PNTA hosts over 200 attendees BY GARY A. DEVON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – In addition to having a party for supporters of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association, as well as those who wanted to know more about the trail and its connection to the area, there were several through hikers who stopped by last Saturday. The party featured live music, activities for young and old, a barbecue of hot dogs and corn, as well as watermelon and cider. In addition there were booths on the trail itself, as well the Okanogan Wildlife League, which had two owls and a raptor on display. The day was hot, but a strong breeze helped to cool things off a bit, as did the big covered seating area. The event took place at the Oroville Soccer Fields, a short distance from the Similkameen River Trailhead, one of two Okanogan County trails in the north county, the other is just south of Oroville, Whistler Canyon Trail. Both are segments of the much larger Pacific Northwest Trail. “We were very fortunate to

have a several through hikers ner that was hosted for PNTA coming through Oroville during Staff and Board members on the weekend,” said David Tobey, Friday evening at Pastime Bar & with the Pacific Northwest Trail Grill. Association. “Len is 62 and from San Among those who stopped by Diego, California. He started hikwere Eric “Stumbling Norwegian” ing upon his Gilje, Kaye retirement in “ H o n e y b e e” 2007. Now he Miller and spends his time “We owe a great deal Dave “Freeeither hiking of thanks to all who bird” Osborn, or planning his according to next hike and participated. However, Tobey. he is the original idea, plan- admits “They gave totally addicted us a short prening, organization to trails” said sentation and Tobey. and implementation answered quesThe Oroville tions from the of the event is due Chapter of the audience. They stayed with us to the major effort of PNTA hosted the events on most of the one man – Joseph Saturday and day and visited Sunday to coinwith people Enzensperger” cide with the attending the Dave Tobey, Oroville Chapter board meeting event,” Tobey Pacific Northwest Trail Association by the National said. Matt WhitePNTA memhead hiked in during the event bers and staff. The board and arriving at 2 p.m., Tobey said. staff members starting arriving in “He is from Cheshire, England Oroville on Thursday and many and the first international hiker stayed until Sunday afternoon. we have made contact with this “Most stayed in the Camaray summer. He selected the PNT Motel which is becoming a major because it is the ‘perfect length’ to hike during a two to three month stop for through hikers as well summer break. After completing since Oroville is on the trail and the trail he will return to school generally accepted as the midpoint on the PNT,” said Tobey in England,” he said. “We owe a great deal of thanks Len Glassner attended the din-

Gary DeVon & PNTA Photos

Above, through hikers Eric “Stumbling Norwegian” Gilje, Kaye “Honeybee” Miller and Dave “Freebird” Osborn gave a short presentation and answered questions from the audience. Top, left to right, Len Glassner at the Camaray Motel, Joseph Enzensperger, Oroville PNTA President and Matt Whitehead from Cheshire, England. to all who participated. However, the original idea, planning, organizing, and implementation of the event is due to the major effort of one man – Joseph Enzensperger, long time Oroville resident and President of the local chapter of the PNTA,” Tobey said. He

“has been working non-stop for months to make sure this event was a success.” Saturday Enzensperger was forced to leave the event when he was overcome by heat stroke. We are very sorry that Joseph did not get to enjoy this wonder-

WE WANT YOU! Register anything from A to Z!

ful event which he created and worked so hard to make it become a reality. Joseph is a priceless treasure to the community he serves,” said Tobey, who considered the event a major success with 200 plus people attending, participating and contributing.

Did you hear the news?

Anything you produce you can register!

 Animals  Beauty

Products Goods  Drawings  Educational Displays  Flowers  Glasswork  Handmade Crafts  Indian Arts & Crafts  Jewelry / Leather Design  Kites  Lego Displays  Model Cars  Needlework  Oil Paintings  Pottery  Quilts  Register today  Sculptures  Taxidermy  Unique Designs  Vegetables  Weaving  Xerophilic  Youth Exhibits  Zany Art  Canned

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at this year’s Fair. Open to youth & adults! Go online or see page 43 in the Premium Book for details!

Phone: (509) 422-1621

Email: fair@co.okanogan.wa.us PO Box 467  175 Rodeo Trail Rd . Okanogan, WA 98840


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2015

SPORTS & RECREATION

Six Hornets attend ‘Trench Camp’ Lineman only camp coached by former NFL players SUBMITTED BY TAM HUTCHINSON OHS ATHLETIC DIRECTOR

ARLINGTON - Six Oroville football players spent three days at a “lineman only” camp led by former NFL players. Charlie Arrigoni, Jaxon Blackler, Logan Mills, Blake Rise, Zane Scott and Brandon Watkins all attended “Trench Camp” held at Arlington High School the last

week of July. The Hornet players received instruction from All Pro lineman such as Stan Brock, Manu Tuiasosopo, Steve Etman and a dozen more former offensive and defensive NFL linemen. Co-founder of the Camp, Stan Brock, put together a camp that had over 100 high school players from as far away as Georgia attending. The Oroville players registration fees were covered by the Oroville Booster Club. And, in June, Golddigger in exchange for the boys digging a “trench,” offered to pick up the cost of their motel rooms, which made it pos-

sible for them to attend. “All the boys worked hard, despite the heat and humidity, with temps on the ‘turf ’ field reaching over 110F,” said Oroville Football coach, Brad Scott, who accompanied the boys. He added, “Our boys received praised from many of the coaches for their efforts.”

PRACTICE & OPENING GAME The Oroville Hornets Football Team officially start practice Wednesday, Aug. 19 at 6 p.m. Season opening game will be Friday, Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. at Oroville’s Ben Prince Field against White Swan.

Submitted photo

Attending the Trench Camp coached by former NFL players in Arlington, Wash. were (L-R) Zane Scott, Logan Mills, Blake Rise, Charlie Arrigoni, Jaxon Blackler and Brandon Watkins

Join OHA for ‘A Walk Through Time’ SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OKANOGAN HIGHLANDS ALLIANCE

On Sunday, August 16th, Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA) offers community members a chance to take a guided hike with Naturalist Dana Visalli, along a hidden canyon connecting the Burge Mountain road and

creating ever more complex ecological relationships and ever richer ecosystems. This walk will offer a condensed version of a 5-day program on this subject that Visalli is teaching this summer in the Methow Valley. “I was asked for a quote that would characterize our August Ecology and Evolution hike,” said Visalli. “One of the most appro-

Community members should consider their physical condition and whether a hike of this nature would be suitable for their needs, strengths, and stamina. Please note that cell phone reception is unlikely on this hike. Restrooms will be available at the start and end of the hike. This event is not able to accommodate dogs, unless they are service

Photos by Okanogan Highlands Alliance.

tion. Further details will be provided to those who register for the field trip. To sign up for this event, please email julie@okanoganhighlands.org  or call 509476-2432. There is no charge for this event; donations are always welcome.

the Highlands Nordic Sno-Park near Havillah. The event has been dubbed ‘A Walk Through Time in the Highlands: Ecology & Evolution at Our Feet.’ Life has been on an immense journey through time, and it turns out that much of the evidence for that journey is all around us in the natural world. On this short hike we will look for the evidence that the plants, animals and even the rocks have changed over time,

priate that I can think of is by an obscure poet named Bill Shakesphere, who noted, after years of observing the natural world, ‘In nature’s infinite book of secrecy, a little I can read.’ On this walk we will be reading some of nature’s secrets.” This hike is rated moderately strenuous, traveling mainly but not always on trails, with sections of uneven terrain and forest debris on the ground. The hike will be 3.6 miles long.

dogs. Proper hiking footwear is essential. Due to the nature of the outdoor event, participation is limited, and priority registration is being offered for OHA members. A waiting list is being generated on a first-come, first-serve basis. To begin or renew OHA membership and be first in line to register for the summertime events, community members can donate at okanoganhighlands.org, or contact OHA for more informa-

OHA is a non-profit organization that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The Highland Wonders educational series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed

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AUGUST 13, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

BUSINESS

Green Okanogan recycling center now open to the public Facility to host Flea Markets each Thursday BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Green Okanogan (GO) Recycling Center is now open to the public, after a trial run serving members only. GO is at it’s new location of 3 Rodeo Road, and open Tuesdays noon to 6 p.m.; and Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Along with recycling transfer services, GO will provide the opportunity for community members to “recycle” goods by finding new owners for items they no longer need. GO will have Flea Market/Yard Sale spaces for rent each Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost is $5 for a 10x10 space and $10 for a 10x20 space. People are advised to bring their own awning, tables, chairs and anything else needed to set up

their booth. The recycling center will be open during the flea markets, so people are encouraged to bring their sorted items to recycle at the same time. GO is accepting the following metals: clean and empty aluminum beverage cans, but no aluminum pet food cans or their lids and no foil or pie plates. Tin/steel cans accepted include magnetic, clean food cans and canning jar rings but no aerosol, paint or fuel cans; and no bottle caps or glass jar lids. Mixed ferrous metal accepted includes a wide range of magnetic material, from large non-refrigerant appliances down to screws, nuts and bolts. Sorted non-ferrous metals accepted include stainless steel, copper, brass, electric motors, insulated copper and aluminum wire. Also accepted is aluminum scrap including siding, door and window frames, auto and machine parts, lawn furniture, and aluminum pots and pans. Paper accepted by GO includes white office/ledger/computer paper, but no ream wrappers, junk mail, windowed white enveloped,

Julie Ashmore photo

Tonasket Outreach Program students present GO president Mariah Cornwoman (far left) with the sign they made for the entrance of the new GO Recycle. (L-R) Addison Epps, Esmerelda Mathis, Oscar Dreschler, Erin Quinlan, Cora Diehl, Keisha Bovard and Bryan Nolan. JJ Hempel (not pictured)

glued binding or self-adhesive stickers. Also, no shredded paper. Newspapers are accepted and the ad inserts that come inside them, but no glossy paper, magazines or junk mail. Also, no phone books or newsprint catalogs unless covers and glued spine are removed. Any size dry and clean corrugated cardboard is accepted, but no boxes with any food residue or rotting cardboard; and no egg cartons or ‘paperboard’ such as cereal boxes, six-pack carriers or shoe box type non-corrugated board. GO is not able to accept waxed produce boxes. E-Cycle items accepted at GO include televisions, monitors, laptops and computer towers; but no printers, ink cartridges, mice, CDs/DVDs or other peripherals. Cell phones or electronic game consoles cannot be accepted. For plastics, GO can accept #1 PET plastic bottles that are transparent clear or colored plastic with screw-top necks such as water and soda bottles. GO cannot accept caps, #1 salad boxes, deli containers or cups, etc. They also cannot accept #1 plastics that are opaque, such as some dish soap or vitamin bottles. Other plastics accepted are #2 HDPE Plastic bottles and jugs including colorless, translucent milk jug and vinegar type bottles with screw-top necks. GO cannot accept caps or #2 opaque bottles such as bleach and laundry detergent bottles, and no #2 tubs such as yogurt and cottage cheese. At this time GO is not able to accept refrigerators, mixed paper, magazines, plastics #3-7, tires batteries or glass. There is no drop box at the site, so please plan your visit for when the center is open. GO’s new location is the only place to drop off any items to be recycled; please do not drop off items at any of GO’s previous, temporary locations.

Submitted photo

Jason Verbeck, owner of Columbia Weed and Pest Management, decided to go into the business when he had difficulty finding a local service to meet his needs in a timely and cost efficient manner.

Local entrepreneur schools pests, educates customers BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

A pesky situation was the inspiration for Jason Verbeck to go into the weed and pest control business. Verbeck said he’s always been an entrepreneur, so when he tried to schedule an appointment and was told there would be a six-week wait and he would be charged several hundred dollars for a simple spray job, “it became very obvious to me that many area residents were being taken advantage of. “We strive to get to all our our customers within 24 to 48 hours,” said Verbeck. “We use top of the line chemicals and have excellent equipment, and we still are almost always 50 to 75 percent less than what any other providers who will come to this area charge.” Verbeck is from Brewster, and returned to the area after graduating from Washington State University. “Most of my family is from the Tonasket/Oroville area, so I have been around this area my entire life,” Verbeck said.

He has been serving Okanogan County for the last year with his business, Columbia Weed and Pest Management; scheduling appointments for Monday through Saturday. “We are the only full service weed and pest control spray company in the county,” Verbeck said. They offer many different services from interior and exterior pest prevention, as well as services for commercial businesses. “Most of our customers sign up for our quarterly program where they have their homes sprayed every three to four months for year-round prevention.” A new customer special of 25 percent off is offered to people who have never used their services before. Asked what the future holds for Columbia Weed and Pest, Verbeck said, “The future looks great for our company. We are rapidly growing and have already established ourselves as the top provider in Okanogan, Chelan, Douglas and Ferry counties.” Verbeck said his company has been doing a lot of bed bug treatments for the entire state of Washington and will continue to expand in that area. “However,

our primary focus will remain to provide people in our area honest and affordable pest and weed control methods. We offer honest and dependable services with guaranteed work.” Verbeck said his was the only company in his field with local ties and interests in keeping the money in the community. “We buy all of our supplies locally and are a huge supporter of our local athletic teams,” said Verbeck. He said the company’s main goal, however, was “to help educate people on why they are having the issues they are. We will not just show up and spray your weeds or pests. We will inspect it, educate you on why it is happening and what measures you can take to prevent the problem in the future.” A large array of services is listed on their website at www. columbiaweedandpest.com. “If anyone has any questions on a problem they are having, they are always more than welcome to call us with questions, and we will do our very best to help anyway that we can,” said Verbeck.

Tonasket considers allowing wells for geothermal use Looking for quality over cost for small works roster BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - City of Tonasket Building Official Christian Johnson appeared before the city council to further discuss the possibility of the council drafting an amendment to allow the drilling of non-consumptive water wells for the purpose of facilities to begin using geothermal heat pumps. Tonasket prohibits the drilling of all wells except by city municipal. “The state has a rigid concern about the drilling of wells, and this would allow for certain wells proven to be reasonably safe to be allowed,” said Johnson. “In order to protect the city’s aquifer, there is concern about anytime anyone drills a hole into the aquifer. With attention to detail, it can be shown to be done safely. I am asking the council for an amendment to allow this new technology, because it does save a lot of energy.” Johnson said while the energy savings would not be cost-effective for a private person to put in a geo-thermal system, large occupancies such as schools, courthouses or hospitals could save a substantial amount of money. North Valley Hospital is currently investigating replacing their heating and cooling system with a geo-thermal system. “If done correctly, it will not damage aquifer for the city,” Johnson said, adding that the city “couldn’t function” if the aquifer was damaged. The council agreed to discuss this further at the next city council meeting, August 11, and to put it on the agenda for adoption at the August 25 city council meeting.

CITY TO CONTRACT FOR QUALITY

Local contractor Ty Olson appeared to advise the council to come up with a procurement process for small works projects that would establish goods and services contracted by the city at the best possible cost to ensure quality, rather than the city simply opting for the lowest bid. “I think it’s time for some policies and procurement procedures to be put in place,” Olson said, citing a current example of the city securing a bid for road work to be done at Chief Tonasket Park. “I went down there and saw (city maintenance supervisor) Hugh (Jensen) out there doing work on it; adding water to the road surface so the contractor can do his job. That’s offensive to me.” Councilman Scott Olson agreed that bid specs should be written well enough to make certain the city got what they needed. “Now we’ve got an eyesore down there, and we’re going to lose the whole side of the parking lot because of the swell they put in,” Ty Olson said. “Hugh should not have been down there doing that work. That was on the contractor. You need a procurement in place that specifies what you need for satisfaction of the project.” Mayor Plumb said he would call a special staff meeting to address the issue. Meanwhile, Contractor Olson said he would “fix the thing for free because it is an eyesore, and I don’t want it next to the water park we worked so hard on.” Ty Olson said as a school board member he had also recently addressed Tonasket School District, urging them to make sure they were contracting for quality services rather than opting for a low bid which might end up costing them more in the long run.

AIRPORT HOPES FOR MONEY FROM FIRES An Emergency Facilities and Land Use Agreement between the city of Tonasket and the USFS

has been adjusted from the previous rate of $100 per day for use by the USFS as a Helibase while fighting fires. There will no longer be a cost incurred for incidental one-time landings. Temporary use for project or small fires, up to three days and up to two helicopters plus support equipment and supplies will cost $100 per day. Fire usage for medium to large fires, more than three days and more than two helicopters plus support equipment and supplies will cost $200 per day. The contract is effective from July 22, 2015, to October 30, 2016. Lee Orr from the Tonasket Airport Improvement Club appeared before the council and asked if any of the money received from the fires would be set aside for use at the airport. Mayor Plumb said money deposited into the general fund “is liquid, so you can allocate it as needs come up.” He said $325 of the fire funds were given to the airport to repair a surplus police vehicle now being used by the airport. Orr said the airport had to drill a new well at a cost of $6500 because the old well was only pumping six gallons of water per minute. The new well has not yet been hooked up, and they have to be “very frugal” with use of water at the airport. The mayor said he knew of at least one hangar “utilizing the water for individual use, and the city is paying for all of that.” The contract between the city and people who lease hangars calls for the leasee to pay “any and all utilities provided to the premises.” Plumb said the council would need to work on a fixed-cost policy. Councilman Olson said he would “love to consider pouring money earned off the fires back into the airport to make the facility better, so in years to come we can continue to get that money.” Orr said the Airport Improvement Club “may need to think about putting a concrete helipad up there,” and that length-

ening the runway was also in the long term plan. The Tonasket Airport runway is approximately 3,000 feet in length. Orr also asked if the city would allow him to put up a permanent pavilion at the airport. “Our idea is to put up a pole building; 20x40 or so; put it up and get a roof on it this year and maybe another year pour the floor, then enclose it and maybe put in a kitchen,” said Orr. The council made a motion to approve the building of the pavilion and directed Building Inspector Johnson to determine if the Airport Improvement Club “has plans sufficient enough to build this pavilion,” which will be turned over to the city after being built.

PUBLIC DISAPPOINTED WATER RANCH TURNED OFF

During the public comment

portion of the meeting, several people expressed disappointment and frustration the Water Ranch needed to be temporarily closed while adjustments are made to the system. “That’s why we said this is a testing phase when the park was first opened,” said Plumb. The city is awaiting a pressure regulator to be added to the system. Dave Kester asked if there were anything he could do to help, stating, “It was very popular the week or so it was open, and we would like to see that enthusiasm back.”

OTHER BUSINESS The city approved resolution 2015-12, allowing membership in the Okanogan Council of Government, and approval of the Interlocal Agreement. Permission was granted for the

Tonasket Library Board to hold a car wash and sell sno-cones Aug. 14-15 at Founders Day Park. Police Chief Darren Curtis was asked to review several proposals for a city-wide fireworks ban to see which one he would best be able to enforce. Chief Curtis provided a list of surplussed items as requested by Councilman Dennis Brown. The surplussed vehicles and firearms are to help offset the cost of items needed by the police department. Anyone wanting a copy of the list can request one from City Hall. After review of four bids, a motion was made to accept a bid of $6400 (not including tax) from Picatti Bros Inc. for the repair of the city’s Well #7, which has a broken shaft in the pump, and to allow up to $25,000 from the water reserve fund for the repair work. A special meeting will need to be called to approve.

Tonasket continues partnership with NCW Narcotics Task Force BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Kevin Newport of the North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force (NCWNTF) appeared before the Tonasket City Council at their request; to present a report of what the task force has been accomplishing for the city over recent years prior to the city re-enrolling in the program at a cost of $2,000 per year. “I tell people to think about the money like you are spending it on insurance,” said Newport. “An ounce of methamphetamine costs $700 to &1,000. If I come up here and take care of a middle level dealer, two buys would cover the cost of the $2,000 for the city.” He said the amount of cases handled in Tonasket varied from year to year. “This year we’ve done at least

three cases. I don’t care where the case are at, I will come and work them,” said Newport, adding, “Yes, we are out here. We are not a mythical agency that takes your money and you never see us.” Newport said staffing of the task force had reduced over the years due to budget cuts, and the force was made up of just himself, two border patrol agents and a Colville Confederated Tribes law enforcement officer. “Back in the 1980s and 1990s we had eight to ten personnel in the office, but now we are down to four detectives including me as supervisor,” Newport said, adding that Steve Brown is the task force commander. Newport said the task force’s budget, not including any grant funding, has been reduced to $122,000 per year, including all operating costs.

“One of the issues we are dealing with is we don’t have the money to make the deals; to buy the drugs,” Newport said. According to the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office website, the NCWNTF is a federallyfunded multi-jurisdictional task force with Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office serving as the signature and parent agency. The task force is operated off a federal grant called the Byrnes Grant and governed by a board consisting of the Sheriffs of Okanogan and Ferry Counties, along with all the police chiefs in both counties. The website lists cocaine as the main narcotic purchased by detectives over the last few years, with methamphetamine as a close second. The council voted to sign up for another year with the task force.


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • August 13, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

www.gazette-tribune.com

Houses For Sale Tonasket. OPEN HOUSE SAT 8/22, 9am- 2pm, 120 South State Frontage Rd. Spacious 4 BR, 2 BA home! Bright, sunny great room with many windows. 2400 SF open concept. 4 acres features 3 car garage, loafing shed. $240,000. FSBO 509-486-2451.

For Rent AVAILABLE RENTALS $1,495 4BR 3BA Lake Osoyoos 1 level home, family rm, garage w/shop. $810 2BR + Den, 2BA Open Concept. $795; 2BR Sonora Shores deluxe condo. $825; 3BR, 2BA Lake Osoyoos Apt. $425; Cute 1BR Apt.

Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004.

Commercial Rentals Business/Office space for lease. Prime spot downtown Tonasket. $375/month. (509)486-1682 or 429-0873.

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Health General

Help Wanted FAMILY ADVOCATES

Okanogan and Brewster.

Assists teacher and provides data entry. Must have knowledge of computers. Requirements: High School or GED; bilingual/Spanish with data entry experience. CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN DENTAL: Dental Assistant One part time on an as needed basis, bilingual preferred and one full time, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OKANOGAN VALLEY: Patient Accounts Rep. 2 full time positions OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual required. BREWSTER DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Employment Education DUMP TRUCK and PUP DRIVER with maintenance skills needed. Must have Class A CDL and be able to pass background check and DOT screening. Experience with water trucks and lowboy a plus. Wages and hours vary. Please call 509-4222326 M-F, 8am to 4pm for more information.

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BILINGUAL CLASS/DATA ENTRY AIDE – Oroville Assists teacher and provides data entry. Must have knowledge of computers. Requirements: High School or GED; bilingual/Spanish with data entry experience.

BUS DRIVERS Oroville.

Transport children to and from pre-school a.m. and p.m. routes. Requires Class C CDL with passenger and school bus endorsements or ability to obtain within 30 days of hire. If interested, please submit an application, cover letter and resume to OCCDA – P.O. Box 1844 – Omak. Applications may be picked up at 101 4th Ave. W – Omak, WA 98841. Equal Opportunity Employer

Livestock & Poultry For Sale: Blue Grass Straw, $90 a ton plus delivery. We haul. Call Gary at 509-5310546 for more information.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF AUGUST 10, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Dyed Diesel #1 (low sulfur)/1,000 Dyed Diesel #2 (low sulfur)/10,000 Diesel #2 (high sulfur)/400 One bid price per gallon regardless of where delivered or from vendor’s dispensers. All bids must declare the cost to District over Dealer’s cost per gallon. Gas Cards to be furnished at no extra charge. All bids must state a firm price as of bidding date and state source of supply. Prices may vary up or down from the original bid price, however any and all price changes must be justified through the Oil Price Information Service ( O.P.I.S.) using supply sources indicated in the original bid. Current copies of OPIS reports shall be provided to the Oroville School District at least once a month. If you do not belong to O.P.I.S., you must verify any price increase to the district with an invoice from your supplier. Or any other document you may have that indicates our increase is a result of your increase. Bids must be sealed and marked “Bids-Gasoline and Diesel”. Successful bidders will be expected to extend their contracts to any municipal corporation in Oroville School District, upon their request, the same prices quoted on accepted bids subject to quantity differentials. Specifications are available at the Superintendent’s Office (509) 476-2281. The Oroville School Board of Directors reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Steve Quick Superintendent & Secretary to the Board Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on August 6, 13, 2015. #OVG647490

WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 34 NORTH, RANGE 27 EAST, W.M., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTH QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19; THENCE SOUTH 0°24’ WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 291.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, AND THE SOUTHEAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRIMARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 10, AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 0°24’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 580.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89°36’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 450.40 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHEAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID PRIMARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 10; THENCE NORTH 38°13’ EAST ALONG THE SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 734.60 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19 AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 257 ENGH RD, OMAK, WA 98841 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/10/2006, recorded 10/10/2006, under 3109755 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from DAVID W ENGH, AN UNMARRIED PERSON , as Grantor(s), to PRLAP, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-9 . II. No action com-

menced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $74,004.04 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $91,379.02 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2009 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/21/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 8/10/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 8/10/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 8/10/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME

Call for BIDS ((Service and lease agreements for copiers) The Tonasket School District is now accepting bids for service and lease agreements for 6 copiers in 6 locations. Specifications include: term of the lease will be for at least 3 years beginning October 1, 2015. The proposal should include lease cost of new equipment and all parts, toners, staples and labor to install along with maintenance services. Bids are due on or before 1:00 pm Wednesday, August 19. Specifications and bid forms are available from the District Office; 35 DO Hwy 20, Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone: 509-486-2126. Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on Augsut 6, 13, 2015 #OVG649126 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 4/21/2015 2:42:14 PM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-14-635292-SW APN No.: 3427190027 Title Order No.: 02-14037783 Deed of Trust Grantor(s): DAVID W ENGH, DARLA CATES, BONNIE ENGH, HOLLY SUZANNE ENGH, SARAH KAYE ENGH Deed of Trust Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3109755 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/21/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 Third North in the City of Okanogan,

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We use...

l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper

24. Solitaire essentials

7. Brook

25. Egyptian fertility goddess

8. “Act your ___!”

26. Foul moods 28. “Fantasy Island” prop

9. Elihu ___, co-founder of General Electric Company

29. Basic unit of money in Norway

11. Board member, for short

30. Heir’s concern

12. Kidney-related

32. Wages

13. Relating to land (var. spelling)

34. ___ tide

14. Long, cylindrical conduit

36. Emulated Pinocchio

15. Stagnation of normal body fluid flow (pl.)

41. Young, unmarried woman 45. Indy entrant 46. Congratulations, of a sort 48. Old World variety of sorghum

Lender Sale-REPO. 40 AC-$38,500. Near Moses Lake. Beautiful Land Selling at Substantial Discount by East Coast Lender. Representative Available Saturday, August 15th. Financing Available to Qualified Buyer. Call 866-928-4397 for More Information.

49. Ancient greetings 50. Reef material 52. Aim 53. End 54. Something that is difficult to deal with 56. “Don’t ___!” 57. Gives power to 59. Outstanding

ANSWERS

recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

37. Sticker showing cost (2 wds)

REAL ESTATE-LAND FOR SALE

CALL FOR BIDS Gasoline and Diesel 2015/2016 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received by the Oroville School District #410, at the district office, 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844 until 2:00 PM, on August 20, 2015, for gasoline and diesel. Period of supply will be from September 1, 2015 through August 31, 2016. Product/Estimated Gallons Unleaded Gasoline (non oxygenated)/2,000 Supreme Unleaded Gasoline (non oxygenated)/1,000

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Across

61. Expire 62. Nonexistent place

1. Contents of some urns

63. Clark of the Daily Planet

6. No angel

64. Deep olive green

10. Not a substitute 13. Bad situations

Down

16. Medieval weapon 17. Preclude (2 wds)

1. Bad-mouth

18. “The Lord of the Rings” figure

2. Plant runners

19. Refined

3. Feeble-minded person

21. “Dilbert” cartoonist Scott Adams has one: Abbr.

4. “... ___ he drove out of sight”

22. Column crossers

6. Melancholy

5. Alone

20. Certain surgeon’s “patient” 23. Positions 25. Atomic no. 77 27. Animal in a roundup 29. Work, as dough 31. “Dig in!” 33. Backboard attachment 35. Native American infant 37. Ran on 38. Gorge 39. Cool sac used to reduce swelling (2 wds) 40. Vestments, e.g. 42. Causing fear 43. Kind of mark 44. Sturdy buff cotton cloth 47. Claw 50. Colgate rival 51. Rotating to the left, shortened 54. Agenda 55. Cry like a baby 58. Drone, e.g. 60. Density symbol


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Puzzle 29 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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DAVID W ENGH, AN UNMARRIED PERSON ADDRESS 257 ENGH RD, OMAK, WA 98841 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 3/16/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to difficulty place therating numbers Puzzle 33 (Hard, 0.65) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-635292-SW IDSPub #0081378 7/23/2015 8/13/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 23 and August 13, 2015. #OVG633923

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dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/21/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Lauren Esquivel, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line:

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not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=

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AUGUST 13, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE August 13, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 13, 2014

OBITUARIES ROBERT ‘BOB’ JOHN IRWIN

Robert (Bob) John Irwin, age 95 of Oroville, died on Thursday, August 6, 2015. He was born February 4, 1920 in Oroville and spent the majority of his life in his hometown. He was the grandson of Hiram F. “Okanogan” Smith, one of the first American settlers of the Pacific Northwest and a pioneer of the Washington apple industry. Bob graduated from Oroville High School where he was an active runner in track. He was offered an athletic scholarship to the University of Washington and intended to pursue a career in law, but the attack on Pearl Harbor altered his plans. Instead, he enlisted in the United States Army. He was stationed at Ft. Hood, Texas where he met and married Mary Helen Ethridge. Their first daughter, Mary Ella, was born in Marlin, Texas in July 1944. Bob

Norene Elva Harnasch

NORENE ELVA HARNASCH

Norene Elva Harnasch passed away on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at Rosetta Assisted Living, Kennewick, Washington. She was born in Wilbur, Washington on September 19, 1923, the second of four children, to James and Kate Sherwood.

Roger Karl Lokken

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spent the final year of World War II in Europe and was a part of the division that took the Ludendorff railroad bridge in Remagen, the last bridge left intact over the Rhine River. This assault was considered instrumental in ending the war with Germany. After the war, the young family settled in Oroville. Bob and Mary Helen’s second daughter, Patricia Francis, was born in September 1949. Bob and Mary Helen were married for 30 years. Bob began working for the United States Postal Service in 1945. He worked at post offices in both Oroville and Nespelem before accepting a term in Spokane during the city’s hosting of the 1974 World’s Fair. He often described the World’s Fair as the highlight of his career. Bob was married for a second time in 1974 to Geneva Ogden. He was named the postmaster in Priest River, Idaho and remained there until his retirement in 1985. Bob returned to Oroville after retirement and spent his later years living on the family apple orchard. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and camping. He was a

well-known member of the community and was considered a friend by many. He could often be found enjoying the company of his friends and will always be remembered for his sense of humor and his numerous and enjoyable stories. Surviving relatives include daughters, Mary Bartels of Newport, Ore. and Patricia Rouillier of Phoenix, Ariz.; grandson, Robert B. Howe of Boise, Idaho; granddaughter, Jennifer Locklear of Newport, Ore.; sister Betty Landreth of Reardon, Wash.; his wife Geneva Irwin and her daughter Patty Garner and grandson John. He also has three great grandsons, Justin, Grayson and Cameron and one great granddaughter, Abby. Funeral Services will be held on Friday, August 14, 2015 at 11 a.m. at the Oroville Riverview Cemetery with Father Jose Maldonado and the Oroville American Legion, officiating. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

She spent her childhood years in Wilbur and Oroville. Norene graduated from Oroville High School in 1941. After high school she worked in the tomato cannery and apple warehouse in Oroville and in retail upon moving to Wilbur. She married Verle Harnasch in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho on July 4, 1942. Permanently moving to Oroville after marriage, Norene worked sorting and packing apples, becoming the bookkeeper at Haskell’s Heavypack, and eventually going into partnership with Margaret Banker in the Style Center dress shop. During retirement years, Norene and Verle enjoyed 19 years of wintering in Arizona and taking various road trips. After moving to independent living in Kennewick in 2013, she still considered Oroville as home. Even while working, Norene was always devoted to providing for her home and family. She kept busy with cooking, baking, and canning and freezing the produce Verle grew, and was continuously busy with her biggest passion of sewing. She was

a beautiful seamstress, putting her talent to work as leader of her daughters’ and friends’ 4-H group for many years. Through the years, she was also active as a member of the Royal Neighbors of America, on a bowling team, and enjoyed playing bridge as a member or substitute in several clubs. Norene is survived by her two daughters, Marsha (Mark) Kuntz, Kennewick, and Nancy Harnasch, Redmond, Washington, three grandsons, one granddaughter, their spouses, six great grandchildren, one step-great grandchild, and nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by Verle, her husband of nearly 73 years, her parents, her two brothers and one sister, and a nephew. A memorial service will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, August 22nd, at the United Methodist Church in Oroville, with lunch following in the fellowship hall. Please join in remembering the love and care Norene gave to her family and friends. Donations in her memory can be made to City of Oroville Ambulance, PO Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844.

ROGER KARL LOKKEN

love for the outdoors, even hiking parts of the Pacific Crest Trail. After graduating from Rogers High School he Joined the Army and was stationed in Germany. Roger lived in Ashford near Mt Rainier and a few years in Oregon. But the Tonasket area was his home. Our family would like to thank the Doctors and Staff at Virginia Mason Hospital Critical Care Unit in Seattle for all the hard work and support they gave us. A private urn placement will take place at Spokane Memorial Gardens. Riplinger Funeral Home and Crematory Spokane, Wash. entrusted with arrangements.

Roger Karl Lokken, 62, died peacefully August 11 with family members by his side. Roger was born to Gilmore and Frieda Lokken on April 26, 1953 in Spokane Washington. He is survived by his sister Nancy Lokken and brother, Ole Lokken. Rogers parents had property at Deer Lake where he spent his youth hiking, fishing and catching turtles, frogs and of course snakes. Later he joined the Boy Scouts. He always had a great

Sally Ann Smith Campbell

SALLY ANN SMITH CAMPBELL

Sally Ann Smith Campbell was born to Virgil (Dick) and Francis Elgin June 20, 1938. She peacefully passed away in her sleep August 9, 2015. Her early years were spent on the family ranch near Nighthawk, then moving with her mother to

Ponda “Jo” Taber

the house on Lake Osoyoos after her dad passed away in 1950. Sally married Delmar Smith June 10, 1955. Together they lived in Tonasket working the family orchard and raising two children Kathy Mikkelson of Garden City Kansas and Randy Smith of Tonasket. Sally remained living in Tonasket after Delmar passed away in 1995. Sally worked many years in the apple industry, both for the local apple shed owned by Bill Allstot as well as on their own orchard. She later worked several years as the school librarian for Tonasket Elementary School, followed by Oroville Elementary and High Schools. Sally loved children; especially reading with them. Sally worked several years with the Disaster Child Care Program, packing up the suitcase of toys, and traveling to disaster sites across the U. S. to provide child care for disaster victims. Most of all Sally loved her own Grandchildren, and has always held a very special place in her heart for Billy, Noah, Emily and Jeremiah Allstot. Sally gave countless hours to her Church, Kiwanis, and serv-

ing others. Sally married David Campbell on July 21, 2012. She then decided to retire from Oroville School District and enjoy a life of retirement with David. Sally was preceded in death by her mother, Francis Elgin; her father, Virgil Elgin, and sister, Dixie LeMay. She is survived by her husband David Campbell; daughter, Kathy (Calvin) Mikkelson; son, Randy (Lana) Smith; five grandchildren; Theresa Bowen of Kent, Jake Smith of Pulllman, Kaitlyn Smith of Yakima, Allyson Smith and Cody Smith of Tonasket; and one great grandchild, Evelyn Bowen; four nieces and nephews and three great nieces and nephews. Services for Sally Ann Smith Campbell will be held at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren Saturday, August 15, 2015 at 1:00 p.m. Interment to follow at the Brethren Cemetery. All are invited back to the Church of the Brethren for refreshments and a time of sharing immediately following. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

PONDA ‘JO’ TABER

Oroville; grandchildren Billie Jo Martin, Travis Ray, both of North Pole, Alaska, Johnny Crain of Moses Lake, Blaine Wagner of Oroville, Dale Rey Youngblood of Auburn, Wash., Tyler Maddox of Pasco, Wash.; 15 great-grandchildren and one great-greatgrandchild. She was preceded in death by her husband Clarence Taber, daughter Melody Maddox, son Dale Maddox and grandson Justin Ray. Jo’s family will have a private celebration of her life on her birthday. Please share your condolences and sign her online guest register at www.carverfamilyfuneralhome. Arrangements in care of Carver Family Funeral Home.

Ponda “Jo” Taber, 79, of Moses Lake, Washington died Tuesday, August 4, 2015 in Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, Wash. Jo was born September 8, 1935 in Rush Springs, Oklahoma to Alice Theodocia (Strickland) and Floyd Roscoe Keeling. Jo lived in Oroville, Wash. and Moses Lake. She loved gardening, especially her flowers, singing, decorating, sewing, reading her Bible and cooking. She is survived by three daughters Tina and her husband Clarence Morales of North Pole, Alaska, Sheila Crain of Moses Lake and Debbie Reynolds of

EARL STUART RICE

Earl Stuart Rice

On Friday, July 24, 2015 our beloved brother, father, grandfather, uncle and friend Earl Stuart Rice, 72, of Oroville, went home to be with the Lord after losing his battle with cancer. Earl was born in Vancouver, Washington on February 25, 1943. He graduated from Woodland High School class of “61.” He was an electrician in the Navy. Earl moved to Yelm, Wash. in 1973 where he met and married Carol Wood. He became the

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father of a large blended family Tom, Tami and Richard soon welcomed Christina, Alisa and Carla. He retired to Oroville in 2007 to be closer to family. He was a friend to all who knew him and will be greatly missed. Earl is survived by his sister, Anne (Dick) Henderson and his brother, Tom (Betty) Rice; six children, 17 grandchildren and 5 3/4 great grandchildren He was preceded in death by his parents, Dale and Alice Rice. Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, August 15, 2015 12:00 noon at Valley Christian Fellowship. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 13, 2015  

August 13, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 13, 2015  

August 13, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune