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Squatters accused of killing woman with pickup truck

BUSY NORTH COUNTY WEEKEND

Suspect alleged to have run woman down, then backed over her again before fleeing Hospital in Spokane. The previous day Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputies were called to a burTONASKET – A man and woman sus- glary complaint at 36 E. Sourdough Rd., pected of squatting in an Aeneas Valley about 20 miles east of Tonasket. Richard home are accused of killing a woman Finegold, the owner of the residence, said he had just returned and severely injuring there after being gone a man by driving over since September of the couple with their last year, according to pickup on Thursday, “The investigation Sheriff Frank Rogers. June 18 “He said when he shows that there was James J. Faire, 55, returned home he Tonasket and Angelina a heated argument discovered locks had M. Nobilis, 51, Kent, between the subjects been changed, there Wash. have been property in the arrested on first degree and then Faire pulled was residence that did not murder and first degree assault charges. a gun on the subjects belong to him and a amount of his Witnesses at the scene and threatened them” large belongings had been said Faire ran the vicSheriff Frank Rogers, moved outside to outtims over, stopped his Okanogan County buildings,” said Sheriff vehicle, backed up and Rogers. At the time then drove forward Finegold had possible again, running Debra L. Long, 51 of Issaquah, Wash. over a sec- information on the suspects who had ond time. Long died at the scene. George been at the residence. Deputies obtained Abrantes, 48, of Marysville, Wash. was injured and was airlifted to Sacred Heart SEE KILLING| PG A3 BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Above, Conscious Culture Festival participants enjoy a tea-pouring ceremony led by Bibi McGill. For more photos, see page B3. Right, Caleb and Hayden Williams enjoy being chauffeured by Aaron Kester in the Spirit of Tonasket, a lawnmower-turned model airplane, at the Father’s Day Fly-in.For story and more photos, see page B1. Below, Rick Gallaher’s 1932 Chev 5 window coupe won best of show at the NCCC Cruise in, see page B1 Below right, Molson Midsummer Fest Horeshoe champs Marc Alden and Riley Davidson, for more see B2

End-of-year enrollment at OSD holds steady Kindergarten Round-up numbers down slightly

Katie Teachout & Gary DeVon

BY GARY A. DE VON

/staff photos

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – End of year enrollment at the Oroville School District appears to be about the same as the previous school year. “There’s one more count to go… currently we are at 544 to 546 FTEs, which is about the same as we had at the end of last year,” said Superintendent Steve Quick. The district is required by the state to take several counts each school year and the district has one more count to make, according to District Business manager Shay Shaw in her report to the Oroville School Board during their last meeting. These counts are important because the state uses the number of Full Time

right, Sam Nau /submitted photo

Equivalent (FTE) students to pay basic education funds throughout the year. It is also important because the board will use these end-of-year numbers to determine next year’s budget. “The board traditionally sets the upcoming school year’s budget conservatively. In other words they base it on a number lower than the end of year count… last year they set it at 525 FTEs,” said Quick. The district’s Kindergarten Roundup, a way to estimate how many new Kindergarteners, will be enrolled next year, attracted 49 students, according to Quick. He says is down a little compared to the past three years where it had been climbing. “We still might pick up a few more in August,” he said. Under good news and announcements School Director Amy Wise said she went up to sixth-grade camp and it looked like

SEE SCHOOL | PG A3

Twelve Tribes Resort Casino open for business

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OMAK - Twelve Tribes Resort Casino opened to the public last week, 14 months after breaking ground April 14, 2014. “The Tribe has been wanting to build a nice casino and hotel for approximately 20 years,” said Colville Confederated Tribe Board Director Gene Nicholson at the ribbon-cutting ceremony June 16. “We knew we had to develop employment; that was one of our first priorities,” said Colville Business Council Vice Chairman Mel Tonasket, who recalled a time when the tribe had no businesses in the area and unemployment was at 87%. “The tribe is one of the biggest employers in the county. It shows what can be done when we work together.” The Colville Tribal Federal Corporation (CTFC) oversees several business enterprises, including three casinos; and employs several hundred

permanent and part-time employees, the gaming environment,” said Gaming with 12 Tribes Resort Casino adding Chief Operating Officer Randy Williams. 200 jobs. “It creates that full flavor.” “Whether it’s through winnings or Full flavor dining-wise includes two wages, the opening of this resort casino restaurants inside the resort along with a will definitely have an sweet shop selling pie impact on our econand ice cream, bulk omy, and the city of candy, espresso and “We knew we had to Omak thanks you,” cigarettes. The Camas develop employment; restaurant serves three said Omak Mayor Cindy Gagne. a day featuring that was one of our first meals Regular bus tours American fare focused priorities.” are scheduled to bring on the Northwest, and people in from Seattle the Yu Asian Bistro Mel Tonasket Vice Chairman and Canada. serves Cantonese, Colville Business Council The Casino encomSzechuan and Hunan passes 56,000 square cuisines during lunch feet of gaming space, with 500 slot and dinner. machines ranging in price from one cent The non-smoking, four-story hotel to one dollar. Eight gaming tables feature with 24-hour room service has 80 rooms, Blackjack, Roulette and Craps, and a including twelve two-room suites. Poker Room. “We are very proud of what we have. “The gaming tables are new to the The rooms are larger than elsewhere in valley floor, and an enhancement to SEE CASINO| PG A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 26

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tribal Councilman Ricky Gabriel was the first to get through the ribbon with gold-plated scissors, handed out to Colville Business Council members to cut the ribbon in celebration of the opening of the 12 Tribes Resort Casino Tuesday, June 16.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Business A&E

A6-7 A8 B1-3

Classifieds Real Estate Schools

B4-5 B5 B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015

CASINO | FROM A1 “We wanted to keep the price where people would want to come” Frank Rodriquez, Hotel Manager Twelve Tribes Resort & Casino

Above, the Northwest Outlaws drum during last Tuesday’s (June 16) opening ceremony of Twelve Tribes Resort and Casino in Omak. Right, Tribal member Dan Nanamkin sings the Honor Song prior to the cutting of the ribbon across the front doors of the casino.

Story and photos by Katie Teachout

Above, players await the dealing of the first hand in Tuesday’s (June 16) poker tournament with a $1,000 prize to be split among the top five hands of the evening. The 56,000 square feet casino features 500 slot machines (left) along with live poker, blackjack, roulette and craps games. Gamblers can take advantage of the Players Advantage Card, with points for play rewards that can be redeemed for free play, hotel stays, meals or merchandise.

An ever-changing water sculpture balances out the interior’s design drawing from the surrounding arid landscape. The Sweet Shop sells pie and ice cream, bulk candy, espresso and cigarettes. Camas restaraunt serves American cuisine focused on the Northwest, and Yu Asian Bistro serves Cantonese, Szechuan and Hunan dishes.

A corner suite offers a sweeping view of the Okanogan Valley from the living area (above).The four-story hotel features 80 guest rooms, including 12 suites. Room decor includes photos from a collection of 145 pictures from the early 1900s up to the building of the Grand Coulee Dam. “The collection represents us as people, as a whole,” said Casino Manager Bryon Miller. The 12 tribes making up the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Nation are the Colville, Nespelem, San Poil, Lake, Palus, Wenatchi, Chelan, Entiat, Methow, the southern Okanogan, Moses Columbia and the Nez perce of Chief Joseph’s Bands.

the Omak area,” said Williams. “Corner suites have beautiful views of the valley with lovely vistas in each of the seasons.” Prices range from $119 to $259, with Double Queens, Kings or Suites that have both a sleeping room and a living room. “We wanted to keep the price where people would want to come,” said Hotel Manager Frank Rodriguez. “Once you’ve got them in, you’ve got them in.” The hotel’s 20’ by 40’ swimming pool and indoor/outdoor hot tubs are handicap accessible, and there’s also a sauna and fitness center. The Renew Spa will offer treatments ranging from manicures to massage. According to Rodriguez, final decisions are being made on spa features before equipment purchases are made. “This is not the end, only the beginning of what is going to happen,” said Mel Tonasket prior to the ribbon being cut. “This site is designed to expand.” Future plans include a convention center, Bingo, an RV Park and a vineyard out in front of the resort. Plans for the Okanogan Casino, closed with the opening of 12 Tribes Resort, are still up in the air. A convention center was being discussed, as well as Bingo, a senior meal site and a wine tasting room once the vineyard starts producing. “It’s not going to sit there and go to waste, I can assure you of that,” said Tonasket. “We are looking ahead towards our Grand Opening Celebration on July 26, during which we will have commemorative gifts, $500 drawings every hour from noon until 10 p.m., a 2015 Cadillac ATS Sedan giveaway and a whole lot more,” said Creative Media Coordinator Stephanie Day. Twelve Tribes Resort sits on a 40-acre parcel of 300 acres 45 miles south of Canada along Hwy. 97, with access across the road from the Fairgrounds Access Road.

Roulette players and Omak residents (l-r) Matthew King, Tim Rubio and Jacob King laugh after turning in their chips for cash. “It’s hard not to come out above what you went in with when you play Roulette,” said Matthew King. “As long as you bet safe,” added his brother Jacob.

The 40’ by 20’ swimming pool and indoor/outdoor hot tub are handicapped accessible. A dry sauna and showers are also located in the pool room. The Renew Spa will offer services including manicures, pedicures and massages.

EARLY ADVERTISING DEADLINE ANNOUNCEMENT: We will have an early deadline for our July 2 publication. Classifieds / Advertising: Noon Monday, June 29

Letters to to the editor, correspondence and other news submissions: Saturday, June 27


JUNE 25, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Commissioners declare county-wide burn ban Early fire season forecast by DNR BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Commissioners have Declared Hazardous Fire Conditions and issued Resolution 62-2015, a county-wide burn ban against outdoor burning of combustible materials. Combustible materials may include, but are not limited to, outdoor burning of yard waste and none emergent agricultural burning. See the resolution for further explanation. Use of gas or charcoal fired BBQ’s are allowed. This follows a state ban announced by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) that started June 17 on DNR-protected lands east of the crest of the Cascade Mountains. This was expanded to include the western side of the state on June 22. The Washington State burn ban applies to state forests, state parks and forestlands under DNR fire protection. It does not include federally owned lands. “With years of persistent drought on the eastern Washington landscape, and predictions by the National Weather Service for a hotter and drier summer than normal, it’s prudent to take precautions now,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “This burn ban will help protect people, forests and property.” In 2015 so far, there have been 241 wildfire starts throughout the state. Last year’s fire season was the biggest on record in Washington, with the largest state fire ever, the Carlton Complex, destroying more than 250,000 acres. More than 1 million acres of Washington’s landscape has been consumed by wildfire since 2009. DNR is awaiting legislative action this summer on requests for $4.5 million for additional firefighting teams and equipment, and $20 million to improve the health of drought-ravaged, flammable forests. The burn ban applies to all outdoor burning on DNR-protected forestlands with the exception of recreational fires in approved fire pits within designated state,

county, municipal and other campgrounds. Fireworks and incendiary devices, such as exploding targets, sky lanterns, or tracer ammunition, are illegal on all DNR-protected forestlands. Charcoal briquettes are also not allowed. The statewide burn ban will run through Sept. 30, 2015. Campfire restrictions have not yet been declared on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National

probably be put in place sooner than in past years. Forest visitors need to factor that into their plans and remember to find out if restrictions are in place before heading to the national forest. On May 15, Governor Jay Inslee declared a statewide drought emergency. “Other parts of the west had less than normal snowpack this winter, unlike last year when Oregon and Washington were

“With years of persistent drought on the eastern Washington landscape, and predictions by the National Weather Service for a hotter and drier summer than normal, it’s prudent to take precautions now” Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands

Forest, but an earlier than normal fire season is being predicted by the Forest Service. According to the National Geographic Area Coordination Center long range forecast, wildfire season is likely to occur earlier than usual in most areas across the west this summer. In addition, above normal significant wildland fire potential, above normal temperatures, and below average precipitation for much of Washington State are expected. “The extent and duration of our fire season will depend upon the amount of precipitation we receive during May and June,” said Okanogan-Wenatchee NF Fire Staff Officer Keith Satterfield. “The plants in the woods are greening up ahead of schedule and grasses have already grown tall in some places. With this early green up comes early curing and drying with the potential for an earlier start to fire season.” Low snowpack and warmer temperatures have allowed fuels to dry earlier than usual. Low snowpack means that high elevation fuels will dry earlier in the season and be available to burn if lightning occurs. “Once summer arrives the biggest factor in determining the kind of fire season we will experience will be the number of thunder storms passing over the forest and how wet those storms are and also the amount of human caused fires,” Satterfield said. Campfire restrictions will

the main areas affected by lower than normal snowpack. Due to this, there may be competition for firefighting resources this summer,” Satterfield said. It is normal for firefighting resources to be moved where they are most needed. There will be competition for resources, nationally as the number of wildfires increases. Limited wildfire fighting resources include airtankers, helicopters and other specialized equipment or personnel. This summer, over 300 firefighting personnel will be working on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Currently, every ranger district has resources available to respond to a wildfire. “Early this spring we sent crews to a fire that started in Canada and burned across the border onto federal lands. We’ve also extinguished a number of lightning and human caused fires in the past couple weeks,” Satterfield said. With the expected long, hot and dry fire season people are advised to be especially careful with fire when recreating in the woods and grasslands. Homeowners should follow FireWise practices around homes and cabins. People living in high fire prone areas need to be prepared when fire season arrives by having evacuation plans in place and knowing ahead of time what items/belongings to take if directed to evacuate.

PAGE A3

KILLING | FROM A1 the information but the suspects had left.” The next day, at around 1:35 p.m., deputies were detailed again to 36 E. Sourdough Rd., when it was reported that the suspects had returned to the residence. Approximately five minutes later dispatch received a call from the same area that two subjects had just been run over, said Rogers. “When deputies and detectives arrived on scene they discovered a female subject in the roadway who was pronounced dead at the scene and a second male subject who was injured but alive,” Rogers said. The investigation shows that the two suspects, James J. Faire, 55 of Tonasket and Angelina M. Nobilis, 51 of Kent had returned to the residence. “Apparently Faire and Nobilis knew Finegold had been gone and decided to move into his place, basically squatting while Finegold was gone. Also, Finegold is missing property and money from the residence,” said Rogers. When Faire and Nobilis arrived back on the property, Finegold was there along with two other

and drove to Tonasket and called law enforcement from there. Faire and Nobilis were contacted by law enforcement and later were arrested and booked for first degree murder and first degree assault. The vehicle has been impounded and weapons that Faire had were also taken. The investigation at this time is still ongoing, according to the sheriff.

James J. Faire

everyone was having fun. Tam Hutchinson, the Athletic Director reported two students competed in state in golf and two girls competed in pole vault for state track. “Nick Hugus was an alternate for tennis and our doubles team missed by one point,” he said. During the public comment section of the meeting, parent Lisa Cole asked for a clarification on the district’s bullying policy. “It’s kind of generalized on how you handle a bully. How do you handle bullying, threatening and name calling?” she asked, wanting to know if the response was based on the type of bullying involved. “We have changed our policy in the last couple of years as the state made new guidelines,” replied Kristin Sarmiento, the principal at the high school. “We look at each incident on an individual basis, we get them counseling, talk about behavior that is appropriate and inappro-

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board approved a consent agenda of several items. These included policy on public access to school district records; renewal of the agreement with Compass Group for food service and approval of an AVID Products and Services Agreement. The board also accepted the resignation of teacher Cenah Whiteaker and hiring of spring coaches. Shaw will be re-hired as business manager, Joan Hoehn as K-6 principal and Sarmiento as high school principal. Evaluations of Quick are ongoing by the board and he has not yet been offered a contract. The board is expected to make that decision at their next meeting. Ila Hall, Shelly Martin and Jennifer Burgard were approved as the elementary summer school teachers. The next meeting of the Oroville School Board is scheduled for Monday, June 29 at 6:30 p.m. at the District Office located at 816 Juniper Street.

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priate,” Sarmiento added. “Some students have been suspended on the first incident because of the severity.” The principal said parents always have the option on whether it should be handled at school or go to the police. “We have been meeting on the discipline so there are changes coming,” she added. The public comments were followed by end-of-season coaches’ reports from Dane Forrester, the softball coach and Hutchinson, the baseball coach. “I thought the girls worked hard, we had five eighth graders nearly all season long... there were always three in the outfield,” said Forrester. “The baseball team had a lot of fun, we had a lot of young players,” said Hutchinson. “It wasn’t a success with wins, but we always drew big crowds.” After returning from a closeddoor executive session where they evaluated Supt. Quick, the

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friends, Abrantes and Long and other witnesses. “The investigation shows that there was a heated argument between the subjects and then Faire pulled a gun on the subjects and threatened them,” the sheriff said. “Faire then got back into this pickup with Nobilis and ran Long and Abrantes over.” Faire and Nobilis left the scene

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Manuel Cabrera Jr., no middle name listed, 26, Omak, pleaded guilty June 16 to seconddegree theft. The court dismissed additional charges of second-degree theft and firstdegree trafficking in stolen property. The crime occurred March 25. In a second case, Cabrera pleaded guilty June 16 to theft of mail. That crime occurred during the month of February. Cabrera was sentenced to a total of six months in jail and fined $1,971. Scott Leslie Reierson, 47, Oroville, pleaded guilty June 16 to harassment (gross misdemeanor) and second-degree malicious mischief. Reierson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 204 days suspended and credit for time served; and fined $500 for the Nov. 11, 2014 crimes. Caleb Ryan Ritz, 31, Omak, pleaded guilty June 16 to second-degree possession of stolen property. Ritz was sentenced to 17 months in prison and fined $600 for the Sept. 4, 2014 crime. Kyle Steven Cate, 23, Omak, pleaded guilty June 17 to second-degree robbery (lesser included of first-degree robbery) and an attempt to elude a pursuing police vehicle. The court dismissed a thirddegree DWLS charge. Cate was sentenced to 14+ months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the May 4 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Dakota Joseph Shaul, 19, Omak, with seconddegree burglary and thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred June 9. The court found probable cause to charge Kyle William Nicholas Johnson, 18, Omak, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred June 12. The court found probable cause to charge Brian Junior Sangster, 35, Omak, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred June 15. Juvenile A 17-year-old Omak girl was found guilty June 16 to intimidating a witness. The state failed to prove a fourthdegree assault charge. The girl was sentenced to 15 to 36 weeks with the State Department of Social and Health Services and fined $100. The crime occurred between March 1 and March 18. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty June 17 to MIP/C. The boy was sentenced to 16 hours community service and three days in detention. He was fined $100 for the March 21 crime.

A 14-year-old Oroville girl pleaded guilty June 17 to third-degree assault. The girl was sentenced to 128 hours of community service and 14 days in detention with credit for 14 days served. She was fined $100 for the Jan. 9 crime. A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty June 17 to fourthdegree assault. The girl was sentenced to 15 days in detention with credit for 15 days served; and fined $100 for the May 13 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Aug. 26.

DISTRICT COURT Franklin J. Raschka, 36, Oroville, guilty on three counts of third-degree DWLS. Raschka was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,808. Semone Lee Reuben, 27, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Rueben was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended and fined $618. Robert Trevor Richardson, 34, Omak, had a charge dismissed: false reporting. Gerald Alan Sam, 58, Omak, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Merton Bazil Solomon, 47, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional third-degree DWLS charge. Solomon was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $383. Dylan Dewight Sprague, 20, Tonasket, guilty of MIP/C. Sprague was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $808. Christopher Joseph Stembaugh, 26, Oroville, guilty of obstruction. Stembaugh was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $893. Joe Richard Stewart Jr., 45, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Stewart was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $818. Donald Bryce Sylvester, 29, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: violation of a no-contact order. Robert Charles Thedorff, 66, Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Randy Lee Timentwa, 34, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault and guilty (other deferral revoked) of unlawful display of a weapon. Timentwa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 357 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,641. Melissa Marchel Torgerson, 47, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Torgerson received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $368. Juan C. Torres Nava, 26, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

Janalda Lynn Warbus, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Warbus was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $408. Christopher Alan Wayland, 26, Okanogan, had a fourthdegree assault charge dismissed. Larry Dale Wilson, 63, Okanogan, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Wilson was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 179 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Jayleen Dawn Zacherle, 24, Omak, guilty of no valid operator’s license without ID. Zacherle received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $468.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, June 15, 2015 Public intoxication on Pine Crest Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Oak St. in Omak. Assault on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on S. Birch St. in Omak. Trespassing on Pine St. in Okanogan. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Amplifier reported missing. Lost property on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Cell phone reported missing. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Omak Airport Rd. near Omak. Fatality later reported. Domestic dispute on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Siding reported missing. Assault on S. Birch St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Three reports of trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Main St. in Oroville. Brian Junior Sangster, 35, booked for first-degree assault and harassment (threats to kill). Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Credit card fraud on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Weapons offense on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Littering on Miller Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Drugs on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on West St. in Riverside. Search and rescue on Sinlahekin Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak.

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Harassment on N. Main St. in Omak. Fraud on N. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Threats on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Kolby Christine Smith, 18, booked on two juvenile warrants: second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Tamitha Marie Davidson, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for third-degree theft. Colin Michael Oakman, 24, court commitments for hit-and-run (unattended) and first-degree negligent driving. Davis Henderson Tatshama, 31, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for first-degree DWLS. Michael Winston Kinzebach, 19, court commitment for POCS. Teddy Wayne Bennett, 58, booked on two counts of fourth-degree assault. Zacharian John Collins, 19, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

Wednesday June 17, 2015 Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 155 near Omak. Injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Copple Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Burglary on E. Sourdough Rd. near Tonasket. Disorderly conduct on Murray St. in Okanogan. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Benton St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Motorcycle theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Assault on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Found property on Oak St. in Omak. Bicycle recovered. Warrant arrest on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Found property on Main St. in Oroville. Purse recovered. Threats on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Jamie Ray Williams, 28, DOC detainer. Arthur George Longdo, 61, court commitment for DUI. Chad Winston Vanatta, 28, DOC detainer. Angela Dawn Gates, 34, court commitment for reckless driving. Dylan Dewight Sprague, 20, court commitment for MIP/C. Thomas Andrew Hamner, 32, booked on four FTA warrants: second-degree possession of stolen property, violation of a no-contact order, fourthdegree assault (DV) and DUI. Thursday, June 18, 2015 Burglary on Camp Desautel Rd. near Omak.

Two-vehicle crash on E. Dry Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on E. Sourdough Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Recovered vehicle on E. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Fire on S. Fir St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Oleg Viktorovich Saley, 32, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Kristen Ann Bob, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault.

Friday, June 19, 2015 Disorderly conduct on S. Western Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Chainsaw and stereo system reported missing. Domestic dispute on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Hungry Hollow Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on N. Elm St. in Omak. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Threats on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on E. First St. in Tonasket. Angelina Nobilis, 51, booked for first-degree murder and firstdegree assault. James John Faire, 55, booked for first-degree murder and firstdegree assault. Shaun Oliver Crane, 45, booked on two counts of third-degree possession of stolen property. Kalvin Eugene Johnson, 45, booked for third-degree DWLS. Penny Annette Weekly, 39, court commitment for seconddegree criminal trespassing. Laural Angelina Anthony, 19, booked for mail theft and a Tribal FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault. Richard Kevin Wright, 35, booked for first-degree child molestation. Saturday, June 20, 2015 Alcohol offense on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Alcohol offense on Simons Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Mail reported missing. Lost property on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Wallet reported missing. DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Hanford St. in

Omak. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Threats on Jasmine St. in Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Lost property on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Tristan Vance L. Andrew-Paul, 19, booked on warrants for DUI (under 21) and hit-andrun (unattended). Kristina Michelle Grooms-Sloan, 41, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree theft. Christina Delrosario, no middle name listed, 34, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Eduardo Pamatz Ponce, 24, booked for obstruction. Lisa Louise Best, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault. Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 51, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing.

Sunday, June 21, 2015 Domestic dispute on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Rape on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on River Rd. near Omak. Automobile theft on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Electronics reported missing. Illegal burning on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Harassment on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jacob Patrick Vincent Ramsey, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). James Preston Simpson, 35, booked for DUI. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

To the maay sponsors who make

Bonaparte Lake Fish Day A Huge Success!

Akins Harvest Foods, Oroville

Oroville American Legion Post 84

Columbia River Carbonates

Oroville Sportsmen Club

Dave Rains Fish Farm

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

Frontier Foods, Oroville

Royal Neighbors of America, Oroville

Gary L. Lesamiz, DVM Hughes Department Store

Scholz Sporting Goods

Jerry Utt’s Apiary

Son of American Legion, Tonasket

Kinross Kettle River Buckhorn

Tonasket American Legion Post 82

Lee Franks Mercantile

Tonasket Awards, Morgan Montanye

Midway Building Supply Nancy Inlow- AVON Okanogan County Sheriff Okanogan Valley Bass Club

U.S. Forest Service – Tonasket & Republic Ranger Districts Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife Wauconda Hall

� Okanogan-Wenatchee National Porest � Tonasket :Raqer District


JUNE 25, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Donate to the Community Fireworks Display

Oroville’s Community Fourth of July Fireworks display has been a big hit for several years now and become an Independence Day tradition. The show is a big attraction to town, drawing people from across the border in Osoyoos to the north and Tonasket to the south. It’s a fun way to share an evening with your family whether your taking in the view from the park, in a boat on the lake, in your car along the highway or from one of the nearby lake side homes and resorts. The event, originally organized by the late Joy Ehlers as a full day of fun at Oroville’s Deep Bay Park, which hadn’t so much earlier undergone a transformation after it had been turned over to the city from the local Kiwanis Club. The Sons of the American Legion were recruited to take over the project and for the last many years it has basically been run by Dane Forrester with help from his wife Joyce (this year’s May Festival Grand Marshals) and friends like Bryan Sawyer, Out of licensed pyrotechnician. My Mind theWhile the music and food events that were Gary A. DeVon originally a part of Joy’s dream have fallen by the wayside, the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, which has taken up the event, is working on offering entertainment and food in the future years. If you have any ideas you might contact Leah Palmer, the chamber’s vice-president. However, the fireworks will retain top billing – and to bring those the chamber of commerce needs your donations – whatever you can afford, even if it’s just a dollar or two. It’s amazing home much money it takes to light up the sky – but the ‘oohs’ and ‘ahhs’ of the crowd are worth it. So, whether you come down to the park to watch or somewhere else where the view is good remember people are working hard to make the event happen and be sure and give what you can so the chamber can bring you the event again next year. Your donations help to make the down payment on next year’s show, which has to be paid early to ensure a spectacular Fourth of July display. Many local businesses have generously donated over the years – even some that aren’t so local. Dan Lepley, from the chamber board has been approaching local businesses about giving this year. You can donate at Umpqua Bank, the Camaray Motel, or via Credit Card at www.orovillewashington.com, or by check to Oroville Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 2140, Oroville, WA 98844. BE LOUD, BE PROUD A new tradition may be starting at the park as the Oroville High School Cheerleaders are asking people to come support them by participating in the first annual Be Loud, Be Colorful 5K run on the Fourth of July. It’s $15 to enter and runners, who are asked to wear white T-shirts and sun glasses will be showered with bright colored powder in the shades of Old Glory. Participants will begin at Deep Bay Park, continue south on Westlake road, turn around by Les Schwab and loop back to the park. For more information call 509-560-1063 or 509-413-6157. CANADA DAY One last thing, while we have to wait until Saturday, July 4 for our celebration, our Canadian neighbors will be celebrating on Wednesday, July 1. Remember to wish your favorite Canuck a Happy Canada Day — it might be a little belated as you see them up at the Chesaw Rodeo or in Oroville for the fireworks.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO EDITOR Use caution before following the masses Dear Editor, Reading multiple online posts, comments, emails, various newspaper editorials/articles and letters-to-the editor while also having conversations to people from all walks of life within our communities over the last several months regarding Commissioners Ray Campbell and Sheilah Kennedy’s job performance during their first term in office, I urge my fellow Okanogan County citizens to be cautious when forming their own personal opinions. In the interest of full disclosure I worked on Commissioner DeTro’s first campaign, managed Commissioner Campbell’s campaign and voted for Commissioner Kennedy along with the majority of currently elected officials in Okanogan County. I am a current Okanogan County Farm Bureau board member and a member/volunteer for various groups and organizations within our county. I do not receive a federal, state, county or grant-backed paycheck funded by the taxpayers of our county, state or nation. I have no desire or plans to hold any elected office or public employee position and am not related to any elected officials in Okanogan County. Nonetheless, I do attend a large number of the county meetings and meetings across the state on my own time and dime—99% of the time representing myself—to confirm that the elected officials I have supported are doing their jobs and are representing their constituents. At every county board or department meeting I have attended, Commissioners Campbell and Kennedy have always put the health, welfare and safety of Okanogan County’s citizens above all else. They have never shied away from the hard questions or issues; although, conventional wisdom clearly dictated that their questions and demands for accountability from all county and state departments to their constituents would be akin to committing social and political suicide. They have both always conducted themselves in a straightforward, open, honest, professional and courteous manner even when confronted with blatantly rude and inappropriate

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, June 7- 14, 1940: The International Shows will furnish the carnival amusement at the Oroville Border Days Rodeo here on Saturday and Sunday, June 15th and 16th. There will be five rides and concessions of all kinds running continuously day and night. The local Grange held a very interesting meeting Thursday night followed by entertainment provided by the Oroville Junior Grange. Oroville can be justly proud of this juvenile group, which is one of the few to be organized in this county, and who won First place in the entire state for the Scrap Book Competition. The group is led by Mrs. Fannie Rogers and she has reminded all that any child may join this group whether their parents are Grangers or not. For the convenience of the general public, as a large crowd is expected in town this week-end for Border Days, the following grocery stores and meat markets, have agreed to maintain these shopping hours on Sunday. Open at 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. and closed from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Those agreeing to these hours are; Wagner’s Grocery and Market; Ben Prince’s Store; John Dykes Market; Mooney’s Market and Meyer Prince’s

behavior from state department and county employees. This is also the very first time to my knowledge that Okanogan County Commissioners have NEVER taken the levy shift of $500,000 (which is legal) from Public Works to balance the budget. Commissioners Campbell and Kennedy have also refused to take in-county travel—which was voted in by p rior commissioners—and opted not to take a pay increase for themselves as was approved prior to their election to office. Okanogan County departments that have been allowed to run amuck unchecked and unchallenged for decades are finally being forced—albeit kicking and screaming—by Commissioners Campbell and Kennedy to: -Account for positions that have been budgeted for but never filled. Justify self-given employee pay increases within budgets that have already run through their reserves.  -Justify why rates for services should be raised to pay those employees’ pay increases when the taxpayers (who fund the paychecks and pay the increased rates) are already struggling and do not receive those same benefits themselves.  -Justify why and how the county departments can complete jobs cheaper, better and more efficiently than the private businesses— since the county depends on those businesses and their employees to provide a large portion of the county budget.  -Justify why some county employees are being offered job contracts that guarantee them outstanding benefits, pay scales and job security multiple years into the future on a scale competing with some Fortune 500 companies and leaving little room within the contracts for disciplinary actions should the need arise when an employee is not performing—when the county and the citizens paying these wages are struggling to even make ends meet.  -Justify why public inclusion and process have not occurred over the years regarding public assets. Demand coordination from state and federal agencies so the people of Okanogan County actually have a say in what happens in our county for the first time ever. The list could go on. Considering that I have personally seen and witnessed all of the above, I urge you to please do your own research before judg-

ing Commissioners Campbell and Kennedy. Meetings are open to the public and the majority of documents are available upon request regarding many of the issues tearing our county apart. If you have questions, call Commissioner Campbell and Kennedy or invite them to a meeting. How can you expect to get a straight answer if the people in question aren’t even at the table with you? Consider the source of where a lot of the turmoil and information within our community is coming from and where those sources’ personal connections and interests lay. And finally, don’t rely on my word or anyone else’s. I have faith in you—the taxpayers and citizens of Okanogan County—to do your due diligence and form your own unbiased opinions. Trinity Stucker Tonasket

Store. The new Baptist Church, which has been in process of construction since last December, will open for services next Sunday, June 16. Sunday School and worship services at the usual hours of 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. We are greatly appreciative of the use of Mr. Peterson’s team and Mr. John Kline’s team in the digging of the basement and all other labors which were so efficiently donated. The new bridge being constructed across the Okanogan River on the Molson-Oroville road, will be open to light traffic in time for this week-end. This opening will eliminate the detour to the bridge southeast of town for the people living in the East Oroville Orchard Tracts and from Molson-Chesaw. Grocery Prices: Nalley’s Potato Chips, $.08 per bag; Kerr widemouth jars, $1.10; Crackers, 2 2lb. pkgs, $.25; 2 lb. jar peanut butter, $.25.

First Methodist Church authorized a building project and elected a building committee. Elected were, Tom Dull, Chairman; Dave Thorndike, Gordon Sylvester, Mrs. Wesley Rogers, Harold Forney, Mrs. Jerry Dull, Warren Carey, W. A. Fassett and Don Reese. Boyd Walter, construction engineer for the Chief Joseph Reclamation Area, appealed to the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, for help in locating five or six houses for rent to his office and field engineers. Boyd stated that they would be living in Oroville for two or three years during construction and would have about 18 children enrolled in the school. Roy Frazier, local orchardists has been elected Commander for American Legion Post No. 84. Other officers elected were, Stanley Nelson Sr., Vice Commander. At the Post’s last meeting, Paul Anderson presented the Legion with Boy Scout Troop 26’s Charter continuing for the 25th consecutive year. Sisters of Kathy Sawtells, new Theta Rho President and all Past Presidents themselves, acted as installing officers for her installation. Those sisters are Mrs. Steve Troth, Miss Peggy Sawtells and Mrs. Kenneth Ripley. Grocery Prices: Fryers. Cut up, 2½ to 3½ lbs. Avg. $.35; Lettuce, 2 hds. $.29; Tomatoes, $.29 per lb. 2 lb. loaf Velveeta cheese, $.75; Cottage Cheese, Pint, $.23; Ground Beef, 3 lbs. $1.17; Radishes or Green onions, $.05 per bunch.; Watermelon, $05.5 per lb.4, 65 and 23; April 5, 65 and 33 and April 6, 59 and 41. A total precipitation of .01” for the period. Grocery Prices: Flour, 25# bag, $1.89; Bread, 4 loaves for $1.00; 2lb. bananas, $.29; Ground beef, 3lb., $1.17; Skinless Franks, $.49 per lb.; Ice Cream, ½ gal. $.49; MJB Coffee, 3 lb. tin, $1.37 and 16 oz. frozen, breaded shrimp,$.99.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: June 3 - 10 , 1965: Commencement exercises for the largest graduation class ever to leave Oroville High School, took place last Friday evening at the Coulton Auditorium, May 28, 1965. A total of 74 seniors received their diplomas and 12 scholarships, totaling $1,712, were given to 12 of those. Named as Valedictorian was Kathleen Kernan and Edna Ballard was Salutatorian. The Glover Cup, which over the years has become the highest award to a graduating senior, was won by Pat Siegrist. A new business just opened in Oroville is “Art’s Miniature Golf Course. It is located behind his drive-in on Highway 97. Each of the 18 holes offers something different to the players. At a special quarterly conference last Thursday, officers of the

Appreciate the work done behind the scenes Dear Editor, So many people work so hard behind the scenes to make May Day a fun day for everyone. I think it is time to say thank you to these guys. We all take for granted that the parade line up and 3 on 3 will have porta potties. This is thanks to Mike Tibbs who has for many years set them out in the morning and picked them up in the evening. He has volunteered this service without asking for payment to even cover the cost of TP and chemicals! A lot of time and work! Another person is Gary Bull who every year rounds up the street barricades and sets them out and has people direct traffic. He also rounds up golf carts for the parade judges as well as working with the kids games. And of course, there is Ken Neal who has announced the parade for over 30 years. Wow, talk about dedication. Just three guys that have worked hard so that we can enjoy May Day. Thank you guys and also the others that spend their May Day in service to the rest of us that gather for the fun. Linda Schwilke Oroville

SEE ITEMS PAST | PG A6


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

No more holidays until the Fourth of July After picnics, barbecues, dinners and what have you, honoring father’s on “their day” it’s now back to the “grind” and no more holidays until July 4th, I think. Oroville has had some visitors. Mary Ellen Lemmond, from Michigan, who lived here some year ago, making many friends and she still comes back, to visit, when her health permits. Many remember Margaret Neff, wife of the late

Russell Neff, who was Oroville School District Superintendent. One of her sons brought her to Oroville to touch base with some of their friends. She now lives in Olympia. And the community welcomes back Candy Churchill who grew up here. She has returned and she and her husband bought Dee Patterson’s home on Cherry Street and her last name is now Floyd. The Seattle Mariners had lost so many

baseball games, I was just about ready to her family, along with her mom, Vivian, give up on them, and now they’ve won a were here for the Molson Midsummer Fest, last weekend. I was sorry few. It must be as frustrating to miss it, as seeing the many for the team as it is for me, folks and visiting and seeing but they can’t quit, as they’re the happy kids, winning (or under contract. losing) games is fun, for all. Brock Hires recently had Luanne (Emry) Billings, an accident, that resulted in is making progress from her being cut with shattered glass serious health issues but has and had a hospital stay, but a series of rehabilitation proreports are he is doing okay. grams to continue with to This is the season for yard keep gaining strength to corsales. Many signs out all along the way, inside towns and in THIS & THAT rect the many things that were affected from her “stroke like” the country. symptoms. Cherry picking and pro- Joyce Emry We went to Clarkston, cessing is in full swing now. Joannie (Emry) Raymond and some of Wash. to visit Elaine Burton and for a

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY Submitted photo

Marvin and Ginger Miller will be celebrating their Golden Wedding Anniversary with an open house on Saturday, June 27 at the Molson Grange from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Marvin and Ginger Cody were married 50 years ago on June 25, 1965 at the Free Methodist Church in Oroville. They have made the Oroville area their home ever since. Their children, Marvin S. Miller and Frances Darrow, will be hosting a potluck for them to celebrate their 50th Anniversary. Friends and family are invited to the potluck wish them the best (no gifts, please). Marvin owned an orchard and Ginger worked for the City of Oroville. They have three children, Francis (Earl) Darrow, of Oroville; Marvin S. Miller of Tonasket and Edie (Warren) Haris of Seattle.

Old building needs constant attention

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

The progress of our storage unit has been slowed, as we have been dealing with several emergencies including the walk-in freezer shutdown, the furnace malfunction, the oven malfunction and the new dining room floor, which required our attention due to sub floor structural failure. And, now the ice maker needs replacement. Thankfully, Adult and Aging Care is assisting us with funding, and replacement of the existing ice maker, soon. All of these have been hard on our budget and time. We are presently, also, working on roof repairs, and lighting electrical repairs. An old building, such as ours, unfortunately, needs constant attention. All of this is occurring during a

busy time for our building committee, and we are thankful that we could accomplish what we have without facilities interruption. We hope to get on with the storage unit progress shortly. Not withstanding, we have been able to still maintain a substantial building fund for a future needed addition, which is still on the back burner. As you all know, Ken and Jim are retiring the 13th of this month. We all want to thank them for 23 years of superb service. I’m sure we are all well aware of the extra effort and time they have contributed over the years in order to facilitate our dining experience. Most important are the little things, such as a lent ear, or a whimsical response to what-

ever, that only a professional staff can provide to kings and queens. Tillie Porter has been suffering with a bad case of shingles, so Computer classes have been on hold, waiting for her recovery. Keep her in your thoughts and prayers. Meals next week are: Tuesday, June 30, spaghetti; Thursday, July 2, BBQ Chicken; Friday, July 3, closed (enjoy Independence Day weekend.) Patience is everything. Well, I guess enthusiasm and felicity deserve mention. OK, OK, so then: Patience, enthusiasm and felicity are everything. Reminds me of my dog in the morning. OK, OK, being a dog is everything. No, no, being a dog in the morning is everything! Pinochle Report June 13: Door Prize, Danny W.; Pinochle, Leonard; Ladies High, Danny and Kate; Men’s High, Dave B. June 20: Door Prize, Ed Craig; Most Pinochles, Sally Eder; Men’s High, Leonard Paulson; Women’s High, Nellie Paulsen.

Busy Saturday at Molson Midsummer Fest

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

There was a very active day up in Molson last Saturday with the 20th Annual Molson Midsummer Festival. There were activities for everyone all day, starting with the pancake breakfast. They served 179 hungry folk. After breakfast you could walk or run in the race to help work off some of those pancakes. As the Classic Cars were gathering in the Schoolhouse Museum parking lot, the parade entries were getting ready. This years Grand Marshals were Maurice and Bettie Reichel. They moved here from McGrath, Alaska where Maurice worked as the Village Public Safety Officer and Bettie was a teacher in the Head Start program. Maurice said that they were interested in a place that was sparsely populate. The Molson area filled the bill. If you have attended the pancake breakfast, the annual yard sale and the Chesaw Rodeo you have seen Maurice and Bettie volunteering their time and energy. Maurice flips a mean pancake and Bettie is famous for her “Walkin Tacos.” Maurice serves as president of the Molson Museum Association and is the chairman of the building committee for the Grange. He is also President of the Knob Hill Home Economic Club of Chesaw. Bettie is involved as a member of the ladies auxiliary for the Grange and has served as a regular volunteer at the Museum in the past. Maurice has driven

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The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: June 7 – 14, 1990: Tonasket Pool Rates for 1990: 17 and under will be $.50 for each session and sessions will be from 1 to 5 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. Rates for 18 and older are $1.50 per session. A record breaking number of entrants marched the length of the parade route in Tonasket, to the snappy music of five bands, accompanied by the long awaited sunshine. The weather was fine as hundreds lined the streets of Tonasket to watch the Founder’s Day Parade. One feature of the parade was an abundance of horses and riders who seemed to stretch from one end of the town to the other. At the 1990 Oroville High School Graduation ceremony, held in the Coulton Auditorium, Quill Hyde was the Class Speaker and the Glover Cup, the highest award to be given in the Oroville Schools Reach

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since the 1930’s for outstanding citizenship and achievement, was awarded to Kenneth John Ripley. At the Tonasket High School Graduation ceremonies Christy Holmdahl presented the Valedictorian address for the class. The class motto was “We don’t know what our future holds, but we know who holds the Future.” History was made last week in Chesaw. For the first time in decades, Canadians and their draft horses, were allowed by U. S. Border officials to cross into this country at Myncaster (four miles north of Chesaw) to participate in the annual Chesaw Draft Horse Play Day. The Canadian South Boundary Draft Horse Club, drove their teams from Rock Creek, B.C. to the crossing and was greeted there by members of the Highland Harness Horse Club, who had caravaned up from Chesaw in their wagons. Pictured in this issue, is a photo of the 1915 Oroville High School Girls Basketball Team. Those in the photo are; Goldie Mitchell, Teacher, Rosetta Murray, Inez Catlin, Hermina Greiege, Hazel Mallory McMahan, Daisy Stansbury and Lorraine Bartell.

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the Senior Bus in Oroville for nine years. However he is often seen riding that big green mowing machine in Molson, keeping the surrounding areas “looking good.” Thank you, Maurice and Bettie for all you do for our community. At Midsummer you could decorate a May Pole, play horseshoes, Frisbee golf, a scavenger hunt and much more. Meanwhile in the Grange Hall you could enter one of many raffles or just one if you wished. The Winners were: Penny Cole, Craig Ortloff, Floyd Rise, Mary Louise, Joanne Gallagher, Linda Noon, J J Forthun, Jeff Forthun, Janet Leslie, J Case, Phyllis Hilstad, Janet Eder,Ralph Rise. I was unable to get what they won, but they were all home made items from the local folk. The Sitzmark Ski Club of Havillah served Lunch in the afternoon. It was a day of making memories. We hope you will return next year. Other Parade entries included the “ 2015 May Day Queen the beautiful Ellamae Burnell riding in a 1979 Volkswagen Beetle convertible, owned and driven by her father, Noah Burnell. Her escorts were Wyatt Sherrer and Jasper Burnell (brother). Ellamae serves as Vice President of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) North Central Region. She will be going to Chicago for the FBLA National Conference at the end of June and will be back in time for the 4th of July Parade in Chesaw. Other local Royalty in the

Parade included the 2015 Miss Omak Stampede of Oroville Menze Pickering. She invited everyone to the 82nd World famous Omak Stampede Aug. 13-16th. The pretty Menze was riding in a 1959 Ford Fairlane 500 retractable hard top convertible, owned and driven by Perry Blackler, her grandfather. There were many other Classic Cars like Sandra Hilstad in her Roadster. The best car was from Chesaw and was a Metalic, green and grey pickup owned and driven by our friend “Oh My God Joe.” Come to Chesaw on July 4th to see more cars in our parade. The Hot August Night this year in Chesaw will be on Aug. 29. New this year will be a dance on Aug. 28. Mark your Calendars for the 2015 Molson School Picnic on July 25 at Lost Lake from noon to 4 p.m. Visitors welcome. The Rodeo Club is hard a work getting things ready for the Rodeo on July 4th. Books open on June 25. Entries accepted 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. only. Junior Events (no entry fee) – Cow Riding, Calf Roping, Barrels, Calf Scramble. Open Barrel Racing, $10 entry. Senior Events: ($20 entry) - Cow Riding, Calf Roping,Regular Saddle Bronc, Ranch Saddle Bronc, Bareback, Wild Cow Milking. Call Mary Ellen Field at 509-4853223 for information. The Community Dance with Powder River Band will be July 3 at 9 p.m. and is $5 per person. Our weather has been warm and that makes every thing very dry so much caution is needed. There is a Burn Ban in effect. Please be careful.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

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reception for her grandson, who had graduated from high school recently in Idaho. We returned by way of Moses Lake where we visited Anita (Emry) McIntosh and had a lovely Father’s Day dinner at the home of her daughter, Laurie VanWinkle, and family. How long has it been since you had a root beer float? Buy the ingredients and make some at home and then you can have seconds. Do you know how old the Statue of Liberty is? It came from France and is 130-year-old. Lotsa people “throwing their hats in the ring” to make a run for president. It’s a rotten job, but somebody’s gotta do it. ‘Til next week.

ACTION / ADVENTURE / SCI-FI STARRING CHRIS PRATT, BRYCE DALLAS HOWARD, TY SIMPKONS. FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00, 6:15,9:30. SUN *3:00, 6:15. MON-THURS 6:30, 9:30 The

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JUNE 25, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OROVILLE - The Oroville Cheerleaders are sponsoring the first annual Be Loud Be Colorful 5K Fun Run to raise money for next year’s cheer season. The event will take place on Saturday, July 4 at Oroville’s Deep Bay Park. The race begins at 8 a.m. What makes the event different is that each runner is showered with bright red, white and blue colored powder to help celebrate Independence Day. The race heads out of the park, south on Westalke to Les Schwab Tires and loops back to the park. Entry fee is $15. For more information call 509-560-1063 or 509-413-6157.

OYSC Fall Soccer Registration OROVILLE - Registration for Oroville Youth Soccer has begun. Go to www.ncwsoccer.om to register children four to 14-years-old. There is a one time $50 fee which allows players to play in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. The deadline to register is prior to July 31, 2015. Players who aren’t registered by then will not be allowed to play. Fall season runs from September to October. Those with questions should contact Jaden Taber at 509-560-3461.

Stroke Support Group Potluck OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group will be holding a potluck on Thursday, June 25 at 10:30 a.m. at Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park at the Pavillion (2207 Juniper St, Oroville, Wash.) This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. This will be a potluck, so bring something tasty.

Good 4 U to Perform at Winery OROVILLE – Good 4 U, of Okanogan, will perform at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, June 25. The group’s diverse performances run from acoustic to rock, with many of the works written by Lonnie and Teresa Good. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this or future events, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or check the Events Page at www.estherbricques.com.

Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096.

Fusion Beads Craft TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Fusion Beads Craft on Monday, June 29 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

Preschool Story Time TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 3 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509486-2366.

Bruce Cool Bench Dedication OROVILLE - There will be a dedication to Bruce Cool on Friday, July 3 at 11 a.m. in Oroville Centennial Park. A bench is being placed in the park in his memory. Cool spent many hours working to make the park a dream and a reality for the communities enjoyment. Everyone is welcome; please come help us honor Mr. B. Cool. Attendees are encouraged to wear WSU crimson and gray.

Jet Pack Craft TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Jet Pack Craft on Monday, July 6 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

Tonasket Music in Library Puppet the Park TONASKET - Tonasket Music Show in the Park starts its annual summer series on Friday, June 26 at 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event takes place at History Park: on Locust Street, between West 1st street and West Jonathan Street. Music in the Park presents Ian McFeron with Nathaniel Talbot. McFeron is joined on tour by longtime friend and accompanist Alisa Milner on fiddle, cello, and harmony vocals. Fans of John Lennon, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and Jackson Browne will feel at home in his music.

Preschool Story Time TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, June 26 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509486-2366.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, June 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this markets on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The market can now accept WIC and Senior checks, through the USDA and Washington State sponsored Farmers Market Nutrition Program. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and

TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents a puppet show on Thursday, July 9 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509-486-2366.

Preschool Story Time TONASKET - Tonasket Library Summer Reading Program presents Preschool Story Time on Friday, July 10 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. The library phone number is 509486-2366.

OHS Class of 1975 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1975 will be having a get together on Friday, July 24 at Copper Mountain Vineyards (Aka - Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Stand) 1 mile north of Princes on Hwy. 97. The get together is from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. with drinks and appetizers. Picnic to follow on Saturday. Bring the family. Pass the word to other classmates or view Brian Brownlee’s Facebook page for further details or call 509-833-0190.

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket may be a small rural village, but it hosts lots of art venues and artists who call the area home. A new gallery, Wild Women Glass, opened Thursday, June 5, at the RV Park in Tonasket. The studio took over the former caretaker’s cabin, after the city acquired it as an extension of the art gallery located at the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center (TVBRC) just south of City Hall. The studio features five artists who create stained, fused or mosiac glass pieces. “All of the artists are from Tonasket,” said Peggy Swanberg, curator of the studio and one of the artists. “Not that we wouldn’t expand, but we want to keep it all local.” Swanberg said the building had been empty five or more years, so it took a major overhaul to make it showcase ready. “Dave Kester and George Kramer did most of the work; they jacked up and leveled the

building; replaced the deck and took out an interior wall,” said Swanberg. “Tonasket Interiors donated the floor. We hope to make it more welcoming and visually attractive to people as they drive by.” The RV Park and Wild Women Glass is located at the north entrance to town, across Highway 97 from Beyer’s Market. The gallery is open Thursday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Tonasket City Gallery, located at the TVBRC, features more work of the same artists as well as a variety of work from local artists from Okanogan and Ferry Counties. Jody Olson of Riverside is one featured artist who brings animal images “to life” with papier mache. Olson has performed residencies with second graders at the Methow Valley School District, where she has kids research local animals—including their lifestyles and habitat— before teaching them to create a papier mache sculpture of their chosen species. Sandra Sweetman of Republic

presents fiber art pieces and Laurie Dorrell, also of Republic, brings in mixed media creations. Republic’s David Wermuth displayed personalized designs and custom furniture; and Omak’s Carol O’Dell displays a variety of work ranging from quilts to pen and ink on leather, along with watercolors and Chinese Brush paintings. There are smaller pieces featured also, including lots of jewelry as well as handmade cards. The TVBRC is open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artists also set up at the Tonasket Farmers Market, which takes place on Thursdays from 3 to 7 p.m. May through September. The Downtown Art Walk features nineteen artists throughout nineteen venues around town, including Tonasket City Hall and Public Library, North Valley Hospital, the Community Cultural Center and many local businesses. For a map of the Art Walk, stop by the TVBRC.

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509-476-2488.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Wild Women Glass, located at the RV Park off Hwy. 97 in Tonasket features the work of five local artists.

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

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OROVILLE

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24 Hour Crisis Line

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A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Restaurant Servers Bartenders Cooks and Dishwashers Housekeeping Front Desk Staff

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PAGE A7

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015

BUSINESS

TONASKET SHIPPING POST

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Alan Fisk in his new store located about ten miles from Oroville on the Loomis-Oroville Highway. The store is in a silver, vintage aluminum Spartan Trailer near his home on the Similkameen River. Fisk plans to offer a wide variety of prospecting equipment, mostly dealing with underwater mining, as well as training.

Lucky Duck Mining LLC offers equipment, training Retail store on the Similkameen River

now he says his tentative hours will be 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. To find himtravel west from Oroville on the

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Alan Fisk has been chasing gold on the Similkameen River for nearly two decades, now he wants to help people learn to find gold themselves – not necessarily to get rich, but as an adventure. “Most of my life was around King County. Nineteen years ago I came here to chase gold. I loved it and stayed, eventually getting my dream property on the Similkameen River,” said Fisk. Lucky Duck is a retail store for prospecting, mining and Hookah dive gear. It is geared toward the underwater gold dredger. The store offers dive masks, including full face, air hoses, weight belts, pump seals, gold scales, hookah air regulators, gold vials and pans, screens, misc. hand tools, ropes, etc. The store, which is located in a vintage Spartan trailer on his property at 2684 Loomis-Oroville Rd., opened for business on Wednesday, June 10, 2015. For

“Nineteen years ago I came here to chase gold. I loved it and stayed, eventually getting my dream property on the Similkameen River” Alan Fisk, Owner Lucky Duck Mining, LLC

Loomis-Oroville Road, his trailer is about three miles before the Nighthawk turn off. “Between those hours I will be in the river dredging. I will be open Monday through Saturday,” he said. Fisk also offers dredge repairs, welding and cutting, fabrication, special orders, training, eventually classes. He has a shaker table to let people clean out the gold from “concentrates.” “I can equip and train any-

one to find and recover placer gold,” he said. “ The first goal is to make sure that I can provide miners any dive or mining equipment they may need. In the gold dredging business time is critical. The second goal is to be able to offer the public the opportunity to dredge underwater in shallow water. “The moment I saw Shanker’s Bend in the Similkameen I knew I wanted to do this, in the right time. The business idea is 19-years-old. For most of those years I kept a low profile and waited for the right time, which is now. Because of the increase in the price of gold, more and more miners are coming to Oroville to chase their luck in the “Gold River.” If the miners know they can supply here, they are more apt to come here. Except for a few items the local stores carry, I have the only place they can get what they need now. While Fisk calls the Oroville area home, he has two daughters that live near Seattle and five grandkids. “I live with my wife Candy, and our dog Rolly. I am retired and doing this for fun,” he said.

&

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Eva‛s Diner & Bakery NOW SERVING DINNER! * Wednesday *

Okanogan Valley

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Entertainment Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

Tonasket Shipping Post, located at 214 S. Whitcomb Ave in Tonasket is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for your packing and shipping needs. The Shipping Post also sells prepaid cellular phones; handles consignments, ebay sales and mail forwarding; does drop shipments and clock repairs and has mailboxes. The business is owned by Betty London, and she hopes to include copy and print services soon. The Londons moved to Tonasket in September 2014 from Wenatchee and Vancouver, Washington; and opened the business March 1 of this year. The Tonasket Shipping Post’s phone number and fax number is (509) 486-4592.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Out on the Town...

Dining

Charlene Helm/staff photo

HOURS: Tue.-Sat., 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. & 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays, 7 to 2 p.m. Closed Monday.

Ph. (509) 476-3266

712 14th Ave., Oroville

Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

Now Open 7 days a week!

Prime Rib every Sat.

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

HOT SPOTS

Want to know where the purrfect places are to shop for products and services in our community? Check out our Business & Service Directory! Subscribe to: OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

1422 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


JUNE 25, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

N.C. CAR SHOW & FATHER’S DAY FLY-IN Fly-in fun for all BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Above, Gavin Potter gets out of a plane flown by Dean Buzzard while Cheri Wahl holds the door open for Lloyd Temby. Right, Betty Wehmeyer, age 6, readies herself for takeoff. Far right, Chelsea, Jenna and Trey Ergenbright, age 5, approach the plane for their turn in the sky. Below right, Spectacle Lake from the sky. Below center, LaMoyne Wahl fuels his plane for one more trip up. Below left, approaching the Tonasket Airport runway from Wahl’s Cessna XP 172. Left, Soren and Cyrus Levine sit in the Spirit of Tonasket, “flown” by Caleb Williams with his brother Hayden next to him.

This year’s Father’s Day Fly-in, held June 20-21 at the Tonasket Airport, saw 52 kids ages 15 and under going on free plane rides. “That was great! I want to go again,” said eight-year-old Natalia Rodriguez after taking her very first airplane ride. Pilots LeMoyne Wahl and Dean Buzzard volunteered their time and planes, along with three different pilots from the Tonasket Flying Club. Wahl, who just started flying four years ago, may well have been having as much fun as Rodriguez. “I’ve been wanting to fly ever since I was a kid,” Wahl said, “so I decided to get a plane and do it.” Wahl keeps his Cessna XP 172 on his cattle ranch near Palmer Lake. “I just take off right from the alfafa fields.” He said having a plane did save a little time on riding to search for cattle, “but that’s probably just an excuse. I just like having it.”

His wife, Tonasket Kindergarten teacher Cheri Wahl, was helping load kids on the planes along with Don Grey. Also on hand for the event was the MedStar helicopter and three-man team of RN Suzy Beck, Respiratory Therapist Jeke Riedel and Pilot David Leeman. “All the medical crew are dual certified as Paramedics or EMTs,” said Beck. “We bring the ICU to the patient, wherever they are.” “We got quite a few airplanes; we had good weather so several came over the mountains from the coast,” said Lee Orr, president of the Tonasket Airport Improvement Club who sponsors the event. “We had a good turnout this morning (Sunday), and 178 people came to our steak BBQ last night.” Orr said local merchants pay for the fuel the planes burn giving kids rides, and any money made from Sunday’s breakfast and Saturday’s dinner goes back to the airport through the improvement club.

Photos by Katie Teachout

North Country holds 26th Annual Cruise-in The 26th Annual North Country Car Club Car Show and Cruise-in, held June 20, had entries from around the state of Washington as well as Canada. A steady stream of spectators viewed vehicles displayed in 17 classes throughout the day, voting for their favorites. “North Country Car Club appreciates all donations of items for the silent auction and monetary donations to help with show expenses,” said Patti Hill. “We are so thankful for the area support of our show and the generous sponsors who assist us in holding the show.” North Country Car Club 2015 Car Show Results Motorcycle sponsored by CJ Cycle 1st – Reggie Zwald, 2005 Harley Sportster Class 1960-1979 sponsored by Whitney’s Garage 1st – Darrel Hickman, 1964 Chevy Nova 2nd – Jim Bretz, 1972 Chevy Chevelle 3rd – Roy Armstrong, 1969 Chevy Chevelle Class 1980 and up sponsored by Rob Nau, Family Dental 1st – Rob Nau, 2007 Ford Shelby Mustang GT 2nd – Devon Sementilli, 2001 Pontiac Trans-Am 3rd – Ernie Rampley, 1990 ZR-1 Corvette Custom Class sponsored by Castelda & Castelda Law Office 1st – Tony Smith, 1956 Ford Sunliner

4-Door Class sponsored by Steve Smith, Accountant 1st- Jak Heggie, 1965 Cevy Nova Post-War Class sponsored by Grant’s Market 1st – Joe Schell, 1950 Ford 2 Door 2nd – Jeff Klimek, 1959 El Camino 3rd – R. Sauchom, 1956 4 Door Hardtop Pre-War Class (1941 and older) sponsored by Nulton Irrigation, Inc. 1st – Rick Galleher, 1932 Chevy 5 Window Coupe 2nd Ralph Otto, 1931 Ford Project Class – not painted – sponsored by RDL 1st – Dale Hawt, 1969 VW Roadster 2nd – ChrisMurrisk, P-38 Drop Tank Land Speed car 3rd – Marty West, 1968 Dodge Charger Street Machine Class sponsored by Superior Auto Parts 1st Dick Sweetman, 1955 Chevy Bel-Air 2nd – Charles Cone, 1935 Plymouth Coupe 3rd – Jim Mastey, 1968 Dodge Charger Teenage Class sponsored by Kuhler Bar and Grill 1st – Chad Bretz, 1986 Chevy Silverado 2nd- Chad Bretz, 1961 Caddy Car Tractor sponsored by Wilbur Ellis 1st – George Hill, 1951 Ford 8N Tractor 2nd – George Hill, 1949

Farmall Cub 3rd – George Hill, 1949 John Deere B Truck sponsored by Hannah Trucking 1st – Dick Carter, 1956 Chevy Pick up 2nd – Joe Schell, 1948 Diamond T 36 3rd – Bacon, 1947 Chevy pickup Unrestored Class (30 years or older) sponsored by US Bank 1st - Garry Eagle, 1948 Pontiac Silver Streak Semi 1 Ton or Bigger sponsored by Double S Meats 1st – George Hill, 1974 Seagrave Fire Truck 2nd – George Hill 1946 Studebaker

Photo by Sam Nau

Dick Sweetman’s 1955 Bel-Air took first in Street Machine Class and Best Interior. Rick Galleher’s 1932 Chevy 5 Window Coupe took Best of Show, Best Paint, Best Engine and first in Pre-War Class (1941 and older).

Rat Rod sponsored by Upper Valley Realty 1st – Terry Cariker, 1929 Essex 2 Door Panel Tractor Slow Race sponsored by Two Sisters Janet Bretz Best Engine Rick Galleher, 1932 Chevy 5 Window Coupe Best Paint Rick Galleher, 1932 Chevy 5 Window Coupe Best Interior Dick Sweetman, 1955 Chevy Bel-Air Best of Show sponsored by OK Chevrolet

Rick Galleher, 1932 Chevy 5 Window Coupe

Photo by Rob Nau

This 1931 Ford, owned by Ralph Otto, took second place in the Pre War Class (1941 and older).


JUNE 25, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B2

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Molson Midsummer Fest a great day for family and friends There was much to do during last Saturday’s Molson Midsummer Fest and much of it was play.

FUN WALK-RUN The day started out with the Molson Fun Walk-Run. The winner of the Overall Mile was

Elejah Burnell, from Oroville, with a time of 4:45. In the 10 and under it was: 1. Wyatt Sherrer, Oroville; 2. Jasper Burnell; 11-18 – 1. Sheridan, Oroville; 2. Riley Davidson, Molson, ; 19-30 – 1. Joelyn Forthum, Seattle; 2. CarliAnn Forthun, Portland; 31-49 – 1. Heather Burnell, Oroville; 2. Mary Gursky, Grand Forks, BC; 50+ 1. Bud Forthun, Oroville. The Three Mile: 1. Hadley Blasey, Oroville; 2. Keisun, Columbus, Ohio; 3. Kate Shulgina, Columbus, Ohio

MOLSON CHALLENGE The Amazing Molson Challenge was won by the team of Maddy Coffelt, Menze Pickering and Stephanie Cisos; in second was Sherdan Blasey, Hadley Blasey and Jessica Blasey and third was Debbie Nesper, Briseyda Pio and Edgar Pio. CAR SHOW Joe Gubser’s 1948 GMC Pickup took top place honors in the car show. Gene Fritts’ 1961 Ford Galaxy Victoria was second and there was a three way tie for third between Mark Fedderson’s 1941 Caterpillar, Tim Roberts 1966 Chevelle and Joe Glover’s 1969 Chevelle.

Lisa Pickering/submitted photos

Above, Oroville May Queen EllaMae Burnell rode in her family’s classic VW convertible in the parade. Right, Menze Pickering, Miss Omak Stampede, helps to decorate the May Pole. Left, The horseshoe tournament was one of the many activities to be found during Midsummer Fest.

HORSESHOES Horse was won by Riley Davidson and Marc Alden. FRISBEE GOLF Frisbee Golf was won by Aaron Reed with a score of 29.

Local area artist told to take a walk out with what was basically the gutters of the time. He was born in a gutter. The people who he associated with most commonly were the lowest of the low,” Brown said of the piece featuring a likeness of Christ surrounded by cigarette butts and syringes. The Blood Goddess featured a papier mache face hooked up to dual blood IVs. “She is my own myth that I’ve created, who for millenia has been secretly reigning over her empire of blood, but she isn’t real; she is only a myth,” said Brown. The third piece is called the Blessed Bleeding Virgin. “This piece incorporates a likeness of female genitalia. This represents the blessed mother, and the way in which all life came into the world,” said Brown. “And the fact that people would be offended by the sight of such a thing, even though each and every one of us came from that, just shows how far we have digressed from the truth; and how we still look upon female parts with fear and suspiSubmitted photo cion. Even though it is extensively The Blood Goddess is one of three pieces submitted to the Tonasket Art Walk that was asked to be removed from used to sell in an overly sexualized culture.” the exhibit at Tonasket City Hall. When asked why he chose to display pieces that might cause hung the display Wednesday especially that age,” Attwood said controversy, Brown said, “I guess I was just trying to explore a slightafternoon, June 3, and “didn’t on Friday, June 5. hear anything about it until Patty The three pieces covered up ly darker and slightly deeper area. As an artist you have to keep movArbuckle (the volunteer in charge and eventually ing forward; of the Art Walk last year) called removed from BY KATIE TEACHOUT you can’t just me at 11:30 this morning and the wall by KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM keep doing the told me she was not happy with Black includ“...if you look at T.V. same stuff over ed a piece Tonasket’s annual Art Walk me either.” and over. The and the internet and Three pieces in the display inscribed with will be short one artist this year. whole point of things that children are The event features artwork were covered up by cardboard the Latin “Deus art is to be able intra purgafrom twenty artists in twenty placards Thursday. to go to places constantly exposed to “I personally had no issue with mentum est” venues around town; both public and explore the art for myself,” said librarian which Brown day after day, it makes things we norbuildings and private businesses. Sarah McVay. “But I felt the four said translates Metal artist Ephraim Brown of me wonder how my mally couldn’t classes of second graders coming to “God is in E.C. Anomalies through other in today and the trash.” had several work can be seen as so means.” their teach“If somepieces of art“He’s a fanoffensive.” probably one follows work displayed “He’s a fantastic artist, ers tastic artist, but would.” the message in the hallway Artist Epraim Brown I warned him McVay said of Jesus, they but I warned him last just outside last week, ‘You was not know he hung the Tonasket week, ‘You will be at she shown the artPublic Library the library, so keep it work ahead of when he time, and the received a appropriate.’” second graders phone call from Bonnie Pleasant, Volunteer were schedLinda Black Art Walk Coordinator uled to tour Thursday, June City Hall and 4, telling him want to say thank you to our extended family and dear friends the Library on that he was no for all the cards, prayers, food and love shared with us over the Thursday, June 4. longer a part of the art walk. past few weeks. Our special thanks to Frontier Hospice for all “My concern was that people “Ephraim was told previously the wonderful care shown to Fred. The entire staff was so very that his art work would be dis- would think that I was accountsensitive to his needs and the needs of his family We especially able. There was a disconnect played at the Tonasket Public want to say a special thanks to Randy McAllister for conducting between the library and the peoLibrary, and was asked to make a lovely graveside service at the Oroville Cemetery. To the Orple in charge of the Art Walk, ” sure his art work would be approoville American Legion for a beautiful Ceremony with the cansaid McVay, adding, “It’s pretty priate for the wide range of ages amazing metal work. ” non salute was a moving tribute to this wonderful husband, fathat use the library,” said Black. City Clerk Alice Attwood said ther, grandfather, brother and uncle who served his family and “Upon seeing the art work which country with love and devotion. We are grateful for the genhe displayed, after having been she had asked previously that Brown’s artwork not be displayed. erosity of the Oroville Legion for providing the facility for the asked to provide something age “He had some artwork up that, luncheon and Linda Darrow for all the great food. And last but appropriate, I decided that he not least, Gary Bergh and Scott Miller for all their great help. We would not be given the opportu- to me...I don’t think ‘offensive’ is truly appreciate all of you. Fred had a wonderful farewell. nity to show a different collection the right word, but it was disturbing. We had a lot of kids here of art this year.” Speaking right after he received yesterday and the artwork was the phone call, Brown said he not appropriate for young people,

will be at the library, so keep it appropriate. There are kids going through there,” said Bonnie Pleasant, this year’s volunteer in charge of contacting the artists with a time and place their artwork will be displayed. “I was repeatedly told that we have to protect the children from these things; from unpleasant visuals that might scare them,” Brown said. “But if you look at T.V. and the internet and things that children are constantly exposed to day after day, it makes me wonder how my work can be seen as so offensive.” The Art Walk began in the summer of 2011. “It was meant to be a way for our talented local artists to display their work while providing a

form of entertainment for locals and tourists alike,” said Black. “He (Brown) has been informed that if he wishes to participate in the Art Walk next year, he will be allowed to do so. It is our hope that the Art Walk will continue to provide a way for Tonasket to support all of it’s local artists.” A map of the Art Walk can be picked up at the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center, located next to City Hall and open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. To view a letter Brown wrote to the City of Tonasket after being censored, and a more detailed explanation of his censored pieces, visit the E.C. Brown Anomalies website at ecbrownanomalies.com

Several art pieces censored

The Family of Fred York

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Puzzle Maker was one of the art pieces that was not censored.

Tonasket Kiwanis Club

FRESH BERRY SALE All profits go back into the Youth Fund All berries are IQF (Instant Quick Frozen) Ready to remain frozen or thawed for jams or just eating.

— 2015 Order Sheet —

Fresh! Ready for eating, making jam or freezing! NO SUGAR ADDED

All Berries Strawberries, Raspberries & Blueberries will be delivered

Wednesday, July 22

Sorry, no last minute orders, deadline is June 29!!!! Strawberries ( ) 20 lbs. Strawberries (IQF) @ $50 Raspberries ( ) 20 lbs. Raspberries (IQF) @ $55 Blueberries ( ) 20 lb Zip Lock (IQF) @ $60

Total enclosed $ ________ Cash________ Check _________ Name______________________ Address ___________________ All orders must be pre-paid City _______________________ Checks payable to and send order to: Day Ph.____________________ Tonasket Kiwanis Club Evening Ph.________________ P.O. 2117 Tonasket, WA 98855 Kiwanis Rep________________ Kiwanis Rep ph #____________ Pick up at Tonasket Food Bank 1 to 3 p.m. Important: Please make arrangements for someone else to pick up your order if you are unable to. We have no way to preserve the berries!


PAGE B3

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015

CONSCIOUS CULTURE FESTIVAL

Araminta Little pedals a bike, producing kinetic friction to run the blender at Shwilly’s Shwankshuary Organic Smoothie spot. Below right, Bolo Dimodica of Carlton ladels sauce in the mobile ‘Manja’s Pizza,’ a business he and partner Kaarin Starr opened for the very first time Friday evening at the festival, serving pizzas until 2 a.m.

Photos by Katie Teachout Yoga instructor and Little Shop of Yoga owner Laura Greenwood (front and center of photo) takes part in one of many free yoga workshops held throughout the weekend Saturday afternoon, June 20.

“I just want to go to my little tent and live there. This is so calm-

ing for me,” said Bibi McGill, taking a break from the fast lane as Beyonce’s lead guitarist to come to the Okanogan Highlands and pour tea, teach yoga and make music. “This is the way I hope we’ll all live in twenty years or whenever we get there.” McGill said she traveled a long way, coming from Portland, but “I’ll definitely come back. This is like a vacation for me, even though I’m working.”

A young mother takes advantage of a hula hoop making workshop. All workshops held throughout the festival were free of charge.

Matt Yung Kanters, one of half a dozen featured artists from the Seattle Songwriters Showcase, plays the Solar Stage. Below right, Bonnie Pleasants of Art and Soul treats Heather Straub to an Aromatouch session.

Women settle in for a spontaneous session in the Red Tent Saturday evening. The Red Tent is set up as “a safe, nurturing space where you can honor and share the collective journey of womanhood with other women.” An ongoing Red Tent takes place the first Sunday of the month at the Little Shop of Yoga in Tonasket, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Above, a pirate climbs to the top of the Hydemade Acavallo Carousel while muscians play on deck.

Cayden Baddeley of Arizona, age 10, tie dies what he describes as a fancy shirt, “the kind you would wear to a wedding with a tuxedo.”

Above, Sarah Christine plays the main stage as part of Saturday evening’s Sick Donkey Records Showcase featuring Adrian Xavier, Essential I, Stingshark and Indigitize. Right, dancers enjoy tunes spun by a DJ Saturday afternoon in the Dome Vizion.


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • June 25, 2015

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Across

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23. Heirloom location

6. Back problem

25. ___-eyed

7. Pandowdy, e.g.

26. Wrist joints

8. “Not to mention ...�

29. Plaque on office door

9. Abode

34. Bottomless pits

10. Garden handtool

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13. Farmer’s place, in song

39. Implement

18. Computer monitor, for short

42. Long-jawed fish

22. Chop (off)

43. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

24. Paint the town red

44. Chit (abbrev.)

26. “Who ___?�

45. Smoke out

27. Cancel

47. Most unusual

28. Actress Winona

51. Article of faith

30. Fold, spindle or mutilate

52. Persian, e.g.

31. About 1% of the atmosphere

53. Downy duck

32. Bait

55. Disperse

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59. Ankle bones

35. Laughed disrespectfully

63. Bolted

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49. Cashew, e.g.

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We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant 2 Full time and 1 Part time on an as needed basis, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

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LARGE MULTI-FAMILY SALE: Antiques, furniture, household, toys, lots of kid items, artwork, quality clothes, more. Saturday, June 27th, 8:30-2:00. 432 5th Ave., Oroville

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Notice of Primary Election Okanogan County, State of Washington Tuesday, August 4, 2015 A Primary Election will be held in the below mentioned districts for the purpose of submitting to the voters the following candidates. Oroville School District No 410, Director Pos. 2, 2 year unexpired term

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Sponsored by

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Puzzle 26 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

Puzzle 27 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT NEWTON BRAMMER, Deceased. No. 15-4-00053-4

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 26 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 11, 18, 25, 2015. #OVG638392

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9

Oroville School District No 410, Director Pos. 5 At Large, 4 year term The registration deadline for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is July 6, 2015. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditor’s Office up to and including July 27, 2015. You can register or obtain registration forms at the Auditor’s Office, on line at www.vote.wa.gov, and Department of Licensing. The Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, will be open so voters may obtain replacement ballots, drop off voted ballots, obtain provisional ballots, and use the Accessible Voting Units, at the following times. Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM July 17, 2015 - August 3, 2015 On Election Day only, August 4, 2015, 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM. Drop box location for the Primary. Tonasket - Tonasket City Hall/Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket Drop boxes will close at 8:00PM on Election Day Voters needing additional information or assistance with voter registration forms or voting may call (509) 422-7240. Voters unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditor’s Office. Ballots require sufficient first class postage and must be postmarked by the day of the election. Check with your local Post Office for deadlines to have your ballot postmarked properly.

3

PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 11, 2014 Personal Representative: Peter Crane P.O. Box 277 Brewster WA 98812 Attorneys for Personal Representative: Bryan J. Maroney, WSBA No. 36966 of Davis, Arneil Law Firm, LLP 617 Washington Wenatchee, Washington 98807 509/662-3551

Sudoku

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Continued from page B4

For additional information on the election or regarding voter registration. vote.wa.gov/okanogan myvote.wa.gov, Local newspaper, radio, and TV www.pdc.wa.gov Meetings of the Okanogan County Canvassing Board are open, public meetings and shall be continued until the activities for which the following meetings are held have been completed. Canvass Board meetings are held in the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, in Okanogan. Wednesday, August 12, 2015 at 11:00 AM to determine the status of any provisional or challenged ballots Tuesday, August 18, 2015 at 11:00 AM to canvass the votes cast and certify the election This notice is in accordance with RCW 29A.52. Dated at Okanogan, Washington this 19 day of May, 2015. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections By Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 25, 2015. #OVG636411

Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

PAGE B5 5 8

Public Notices

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JUNE 25, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE June 25, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 25, 2015

SCHOOLS SIXTH GRADE PROMOTIONS Local students to play at WSMTA Conference future. She loves science and plans to become a veterinarian. She is a violinist at her church, New Hope Bible Fellowship in Oroville; and has five siblings who are also involved in music. OKMTA welcomes all music teachers in the Okanogan Valley area to visit a chapter meeting. See www.wsmata.org, www.mtna. org or call (509) 422-4660 for information.

SUBMITTED BY KATHLEEN CHRISTENSEN OKANOGAN COUNTY MUSIC TEACHERS ASSOCIATION

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Oroville Elementary School held their Sixth Grade Promotions on Monday, June 15 in the elementary gym. In addition to hearing from their teachers, Ila Hall and Mary Willey, principal Joan Hoehn also spoke about how proud she was of the class which will head to the high school building next year to begin junior high school. Parents, relatives and friends were also treated to a slide show of the students when they were young and of their sixth grade year. After the certificates of promotion were handed out there was cake and punch for all in attendance.

Two local students won competitions for the privilege of playing at the Washington State Music Teachers Association Annual Conference June 23-26 in Bremerton. Bethany Fast of Oroville is a violin student of Roz Nau in Tonasket and Joe Mintzer of Okanogan is a piano student of Kathleen Christensen in Omak. They will join students from thirty-three state-wide local chapters performing at the Honors Recital. Fast, whose parents are Pastors Mark and Teresa Fast, won the non-keyboard District V competition which also includes Wenatchee and Moses Lake chapters. Mintzer represents the Okanogan Valley Chapter (OKMTA). His parents are Jim and Kathy Mintzer of Chiliwist. Mintzer, 17, is attending Wenatchee Valley College North as a Running Start student after homeschooling for 16 years, and

plans to attend a four-year college after earning his Associates Degree in Omak. He carried a 4.0 GPA his first year at WVCN. He has been playing the piano for six years, and also enjoys playing sports, reading and swimming. He plays soccer and football and wrestles for Okanogan High School. Fast is an EMT who plans on going into music study in the

Bethany Fast

OES Super Citizens for 2014/15 school year SUBMITTED BY MARLENE BARKER

OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

The Oroville Elementary School would like to share the names of the Super Citizens for each month of the past school year. Super Citizens are awesome little leaders. To qualify the student must have positive attitude toward school rules, dependability, caring for school property, being fair, respecting teachers and peers, friendliness, cheerfulness, are trustworthy, completes schoolwork, and has a good attendance record. This year’s Super Citizens were: September: Rilee Buckmiller,

BIKES FOR BOOKS

Joe Mintzer

Stella Chen, Lisbeth Nemecio, Cevina Morales, Esmerelda Bejar, Isaaih Godinez, David Hernandez, Victoria Martinez October: Dylan Herrick, Leah Martin, Crystal Nemecio, Briseida Ortiz, Kaila Banks, Rebekkah Martin, Bowe McKinney, Maddie Martin, Sierra Buckmiller November/December: Henry Gomez, Sandra Minigell, Lexis Duarte, Ava Singer, Raquel Ocampo, Skyler Noel, Natalie Rodriguez, LeRain Wallace. January: Patti Montero, Ethan Cheney, Hayden Darrow, Liset Nemecio, Elijah Godinez, Marta Capote,

Andee Frederick, Emily Rawley, Ryken Harris February: Stacy Padilla, Charlee Bilbruck, Jonathan Corrales, Anastasio Lozano, Lauren Rawley, Laura Padilla, Hadley Blasey, Austin Mathis March: Jay Tietje, Shiloh Willis, Israel Barrera, Kinley Harris, Araceli Esquivel, Jordy Gomez-Mendoza, Gisela Bejar, Angel Rosales April: Hazel Fogg, Brock Fox, Jacob Hughes, Luke Studard, Joey Lozano, Alexis Sanchez, Matthew Rodriguez May/June: Sydney Lewis, Natalia Rodrigue, Amara Hayworth, Kylie Acord, Miguel Quesada, Tristan Poff, Vincent Reyes.

SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE

Submitted photo

Oroville Elementary students are able to earn a bike, donated by the Masons Bikes for Books program, by behavior, citizenship, attendance, number of books read, number of words read, accuracy, and improvement in reading based on several different test scores. Frank Grunert, of the Aurora Mason Lodge was on hand to award the bikes to students (left to right) Carly Mieirs, Austin Darrow and Maya Spikes. Representatives of the HOSTS (Helping One Student to Succeed) Program said they were very grateful to the Masons for their generous donation.

Submitted photo

This past Spring, the Oroville Junior and Senior High School band participated in the NCW Music Educators Association Large Group Instrumental Music Festival held at Manson. The students performed brilliantly, and received the highest rating, Superior, from the judges, according to Oroville School District Superintendent Steve Quick. “These students comprise a wonderful team of musicians, and they represented our school district well in all that they did while at the festival. Needless to say, I am very proud of these students and so should we all! We will hang our new banner proudly in our band room,” Quick said.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 25, 2015  

June 25, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 25, 2015  

June 25, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune