Page 1

PNTA Cookout & Hike

Lost Lake Forest Trek

Bonaparte Lake Forest Service Campground, Saturday, July 25 and Sunday, July 26

See Page A10

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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Lightning sparks Wildhorse fire on Mt. Hull PNT hiker hunkers down during Sunday’s storm, runs into USFS fire crews near Summit Lake inside the National Forest boundary and is burning in timber and grass, in difficult rocky terrain on lands manOROVILLE - Tonasket Ranger aged by the Tonasket Ranger District District’s firefighters continue to respond of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. The fire is to fires caused by of last Sunday night’s “I’ve never seen a bigger west/northwest Summit Lake. lightning, including Whistler Canyon the Wildhorse Fire storm, I counted 100 lightTrail and those poron Mt. Hull which ning strikes and the thunder tions of the Pacific grew to 185 acres by Monday evening. was a constant roar. I slept Northwest Trail (PNT) on National Firefighters with my shoes on, which Forest lands within responded to a Township 40N and fire in the Summit I never do, just in case I Range 27 and 28E Lake area on Mt smelled smoke and had to are closed for pubHull. Firefighters, lic and firefighter supported by both run out of there.” safety. fixed wing aircraft Ashley Hill, Hiker “Almost 150 and helicopters, Pacific Northwest Trail lightning strikes were able to conblanketed the area struct about 2,000 east of Tonasket, feet of fireline. The fire was staffed overnight Monday and within Okanogan County. Firefighters have successfully contained seven of the more crews arrived to assist Tuesday. A total of six crews, four of them hot- fires reported Monday and will keep shot crews, are working on the Wildhorse them in patrol status,” writes Shannon Fire. The fire is on National Forest Land O’Brien, with the Okanogan-Wenatchee and the north edge is about two miles National Forrest. Six of the fires detected BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above, a heavy lift helicopter sucks water from Osoyoos Lake near Oroville’s Veteran’s Memorial Park. The water was later dropped on the Wildhorse fire burning on Mt. Hull near Summit Lake. Left, Ashley Hill spent a stormy night on the Pacific Northwest Trail Sunday, only to be told the fire had closed a big portion of the trail while U.S. Forest firefighters battle the blaze. Below, smoke can be seen billowing out from Mt. Hull on Monday, causing smoky conditions in Oroville. Monday remained staffed Tuesday. Each of the 13 fires are small, most of them are less than one acre in size. Ashley Hill, who was hiking the Pacific Northwest Trail said she saw the storm coming and set up shelter about 17 miles from Summit Lake. “It was a wild experience, I’ve never seen a bigger storm, I counted 100 lightning strikes and the thunder was a constant roar,” said Hill, 30, from San Jose, Calif. “I slept with my shoes on, which I never do, just in case I smelled smoke and had to run out of there.” She said she got up early the next morning and it was a beautiful day. “There wasn’t a cloud in the sky I hiked about 17 miles and that’s when I hit the fire crew, they said I couldn’t go through because there was fire burning on both sides of the trail. I watched two helicopters getting water from Summit Lake and they gave me a ride to a place where I could turn around and hike out... it added about 10 miles to the hike,” she said. Hill, who has been doing the PNT on her own, met a member of the local Eagles club and they brought her to the Camaray Motel where she spent the night. “I wanted some time to do some writing, especially to let the group behind

me know about the fire and that it looks like the trail is closed in that area,” said Hill, who has a small laptop she uses to get emails and to check the PNT website. Her last touch with civilization before hitting Oroville had been at Bonaparte. She says she has planned an alternate route to avoid areas of the Pasayten Wilderness that have been affected by the Newby Lake Fire burning west of the Okanogan Valley.

Temperatures are down about ten degrees from yesterday and relative humidity levels are up about five percent, according to USFS’ O’Brien. New fires associated with the lightning storm continue to be reported as of press time Tuesday. The Tonasket Ranger District has brought in additional resources to assist in responding. For an update on the Newby Lake Fire see A11

New Tonasket Police Chief sworn in BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Interim Police Chief Darren Curtis was sworn in as Police Chief Tuesday, July 14, at the Tonasket City Council meeting by City ClerkTreasurer Alice Attwood. Curtis, who has been filling in as chief of police since Rob Burke’s retirement earlier this year, passed his Civil Service test with an 88. He was the only applicant for the position. “I am glad that you are willing to do this; I can’t think of another person I would like to see doing this,” said Councilman Scott Olson, who made the motion to approve Curtis as police chief. The motion was seconded by Councilwoman Claire Jeffko, who com-

plimented Curtis on both his transparency and high visibility. “The people of this city deserve a chief who leads with honesty and integrity, and I believe you do that,” said Councilwoman Jill Vugteveen. Curtis’ swearing in was witnessed by several members of his family and friends, along with fellow police officers including Republic’s Chief of Police Jan Lewis. “I think he will do really well because he is well-rounded with the experience he has already had in his time working with the police department,” said Lewis, who was on the committee to interview Curtis. “Plus, he is pretty well liked in the community as a whole.” Lewis, who was with the Washington Narcotics Task Force for over 20 years, has

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 30

also worked with the Oroville, Tonasket and Concrete Police Departments. “As I’m getting ready to retire, it is nice to see young officers like Darren step up.” Linda Black appeared before the city council to report the Tonasket Water Park was up and running in a test phase, but she and her board would continue to remain involved until the project was completely finished. On Thursday, July 16, Black reported the Water Ranch was temporarily closed while an issue with the water pressure was addressed. Black said she thought the city would need to order a water pressure gauge. “We don’t want to risk anything not running right and damaging a very expensive system,” said Black. She had good news to share also; Nulton

Irrigation will be donating the irrigation system for the lawns surrounding the park. That work will be done in the fall. Also Dave Kester of Lee Franks ACE Hardware donated more fencing to enclose the park. Mayor Patrick Plumb, who said he felt the splash park was going to be a real asset to the City of Tonasket, complimented Black on her perseverance. “There are people who say they expect things to get done, and then there are those who get them done. It is rare for people to follow through to see everything get done to the end, and I would like to thank Linda for getting that done,” said Plumb. “It was not easy; you spearheaded something that was just a crazy

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 23, 2015

NEWS

Take a trip around the world with the Tumbleweed Film Festival Washington’s most unique film festival rolls back to Oroville THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - The sixth annual Tumbleweed Film Festival covers three nights of different short films from around the world starting Thursday, July 30 through Saturday, Aug. 1. Over the three nights, which take place at four different venues around Oroville, 40 American and international short films will be presented. What sets Tumbleweed apart from other film festivals is how the festival turns wineries, bars, restaurants or resorts into theaters for a night. Attendees will also enjoy a film experience very different from that of a typical movie theater. At most of Tumbleweed’s venues filmgoers may sample local wines, beers and cuisine while they watch entertaining short films from around the world. This year filmgoers will even have an opportunity to meet up with some of the festival’s filmmakers, who will be visiting the Okanogan from Los Angeles and Seattle. Venues for this year’s festival include the Pastime Bar and Grill with Vicki’s Back Door Club, Esther Bricques Winery, Alpine Brewing and the Oroville High School Commons. Each evening will feature different films, and the festival line-up is always comprised of a mix of comedies, dramas, documentaries

and animation. This year’s offerings include films from the U.S., Spain, England, Portugal, France, Australia, Argentina and Kenya. “Each evening’s short films program is as different as are the venues,” said Geoff Klein, Tumbleweed co-founder. “With films from around the world, audiences may virtually take a trip around the world each night.” “Besides offering a great assortment of humorous and thought provoking films every night, each venue truly offers filmgoers a unique, fun movie experience,” said co-founder Maureen Fine. This year Tumbleweed will kick off the film festival on Thursday, July 30 with a special opening night reception at the Pastime Bar and Grill. Following the reception, which includes an ample variety of appetizers, guests will enjoy a special screening of films at Vicki’s Back Door. Reception begins at 5 p.m., with films starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 and may be reserved online at Tumbleweed (www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com ) or in-person at the Pastime Bar and Grill. Also on Thursday, Tumbleweed brings Family Night films to the Oroville High School auditorium, which offers a cool, comfortable theater setting from which to enjoy short films that both kids and adults will enjoy. These films will include action adventures, funny cartoons and even a love story. Movies start at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the door or on the Tumbleweed website. Some free tickets to the July 30 Tumbleweed Film Festival family film night and will be available thanks to a

donation by Reman and Reload. Tickets may be picked up at the Camaray Motel. For more information, go to www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com. On Friday, July 31st it is “Beers, Brats and Short Films” at the Alpine Brewing Company, where attendees may sample hand-crafted German style beers or taste wines from some of the local wineries. Attendees may also enjoy a BBQ dinner for purchase on the patio featuring the official “Wurst of the Fest.” “Many of our filmgoers are already looking forward to another fun event with Tumbleweed this year,” said Bart Traubeck, Alpine Brewing Company owner. “They know it’s a nice combination of film festival and party here,” adds Traubeck. Doors open at 5 p.m. and films start at 7 p.m. Attendees at this venue must be 21 or older. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or on Tumbleweed’s website. Saturday, Aug. 1 brings “Movies in the Vineyard” back to the Esther Bricques Winery, which hosts a special night of wines, award winning films and live music. Once again, Esther Bricques offers a hot night in a cool setting, as they transform their winery production area into an air-conditioned, dark movie theater. The evening begins at 5 p.m. with live music on the patio performed by Mood Swings. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask some of the filmmakers questions, as a few directors of the films will be in attendance this evening. Directors include Los Angeles film director Ryan Moody, whose film

the pump so the water can be sold are being looked into. It was moved by Jeffko and seconded by Council Member Lois Rice to enter into an agreement allowing the U.S. Forest Service to use the Tonasket Airport as a temporary Helibase during the Newby Lake Fire at a cost of $100 per day, with expectations of the mayor and staff to negotiate for a higher price for a higher number of aircraft; but if the government cannot afford it, the city will accept the contract as written. According to Plumb, staff was able to raise the rent to $200 per day. Due to the hot weather, divots have been created in the pavement at the airport from the helicopters, which the USFS has agreed to repair. The city also

accepted a contract to provide the USFS with potable water at a cost of $20 per 1,000 gallons during the Newby Lake Fire; and disposal of gray water at a cost of fifty cents per 1,000 gallons. A Tonasket resident appeared before the council to protest a $10 time-payment fee that was allocated to a ticket he received three months ago for not having insurance. The resident said after appearing in court, his ticket was reduced from $500 to $250, and he felt he should not have to pay $260. The resident was advised a) a judge cannot change the fee schedule, only give him a break on the amount of the fine, but the resident had the right to appeal it to district court at his own cost if he so chose and b) don’t get a ticket in Tonasket.

CHIEF | FROM A1 dream, and now we see the park being utilized before it is even officially opened.”

IN OTHER BUSINESS:

Olson thanked the Tonasket Fire Department for their instant response to the July 4 house fire and their ability to contain the fire and prevent it from spreading throughout the neighborhood. It is on the agenda for the next city council meeting to draft an ordinance banning Fourth of July fireworks. The Chamber of Commerce received a water bill for $220 after a Hertz truck with a 1400 gallon capacity filled up from the water spout near Triangle Park. This is an ongoing problem with people taking water from there, so options of locking up or metering

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The Tumbleweed is a movable feast of short films from around the world. Here the famous film festival screen is transported last year from Vicki’s Back Door to the Friday venue at Alpine Brewing. The Tumbleweed will present films at four venues this year -- Pastime/Vicki’s, OHS Commons, Alpine and Esther Bricques Winery. “Obituaries” includes actor James Franco, Eastern Washington native Marcus McCollum (now residing in Los Angeles), who directed “Best Driver in the County” and Seattle documentary filmmaker Aimie Vallat, who directed “Present Moment.” Also in attendance will be Oroville local Brendan Biele, who was the music composer for “Best Driver in the County.” Besides tastings in the winery’s tasting room, light appetizers and wines by the glass or bottle are available for purchase.

“We’re excited once again to host Tumbleweed and expect our attendees to be as pleased with this year’s selection of films that Mo and Geoff programmed for our winery as they have the past five years,” said Linda Colvin of Esther Bricques Winery. “The arts are indeed alive in the Okanogan! We hope that each year more people in the area will take the opportunity to a part of this magical evening and that this year’s fest is the best ever,” adds Colvin. Doors open at 5 pm, and films

start at 7 p.m. Attendees under age 21 are welcome. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or online at Tumbleweed’s website, Tumbleweed Film Festival is a Washington-based non-profit organization committed to bringing the art of storytelling through filmmaking to communities in Washington and British Columbia. For more details about the annual festival, including trailers and venues, please visit www. tumbleweedfilmfest.com or their Facebook page, www.facebook. com/TumbleweedFilmFestival.

Council hears concerns about stormwater Mandates apply now that Tonasket population is 1000+ BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Jeff Moran from Varela and Associates appeared before the Tonasket City Council July 14 to follow up on a stormwater treatment plan he submitted to the city in February. Cities are mandated by law to do a stormwater treatment plan when the population reaches 1,000, and Tonasket is now at 1,100. Moran said after the city identified several stormwater issues with the downtown area, he was able to get a community block grant to fund a study which enabled him to inventory the entire stormwater structure. He said to correct the issues downtown would cost $1.7 million. Moran next said improvements to the most immediate con-

cerns of flooding to downtown businesses at Third and Fourth Streets could be made at a cost of $425,000. “It’s a smaller project that won’t fix the problem, but it will go a long ways towards improving it,” Moran said. Vugteveen questioned the idea of spending money on what seemed a temporary fix or bandaide to a problem that would need readdressed at a later date. Moran said it would be three years down the road to get a study done and funding in place to “attack the big picture, as opposed to just dealing with the flooding right now.” He said the road itself really needs work, but that was a big expense all its own; and another issue was embankment flooding issues on Highway 20 due to erosion on the bank, but an estimate for a temporary fix on that came in at $86,000. Olson said he agreed with Vugteveen, that it didn’t make sense to “dig up the roads and spend half a million dollars on a two-year fix for a 20-year problem.” The council then moved to Unfinished Business, which

was to discuss funding of the storm water facility plan. The Department of Ecology sent a letter to Plumb dated July 1 announcing the city qualified for a 20-year $27,500 loan from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) at a 2.4 percent interest rate, along with a $27,500 Forgivable Principal loan from CWSRF that will not require repayment. Ecology received 227 project proposals requesting $352 million in funding this year, and after rating and ranking all eligible projects, is offering approximately $227 million to 162 projects. The agency is committed to negotiating and signing a funding agreement by Jan. 30, 2016 and encourages potential recipients to begin the negotiations as soon as possible. Vugteveen voiced concern over where the city was going to come up with the $27,550 that will need to be repaid. Vugteveen and Councilman Dennis Brown both voted against accepting the proposed stormwater treatment plan and loan from the DOE, but the motion passed 3-2.

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JULY 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

Seeing options in education as reason to stay competitive

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - When Steve McCullough interviewed for the position of Superintendent of the Tonasket School District last March, he promised if hired, he would “look at what is working here, and what else can be done; accomplishing that, in part, by getting out in the community and finding out what the community needs and what I can do to help.” Wtih the new school year still several weeks away, McCullough, who took over as Superintendent July 1, has already started digging for answers to his self-imposed questions. Meeting with the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce, the Kiwanis Club, staff, board members and community members, McCullough presents a series of questions in his search for understanding the needs of his new community. What should I know about our Tonasket community? What do you want to see preserved in the Tonasket School District? What do you think needs attention or should be improved? What do you need from a superintendent? And, finally, What is the biggest mistake I can make as a new superintendent in your community? “I have an open leadership style, and I am looking for answers to those questions,” McCullough

said, listing his biggest challenge in his new role being “To learn as much as I can from the school and community so I can identify the things they need; or explore things already identified that I can help move forward.” McCullough said he realizes transition of leadership is always difficult, “so to make that a positive transition is always at the forefront of my mind.” At the forefront of his mind in March when selected for the position in Tonasket was making sure the transition out of Curlew, where he served as superintendent the past 11 years, was a smooth one not only for himself, but for the school district he was leaving. “They hired Paul Clark out of Nome, Alaska, as principal; and Curlew and Republic will share John Glenewinkel as superintendent. They’re both on the job now, and I am happy for them. Fifteen years as an administrator in one place is a long time, so I am excited for the growth they are going to have with a new administration,” McCullough said. He had been serving as both principal and superintendent for Curlew the past three years when funding cuts necessitated the doubling-up of duties. His eyes light up as he looks out the windows of his Tonasket office. “Here, I have three principals and a Special Ed Program Director, so I don’t have to be the expert in everything,” he says

with a smile. But that doesn’t mean he won’t still strive to be. “It’s hard to lead an organization without knowing what people need,” said McCullogh. “A Superintendent’s work should be ongoing in establishing communication pathways; always building new ones and keeping the ones already established healthy and open.” He said he sees Tonasket as a community in support of the schools. “People in the community have a great respect for the school system here; a lot of support and that’s what makes great schools,” said McCullough, adding, “This school district has had to work though some tough issues over the past few years, but I don’t see any negative ramifications of that.” His recognition of, and capacity for cooperating with, students who have had to “work through some tough issues” is likely part of the reason the Washington Association for Learning Alternatives saw fit to bestow upon him an award called ‘Friend of Alternative Education’ in 2008. “My philosophy of education works really well with alternative schools,” McCullough said. “Parents are the first educators, and our job is to work with them. As a school administrator, I am here to support the education of every child; no matter what

methods they choose. I hold the philosophy that you can learn many different ways, and alternative education is all about trying to meet the needs of the child the best way possible.” The awareness of the many avenues and options available to students appears to spur a competitive streak in McCullough. “We have a system now where we have competition for the educational product we offer. We have to embrace that and be competitive in serving our community,” McCullough said. He pointed out Omak School District having an online program that reaches kids all over the state. “A child in our district could do a complete online education, kindergarten through grade 12. We have to be able to compete with that,” McCullough said. “It goes back to what can we offer to help that family and child meet their educational goals. How can our system respond to their needs. It’s a fun challenge.” McCullough said his own kids took advantage of an online program while attending Curlew schools to take AP Music Theory classes, which the school district was not able to offer. “My family is excited to be moving here,” said McCullough. “We packed our first box last week.” Two daughters, one a freshman and the other a junior, will be playing volleyball with the Tigers in the fall.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Supt. Steve McCullough said he loves his new office, but does not intend to spend a lot of time in it; preferring to mingle among staff and students on campus as well as meeting with members of the community.

Oroville School staff to get Gap training Seeks more input on arming staff BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – While it was advertised as a public input meeting on Gap training and the potential arming of trained school staff, most people who attended seemed to be content to listen to Jon Ladines founder of Force Dynamics explain his training programs. The meeting, held last Monday was called by Oroville School Board members who wanted to hear more about Ladine’s training which he says gives staff other options rather than locking students away in the rooms and trying to hide them in the corner – a situation he says could spell disaster if there is a “shooter” or other threat on school grounds. Superintendent Steve Quick brought the training to the attention of the board after hearing Ladines speak at North Valley Hospital. “When I did the training I saw he did offer armed training of staff and I asked if we were able to do that in this state,” said Quick, who has since spoken with the two schools that have armed staff

– Toppenish and Kiona Benton City School districts. “I asked them how their community and students perceived it and they said there was a lot of support, although their were some who didn’t support it,” Quick said. “I asked Jon here to answer questions.” Ladines spoke at length about the Gap training and his business, Force Dynamics. Gap is the time it takes law enforcement to arrive after they are made aware of a shooter or other threatening situation at a school, according to Landis, a former police officer and SWAT member who said he has worked with anti-terrorist teams. After saying that school shootings are not new with recorded shootings going back to the beginning of this country, he said they became an issue 10 to 15 years ago. “What we found is what we are doing to protect our children and staff is not working,” said Ladines. He spoke at length about Sandy Hook, Columbine and other recent school and church shootings. He also said that schools were the number one target for these kinds of actions because of lack of security. “Those schools failed because

they are not thinking like the shooter, they are thinking like the victim. At Columbine there were 35 wounded and 13 kids killed,” he said. “Can we avoid someone walking into a school... sometimes we can’t. But when you have a lockdown you lock the bad guys in and the good guys out. “Just because there are police down the street doesn’t mean they can get there in time. Gap training helps staff to know what to do between the time the incident starts and police can arrive,” he said. Landis said it doesn’t do any good to just lock the kids in a room, that the door needs to be barricaded because most doors alone do not provide an insurmountable obstacle to a determine shooter or shooters. He said he could train staff how to spot potential threats and how to fight back. He also said that 98 percent of the places where he has trained staff they do not have staff armed with concealed weapons. Supt. Quick said the board had decided to do the Gap training for staff this year, but more community and staff input was needed before selected and trained staff would be allowed to carried a concealed weopon. He suggested the public call him at the district office or talk with current school

board members, as well as those running for board positions in the fall. When there was concern about whether the guns, if Oroville went that route, would be visible to students, Landis said there were rules that required them to be concealed and only revealed if they, staff or a student were being threatened. Local businessman Spence Higby, a former school teacher and former school board member, as well as a licensed gun dealer, said he was carrying two concealed holsters on his person at that very moment, although

they were empty. Board chairman Rocky DeVon indicated he liked the option of training and arming certain staff. Joseph Enzensberger said he wished the type of issues that have sometimes driven people to commit school shootings could be addressed. Ladines said he would like to see that too, but if a shooting or other life threatening incident was occurring by then it was too late. Supt. Quick said the school offered many programs to address things like bullying. Ladines said stress is one of

the biggest factors in surviving a threat – he said just dialing 911 can be a problem, especially with today’s modern phones. The training would help staff learn how not to panic when seconds could mean saving lives. He compared it to fire drills. He said schools spend lots of time practicing fire drills and the last kid killed in a school fire was in the 1950s and before that in 1914. He put the question to the community about whether they think at least as much training should be done to prepare for what to do if a shooter or some other threat enters the school campus.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 23, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Cecilia Rita Condon, 42, Omak, pleaded guilty July 14 to second-degree burglary and two counts of second-degree trafficking in stolen property. The court dismissed four counts of third-degree theft. Condon was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the April 7-8, 2014 crimes. Amanda Arlene Sanabia-Hammons, 33, Riverside, pleaded guilty July 14 to POCS (heroin). The court dismissed an additional charge: making a false or misleading statement. Sanabia-Hammons was sentenced to 60 days in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the April 4 crime. Riley Dean Buzzard, 22, Tonasket, pleaded guilty July 14 to third-degree malicious mischief. The court dismissed a residential burglary charge. Buzzard was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended and credit for two days served, and fined $760.50 for the April 11 crime. Enrique Anthony Castillo, 23, Oroville, pleaded guilty July 14 to second-degree theft, second-degree identity theft, second-degree vehicle prowling, second-degree possession of stolen property and false swearing. Castillo was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred June 8, 2014. Jeremy William Andrews, 31, Omak, pleaded guilty July 15 to eight counts of identity theft and one count of thirddegree theft. Andrews was sentenced to 22 months in prison and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred Dec. 18 and 29, 2014; and Jan. 1. Lukas Timothy Mieirs, 19, Oroville, pleaded guilty July 15 to MIP/C. The court dismissed a residential burglary charge. Mieirs was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended and credit for two days served; and fined $1,010.50 for the April 11 crime. Justin Shane Rogers, 25, Okanogan, pleaded guilty July 15 to POCS (methamphetamine). The crime occurred May 5. The court dismissed an additional charge: second-degree unlawful hunting of wild animals. In a second case, Rogers pleaded guilty July 15 to first-degree criminal trespassing. That crime occurred March 25. In that case, the court dismissed charges of thirddegree theft and making a false or misleading statement. Rogers was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 351 days suspended and credit for 13 days served, and fined a total of $3,121. Mark Edward Morris, 37, Tonasket, pleaded guilty July 15

to failure to register as a sex offender and fourthdegree assault (DV) (lesser included of second-degree assault). The court dismissed a third-degree malicious mischief charge. Morris was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $1,210.50 for the crimes that occurred between March 24 and May 21. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 27, Oroville, pleaded guilty July 16 to POCS (methamphetamine). The court dismissed an introduction of contraband charge. Anguiano was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the Nov. 6, 2014 crime. Austin Adam Nigg, 24, Oroville, pleaded guilty July 16 to third-degree malicious mischief. Nigg was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended and credit for three days served; and fined $510.50 for the March 9, 2013 crime. Kristina Michelle GroomsSloan, 41, Omak, pleaded guilty July 16 to theft on a motor vehicle. The crime occurred Sept. 7, 2014. In a second case, Grooms-Sloan pleaded guilty July 16 to POCS (methamphetamine). In that case, the court dismissed a use of drug paraphernalia charge. That crime occurred July 9, 2014. Grooms-Sloan was sentenced to two months in jail and fined a total of $3,221. The court found probable cause to charge Dustin Hawk Chambers, 24, Omak, with failure to register as a sex or kidnapping offender (felony). The crime allegedly occurred between June 18 and July 8. Juvenile A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty July 15 to thirddegree assault. The boy was sentenced to 30-40 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration with credit for 61 days served, and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 30. The crime occurred May 15. A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty July 15 to attempted third-degree assault (of a law enforcement officer) and resisting arrest. The girl was sentenced to 10 days in detention with credit for 10 days served, and fined $100 for the July 5 crimes. A 14-year-old Tonasket boy pleaded guilty July 15 to indecent liberties (forcible compulsion). The boy was sentenced to 36 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration with 36 weeks suspended and credit for 125 days served; and fined $100 for the Dec. 15, 2014 crime. A 17-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty July 16 to fourth-degree assault. The boy was sentenced to three days in detention with credit

for three days served, and fined $100 for the July 13 crime. District Court Angel Nunez Mora, 24, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Nunez Mora was fined $200. Kimberly Ann Porter, 50, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and third-degree theft. The court dismissed an additional charge of third-degree DWLS. Porter was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 175 days suspended, and fined $1,086. Angeline M. Red Horse Whiting, 36, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Red Horse Whiting was fined $200. Jesus Denis Sandoval, 20, Oroville, guilty of MIP/C, possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams), hit-and-run (unattended property) and thirddegree DWLS. Sandoval was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 179 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,126. John Paul Schultz, 44, Oroville, guilty of reckless driving. Schultz was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,283. Kammie Elizabeth Stanger, 34, Omak, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Stanger was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $768. Daniel Dewey Thompson, 42, Omak, guilty of fourthdegree assault. The court dismissed a third-degree malicious mischief charge. Thompson received a 364days suspended sentenced and fined $933. Deedee Louise Tompkins, 28, guilty of third-degree theft. Tompkins received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $808. Guy Ray Van Brunt, 65, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. The court dismissed a violation of a no-contact order charge. Van Brunt was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $750. 911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, July 13, 2015 Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Burglary on S. Birch St. in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Jasmine St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Firearm reported missing. Threats on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Fraud on Kendall St. in Riverside. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Drugs on Jasmine St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Assault on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash

2015 Ticket locations:

When: Fri. July 24th at 7pm

Sat. July 25th at 7pm Where: Tonasket Rodeo Grounds Daily ticket prices: $15 Adults $10 Kids (6-12) PRESALE ONLY: Group Ticket Prices 10+ Adults 12.50 each PRESALE ONLY: FAMILY TICKET PKG. (2 adults & 2 kids) $40.00 (add. Kids $8.00 each) VISIT US AT: www.facebook.com/Rodeo.Club http://www.tonasketrodeoinc.com

The Junction Superior Auto Parts II Sisters Video Tonasket Eagles Les Schwab~ Oroville, Omak, Chelan, Brewster & Twisp North 40 Outfitters

on Sinlahekin Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Oak St. in Omak. Theft on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Maple St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Forest Justin Lowery, 36, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jimi Phillips, no middle name listed, 37, booked for DUI and hit-and-run (unattended). Jesus Pimental Valencia, 46, booked for DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Jacob Patrick Vincent Ramsey, 29, DOC detainer. Aaron Lee Marchand, 50, booked for delivery of a controlled substance and a Tribal FTA warrant for POCS. Luis Alberto Martinez Gonzalez, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and a USBP hold.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015 Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Theft on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. DWLS on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Copple Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Automobile theft on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Oamk. Assault on S. Ash St. in Omak. Alcohol offense on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Norman Emery Thomas, 55, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Joshua Andrew Fischer, 30, DOC detainer.

Wednesday July 15, 2015 DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Dwinnell Cutoff Rd. near Oroville. Mailboxes reported damaged. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Sex offender registry on Reevas Basin Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Kruse St. in Oroville. Illegal burning on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Third St. in Omak. Lyscomb Fred Brown Jr., 22, booked for second-degree burglary, theft of a motor vehicle, and two charges each of second-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree malicious mischief. Amanda Rose Garcia, 25, DOC detainer. Ryan Eugene Bass, 35, DOC detainer. Miguel A. Dominguez Santana,

Saturday, July 18, 2015

19, DOC detainer. Antonio Allen Newborn, 36, booked for residential burglary, second-degree malicious mischief, third-degree theft and a DOC detainer.

Thursday, July 16, 2015 DWLS on James Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Cobey Trail Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Ferry St. in Omak. Trespassing on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. John Leon Thomas, 63, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Darryle Clint Gua, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and second-degree assault. Jose Luis Morenos Ceneros, 45, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants, both for making false or misleading statements. Shane Michael Heisey, 28, DOC detainer. Kyle Lloyd Campbell, 27, DOC detainer. Anthony Thomas Thompson, 34, booked for second-degree assault (DV) and harassment. Kristina Michelle Grooms-Sloan, 41, Omak, court commitments for theft of a motor vehicle and POCS. Victoria Leann Brouse, 21, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant.

Friday, July 17, 2015 Domestic dispute on Sand Flat Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Vehicle fire on Main St. in Riverside. Threats on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Vehicle fire on S. Granite St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Injuries reported. Assault on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Patrick Wapato, no middle name listed, 21, DOC detainer. Timothy Scott Eiffert, 39, booked for theft of a motor vehicle. Alexander Henry, no middle name listed, 29, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Shane Michael Heisey, 28, DOC detainer.

DUI on Cameron Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Tip jar reported missing. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Public intoxication on Benton St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Garfield St. in Omak. Robbery on S. Ash St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on N. Main St. in Omak. Injuries reported. Vehicle prowl on 11th Ave. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Katheryn Elizabeth Bigwolf, 20, booked on five counts of third-degree assault. George Elmer Britt, 31, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Simon Lee Thayer, 31, booked for DUI. Adan Lopez Cruz, 33, booked for DUI and no valid operator’s license without ID. John Michael Leaf Sr., 59, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Justin Patrick Dunlap, 19, booked for DUI.

Sunday, July 19, 2015 Wildland fire on Rone Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Queen St. in Okanogan. Assault on Nick Cain Rd. near Okanogan. Wildland fire on Rooster Flats Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Omak. Towels reported missing. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on W. First St. in Tonasket. Purse reported missing. Wayne Dale Rieb, 30, booked for second-degree theft, residential burglary and an FTA warrant for theft of a firearm. Kevin Joel Ballenger, 46, booked for DUI and hit-and-run (unattended). Fabian Vilchis Bautista, 24, booked for DUI.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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JULY 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Walmart’s use of tax havens hurts small businesses OPINION BY KELLY CONKLIN

Recent revelations that Walmart, the world’s biggest corporation, is maintaining secret subsidiaries in well-known offshore tax havens are outrageous but far from surprising to small business owners. That’s because we’re used to seeing large corporations abuse the tax system in ways that hurt our businesses, communities and families. Walmart’s hidden web of 78 subsidiaries in 15 tax havens,  unveiled in a report by Americans for Tax Fairness  (ATF), is just the latest example. Let’s hope it spurs reform. ATF says Walmart may have skirted U.S. securities law by not properly reporting its tax-haven subsidiaries. But even if hiding them runs afoul of the law, using tax havens to avoid U.S. taxes is perfectly legal. Yet, every time a big  corporation  uses accounting schemes to avoid paying its full measure of taxes—the typical use of tax havens—small businesses and working families pay the price, either in higher taxes or deteriorating public services.   A good example lies, ironically, right next to my local Walmart: a traffic-choked, 90-year-old highway desperately needing repair. My cabinet-making company recently had to pay $2,300 to install a new suspension system in a delivery van ravaged by potholes. Now there’s talk in Washington of taxing the offshore profits of companies like Walmart to help fix highways. It may be a worthwhile solution —if it isn’t hijacked by those in Congress who want to give  corporations even more tax cuts.   Walmart is not alone among big, profitable American  corporations  using well-known taxavoidance strategies. In one recent five-year period, famous  corporate  names like General Electric, Verizon, Boeing and PriceLine. com  paid zero federal income taxes, according to Citizens for Tax Justice. It’s outrageous that my small business paid more federal income taxes in one year than all of these huge companies combined paid in five years! Small businesses can’t afford an

army of accountants and tax lawyers like Walmart can to create offshore tax-avoidance strategies. None of us have shell corporations  in Luxembourg (a country smaller than Rhode Island and with just half the population).  Walmart has 22 paper subsidiaries there, holding $64 billion in assets. And none of us would get away with paying just 1 percent in taxes—but that’s what Walmart paid Luxembourg between 2010 and 2013, on over a billion dollars in profits. Even if we could pull off such financial shenanigans, I honestly believe most of us wouldn’t want to. We’d rather contribute what we should to the public good and see our communities thrive right alongside our businesses. Meanwhile,  corporate  tax dodging flourishes. For instance, American  corporations  owe U.S. tax on all their profits earned overseas (less any foreign taxes paid). But a loophole called “deferral” lets them delay paying their U.S. bill until the company brings those profits home.  That’s why American  corporations  have  $2 trillion in profits stashed offshore. It makes sense that federal officials are looking to that big cash hoard as a source of highway funding: the federal highway trust fund is going broke and Congress refuses to raise the gas tax to replenish it.  But don’t be fooled by two similar sounding proposals for tapping that offshore money that are actually very different—and keep in mind a third option that makes the most sense of all. The worst idea—a repatriation tax holiday—would let companies  voluntarily  bring their profits home at a tax rate of about 6 percent – way below the normal 35 percent corporate rate. A similar holiday was tried in 2004, and all it did was  enrich shareholders and executives, creating few if any jobs, according to a Congressional report. Pre s i d e nt O b am a would  require  corporations  to pay tax  on their offshore profits whether they brought them home or not. But the proposed rate of 14 percent is so low that ten

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SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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companies alone would enjoy an $82-billion tax-cut bonanza  over the next decade, according to Citizens for Tax Justice. The simplest and fairest solution would be to end the deferral loophole and tax  corporations  at

the 35 percent rate on all their income wherever it is earned. This will eliminate corporations’ incentives to hide profits in tax havens and ship jobs offshore. Like a lot of other  corporations, Walmart is apparently

banking on some form of tax holiday winning out. That’s why it’s shifting more and more of its profits into tax havens. But it’s small businesses that need the holiday: a permanent holiday from big corporations  damaging

our businesses and communities by gaming the tax system. Conklin is co-owner of FoleyWaite, LLC, of Kenilworth, NJ, and serves on the executive committee of the Main Street Alliance.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PUD needs to let go of Enloe Dear EditorThe PUD Meeting, last Monday July 13th, left many of us scratching our heads. After halting the rush toward electrification in order to explore other options last February, the PUD seems to be considering electrification of Enloe Dam once again. Faced with the high cost of producing power at Enloe, the PUD asked for a large federal agency with deep pockets to assume all liability and expenses for the alternative to electrification of Enloe Dam, dam removal. After many months of work, meetings and conference calls by ratepayers, biologists, federal and state agencies, tribes, non-profits and non-government organizations, an interested lead agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, N.O.A.A. and the National Marine Fisheries Service have come forward. On June 30 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, N.O.A.A., and National Marine Fisheries Service representatives met with Commissioner Vejraska, Manager John Grubich, Director of Regulatory and Environmental affairs, Dan Boettger and PUD attorney Mick Howe to discuss N.O.A.A. becoming the lead federal agency. Unfortunately, the PUD wanted more than N.O.A.A. could give. The major stumbling block is the sediment behind Enloe Dam. N.O.A.A. is being asked to assume all liability for the sediments behind Enloe Dam. N.O.A.A. would like to know what metals and toxic materials are present before assuming all liability. A sediment study with 108 core samples has been designed and was scheduled to take place in August. The PUD canceled the study. One Commissioner expressed his fear the utility would be sued if the sediments contents were known by the public. Is it better to know or not know? Would anyone take on this liability without knowing what those sediments contain? Is the PUD being rational or is the management of the PUD intent on scuttling this potential partnership with N.O.A.A.? N.O.A.A. considers the Similkameen River the “crown jewel of steelhead recovery in the Upper Columbia Basin” and the” best bang for the buck” in recovery of these amazing fish. Upstream of Enloe is 166 miles of steelhead habitat capable of sustaining 100,000

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY

spawning adults. Our local economy needs the boost a wild scenic river and a strong, abundant steelhead fishery would create. Take a look at Pateros and Brewster when the fish are running and those two towns are buzzing. You can see what we are missing. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

Response to letter writer Dear Editor, In response to John Connot’s letter in the July 16th paper concerning the Dan Newhouse opinion on the Supreme Court decision, bailing out Obamacare again, John didn’t mention Justice Scalia’s statement on that decision, “the court forgets that ours is a government of laws and not of men.” As a side note the best part of the editorial was, “The Court’s decision effectively rescued Obamacare from its own text.” Mr. Connot gives me the impression that with the election of Barak Obama we have coronated a King, instead of a public servant, and with some of the decisions recently of the Republican leadership this may be the case. I need to apologize for my “sick mind” that described Obama with the same word that the Apostle Paul used for himself and those with him in 1 Corinthians chapter 4.

Woodbury Lumber Company for $1,518.36, for the plumbing, Oroville Plumbing & Hardware for $228.56 and for electrical from Jordan Krusoff for $155.30. This should leave about $2,100 for the actual construction which will be within the $4,000 in the budget. The Okanogan Valley apple crop will be slightly above that of last year and the largest since 1937. The estimate of 5,347 cars against the actual 4,553 from last season.

FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

The Oroville Gazette

50 years Ago:

75 years Ago: Friday, July 5 - 12, 1940: Oroville made the largest gain in population of any town in Okanogan County during the past ten years according to figures release last week from the district supervisor for Wenatchee. From 800 population in 1930 to 1195 in 1940 for a gain of 395. Tonasket gained from 514 to 635 for a gain of 121, Riverside came up with a loss from 218 to 191, while Omak grew from 1929 to 2547 and Okanogan, from 1519 to 1730. Okanogan County showed a gain from 18,519 to 24,519 for a total for the county of 6100. On Wednesday afternoon, July 10, the Oroville Methodist Women will bring into being a new organization for the women. The name of the new group will be called “Women’s Organization for Christian Service” and will replace three previous groups, Women’s Foreign Missionary, Women’s Home Missionary and the Ladies Aid. The Economy Motors garage and implement business changed hands the first of the week and is now owned by G. O. Potter. He is well known in Oroville, having been Town Marshal and Clerk for several years. Mr. Potter stated that he intended to keep Bob Jackson as bookkeeper and in charge of parts while Ralph Van Brunt will continue as mechanic. People in the Oroville vicinity of any age who like to swim but can’t, will have an opportunity of learning under a qualified Red Cross instructor from July 22 to July 29 inclusive. The Civic League and Boy Scouts are sponsoring the course. There will be no charge for this instruction. Work was actually started on the construction of the Town of Oroville’s City Hall and Jail Wednesday morning under the supervision of W. E. Jones and is expected to be completed within the next sixty days. The bid for materials was accepted from

July 8 - 15, 1940: In spite of the fact that there were no organized community activities, held on the Fourth of July, the town was covered with people. The large percentage were persons coming to the area for sunshine, swimming, picnicking, fishing and many other activities in the valley. Marge Frazier, official weather recorder for Oroville, posted the weather beginning July 4th, with a high of 91 degrees and a low of 64; July 5, 95 and 50; July 6, 97 and 51; July 7, 95 and 66 Chief Buck Gates said his office was kept busy over the play day by arresting and jailing 25 persons over the three days. All arrests were for being drunk and disorderly. An ad for Freeman’s Berry Farm Truck sponsored by the Civic League for fresh-frozen – uncooked jams and locker ready fruits. Fresh Frozen, 30 lb. strawberries, in sugar, $11.59 per tin; 30 lbs. raspberries in syrup, $11.10 per tin; 30 lbs. sour cherries in sugar, $10.50 in tins and 3 lbs huckleberries, $1.95 per tub. Don Hughes shot a near par 36 holes to beat out Charles Cox for the coveted Club Championship trophy on July 9 at the Oroville Golf Course. It was a good match and Charlie gave him a good battle. The new slate of officers have been installed for the Civic League as follows: Katie Strickler, president; Lucille Landreth, first vice president; Emma Armstrong, second vice president; Molly McDonough third vice president; Kathleen Prince, secretary and Muriel Turner treasurer. This was the first season for the Girl’s Little League Softball. There were four teams of 14 players in each in the league as follows: Braves, coached by Susan Chamberlin and Joan Fleischman; Giants, coached by May Valentine and Henry Steg; Yankees, coached by Wreathel Loose and Shellie Taber and Pirates, coached by Mary Lou Barnett and Sharon Manchester. Grocery Prices: Tomato Juice, 46 oz cans, 4 for $1.00; Angel Food cakes, 4 for $1.00; Chunk Tuna, 4

An exalted leader like Barak Hussein Obama should never be thrown into the same class as some guy who wrote a good portion of the New Testament, preached the Gospel of Jesus Christ, with all the perks of being stoned, beaten, run out of towns, and finally having his head cut off. Paul also called himself; a slave of Jesus Christ. What I was thinking? John has again exhorted me to be more tolerating of other religions. Being forced to the kiss the ring of “Tolerance” maybe the factor that appeases the Muslim world, who kill people and cut heads off those who disagree with them, and let’s not forget their views and treatment of women. Am I missing something John? “Sick minds” sum it up well, thank you for the correction. I’d suggest that we don’t go down the road of Islamic Fascism, as the decisions of this President seem to be leading us and the world, but instead see if there is a copy of the Constitution laying around our nation’s capital, and then began the task of bidding down this run away government with the strong chains of that document. That is why the arrest and conviction of this president would only be a small step on the journey back to our roots as a republic. Steve Lorz Tonasket

6.5 oz cans, 4 for $1.00; Rib Steaks, $.89 per lb.; Peanut butter, 16 oz. jar, $.49; Margarine, 4 lbs. $.95; 20 oz. bottles of pancake syrup, 2 for $.67; Giant size Tide detergent, $.59.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 years Ago: July 5 - 12, 1990: Former Tonasket Mayor, Ron Weeks, Spence Higby, an Oroville business man and Mike “Buffalo” Mazetti, former Tonasket business manager, have all filed for the position of Okanogan County Commissioner for the Third District to replace Mel Kuhlman, whose term is up, but could possibly file later. Vandals are taking a toll on Tonasket Ranger District lookouts, gates, signs and campgrounds and the Okanogan National Forest officials are offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to their conviction. Work is going on at an accelerated rate at the new Tonasket Senior Housing facility. Framing is complete on the ground floor of the soon to be two story structure that will house 30 units. Between 400 – 600 people showed up for North County’s First Annual LaQuemes (the Festival) last Saturday at Deep Bay Park. It included everything from the breaking of pinatas to dances and music, plus a variety of Mexican foods. The list for the county commissioner’s position now has some additions. Bob Hirst, local businessman has declared as a democrat and Ed Thiele from North Omak as a Republican. Doug Adams, of Riverside, has been approached but as yet hasn’t made up his mind. Nearly 4,000 spectators packed the small community of Chesaw, for the 48th Annual Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo. Nick Zabreznik, of Tonasket, rode away with Best All-Around Cowboy honors. Best All-Around Junior title went to another Tonasket native, Seth Buchert, age 14. Several feet of the bank alongside the Oroville-Nighthawk Road was washed away in last Friday’s rain storm. Water was across the road in several spots and the County Road crews were called to fix the bank and several other areas where the water had caused damage. Real Estate Bargains: 4 plus acres on the west side o river, 6 miles south of Oroville, well easement, 30 apple trees, $12,500.00; On a large city lot, new vinyl siding and metal roof, walking distance to business district, $39,500 on owner contract: Close to National Forest, lots of nice trees, super recreation site, $6,000 on owner’s terms of $3,500 cash.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 23, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Soon it will be back to school for some We’re getting toward the end of another month. Soon it will be time for the kids to return to school and some to make big changes in their lives as they enter college and experience being away from home. And so life goes on. Sometimes we can have the best of intentions, such as I had last Saturday morning, as I hurried around and got ready to go to the funeral of Mary Bourn, arrived at the mortuary, to find no one there and the service had been the day before. Did I feel really dumb? Indeed I did. Once again we had lunch with the patients at Extended Care, last Friday and played pinochle with Bob and Margaret Hirst and also had another

Parking Lot Sale planned

table, with friends, Myrtle Wood, Evelyn Dull, Betty Steg and our visiting friend, from Michigan, Mary Ellen Lemmond. Good news for Luanne (Emry) Billings. She came home on the 20th, and will continue with home therapy treatments and hopefully time will help to restore her memory loss and get her up “to speed,” after the issues she has been dealing with for the past several weeks. Finally our intense hot weather has given us a break. And we were ready for that. Reports were that the last Red Cross blood draw not was quite as successful as the norm. Perhaps the extremely hot weather and then some went to the wrong building. By the next date it will

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

and was installed by yours truly. We are planning a Senior Thank you to Adult and Aging Center Parking Lot Sale fundrais- Care of Central Washington for er Saturday Aug. 8, in conjunc- funding that purchase. It’s an interesting sign that tion with our Pancake Breakfast. Donation of quality goods for Oroville is relaxing rules. I’m talkthe sale will be appreciated. (No ing about allowing ATV use on clothes, please). See Betty Steg, streets passed by the city council Raleigh Chinn, or myself if you on July 7, and the proposal by the school board allowing teachers have something to donate. Meals next week are as fol- to carry arms. (Fire arms that is.) Lord knows we need somelows: Monday, July 28, Beef Enchilada;Thursday, July 30, thing exciting to attract business Oven Fried Chicken; Friday, July and people before our town dis31, Lasagna. Seniors age 60 and appears, and these changes would over, the suggested donation is attract, well, an interesting cross $3.50,or as one can afford. The section. Maybe the following should price for those under is $8.00. Why not start60 a new holiday tradition? Make this the Our new icemaker arrived also be considered: (1) Eliminate

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be back at the usual place. served with our fresh garden tomatoes, Since I have been a bit out of cir- crisp cucumbers, an ear of corn and who culation the past week or so, I may needs any meat, but the recipe did say, be behind in happenings “good with steak”. Favourite Potato Dish around town. My knee has 9 large potatoes been causing a lot of pain 8 oz. white cream cheese and the best thing to do is I cup sour cream stay off of it. Hopefully we’ll 2 tsp. onion salt soon know why it isn’t coop1 tsp. white pepper erating. I know my husband 1 garlic clove, crushed will be happy when I put 2 tblsp. butter (or more) the crutches away, because 1 cup corn flakes getting meals on the table Peel, cook, and mash the isn’t exactly his “cup of tea.” potatoes. Add the cream I’m content with a cucumcheese, sour cream, and seaber sandwich with the crisp THIS & THAT sonings and beat until well goodies provided us by our Joyce Emry blended and fluffy. Place in good friend, Evelyn Dull. a buttered casserole, crumble Elsa Lewis shared a family cookbook with me, that came from corn flakes on top and dot with butour neighbors to the far north and some ter and bake in a preheated oven 350 of the recipes sounded so good, made degrees, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Try the above and see how you like the good old-fashioned way with lots of butter and cream. The following is it. If you don’t, you can blame Elsa’s one I copied from the book. I have not Canadian relatives... or bring it to me. tried it but I know it will be a winner, I’m a ‘tater lovin’ Missourian from a way

building and zoning codes. Republic did this and thrived. We would save by not needing management and enforcement staff. There were only scant electrical codes prior to 1940, that I know of, and those were sparsely adhered to. Most of Oroville was built without code enforcement by responsible persons. (2) Eliminate Marriage Licenses, and make Oroville a marriage hub. Marriage licenses were brought to this country in 1929 as a response to the Lateran Treaty. They were a European idea, and are a throw back from slave trade regulations in Roman times. They did not exist here, except as applied to miscegenation (interracial marriage,) prior to 1929. With the latest Supreme Court ruling marriage licenses are meaningless anyway. And they are not a legal requirement. (3) Turn the town over to the Tribes, so we could allow gambling. (I’m not advocating, just brainstorming.) (4) Give the Seniors a free lunch, paid for by the earnings from the above changes. We’re talking, here, about hope and change. Lets get creative. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Kate; Pinochle, Danny W.; High Man, Jim Frye; High Woman, Dolly.

W.E. ROCK Trail-Gear Western Series

Some history of the Garden Club of America SUBMITTED BY AUDREY HOMES SECRETARY, TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

Members and two guests, Kayla Olney, from Yakima, the great granddaughter of Sue Kramer, and Marisa Lopez, from Oregon, granddaughter of Wendy Taylor, met at the Hillside Apartments on July 13 for their meeting. We discussed the June 10 Methow Valley Community Center. Their programs were very decorative and full of information about the history of their Garden Club established in 1938. It went on to say that the first Garden Club in America was founded in January in 1891, by the Ladies Garden Club at Athens, Georgia. On May 1, 1929, thirteen federated states became charter members at an organized meeting in Washington D.C. In 1935 The National Garden Club established headquarters at Rockefeller Center in New York City. The permanent headquarters building

back! Once again, I’m sorry to report that Bill Greene is having some serious health issues. Keep him in your thoughts and hope he is healthy enough to have some of the procedures necessary for him to have better health. Sometimes our bodies are like an old car, you repair one thing, then something else goes “haywire.” The older we get, the fewer things seem worth waiting in line for. It has been reported that Norma Goeyle passed away. Norma was a pharmacist, along with her husband Dick, for many years in the Tonasket Drug, and will be remembered by many. A memorial was held for Lillian Tibbs in Tonasket, last Saturday and friends met at the Mike Tibb’s home Sunday afternoon in Oroville, to share thoughts and memories of her. The Tibbs family have been long time residents in the community and have many friends. Til’ next week.

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB in St. Louis, Missouri was dedicated in May 1958. The Methow Program was given by Tess Poke from Twisp after a delicious and attractive lunch. Tess has a business in Twisp called “Good Wood Nursery.” She emphasizes that rich soil is so important. Our soils are alive with microscopic life, enhance your soil with leaf compost and organic material for your garden bed. Chicken fertilizer is good. Moisten your soil with water and tea mixed and mulch often. The trip to Shady Creek in May 19 was informative and the nursery was beautiful. Some of their favorite plants were discussed by the caretaker and pointed out to us. We were each given a plant to take home. We nominated new Officers for the coming year, starting in September. Wendy Taylor for President, Freda Holmes, Treasurer and Secretary Pam

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Burton. The annual Family Potluck will be at Sue Kramer’s place this year at 5:30 on August 10. We welcome guests and new members to attend our meetings. The number to call for the time and place is 509-223-3427.

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ACTION/SCI FI STARRING PAUL RUDD, MICHAEL DOUGLAS, COREY STOLL. FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00 SUN *3:00, 6:00. MON-THURS. 6:30, 9:30 The

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6:15, 9:15. SUN *3:15, 6:15. MONTHURS 6:45, 9:45

OKANOGAN VALLEY

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ANIMATION/COMEDY/FAMILY STARRING SANDRA BULLOCK, JON HAMM, MICHAEL KEATON. FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30. SUN *3:30, 6:30. MON - THURS. 6:30, 9:30. R

COMEDY STARRING AMY SCHUMER, BILL HADER, BRIE LARSON. FRI. 6:15, 9:15. SAT. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. SUN *3:00, 6:00. MON - THURS. 6:15, 9:15.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000 www.gazette-tribune.com

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No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000


JULY 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR MUSIC IN THE PARK, FRIDAY, JULY 24 TONASKET - Music in the Park is Friday, July 24 at s p.m., at History Park in Tonasket. “Ruby Scene” with Denny Richardson, Ruby Marchand and friends, plus, “Family Vibe”the Rickabaugh family will provide music for the third session of Music in the Park, sponsored by the Community Cultural Center. Food will be available to purchase from La Ultima at 6 p.m., drinks and snacks from the CCC table, donations for musicians will be welcomed and the weather is supposed to be in the 80’s for a cooler evening under the big trees. Bring your lawn chairs or blankets and plan to spend the time with us from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Call Janet Culp at 509-4862061 for more info.

Library. For more info call 509476-2096.

Vaughn, Kinzie, Ashmore to Perform at Winery PNTA Meeting OROVILLE – Sandy Vaughn Cookout & with Steve Kinzie and Julie Ashmore will perform at Esther Pipsissewa Hike Bricques Winery on Thursday, July 23. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at 509-4762861 or check the Events Page at www.estherbricques.com.

Preschool Story Time TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 24 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

TONASKET - On Saturday, July 25 the Oroville Chapter of the PNTA will meet in the Bonaparte Lake Forest Service Campground for the regular monthly meeting. Meet, greet, and eat at 6 p.m. On Sunday morning, July 26 we will hike Pipsissewa Trail. Come for the cookout, hike, or camp in the Bonaparte Campground and attend both events.

Molson All School Picnic MOLSON - The Molson All School Picnic will be Saturday, July 25 at noon at Lost Lake. Everyone is welcome to the potluck, call Mary Louise for more info 509-485-3292.

Library Puppet OHS Class of 1975 Show Reunion TONASKET - Tonasket OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1975 will be having a get together on Friday, July 24 at Copper Mountain Vineyards (AKA Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Stand) 1 mile north of Princes on Hwy. 97. The get together is from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. with drinks and appetizers. Picnic to follow on Saturday. Bring the family. Pass the word to other classmates or view Brian Brownlee’s Facebook page for further details or call 509-833-0190.

Grasshopper Festival REPUBLIC - The Grasshopper Festival, Friday, July 24 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., is a fun summertime festival with local artists and food, a ScareCritter Contest (think insect scarecrows), a Bug Parade, real life info about grasshoppers including natural pest control, and fantasy bug stuff, too, like insect mask and piñata making. And what makes this festival different? Eating real bugs! No one has to eat a bug, bug don’t you want to see someone else eat a bug? The festival is at Republic City Park, 40 N. Kean Street.

Library Summer Reading Program presents a Library Puppet Show on Wednesday, July 29 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

Community Action Board Meeting OKANOGAN The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, July 29, 2015, at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization. OCCAC works with community members of all groups to raise the poor out of poverty, to feed the hungry, to provide affordable housing for all, to empower community members through education, and in the process to return prosperity and hope for the future to the county. Those with questions or need additional information contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, 509-422-4041.

Dramatic Escape’s Tumbleweed at Pastime & Vicki’s ‘Almost, Maine’ OROVILLE – Dramatic Back Door Club Escape will perform “Almost, Maine,” a romantic comedy, at Esther Bricques Winery on Friday and Saturday, July 24 and 25. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. and the play begins at 7 p.m., with dessert at intermission. Tickets are $35 and include the cost of dinner, glass of wine, dessert and the production. Contact 509-4298051 or Esther Bricques Winery at 509-476-2861. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, July 25 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates, the remaining dates are: Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public

OROVILLE - The Tumbleweed Film Festival kicks off this years events on Thursday, July 30 with a special opening night reception at the Pastime Bar and Grill. Following the reception, which includes an ample variety of appetizers, guests will enjoy a special screening of films at Vicki’s Back Door. Reception begins at 5 p.m. with films starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 and may be reserved online at Tumbleweed (www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com) or in-person at the Pastime Bar and Grill.

Tumbleweed Film Fest Family Night OROVILLE - Tumbleweed brings Family Night films to the Oroville High School auditorium, which offers a cool, comfortable theater setting from which to enjoy short films that both kids and adults will enjoy. These films will include action adventures, funny cartoons and even a love story. Movies start at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 and

may be purchased at the door or on the Tumbleweed website www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com. NOTE: Some free tickets to the July 30 Tumbleweed family film night will be available thanks to a generous donation by Reman and Reload. Pick up tickets at the Camaray Motel. For more information, go to www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com.

Naturalization Information Session BREWSTER — U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will host a free twohour information session at the Brewster Public Library (108 3rd St.) on Thursday, July 30 at 5 p.m. The session is part of a larger USCIS initiative to help immigrants better understand the naturalization process, including the content of the naturalization test, and to become familiar with free educational resources and materials available from the agency. The public is invited, and USCIS personnel will be on hand to discuss the naturalization process step-by-step, and provide information about eligibility and residency requirements, application forms, fees, the background security check and processing times. Participants will also see sample questions from the test, and will receive an overview of U.S. history and civic principles. They’ll watch USCIS officers act out a naturalization interview. Free educational materials will be handed out while supplies last.

Tumbleweed Film Festival at Alpine Brewery OROVILLE - On Friday, July 31 it is “Beers, Brats and Short Films” at the Alpine Brewing Company, where attendees may sample hand-crafted German style beers or taste wines from some of the local wineries. Attendees may also enjoy a BBQ dinner for purchase on the patio featuring the official “Wurst of the Fest.” Doors open at 5 p.m. and films start at 7 p.m. Attendees must be 21 or older. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or on Tumbleweed’s website, www.tumbleweedfilmfest.com.

LDS Annual Clothing Giveaway OROVILLE - The LDS’s annual Clothing Givaway will take place on Saturday, Aug. 1 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the LDS Church, located at 33420 Hwy. 97 N. Most sizes are availble; there is a large selection (not just for kids) and the clothes are clean.

Tumbleweed Film Fest at Esther Bricques OROVILLE - Saturday, Aug. 1 brings “Movies in the Vineyard” back to the Esther Bricques Winery, which hosts a special night of wines, award winning films and live music. Once again, Esther Bricques offers a hot night in a cool setting, as they transform their winery production area into an air-conditioned, dark movie theater. The evening begins at 5 p.m. with live music on the patio performed by Mood Swings. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask some of the filmmakers questions, as a few

directors of the films will be in attendance this evening. Directors include Los Angeles film director Ryan Moody, whose film “Obituaries” includes actor James Franco, Eastern Washington native Marcus McCollum (now residing in Los Angeles), who directed “Best Driver in the County” and Seattle documentary filmmaker Aimie Vallat, who directed “Present Moment.” Also in attendance will be Oroville local Brendan Biele, who was the music composer for “Best Driver in the County.” Doors open at 5 pm, and films start at 7 p.m. Attendees under age 21 are welcome. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or online at Tumbleweed’s website, www. tumbleweedfilmfest.com.

Loomis Community Church LOOMIS - The Loomis Community Church has Vacation Bible School set for Monday, Aug. 3 through 7, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the church in Loomis located on Main street. Ages are 4 through 11 years. The theme is “The Castle of my Heart, God’s Royal Home.” Games,stories, crafts, music and treats are included in the program. For more information or rides call the church 509-223-3542.

Rep. Newhouse Staff Mobile Office OMAK - Congressman Dan Newhouse’s staff members will be available to meet with anyone who needs help with a federal agency or has questions or comments on federal issues during monthly mobile office hours on Tuesday, Aug. 4 between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. at Omak City Hall, 2 N. Ash St. Members of the public are invited to meet with Congressman Newhouse’s staff with no appointment necessary.

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509-4762488.

OYSC Fall Soccer Registration OROVILLE - Registration for Oroville Youth Soccer has begun. Go to www.ncwsoccer. om to register children four to 14-years-old. There is a one time $50 fee which allows players to play in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. The deadline to register is prior to July 31, 2015. Players who aren’t registered by then will not be allowed to play. Fall season runs from September to October. Those with questions should contact Jaden Taber at 509-560-3461.

Vacation Bible School OROVILLE - Valley Christian Fellowship presents “Jungle Jaunt,” a unique summer VBS program. Come explore the rainforest and get to know God through Bible stories, music, games, crafts and more! Jungle Jaunt will be held each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins July 5 and continues through Sept. 20. Open to kids age 4 to 11. For more information, or to arrange a ride for your child, call 560-0228. Valley Christian Fellowship is located at 142 East Oroville Road.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Okanogan and Similkameen rivers closed to fishing Drought conditions prompt fishing closures, restrictions on numerous rivers THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers are closing or restricting fishing on more than 30 rivers throughout Washington to help protect fish in areas where drought conditions have reduced flows and increased water temperatures. The Okanogan and Similkameen Rivers are among those slated to close starting in the early hours of Saturday morning. The closures and restrictions take effect Saturday, July 18 at 12:01 a.m. The changes will remain in effect until further notice. Fishing will be closed in some waters, and limited in others each day to the hours between midnight and 2 p.m. These “hootowl” restrictions will go into effect on rivers where fishery managers want to reduce stress on fish during the hottest time of day. High water temperatures can be deadly for fish, such as trout, while diminished stream flows can strand migrating salmon and steelhead, said Craig Burley, fish program manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “With such extreme drought conditions in several areas of the state, we needed to take these steps to help protect vulnerable fish in waters where we have concerns,” Burley said. “We’ll continue monitoring stream conditions throughout Washington this summer and take additional actions if necessary.” For details on the closures and restrictions, check the emergency regulations, which will be posted tomorrow on WDFW’s webpage at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/. Fishing closures and restrictions are listed by region below. Today’s action does not include any rivers in Region 6 (South Sound/Olympic Peninsula). However, earlier this summer, the department closed fishing on a section of the Sol Duc River to protect returning chinook during drought conditions. Region 1 – Eastern Wash. Closed to fishing: North Fork Touchet River above Spangler Creek. South Fork Touchet River from the mouth to Griffen Fork and above Griffen Fork. Wolf Fork Touchet River from the mouth to Coates Creek and Robinson Fork. Asotin Creek and tributaries (Asotin Co.) from the mouth to headwaters. Kettle River and all tributaries (Ferry Co.) from the Barstow Bridge to the headwaters, all portions contained within Washington. Hoot-owl restrictions: Walla Walla River (Walla Walla Co.) from McDonald Road Bridge to the Oregon State Boundary. Touchet River (Columbia/Walla Walla Co.) from the mouth to the confluence of the North and South forks. North Fork Touchet River from the mouth to Spangler Creek. Tucannon River (Columbia/ Garfield Co.) From the Highway 12 Bridge to Cow Camp Bridge. Spokane River (Spokane/Lincoln Co.) from upstream boundary at Plese Flats Day Use Area to the Idaho State Boundary. Spokane River tributaries, including Little Spokane River and tributaries (Spokane/Pend Oreille/Stevens Counties) from the State Route 25 Bridge upstream to Monroe Street Dam. Colville River and all tributaries

312 S. Whitcomb

(Stevens Co.) from the mouth to the headwaters. Sullivan Creek and all tributaries (Pend Oreille Co.) from the mouth to the headwaters. Region 2 – North Central Washington Closed to fishing: Wenatchee River (Chelan Co.) from the mouth to the Icicle River Road Bridge. Icicle River (Chelan Co.) from the mouth to 500 feet downstream of the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam. Lake Wenatchee (Chelan Co.) Okanogan River from the Hwy 97 bridge upstream to Zosel Dam, except open to game fish fishing. Similkameen River from the mouth upstream to Enloe Dam. Region 3 – South Central Wash. Closed to fishing: Ahtanum Creek, including the north and middle forks Little Naches River Teanaway River, including west, middle and north forks Hoot-owl restrictions: Naches River from Tieton River to Bumping River/Little Naches River Rattlesnake Creek Region 4 – North Puget Sound Closed to fishing: Raging River (King Co.) from the mouth upstream. Skykomish River (Snohomish Co.) from the mouth upstream closed to all fishing, except the section around Reiter Ponds remains open from the Gold Bar/Big Eddy Access (Hwy. 2 Bridge) upstream to the confluence of the North and South forks. Wallace River (Snohomish Co.). From the mouth upstream including all tributaries. Stillaguamish River (Skagit/ Snohomish Co.) From Marine Drive upstream including the North and South forks and all tributaries. South Fork Nooksack (Whatcom Co.) From the mouth to Skookum Creek, and from Wanlick Creek to headwaters including Wanlick and all tributaries. Suiattle River (Skagit Co.) Tributaries Buck, Downey and Sulpher Creeks. Hoot-owl restrictions: North Fork Skykomish River (Snohomish Co.) From the mouth upstream including all tributaries. South Fork Skykomish River (Snohomish/King Co.) From Sunset Falls upstream and all tributaries, including the Beckler, Foss, Miller and Rapid rivers and their tributaries. Sauk River (Skagit/Snohomish Co.) Above the Suiattle River including the North Fork to the falls and the South Fork to headwaters. Samish River (Skagit Co.) From I-5 to headwaters and Friday Creek upstream. Region 5 – Southwest Washington Closed to fishing: East Fork Lewis River from Lewisville Park downstream. Washougal River from Mt. Norway Bridge downstream. Hoot-owl restrictions: East Fork Lewis River from Lewisville Park upstream. Washougal River from Mt. Norway Bridge upstream. WDFW has also closed fishing for spring chinook on the Grande Ronde River in eastern Washington due to low river flows. For more information about drought’s impact on fish and wildlife, visit WDFW’s drought webpage athttp://wdfw.wa.gov/.

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

TUSK, TUSK, TUSK! We have a “trunk” full of elephant figurines for Ivory one.


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 23, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • July 23, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

www.gazette-tribune.com

Houses For Sale Charming 2 br plus den home situated at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac in town of Oroville. Must be credit worthy. Month to month. $750.00 mo - first and last due upon acceptance and credit approval. available August 1st. contact 928 503 1845 TONASKET. SPACIOUS 4 BR, 2 BA HOME! Bright, sunny great room with many windows. 2,400 SF open concept. 4 acres features 3 car garage, loafing shed and mature landscaping. Located at 120 South State Frontage Road. $240,000. FSBO, appoinments only, call now, 509-486-2451.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Visit our website.

For Rent

Announcements

AVAILABLE RENTALS $1,495 4BR 3BA Lake Osoyoos 1 level home, family rm, garage w/shop. $810 2BR + Den, 2BA Open Concept. $795; 2BR Sonora Shores deluxe condo. $825; 3BR, 2BA Lake Osoyoos Apt. $425; Cute 1BR Apt.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 House in OROVILLE: 2 Bdrm 1 bath house $600/mo + deposit. Call Carol 509-4852214 OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004.

RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Commercial Rentals TONASKET. 2 OFFICE SPACES; 90 SF $160/mo. 270 SF $250/mo. Community Cultural Cntr. Light, quiet and spacious. Air conditioning and high speed internet included. Call Valerie 509-486-0365 info@communityculturalcenter.org

Announcements

Sweet Dreams

Powders Gag Gifts Adult Toys

Hours: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.

509-826-5486

East Side 831 Omak Ave., Omak

www.gazette-tribune.com

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces

Lotions Oils Creams

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Found

“TED & DODDIE HART BENEFIT DONATION FUND” has been set at Wells Fargo Locations. This couple lost their home in the July 4th fire. Donations can also be mailed to Wells Fargo Bank, PO Box 667, Tonasket WA 98855.

Crosswords

Help Wanted Coleman Oil Receptionist/Billing Clerk Visit

www.colemanoil.com/careers/

to apply For Tonasket Office. Knowledge of Excel helpful we will train. The job includes a variety fo office duties and lots of customer service. MS C-Squad Volleyball Coach

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a MS C-Squad Volleyball Coach. Volleyball coaching experience preferred. Position is open until filled. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer

25. 1969 Peace Prize grp.

7. Always

26. Argus-eyed

8. Mouselike animal

28. ___ vera

9. Addition

30. Ado

10. Bust, so to speak

31. Crackpot

11. Forming a series

33. Those enrolled for compulsory military service

12. Rat

35. Area’s outer edge

14. Certain fir

37. Aircraft with landing floats

20. First place award (2 wds)

40. “___ me!”

23. Leaking drops

44. Prize since 1949

27. Old Chinese money

45. Wanders aimlessly in search of amusement

29. Beanery sign

47. Commemorative marker 48. Marienbad, for one 49. Cart 51. Fishing, perhaps 52. Back talk 54. Cheated

ANSWERS

Across 1. Beat 7. High point 14. Young child, Italian 15. Two-wheeled carriage in Cuba 16. Dress 17. Lunar crater on the far side 18. On, as a lamp 19. Person who flees a native land 21. Couples 22. Coaster 24. Bit

13. Some muscles

30. Layers 32. Mountain goat’s perch 34. Charges 36. Rushed (3 wds) 37. Stalkless and attached at the base

56. Congratulations, of a sort

38. Select a jury from a list of names

57. To such an extent

39. Put together

59. Bullish

41. Breathe in and out

61. More suspicious

42. Picked up

62. Guaranteed

43. Like some discussions

63. Senior citizen

46. Mideast V.I.P.

64. Ensnared

50. Car dealer’s offering 53. Achy

Down

54. Highlander 55. Fine, dry particles

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant One part time on an as needed basis, bilingual preferred and one full time, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JULY 20, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS

4. Bog 5. Clyster

LEGAL SERVICES

58. Alpine sight

2. Innumerable

60. Same old, same old

3. “Dilbert” cartoonist Scott Adams has one: Abbr.

6. Nabokov’s 1955 novel

preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

1. Tongue taste bud

Statewides

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete

Drivers-No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! We support every driver, every day, every mile! Call Central Refrigerated Home. (888) 793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com

Public Notices The Tonasket School District will be holding the Budget Hearing on Monday, July 27 at 7:00 p.m. in the district office board room. Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 16, 23, 2015 #OVG644909 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 4/21/2015 2:42:14 PM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-14-635292-SW APN No.: 3427190027 Title Order No.: 02-14037783 Deed of Trust Grantor(s): DAVID W ENGH, DARLA CATES, BONNIE ENGH, HOLLY SUZANNE ENGH, SARAH KAYE ENGH Deed of Trust Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3109755 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/21/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 Third North in the City of Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 34 NORTH, RANGE 27 EAST, W.M., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTH QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19; THENCE SOUTH 0°24’ WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 291.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, AND THE SOUTHEAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRIMARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 10, AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 0°24’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 580.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89°36’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 450.40 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHEAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID PRIMARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 10; THENCE NORTH 38°13’ EAST ALONG THE SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 734.60 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19 AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 257 ENGH RD, OMAK, WA 98841 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/10/2006, recorded 10/10/2006, under 3109755 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from DAVID W ENGH, AN UNMARRIED PERSON , as Grantor(s), to PRLAP, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-9 . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $74,004.04 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $91,379.02 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2009 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/21/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 8/10/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be dis-

Public Notices continued and terminated if at any time before 8/10/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 8/10/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME DAVID W ENGH, AN UNMARRIED PERSON ADDRESS 257 ENGH RD, OMAK, WA 98841 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 3/16/2015 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/21/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Lauren Esquivel, Assistant Secretary

continued on next page


JULY 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE July 23, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Puzzle 33 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.65)

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Puzzle 29 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 36 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.48)

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Puzzle 30 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.67)

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Puzzle 27 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

Sits directly on beach of Lake Osoyoos 2nd lot included. Best Value! $179,500

www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

Oroville Building Supply

Law

n Criminal

n Felony / Misdemeanor

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

n Civil

Litigation Planning n Probate n Estate

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TS No WA05000955-14-1 APN 1250090800 TO No 8507474 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 7/31/2015, 10:00 AM, At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 9, PLAT OF NORTH ALMA, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK A OF PLATS, PAGE 42, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 1250090800 More commonly known as 205 4TH AVENUE, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/31/1996, executed by STAN BEHRENS AND ERLENE BEHRENS, WHO ARE MARRIED TO EACH OTHER as Trustor(s), to secure obligations in favor of BANK OF AMERICA OREGON, A STATE CHARTERED BANK, as original Beneficiary recorded 06/05/1996 as Instrument No. 841725 in Book 144, on Page 1427 and the beneficial inter-

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Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-635292-SW IDSPub #0081378 7/23/2015 8/13/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 23 and August 13, 2015. #OVG633923

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to difficulty place therating numbers Puzzle 30 (Hard, 0.67) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: (877) 894-4663 or (800) 606-4819 Website: www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; DATED: 3/27/2015 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By: Athena Vaughn, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps 1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Phone: (800) 409-7530 TDD: (800) 833-6388 For Reinstatement/Pay Off Quotes, contact MTC Financial Inc. DBA Trustee Corps TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.priorityposting.com P1137458 7/2, 07/23/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2 and July 23, 2015. #OVG641234

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The sale may be terminated any time after the 07/20/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, Green Tree Servicing LLC or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS ERLENE BEHRENS 205 4TH AVENUE, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 ERLENE BEHRENS 205 4TH AVE S, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 ERLENE BEHRENS PO BOX 189, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 STAN BEHRENS, 205 4TH AVENUE, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 STAN BEHRENS 205 4TH AVE S, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 STAN BEHRENS PO BOX 189, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 by both first class and certified mail on 02/06/2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY

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est was assigned to Green Tree Servicing LLC and recorded 07/22/2013 as Instrument Number 3184110 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Okanogan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by Green Tree Servicing LLC, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: Green Tree Servicing LLC Contact Phone No: 800-643-0202 Address: 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, MAIL STOP T111, TEMPE, AZ 85283 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From 03/01/2014 To 03/27/2015 Number of Payments 1 Monthly Payment $187.07 1 $190.14 1 $196.95 3 $302.95 6 $301.05 1 $422.85 Total $3,712.16 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION From 03/01/2014 To 03/27/2015 Total $54.96 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 05/31/1996 Note Amount: $25,800.00 Interest Paid To: 02/01/2014 Next Due Date: 03/01/2014 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $17,748.39, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 07/31/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 07/20/2015, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 07/20/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 23, 2015

OUTDOORS OHA tour of the woods highlights useful plants BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Twenty participants enjoyed the Lost Lake Forest Trek: A hikeand-learn day trip led by local botanist and retired schoolteacher George Thornton Saturday, July 18. The hike was part of Okanogan Highlands Alliance’s (OHA) Highland Wonders educational series, and began at Lost Lake; a 46-acre lake at 3,800 foot elevation located four miles north of Bonaparte Lake. The trek wound through the forest at the south end of the lake, climbing to 4,244 feet before circling around and dropping down to OHA’s Lost Lake Wetland and Wildlife Preserve. The wildlife preserve is 40 acres of wetland and 25 acres of adjacent forestland, purchased in 2010 by OHA with the goal of maintaining and enhancing forest health, habitat and diversity while reducing weeds and fire danger. “The point of the educational series is to get people to know what they’ve got, and to get out and experience it,” said Thornton. “They can’t value something if they don’t know they’ve got it.” The trek took a leisurely pace, stopping often to identify plants or geological features; and pausing quietly to listen for and identify birds in the area. Todd Thorn, a Watershed Program Manager for the Colville Tribes by trade and birder by hobby, helped to identify a Ruby Crown Kinglet, Redtail Hawk, Osprey, Mountain Chickadee, Hairy Woodpecker, Townsend Solitaire and an OliveSided Fly Catcher. “The best way to identify the

Olive-Sided Fly Catcher is by learning their calls and knowing what kind of habitat they favor, which is coniferous forests at elevations of four thousand feet or higher,” said Thorn. “All the songbirds play a tremendous role in keeping the forest healthy,” Thornton said. Plants identified included an orchid called the Mountain Lady Slipper. “There are few

“The point of the educational series is to get people to know what they’ve got. They can’t value something if they don’t know they’ve got it.” George Thornton, local botanist and educator

places where these grow,” said Thornton. Another orchid found in the area, Platanthera obtusata, or the little northern bog orchid, is currently being researched at the University of Washington. “They are pollinated by mosquitoes, so researchers from the UW were here trying to determine what scent was attracting the mosquitoes and what the specific pollinators are,” Thornton said. “Don’t pick them; plucking the flower will kill the plant,” said hiker and Rocket Mass Heater Researcher Ernie Wisner. “Deer will eat them, but when they defecate, the seeds drop and will repopulate the area.”

According to the Washington Native Orchid Society, the plant can take up to fifteen years to bloom and live to be eighty years old. Another plant pointed out was Pearly Everlasting. Common uses for this plant among Native Americans, according to the USFS website, include poultices for treatment of sores, boiling in tea or a steam bath for rheumatism, smoked to treat colds and used as a tobacco substitute. Another plant the group observed was yarrow, or Achillea millefolium, which, like Pearly Everlasting, also has clusters of small white flowers and long, slender leaves. “The leaves of yarrow make an antiseptic and also a coagulant,” said OHA Conservation Coordinator Julie Ashmore. “It’s one of my favorite plants to use when my daughter hurts herself. It stops the bleeding and cleans the wound, all in one.” Growing side by side were Fragaria vesca (Woodland Strawberry) and Fragaria virginiana (Wild Strawberry). The wild strawberries, with the sweeter taste are identified by their smooth, darker green leaf; while the woodland strawberries have a lighter green leaf with prominent veins. The strawberries and pearly everlasting were bordering an area described as good Great Grey Owl habitat; consisting of mature trees with good views. Another plant of interest to the group was a lichen system called Letharia vulpina, commonly known as ‘Wolf Lichen’ for it’s historical use as a poison to ward off wolves and foxes.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Local botaist George Thornton examines a branch covered in Lutharia vulpina, known as ‘Wolf Lichen, discussing its historical use as a poison for wolves and foxes. Pictured left to right are Melanie Thornton, Erica Wisner and Julie Ashmore. In the background oare Todd Thorn and Ernie Wisner. “When used by Scandinavians, it was mixed with Caribou fat and ground glass,” said Science and Art Educator Erica Wisner. Thornton said USFS employees denied a request from someone wanting to collect a pickup truck load of the lichen for art projects. They were turned down, as the volume they wanted to gather would have caused too much damage to the forest’s ecosystem. According to Lichens of North America, wolf lichen was the most commonly used dye lichen for indigenous peoples in western North America. It’s sufficiently poisonous that the Achomawi in

Hikers check out maps and information at the Lost Lake Wetland & Wildlife Preserve trailhead. Okanogan Highlands Alliance purchased the 40 acres of wetland and 25 acres of adjacent forest that make up the Preserve at the south end of Lost Lake in January of 2010.

Photos by Katie Teachout

Hanna Kliegman of OHA stands by a sign designating the Upland Loop Trail which travels through the upland portion of the Lost Lake Wetland and Wildlife Preserve.

Northern California used it to make poison arrowheads; but the Okanogan-Colville made a weak tea of it to treat internal problems, and the Blackfoot made a remedy of it for stomach disorders. Looking at the bigger picture, Thornton pointed to both sides of a forest service road that highlighted changes in forest practices. On one side, the forest was left unpruned with lots of underbrush underfoot. On the other side of the road, the underbrush and ladder fuels had been cleared out to prevent the spread of wildfire, leaving just the larger trees. “However, with less under-

brush, it dries the soil out quicker. So it’s a give and take,” said Thornton. “We’re learning more and doing different things all the time. But sometimes we’re not learning about the trade-off until it is too late or too expensive to go back and fix it.” The next outdoor event of the OHA Highland Wonders series is a hike with Methow Valley Naturalist Dana Visalli on Sunday, August 16. Interested community members can email julie@ okanoganhighlands.org for more information, or visit www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. Preregistration is required.

Lee Miller, Ernie Wisner and Julie Ashmore examine a nest found on the ground and thought to belong to a Kinglet when a field book described their nests as being made of lichens and mosses with a feather-lined cap.

The group heads back down toward Lost Lake after making a 5.6 mile through the forest surrounding the southern end of the lake.


JULY 23 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

NEWS

GO Recycling Center opening soon BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Green Okanogan Recycling Center is open at its new location, 3 Rodeo Road, to members on a trial run; or what GO President Mariah Cornworman calls ‘The Recycle Center on Training Wheels.’ “We thought we would start out with it open just to members until we work out the kinks, as we thought our members would be kinder about our glitches and have positive suggestions,” said Cornwoman. “We’ll open to the general population as soon as we can.” Anyone can sign up to be a member. GO has about 150 members now, with membership prices ranging from $15 for students and seniors, $25 for individuals and $50 for families. Major donors are those who give $250$500 and Founders are those who donate $1000 and up. “We’re trying to get everything streamlined so we’ll be able to answer everyone’s questions and direct them where to take stuff we can’t accept,” said Doug Bovard.

“Trying to keep people educated in a changing market is difficult,” Cornwoman said. “We don’t accept #3-7 plastics, as those are going to China and being burned. You have to look at recycling from the global perspective.” Cornwoman said recycled metals were also going to China, but those were being broken down and reprocessed as finished products that often ended up purchased in the states. GO Recycling, after years of operating in temporary and unsecured locations without buildings, water or power, is now located on property owned by Chris Wood of Midway Building Supplies with a lease-option-tobuy. “Chris has been wonderful to work with,” said Cornwoman. “We love our new facility. We have until May to come up with funds to pay for the property, and I think we’ll make it.” Cornwoman said a fundraiser in February raised enough cash to pay the rent for the first year’s lease, adding, “So now the grants we receive and money from recycling is covering our operating

costs.” The center is working to develop a business plan, which will make them eligible for more grants. “We also finally qualified as a 501(c)3 non-profit, and that also opens doors for funding,” said Cornwoman. “We just have to focus on being a service to the public, rather than making money. So our goal is to break even.” The GO Recycling Center is open Tuesdays noon to 6 p.m., and Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There are no drop boxes when the center is closed, and people are asked never to leave anything at the gate. Additionally, the public is asked not to drop items off at the former location on North Western Avenue. At this time, the center is not accepting refrigerators, mixed paper, magazines, plastics #3-7, tires, batteries or glass. The center is working on being able to take more items in the future. For a list of things the center does accept, visit www.greenokanogan.org.

Julie Ashworth/submitted photo

To find the Green Okanogan Recycling Center, look for this sign made from recycled bottle caps by Tonasket Outreach students. GO is located across from Baker’s Acres, at 3 Rodeo Road off Clarkson-Mill Road. Pictured, left to right, are GO President Mariah Cornwoman and Outreach students Addison Epps, Esmerelda Mathis, Oscar Dreschler, Erin Quinlan, Cora Diehl, Keisha Bovard, and Bryan Nolan. Not pictured is JJ Hempel, who also worked on the sign.

Newby Lake Fire sizes down to Type 3 Team

THREE-ON-THREE CHAMPS

Fire has moderated but crews looking for hot spots and mopping up BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Shari Lopez/submitted photo

A local team competed at the Pateros Apple Pie Jamboree 3 on 3 tournament and brought home a first place trophy in their division. All three boys are from Oroville (they had no fourth person, so no sub). They placed first in their bracket which had 8 teams. The boys are Easton Anderson, Noah Hilderbrand and Julian Lopez.

BIRTHS Domenic Yandel Zamora Orosco was born to Dalila Orozco and Angel Zamora of Loomis, Wash. on July 5, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. He weighed seven pounds, 10 ounces at birth and was 21 inches long. His grandparents are Hermania and Jesus Orozco and Gilberto Zamora Elias and Antonia Filipe Vargas. Waylon Johnathan Kretz was born to Chandra D. Hutsell of Oroville and Jediah V. Kretz of Wauconda on July 18, 2915 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. He was 3001 grams at birth. His grandparents are Robin Acord of Oroville and Chad Hutsell of Ritzville and Joel and Sara Kretz of Wauconda.

North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She was seven pounds, four ounces at birth and 20.5 inches long. She joins siblings Levin, eight; Noah, five and

Friends of

Owen, three. Her grandparents are Bob and Penny Harris of Tonasket and Larry Sr and MaryAlice Johnson of Tonasket.

Glenn Richardson

LOOMIS The Type 1 Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team #3 led by Incident Commander Ed Lewis transitioned management of the Newby Lake Fire over to a Type 3 Incident Management Team Tuesday, July 21. A Type 1 Incident Management Team is assigned to more complex fires, operating at the National and State Level, whereas a Type 3 Incident Management Team operates at a State or Metropolitan Area Level and is assigned to less complex fires.

He’s alive & kickin’!

Come help Glenn celebrate his

70th BIRTHDAY! Sat., Aug. 1 6 p.m. until Dinner Provided

See you there!

Ava Elise Anastasia Nora Johnson, was born to Elizabeth and Larry Johnson of Tonasket, Wash. on July 26, 2015 at

Sports physicals will be done by physician volunteers. All proceeds will be donated to Oroville Booster Club.

DINING & Entertainment

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Prime Rib every Sat.

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| Family Medicine

Lake Resort & Restaurant

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

Mon., July 27 Thurs., Aug 13

– by appointment only –

Bonaparte Advertise your goods and services in the Classifieds and reach hundreds of potential buyers daily. Call today to place your AD and make a sale quickly. Watch for classified specials!

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release put out by the Type 1 team, firefighters were scheduled Monday, July 20, to continue to scout out the location and construct direct fire line west of the Middle Fork of Toats Coulee Creek to the Tripod Fire scar. Mop up of hot spots at the southeastern and southern sections of the fire were scheduled to continue. Air patrol of the northern and northeast sections of the fire is expected to be on-going. Construction of the contingency line in Nine Mile Creek and Branch Creek was also expected to continue. An area closure remains in place on all National Forest Lands and WA DNR lands affected by the fire. For the most up-to-date trail, road and campground closure information on National Forest lands visit www.fs.usda. gov/okawen/; and on Washington DNR lands visit www.dnr.wa.gov/ managed-lands/forest-and-trustlands/loomis-and-loup-loupstate-forests.

.00r $15 od fo

Sun., Aug. 2 8 - 11 a.m. BYOB & Chair.

SPORTS Physicals

Bonaparte Lake Resort (Cabin #9)

Breakfast Provided

According to Shannon O’Brien, Public Affairs Information Specialist with the WenatcheeOkanogan Forest Service, two new commanders have been assigned to the fire; one with WA DNR and one with USFS, as the fire is burning on both DNR and FS lands. O’Brien said the fire has really moderated, but “They will have to keep going out there, finding the hot spots and mopping them up where they can; there are still a lot of dead snags out there, so they have to consider safety.” O’Brien said line construction for the contingency lines was completed, with hose in place along some of the completed lines. Personnel assigned to Newby Lake Fire has steadily declined over the last few days, with 403 total personnel assigned Monday, July 20, compared to 504 total personnel assigned Saturday, July 18. According to the final Newby Lake Fire Information press

Ph. 509-486-2828

Wed., July 22 Wed., July 29 Thurs., Aug. 6

6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

$15.00*

*To be paid at the time of the physical Insurance will not be billed.

Sports physicals will be done by physician volunteers.

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

All proceeds will be donated to Tonasket Athletic Booster Club. – by appointment only – Call 509-486-2174

| Family Medicine For Tonasket High School and Middle School Students!


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE JULY 23, 2015

Oroville School Board Chair faces challenge in Primary Two three-way races for Oroville School Board BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN – Ballots for the Aug. 4 Primary Election went into the mail last Thursday, but only two positions have three candidates on the ballot, both on the Oroville School Board. Two candidates looking to unseat incumbent Rocky DeVon, including a former school board chairman and former Oroville High School teacher. Phil Barker, who served in DeVon’s current spot, wants a second chance on the board in Director Position 5. Saying people did not like his “John Wayne style” of governance, Barker resigned his board position without serving the full four-year term at the end of May 2012. DeVon, who was serving on the board as vice-chairman, assumed the chairmanship at that time. Ryan Frazier, a probationary social studies teacher, did not have his contract renewed by the board after the 2013/14 school year. Frazier is currently in litigation with Superintendent Steve Quick and his wife. The second three-way race for Director Position 2, which is a two-year unexpired term. Seeking the seat currently held by the longest serving member of the board, Amy Wise, are Patricia Maher, Kolo Moser and Becky Lewis. Wise decided not to run for another term. The rest of the candidates for office will have to wait until the General Election in November. The other two positions on Oroville’s school board, that of Director Positions 1 and 4, will only have the names of the

incumbents, Todd C. Hill and Mike Egerton, respectively. Position 1 is for a full four-year term, while Position 4 is for a two-year unexpired term. In Tonasket, Catherine Stangland and Jerry Asmussen are asking a return to the Tonasket School Board in Director Positions 2 and 5, both four-year terms. In Director Position 3, another former school board member, as well as a retiring Tonasket teacher, Joyce Fancher, wants to unseat current incumbent Ty Olson for a four-year term. The Oroville City Council is guaranteed to see some changes as Ed Naillon decided to not run for Position 3. Robert Fuchs and David “Mac” McElheren have thrown their hats in the race for the position. Incumbent Neysa Roley faces a challenge from Chris Allen for Council Position 5. Allen, who tried to displace Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth in the last election, has been vocal about the way the city has been running the ambulance service, especially after former ambulance coordinator Debra Donohue refused to put him on the Oroville crew. All three offices are for fouryear terms. Claire Jeffko’s seat at the table seems secure, as the incumbent will run unopposed for Tonasket Council Position 5. Also running unopposed are Jensen Sackman for Position 2, currently held by Scott Olsen, and Maria Moreno for Council Position 4, which is currently Lois Rice’s seat. All are four-year terms. Herbert Wandler will find himself back on the board for Hospital District 4. The current North Valley Hospital District Commissioner is running unopposed for another six-year term in Position 3. Candidates for other offices include: Gary Nelson, Cemetery District 4 (Riverview, Oroville);

Kenneth D. Ripley, Commissioner Position 3 for Fire District 1 (Oroville, Rural); Duane Van Woert and Jack Denison, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 4 (Tonasket area) Mark Robanske for Position 3, for Fire District 12 (Swanson Mill); Michael Woelke and Robert K. Bauer, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 16 (Aeneas Valley) and Guy D. Fisher, Leland “Lee” Chapman and Mike Cantwell, for Commisioner Positions 1, 2 and 3, respectively for the Lake Osoyoos Water District. Those voters in the Oroville School District who have not received their ballots by Friday, July 24, are encouraged to contact the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office at 509-422-7240, according to Mila Jury, election official with the auditor’s office. All ballots must be signed to count and if mailed must have sufficient first class postage. Mailed ballots must be postmarked by the day of the election, Aug. 4, 2015. The auditor’s office advises voters to check with thier local post office for cut off times. The Okanogan County Auditor’s Office is located at 149 3rd Ave. N. in Okanogan. It is open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and on Election Day only from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following services. • Drop off voted ballots • Obtain replacement ballots • Disability Access Voting Units The drop box will be open July 17 through Aug. 4. The drop box will be open until 8 p.m. the day of the Primary, Aug. 4, 2105. It is located at Tonasket City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. People with questions, may contact the auditors office at 509422-7240.

OBITUARIES

Patricia Mae Punteney

PATRICIA M. PUNTENEY Patricia M. Punteney, 81, of Waterloo and formerly of Oelwein, Iowa died Monday morning, July 20, 2015 at NorthCrest Specialty Care in Waterloo, Iowa. Patricia Mae King was born September

28, 1933 at Spokane, Washington, the daughter of Patrick Kelly and Eva Mae (Riste) King. She graduated from Oroville High School in Oroville, Wash. On March 6, 1954 and was united in marriage to Alvaro James “A.J.” Punteney at Oroville. Patricia was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She was a member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church and Blessed Sacrament Church in Waterloo. Her interests included working at Kathy’s Bakery, cooking, gardening, crocheting, embroidering, taking care of children and most of all her Catholic Faith. Patricia is survived by her five daughters: Eva (Raul) Garcia of Waterloo, Geri Punteney of Toledo, Ohio, Teri Jo Punteney of Seattle, Wash., Carolyn (Craig) Rohrick of Independence, Mo. and Marilyn Payne of Independence, Mo.; one son: Ted Patrick Punteney of Sebastopol, Calif.; 14 grandchildren; 29 great grandchildren; two great-great grandchildren; two sisters: Mary (Bob) Seamons of Oroville and Deloris (John) Brentt of Spokane;

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

DENTISTRY

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Healthcare Services Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology

Columbia River

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG OPTICAL

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

www.okbhc.org HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

Toll free: 866-826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

CLINIC

 Behavioral

Phone number & 24 hour crisis line: 509-826-6191

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Radiology

• Mental Health • Chemical Dependency • Developmental Disorders • Psychiatric Services • Therapeutic Housing

In Tonasket & Oroville

OMAK

 Anti

Services

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program 

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal 

two brothers: Bill (Ann) King of Lacey, Wash. and Tom (P.J.) King of Hillsboro, Ore. and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband on April 8, 2006; son: Shane Kelly Punteney on Dec. 7, 1984; son-in-law: Kevin Payne; grandson: Danny Higgins and three brothers: Edward King, Jimmy King and Michael King. Mass of Christian Burial will take place at 11 a.m., Thursday, July 23, 2015 at Blessed Sacrament Church in Waterloo with Reverend Thomas J. McDermott officiating. Visitation will be from 4 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Wednesday at the Jamison-Schmitz Funeral Home in Oelwein and after 10 a.m. Thursday at the church. Rosary: 4:00 P.M. Wednesday at the funeral home. Inurnment will occur at a later date in Garden of Memories Cemetery, Waterloo, Iowa. Online obituary at www. jamisonschmitzfuneralhome. com

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 23, 2015  

July 23, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 23, 2015  

July 23, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune