Page 1

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Get ready for rodeo and fireworks on Fourth of July

PLAYING WITH FIRE

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

NORTH COUNTY – Independence Day will be celebrated with fireworks and a rodeo again this year in the North County with the 73nd Annual Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo and the community fireworks display in Oroville, this year featuring an expanded list of activities. The rodeo events take place on Saturday and start at 10 a.m. with the small sports. The parade is at 12:30 p.m. and the rodeo follows at 1 p.m. The rodeo again features two forms of saddle bronc riding this year. Along with the regular saddle bronc riding, there will be ranch-style saddle bronc. While similar to professional bronc riding, the differ-

ence between that and ranch bronc riding is that the cowboys ride using their everyday work saddle, rigged like they were going to go to work on the ranch that morning. The rodeo also features bareback and cow riding, as well as barrel racing and wild cow milking events. The junior events, which can be entered at no fee, are cow roping, calf roping, barrel racing and the calf scramble. For the kids there’s also the chicken catching event. The books have been open for a week to sign up for the senior and junior rodeo events. Entries will be accepted 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. only by calling Field at Mary Ellen Field at 509-485-3223. The books close when events are filled and must be paid by 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 2.

SEE JULY 4TH | PG A2

Rich Fewkes Chesaw Rodeo Grand Marshal

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, Alisa Milan and Ian McFeron perform the opening concert for this year’s Music in the Park series., held in Tonasket’s History Park.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

This year’s Chesaw Rodeo will be presided over by Grand Marshal Rich Fewkes. Born in Tacoma on November 4, 1946, Fewkes was less than a week old when his family moved to the Okanogan Valley. He graduated high school in Omak, and has been active in the community serving on many boards and announcing at many types of Rich Fewkes events, including the Chesaw Rodeo for 23 years, the Tonasket Founders Day Parade, serving on the fair board for eight years and announcing the horse races at the Republic Fair for twenty years.

Right, Galen Lichterfeld, formerly of Tonasket, performs Fire Poi during Music in the Park Friday, June 26.

Fewkes is well known for his 32 years in the car business, starting with Damsko Ford in Omak for three years before coming to work as a salesman at OK Chevrolet, where he’s been since. Prior to that, he worked for the Jobs Corps in Republic for seven years; lived on the Olma ranch where they ran cows with Leonard Hedlund; and fished professionally in bass tournaments for 20 years. “We went all over—Banks Lake, Roosevelt, the Potholes, Moses Lake. It was tournament fishing where you have a partner and keep the five biggest fish you get all day. Some of the tournaments had 100 to 125 teams,” said Fewkes, adding, “When you’re young it’s fun, but when you’re older it’s just hard work.” Fewkes celebrated his 50th wedding anniversary with his wife Lorene last Thursday, June 25. Lorene, also an Omak high school graduate, is five years older

SEE FEWKES | PG A2

New commissioner takes a seat on North Valley Hospital board BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Adam Tibb was sworn into the vacant position on the North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners Thursday, June 25. A special meeting was held June 18 by board members to interview candidates and make their decision. Marylou Criner and Leon Alden were also running for the position left vacant by Theresa Hughes. Tibbs was born in Tonasket, and helps to run his family farm and apple orchard. He said he wanted to serve on the board because “I’m getting to an age where I wanted to support the public, and the staff here at the hospital.” Tibbs said volunteer work for the community he has performed in the past includes coaching a boys’ AAU basketball team and helping with the football team.

Employees honored Patient Financial Services Director Jana Symonds honored employees Krista Zabreznick, Patrick Plumb and Jill Baber (present over the phone) at the June 25

meeting, asking them to stand and be recognized for the work they have done in turning the department around. Symonds said she was “happy and amazed” with the caring staff and that without the “sacrifices made by all of them we would not have made the great turnaround we did.” Symonds said the goal set in 2009 to see accounts receivable at less than 50 days, and three million dollars in the bank had been achieved. “When I first came onboard, I saw it took a team approach to get financials out of the red and into the black,” said new CEO Mike Zwicker. “I’m seeing the hard work and due diligence individuals are performing; making us financially viable in a time when it is really hard to do so.” “These are the core members, the Make-it-Happen folks,” said Symonds of Zabreznick, Plumb and Baber. She said Hardin came in with no experience to work in admitting, then moved up to working with private pay collection and charity care. “Krista is a great role model. She is personally driven and tries to constantly one-up herself,” said Symonds. “She has

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 27

proven her loyalty to me and the hospital district time and time again.” According to Symonds, Baber started in billing and excelled in her position. She is now employed as a patient services rep with the hospital. “I told her the paychecks are in the balance of your actions, so don’t let us down. She is a true warrior,” said Symonds. Plumb has been employed at the hospital for over 13 years. “He knows how to make things happen. He is a methodical expert on improvement, thinks outside the box and rises to the occasion when called upon,” said Symonds. “I am very honored and proud to work with these three.” “This is a huge,” said Commissioner Clarice Nelson. “I just came from a conference where they said 47% of Critical Access Hospitals are in the red.” Board Chair Helen Casey said 2001 was the last time the hospital had cash on hand for 50 days. “It’s been a long time. I commend each one; it takes a team,” Casey said. “Without Jana Symonds’ experience and knowledge, we wouldn’t have known what to do,” said Plumb. “She has been responsible for a $7 million turnaround

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Adams Tibbs is sworn in as a North Valley Hospital Commissioner June 25 by Human Resources Director Jan Gonzales, as witnessed by Board Chair Helen Casey on the left. in five years, which is unheard of in rural healthcare. I think she set an example for how a patient financial services director can instill a culture change that is able to bring together clinical and financial services departments to maximize reim-

SEE NVH | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

bursement in the absence of increased patient volume. Our volume of patients has stayed static over these last five years.” Plumb attributed the turnaround to a

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Classifieds Real Estate

A6-7 A8-9 A9

A&E Obits

A10-11 A12


PAGE A2

NEWS

Trees topic of discussion at Oroville Council meeting

FEWKES | FROM A1

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Richard Fewkes, Grand Marshal of the 2015 Chesaw 4th of July Rodeo, stands with his wife Lorene at home in Tonasket. Lorene said she enjoys the hobby of yardwork, and it shows in her landscaping;, which features an exquisite array of flower gardens. They celebrated their 50th anniversary Thursday, June 25th. than her husband. “We got married in 1965, right out of high school. He was only 18,” Lorene said. She worked for the Omak School District for 22 years, as a cook and then as a teacher’s aid after the school burned down. They raised three children: Troy, Candi and Casey.

the whole football team and baseball team,” said Lorene. “They all came.” The Fewkes were thrilled to have their grandson Dalton Wahl home for a visit from work on a ranch in Montana. “He’s excited to get to see his

grandparents at the rodeo,” said Lorene. “He’s the only one who takes after his Papa, riding horses.” Richard Fewkes said he was “extremely thankful for such an honor,” to be serving as the 2015 Chesaw Rodeo Grand Marshal.

“Extremely thankful for such an honor” Rich Fewkes, Grand Marshal Chesaw 4th of July Rodeo

They settled into a home in town in Tonasket close to the schools when three of their seven grandkids were attending Tonasket High School. “It was so handy to move here, they would come by in the morning and have breakfast with us; they would come down for lunch. They (Dalton and Logan Wahl and Dylan and Rylee Fewkes) came down with their friends—

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 2, 2015

OROVILLE – Trees along Oroville’s downtown area, as well as those at it’s Veterans Memorial Park dominated much of the conversation at the city council’s Tuesday, June 16 meeting. Lynn Chapman, with the Oroville Streetscape Committee said she had recently attended the Urban Forest Conference and would be conducting an inventory of the city trees. She asked about the process for replacing “at risk” trees with healthy trees. Rod Noel, head of Public Works said removal or replacement of any of the city’s trees was a decision for the city council. Chapman would like to have a discussion about the tree outside the Plaza Restaurant, which she felt should be replaced. She also asked if the city could do additional watering. In addition to the tree issue she wanted to talk about weeks along the sidewalks and curbs. Noel said a member of his staff had recently sprayed the weeds. Also on her list were questions about replacing sidewalks that were in bad discussion and who was responsible for replacing them. Councilwoman Neysa Roley suggested the replacement of the sidewalk issue be a Lastly, she said she had been contacted by Betta Lindstrand about getting more water for the flowers her daughter planted sev-

eral years ago as a senior project along the new sidewalk at the south end of town. Noel said a connection would have to be put in, but that it would be very expensive. In the past the mayor and council has discussed the need to determine the long term costs to the city that some of the senior projects might generate because of the need for future maintenance. In further discussion of trees, Councilman Tony Koepke asked about the arborist from the state whou had looked at the trees at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park. The arborist had met with Chris Branch, director of Community Development and said the arborist felt that some of the trees had a fungus and the matter was going to be further investigated. Councilman Koepke gave his opinion on the condition of the trees at the park and suggested the dead trees be removed. Noel said his crew would be removing them as time and conditions allow.

than budgeted. This along baseball tournament has been delayed until next year freeing up about $1000 and the Toast of Oroville Wine Festival was cancelled freeing up another $750. Andrews asked that this money be used to create rack cards to be place on brochure stands throughout the state. The Discover Oroville group has already designed a preliminary draft of such a card. Jeff Bunnell, another chamber member, discussed the South of the Border Festival being planned for Sept. 19. He asked about the possibility of holding it at City Park and will be submitting a park use application at a future date. The council approved a state Liquor License Application for the Pastime Bar and Grill that was submitted for the city’s review. Tim and Dianna Naillon have made the application so Councilman Ed Naillon recused himself from the discussion and vote.

TOURISM Clyde Andrews, president of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, requested that funds that were approved for events that will not be taking place this year, as well as funds left over from advertising that in Recreationland, be shifted to other events. The tourism publication turned out to be approximately $250 less

AMBULANCE Janet Allen asked if there was an update on the interlocal agreement between the county commissioners and the city on ambulance service. Mayor Chuck Spieth said there was nothing to report. “County planner Perry Huston is working with the city on forming an agreement,” said City Clerk JoAnn Denney.

a half billion dollars per year, and we turned around to be making one and a half million per year,” said Plumb. “The type of change Jana was able to spearhead is why you see the graph going up, and that’s not normal in healthcare right now. And that’s with some departments not making any money; we are still carrying the nursing home financially. We

are able to provide and finance a service for the most vulnerable and least able to speak up for themselves members in this community.” Plumb said the patient financial services department had decreased full-time equivalent employees and increased productivity immensely over the last six years.

NVH | FROM A1

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Kim Sapp of Tonasket Auto Parts congratulates the Fewkes on their 50th Anniversary. She said it’s “well deserved” Fewkes is Grand Marshall.

correction of market pricing for services provided and a correct coding initiative which captures services provided by the clinical team to be billed to insurances. “Jana was able to identify the care that’s provided by our nurses and clinical staff is high end, but our billing process didn’t show the work that was being done. We were probably losing one and

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Kinross prepares community for closure During the upcoming months, Kinross repreOther aspects of the SCP include a social and Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn (KRB) has been implementing a comprehensive Social Clo- economic impact analysis, a community survey to sentatives will be meeting one-on-one with insure Plan (SCP) to assist the local communities assist with local planning efforts and individualized terested businesses and stakeholders to discuss with upcoming change as closure of the Buck- meetings with current vendors specific impacts related to closure, and to provide suphorn Mine approaches in 2016. and contractors to review port through relevant planThis past winter, the company ning tools and resources. If worked with the state and othpotential impacts. It is you are interested in particier community partners to offer pating in these confidential important for a series of trainings and workshops designed specifically for the commumeetings, please contact Ferry and Okanogan county nity to get Deana Zakar, Community involved and residents and businesses. This and Government Relations participate in series was aimed at helping Specialist, at 509-775budding entrepreneurs to creproactively 3157 x125 or deana.zakar@ ate new business ventures, taking conkinross.com. trol of the The sessions also gave local as well as help existing busiThroughout this closure businesspeople the opportunity to economic vinesses add value to their curprocess, and as the realities solidify plans for working together in rent business model. Since Local businesspeople met with agency ability of their the future. surrounding mine closure the completion of the training representatives in a series of training own future, become more apparent, we utilizing Kinross’ SCP and oth- will continue to be committed to our priorities of series, our community partners sessions designed to equip Ferry County entrepreneurs for the future. er resources as tools to assist safety, environment and community by working with have continued to offer training Photos Kate Meginley. opportunities that have been them. you to make this transition as smooth as possible. specifically requested by participants.


JULY 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

City adopts six-year transpo plan Tonasket continues with Drug Task Force, but wants hard data BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Council held a public hearing and adopted the 2016-2021 Six Year Transportation Improvement Program Tuesday, June 23. The state requires each city complete a six-year plan every year, and cities cannot apply for state or federal funding on projects unless they are on the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program. The first priority on the plan calls for $450,000 of state funds and $50,000 of local funds to be dedicated to various projects for maintenance of existing local access streets for the year 2017. The second priority is to construct a sidewalk and ADA ramps along the North side of 3rd Avenue from Whitcomb to Western, with $100,000 of state funds scheduled with a phase start year of 2017. Priority number three is to reconstruct the County Shop Road from the northern end at US 97 south to a proposed new access road into Chief Tonasket Park. The project includes continuation of pedestrian access from Legacy Park through to Chief Tonasket Park and a new railroad crossing. The project marks $300,000 of state funds for 2016; and $600,000 of state funds combined with $100,000 of local funds for 2017. The fourth priority is the extension of Division Street east to Roy Stotts Avenue. The project calls for $300,000 of state funds and $60,000 of local funds for the phase start year of 2017; and $800,000 of state funds and $40,000 of local funds

for 2018. The fifth priority is to reconstruct and install sidewalks with upgrades to water, sewer and storm drainage as needed. $360,000 of state funds are marked for the year 2016, and $840,000 of state funds are marked for the year 2017. City Planner Kurt Danison said there was no way to predict how many projects might end up getting done each year, given the lack of financial resources. “Some projects could remain in the plan for many years,” he said. “It all depends on the money available to match grants and pay for projects.” Mayor Patrick Plumb and council members asked to again have paving of the Airport Road included in the program. Danison said he put it in the program, but “in reality it belongs on the county’s program because it is a county road.” “The people of Tonasket have to let the county know it is a priority,” said Danison.

DRUG TASK FORCE The council debated on whether or not to approve the North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force Agreement to participate from July 1,2015 through June 30, 2016. The agreement is renewed annually at a cost of $2,000 for the city of Tonasket. “I think we should get ahold of Joe (Somday, Task Force Financial Coordinator) to get a five-year arrest record to show what they have done in Tonasket area,” said Councilmember Lois Rice, adding that she thought the Task Force had only made one arrest in the past five years. Mayor Plumb said he liked the idea of “holding them accountable,” but added there had been one arrest made just in the last year. “They’ve had charges on several people here in the last six

months,” said Interim Police Chief Darren Curtis. “When we didn’t pay our bill with them a few years back, they took a completely ‘hands-off ’ stance and didn’t touch this area for six months; until we paid our bill. Our drug problem went up exponentially.” Councilmember Dennis Brown suggested having the task force come to a council meeting and present a report. “For $2,000 I want to get something out of it,” Brown said. Curtis said he could ask Kevin Newport, the head of the task force; and Somday if they could make a presentation to the city council. Councilmember Scott Olson said he agreed with Rice and “wanted to see some hard numbers,” adding that the presentation and arrest report were separate issues. He asked Curtis if he thought it was worth the money, to which Curtis responded in the affirmative. Regarding the request for arrest records from the task force, Curtis stated, “All you can do is ask them.” Oroville, Tonasket, Republic, Coulee Dam, Pateros, Twisp and Winthrop are each charged $2,000 to participate. Okanogan, Brewster and the Ferry County Sheriff ’s Office are charged $3,000. The city of Omak is charged $5,000 and the Okanogan County’s Sheriff ’s Department is charged $6,000. Other participating agencies are the Okanogan County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and Homeland Security Investigations. The Task Force is composed of personnel assigned from federal law enforcement agencies, Washington State Patrol, law enforcement agencies with the counties, tribal law enforcement and the prosecutor’s offices. Councilmembers voted to adopt the agreement for another

JULY 4TH | FROM A1 The family games start at 10 a.m. and the parade starts at 12:30 p.m. Those that want to sign up for parade should call Dalene Nigg at 509-476-2792 to reserve a spot in the line up. The night before the rodeo, on Friday day, July 3, there will be the Country Western Dance with music by Powder River Band. The dance is for families and people of all ages and starts at 9 p.m. and goes to 1 a.m. Entry is just $5 per person. FIREWORKS & MORE The Oroville Community Fireworks Display is in it’s second year being organized by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. The chamber is promising expanded activities at Deep Bay Park, including a return of the Patriotic Song Contest

and the Lighted and Decorated Boat Parade. The day at Deep Bay begins at 7 a.m. with the registration for the Be Loud Be Colorful 5K run which is hosted by the Oroville High School Cheerleader as a fundraiser. The colorful race begins at 8 a.m. and runners are showered with red, white and blue powder to show their true patriotic colors on Independence Day. There will be an Open Mic and Talent Show starting at 3 p.m. and

the Patriotic Song Contest is at 6 p.m. Food vendors will be available at the park all day. The main event, the annual fireworks display blasts skyward beginning at dark. Those who would like to contribute in any way to this year’s fireworks display should contact Leah Palmer at 509-429-0201 or Dan Lepley at 509-560-3368. Donations can also be dropped off with Peggy Shaw at Umpqua Bank.

year, and the mayor assured them they would get their questions answered regarding arrests. Councilmember Jeffko said the city needs a new drug dog. Tonasket Police Force had to retire Zeuss from the canine unit, as the legalization of marijuana makes him “unqualified.” “I’ve approached several businesses to see if we can get another dog,” said Curtis, estimating about $15,000 would need to be raised including training of an officer. Curtis said he would be able to train the dog himself. In the case of Zeuss, only about $1500 was spent on the dog and the officer training; plus housing and food for the six weeks Curtis was in training. He said an untrained green dog only cost $500, but it was an anomaly to get a full-blooded German Shepherd. Curtis said two police officer candidates have applied and passed the testing process, and the police department was finishing background checks on them. Curtis will be testing for the permanent Chief of Police position on July 10. He said he will hold off offering the fourth police officer position to one of the candidates until the Chief position is solidified, as Curtis will return to being a Sergeant if he is not chosen as Police Chief. Jeffko said she attended the Okanogan County Commissioners meeting with Olson regarding the Park and Recreation Feasibility Study. “There were about 30 people there, and I did not hear any dissenters,” said Jeffko. “Bonnie Smith’s 10-year-old granddaughter got up in front of the commissioners and addressed why we needed the swimming pool. She did a really good job. It was an education going down there.” Jeffko said Tonsket Chamber of Commerce President Julie Alley attended, along with her daughter Noni. A freshman at THS, Noni also addressed the commissioners. She said it was a little nervewracking, but told them all the good reasons to have a pool in Tonasket. “The commission seemed supportive. It was important to Commissioner Kennedy that we

Katie Teachout/file photo

Interim Chief Darren Curtis is raising money in the hopes of replacing Zeuss, who was retired due to being “unqualified” after laws changed to allow the use of recreational marijuana in the state of Washington. backed it up by passing a resolution, so I’m glad we did that,” said Olson. The commissioners were scheduled to decide on Monday, June 29, whether or not to put the Recreation District on the upcoming ballot. Mayor Patrick Plumb reported attending the Princeton Rodeo and being pleased to see the Tonasket Founder’s Day Rodeo Queen Sarah Quinlan in attendance; along with Bert Beeman, a long-time Commanchero who was running the chutes. “There’s a lot more Canadian traffic coming down here, as far as I’m concerned, due to the sister city relationship,” said Plumb. “We should do our part

to reciprocate.” He said he would be attending their Princeton Days July 3, along with Tonasket City Council Candidate Jensen Sackman. Sackman, a 2015 THS graduate, said she was running for the position as it may help her to decide what to do in her future. Also running for city council is 2011 THS graduate Maria Moreno. “I want to be more involved in the city of Tonasket,” said Moreno. “I was born in Omak at Mid Valley Hospital and have lived here all my life. I own property with three mobile homes up Highway 20.” “I’m excited to see both of our candidates attending meetings at this time,” said Plumb.

BEYERS 212 N Highway 97 • Tonasket WA

509-486-2183

73 Annual rd

Hours 8am - 8pm 7 Days A Week We gladly accept EBT Quest cards and WIC checks.

FA MI LY PA CK !

Subscribe to the... OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

www.gazette-tribune.com

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

ZOOM IN ON A B UYER

Advertise your goods and services in the Classifieds and reach hundreds of potential buyers daily. Call today to place your AD and make a sale quickly. Watch for classified specials! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 509-476-3602

COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE!

Fri., July 3

rd

6

98

Bone-In Beef Rib Steaks Music by

l

Powder River

lb.

Whole Seedless Watermelon A holiday picnic favorite!

33

¢ lb.

FA M IL Y PA CK !

9:00 p.m - 1:00 a.m.

$5 admission to Rodeo & Dance l Children 10 & under FREE

SMALL SPORTS 10:00 A.M. PARADE 12:30 P.M. RODEO 1:00 P.M. Registration: Mary Ellen Field 509-485-3223 For info: 509-485-2204, 509-485-3941 or 485-3041 Parade pre-registration contact: 485-3606 Presented by CHESAW RODEO CLUB

2

5/$

Yellow or White Corn

Wrap in foil and cook on the grill!

Wed., July 22 Wed., July 29 Thurs., Aug. 6

85% Lean Ground Beef 85% Lean, 15% Fat

2

98 lb.

6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

$15.00*

*To be paid at the time of the physical Insurance will not be billed.

Sports physicals will be done by physician volunteers.

All proceeds will be donated to Tonasket Athletic Booster Club. – by appointment only – Call 509-486-2174

| Family Medicine For Tonasket High School and Middle School Students!

Western Family Enriched Hot Dog or Hamburger Buns 8-ct.

ase

First 2 Ple

78¢

Western Family Large Pitted Olives 6-oz.

88¢

Lay’s Family Size Potato Chips Selected Vtys., 10 to 10.5-oz.

198

– www.centerplacemarket.com –

We reserve the right to limit quantities and to correct pricing errors. No sales to dealers. Not responsible for typographical errors.

Ad Effective Dates July 1 – 7, 2015


PAGE A4

Early water restrictions for E. Washington irrigators “These are really hard times for farms and fish, and many people in the state,” said Ecology WASHINGTON STATE DEPT OF ECOLOGY Director Maia Bellon. “We’re OLYMPIA – A dramatic drop working hard to provide support in streamflows caused by drought and relief across the state to comhas several hundred irrigators munities and irrigation districts. in north-central and eastern We’ve asked the legislature for Washington facing water cutoffs emergency funding so we can continue our work.” far earlier than normal this year. In a normal year, junior water That’s because snowpack in users aren’t Wa s h i n g t o n typically asked melted a month to restrict their early, and 43 “We’re working hard to use until late percent of rivprovide support and September. ersstatewide are nowpack now running at relief across the state is Sthe primary record-low levto communities and water supply els. for most of As a result, irrigation districts.” Washington’s about 380 irriMaja Bellon, Director rivers. In a norgators on the Washington State Dept. of Ecology mal year, snow We n a t c h e e , accumulates Okanogan, over the winSimilkameen, Methow, Colville and Little ter and then slowly melts in the Spokane rivers are being notified spring and summer with the runby the Department of Ecology to off feeding our rivers and farms. Since June 15, some 40-plus curtail their water use. These irrigators have water users on the Wenatchee River rights that can be restricted when have been required to stop waterstreamflows drop below certain ing unless streamflows improve. levels (as set by law). Water users Another 80 users in the Okanogan will call a hotline to find out if and Similkameen river watershed began calling the hotline June 23 they can irrigate that day. Junior water users on the and have stopped watering. And about 260 users on the Colville River may have their water use regulated for the first Methow, Colville and Little timeever this year. The river is Spokane rivers will be asked to currently flowing at 28 percent call their hotline beginning the week of June 29. of normal. SUBMITTED BY SANDRA PARTRIDGE

from

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

We will be closed Friday, July 3, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 2, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Christopher Charles Anaya, 24, Oroville, pleaded guilty June 25 to second-degree burglary, second-degree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. Anaya was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50 for the Feb. 23 crimes. Nabor Cervantes Vargas, 33, Manson, pleaded guilty June 25 to forgery and making a false or misleading statement. The court dismissed an additional count of forgery. Cervantes Vargas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred April 25 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Angelina Maria Nobilis, 51, Kent, with firstdegree theft and first-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred between Feb. 3 and June 18. The court found probable cause to charge James John Faire, 55, Tonasket, with first-degree murder (premeditated and/ or extreme indifference [with an alternate charge of second-degree murder {felony murder}]), first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon), firstdegree theft and first-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred between Feb. 3 and June 18. The court found probable cause to charge Richard Kevin Wright, 35, Tonasket, with two counts of first-degree child molestation and two counts of second-degree incest. The crimes allegedly occurred between June 1 and Nov. 22, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Hiroaki Miyazaki, no middle name listed, 33, Vancouver, Wash., with POCS (LSD) and POCS (psilocybin mushrooms). The crimes allegedly occurred June 22 at the Oroville Port of Entry. District Court Shiloh Justin Aldag, 38, Omak, guilty of DUI. Aldag was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, Oroville, guilty of thirddegree theft. Anguiano was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 346 days suspended, and fined $808. Tenea Shantel Aragon V, 23, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Anthony Kevin Baker, 27, had a charge dismissed: introduction of contraband. Bill Cephas Bedard, 46, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Bedard was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined $308. Jeffery Lynn Bergh, 67, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Bergh was fined $200. Isaac Koostahtah Bessette, 23, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Bessette was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $858. Michael F. Breen, 67, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: possession of marijuana.

Out on the Town...

Dining

&

Entertainment * Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

HOURS: Tue.-Sat., 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. & 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays, 7 to 2 p.m. Closed Monday.

Ph. (509) 476-3266

712 14th Ave., Oroville

Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

Now Open 7 days a week!

Prime Rib every Sat.

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, June 22, 2015 Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Foggy River Loop Rd. near Riverside. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Illegal burning on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Park Dr. in Omak. Harassment on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. David Thomas Kay, 34, DOC hold. Victor Manuel Hernandez, 24, booked on an FTA bench warrant for possession of a stolen firearm. Jon Paul Schultz, 45, court commitment for reckless driving. Mark Harold Perman, 34, booked for disorderly conduct. Guy Ray Van Brunt, 64, booked for violation of a protection order. Adrienna Palmenteer, no middle name listed, 48, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Hiroaki Miyazaki, no middle name listed, 33, booked on two counts of POCS and an ICE hold. Tuesday, June 23, 2015 Malicious mischief on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Search and rescue on Bluebell Lane near Tonasket. Trespassing on Hubbard Rd. near Riverside. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Jacquish Rd. near Omak. Illegal burning on Yarnell Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Koala Dr. in Omak. Theft on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. First Ave. in Omak. Theft on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Threats on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Michael Jerome Carroll, 26, booked for third-degree DWLS and an ignition-interlock device. Reynaldo Thomas Rocha, 26, booked for VUCSA and possession of drug paraphernalia. Deena Jean Lazard, 26, booked on an FTA warrant for possession of legend drug without a prescription. Jeremy L. Jackson, 40, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTC warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Mark Anthony Yingling, 32, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Michael J. Carroll, 26, DOC detainer. Timothy J. Vallee, 29, booked on a DFW FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Wednesday June 24, 2015 Theft on Jaquish Rd. near Omak. Diapers reported missing. Burglary on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Railroad Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Meadow Dr. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7

Eva‛s Diner & Bakery NOW SERVING DINNER! Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

Cullen Wayne Buzzard, 35, Oroville, guilty of fourth-degree assault and violation of a nocontact order. Buzzard was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,483.

Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Beer reported missing. Trespassing on Jackson St. in Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Cherry St. in Oroville. Air compressor reported missing. Trespassing on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, booked for POCS and introduction of contraband. Caesar Arroyo, 29, no middle name listed, booked for felony elude, DUI, first-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Joshua Dean Allen, 33, booked on two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: seconddegree criminal trespassing and second-degree vehicle prowl. Jose Manuel Murillo Vera, 19, booked for first-degree burglary (DV). Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 34, booked on a DOC hold. William Keaton Jr., no middle name listed, 65, booked on an FTC warrant for seconddegree assault. Shilo Justin Aldag, 38, court commitment for DUI. Justin Thomas Gentemann, 25, court commitment for DUI. Ari Kay Hilliard, 24, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Thursday, June 25, 2015 Trespassing on River Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Utility problem on Golden St. in Oroville. Power reported out. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Jeans reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fire on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on S. Columbia St. in Omak. Theft on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Fire on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Marcos Florentino Rosas, 30, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Tyler Lee Shelton, 25, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Juliann Marie Orr, 18, booked for second-degree theft. Chris Eugene Bogart, 52, booked for obstruction, possession of drug paraphernalia and DUI. Jose Dionicio Perez Garcia, 31, booked for criminal trespassing. Friday, June 26, 2015 Theft on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Trailer reported missing. Domestic dispute on Pagan Place Lane near Okanogan. Theft on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Tools reported missing. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Trailer reported missing. Fraud on Waring Rd. near Loomis. Threats on Pagan Place Lane near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Lawn mower reported missing. Threats on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Sunrise Dr. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Burglary on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on S. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville.

4th of July Celebration

ONCONULLY SATURDAY, July 4, 2015

Car Show, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. / Judging, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Arts and Craft Vendors, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Silent Auction, 11 to 4 p.m. Frozen T-Shirt at General Store 11 a.m. / followed by Berneys Gang Followed by Parade Hot Dog Eating Contest at the General Store after Parade Firefighter Water Competition by the Fire Station Duck Races down Salmon Creek at 5 p.m.

More Calendar of Events check out our website at www.conconully.com

License plate reported missing. Domestic dispute on Fir St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Illegal burning on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Ira David Rodriguez, 42, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Ryder James Lewis, 20, booked for second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Robert Curtis DeCosta, 29, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants, both for fourthdegree assault (DV). Hugo Hernandez, 27, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Clomiat Annemaude McCraigie, 39, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for first-degree DWLS. Mandi Marie Smith, 36, booked on two counts of fourthdegree assault (DV). Laura Vivian Jones, 55, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Saturday, June 27, 2015 Burglary on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Eastman Mill Rd. near Riverside. Two reports of trespassing on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Illegal burning on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Dayton St. in Omak. Theft on Ferry St. in Omak. Bicycles reported missing. Warrant arrest on Benton St. in Omak. Theft on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Phone reported missing. Theft on S. Birch St. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Warrant arrest on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on S. Locust Way in Tonasket. Eric Andreas Bakken, 51, booked for violation of a protection order. Joseph Shawl, no middle name listed, 44, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michelle Ann Hernandez, 25, DOC detainer. Kendall Ray Boyd, 57, booked for DUI. Sunday, June 28, 2015 Automobile theft on McLaughlin Canyon Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on E. Grape St. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Tablet computer reported missing. Fletcher Clay Rickabaugh, 19, booked for second-degree theft, two counts of seconddegree vehicle prowling, and one count each of first-degree criminal trespassing and second-degree criminal trespassing.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

www.gazette-tribune.com


JULY 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER This Fourth of LETTERS July, be ever vigilant about your freedoms

I want to wish everyone a very Independence Day and hope that we all keep in mind just what freedoms we enjoy in our country – whether we were born here or have come here to become one of its citizens. America is not perfect, but we have to strive to be as good as we can be. To continue to be an example to the world that democracy can work. And we have to be vigilante about all our freedoms – especially those like Freedom of Speech and Freedom of the Press, my favorite of course. If we lose the right to criticize our leaders when they don’t represent us to our best interests and not those of big money, then it won’t be long before we see all our freedoms start to fall. Some might say it’s too late, but Out of I’m always hopeful we will again come to our senses and realize the we are the people and My Mind corporations, we are the ones that the Gary A. DeVon not Founding Fathers had in mind. I’m sure they weren’t thinking of trading in one master – Great Britain, for a bunch of self-appointed corporate kings who think they know what’s best for us. That’s enough preaching for today, but I’d just like to remind you there’s a real potential for fire danger this summer so be careful with your fireworks. Consider taking in a fireworks display like the one we have at Deep Bay Park. Mother Nature doesn’t need any more help, what with severely dry conditions and lightning storms. While last Saturday’s lightning storm was spectacular to watch, especially from the patio at Alpine, as the band played on everyone had to be thinking – oh man, I wonder how many fires will have been sparked by the many strikes we were seeing. There were reports of strikes that had flamed up on this side of the border, but after a trip to Osoyoos on Sunday, it looked like they got the brunt of them up Anarchist Mountain as well as on the other side of the valley. You could certainly hear the fire bombers flying about Sunday afternoon. Apparently the biggest fire in our area is near Spotted Lake, about 3.5 miles west of Osoyoos. It had grown to about 7.5 acres by Monday. A fire near Keremeos was reported to be reaching 30 acres in size. The worst fires seem to be south of us in the Wenatchee and Cashmere areas. Several residents were evacuated for the Sleepy Hallow Fire and Northwest Wholesale, Blue Bird and 22 other structures, including several homes were lost. And it wasn’t even July yet. Normally we get a little bit more time to prepare, but like cherry season, fire season is early this year and hot temperatures have just made fire conditions explosive. We can only hope that the little bit of rain we were having on Monday will help to quench any smoldering potential fires. The last thing we want to see is a repeat of the devastation caused by last year’s Carton Complex of fires.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

TO THE EDITOR

Education: expand on putting kids first Dear Editor, I recently read a letter that Washington schools need more funding, fewer tests, smaller class size, etc. Being a teacher is not easy, let alone being an exceptional one. I was fortunate to have had a few exceptional ones. They taught me to question everything. The letter contained many nebulous statements which I feel need to be properly qualified. First, the unconstitutionally court ordered school funding. Read the dissenting option of Supreme Court Judge J.M. Johnson, McCleary v State No. 84362-7 Dec. 20, 2012. To quote, “Today’s order clearly violates two important provisions of our constitution: the separation of powers and the explicit delegation of education to the legislature.” In addition, “Today’s order is a clear usurpation of the legislature’s constitutionally mandated duty.” Further, “We have recognized that the spirit of reciprocity and interdependence requires that if checks by one branch undermine the operation of another branch or undermine the rule of law which all branches are committed to maintain, those checks are improper and destructive exercises of authority.” I have spoken to our local legislators and feel they all agree with Judge Johnson. Look up and read the whole document. Second, “school funding is always on the chopping block.” A game of semantics is being played here! X amount of dollars are proposed for the education budget. Less is actually approved. It is STILL more than was spent in the previous budget! To call it a cut is not being honest. Washington ranks anywhere from 41st to 6th depending upon which measure is used. If you look at the Washington Education Association (WEA) union website, “Education Statistics,” you are deceived into believing Washington ranks 40th in the nation in per student spending. That assessment is based old numbers, so it misses the increases passed in recent state budgets. Washington’s school districts actually spend an average of $11,300 per student, the highest level in state history. Yet only 59¢ of every education dollar reaches the classroom. Private schools typically spend 90 percent of their budgets on classroom instruction, and generally charge less than $11,300 a year for tuition. Lawmakers should give parents the choice to direct public education dollars in ways that help kids, focus less on how Washington compares with other states, and more on how well kids are learning in class. Then there is the statement “full funding.” Define full funding, exactly. Third, “smaller class sizes.” Exactly how small is small? What IS that elusive number when we will start to see difinative results? A

Quack OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIO-POLITICAL WRITER

Suppose you want to marry a duck. You wish for the duck to be able to visit you in the hospital if needed, inherit your estate or join you in the adoption or artificial generation of a child or duckling. Would these not be rights you and the duck are entitled to? Why not? Says who? It must be comforting to a person with this predilection to know that there’s now one less legal barrier to marrying a duck since the state has decreed that marital options are no longer confined to persons of the opposite sex. Marital Bill Slusher choices are now more biodiverse than they’ve been in America’s history. Now before the same-sex marriage ‘movement’ shows up in my yard to wax indignant, let me encourage any who feel I’m anti-gay to read my award nominated, 2009 novel, FOR WHOM TO DIE, and see if you still feel that way. If you do, I’ll buy the book back. It isn’t necessary nor does it logically follow that one must ‘hate’ nor even dislike gays to oppose gay ‘marriage.’ Such kneejerk, politically correct ‘hate’ accusations are emotionally satisfying but asinine. Would that it were that simple. It’s like saying pro-choice advocates ‘hate’ babies. Moreover, I don’t oppose civil union that provides gays all legal considerations under law that heteros enjoy. I just don’t think it right to blithely bastardize the definition of the word marriage that has been consistently hetero for 3000 years. I submit that heteros have the same inalienable right to exclusive ownership of the term ‘marriage’ as gays/

study done a few years ago, the Starr Study, sort of mentioned smaller class size is better. If you read the WHOLE study, you see that there was a benefit for kindegarden. It gradually evaporated. Atter 3rd grade, then there was no difference. Is this study the basis for this claim? A report on education that takes the smaller class size notion into account was prepared by Eric Hanushek, at: http://www. educationnext.org/. Read it. “More access to individual support” and “more manageable work loads.” INDIVIDUAL support? More manageable workloads in relation to what? Fourth, “our students are insufferably over-tested.” In relation to what or whom? “Testing is getting in the way of student learning.” How else do you plan on measuring their success? “A teacher cannot teach when testing all the time.” A bit of an exaggeration? “Lessen the high stakes nature of standardized tests.” How high are the stakes when only 16% of students leaving HIGH SCHOOL can read at an 8th grade level, as in Baltimore and other cities? DON’T EVEN say the results are so bad because they are poor or not white! Talk about a racist and bigoted comment! Incidentally, if you look at the Washington State School Profile, it appears testing stops at 10th grade! So how exactly are students getting out of high school, since it does list graduation rates? By the way, what exactly are the reading or math competency levels of graduates from Oroville High School? 70% of Americans don’t even know what the Constitution is! What is the level of Constitutional competency in the Oroville School District? I pose these same questions to the Tonasket School District, and every other school district in this state. While listening to the radio recently, I heard discussion of Washington State’s plan of race for the bottom in education, my description. There is evidently some model the state is using where educational competency is measured in tiers. Education in Washington is so pitiful that the aim is not for excellence, top tier, but shooting for the bottom tier and hoping we can get at least a 30% success rate! We are in a life or death struggle for our future! Why are Washington State teacher’s, (and teachers across the country), so adamantly against linking their pay to performance, as every other profession or job does? This was a request from the Secretary

of Education, Arne Duncan, as a condition of Washington State receiving Federal funding. Washington State, for years now, has failed to meet basic minimum requirements, which is why you keep hearing about the state asking for exemptions! I seriously have to ask Washington State teachers, are you ready to put some skin in the game? As It stands, you get paid the same amount whether the kids pass or fail. Whether they are ready for life or not. “Teachers are expected to meet so many professional requirements.” “They pay out money for fees as well as spend more personal/unpaid time to keep their certification.” Are you saying teachers are being held to a higher standard? Could that be because of the importance of your success? Because if you don’t succeed, our society is lost! By any measure, we are in pretty bad shape. How do your professional requirements compare to other professions, which are also subject to increasing standards and certifications? They pay out money for fees, on the average work a 52 week year, and in practically all circumstances, use unpaid time to do it. Regarding education loans. When the price of something goes up for apparently no good reason, people rightfully complain. For many years now, the price of a college education has been skyrocketing at a rate of 10 to 15% PER YEAR, and no one does anything except get a bigger loan! Since it is public record, I looked up the salaries at Washington State University, for example. The President makes $662,560. 3 Directors: $581,092, $275,820, and $259,967. 3 Regents Professors: $362,915, $351,799 and $267,840. 2 Dean and Professors: $320,000 and $287,500. 2 Chancellors at $300,000 each. 1 Interim Provost at $310,500. How many people does it take to change a lightbulb?Who makes the most? Head Football Coach at $2,325,000, followed by Head Basketball Coach at $870,143! This is pretty typical of most universities. But sports bring in millions. So why aren’t tuitions going down? What is that outrageously expensive student loan really paying for? To reiterate, if teacher’s don’t succeed, our society is lost. By numerous indicators, it appears we are circling the drain! Just looking to get answers to my questions and hoping to raise a few. David Wolosik Oroville

lesbians have to legal partnership benefits equal to heteros. I’m glad gays/lesbians now have legal civil union and I sincerely wish them well. Divorce lawyers nationwide are no doubt ordering new yachts as we speak. You can call this civil union whatever pleases you in America. It’s a free country... mmm... strike that... it’s a free country unless you wish to run your own business in accordance with the contrary tenets of your Christian religion. (Islam seems to be a sacred cow to the current PC state, thus exempt from compliance.) Then the state will intimidate you with threats of taking away your money, your right to your legal livelihood and your freedom, and will if necessary send badged persons with guns to politically correct you behind bars. The modern state no longer exists to facilitate citizen rights, as originally intended, but rather to redefine them as it arbitrarily deems politically expedient, the American constitution be damned. (I’m agnostic for what it matters here.) Nonetheless, whatever you call gay civil union, what it cannot in any linguistic context legitimately be called is... ‘marriage.’ That term has always exclusively and unequivocally applied to opposite-sex partners, which no trendy pop revisionism can alter. Fortunately for my critics, no one of any power gives a happy damn what I think, but I’m still moved to wonder what’s next. Apparently this sentiment is shared by polygamists who now ask why, if a man can marry a man, he cannot marry more than one wife simultaneously. Why does the polygamous form of marriage, around for millennia, not enjoy a benevolent blessing the PC state bestows upon a form that has never existed? And if that seems... unique... consider that the gay ‘marriage’ movement has emboldened not merely pedophiles but whole elements of the American psychiatry profession

to propose destigmatizing pedophilia just as we have with homosexuality. In 1973, psychiatrists officially stopped defining homosexuality as the mental illness it too had theretofore been ‘scientifically’ considered. Now it seems there is ‘movement’ to do the same with pedophlia. Can, say, bestiality be far behind? Chill, outraged gays and lesbians, I’m not equating gay ‘marriage’ with pedophilia or bestiality, I’m only pointing out that legalization of the former was once considered just as beyond the pale of imagination as legalization of the latter two. What’s really... next... in a world of politically correct, moral convenience? Who knows for sure? I admit that I don’t. Let they who perceive this as offensive be offended. Legions of hetero married folk are deeply offended by what they see as the state-sanctioned kidnaping of a social institution exclusively theirs for millennia. Gays/ lesbians have told heteros to lump it and get over it, and thus may fairly be expected to do likewise. Lest my meaning here be confused or distorted out of emotion or bigotry, I repeat that I sympathize with gays/lesbians who (for reasons I suspect are beyond their control, whatever naysayers declare) find themselves sexually so inclined. I would not care to see them deprived of the legal rights to lead their lives with adults they love, as heteros do. I’m only observing that morality is apparently not static for the PC state, and the implications thereof are profoundly disturbing. William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 2, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Have happy and sane Fourth of July Almost the Fourth of July, so another rodeo and big celebration in Chesaw. Have a happy, sane celebration, wherever you are! So, next week will be the Red Cross Blood Draw. Where? Oroville High School Commons. When? Wendsday, July 8. Time? 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. United Methodist Church are the hosts, but sometimes the heat is such that it’s more comfortable for the workers and donors, at the school. Everything is the same, except the location. Vivian Emry and daughter Joannie Raymond were in Molson, for the Midsummer Fest, and to tie up loose ends at her place. Luanne Billings, another of Vivian’s daughters, who has been quite ill, is slowly regaining on some of her problems, but progress is slow and will probably be over a long period of time. We had a nice visit at the museum and from there could see the art work in

progress on the Grange Hall. So, the Big casino in Omak has opened. It sounds pretty fancy. Hopefully it will be a big asset to the community. One of the empty buildings in Oroville, has been leased and will soon reopen. The former Pastime Bar and Grill. Also hear rumblings of the Peerless reopening. Would be a good thing as eating places are in short supply right now. The idea of having the picture of a woman on a ten dollar bill, is being discussed. I’d rather have one that is worth ten dollars, and leave the picture alone. How about you? I try and stay out of the political field but sometimes it isn’t easy. Do you believe in the death penalty? Many say the United States is such an awful place. Can anyone explain to me why there are so many wanting in to our country, not out of it, if it is such a bad place? Word has been received of the death of

State Legislature still haggling over nutrition and transportation SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Submitted photo

Chester and Marieree (York) Guyll, starting out as a young couple 60 years ago. They will be celebrating their Diamond Anniversary at the Valley Christian Church with family and friends.

Guylls to celebrate 60th ‘Diamond’ Anniversary SUBMITTED BY REBECCA WALTERS

Chester (Chet) Guyll and Margieree (Margie York) Guyll, both originally from Arkansas, are celebrating 60 years of marriage on July 8, 2015 at 1 p.m. at the Valley Christian Church, with a potluck in their honor. They met in 1954 at the Pentecostal Church. Chet had been working any job he could find at the time, having just served one term in the US Army. Margie had moved to Oroville with her family when she was 14 and worked multiple jobs by the time she met Chet. Shortly after meeting they started dating and were married on July 8th 1955, at the Free Methodist Church in Oroville. Within the next three years

their two oldest sons were born. However, steady work was hard to find at the time so Chet reenlisted in the Army in about 1958 and was sent to Korea. Margie continued to work odd jobs to help support the family. Once Chet returned from the Army, they moved to Riverside, and then Wenatchee where they had their third and fourth child. In the 1960s they moved to Everett, Wash. There Chet found a job at Weyerhaeuser where he worked until he retired. Margie continued to work a variety of jobs as well as caring for her grandmother even though their family had grown to five children by then. In 1985 they moved with their youngest daughter back to Oroville and lived there off and on until now.

sary and the 4th of July. One year as many as 75 were in attendance and Verle made home made ice cream for one and all. Verle would have been so pleased to learn how many people he had touched along his way in life, which neared the century mark. He had such a wonderful sense of humor and it was delightful to hear the memories shared with those present. He and his brother Gene, were close throughout their entire lives and it almost seemed ironic that they should leave from this earth only thirty days apart. It is unfortunate that Noreen was not able to be on hand for the occasion. She is in a care center and suffers from dementia. Five new babies have been born at the Larry Eder Ranch. Baby buffalo, that is. And more are on their way. New paint job at Windemere Real Estate Agency. Bright and clean white with blue accents. Looks good! Have you read the Boys in the Boat? It is available at the Oroville Library. I hear nothing but raves and I believe there is to be a movie made. Mary Moran is now a resident at The Golden Years Family Home, 48 Hubbard Rd., Riverside, WA 98849. ‘Til next week.

Gene Dammel. High school graduate of is, it was HOT!! Hey! The Mariner’s won another Oroville High School and a resident of game. Yeah! Placerville, Calif. at time of death. One day Marge told her Do you ever wonder what husband that she was worto do with left-over prescripried that she was losing her tion medicines? Todd Hill, memory.”Look on the bright Oroville Chief of Police says side,” he told her. “You’ll it’s in “the works” at City meet someone new every Hall and you may bring the day.” I don’t know about that, unusable items there, as they but I do know, if I didn’t have do not like them put in the to spend so much time looksewer system. Probably more ing for something that I’ve information in the Gazetteput away, only a short time Tribune as the program proago, I’d have lots more time gresses. during a day to do something I hurried around and made THIS & THAT constructive. a bunch of cookies think- Joyce Emry I guess those two guys that ing our little boys from escaped from prison, in New Snohomish were coming and once again they couldn’t make it. So, I York, have found that you can run but you can’t hide...forever. guess the big boys will have eat them. What a wonderful bunch of family Grandma had to talk fast to get out of a speeding ticket the other day. She and friends gathered at the American explained to the officer that she had to Legion Hall, in Oroville last Saturday, drive fast. Otherwise she’d forget where to celebrate the life of Verle Harnasch. On July 4th Verle and Noreen would she was going before she got there. Remember to go to the Farmer’s have been married 73 years. A tradition Market on Saturday and get some good, was started some years after they were married and made their home on Lake garden fresh “stuff.” Someone turned up the thermostat... or Osoyoos and family and friends gathered is that real global warming? Whatever it at their home to celebrate their anniver-

Over the years they have enjoyed boating, camping, fishing, and hunting together. They’ve been devout Christians who have always been willing to help others, even when it’s cost them the ability to fulfill their own dreams. Their children include Bradford and Willy Guyll of Anchorage, Alaska, Michael and Lisa Guyll of Northport Wash., Deanna Lynn Guyll (deceased), Derek Guyll, David and Rebecca (Guyll) Walters of Denver Colo. They also have 11 grandkids and their spouses and 10 great grandkids with one on the way. When asked how they have managed to stay married for 60 years, their answer is always that they’d “rather fight than switch.”

By now everyone knows whether our nutrition and transportation is shut down or not. It seem that the Washington State Legislature is having a hard time compromising the budget. Its the same thing year after year after year. Politics. (For the unenlightened: No budget, no meals. Get it?) Friday, July 3rd, we are closed. No meal. Enjoy the 4th of July. We have a new cook. Her name is Peggy Doyle. I understand that she is very well qualified, indeed, and prefers home style cooking,

Chesaw Rodeo this Saturday SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Are all of you ready for the Fourth of July? We are on our second round of company. Mark (my favorite nephew) and his grandkids: Alec, Ethan and Kenzi and Grandma Jackie arrived last Saturday and will be here for two weeks. They all come every year for the activities in Chesaw over the Fourth. They are in their 11th year.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS which should go over well. I hear she has had experience managing a bakery. I for one, am looking forward to homemade pastries. Ya! I hear that Tillie is doing better, as she has been under the weather of sorts, and has canceled computer classes for the time being. You all remember Dal Zita, (our pianist from Canada?). He has had some serious medical conditions, that have kept him away for several months. Also, Ruth LaFrance was admitted to the emergency room last week, (but released the next day, so I hear.) Let’s keep these in our thoughts and prayers that we will see them well, and soon. (Just heard from

HILLTOP COMMENTS They come to us from the Seattle area. The books opened Thursday, June 25 to enter the rodeo events. Entries will be accepted 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. only. The books close when events are filled and must be paid by 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 2. Call Mary Ellen Field at 509485-3223. Senior events are $20 for cow riding, calf roping, Regular Saddle Bronc,

BIRTH Dylan Galvan Dylan Illandria Galvan was born to Olivia Glavan at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on June 11, 2015. The baby weighed 7 lbs., 1 oz. and was 21 inches. She joins a sibling, Marley Irie Regan. Grandparents are Dianna and Antonio Galvan and Jeff and Darlene Regan.

Ruth. She’s better. Our prayers are answered ex post facto.) We have a new Bingo committee chair, Jan Harper. She has reorganized things and has solicited new Bingo callers. Go Jan! Bingo, for you kings and queens, is Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m. (Vassal subjects need not apply.) Menu for next week is: Tuesday, July 7, Sweet and Sour Chicken; Thursday, July 9 Baked Ham; Friday, July 10, Chicken Cordon Bleu. Our Pancake Breakfast is scheduled for, not this, but next Saturday, July 11, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Don’t miss a scrumptious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, and milk. All for $8, cheap. Laugh, or cry our former cooks are good by. If you haven’t said your goodbyes by this date, you’ve missed your chance, you’re way too late.

Ranch Saddle Bronc, Bare Back Wild Cow Milking. Open Barrel Racing $10 Entry Fee. Junior Events (no entry fee) – Cow Riding, Calf Roping, Barrels and Calf Scramble. Put on your Western Duds and come to the Dance on July 3 at 9 p.m. for $5 per person, with the Powder River Band. On Saturday, July 4th the family games start at 10 a.m. and the parade will start at 12:30 p.m. If you want to sign up for parade call Dalene Nigg at 509-4762792 to reserve your spot in the line up. The Rodeo will start at 1 p.m. Once again, please be careful with fire and enjoy the Fourth of July holiday.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

SUBMITTED BY SONJA MYKLEBUST

OROVILLE GARDEN CLUB

OROVILLE GARDEN CLUB

The Oroville Garden Club got ready for the first day of summer by enjoying their June 19 meeting at the home of Doris Hughes. Doris hosted the potluck lunch in her beautiful backyard. Naturally, during lunch, most of the discussion was about what is growing in everyone’s garden. Old business included rave reviews of the 2015 District Meeting held on June 14 by the Methow Valley Garden Club in Twisp. Guest speaker was Tess Hoke with the Yard Food Garden Shop in Twisp. She spoke about the importance of microbes in the soil. Our attendees could not say enough good things about not only the speaker, but also the entire event. Best garden tip was Manure Tea for your flowers in the garden. Take a five-gallon bucket, add a couple of scoops of manure and then fill with water. Betty Bair went home, made it, and is now enjoying happy flowers in the garden. Did you know that we have a Seed Library? Most of the Oroville Garden Club didn’t know about it either. The Seed Lending Library

is a formal NCRL Library project, with a mission to provide community education in growing plants for food and enjoyment, provide locally adapted seed varieties to the community, and educate community members about soil quality, dry land gardening, and microclimates. There is no cost to participate, and participants are not obligated to collect and donate seeds, although that is their goal. They also have a “grow a row for the food bank” program, and encourage participants to grow extra produce to donate. We plan on having LaVonne

Hammelman, the creator of this program, as our guest speaker later this summer to share more information. Installation of new officers was the finale. The new officers installed are President Bob Greer, First Vice President Marlene Laws-Convery, Second Vice President Dolly Engelbretsen, Secretary Betty Bair and Treasurer Judy Dunston. We are very excited that Bob Greer is the first male president ever in the Oroville Garden Club which started in 1941. Next meeting will be on July 10 with a no host lunch at the Wauconda Café. We welcome anyone who would like to join our group. For any questions about becoming a member of the Oroville Garden Club please contact Marilyn Perry at 509-4762584.

Reach Your Constituents We’ve Got You Covered

Reach 2.7 Million Readers YOU NEED HELP – They need work.

throughout Washington advertising YOUskills NEED HELP – They byneed work. Community your job in 106 Community Newspapers! Reach over 2 million readers with many

Advertise in

Reach over 2 million readers with many Newspapers, LOWthroughout COST • Washington ONE CALL aby • Key ONE BILL skills advertising Source of Local Region or the Entire State! your jobBuy in a106 Community Newspapers!

Political News

Request a free information kit today:

LOW COST •Call ONE• One CALLPayment • ONE BILL One 509-476-3602 Call this Newspaper for Details

Buy a Region or the Entire State!

Request a free information kit today:

509-476-3602

FREE Phone 5OO Minutes & Unlimited Text

SAN ANDREAS

WED-THURS-FRI JULY 8-9-10 SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY AT 7:00 & 9:10 PM

for the first 4 months of service!

After 4 months, Lifeline benefit includes 250 Minutes/Texts*

INSIDE OUT

You may qualify for Access Wireless if you participate in programs such as Food Stamps, SNAP or Medicaid. To Apply: Call 1-888-450-1838 or visit www.enrollaccesswireless.com * Promotional offer is limited to new, eligible customers who activate service between 5/1/15 and 7/31/15. Customers must be approved for Lifeline service with Access Wireless and reside in selected geographic areas. Promotion ends 4 months from activation date. Minutes do not carry forward. Offer is not available in all states/areas. Customers de-enrolled from the federal Lifeline program no longer qualify for the promotion. Unlimited does not mean unreasonable use. Free phone is provided by Access Wireless. Access Wireless is a service provider for the government-funded Lifeline Assistance Program. Lifeline service is provided by i-wireless, LLC, d/b/a Access Wireless, which is an eligible telecommunications carrier. Lifeline service is non-transferable. Only one Lifeline discount, including wireline or wireless, may be received per household. A household is defined, for the purposes of the Lifeline program, as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. A household is not permitted to receive Lifeline benefits from multiple providers. Violation of the one-per-household rule constitutes a violation of FCC rules, and will result in the customer’s de-enrollment from Lifeline. Only eligible customers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make a false statement in order to obtain the Lifeline benefit can be punished by fine or imprisonment, or can be barred from the program. Customers must present proper documentation confirming eligibility for the Lifeline program. Your information will be validated against public records and any discrepancies could result in delays in your approval or rejection of service. For unresolved questions or complaints, customers may contact the Washington State Office of the Attorney General at 1-360-753-6200.

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES.-WED-THURS.FRI. JULY 11-12-13-14-15-16-17. THERE WILL ALSO BE A MATINEE OF THIS SHOW ON THE SAT 2:00P.M.ALLSEATS $6.00 FOR THE MATINEE.

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

JURASSIC WORLD 124 min

Introducing The new and revolutionary

PG13

Jacuzzi Hydrotherapy Shower. ®

Four Jacuzzi® ShowerPro™ Jets focus on the neck, back, hips, knees and may help ease the pain and discomfort.

The Jacuzzi ® Hydrotherapy Shower provides a lifetime of comfort and relief… safely and affordably.

enjoyment, comfort and pain-relief. They’ve thought of everything. From the high-gloss acrylic surface, slip-resistant flooring, a hand-held shower wand, a comfortable and adjustable seat, to strategicallyplaced grab bars and lots of storage, this shower has it all. Why wait to experience the Jacuzzi® Hydrotherapy Shower? Call now… it’s the first step in getting relief from those aches and pains.

For over 50 years, the Jacuzzi® Design Engineers have worked Call toll free now to get to bring the powerful benefits your FREE special report of soothing hydrotherapy into millions of homes. Now, they’ve “Tips on Living to be 100” created a system that can fit in the Mention promotional code 101162. space of your existing bathtub or 1-888-586-5951 shower and give you a lifetime of

82008

‘What’s is everyone growing?’

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

LIMITED TIME OFFER!

ACTION / ADVENTURE / SCI-FI STARRING CHRIS PRATT, BRYCE DALLAS HOWARD, TY SIMPKONS. FRI. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00, 6:15. SUN *3:00, 6:15. MON-THURS 6:30, 9:30 The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

INSIDE OUT

102 min

PG

ANIMATION / COMEDY / FAMILY. RASHIDA JONES, DIANE LANE, AMY POEHLER. FRI.

*3:30, 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00, 6:00,9:00. SUN *3:00, 6:00. MON-THURS 6:30, 9:30

TED 2

115 min

R

COMEDY STARRING MARK WAHLBERG, SETH MACFARLANE, AMANDA SEYFRIED. FRI. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *3:15, 6:15, 9:15. SUN *3:15, 6:15. MON - THURS. 6:45, 9:45.

TERMINATOR: GENISYS ACTION / ADVENTURE / SCI-FI STARRING ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, EMILIA CLARKE, JAI COURTNEY. 125 min PG13 WED.-THURS 6:45, 9:45 Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


JULY 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

TONASKET EAGLES

COMMUNITY CALENDAR phone number is 509-486-2366.

OYSC Fall Soccer Registration

Preschool Story Time

OROVILLE - Registration for Oroville Youth Soccer has begun. Go to www.ncwsoccer. com to register children four to 14-years-old. There is a one time $50 fee which allows players to play in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. The deadline to register is prior to July 31, 2015. Players who aren’t registered by then will not be allowed to play. Fall season runs from September to October. Those with questions should contact Jaden Taber at 509-560-3461.

TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 3 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

Marchand and Rhodes Perform OROVILLE - Ruby Marchand and Jimmy Rhodes will perform original works this Thursday, July 2 at Esther Bricques Winery. Music begins at 6:30. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or check the Events Page at www. estherbricques.com.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, July 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this markets on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The market can now accept WIC and Senior checks, through the USDA and Washington State sponsored Farmers Market Nutrition Program. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096.

Fusion Beads Craft TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Fusion Beeds Craft on Monday, June 29 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

BIRTH

Ava Johnson Ava Elise Anastasia Nora Johnson was born to Elizabeth and Larry Johnson of Tonasket at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on June 26, 2015. The baby weighed 7 lbs., 4 oz. and was 20.5 inches long. Grandparents are Bob and Peggy Harris and Larry Sr and Mary Alice Johnson, all of Tonasket.

Bruce Cool Bench Dedication OROVILLE - There will be a dedication to Bruce Cool on Friday, July 3 at 11 a.m. in Oroville Centennial Park. A bench is being placed in the park in his memory. Cool spent many hours working to make the park a dream and a reality for the communities enjoyment. Everyone is welcome; please come help us honor Mr. B. Cool. Attendees are encouraged to wear WSU crimson and gray.

Chesaw Rodeo & Dance CHESAW - Chesaw Rodeo is July 4th starting with the dance on the Friday, July 3 and Family Games on the July 4 at 10 a.m., Parade at 12:30 p.m. and Rodeo at 1 p.m.

Jet Pack Craft TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Jet Pack Craft on Monday, July 6 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509486-2366.

Library Puppet Show TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents a Library Puppet Show on Thursday, July 9 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

Preschool Story Time TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 10 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library

OHS Class of 1975 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1975 will be having a get together on Friday, July 24 at Copper Mountain Vineyards (Aka Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Stand) 1 mile north of Princes on Hwy. 97. The get together is from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. with drinks and appetizers. Picnic to follow on Saturday. Bring the family. Pass the word to other classmates or view Brian Brownlee’s Facebook page for further details or call 509-833-0190.

Grasshopper Festival REPUBLIC - The Grasshopper Festival, Friday, July 24 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., is a fun summertime festival with local artists and food, a ScareCritter Contest (think insect scarecrows), a Bug Parade, real life info about grasshoppers including natural pest control, and fantasy bug stuff, too, like insect mask and piñata making. And what makes this festival different? Eating real bugs! No one has to eat a bug, bug don’t you want to see someone else eat a bug? The festival is at Republic City Park, 40 N. Kean Street.

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509-4762488.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day

“2-Night Free Vacation!”

1- 800 - CAR - ANGE L

w w w.boatangel.com

STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN

Know the Impact of Retirement Goals on Your Finances FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

The concept of “retirement” has changed dramatically in recent decades. Today’s retirees are traveling, volunteering, pursuing their hobbies — and even working for money. In fact, as a retiree, you can essentially do anything you want, as long as your health and finances permit it. Through exercise, proper diet and avoidance of bad habits, you can do a lot to stay physically healthy. And by clearly identifying your retirement goals and estimating their financial impact, you’ll know how to stay “financially healthy” throughout your retirement years. So, what are your retirement goals? Here are some of the more common ones: Travel. Many people can’t wait to see the world once they retire. If you’re one of these eager travelers, you’ve

got more choices than ever. Programs such as Road Scholar (formerly known as Elderhostel) provide educational travel programs to virtually every area on the planet. And, of course, you are free to journey on your own. But however you decide to hit the road, you’d better bring your wallet — because travel is expensive. One way of dealing with these costs is to place a certain amount of money each year in a liquid account that offers significant protection of principal. Set aside enough money to cover all your travels for a year, and when it’s exhausted, you’ll know it’s time to stay home for a while. Rent or buy a second home. During retirement, many people like to spend a few months each year in a more pleasant climate or in a location nearer their grown children. If you are considering a second home, you’ll need to decide whether you want to rent or buy. You’ll find considerable differences from a financial point of view, so you’ll want to think carefully about your choice. Pursue your hobbies. While you were working, you might have wished that you had more freedom to pursue your hobbies. Once you retire, though, you’ll probably have a lot more time to do what you like, whether that’s driving your classic car, painting landscapes,

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Summer has arrived and giving us some very warm temperatures, so hope all have gotten those air conditioners up and running. Keep your animals in doors or lots of water. This last Sunday was District meeting in Oroville #3865, a big thanks for a great meeting and meal. (Hats off to Ya). On Saturday, July 18 we will be having your annual catfish or chicken fry. This event will start at 5 p.m. and go to 7 p.m., all proceeds

will go towards our up coming new reader board. Karaoke to follow by Linda Wood. Don’t forget Bingo on Fridays starting at 7:pm and kitchen at 5:30 p.m. Free pool on Tuesdays and Joker Poker on Saturday at 6:45 p.m. Pinochle scores are as follows from last Sunday: first place Gene Michels and Neil Fifer, second place Dale Byers and Lyle Anderson, last Pinochle Went to Dale Byers and Lyle Anderson. No name was given for low score. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. P.S. Don’t forget to come in and pay your dues.

312 S. Whitcomb

509-486-0615

239 YEARS...

We will be closed Sat., July 4

LET FREEDOM RING!

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

Tonasket Food Bank

Donate A Boat or Car Today!

sponsored by boat angel outreach centers

Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Attended District meeting in Oroville

golfing, fishing, building furniture — whatever. Be aware, however, that some people do get over-exuberant and spend more money on their hobbies than they can really afford. So have fun with your pursuits, but set a budget — and stick to it. Get back to work. Upon your formal retirement, you may decide to do some consulting or open a small business. Any wages you receive can greatly improve your retirement income picture. For example, the more money you earn, the less you’ll have to take out each year from your 401(k), IRA and other retirement plans. (You will have to take at least minimum withdrawals from some of these accounts.) Plus, if you make enough money, you may be able to postpone Social Security for a few years, thereby increasing your monthly payments when you eventually start taking them. As you can see, your retirement goals will be closely tied to your finances. So think carefully about what you’d like to do when you retire — and connect these objectives to the money you’ll spend and the money you may earn. By being aware of both your dreams and your “bottom line,” you should be able to enjoy the retirement lifestyle you’ve envisioned. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 2, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • July 2, 2015

Classified Deadline - Noon Tuesday • Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination”. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale TONASKET 2

Health General

For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004.

Announcements

Sweet Dreams

Lotions Oils Creams

Powders Gag Gifts Adult Toys

Hours: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

509-826-5486

We have the following opportunities available:

East Side 831 Omak Ave., Omak

Busy Beavers

BR, 2 BATH + UPSTAIRS BALCONY area. Full basement is unfinished. This house has charm, situated in Old Orchard Estates. $149,500. Shown by appt only. Call for details 509322-3471 or please leave message. FOR LEASE Storage/Workshop 2700 sq. ft. with small office and restroom. Good Tonasket location. Only $950 per month. Call 509 322 4732

For Rent American Legion Housing 1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

Subsidized for Income Qualified Households l Great Oroville Location l Spacious Floor Plans l Park-like setting

l Picnic area l On-site laundry

FIREWOOD

Providing Premium Firewood to the Sunny Okanogan!  Cord Wood  Campfire Wood Bundles

Call and Order Today!

Ph. 509-560-3064

or visit busybeaversfirewood.com

TTY 425-562-4002

CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS $450-$795, Possible 1 month free. 3 BR HOME $750 & $850

Call Today Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Crosswords

ANSWERS

OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred.

UBI#601 422 863 21

Call for information and application

509-476-2808

OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant Full time on an as needed basis, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville

BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

30. Expression of disgust

7. In ___ of

31. Aroma

8. Twice

33. Artless one 35. Flip-flop

9. Country whose capital is Seoul (2 wds)

38. ___ gin fizz

10. Fish

39. Animal in a roundup 41. Length x width, for a rectangle

11. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto)

42. Third of the seven canonical hours

13. He took two tablets 15. Small talk (2 wds)

44. ___ Bowl played at Aloha Stadium

17. Hose

45. Makeup, e.g.

23. Disinclined

46. ___ Jackman, actor

25. Announce

48. After-dinner drink

26. Doing nothing

50. Absorbed, as a cost

27. Institutions for paupers

51. Fake

29. Entanglement (hyphenated)

52. Intelligence

32. Happened again

54. Single-handedly

34. Criminal

57. Clerks who arrange papers for storage

36. Home, informally

61. “... or ___!”

40. Make less dense

62. Burdened by cares (hyphenated)

43. Baker’s dozen?

64. Emulated Pinocchio

21. Drawn tight

37. Box office take

47. Donkey bray (hyphenated)

Across

65. Chill

49. Fabric with diagonal parallel ribs

66. Youngest Bennet sister in “Pride and Prejudice”

51. Thin leaf-like layers

1. Fancy-schmancy 5. Blend

67. ___ de deux 68. Custom

54. Canine cry

9. Ed.’s request (acronym) 12. Crosswise, on deck

69. Caroled

14. Assortment 15. Bamboozles

Down

16. Master chef (2 wds) 18. Holds close

1. Agreement

19. Itty-bitty

2. “O” in old radio lingo

20. Silent movie caption

3. Arid

22. Be a snitch

4. Lacked (contraction)

24. Carpenter’s machine25. Lulu28. Dirty coat

5. Kind of rule 6. Building additions

53. Kills, as a dragon

Help Wanted

Accepting applications for: Cook Bartender  Wait Staff Dishwasher / Prep Assistant Previous experience preferred. Applications can be picked up at 1307 Main St., Oroville. Call (509) 731-5772 for an application pick up time.

Food & Farmer’s Market Hang Em High Meat Shop Republic, WA (509)775-8095 Custom Exempt Slaughtering and Butchering Serving North Okanogan County Terry Koepke, Owner

Public Notices Notice of Application Final SEPA Determination and Hearing Date CUP 2015-3 “Buddha Amitabha Pure Land Retreat” An application has been submitted by the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition Inc. for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) to operate a religious retreat. The project will include seven residences and two water systems on 366.4 acres. The project site is located approximately 16.7 miles east of Riverside, take Tunk Creek Rd and continue for approximately 16 miles and turn north onto Fritz Rd, continue to destination. The properties are located on tax parcel numbers 3528242006, 3529193005, 3529190010 & 3529190012. According to Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) regulations, the office of Okanogan County Planning and Development issued a final environmental determination of non-significance (DNS) for this proposal. This decision may be appealed in accordance with OCC 14.04.220. Appeals must be made in writing to the Okanogan County Hearing Examiner, 123 5th Ave N Ste. 130, Okanogan, WA 98840. Appeals must be submitted or postmarked by 5:00 p.m. on July 16, 2015. Appeals shall state with specificity the elements of the environmental checklist and resulting determination the appellant finds objectionable and shall state the reason therefore. Appeals must include the $300.00 appeal fee. The public hearing for this project is scheduled for July 23, 2015 at 10:00 am in the Commissioners Hearing Room. Project comments can be submitted up to the hearing date and testimony may be given at the hearing. Failure to comment by this date denies a party standing to appeal the final decision. Direct questions and comments to: Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, Anna Randall, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 4227117. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2, 2015. #OVG642509 Okanogan County Notice of Final Decision Project: Ellis-Barnes Livestock Co. CUP 2015-5

Public Notices

Public Notices

Decision: Approved Appeal Deadline: July 22, 2015 The Okanogan County Hearing Examiner approved the above-noted project. Within 21 calendar days of the publication date, parties with standing may appeal this decision pursuant to RCW 36.70 C. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2, 2015. #OVG642468

gations in favor of BANK OF AMERICA OREGON, A STATE CHARTERED BANK, as original Beneficiary recorded 06/05/1996 as Instrument No. 841725 in Book 144, on Page 1427 and the beneficial interest was assigned to Green Tree Servicing LLC and recorded 07/22/2013 as Instrument Number 3184110 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Okanogan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by Green Tree Servicing LLC, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: Green Tree Servicing LLC Contact Phone No: 800-643-0202 Address: 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, MAIL STOP T111, TEMPE, AZ 85283 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From 03/01/2014 To 03/27/2015 Number of Payments 1 Monthly Payment $187.07 1 $190.14 1 $196.95 3 $302.95 6 $301.05 1 $422.85 Total $3,712.16 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION From 03/01/2014 To 03/27/2015 Total $54.96 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 05/31/1996 Note Amount: $25,800.00 Interest Paid To: 02/01/2014 Next Due Date: 03/01/2014 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $17,748.39, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 07/31/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 07/20/2015, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 07/20/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 07/20/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, Green Tree Servicing LLC or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS ERLENE BEHRENS 205 4TH AVENUE, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 ERLENE BEHRENS 205 4TH AVE S, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 ERLENE BEHRENS PO BOX 189, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 STAN BEHRENS, 205 4TH AVENUE, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 STAN BEHRENS 205 4TH AVE S, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 STAN BEHRENS PO BOX 189, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 by both first class and certified mail on 02/06/2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in

Okanogan County Notice of Final Decision Project: Williams Pit CUP 2015-4 Decision: Approved Appeal Deadline: July 22, 2015 The Okanogan County Hearing Examiner approved the above-noted project. Within 21 calendar days of the publication date, parties with standing may appeal this decision pursuant to RCW 36.70 C. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2, 2015. #OVG642470 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 7/7/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1997 Nissan Stanza Lic# 4LWF943 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2, 2015. #OVG642446 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 7/7/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2004 Lincoln Navigator Lic#AHY8932 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2, 2015. #OVG641167 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 7/7/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2002 Ford Explorer Lic#ADE1045 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2, 2015. #OVG641169 TS No WA05000955-14-1 APN 1250090800 TO No 8507474 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 7/31/2015, 10:00 AM, At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 9, PLAT OF NORTH ALMA, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK A OF PLATS, PAGE 42, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 1250090800 More commonly known as 205 4TH AVENUE, OKANOGAN, WA 98840 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/31/1996, executed by STAN BEHRENS AND ERLENE BEHRENS, WHO ARE MARRIED TO EACH OTHER as Trustor(s), to secure obli-

Think Green!

Continued on next page

Did you know?

We use... l Soy Ink

l Recycled Paper l Excess paper recycled for

gardens, fire starter & more!

55. Toy building brick 56. Part man/part goat 58. Icelandic epic 59. Curb, with “in” 60. Catch 63. Check for accuracy

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


6 9

1 7

2 4

9 8

5

3

1

4

2

5

Sudoku 9

1

7

8

6

5

2

3

4

2

2

5

4

2

9

1

1

4

5

7

3 5 8 9 6

8 3 7 6 1

4 1 2 5 3

6

7

9

3

6

3

1

4

7

8

8

8

9

9

2

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44) The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 1

7

3

9

8

3

6

8

2 4

9 5

6 7

4

5

2

7

1

6

Puzzle 10 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

4

1

5

6 8

2 5

2 7

9

3

5

4

4 3

3

5

9

8

6

2

3

9

1

5

9

3

8

1

7

9

6

8

5

6 2 7

1 4

1

9

3

4

2

4 6 5 3 7 2 1 9 8

2 1 3 8

7 4 6 5 1 9

5

8

2

7

7

1

6

9 4 7 5 6

8 2 3

3

1

5

9

3

8

4

7

2

6

9

3

7

6

9

8

8

6

1

5

4

5

4

7

2

Puzzle 7 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

7

1

4

2

7

1

6

3

9 3 2

4 6

5

4

1

3

9

1

2

5

5 8

3 5 6 2 8 9 1 7 4

9

6

1 5 6 8

8

9

5

7

4 8 9 2 7 5 1 3

2 3 4 7

5 7 3 8 4 1 2

6

4

6

1

6 9

1 3 5 4 9 8 7 2 6

2 6 9 5 7 3 8 4 1

4

5

8

1

7

8

6

7

1

3

2

2

3

6

9

9

5

4

Puzzle 4 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

Easy, difficulty rating 0.44

6

1

9

Sponsored by

2

7

8

3

7

4

509-476-3602

6

5

5

2

4

8

9

1

8

5

5

3

4

8

2

6

9

1

1

4

3

9

7

2

6

7

4 2 6 7 3 9 1 5 8

9 7 1 5 8 2 6 3 4

2 4 9 1 5 7 8 6 3

7 9

5 3 7

8 1 4

6 9 2

3 6 1

9 2 8

8

7

7

5

4

2

5 7 4 9 3 1

3 6 2 5 8 4

4 9 1 6 2 8

6 2 7 3 9 5

8 3 5 4 1 7

9 5 8 7 4 2

7 4 6 1 5 3

2

6

1

3

3

9

8

4

6

5

9

1

4 8 5 7 2 3 1 9 6

6 2 9 4 1 5 7 8 3

2 9 6 5 3 7 8 1 4

7 4 3 1 8 6 9 2 5

8 5 1 2 9 4 3 6 7

9 1 4 3 7 2 6 5 8

3 6 2 8 5 9 4 7 1

1 6 3 4 2 8 7 9 5

6 3 7 9 8 4 5 1 2

9 4 2 1 5 6 7 8 3

2 8 1 6 7 5 3 4 9

7 6 3 4 9 1 2 5 8

4 9 5 3 2 8 1 7 6

8 7 6 5 4 3 9 2 1

1 5 4 2 6 9 8 3 7

7

2

8

1

5

8

9

5

6

3

3

4

4

7

1

6

2

9

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

6 5 3 2 7 9 8 4 1

9 7 4 8 1 6 5 3 2

7 3 9 4 2 5 1 8 6

1 4 2 3 6 8 9 7 5

5 8 6 7 9 1 4 2 3

3 9 1 6 8 7 2 5 4

4 6 7 9 5 2 3 1 8

5 1 9 8 2 4 6 3

4

3

6

9

3

2

7 4 6

1 5 8

6 3 4

2 7 1

1

5

5

6

7

8

8

1

2

7

9 1 2 5 8

7 4 3 2 9

2 9 5 7 1

3 8 6 9 4

9 8 5 4 7 1 3

7

9

4

3

6

8

5

6 2

Puzzle 12 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

5

4

7

8

8

2

6

9

4

5

1

3

2

6

3

7

9

1

1 6 9 8 7 2 3 4 5

7

6

3

5

5

8

4

2

6

3

1

7

9

1

8

9

2

4

9 7 3 1 4 8 2 5 6

2 4 1 5 9 6 8 3 7

8 2 4 3 1 5 7 6 9

3 9 6 7 2 4 5 1 8

5 1 7 6 8 9 4 2 3

Puzzle 9 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

3

4

2

3

9

9

8

6

1

5

7

8

4

1

6

7

5

2

Puzzle 5 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

ANSWERS

3

6

1

Puzzle 8 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

8

8

8

Puzzle 11 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

1

2

2

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

3

5 1 7 3 2 4 9 8 6

2

6

6

7

8

4

7

2

9

3

1

5

4

8

5

9

3

1

1 2 3 4 8 9 7 6 5

8 9 5 1 7 6 3 2 4

9 4 2 8 6 3 5 1 7

7 5 1 9 4 2 6 3 8

3 8 6 5 1 7 2 4 9

Puzzle 6 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

8

6

2

5

5

3

1

2

4

4

3

9

6

1

9

7

7

8

Puzzle 2 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

4 9 2 8 1 7 6 3 5

8

7

7

4

1

9

3

1

6

2

5

8

4

3

9

5

2

6

2 3 6 5 7 4 9 8 1

5 1 8 6 9 3 2 4 7

1 8 5 4 3 2 7 6 9

3 2 7 9 5 6 8 1 4

9 6 4 7 8 1 5 2 3

Puzzle 3 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclo-

www.priorityposting.com P1137458 7/2, 07/23/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on July 2 and July 23, 2015. #OVG641234

7

sure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: (877) 894-4663 or (800) 606-4819 Website: www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; DATED: 3/27/2015 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By: Athena Vaughn, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps 1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Phone: (800) 409-7530 TDD: (800) 833-6388 For Reinstatement/Pay Off Quotes, contact MTC Financial Inc. DBA Trustee Corps TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT

Subscribe to the...

6

Continued from previous page

Public Notices

4

Public Notices

PAGE A9 9

5

Public Notices

8

JULY 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE July 2, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE #1 Top Producer Office in North County

SUN 1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 LAKES Tamara Porter, Joan Cool, Shayne Thacker & Mishel Feerer REALTY Best Priced Water Frontage On Lake Osoyoos!

200 Prime Ft of Beach Frontage. Modest Cottage fixer upper. Great beach to the East & owns small wildlife pond on South! $279,900

BEAUTIFUL BEACH!

Ready to build - All utilities installed Power, water & 5 bedroom septic system. Sunny, Exclusive Private Beach lot! Comes with Park Model $338,900

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

HILLTOP REALTY 68 ACRES m/l. 8 mi from town. Borders National Forest on 2 sides. Very Private. Excellent Access. Fenced. Meadow. Timber. 3-bdrm, 2-bth, 1996 Manuf Home in Good Condition, Super Good Sense. Approx 1568 sqft. 30x50 Shop, Plus Additions. Barn. Outbldgs. $250,000.00

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Lake View Home, within walking distance to town. Lake access just steps away. 2 bd / 2 ba home, approx. 1440 sq ft. Downstairs would be a great mother in law suite as it can be completely independent from the upstairs. MLS#721550 $159,000

40 ACRES m/l. Molson-Chesaw area. 1995 Marlette Manuf Home in Good Condition. Approx. 1512 sqft. 3-bdrm, 2-bth. Alaska Pack Insulation. 30x36 Garage. Equipment/Hay Barn/ Lean-to. Small Barn/Corrals. Fenced & Cross-fenced. Private. Big Views. Excellent access. Well Maintained. Excellent Value at $229,000.00

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

www.windermere.com

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

LAKE AND COUNTRY

NEW LISTINGS, OROVILLE

Missed out on that dream home?

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee Enjoy the privacy of this recently updated home. Living room and dining area have new laminate flooring. Spacious kitchen has new cabinets, counter tops and flooring. Sun room with tiled floors is an added bonus. Get out the grill and enjoy the covered patio and fenced back yard. this house is move in ready at a great price. NWML#8069003 $122,500

You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds. Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

Check them out today!

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Building Supplies

Midway Building Supply

RENTAL RENTAL RENTAL

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Subscribe

OROVILLE

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Installed Fiberglass Insulation / Blown & Batt Ask about our spray foam  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced, Professional Service 

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Storage

Paint Sprayers n Bobcat Bobcatexcavators, Excavators excavators,n scissor lifts, Bobcat excavators, scissor lifts, Bobcat scissor lifts, n All Contractor n Scissor Lifts Z booms, reach forklift, booms, reach forklift, Party ZZ booms, forklift,Party Party n Z Booms Rental, tents,tables, tables, Equipment chairs, Rental, tents, chairs, paint Rental, tents, chairs,paint paint n Call Today! n Reach Forklift sprayers all contractor sprayers all all contractor contractor equipment. equipment. sprayers equipment. PARTY RENTALS: 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tents, Tables, Chairs & More!

Tonasket Tonasket Tonasket 509-486-2888

509-486-2888 509-486-2888 509-486-2888 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

Pumping Service

OKANOGAN VALLEY

www.gazette-tribune.com

Excavation and Septic Service

Now Serving North Okanogan County

Serving you from the Canadian Border to Brewster!

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power / Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

509-560-0166 509-560-0367

www.orovilleministorage.com

140 Oroville Chesaw Rd., Oroville

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC LIC.#ALLVAVI945DC

Credit Cards Accepted!

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

OFFICE:

509-486-2624 CELL:

509-429-0417 Call today for a

FREE

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 We recently purchased Eisen’s Pumping Service and look forward to serving you!  Septic Pumping

509-422-3621

 Portable Toilets

MORGASE983JS

 Septic Installation

Cell: (509) 322-4777

Storage units are fully fenced, easy 24 Hr. access, close to town. 132 Clarkson Mill Rd.

Tonasket

Estimate!

509-486-2888

Email: avi_john@hotmail.com

Well Drilling

“The Water Professionals” 509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

A Secure Mini Storage

Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Storage

Insulation

MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

Quality Supplies Since 1957

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

MINI STORAGE

Equipment Rental

Concrete

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems

Colville  Spokane  RepublicLic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 2, 2015

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Ian McFeron, above, sits down at the piano during the opening of the Music in the Park series Friday, June 26. McFeron was accompanied by Alisa Milner, left, on violin, cello and backing vocals. McFeron also played guitar and harp. The concert featured songs off his 2015 CD ‘Radio,’ as well as other CDs McFeron has produced over the last ten years.

McFeron brings ‘Radio’ waves to Tonasket’s heat waves BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Temperatures above 100 degrees did not keep people out of History Park Friday, June 26, for the opening of this summer’s Music in the Park series with Ian McFeron and Alisa Milner. Eighty-two people relaxed in the plentiful shade while McFeron and Milner’s soothing melodies seemed to soften the sweltering heat; the lyrics stirring breezes of familiarity with the human experience. “Art is a way to highlight certain moments; a way to put those moments under the microscope and untangle them,” McFeron said. “You hope your art can be useful to other people as they get in touch with their feelings; their presence.” McFeron said he and Milner come through in the winter with a band that includes a drummer and bassist, but “for the concerts in the park, we slim down to just the duo.” Friday’s heat slimmed down his instrumental choices; as he was playing ‘River of Time,’ off his 2015 release ‘Radio,’ the electric went out to his piano. McFeron carried on a cappella in such a full, rich sound the instrument was barely missed before being

replaced by a guitar. The dancers didn’t wait for the heat to dissipate; 2013’s ‘Long Weekend in the Country’ drew women out of their seats, unable to resist the urge to move to the music. When the sun fell lower behind hardwoods along the river, McFeron sat at the piano to play ‘the First Cold Day of Fall.’ “I was just happy once it cooled off enough for the piano to stay on for an entire song,” he said later in the evening. Perhaps the lyrics cooled the audience enough to stay for the entire concert rather than strike out for air-conditioned homes. “On the first cold day of fall, I turn the heat up in my car; and roll the windows down. I remember you were laughin’ with your eyes, and I was tryin’ not to smile,” McFeron sang. The song is recorded on his ‘Time Will Take You’ album with backup including drummer Brad Pemberton, but the duo of McFeron and Milner delivered it with such a vast tapestry of sound one could close their eyes and imagine the concrete stage at History Park to be crowded with musicians. McFeron, with impeccable timing and flexibility of intensity, tells his stories in song with the thrill of a suspense writer; build-

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Above, Kyle MacConnell (left) and Rick Castor sing ‘Reverence’ from Freedom’s ‘Warriors on the Way’ album. MacConnell said he taught the song to students during his debut as an art teacher at Paschal Sherman School, and the students performed it at the 2012 Sunflower Festival. MacConnell and Castor performed Friday evening, June 26, while McFeron and Milner took a break. MacConnell and Castor both live in Tonasket. Left, Galen Lichterfeld demonstrates Fire Poi while moving to McFeron and Milner’s music June 26. Lichterfeld stopped by for a visit in Tonasket on his way back to Maine from a fire-spinning retreat in Vancouver, B.C.; and was headed out the following morning. Lichterfeld said he lived in Tonasket until the age of seven.

ing tension and release like a drummer might. And despite the song telling of love lost and “the one that got away,” it’s surprisingly optimistic as McFeron explores all emotions. “Now I been walkin’ miles with no direction; searchin’ the heavens for a star. But it never matters which way you go. It only matters where you are,” McFeron reflects in his lyrics. Completely self-taught; McFeron first sat down at the piano and started playing when he was just two years old. “He came from a large family, and the piano was a safe place to get away from his siblings,” Milner said. McFeron has three older sisters and two younger brothers. “His mom said he took a couple of piano lessons, but when he was taking the lessons he quit playing; so she told him, ‘That’s it. You’re down with lessons,’” said Milner, who began playing violin at the age of six. She said she “grew up playing fiddle” with her father and two brothers. McFeron spoke of a friend who moved back east to work on a farm in South Carolina, commenting that the urge to ‘get back to the country’ has circled around again to be a common theme among the young.

“I asked him, ‘How’s it going for you?’ and this was his reply: ‘Life is good since I moved back to the farm,’” McFeron sang in an upbeat song that speaks of the sun climbing high in a big blue sky to set the back hills all aglow. “And this black dirt now, lord is prettier to me than gold. But the days can be long and the work is hard; but this country livin’s got a different sort of charm.....So when you ask me do I ever think about movin’ back to town? Well I remember the man livin’ in the tin can, and he was always lookin’ down. So I was glad to trade that workin’ wage for five good acres and a pretty red barn,” McFeron sings in an echo of his friend’s epiphany. McFeron and Milner promise to return to Okanogan country in the late winter or early spring. “It’s always a pleasure coming through here,” McFeron said, urging people to get on Janet Culp’s mailing list of CCC activities, “and we’ll see you next time around,” before closing the show with ‘Down the Road,’ a song whose lyrics are universal enough to stir not just wildfire survivors. “Out of the ashes, out of the fire a new day will start to grow. And if you let it grow, you might find what you’re lookin’ for is just a little ways down the road.”


JULY 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Apple Hill artists planting seeds among youth BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Apple Hill Art Camps continue their second decade this summer of bringing out the best in kids; creating art, making friends and writing songs. Meeting at the Community Cultural Center (CCC) in Tonasket June 22-26, kids 5-7

by twins that went all the way through the program, Jordan and Eric. They showed kids how to make color wheel cookies, and then they got to eat them,” said McCue. “They do some great projects there.” Student Shannon Smith taught cartooning in Omak and was assisted in Tonasket by fellow student Marsie Brazil.

we had to make something out of three toilet paper rolls,” said Zandel. “I was looking at them wondering what I could make out of them when it just struck me it looked like a tree trunk. So then I thought about different kinds, and thought about the coconut tree and how I could make it bend a little bit.” He made coconuts from crumpled tp rolls, adorning

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Sandra Walters (above) assists 8-10 year olds in Tonasket with an art called Zentangle. “It’s simple--just lines and circles, so it’s something everyone can succeed at, but but you do have to count,” said Walters, who has her Masters in art education and has taught the past eight years at the Apple Hill Art Camps. Below, left, the palm tree project taught by Steve Zandel. Below, right, cartoonists Shannon Smith and Marsie Brazil.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Julie Ashmore of Okanogan Highlands Alliance and art students perform a song about beavers they wrote in a class by Ashmore called ‘Wetland Education Through Songwriting,’ while volunteers Noni Alley and April Bigelowe prepare and afternoon snack. Looking on in the paint shirt is Jody Olson, founder of the art camps. years old attended the morning session while kids 8-10 got artistic from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Classes held in Omak fill up the first day of registration, and classes in Tonasket tend to be full by the time the classes begin. In a given week, 25 different teachers come in, helping kids create 2-3 art projects a day. The art camps were started in Tonasket 11 years ago by Jody Olson, an art teacher from Eatonville who moved to Riverside started doing art camps “low-key” at the Riverside Park; advertising with a notice tacked up at the post office. “She started out with 5-10 year olds, and when they graduated she started doing older classes, keeping right along with them,” said board member Emily Hale. “Jody is phenomenal; so kind and

Ally Murphy works on her initial ‘A’ with the Zentagle techniques.

green construction-paper palm fronds with some, and putting some on the construction-paper beach below the tree. Zandel said it was fun to teach the kids, and they completed the project in the 45 minutes allotted. “The kids came up with their own idea to have the coconuts on the side of the tree trunk; like they were falling down,” Steven Zandel said. “That was kinda neat.” He is looking forward to joining 54 other kids in a class for kids ages 11 an up in Omak July 6-10. Adult teachers include local successful cottage industry artisans along with experienced public school teachers with master’s degrees in art education. Kids come home with a large bag full of the week’s projects;

Katie Teachoutstaff photo

Above, Katlynn Angiloey (right) and Abby Steinshouer enjoy a cartooning class taught by Shannon Smith and Marsie Brazil along with classmates Zelene Ruiz and Jamyn Clark.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Above, Payton Akins, Eve Sutton and Ava Singer show off needle felting pictures made in a class taught by Priya Shellenbarger, shown below with her own example of work.

so caring and devoted. So many of her hours are spent teaching kids more than just being able to paint a picture; but also to be able to express yourself. Jody can really bring out the best in kids.” “We’re building a youth leadership program, so older kids who have been here will be the ones to run the camp; planning the projects and making supply lists for the 5-7 year olds,” said Hale. “One of our goals is to develop relationships between older established artists and younger ones.” “We like to have the kids teach, and have at least one alumna in all our camps,” Olson said. Susan McCue, who volunteered at the art camp in Omak the week of June 15, said all the morning teachers for younger students in Omak were students who had come through the art camps themselves. Her own daughter, Shoshanna Thomas McCue taught ceramic painting on plates. They also got to make wood sculptures under the guidance of Rowan Bauer, son of board member Lisa Bauer. “One of the classes was taught

Priya Shellenbarger “I’ll help Jody in any way possible,” said Brazil. “When I was younger I would go to her for advice. She was like my mentor. Still is to this day. Steven Zandel was invited to teach when Olson noticed the kind of art he was creating at camp. This year he had the perfect project to share. “I was in art class at the (Tonasket) middle school and

the 8-10 year olds’ bags included puppets taught by Dayton Edmonds, painted scarves, clipon hand-braided bracelets, needle felting pictures instructed by Priya Shellenbarger, Zentangle drawings guided by Sandra Walters, a life-size caricature of themselves made from a tracing of their body lying on construction paper. Julie Ashmore with Okanogan Highlands Alliance taught Wetland Education Through Songwriting, with kids performing a song they wrote themselves in front of the group. “I just choose five chords I know go good together; the kids choose a card with a chord on it and then pick the order for the chords to go in,” said Ashmore. “The kids write down ideas on a clipboard, and then we create the lyrics.” The program is “created” each year through grants and donations. “This art camp has been successful because of all the community support we have,” said Hale. A primary funder is the Community Foundation North Central Washington out of Wenatchee. “They have been

phenomenal. Okanogan Family Faire gives us a grant every year. They take all the money they make each year and give it back to the community. Kinross Gold has given us a grant the last couple of years. It’s cool we have such a broad range of kids coming to camp each year, and a broad range of funding. A lot of local businesses and individuals support us. It makes it more personal because people support us every year.” Only about 10% of funding comes from tuition, with kids 10 and under paying $1 a day, and the older kids paying $5 a day for more expensive materials. “Jody wanted to keep it super

cheap so everyone could come,”

““I’ll help Jody in any way possible. When I was younger I would go to her for advice. She was like my mentor. Still is to this day. Marsie Brazil Volunteer Teacher

Hale said. “All the teachers are paid, including kids who come

to teach. But we have quite a few artists who take their check and donate it right back to us.” The generous donations come full circle in the way of community service projects performed throughout the year, outside of art camp. One project was helping to paint a mural in Omak’s Civic League Park. “It’s good for kids to do a large project, because they get to take a small project and multiply it several times over,” said Hale. The Board of Directors, all volunteers who meet year-round, is made up of members from Oroville, Tonasket, Riverside, Omak and Okanogan.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Students in a puppet-making workshop taught by Dayton Edmonds perform for their fellow art students at the Apple Hill Art Camp Wednesday, June 24.


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE JULY 2, 2015

OBITUARIES

Nicholas Andrew Rainsberry, age 64, passed away peacefully

in his home, Saturday, June 27 with his children by his side. Nick was born to Grant and Lorraine Rainsberry on August 19, 1950. He married Linda Thrasher in 1970, in Oroville, and in November of that year they welcomed their daughter Michelle Lynn into the family. She was joined by brother Scott Nicholas in March 1974. Their early years were spent living in SanDiego, Calif. where Nick was stationed on the Navel base, his ship was the USS Horne. He served in the Navy from 1972 - 1978. After the military years they moved to Spokane where Nick lived out his life. He most enjoyed socializing, especially any place where people were having a good time. That may be why his employment at Northern Quest Casino lasted until his retirement, having been

employed there a little over 10 years. He loved the outdoors, his whiskey and pushing the limits. He was a very free-spirited character and loved people. Nick was preceded in death by his grandparents, parents and numerous uncles. He is survived by daughter Michelle (Brian) Witt of Spokane and son Scott (Nicole) Rainsberry of Richland, five grandsons Tyler, Tanner, Andrew, Kaleb and Lucas and two granddaughters Chloe and Gracie; his step-dad John Meyer of Post Falls, Idaho, his brother John (Nancy) Rainsberry of Ellensburg, sister Peggy (Frank) Jones of Clarkston and sister Deanna (Verle) Rowton of Oroville and four nephews, five nieces. Services will be held for Nick in the Pavilion at Washington State Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Medical Lake, Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 10:30 a.m. Dave Christiansen officiating.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Nicholas Andrew Rainsberry Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket Water Ranch scheduled for trial run Project gets the opposite of a dry run this week

someone out to set the timing on the features Tuesday morning before the ‘Grand Closing.’ Black said one delay came when she decided to have the concrete stained a rust color.

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tonasket Water Ranch will be turning the water on Tuesday, June 30, at noon in a test run. Project coordinator Linda Black said she will be there with her girlfriends in bathing suits to try it out. “I’m calling it the ‘Grand Closing’ because it means I’ll be out of there and the project will be turned over to the city,” said Black on Thursday, June 25. She has been working on getting the Water Ranch going for the past four years. “I’m just starting to be able to relax, but holding my breath as something could still go wrong. I’m throwing myself a big party on Tuesday and plan to whoop it up at noon in a very silly fashion.” Black said Ty Olson would be setting the features Monday, June 29, adding “The Olsons have been wonderful to work with.” Texas Playgrounds, a subsidiary of Water Odyssey out of Texas, was scheduled to send

““I plan to whoop it up in a very silly fashion.” Linda Black, Project Coordinator Tonasket Water Ranch Project

“I don’t trust the water here, it’s kind of rust-colored, so this way the concrete is supposed to look like dirt. It’s an expensive project and takes extra time,” said Black, but I thought it would be worth it.” She said Ty and Cathy Olson wrote a check for $7,000 to cover the cost of the stain and the labor. “We originally thought it was going to be $4,000. They had already committed to doing it, so they wrote the check out on the spot,” Black said. She said a picnic shelter should be installed next week, adding “we didn’t want the work to be done this week during the heat wave.”

Black said she didn’t know yet when the city would open the park to the public, “but I’ll be out of there next week.” A sign was recently installed at 4th and Railroad pointing the way to Chief Tonasket Park, with volunteer Dave Kester of Ace Hardware doing most of the work. A $3,750 grant Black received a couple years ago from Community Foundation of North Central Washington out of Wenatchee paid for the materials of that sign along with a ‘Welcome to Tonasket’ sign installed at the north end of town last year, with Kurt Haskins volunteering to make that sign. “The labor was donated on both signs; we just had to pay for materials,” said Black. “Otherwise we would not have been able to afford both signs on that grant.” Black said Community Foundation of North Central Washington had done a lot of small grants in this area. “Bluebird out of Peshastin just came through with a check for $5,000 to help me get over the top,” said Black, “and Gold Digger already gave me $5,000. We will be attaching metal plaques to the fencing to represent the area fruit growers.”

HOT SPOTS

Want to know where the purrfect places are to shop for products and services in our community? Check out our Business & Service Directory! Subscribe to: OKANOGAN VALLEY

NICHOLAS ANDREW RAINSBERRY

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

(509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Healthcare Services Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

Columbia River

 Behavioral

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services

OMAK

509-826-1800

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-8496

HEALTH CARE

 Anti

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

A new sign at 4th and Railroad points the way to Chief Tonasket Park. The sign was purchased through a grant, with labor donated by Dave Kester.

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

OPTICAL

Advertise In The

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

1422 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

www.gazette-tribune.com

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 02, 2015  

July 02, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 02, 2015  

July 02, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune