Page 1

LOST LAKE FOREST TREK

Music in the Park Series

A Hike-and-Learn Day with George Thornton Saturday, July 18

See Page A10

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Should Oroville School teachers be armed?

OPEN FIRE

Board to consider ways to allow staff to fight back against ‘active shooter;’ public meeting, July 20

the “fatal funnel” (doorway). “The premise behind the training is to help staff members not just hide and OROVILLE - The Oroville School wait, but to take an active role in defendBoard is considering training school ing doorways and fighting back should staff in ways to respond to threats in the an active shooter ever be present, essenschool, as well as allowing a select num- tially taking a trained, proactive approach ber to receive training to carry concealed rather than hiding in a classroom and weapons on school grounds – but before simply doing nothing. The GAP training they would approve either or both, they seeks to minimize casualties in such an want public input next Monday, July 20 event in that gap of time when police are on their way to an at 6:30 p.m. in the active shooting in a high school com“Student and staff safety is school,” said Quick. mons. “The board is “The school a very high priority of the also considerboard realizes that board and having staff at ing utilizing Force arming staff members may be conschool be able to protect Dynamics to train select staff memtroversial in nature our children in an event bers on concealed and is seeking community input on such as an active shooter weapons to give a few staff members the subject,” said weighs heavy on their the ability to miniSuperintendent mize the number Steve Quick. minds.” of casualties in The board is Steve Quick, Superintendent an active shooter considering using Oroville School Superintendent event by arming Force Dynamics to them when it can train the entire staff sometimes take law this fall in GAP training. Force Dynamics has trained enforcement 5-10 minutes to respond several schools and hospitals, including from the time the first shot is fired North Valley Hospital in GAP training, and officers arrive on scene, Quick said, according to Quick. GAP training is a adding, “Trained staff members would lockdown system that is based on the receive much more than the minimum concept of proper room fortification in the case of active shooter and defending SEE TRAINING | PG A3 BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Oroville to open city streets to ATV use Ordinance patterned after Omak’s BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Teagan Walker, age 6, ducks for cover while spraying water at his brother Tanner, age 5. The Tonasket Water Ranch officially opened Sunday, July 12. The park is free of charge and open daily from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more see page A10.

OROVILLE - The Oroville City Council adopted an ordinance allowing people to drive their ATVs on its city streets at their Tuesday, July 7 meeting. The ordinance, which is patterned after Omak’s will allow licensed fourwheelers and side-by-side All Terrain Vehicles to travel on all roads where the speed limit is 35 mph or below, which is all of Oroville’s streets.

Councilman Ed Naillon wanted to make sure the ordinance was not talking about all categories of ORVs (off road vehicles). “We are talking about the common smaller four-wheel vehicles with handlebars, as well as the larger four-wheel utility ATVs?” asked Naillon, by way of clarification before making a motion to approve the ordinance. “The common theme is they’re a four wheel vehicle.” “Yes, we kept to Omak’s closely,” replied Chris Branch, Oroville’s director of Community Development. “I just want to make sure what the ordinance is talking about,” said Naillon.

SEE ORDINANCE | PG A3

Fate of PUD’s Enloe Dam still on hold

NOAA won’t serve as lead agency on removal; PUD seeks another electrification option BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - At the PUD regular commission meeting Monday, July 13, Commissioner Scott Vejraska reported on a June 30 meeting he had with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to discuss the possibility of NOAA playing the role of lead agency in the potential decommis-

sioning and removal of Enloe Dam. Vejraska said that because the organization could not and would not take over liability of the dam, the negotiations were at a standstill. “If they aren’t going to take 100% of the responsibility, it doesn’t work for us,” said Vejraska. “They want to be more of a quarterback and organize the way things are going to go, but not take on the role of a leader.” Dale Bambrick, the NOAA Branch Chief of the Interior Columbia Basin Office who met with Vejraska, stated in a letter dated July 10 “The most challenging issue identified in the removal option had to do with the lead agency role that NOAA could assume versus the role the PUD is hoping that a lead agency

can provide. Unfortunately, despite the PUD’s requests, NOAA would not be able to reimburse the $13 million in costs incurred on the dam. NOAA also would not be able to assume liability for the dam, nor would our lead agency be able to take ownership of the dam or its license.” “The expectations for a lead agency are what we have had all along. The money wasn’t the deal killer,” Vejraska said. “They said they had funding to help remove it from different organizations, but they wouldn’t tell us who; they just said it was an offshore account. We spent the better half of two hours trying to work something out.” Bambrick said NOAAs role as lead agency would involve technical support,

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The fate of Enloe Dam, decommissioned in the 1950s because it wasn’t generating power in a cost-efficient manner, has been a source of debate and dissension for decades.

coordination of efforts among agencies and stakeholders, and potentially helping

to initiate a sediment study to determine potential contamination behind the dam.

SEE PUD | PG A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 29

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NEWS

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 16, 2015

Newby Lake Fire: The battle rages on BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

LOOMIS - Personnel assigned to fight the Newby Lake Fire, located 12 miles northwest of Loomis, was up to 537 as of Tuesday, July 14. The fire, which started July 2 south of Keremeos in Canada and crossed over into the U.S. via the Pesayten Wilderness before encroaching into the Loomis State Forest, has grown to approximately 5,065 acres. Agencies cooperating on the fire are the USFS, WA DNR, BC Wildlife Service and the US Border Patrol. According to the Newby Lake Fire Information Center, plans include two Hot Shot Crews being flown into the remote northern side of the fire via helicopter today, July 14, to work with their Canadian counterparts. Their objective is to prevent the fire from again spreading into the U.S. Fire line construction will continue near the eastern portion of the fire to minimize the amount of acres burned in the Loomis State Forest. Firefighters will continue to strengthen fire line at the South by widening and removing brush. One-tenth inch of rain was

measured at the northern section of the fire Monday, July 13, with only three one hundredths of an inch received at the southern part of the fire. “All rain is not created equal,” said Forest Pathologist Dan Omdal serving as Public Information Officer. “There’s a big difference between a quarter inch falling in a five-minute dump, and the same amount of rain falling over a ten-hour period, which is a lot more wetting. Omdal said one of his priorities was to set up a “trapline,” a communication circuit between Tonasket, Loomis and Oroville with updates every day and fire protection information. “We try to establish a relationship where people congregate locally, and try to lay aside any anxieties they might have about immediate threats from the fire,” said Omdal. The Incident Base Camp, originally established at the Tonasket Middle School, moved to the Loomis Base Camp last week. The camp, located on land owned by Spear Ranch, was also the location of the northernmost fire camp during the 2006 Tri Pod Complex. That fire traveled across Toat’s Coulee from the Winthrop area.

The Washington Interagency Incident Management Team 2 completed their deployment Monday, July 13, and headed home after a 14-day stint that began with the Sleepy Hollow Fire in Wenatchee. The team was replaced by the Pacific Northwest National Incident Management Team 3, with Commander Ed Lewis taking charge early Monday morning, July 13. Supply drivers Howard and Jeannie Day said they enjoyed working under Mike Renden, logistics coordinator for the Loomis Camp. “He’s become a real friend,” said Howard Day, who worked for the Seattle Fire Department for twelve years before moving to Twisp in 1970, when he began working summers with the USFS. His wife first joined him working at fire camps during the Tripod Complex. Kelly Peters of Twisp, working with a falling module called Rainstorm responsible for going in and taking down snags “before the big teams go in,” said they were fortunate the Tri-Pod lines were in place for crews to tie into. An area closure remains in place on all National Forest Lands and WA DNR lands affected by the fire. For the most up-to-date

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The first thing any vehicle entering the Loomis Fire Camp comes upon is this inspection station. All vehicles traveling to and from the fire are inspected for mechanical soundness; to make sure all safety equipment works; and that there are no oil leaks or other fire hazards. Fire behavior was expected to become more active Tuesday, July 14, with an increase in temperatures and an expectation of the air drying out. For up-to-date information on the Newby Lake Fire, visit inci-

web.nwcg.gov/incident/4355. For information on smoke visit wasmoke.blogspot.com, and for information on air monitoring visit http://tinyurl.com/o2nu2ks. To see a lightning map, check out http://tinyurl.com/pu835ha.

to the ratepayers; there’s a lot of ing dice. You don’t know what is money there.” in there, but you want someone Commissioner Houston said to take on the responsibility.” he was concerned if an agency Chief Crow said the Lower got involved, and found out the Similkameen Band were comsediment is a big risk, they could mitted to the removal of the walk away from the project. dam, and supported the Colville “Another dimension is all the Confederated Tribe in a Band players on the First Nation side Council Resolution. “So it is a are not convinced fish should go legal document that stands over that spot, and that’s not a until rescinded,” Crow said. In battle the PUD should fight,” said addressing the PUD commisBolz. sioners, Crow said he agreed with Elected Chief Keith Crow of members of the audience. the Lower Similkameen Indian “We don’t see why you won’t Band traveled fund the studfrom Keremeos, ies for the sediB.C. to attend ““There is ample fund- ment. Everyone the meetin this room ing for a project this seems to be ing along with Rob Edward, a size; the money is there saying, ‘Why Chopaka resiwouldn’t you and the project has do the testing?’ dent and member of the Lower you need a lot of upside for an Maybe Similkameen to go after the agency like NOAA. My proponents and Band. They both stated they to grab some opinion is there is not a try opposed electriof the money to risk to the ratepayers...” do these studfication of the dam. ies,” said Crow. Chris Fisher, Fish & Wildlife Biologist E d w a r d Bolz said he Colville Confederated Tribes spoke of conwas concerned cerns about if the study was having Chinook Salmon in the done, “and we find out it is hot, upper Similkameen due to tribal the people in this room opposlegend, as well as preservation of ing the dam will have us in legal their cultural sites. battles that the ratepayers will “It is important for people on have to pay for.” both sides of the border to have Fisher said a proposal submitcultural sites left in tact,” Edward ted to do a more robust sample of said. “It seems like you are shoot- the sediment had secured fund-

ing and could have had the study done within the year. “My understanding is PUD was not supportive of the study because it might uncover something,” said Fisher. Bolz replied, “It’s not the sampling that worries us, it’s what will be done to us.” “If you found something that pushes a lead agency away from you, you are not losing anything because you don’t have a lead agency now anyway,” said Fisher, “and if you found out there was nothing there, you would have a lead agency.” Jere Gillespie of Chesaw pointed out that the PUD would not be the potentially liable party for the sediments, as they did not put them there. She said if a lead agency were in place, the legal steps would include a search for the responsible party, and if they were no longer around, by law the responsibility would go to the U.S. government’s general tax fund. “But if there were an act of God such as an earthquake, and the sediments go down the river, then you are responsible,” Gillespie said. Vejraska pointed out that despite July 1 being a deadline for the PUD to move forward with electrification, “We are still looking at options here. We are looking at the economics of this thing and trying to find the best outcome.”

information on road and campground closures on National Forest and DNR lands, visit www. dnr.wa.gov/managed-lands/forest-and-trust-lans/loomis-andloup-loup-state-forests or www. fs.usda.gov/okawen/

PUD | FROM A1 “If in the future the PUD decides against the hydroelectric option or chooses to reduce any of its requirements for lead agency reimbursement or liability, we hope you would contact us to discuss the options further,” stated Bambrick, adding “dam removal would result in substantial benefits to NOAA trust fish species. We remain serious about the consideration of the lead agency role as we have defined it.” Vejraska concluded his report by saying, “This doesn’t mean we are not moving forward one way or another. Wednesday (July 15) an outfit is coming in from Colorado who is interested in buying the dam to generate power. That’s where we stand.” Vejraska’s report was followed by nearly two hours of public comment. No one in the audience spoke in favor of electrification. The most common query was why the PUD would not allow for a sediment study to be performed. Commissioner Steve Houston said the PUD was still waiting to hear from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) about the status of the lease, as the dam sits on BLM land. Linda CoatesMarkle, BLM Manager from the Wenatchee Field Office said in February she was attempting to find the original lease, which predated the existence of BLM land. “The lease should state whether the dam must be removed, and

clarify what PUD can demand only way to get away from the a lead agency to do,” said liability is to move quickly to get Commissioner Ernie Bolz. rid of Enloe; then you would be “It seems like this would be rid of the liability. You can’t block one of the very first things you sediment studies and expect anywould want to find out before one to take the lead on this.” going ahead with the projects and Mark Kubiak, who said he has all the debts,” said Jim Miller of lived in the county as a busiOmak. nessman the Bolz said, “In last 16 years, terms of process urged the “This doesn’t mean we also we have done commissioners what is required are not moving forward to get rid of the by the law of the dam. one way or another. land.” “Walk away ...an outfit is coming in as quickly as “Clearly getting the origican from from Colorado who is you nal document this. The counis something ty can’t afford interested in buying we have to do it and the ratethe dam” right away,” said payers can’t Scott Vejraska, Commissioner Houston. afford it,” said Okanogan County PUD #1 Joseph EnzKubiak. “The ensperger of climate has Oroville said become erratwhen he was setting up the No ic, and it’s not dependable. We on Enloe committee of volun- may be looking at the new normal teers, he asked about the original with a drier, hotter climate.” document and was told by PUD Chris Fisher of Riverside, a General Counsel Mick Howe Fish and Wildlife Biologist with that Clark and Associates had a the Colville Tribes, addressed the document issuing their opinion. PUDs concern of ratepayers being However, Enzensperger was told potentially stuck with the liability he could not see the document of removal of the dam. due to client-lawyer privileges. “There is a lot of funding for “So the Clark opinion seems salmon recovery,” said Fisher. to be the legal document here,” “There is ample funding for a Enzensperger said. “The PUD sets project this size; the money is up all these obstacles to agencies there and the project has a lot of that want to take the lead. The upside for an agency like NOAA. liability is on us as a utility. The My opinion is there is not a risk

North Valley gets good marks from patients BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATIE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

North Valley Hospital scored higher than the state average in nine of eleven categories in a survey completed by patients discharged from the facility between July 2013 and June 2014. The nationwide survey, called Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), was implemented in October 2006 by the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid, with Critical Access Hospitals given the opportunity to participate. The first national,

standardized, publicly reported survey of patients’ perspectives of hospital care; it allows valid comparisons to be made across hospitals locally, regionally and nationally. Results are published on the hospital compare website four times a year at www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov. They can also be viewed at www.cms.gov. NVH joined in 2013, with patients surveyed over the phone or by mail within 48 hours to six weeks of being discharged. “NVH is very excited to be a part of this program and would like to encourage everyone to please complete these surveys,”

Bruce Cool

DEDICATION

I would like to thank everyone that made the B Cool Bench Dedication such a huge success: Brant & Vicki Hinze our fabulous MC and partner, Gordie Cockle, Vicki & Walt Hart for the wonderful lunch location, American Legion for tablecloths, Sonja Myklebust, Dennis & Nancy Peterson, Sonja Burch and Reba and all of the wonderful voices, Lynn & Lee Chapman, Mike Cantwell for bench installation, Hometown Pizza, Linda Darrow, Hilary Blackler for fabulous food, Tim & Dianna Naillon, Guy Fisher for all of the WSU hats & shirts, Theresa Hawkins (photographer), Kim, Jack & Nolan Baugher (my super hero kids) and to all of YOU for your generous donations that made the bench possible.

said Sam Nau, Continuous Quality Improvement assistant. “If you receive a telephone call after you get home from the hospital, you would be helping your local hospital by completing the surveys. The results help the process improvement team work to improve the patient experience.” The phone calls to the patient come from out of state. Patients eligible to participate must be 18 or older, have

SPORTS Physicals

had at least one overnight stay at the facility, be non-psychiatric patients, and be alive at discharge. The survey administered to patients using the facility between July 2013 and June 2014 had the following results, with NVH rating listed first and the state average listed second: • Communication with Doctor: 84, 80 • Received help as soon as they wanted: 74, 66.

• Pain Management: 66, 70 • Explanation of Medicines that the patient could understand: 75, 64 • Cleanliness: 78, 73 • Overall Quiet: 64, 56

SEE SURVEY | PG A3

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JULY 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

TRAINING | FROM A1 state requirement for a security guard and would receive ongoing and annual training and recertification.” Currently two school districts in the state, Kiona-Benton and Toppenish have approved policies allowing the training of school staff to carry concealed weapons through this very rigorous program, according to Quick. Their experience of arming select staff members to carry concealed weapons has been very positive in their districts. At the last school board meeting the subject was broached to the board by Director Todd Hill, who also serves as Oroville Police Chief. “I like the GAP training

because it teaches staff how to fight back. If you’re not trained you often tend to panic,” said Hill. Teacher Ed Booker, a former officer with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, commented that “it was a sad state of affairs” when schools have to consider having armed staff. “Our school is more fortunate than most with law enforcement and former law enforcement presence,” added Rock DeVon, board chairman. DeVon said he had spoken with students at Toppenish, where some staff members had completed the training, including carrying concealed weapons. He said the students told him they were comfortable with the fact

ROOF REPAIRS

some staff were armed and felt greater safety at school. “Student and staff safety is a very high priority of the board and having staff at school be able to protect our children in an event such as an active shooter weighs heavy on their minds,” said Quick. A trainer from Force Dynamics will be on hand at the public input meeting to answer questions. Those that are unable to make it to the Monday, July 29 meeting and who would like to provide comment one way or the other, are asked to write a letter to the board or call the district office to speak with the superintendent at 509-476-2281.

ORDINANCE | FROM A1 “Were not addressing anything like an ORV park,” said Branch. “That wouldn’t be allowed anywhere in the city.” Naillon made the motion to approve the ATV ordinance and Councilwoman Neysa Roley seconded and it passed unanimously. The new ordinance does not change the city ordinance as it relates to the use of ORVs for snow removal. The ordinance will go into affect after being published in the local newspaper’s legal notices, according to JoAnn Denney, Oroville City Clerk. New Business Under new business, the council approved a request from Denney to continue to contract with Municipal Code Corporation for their Municode Software. “How much is it?” asked Naillon. “I assume it makes it (city codes) indexable and searchable?” Denney said the software was $300 a year and makes Oroville’s ordinance much easier to search. It can be found on the city’s web-

site at www.oroville-wa.com, by clicking on the Municipal Codes tab at the top. Mayor Chuck Spieth requested that the council approve a new board member for the Oroville Housing Authority, which has been short one member since the passing of Roger McClendon. “Cheryl (Lewis, OHA executive director) and I have talked and think it would be beneficial to both parties if Chris Branch was appointed,” said Mayor Spieth. “We work for the same purposes and once in awhile I think we could better keep on that purpose if they know the city’s side of things,” said Branch, who said he was willing to join the board. There was discussion about the broken curb near the Subway parking lot. Public Works Superintendent Rod Noel will assess the situation. “Has there been a discussion among staff about people dumping garbage in city receptacles?” asked Councilman Jon Neal. He was concerned about people who live outside the city limits

coming to town and filling up the garbage cans in the parks and on city sidewalks, rather than contracting for garbage service on their own, or hauling it to the transfer station. “The City of Chelan has a good ordinance,” said Branch. “Is it a requirement that everyone in town have garbage service?” asked Clyde Andrews, Oroville Chamber of Commerce president and manager of the Camaray Motel. Andrews was told that it was a requirement and then he asked who was doing the dumping. “People from out of town,” answered Denney. The council will study the Chelan ordinance covering the situation and decide if that is something they would like to pattern their own ordinance after. The city council meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month. The next meeting of the council will be at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July 21 in the city council chambers located at 1308 Ironwood Street, Oroville.

of 2015,” said Nau. That is a 6% improvement, bringing it up to the state average. Hospitals may either use an approved survey vendor, or collect their own data, if approved by CMS to do so. NVH uses HealthStream as the survey vendor, as recommended by Rural Health Quality Network. “With the data gathered from HealthStream, we are able to use data driven best practices to help improve the patient experience at NVH,” said Nau. “We in the healthcare field continuously strive to offer the best healthcare with the best patient experience and positive outcomes.” Continuous Quality Improvement and Risk Manager Kathy Swedberg said 50% of patients get a phone call within a few days of going home. “We encourage people to report, as it gives us data to improve our services,” said Swedberg. She said

patients who are in and out of the hospital have the option of backing out of repeated surveys. According to the CMS website, the survey is designed to produce data about patients’ perspectives of care that allow objective and meaningful comparisons of hospitals on topics that are important to consumers. Public reporting of the survey results creates new incentives for hospitals to improve quality of care, as well as enhance accountability in health care by increasing transparency of the quality of hospital care provided in return for the public investment. “NVH previously did a survey in house, where we could compare data between years but not with other hospitals,” said Nau. “We believe using the HCAHPS survey will increase patient satisfaction and create competitiveness, as we are able to see other hospitals’ data.”

SURVEY | FROM A2 • Overall: 73, 70 • Recommend hospital: 77, 73 • Nurses Communicated well: 72, 78 In the two categories where NVH fell below the state average, Nurses Communication and Pain Management, Nau said implementations put in place for improvement include bedside reporting and whiteboard integration. A board is mounted in each patient’s room that can be used to show current patient information at a quick glance, such as who their attending nurse is that day and when they had their last pain medication. Regarding nurse communication, the nursing staff is in the early stages of giving shift reports directly in the patients’ rooms. “We have worked hard to improve nurses communication and I’m happy to report that we have raised nurses communication to 78% in the first quarter

2015

submitted photo

Jimmy’s Roofing has completed a roof resealing project at the north end of Oroville High School. This particular section of the building did not have a new roof placed on it when the high school was remodeled in 1994, so it was long overdue for having some work done on it, according to Supt. Steve Quick. “It held up very well over the years, but started to shows signs of needing immediate attention this past winter. The new seal coating that has been applied has a 15 year warranty that will help keep that wing of the building dry and protected,” Quick said.

New Family Planning Clinic in Okanogan women and men would be unable to access Family Planning services after Okanogan Family Planning closed in last November. The Board of Directors of Okanogan Family Planning donated much of their clinic furniture and supplies to FPNCW to help furnish the new clinic. FPNCW is a Title X clinic with a sliding fee scale that goes to zero for those who are at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), if the client has no other insurance. For those who might qualify, FPNCW can help enroll clients into the new Healthcare Insurance Plans and Apple Health. FPNCW is celebrating it’s 45th year in providing reproduc-

SUBMITTED BY ANITA TAUSON EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FPNCW

OKANOGAN Family Planning of North Central Washington (FPNCW) has opened a reproductive health clinic at 703 S. Second Avenue, in the town of Okanogan. Currently, the clinic is open Mondays and Tuesdays from 9 to 5. Family Health Centers offered the space where there WIC clinic used to be before the WIC clinic moved into their administration building on First Street. FPNCW was asked to provide services in this area by concerned citizens worried that low income

tive and sexual health services in our region. Today, the agency provides services and supplies in Moses Lake and Mattawa in Grant County, Okanogan and Twisp in Okanogan County. With their main clinic in Wenatchee, FPNCW serves Chelan and Douglas Counties as well. FPNCW provides affordable, quality, confidential services to anyone who needs Family Planning services. With education as its keystone, FPNCW also provides outreach to the community and other social service agencies to provide medically accurate, age appropriate, scientifically based sexual health education.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 16, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Aaron Michael Bauman, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty June 23 to three counts of seconddegree unlawful possession of a firearm, POCS (with intent to deliver) (heroin) and POCS (methamphetamine). The court dismissed additional charges of POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. Bauman was sentenced to 40 months in prison and fined $2,210.50 for the March 12 crimes. Hiroaki Miyazaki, 33, Vancouver, Wash., pleaded guilty July 1 to POCS (LSD). The court dismissed an additional charge of POCS (psilocybin mushrooms). Miyazaki was sentenced to 15 days in jail and fined $2,110. The crime occurred June 22 at the Oroville Port of Entry. Daniel Wilson Ray, 44, Oroville, pleaded guilty July 7 to unauthorized use of food stamps. The crime occurred June 3, 2014. The court dismissed a second-degree identity theft charge. In a second case, Ray pleaded guilty July 7 to third-degree theft. That crime occurred Aug. 30, 2014. The court dismissed a first-degree robbery charge. Ray was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 310 suspended, and fined a total of $2,121. Cara Ann Campbell, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty July 7 to second-degree burglary, third-degree theft and second-degree criminal trespassing. Campbell was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred May 28 and June 6. Shannon Cersten Strader, 23, Okanogan, pleaded guilty July 7 to two counts of firstdegree kidnapping and two counts of harassment (threats to kill). The court dismissed four additional charges: thirddegree assault of a child, second-degree assault of a child and two counts of intimidating a witness. In a second case, Strader pleaded guilty July 7 to tampering with a witness. Strader was sentenced July 9 to 84 months in prison and fined a total of $2,221. The court issued July 10 a criminal summons to Eleanor Jean Beach, 67, Omak, for four counts of residential burglary and four counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred between June 28 and July 1. The court dismissed July 13 a harassment (threats to kill) charge against Kerry Dean Ludahl, 55, Tonasket. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. Lorna Fay Bird, 58, Vancouver, B.C., pleaded guilty July 13 to POCS (heroin). Bird was sentenced to three days in jail and fined $860.50. The crime occurred May 29 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Juliann Marie Orr, 18, Omak, with seconddegree theft, third-degree theft and third-degree mali-

cious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred June 16 and June 23. The court found probable cause to charge Aaron Austin Buoy, 28, Riverside, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred June 30. The court found probable cause to charge Reynaldo Diaz Patino, 60, Tonasket, with third-degree assault (DV) and third-degree assault of a child (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred July 4. The court found probable cause to charge Bradley James Verstegen, 28, Omak, with second-degree possession of stolen property. The crime allegedly occurred July 1. The court found probable cause to charge Chelsey Renee Applebee, 18, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The crimes allegedly occurred July 1.

Juvenile A 16-year-old Okanogan boy was found guilty June 18 of indecent liberties (forcible compulsion). The boy was sentenced to 15-36 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration with credit for 15 days served, and fined $100. The crime occurred Dec. 20, 2014. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 30. A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty July 1 to third-degree theft. The girl was sentenced to two days in detention with credit for two days served, and fined $100 for the March 19 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 30. A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty July 8 to fourth-degree assault (DV), third-degree malicious mischief (DV) and obstruction. The girl was sentenced to 14 days in detention with credit for 14 days served, and fined $100 for the June 3 crimes. A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty July 8 harassment (threats to kill), third-degree DWLS and unlawful display of a weapon. The crimes occurred May 13. In a second case, the same girl pleaded guilty to resisting arrest. That crime occurred June 21. The girl was sentenced to 15-36 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration with credit for four days served, and fined a total of $200. A 16-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty July 10 to third-degree malicious mischief (DV). The boy was sentenced to two days in detention with credit for two days served, and fined $100 for the June 6 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Aug. 26. Civil The state Department of Revenue assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes, penalties and fees: Badger Excavating and Construction, Inc., Tonasket, $9,232.35; Sully’s Cafe, Loomis, $4,744.82;

Michael D. Stansbury Enterprises, Oroville, $1,109.98; M A Smith Construction, Oroville, $357.85. The state Employment Securities Department assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment benefits, penalties and fees: Bradley Vanatta, Tonsaket, $303.45; Lawrence Waters, Omak, $1,998.20; June M. Smith, Omak, $1,773.82; Sashina R. Joseph, Omak, $2,910.78.

DISTRICT COURT Chris Eugene Bogart, 52, Omak, had a charge dismissed: use of drug paraphernalia. James Edward Grant, 34, Omak, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Grant was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $508. Thomas Andrew Hamner, 32, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Hamner received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $858. Darcy Patrick Jackson, 47, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: hit-and-run (unattended vehicle). Jackson was fined $200. Carli Jean Jones, 25, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Michael Alan Keil, 29, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed two additional charges of third-degree DWLS. Keil received a 90-day suspended sentenced and fined $343. Arthur George Longdo, 61, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Longdo was sentence to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Rachele Lorraine Moore, 31, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Moore was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 83 days suspended, and fined $858. Edward Robert Morgan, 69, Tonasket, guilty of reckless driving and reckless endangerment. Morgan received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined a total of $1,236. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, July 6, 2015 Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Lower Thrapp Mountain Rd. near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on Barnholt Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Drugs on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Clint Michael Griffin, 40, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Abass K. Jama, 18, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and MIP/C. Alyssa Ann Descoteaux, 21, DOC detainer.

Jacob Patrick Vincent Ramsey, 29, DOC detainer. Dustin Hawk Chambers, 24, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant and failure to register as a sex offender.

Tuesday, July 7, 2015 One-vehicle crash on Molson Rd. near Molson. Vehicle prowl on Nickell St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Illegal burning on Red Apple Dr. near Omak. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on Benton St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Jasmine St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Oak St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fireworks on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Third Ave. in Oroville. DWLS on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Maria Asusena Contreras, 59, booked for third-degree DWLS. Jesse Ballesteros Garcia, 25, booked on three FTA warrants: obstruction, seconddegree criminal trespassing, third-degree malicious mischief; and two Douglas County FTC warrants: first-degree DWLS and DUI. Lisa Kay Williams, 28, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Gale Celeste McMillan, 48, booked for first-degree burglary, fourth-degree assault (DV) and harassment. Jacob Robert Guy Nanamkin, 25, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS and fourth-degree assault (DV). Samantha Ann Harding, 44, DOC detainer. Nicole Ashley Geddes, 23, booked for third-degree theft and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Rodolfo Martinez Pamatz, 52, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Shawn Murice Cook, 37, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: third-degree DWLS and thirddegree theft. Wednesday July 8, 2015 Warrant arrest on S. Fir St. in Omak. Burglary on FS 3525 Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hopfer Rd. near Omak. Propone tank reported missing. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Wannacut Lake Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Eighth Ave. in Okanogan. TMVWOP on Columbia River Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Hennepin St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Blue Lake Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on W. Apple Ave. in Omak.

ZOOM IN ON A BUYER

Theft on Benton St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Locust St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Panvista Dr. in Omak. Tires reported slashed. Custodial interference on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Kenneth Wesley Clark, 36, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. David James Lavin, 55, booked on a Superior Court warrant for second-degree theft. Christina Jean St. Clair, 28, booked for possession of a legend drug without a prescription, POCS, seconddegree theft, second-degree trafficking in stolen property, and a Grant County FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Miguel Dominguez Santana, 18, DOC detainer. Christopher Brian Durgan, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Enita Erlene Kelly, 47, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Thursday, July 9, 2015 Illegal burning on Elmway in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Narcotics reported missing. Theft on Whiterock Rd. near Okanogan. Dog reported missing. Illegal burning on Hi-View Lane near Tonasket. Illegal burning on Main Rd. near Tonasket. Child abuse on Index St. in Omak. Theft on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Firearm reported missing. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Michelle Lynn Carden, 27, DOC detainer. Friday, July 10, 2015 Threats on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Injuries reported. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Elgin Way near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Jackson St. in Omak. EBT card reported missing. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on W. Jonathon Ave. in Omak. Found property on Locust St. in Omak. Bicycle recovered. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Columbia St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. David John Donovan, 59, booked for third-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. Fawn Josephine Abrahamson, 40, DOC detainer. Brandon Herz, no middle name listed, 28, DOC detainer and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order. Steven Derek Nordlund, 25, booked for second-degree DWLS. William Bunting, no middle name listed, 24, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Rory Allen Westmoreland, 53, booked for theft of a motor vehicle and third-degree theft. Maddesyn Danielle George, 21,

booked for POCS (methamphetamine). Kolby Christine Smith, 18, booked for second-degree burglary.

Saturday, July 11, 2015 Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Automobile theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Ivy St. in Omak. Harassment on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Motorcycle crash on Golden St. in Oroville. Injuries reported. Structure fire on W. First St. in Tonasket. Stonechild D. Moran, 38, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft and an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Sunday, July 12, 2015 Vehicle prowl on N. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Disorderly conduct on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Motorcycle crash on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Injuries reported. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Main St. in Omak. Structure fire on Benton St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Apple Lane in Omak. Domestic dispute on Skyview Dr. near Omak. Trespassing on Pine St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Oak St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Custodial interference on Central Ave. in Oroville. Warren William Louie, 49, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. David Donald Allen Jr., 32, booked for first-degree robbery. Adam Wade Gilbert, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Tiffany Lana Yallup, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Richard Allen Watt, 57, booked for first-degree assault (DV), attempted burglary (DV), felony harassment (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Nickolas Gilbert Andrews, 29, booked for obstruction. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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JULY 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Not sure I’m ready for guns in the classroom

I hope those in the Oroville School District, especially those with kids attending school, come to the public input meeting planned on Gap training for staff and the possibility that certain trained staff will be allowed to carry concealed weapons (see story page 1). It’s hard to disagree with teacher Ed Booker when he wonders how it’s come to this point. The point where it’s felt by some that a percentage of school staff should go armed into our schools. This is a hard decision being made by the board; it needs your input. A well-trained and armed teacher might make the difference between a “shooter” hurting several people or none. It’s imperative that staff gets training on how to fight back, or at least what to do so that panic doesn’t set in, but carrying guns – that’s a decision that needs to be made with a lot of input by the parents and the community at large. It wasn’t that long ago when a shooter was loose in a Marysville, Wash. high school. I know I was especially concerned, because one of my nephews is in school in Marysville. While watching the news and texting my brother and sister-in-law, I learned that my nephew went to Out of a different school. It is easy to see how panic My Mind could set in for those who find themselves in Gary A. DeVon that situation – whether they’re a kid or adult. Any training that would help those responsible for our kids get out of the situation unharmed would be good – I’m just not sold on the armed staff at this point. Let’s see how the rest of you feel at next Monday’s meeting at the high school commons at 6:30 p.m. What else to talk about this week – well, we could discuss the 16-year-old who miraculously survived a small airplane crash and made her way through forest and rough terrain to a store in Mazama, despite both her step grandparents having perished. As of our deadline they were still searching for the crash site. Then there’s the Newby Lake Fire, it seems to keep growing, starting in Canada it has burned into the Pasayten Wilderness Area where it can be fought from the air and by non-mechanized means on the ground. It is now burning into the less environmentally protected Loomis State Forest where trucks, dozers and other methods can be used to stop it. Fire lines drawn during the Tripod Fire in 2006 are said to be aiding in the fight. While the Newby Lake Fire is less likely to threaten structures like last year’s devastating Carlton Complex, where 300 homes were lost, we are all hoping those fighting the fire remain safe and can bring it to a speedy end. Several people took issue with me giving up my space for U.S. Rep. Dan Newhouse’s diatribe on what he, and many Republicans now call the “Activist” Supreme Court. Like, Mr. Connot, I wonder why they weren’t “Activist” when they ruled on Citizens United, giving big corporations and big money, the power to sway elections. Why weren’t they deemed “Activist” by the right when the highest court in the land threw their beloved State’s Rights out the door and told Florida they couldn’t do another presidential recount. The Republican Party has done its best to take away the right to vote for the poor, elderly and minorities, by passing draconian voter registration and ID laws. They scream State’s Rights over everything from gun laws to flying the Confederate Flag – of course that’s only if the state has the same way of thinking as the GOP or it means more Republicans in office.

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Enough already

Dear Editor, In response to two items in your July 6, edition, first, the guest editorial was headlined “Activist Court Bails out Obamacare.” It is an easily observed fact that the ONLY time that the right wing refers to the court as activist is when it displeases their narrow interests. How many Republican congressmen labeled the court activist for the most damaging, evil decision of the last 50 years, Citizens United, which, in effect, turned our political election process over to the few in this country with enough money to buy our elected representatives? So watch the labeling, Dan Newhouse, or we might think you agree with giving the country to the Koch brothers. Then we have the letter from Steve Lorz (was he impatient for his ‘opinion’ column to appear?). Out of a myriad of distortions and falsehoods, I single out his truly wicked assertion”…the offscouring of Chicago attempted to appease the Muslim world by saying that “The future does not belong to those who slander the prophet of Islam.”” Two points, first it is an unbelievably sick and hateful thing to refer to ANYBODY, let alone our President, as ‘the offscouring of Chicago’. What kind of sick brain dreams up these filthy insults? Second, the clear implication of this sentence is that Lorz believes that the future does belong to those who slander Mohammed. Sorry, Lorz my friend, but in a Christian nation, hateful slandering of another religion is NOT the flavor de jour.

(Incidentally, why do we, in English keep referring to Mohammed as the ‘prophet?’ In Islam his universal title is not ‘prophet’ but ‘rasul,’ which means ‘Messenger.’ Also, before Lorz jumps on me as a Muslim, I am a practicing Roman Catholic, the offscouring of Ellensburg, but that does not prevent me from gaining knowledge and understanding of other religions. (Hint, hint, Lorz). Yours truly, John F, Connot Everett

Words from the umpire Dear Editor, Being politically correct is not one of the burning desires in my life. Rather, I’d like to think that I’m an umpire who calls it as he sees it. Granted some calls an umpire makes are incorrect and some are only questionable but most of them are ‘right on.’ However, many in the stands who, between bites of their hotdog and gulps of beer see it differently. But, the umpire still calls it as he sees it and everyone else needs to deal with it as it confronts them. Wow, that was a lot of prattle that some may say is almost meaningless; but, it does set the stage for saying how this umpire sees the state of our nation. Our nation was founded upon principles from the Bible. Bet some of you reading this letter will read no further because of the last words in the last sentence; but if that’s true, you haven’t even read this

sentence, aw, smile. Well, this umpire wants to share a few ‘calls’ with you and ask you to think about them. In my opinion, this nation has strayed far from the intent of Adams, Franklin, Hancock, Jefferson and Middleton, and the 51 others who signed. Granted, as this nation developed there were several examples of how the general populace either did not act as they should have, or looked the other way when it came to gender, color of skin, or economics and as a result, there has been and continues to be instances of non-Biblical conduct. But, it is time, actually it is PAST time for us to look the other way. Just as a tiny snowflake starts to roll, gathering speed and size it becomes a snowball, and eventually an avalanche so does getting away from our founders intent become a snowball that crushes everything in front of it. This has happened to every nation that has existed since creation and it is happening to our nation today. The question becomes, ‘will we continue to slide the slippery slope of inclusive tolerance/or will we stand up as we should? I encourage you to read the Bible, learn from it, talk with others, enter into the fellowship of a Bible believing church and help our nation become again what it has been. But, not necessarily what it has been but go even further becoming what God intended us to be. That is to say, right the way of wrong, be better than we have been and yet steadily increase towards what were intended to be. Randy Middleton Tonasket

The Cult of Preposterousity OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIO-ECONOMIC WRITER

Did you know Batman and Robin were lovers? Me neither, but some professor overpaid $300K-plus at Harvard said so last week on Neo-leftist Propaganda Radio (NPR). You hear some amazingly preposterous things on the social and commercial media these days. Another obscenely overpaid professor at some other ‘leading university’ said last week that white Americans should all ‘commit suicide over slavery.’ And he was white. I read Bill Slusher that an illegal alien film maker has made a ‘documentary’ showing white people weeping with guilt over something called ‘white privilege.’ Another accuses white Americans of genocide against Native Americans, as though whites invented aggression and American Indian tribes had not already been conquering, enslaving, killing, raping and plundering each other for centuries before Wasichu ever made the beach. Part of the problem here is the archaic and corrupt practice of tenure in universities. Firing a tenure-sheltered professor for babbling bigoted nonsense is more impossible than firing a union schoolteacher for demonstrated incompetence. Tenure makes academia the last institution in America where racism and other forms of asinine bigotry are not just protected, but outright encouraged and monetarily rewarded, as long as the targets are white, hetero or Christian. The other part of America’s overpaid idiocy problem is that increasing numbers of Americans spend their every waking minute contriving schemes of ‘wealth redistribution,’ a perfumed phrase for the communist theft of money earned by some people to be given free to others. Call it ‘scammer privilege.’

Take ‘white privilege.’ The intent of this creative silliness is to move money and opportunity from whites to blacks based on the notion that whites enjoy racial advantage. When supreme courts promote this bigotry, they call it ‘affirmative action.’ It’s a clever con I admit. We’ve seen recently that even white women can declare themselves black NAACP officials and avail themselves of affirmative action freebies and protections for decades. This ‘privilege’ con may catch on. The possibilities are endless. African blacks could claim that American blacks must pay them for ‘privilege.’ I’d bet there are several million African blacks who consider modern American blacks as highly privileged, given their lifestyle as compared to Africans. American blacks have full American opportunity proved beyond any intelligent doubt by countless black CEOs, doctors, lawyers, athletes, musicians, generals, politicians, and even a black American president. I suspect that many African blacks consider American blacks privileged because the latter aren’t living in abject poverty and disease in unstable, corrupt nations, hacking one another to death with machetes or losing their daughters by the hundreds to African Muslim gangs. I’d venture to guess that a survey of African blacks would reveal that they consider American blacks quite... privileged. They might even wonder how American blacks haven’t made more of that extraordinary privilege. They would pose a fair question. Get out your checkbooks, black Americans. Time to pony up for American ‘black privilege.’ And what about American Indian ‘privilege?’ After all, didn’t the tribes have centuries living on top of extraordinary North American resources before Whitey ever rowed ashore? With that remarkable privilege, why didn’t Native Americans develop a great technological society that could build ships and weapons and sail to foreign lands to conquer same? Don’t even try to say it’s because they were nicer folks. They’re as nice

as the rest of us, of course, but their history proves they had imperialistic, genocidal ways of their own. Yes, I have a point and it’s this. Perhaps American blacks and Native Americans would do enormously better for themselves if they put all that wealth redistribution scam energy into making better advantage of American opportunity. No, I never said it was easy, but (A), historical percentages of blacks and Indians are doing it every year, and (B), how’s that white privilege scam been working out for you? Has black or Indian poverty in America gone down significantly for the anti ‘white privilege’ scheme called ‘affirmative action?’ The US Census Bureau says the “black poverty rate has risen from 21.2% in 2000 to 25.7% in 2012” (BlackDemographics.com). “The Native American rates are comparable to those of blacks and Hispanics” (Pew Research Center). Blacks comprise about 12% population in America, Indians 2%. Is the wise path for these struggling people to insult, alienate and try to scam the overwhelmingly dominant remaining population? Doesn’t it make more sense to enlist the respect, admiration and support of the other races by accepting responsibility for one’s own people, and moving forward from there? What theme do you suppose promises minorities more? “My life is your fault, Whitey! Gimme your money!” Or, “My people and no one else are responsible for our plights and our futures in modern America. We will earn our own way up.” Are those racist, blame-game academicians and politicians who preach ethnic self-pity doing minorities any favors? William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, calledCASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 16, 2015

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE What did we ever do before air conditioning? Already we have reached the half way point of July, and a hot one it was. What did we ever do without air conditioning? July is the month of class reunions, weddings and other fun get-togethers. The Rainsberry family continue their tradition of having a cousins reunion, usually at the home of Gai (Rainsberry) Wisdom, here in Oroville. We were pleased to have visits from Merlin and Kevin Forney, whose mother is Donna (Rainsberry) and expect to see Ann, sister of the boys, as she will be staying extra days. Donna and Virgil were not able to be on hand due to health issues. Our valley has been filled with smoke from area fires but seems to be cleared, as of this writing. And of course there have been some rain showers, helping to cool things off a bit. Waking last Saturday morning to

Pacific Northwest Trail Days to be celebrated in Oroville

strange and loud noises, turned out to be tree removal at the house across the alley. It was a very large tree, at Steve and Ada Retasket’s, and left quite an opening and we can see quite a distance to the north. Once again George Thornton has been very generous, sharing the flowers he grows. In the spring, it was daffodils and now is very large lilies, of assorted colors he brought to the Oroville Senior Center for folks to take home with them. There is just nothing that brightens a home more than fresh flowers, or so it seems to me. Last week the Thursday Pinochle Club met at the lake home of Jeanie Robison. I’d forgotten how interesting it is to watch the activity on the water from boats. It seems there isn’t nearly as much old fashioned water skiing as there

OROVILLE PNTA NEWS

OROVILLE- The Oroville Chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association is hosting two days of family fun on Saturday and Sunday, August gth and 9th, 2015. Taking place on the Youth Soccer Fields adjacent the U.S. Post Office on Kernan Rd. On Saturday, “Pacific Northwest Trail Days” will feature allday live music, Kids’ Arts and Crafts Activities, Speakers, maps and information, raffle items, hiking gear, live hawks and owls, photography, and local artists. Sunday we will be getting out on the trails with group hikes, bike and horseback rides planned for the morning The Oroville Chapter of the PNTA is a nonprofit volunteer organization

working to complete and connect the Okanogan section the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Northwest Trail is a continuous hiking trail from Glacier Park Montana to the Pacific Ocean. The trail was just an idea in 1976 when a young man named Ron Strickland made his trek from Glacier Park. He stopped in Oroville and had a great time. While here, he was hosted by local realtor, the late Stan Porter and his family, before hiking on through to the Coast. He later published a book with maps describing his route titled “The Pacific Northwest Trail Guide” and the Pacific Northwest Trail was born. Ron’s vision for this trail was so good it quickly gained popular support. It was designated a national scenic trail by Congress in 2009. Oroville is well placed midway on the trail, 600 miles from Glacier Park with 600 more miles to the Pacific. Our cen-

Going to miss our friend Pauline

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER PNTA, OROVILLE CHAPTER

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

We have lost yet another one of our Hilltop family. On June 24, 2015 our dear friend Pauline Waits left us. How do you say good-by to a friend? There are many ways. By remembering how they looked, how they talked, and how they made you feel when you were together. From the very start of our friendship I knew it was going

Karoake show on Friday, July 17

to be a long one. We could start a conversation one day and perhaps get interrupted and pick up where we left off, days or even a week or so later. She was a beautiful lady with porcelain skin dark hair and eyes. She had a positive attitude and a beautiful smile, and a heart of gold, that make you feel good and welcome. Pauline was born in Vancouver, B. C. and later came to Chesaw from California with her soul

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

Jeannie Riggan will be in on Friday, July 17 with her Karaoke Show. Meat draw and Joker Poker will be happenin’ too. Sounds like an evening of great fun with friends and family. Speaking of family, the Rainsberrys would like to thank the Aerie for cooking us dinner

Raising money for new reader board SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

The weather has been fantastic for most of us, (HOT) it is to cool off some what. Dues renewals have been going great and we would like to thank all those that have been getting in and updating their membership status. Come in or send in your dues and be an early bird.

on a special steak night. It was special; large enough for all of us to get together, the food was great, and the price was right. Thanks again guys. The group had a very good time. A very special thank you to Jackie and Garrett for the volunteer job they did. Your Eagle brothers and sisters appreciate all you do for the organization.

TONASKET EAGLES This Saturday, July 18 we will be having our annual Fish & Chicken feed from 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Proceeds for this event will go towards the new reader board. Also there will be a Dessert Benefit Auction for Ted and Dottie Hart due to a fire at their home that destroyed their roof and water damage Please help support this event. Bingo is Friday at 7 p.m. and

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used to be. Now it is ski-doos and other goal was to reach a hundred thousand water toys. dollars by the time he graduated from Was good to see that Oroville did well high school, when he started his projin the Spokane 3 on 3 basect in fourth grade. He has ketball play off, even in the reached that goal, already, extremely hot weather. Way and still has one year left. to go, Lily and Hannah! What a kid! He will continue This week we have some on with the project to help death notices. Lillian Tibbs Korean vets to go on similar had been failing and finally trips. lost the battle. I was shocked It is good to report that to learn of the death of Mary Joan Thorndike is home, Bourn, as we had visited with after a stay in the hospital her at length, at the Extended due to health issues. Family Care, just a week ago. And members have come to her the third one is a lady, not THIS & THAT aid, as she has horses, a mom so well known in the com- Joyce Emry and an uncle, whom she munity, but Annie the mother cares for. of Wilma Colburn,a retired Marilyn (Sawtell) Toth, teacher from Oroville schools, who had who has battled cancer for many months, brought her mom to live with her as she is once again in hospital, after taking a needed assistance. Sincere condolences fall. Judy Ripley, her sister, didn’t have go out to families of these folks. many particulars, at this writing, as the We’ve all heard of and applauded the call from Canada came during the early good works of Justin Peterson, with his hours of the morning. fund raising for the Honor Flights that It sure doesn’t take much fabric to help World War II veterans go, for free, make young gals swimsuit, these days. to Washington D.C. to have a nice trip Did you notice? and see the Memorials to the vets. His

tral location on the Trail is a golden opportunity for our town, Oroville and the North County We are throwing a big party and inviting everyone to come out and join the fun celebrating the Pacific Northwest Trail. Here is a list of the musical talent taking to our stage. Sandy Vaughn, John Phillips, Hippies on Vacation, Digital Deb and friends, Steve Pollard, Scott Green, Picker Rick and friends, Harvey Swanson, Ruby Scene, and Nuance finally closing with dance music from Chesaw’s Happy Dog. “What a Show, What a Show!” Kids can learn about hiking and camping, wildlife, fish, hawks and owls. They will have opportunities to be creative. They can make a beaded necklace or bracelet, make a walking stick, learn to cast a fly or spin wool into yarn. With a big party tent for shade and lots to see, hear and do, the Trail Days Celebration is the place to be on Saturday, August 8. For more information or to participate in the Event contact Joseph Enzensperger 509-4764072 jgenz4@gmail.com mate, Tony. They owned and operated the Chesaw Tavern. While there, they started the Hot August Nights Car Show, now in its sixth year. She moved on to Real Estate on the Hilltop where she found homes for many in the community. She was a fighter and always with a smile. You could tell when she was not up to par, but kept on going– just like that Energizer Bunny. I really admired her courage. Pauline liked the Western look, so join us on July 25, 2015, in your best Country Duds at noon in the Rodeo Hall in Chesaw for a Pot Luck Celebration of the Life of our dear friend, Pauline Waits.

The Eagles Picnic will be on Saturday, Aug. 22 at Thorndike’s Beach. I don’t know how many years we’ve been doing this there, but it’s always a good time. Start making plans to be there. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw and Tacos. We are People Helping People! the kitchen is open at 5:30 p.m. Free Pool on Tuesdays all day. Don’t forget Name Game and Shake a Shift every day. Joker Poker on Saturday at 6:45 p.m. Must be present to win. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Neil Fifer second place Wanda Sutherland Low score went to Ted Zachman and Last Pinochle to Neil Fifer and Leonard Paulsen. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy Recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

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General Membership Meeting July 22 SUBMITTED BY FORD WATERSTRAT LAKE OSOYOOS ASSOCIATION

The Lake Osoyoos Association (LOA) is a dedicated group of lake shore owners and interested residents of Oroville whose goal has been to improve the quality of water in the lake as well as recreational uses of the lake. The LOA has been working towards reclaiming the lake from the ravages of milfoil that has been increasing since the late 1980’s. The milfoil has been spread due to multiple methods. Most notably the harvesting of milfoil on the Canadian side of the Border and also due to boats running through dense mats of milfoil fragmenting the milfoil into smaller pieces which floats downstream and toward shore and then lays down roots in the littoral zones around the lake. Milfoil can be deadly as swimmers can get tangled in it and drown. Studies have been shown that having milfoil in front of your property can decrease the value of your property by as much as 10-15 percent. It can make the easy use of your waterfront very difficult. Over the last five years the Lake Osoyoos Association has been working toward decreasing the impact of milfoil in the lake. The LOA initially was awarded a grant for coming up with a comprehensive plan for man-

Fairly recently Ryan Hughes, son of Glen and Kathy Hughes, was married, in Arizona, and last Sunday a reception was held at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, for folks that couldn’t go to the wedding, to get acquainted with the young couple. Don Steg had reached his sixties and never had a birthday party. He was born near the Fourth of July and the family was always camping and the years slipped by and no party. His mother and sister altered that situation and he had many friends stop by for refreshments and a big cake last Sunday afternoon. Mary Ellen Lemmond has been enjoying time spent with friends that she made while living here. She now resides in Michigan, but really enjoys the “Dear Hearts and Gentle People” of Oroville. Remember that song? How sad that someone like Bill Cosby acted so stupidly, when he had so much going for him. His show was the greatest and he didn’t have sense enough to appreciate it, and he’s in a peck of trouble! ‘Til next week

LAKE OSOYOOS ASSOCIATION aging milfoil in the lake. This included attempting a pilot strategy of using a biological method for controlling milfoil using very small weevils which are natural to the lake. These weevils attack the stems of the milfoil and kill it. This was a very intensive project which included finding weevils in milfoil beds, capturing them, and taking them to twenty gallon water tanks which were set up in the High School Science lab in the summer in an attempt to propogate them. This demonstrated that it can be done, but not in the numbers that are needed to make an impact. Research suggests that you need 200-300 weevils per acre to have a significant impact on milfoil. The LOA also used their grant money for education regarding milfoil and put up signs at all public parks in Oroville, and at most private boat launches. In addition, they came up with a card brochure which is handed out to boaters in the park which emphasizes to “Clean, Drain, Dry” the milfoil off boats when they come out of the water so as not to spread it to other lakes. The spread of milfoil by boats has been significant, look at Spectacle and Palmer lakes, and most other lakes in the County. Early last year the LOA was awarded another grant for the eradication of mifoil. The LOA

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used some of this money last summer to do a Milfoil application using a herbicide by Aquatechnex, a Department of Ecology certified applicator This was successful in drecreasing the Milfoil in areas of application. This summer the LOA has done smaller application in several areas. # This won’t entirely eliminate milfoil completely. It is very hardy invasive weed which will come back again and again. This has been a step in the right direction. Lake Osoyoos is the jewel of Okanogan County. People from all over the State and Canada come to Veterans Park to enjoy these waters. The LOA needs your help. They are having a General Membership meeting on Wednesday July 22 at 7 p.m. at Oroville High School in the Commons Area. They will be looking for your attendance and involvement at this meeting. We need new leaders for our Association. You can help us to reclaim our lake with your involvement. We need your participation. We will have a display regarding Invasive Mussels, as well as, current information on the LOA’s activities. Come and help us set our goals for next year. Help us reclaim our lake.

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JULY 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Storyteller Deb McVay

TONASKET- Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Storyteller Deb McVay on Wednesday, July 15 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509486-2366. Ruby Scene at Winery

OROVILLE – Ruby Scene will perform at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, July 16. Musicians include the regulars Denny Richardson, Steve Bell and Ruby Marchand with the addition of Kyle Mac Connell and Sonny Lanigan for the evening. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at 509-4762861 or check the Events Page at www.estherbricques.com. Preschool Story Time

TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 17 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, July 18 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509476-2096. Lost Lake Forest Trek

CHESAW - Lost Lake Forest Trek, a hike-and-learn day trip with George Thornton on Saturday, July 18. The trek will travel a route not commonly used by hikers in the forest around the southern end of Lost Lake, participants will have the opportunity to see areas often missed by recreationists. Local botanist and retired schoolteacher, George Thornton, will share observations and knowledge about local plant life, helping community members to see some of the details that make up the big picture of biodiversity in the Lost Lake forestlands. The hike will be 5.6 miles long round trip. Please consider your physical condition and whether a hike of this nature would be suitable for your needs, strengths, and stamina. More info: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. Preregistration is required: julie@ okanoganhighlands.org or call 509-476-2432. Due to the nature of the outdoor event, participation is limited, and priority registration will be offered for OHA members. There is no charge for this event; donations are always welcome. Art in the Green at Esther Bricques Winery

OROVILLE - Artists from the Okanogan region will share their works in the setting of Esther Bricques Winery’s grounds on Sunday, July 19 from 1 p.m.

to 6 p.m. Over a dozen local artists with be performing their arts with displayed works available for sale. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. Contact the winery at 509-476-2861 for more information. Bottle Cap Necklace Craft

TONASKET- Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Bottle Cap Necklace Craft on Tuesday, July 21 at 4 p.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509486-2366. Lake Osoyoos Association

OROVILLE - The Lake Osoyoos Association, LOA, is having their General Membership Meeting on Wednesday, July 22 at Oroville High School at 7 p.m. in the Commons area. The LOA is looking for more involvement from community members and lake shore owners as the lake is used by all. Preschool Story Time

TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 24 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366. OHS Class of 1975 Reunion

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1975 will be having a get together on Friday, July 24 at Copper Mountain Vineyards (AKA - Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Stand) 1 mile north of Princes Center on Hwy. 97. The get together is from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. with drinks and appetizers. Picnic to follow on Saturday. Bring the family. Pass the word to other classmates or view Brian Brownlee’s Facebook page for further details or call 509-833-0190. Grasshopper Festival

REPUBLIC - The Grasshopper Festival, Friday, July 24 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., is a fun summertime festival with local artists and food, a ScareCritter Contest (think insect scarecrows), a Bug Parade, real life info about grasshoppers including natural pest control, and fantasy bug stuff, too, like insect mask and piñata making. And what makes this festival different? Eating real bugs! No one has to eat a bug, bug don’t you want to see someone else eat a bug? The festival is at Republic City Park, 40 N. Kean Street. PNTA Meeting & Cookout

TONASKET - On Saturday, July 25 the Oroville Chapter of the PNTA will meet in the Bonaparte Lake Forest Service Campground for the regular monthly meeting. Meet, greet, and eat at 6 p.m. On Sunday morning, July 26 we will hike Pipsissewa Trail. Come for the cookout, hike, or camp in the Bonaparte Campground and attend both events. Molson All School Picnic

MOLSON - The Molson All School Picnic will be Saturday, July 25 at noon at Lost Lake. Everyone is welcome to the potluck, call Mary Louise for more info 509-485-3292.

Library Puppet Show

TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents a Library Puppet Show on Wednesday, July 29 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366. OHS Class of 1953 Reunion

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509-4762488. OYSC Fall Soccer Registration

OROVILLE - Registration for Oroville Youth Soccer has begun. Go to www.ncwsoccer. om to register children four to 14-years-old. There is a one time $50 fee which allows players to play in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. The deadline to register is prior to July 31, 2015. Players who aren’t registered by then will not be allowed to play. Fall season runs from September to October. Those with questions should contact Jaden Taber at 509-560-3461. Vacation Bible School

OROVILLE - Valley Christian Fellowship presents “Jungle Jaunt,” a unique summer VBS program. Come explore the rainforest and get to know God through Bible stories, music, games, crafts and more! Jungle Jaunt will be held each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins July 5 and continues through Sept. 20. Open to kids age 4 to 11. For more information, or to arrange a ride for your child, call 560-0228. Valley Christian Fellowship is located at 142 East Oroville Road. Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville Food Bbank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 476-2386. Listing Your Item

The Community Bulletin Board allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info phone number. You may place an event on the online by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button. Please list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

What Happens to My IRA After I’m Gone? FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

Contributing to an IRA can help you build some of the resources you will need to enjoy a comfortable retirement. But what happens to your IRA if you don’t use it up in your lifetime? You can still put the IRA’s assets to good use — as long as you’ve made the right moves and communicated your wishes clearly to your family. When you opened your IRA, you should have named a beneficiary — someone who will receive the IRA assets when you pass away. You could also name a contingent beneficiary if the first beneficiary dies before you. These beneficiary designations are important because they can supersede the instructions left in your will. If you name your spouse as beneficiary of your IRA, he or she has options unavailable to other beneficiaries.

Here are two possibilities: Roll over assets into a new or an existing IRA — Your surviving spouse can roll over your IRA’s assets into his or her IRA or use the money to create a new IRA. And, as long as your spouse is eligible, he or she can then add new contributions to the IRA. This could be a good choice if your spouse won’t need the money right away and would like to keep it in a tax-advantaged account for as long as possible. Upon reaching age 70½, though, your spouse will likely need to start taking withdrawals (“required minimum distributions”), unless the inherited IRA was a Roth IRA. Convert the assets to a Roth IRA — If you are leaving a traditional IRA to your spouse, he or she could roll over the assets into a new or an existing IRA and then convert the assets into a Roth IRA. This move gives your spouse at least two potential advantages. First, if certain requirements are met, no taxes are due on the withdrawals. Second, as mentioned above, no withdrawals are even required — your spouse can leave the money intact for as long as desired. However, taxes will be due on the amount converted to a Roth, so this conversion may only make sense if your spouse has enough assets available in a nonretirement account to pay the tax bill.

Thus far, we’ve just talked about your spouse as the beneficiary. But what might happen if you’ve named someone else — perhaps a child or grandchild — as the primary beneficiary of your IRA? In this case, the beneficiary won’t have the option of rolling over the IRA. Instead, he or she can either take the money as a lump sum or take distributions over time. If you pass away before age 70½, and you hadn’t started taking the required minimum distributions, your beneficiary must start taking withdrawals by Dec. 31 in the year following the year in which you pass away. These withdrawals can be stretched out over your beneficiary’s lifetime, though, spreading out the tax obligations. As an alternative, your beneficiary can delay taking distributions, but he or she would need to withdraw all the money within five years of your death. When dealing with any aspect of your estate plans, including naming beneficiaries for your IRA, you’ll want to consult with your tax and legal professionals. You put a lot of time and effort into building the assets in your IRA — so you’ll also want to take care in how you pass these assets along. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Pancake breakfast well attended

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our Pancake Breakfast was well attended, and our volunteers had a good time. Ruth’s daughter, Pat, from Battle Ground, Wash., taught us a thing or two about cooking hash browns. I’ll tell you, they were about the best hash browns I’ve ever eaten, especially with sausage gravy on top. Be sure to put Saturday, Aug. 8 down for another breakfast, and get there early, before the stampede, y’all.  Meals next week are as follows:  Monday, July 21, Meatloaf; Thursday, July 23, Chicken Cacciatore; Friday, July 24, Beef Stew.  Seniors age 60 and over, the suggested donation is $3.50, or as one can afford. The price for those under 60 is $8.00. We should have our new ice maker, by now, so we can have in-house ice, again, instead of store bought. Thanks go to Adult and Aging Care of Central Washington, for funding that item. Prayers and thoughts for a speedy recovery for Ruth, who was scheduled for knee surgery Monday. Tillie is doing better. She was able to produce

the newsletter, but vows to cut back on her other activities. About time. It seems that we get so busy, that we forget to spend time doing just nothing, to where being still becomes just another stressful activity.  Roberta’s son Kyle wowed us last Tuesday with his ukulele, guitar, and his own songs.  Roberta was pleased as punch, of course. Keep in mind that every Tuesday, at 11 a.m. we have speakers, or entertainment in addition to our monthly business meetings.  See you there. We’re doing our best in order to survive the August heat in July. California is out of water.  I suppose we will experience dry wells, and a robust fire season. The summer is just started and everything is bone dry. Mary Lou prayed for rain, the other day, and sure enough when we were half a mile from home we hit wet pavement. This was unusual, because before she prayed for sunshine and no snow.  I read the other day that scientists have cloned pigs, cows, dogs

cats, ferrets, goats, and horses. The latest trick is they’re cloning thoroughbred race horses worth a million dollars a piece. Talk is also about genetically engineering and cloning super soldiers. We truly live in the age of science fiction reality, and double the trouble. “What is the quality you most like in a man? Honesty. What is the quality you most like in a woman? Honesty. What do you most value in your friends? Honesty.... What is your most marked characteristic? Tenacity.” Jimmy Carter, responding to a Proust Questionnaire. Pinochle Report for July 11: Door Prize, Myrtle Wood; Pinochle, Ed Craig; High Man, Jim Frye; High Woman, Mary Lou Barnett. 

Subscribe to the... Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us! OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 16, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • July 16, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale Charming 2 br plus den home situated at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac in town of Oroville. Must be credit worthy. Month to month. $750.00 mo - first and last due upon acceptance and credit approval. available August 1st. contact 928 503 1845 TONASKET. SPACIOUS 4 BR, 2 BA HOME! Bright, sunny great room with many windows. 2,400 SF open concept. 4 acres features 3 car garage, loafing shed and mature landscaping. Located at 120 South State Frontage Road. $240,000. FSBO, appoinments only, call now, 509-486-2451.

Manufactured Homes

For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments

1976 Marlette Mobile Home 2 bedroom 1 bath, wood stove, large covered deck, central air. Also comes with a nice wood 8x14 storage shed. In good condition. $2800.00 obo. For more info. Call (509)740-7960 or (509)557-6151

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

For Rent Commercial FOR LEASE Storage/Workshop 2700 sq. ft. with small office and restroom. Good Tonasket location. Only $950 per month. Call 509 322 4732

OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004. OROVILLE 3BR, 3BA, 1565 SF Home. Available Aug 3rd. Water/ garbage paid. $900. $500 dep. 509-990-4402

For Rent

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces

AVAILABLE RENTALS $1,495 4BR 3BA Lake Osoyoos 1 level home, family rm, garage w/shop. $810 2BR + Den, 2BA Open Concept. $795; 2BR Sonora Shores deluxe condo. $825; 3BR, 2BA Lake Osoyoos Apt. $425; Cute 1BR Apt.

Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059 Mobile Home Space in Senior Park. Quiet & Clean. Next door to Oroville Airport. $250/per month plus deposit. Water/Sewer/Garbage included. Background Screening Required. Small dog okay. Call Judy or Zack Miller, (509)476-2645 after 5pm.

Commercial Rentals

Start your newspaper subscription today and see the light. Get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

TONASKET. 2 OFFICE SPACES; 90 SF $160/mo. 270 SF $250/mo. Community Cultural Cntr. Light, quiet and spacious. Air conditioning and high speed internet included. Call Valerie 509-486-0365 info@communityculturalcenter.org

Announcements

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 1420 Main St. l P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA. 98844

Sweet Dreams

Lotions Oils Creams

Phone: 509-476-3602 Toll Free: 866-773-7818

Hours: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.

509-826-5486

www.gazette-tribune.com

Crosswords

ANSWERS

Across 1. Fabric dyeing method 6. Jiffs 10. Gigantic 14. Avoid 15. Fencing sword 16. Length x width, for a rectangle 17. Bridal path 18. Give shape to 19. In ___ of 20. Container 22. Actor’s goal

Powders Gag Gifts Adult Toys

East Side 831 Omak Ave., Omak

24. High

5. Fish large enough to be legally caught

26. Tough, durable wood

6. Signalling system using flags

28. Cover, in a way

7. Age

32. Messy dresser

8. Quartet member

34. Forward roll

9. Exodus commemoration

38. Coaxes

10. City in Chile and Indiana

39. Be bombastic

11. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g.

40. “I had no ___!”

12. Merlin, e.g.

41. Refraining from drinking alcohol

13. Drawn tight

43. Granite-like rocks that form the earth’s crust

25. Driver’s lic. and others

44. Long 45. “Four Quartets” poet

29. Large building for public performances

47. Disconnect

30. “Guilty,” e.g.

51. Mozart’s “L’___ del Cairo”

31. And others, for short

54. Blocks

32. Go to and fro

57. Antiviral protein produced by cells

33. Brain area

59. Profligate

36. Sundries

60. Pinocchio, at times

37. Staggerer

61. Breezing through

42. Setting for TV’s “Newhart”

62. Aardvark fare

46. Actually (2 wds)

63. ___ Minor

48. Having threads

64. Unrefined

49. Biscotti flavoring

65. Makeup, e.g.

50. Composed

66. 1990 World Series champs

52. Complex unit

67. Abnormal tissue growth

53. A deadly sin

23. Chain letters?

21. Popular retirement destination 27. Most difficult to understand

55. Bang-up (hyphenated) 56. Dead-end jobs

1. Santa Claus feature 2. Roswell crash victim, supposedly 3. Former capital of Alabama 4. Doing nothing

Help Wanted

Miscellaneous

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

MS C-Squad Volleyball Coach

FREE TUB/SHOWER ENCLOSURE, fiberglass, one piece, great shape, you move 360-827-3462.

www.gazette-tribune.com THANK YOU TO ALL!! Thank you for all the cards, flowers & words of comfort, at the loss of our mother. We especially thank the church for providing desserts, and a place to gather and share memories with her many friends. THE FAMILY OF BETTY DESCOTEAUX

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a MS C-Squad Volleyball Coach. Volleyball coaching experience preferred. Position is open until filled. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer OFFICE MANAGER/ BOARD SECRETARY The Whitestone Reclamation District is seeking an Office Manager/Board Secretary for year-round part-time work at it’s office near Loomis, WA. Computer and accounting experience are required, working knowledge of county government preferred. For application and information email janinem@whitestonerd.com or call (509) 2233295. Letter of application, resume, and application need to be submitted no later than July 24, 2015.

Health General

Subscribe to the...

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Help Wanted

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a Coleman Oil place to work that encouragReceptionist/Billing Clerk es growth, teamwork, comVisit munication and positive emwww.colemanoil.com/careers/ ployee/supervisor relationto apply ships. FHC is a not for profit For Tonasket Office. Community Health Center Knowledge of Excel helpful - dedicated to providing quality we will train. The job includes health care regardless of a variety fo office duties and ability to pay. EVERYONE is lots of customer service. welcome.

Family Advocate

Oroville Promotes family wellness, parent involvement programs and supports the family partnership process. Acts as a liaison between classroom and home settings in the area of education, child development and mental health. CDA and AA degree preferred. Bilingual/Spanish preferred. Salary $10.59 - $12.84 per hr. DOE. Applications at 101 4th Ave. W. – Omak. If interested please send in a cover letter, application and resume’ to OCCDA – P.O. Box 1844 – Omak, WA 98841 EOE

We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant One part time on an as needed basis, bilingual preferred and one full time, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics

35. “Gee whiz!”

54. No angel Down

Announcements

58. Almond

Front Desk Position Gold Digger Apples is looking to hire a permanent part-time front desk person. Approximately 20-30 hours per week. Must have a basic understanding of Microsoft Office programs and be able to operate basic office equipment. Bilingual preferred. Email resume to rdevon@golddiggerapples.com

or drop off at 1220 Ironwood,Oroville.

BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Garage & Yard Sale OROVILLE.

~HUGE YARD SALE~ Trinity Episcopal Church 604 Central Avenue, Oroville Friday, July 17th ~ noon to 6pm Saturday, July 18th ~ 9am to 4pm NO early sales! Tonasket. Yard Sale! Fri 17th, Sat 18th, Sun 19th; 7 am - 3 pm; 222 East First Street. Rain cancels.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JULY 13, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE OtterRock, Oregon timeshare. 2 bedrooms, 2 ½ bath. Amenities include pool, Jacuzzi and beach. Spectacular ocean views. Two weeks $4500terms John’s Real Estate 1-800-7535646 FOR SALE BUY OR SELL AN RV ONLINE Best RV Deals and Selection Owner and Dealer Listings Millions of RV shoppers Visit RVT.com Classifieds www.RVT.com 888-574-5499 HELP WANTED Drivers-No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! We support every driver, every day, every mile! Call Central Refrigerated Home. (888) 793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com HELP WANTED THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days’ vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 4756289, or jobs_seatlle@navy.mil HELP WANTED HIGH-TECH CAREER with U.S. Navy. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HELP WANTED HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE training with U.S. Navy. Good medical/dental, vacation, great reer. HS grads ages 17-34. Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, jobs_seattle@navy.mil

Paid pay, caCall or

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JULY 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE July 16, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Puzzle 31 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

Sponsored by

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Visit our website.

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We’re more than just print!

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recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

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l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper

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Puzzle 30 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.67)

The Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA) seeks bids from qualified contractors to provide vegetation management services for the Triple Creek Restoration Project, located near Chesaw, WA. Bids must be submitted in the manner specified by

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The Tonasket School District will be holding the Budget Hearing on Monday, July 27 at 7:00 p.m. in the district office board room. Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 16, 23, 2015 #OVG644909

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Summary of Ordinance #755 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, clarifying side-sewer ownership, operation and maintenance and specifying an effective date. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-4862132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 16, 2015. #OVG644886

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is todifficulty place the numbers Puzzle 29 (Easy, rating 0.44) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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the bid documents, accepted via email at info@okanoganhighlands.org or via post at P.O. Box 163, Tonasket, WA, 98855. Bids must be received by July 20, 2015. Bid documents are available electronically at no cost, and may be obtained online: www.okanoganhighlands.org/news/ bid-veg-mgmt or by email from info@okanoganhighlands.org. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 9, 16, 2015 #OVG643991

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Summary of Ordinance #753 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, granting a franchise to North Valley Hospital for use of a portion of Western Avenue. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 16, 2015. #OVG644887

Sudoku

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SCHOOL DISTRICT BUDGET HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors of Oroville School District No.410 will hold a public hearing on July 27, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. to adopt the 2015-2016 school year budgets. The hearing will be held in the boardroom at 816 Juniper Street. The public is invited to attend, and comments will be heard for or against any part of the budget. Steve Quick Superintendent of Schools June 6, 2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 9, 16, 2015. #OVG643922

Public Notices

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PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 844 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington, adding Chapter 10.22 to Title 10 of the Oroville Municipal Code authorizing the operation of Wheeled All-Terrain Vehicles on City streets and setting an effective date. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the July 7, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 16, 2015. #OVG645088

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 16, 2015

ARTS & RECREATION

The heat is on, but so is the water Water Ranch opens to public BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

KATIE TEACHOUT/STAFF PHOTOS

Teagan Walker (right) aims a spray of water at Cannon Mirabel at the Tonasket Water Ranch Sunday, July 12.

Deric Bevier (right), soaked from water play, blasts his daughter Jillian.

Jillian Bevier aims for retaliation

The Tonasket Water Ranch officially opened their doors, or sprinklers, to the public Sunday, July 12. “I think it’s going to be really well-used,” said project director Linda Black of the splash park located in Chief Tonasket Park. Black, whose efforts took four years to come to fruition, was intending to celebrate her anniversary Tuesday, July 14, in part by turning over responsibilities of the plash Park to the city of Tonasket at their regular city council meeting. Her board of volunteers, however, urged her to stay on it for a little while longer. “The board and I are going to keep on this to make sure it’s all working well before we turn it over to the city. We’re feeling pretty protective of the project. We’re basically open, but we are going to keep on it until we get everything done. I’m very proud of my board; they are really taking over responsibility,” said Black, adding that the board planned to paint the inside of the restrooms Tuesday, July 14, after having

given them a thorough cleaning. “The art work will be coming in another week, and the town is really going to be impressed. The whole park is going to feel festive, alive and interactive without much money having been spent,” said Black.

“The whole park is going to feel festive, alive and interactive...” Linda Black, Project Coordinator Tonasket Water Ranch

“Quill Hyde is donating his Mare Pony, and Gary Eagle is constructing a 20-foot-tall Eagle Tower that will include the names of anyone who has donated over $1500. Ephraim Brown made a big flower for the entrance of the parking lot with a sign that says ‘Water Ranch,’ and high school art teacher Kevin Anderson is designing a sign for the rules. Linda Aujier has been working on a big mosaic with kids in the park for the last three years, so we’ll be bringing that in.” Additional artists contributing works to the Water Ranch are Bob Raymers, Jane Thompson and George Baumgardner.

Dave, Ryan and Stacy Kester installed a fence with help from Dr. and Mrs. Paul Lacey and Fred Bevier Saturday, July 11, with materials donated by ACE Hardware. Midway Building Supplies donated all the materials for a picnic shelter, and the Lions Club plans a horseshoe pit. “All these local businesses are really stepping up. Beyers Market and Grants both made generous donations, and Calcium and Carbonate has really pulled through by donating all the white rock that’s down there,” said Black. “I’m starting to be able to breathe again; it’s so much fun seeing the kids playing in the water and doing the things the kids were doing in the brochure given to us when we first starting looking into putting this project together.” “Everyone of all ages can come and cool off,” said Jennifer Walker as she watched her kids play in the water. Walker said she and her husband Chris bring the boys to visit their grandmother, Mary Baechler, every other year “so we’ve been waiting for this to open.” Walker said they were headed home to Greeley, Colorado, the following day. The Water Ranch is open daily from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is free of charge.

Music in the Park

Kristin Super plays the spoons while Sonny Lanigan sings and plays guitar with Ron Champagne on bass. Katie Teachout/staff photos Sonny Lanigan sings, while backed up by Ron Champagne on bass. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Laura Love was scheduled to play Friday, July 10, for this summer’s second event of the Music in the Park series. When Love had to cancel, local musicians were quick to fill the bill. Organizer Janet Culp said Sonny Lanigan took charge of arranging to bring in the equipment, while Culp reached out to area performers. About 50 people relaxed on the grass while Deb Vester, Andy Marincak and Ron Champagne started off the show. They were soon joined by Chuck Oates, Bud McSpadden, Lanigan and Kristin Super. “It’s amazing you were able to pull this off,” Linda Black complimented Culp. “It wasn’t easy— it was a lot of phone calls, but

it came together,” Culp replied. “Yes, and look how beautifully,” Black said. Comedian/musician McSpadden sang a spoof on Enloe Dam to the tune of ‘The Water Song,’ before growing serious and singing ‘Dumb Smart Phone’ to the tune of Johnny Cash’s ‘Don’t Take Your Guns to Town.’ “I’ve known three kids from Tonasket who got into car accidents while texting,” said McSpadden. Mike, Diego and Anna of La Ultima served up delectable plates of chicken and vegetarian enchiladas, along with a mound of salad for just $6. The next Music in the Park event is Friday, July 24, with Ruby Scene and The Rickenbaugh Family.

Ron Champagne sings ‘Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door’ with Chuck Oates providing backup vocals.

Deb Vester sings ‘Freedom’ while accompanied by Andy Martincak on ukulele and Ron Champagne on bass.

Hikers stop in Oroville while crossing the PNT SUBMITTED BY DAVE TOBEY PNT, OROVILLE CHAPTER

On Monday, July 6, we caught up with Pacific Northwest Trail through hikers Richard Pomerinke and Daniel Hogan at the Camaray Motel in Oroville. They started their hiking adventure in Northport, Washington on June 27 and plan to hike the PNT across Washington spending a total of 48 to 55 days on the trail. The hikers were rewarding themselves with a couple of rest days at the Camaray and enjoying area restaurants before continuing west. They also had to plan a re-route around the Pasayten

Wilderness due to the Newby Lake Fire. Richard and Daniel had several good things to say about the trail and people they encountered in the Oroville area. On July 3 they camped in Havillah and were treated to a sloppy joe dinner by area residents. Hiking 30 miles to Oroville the next day they were excited to see the view from the top of Whistler Canyon which included the Okanogan River and lush green orchards. Their biggest challenge along the trail was the heat and lack of water sources along the way. In spite of the obstacles they were having a great adventure on the PNT and

encouraged us to keep working on the trail. You can read more about their hike at seeksummitpnt.blogspot.com. The PNT will be holding a Trail Celebration at the Kernan Road Soccer Fields August 8 & 9. The event features all-day live music Saturday, Kids Arts and Crafts Activities, Speakers, maps and information, raffle items, hiking gear, live hawks and owls, photography and local artists. Sunday morning events include group hikes, bike and horseback rides on the trails. For more information, visit h t t p : / / w w w. m e e t u p . c o m / Oroville-Tonasket-Trail-Mix/.

Submitted photo

Daniel Hogan, left, and Richard Pomerinke peruse the Gazette-Tribune while enjoying a few days of rest at the Camaray Motel in Oroville before continuing their hike across Washington State on the Pacific Northwest Trail.


JULY 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

Hospital going smoke free

Douglas Arthur Weeks

DOUGLAS ARTHUR WEEKS Douglas Arthur Weeks, age 81 of Oroville, passed away on Monday, July 13, 2015 at his home in Oroville. He was born September 30, 1933 in Wilkie, Saskatchewan, Canada to parents Arthur and Ruberta Weeks. A hand to hold, a glove to catch, a broom to sweep and a

Lillian Mae Tibbs

LILLIAN MAE TIBBS Lillian Mae Tibbs, 86, of Oroville, WA, passed away July 9, 2015, after a courageous battle

MARY BOURN Mary Bourn, age 85 of Oroville, passed away on Friday, July 10, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She was born June 20, 1930 in Ekalaka, Montana to parents Allen and Nellie Robinson. Mary moved to Oroville in her teens and graduated from Oroville High School. In June of 1948 she married Robert F. Bourn and had two children, Holly K. Lee (nee Bourn) and Craig L. Bourn. She worked for the Oroville School District through her work career until she retired at 65. She was a terrific mom and a good neighbor. She loved to cook and bake “goodies”

whistle. Dad was always at the other end. Our dad will always be just a whistle away, a laugh in our hearts and ready to play the next game. Doug ‘Coach’ Weeks, also known as a ‘Rink Rat’ from his early years playing hockey... he had a passion for sports and shared his love with Family and Friends. At the age of 18 his love of baseball took him to Florida where he tried out for the Yankees at their spring training. Shortly after that he attended Seattle Pacific University on a baseball scholarship and then attended the University of Washington where he received his Masters in Physical Education. In the early 80s he focused his athletic abilities into Curling which took him to three U.S. National Tournaments representing Washington State, one of which he and his team came in Second in the Nation. Doug is referred to by most people that know him as “Coach” from his many years coaching baseball at Oroville High School, Big Bend Community College, running the baseball camp in Oliver B.C. and coaching at a charity hockey tournament in Seattle. He not only had a great

knowledge of every game but was someone who could pick up a glove, a bat or a hockey stick and show you how to do it as well. No matter what he was doing Doug made sure there was always an aspect of fun and silliness. He never failed to have a joke ready for any occasion, usually something naughty or dirty, and was always giggling or laughing which made everyone around him join in laughing and giggling too. He loved life and he loved his family and life and his family loved him back. We will all miss him dearly but we all have a piece of his laughter and his love inside of us which will make sure that his memory will live on forever. Survivors include his wife, Donna Weeks; daughter, Nadeene Gosselin and husband Allen; son, Todd Weeks and wife Stephanie; and grandchildren, Emily Gosselin, Todd Goselin, Andrew Weeks and Jack Weeks. Doug was preceded in death by his parents and brothers. No services will be held. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

with cancer. Lillian was born to Raymond and Dora (Duncan) Hudson on May 17, 1929, in Greenville, SC. Lillian was raised and educated in Salt Lake City, Utah. After high school graduation she married David M. Tibbs in Evanston, Wyoming. Together they raised six children, Morris “David,” Danny, Mike, Steve, Patti and Jeanne. In 1947, upon learning of the opportunities offered, Lillian and Dave decided to move to Oroville, Wash. Lillian continued to raise her growing family while working alongside her husband Dave in the family orchard, St. Martin’s Hospital in Tonasket, Wash., local packing sheds and retiring from Princes Department Store in 2007. After a long and fruitful life, Lillian became ill in 2014. She passed away surrounded by family in her home as she had wished. She is survived by her children

David, of Soap Lake, Wash.; Danny (Katy), Mike (Miki), and Steve (Colleen) of Oroville, Patti (Larry) Field of Lacey, Wash. and Jeanne Tibbs of Mountlake Terrace, Wash., numerous grandchildren and great grand children, sisters Annette Smith and Linda Roos of Salt Lake City, Utah and her special friend of many years Frances Lesamiz. She was preceded in death by her husband, parents, brothers Dolan and Earl Hudson and sister, Margaret Parks. The family is very grateful for the wonderful care our mother received from Frontier Home Health and Hospice and care givers Gail LeMaster, Teresa Fast and Priya Shellenbarger. There will be a Celebration of Life at Tonasket Community Church, 24 E. 4th Street, Tonasket, at 11 a.m., with a luncheon following. A graveside service will take place at 2 p.m., at the Oroville Riverview Cemetery.

for her family and friends and loved to read. She is survived by her children Holly K. Lee of Seattle and Craig L. Bourn of Spokane and seven grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband Robert F. Bourn. Funeral Services will be held on Friday, July 17, 2015 at 10 a.m. at Bergh Chapel in Oroville with the Rev. Marilyn Wilder, officiating. Interment will follow at the Oroville Riverview Cemetery. Visitation for family and friends will be held Thursday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Policy enforced as part of Healthier Washington BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital CEO Mike Zwicker announced the hospital will become a tobacco-free campus as of Aug, 1. Zwicker said he is resurrecting a non-smoking policy already in place that has not been followed. The policy requires all employees, contract employees, patients and customers to not utilize any types of tobacco on or within NVH’s campus. “We cannot promote wellness to the community if we are not promoting it within ourselves,” Zwicker said. “When you come to visit a loved one in the hospital, please realize we are a tobaccofree campus.” Zwicker said he is not asking people to quit smoking, but asking them to respect the hospital’s policy. “I am asking for the community to help support us in this being a tobacco-free organization. It is important to have the community support, and it is a win-win situation for everyone,” Zwicker said. Enforcement of the nonsmoking policy is part of a new approach to wellness as designated in a federal agenda that has allotted $65 million from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) to the state for a program called Healthier Washington. The state plans to save $1 billion in four years in healthcare with the stated goals of improving population health, transforming delivery systems and reducing per capital spending. The program was presented at the Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA) and

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BIRTH Lena Marie Rogers was born July 6, 2015 to Brittany Rogers of Bakersfield, Calif. and Jesse Rogers of Puyallup, Wash. at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. Lena Marie was six pounds, 15 ounces at birth and 20.5 inches long. She joins siblings Cole, age 10 and Weston, age two. Her grandparents are Linda Robertson of Atwater, Calif. and Scott Robertson of Bakersfield and Lena and Mark Rogers of Puyallup.

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board members from throughout the state, focused on different payment options for healthcare services; and ensuring access to basic primary, emergency and outpatient care. Zwicker said discussions were to assist in identifying a payment model for outpatient services and to incentivize organizations for promoting wellness of the community. A new policy in place will have all NVH employees become CPR certified within the next few months. “This will demonstrate to the community and organization that its employees are committed to excellence and quality care,” Zwicker said. Human Resources Manager Jan Gonzales is evaluating organizations to perform an Employee Engagement Survey. “Our goal is to have NVH be the best organization in the state and to become recognized as an “Employer of Choice,” said Zwicker, “and in order to do that we need to hear from staff. This will be a very non-threatening, proactive survey done by a third party. We won’t see the results until after the company compiles them, so it will be a safe environment for the employees to say what they feel.”

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Association of Washington Public Hospital Districts (AWPHD) annual Rural Hospital Leadership Conference held in Chelan June 22-24. “The Triple Aim was discussed in great detail concentrating on Quality Care, Lower Costs and Community Wellness,” reported Zwicker, adding that a lot of time was spent with emphasis on Accountable Community of

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE JULY 16, 2015

At Omak Wood Products, we support more than just growth in the timber industry. Omak Wood Products was formed in 2013 from a partnership between New Wood Resources, the Colville Tribal Federal Corporation and a vision of promoting growth in our local community. We’re proud of the area’s worthy causes and events, and we’ll lock arms with you to help them thrive for years to come.

Here are some organizations and activities we’ve supported during the past two years: 2014 Donations

2015 Donations

• Omak Stampede - $7,500 • Caribou Trail Jr. Rodeo - $600 • Omak High School Bowling - $500 • Okanogan County Jr. Rodeo - $500 • Swim at Alcatraz - $500 • Inner Warrior Race - $462 • Okanogan Fair Jockey Silks - $230 • Christmas Food Bank • Volunteering at Stampede Store

• Omak Stampede - $7,500 • One Unit of Plywood to Nespelem Rodeo Grounds to Rebuild Chutes for Bulls - $720 • Owners & Jockeys - $650 • Caribou Trail Jr. Rodeo - $600 • High School Rodeo - $500 • Okanogan Valley Rodeo Club - $500 • Okanogan Youth Baseball - $375 • Half Unit of Plywood Auctioned for Stampede Queen Expenses - $360 • Okanogan County Jr. Rodeo - $300

We look forward to sustaining a long-term partnership with the Confederated Tribes and supporting worthy endeavors in the community for many years to come.

OWP General Manager David Niessner presents Coach Craig Fingar from Okanogan Youth Baseball with a check for $365.

Omak Stampede’s Sarah Grooms and George Dunckel accept a check for $7,500 from OWP’s Ernie Plaunty and Dick Baldwin.

Learn more at omakwood.com.

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 16, 2015  

July 16, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 16, 2015  

July 16, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune