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LOTS STILL GOING ON

MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

IN OUR SCHOOLS

Molson, Saturday, June 20 at School House Museum & Molson Grange

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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New NVH board member to be selected tonight

‘LIVE EACH DAY AS IF LIFE HAS JUST BEGUN’

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

North Valley Hospital will be holding a special board meeting this evening (June 18) to select a board member to fill the place of Theresa Hughes, who resigned at the end of May. Adam Tibbs, Marylou Criner and Leon Alden have applied for the position. New CEO Mike Zwicker reported his first few days on the job included meeting one on one with the senior leadership team and getting out in the community to meet people. “I’m getting out in the community and getting a taste of issues that might be brewing,” Zwicker said. “I’m trying to get to community meetings; once I’m tucked

in here I will get out to Oroville as well.” He attended a hospital Foundation meeting and suggested a community Gala event be held as an opportunity to raise donations from the community. Zwicker reported the McKinstry Geo-Thermal project will be moving into phase two, with the drilling of two extraction wells and two direction wells. Phase one was completed in October 2013. Chief Information Officer Kelly Cariker said the delay in moving forward was due to the hospital wanting to get out of debt first, and then not being able to do the work during winter months. A new bid for phase two will need to be secured because of the time lapse.

SEE HOSPITAL | PG A3

Council schooled in fire safety

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Above, Kali Marie Peters poses for a photo with family at last Saturday’s graduation of the Oroville High School Class of 2015. Peters was this year’s class Salutatorian. Right, class Valedictorian Leonardo M. Curiel, winner of the Glover Cup, shows off his award with Oroville School District Superintendent Steve Quick who presented the cup at the graduation ceremony. In his class speech Curiel reminisced about his time in Oroville schools with his fellow classmates. For more on last Saturday’s Commencement Ceremony see page A8

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Council member and USFS employee Jill Vugteveen presented information during the June 9 council meeting on how to protect your home from wildfires. Over 300 homes were lost during last summer’s Carlton Complex Wildfire. Tips for protecting properties include using fire resistant building materials, and wetting down combustible roofs or turning on roof sprinklers if a fire breaks out. Clean your roof and gutters regularly to avoid accumulation of leaves, twigs, pine needles and other flammable materials. Inspect your chimney at least twice a year, and have it cleaned at least once a year. Homes and cabins built in wooded areas should have a spark arrester installed in chimneys. Use only approved woodburning devices, and be sure they are installed

according to manufacturer’s recommendations and local regulations. When disposing of ashes, make sure embers are completely extinguished and dispose of cold ashes in an area free of flammable materials. Store firewood away from your home, as well as all combustibles such as picnic tables or boats. Control vegetation and establish a fuel break at least 30-feet wide around all structures. Shrubs and trees should be at least 15 feet apart. Remove branches from trees to a height of 15 feet to prevent ground fire from spreading to tops of trees. Keep trees and vegetation at least 10 feet away from a chimney or stove pipe. Foundation plantings should be of the non-resinous, fire resistant variety and be free of dead and dying vegetation. Develop an adequate and reliable water supply. Locate and note nearby creeks, rivers, lakes and ponds so firefighters can

SEE FIRE | PG A2

Tonasket Outreach school has big impact for students BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Outreach Director Carol Lanigan, who is retiring this year, presented her final report on Tonasket’s Outreach Program at the June 8 school board meeting. Eight seniors graduated from the program this year, and five eighth graders were promoted. “Some of the students who come to us and graduate through us just wouldn’t make it otherwise,” Lanigan said. She said highlights of the year included field trips, with elementary students going to the salmon fest; middle and high school students visiting Coulee Dam; and the Friday School going to Padilla Bay and Seattle. The trip to Seattle was paid for with grant funding, and included a trip to the Burke Museum at the University of Washington. “We got to be some of the first ones to see the first fossil found in Washington State, and I heard a lot of students say they wanted to attend UW now; it was very inspiring for them,” said Lanigan.

“We were at Padilla Bay for the lowest tide of the year, so we got to go out and dig up specimens to put under microscopes at the research center.” Lanigan said another highlight of the year was the visit from the State Auditors Office. “They interviewed a lot of people at the school district; from Paul Turner on down to students and staff. They felt we were doing something good and they wanted to write something up to share with other alternative programs in the state.” Board member Catherine Stangland congratulated Lanigan on “leaving on a high note, with the state recognizing your achievements.” “The recognition from the state is a testament to your years, and the good job you did down there,” said Superintendent Turner. Andy Jones, Program Director for Tonasket Alternative High School from 1996 through 2003, will be returning to Tonasket. “I’ll be teaching and helping to direct

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 25

the Outreach Program, and I hope to help the Choice High School any way I can,” said Jones. “I’m hoping to revive a music program there. I’m really excited about the possibilities for the kids and families, and psyched to be living up in the highlands again.” Jones has been working as a high school counselor and teacher with the Arlington School District for the past nine years, after serving as Alternative High School Principal with the Stanwood School District. Projected enrollment in the Outreach Program for the 2015/16 school year is between 38 and 40 students. “Andy Jones and Jen Weddle are coming up with some great new ideas; I’m excited about the upcoming changes,” said Lanigan. “It’s been my pleasure to work here and I will miss my time here.” Chelsea Freeman reported seven seniors graduating from the Tonasket Alternative High School (Choice High School). Senior Branden Hicks said while most

SEE PROGRAMS | PG A3

Carol Lanigan/Submitted photo

Outreach students check out the Suzzalo Library on the University of Washington campus.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

News A2-4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Sports B1-3 Schools B4 Cops/Courts/911 B5

Classifieds Real Estate Obits

B6-7 A9 B8


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE18, 2015

FIRE | FROM A1

ELECTIONS OFFICIALS HONORED

Submitted photo

Secretary of State Kim Wyman presented Okanogan County Chief Deputy Auditor/Election Supervisor Mila Jury and Pierce County Elections Manager Mike Rooney with the County Election Employee of the Year award at the 2015 state Elections Conference.

Mila Jury ‘County Election Employee of the Year’ THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SEATTLE - Secretary of State Kim Wyman presented Okanogan County Chief Deputy Auditor/Election Supervisor Mila Jury with a County Election

Employee of the Year award at the 2015 state Elections Conference last week in SeaTac. Wyman praised Jury, who has 40 years of experience working in elections, for providing leader-

ship for her peers and offering feedback on elections issues. “Mila displayed nerves of steel and great leadership during last year’s raging wildfires,” Wyman said. “She was unfazed and had a plan to manage elections manually if needed.” “Mila conducts elections with integrity, efficiency and transparency, we are fortunate to have her knowledge and dedication in the Okanogan County Auditor’s office.” Thomas added. Mike Rooney, Elections Manager for Pierce County also received the county award. During last week’s conference, Wyman and her Elections Division staff joined Thomas, Jury and other county auditors and county elections employees to learn or share new ideas and practices that will allow them to run elections even better both at the county and state levels. The annual conference was hosted by the Washington State Association of County Auditors.

obtain additional water if needed. Install a garden hose outlet on the exterior of each dwelling, and keep 100 feet of hose connected to protect all sides of the house and roof. Plan adequate access and escape. Each home should have at least two different entrance and exit routes. Plan a safe retreat route for you ad your family before a forest fire occurs, and make sure everyone knows the plan. Keep fire tools ready, including a ladder long enough to reach the roof, a shovel, a rake and a bucket. Keep the the tools in an easily-accessible place, with all occupants of the home informed of where the tools are located. If you are going to burn outdoors, make sure you have a valid permit and clear the ground of all flammable materials for at least 10 feet. Have adequate water and fire tools available. Burn only during the hours specified on the permit; and don’t burn on dry, windy days. Have an adult attending the fire until it is completely out. • If a forest fire occurs, here are some steps to take to remain safe. Back your car into the garage, close the garage door, and leave the keys in the ignition. • Close windows and doors to the house and close all inside doors. Take down curtains. • Place water in containers to fight the fire. • Place a ladder against the front of the house. • Wet down combustible roofs. • Turn off gas at the meter and propane tank. • Evacuate family ad pets to a safe location. • If you’ve done everything on your checklist and the fire is close, it’s time to evacuate. • If fire authorities permit, an able-bodied member of the household may remain to protect the house. • If the fire cannot be stopped and passes over your home, the safest place for protection is inside the house with all doors and windows closed. • Immediately after the fire passes, check for hot spots for the next 10 hours.

In a major conflagration, fire protection agencies may not have enough equipment and personnel to be at every home. Taking all proper precautions before a wild fire will be your best defense against it. Vugteveen said she would be sharing the fire safety information with the Tonasket Fire Department and asking them to approach homeowners of some properties in town that community members have voiced concerns about. Other hot news included Mayor Patrick Plumb informing the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center to put together a guideline for artists displaying art at City Hall and the Public Library. Tonasket Chamber of Commerce President Julie Alley said they asked all artists involved in the art walk to keep their art appropriate. “Do we have to ask your approval if we put something together?” Alley inquired. “No,” Plumb responded, “we are not playing around. If something gets put up and it’s not appropriate, then the decision is permanent to not allow art to be displayed here anymore.” Council member Scott Olson said if he goes into an art gallery, he “expects to see controversial stuff and that’s fine; but if I take my 10-year-old into the library I don’t expect to see controversial stuff.” Council member Claire Jeffko said she thought artwork recently displayed in the hallway outside the library “was quite controversial, and I’m an artist.” Jeffko said when displaying her art at the PUD building, she had to bring in a few pieces

ahead of time to show them her style, and sign a waiver, adding, “And I didn’t spring any surprises on them.” City Clerk and Treasurer Alice Attwood reported having 80 second graders touring City Hall last Thursday (June 4). “I got to give them a speech about government and tell them about the council members. They asked wonderful questions and were all very well behaved. It was great fun,” Attwood said. Attwood also reported a test was given for an entry level police officer position. She said four applicants showed up. Two of them did not pass the physical test; but the other two did, along with the written and oral tests. Interim Police Chief Curtis will be interviewing them. Attwood said she began advertising for the police chief position, with July 10 scheduled as the test date. Attwood also reported speaking to Jeff Moran, who put together a storm water plan and “wants to meet with the council; he is interested in pursuing this further.” Mayor Plumb suggested scheduling it for the next council meeting, and in the meantime the city would need to look into what starting another utility would comprise of. City Supervisor Hugh Jensen said the new Splash Park is “coming along.” He said the concrete had been poured and they were ready for grass to go in. The council approved the idea of spending $1,623 to improve the road going into Chief Tonasket Park. Council member Olson said it would be a short-term fix, but the money would be well spent to support the water park by improving the road.

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PROGRAMS | FROM A1 people would consider graduating from high school a “very common feat,” he didn’t believe he would have stayed in school if it wasn’t for the Tonasket Choice High School (TCHS). “The truth of the matter is that I was always high risk to drop out of high school. With the help of TCHS, not only have I grown academically, but I have also learned how to interact with other human beings in a productive way. I probably would not have discovered many of my own talents without the help of this school, and I thank the teachers here for never giving up on me,” said Hicks. Senior Johan Jhatason said he wouldn’t have graduated if it wasn’t for TCHS helping him out. Reporting on his senior project, Jhatason said, “So to give back, I helped them by turning an old, ancient, dilapidated desk into a brand-new looking desk. It took 15 layers of stain and five layers of clearcoat.” “This is our best year ever,” said Freeman. “I probably said that last year, and I’ll probably say it next year also, but I really feel it’s been a great year.” High School Vocational/ Agricultural teacher Andie Wommack and students reported on the Xeroscape Landscaping class project of Habitat Restoration with dripline irrigation, saying they expected a new drip system to decrease irrigation costs from $1,050 to $240 per year. Wommack said she set the Xeroscape class up as a business, and stayed very “hands off ” herself. “The kids are very proud of the work they’ve done,” Wommack said. Still, they weren’t entirely certain they should continue with

the project; listing concerns of ongoing maintenance and the need for lots of help from volunteers. “I don’t think we are utilizing the school garden as much as we should be, so adding another large learning lab might be a little premature,” Wommack said. School maintenance supervisor John Verbeck said that while he was very impressed with the research the class did, he didn’t think the Xerolandscaping project was one that should move forward. “The goal on the grounds is to keep it as open as possible, with less places for kids to hide. Branches hanging down is a problem; we’ll need to keep it pruned back for semis to go under. We’ve had other planting projects, and they turned into clover weed and knap weed,” Verbeck said. “Right now it takes about 10 minutes to mow that area, but are we going to be able to spend only that amount of time to keep it nice after five years? The insurance company is after us to keep the lowest limbs eight feet or higher so kids can’t climb up on them. The other problem is roots, which result in curbs being broken and pavement cracked.” Wommack said if she was “going back to the drawing board,” she would probably go back to a more traditional Xeroscape rather than habitat restoration. She said she would report back to the school board next fall. A decision to make changes to the administrator contracts was postponed until the next meeting. Stangland said she would like to see it become more equitable across the district, as the Special Ed Director works just as hard as the elementary school principal, who works just as hard as

the middle school principal, who works just as hard as the high school principal. Turner said it would cost more than the previously estimated $13,000 to move everyone up to the high school schedule of pay. Board member Ty Olson said he would like to see the pay scale “raised to a competitive point where excellent staff won’t be tempted to apply elsewhere.” The board voted to keep the traffic safety education program at a cost of $393 per student. STEM Coordinator and grant writer Bob Ashmore’s contract was approved to be continued, with a reassignment of duties to include a focus on early childhood education. Middle school counselor Josh Thayer reported meeting with Okanogan County Youth Suicide Prevention Coalition twice as month as “a time to collaborate on suicide prevention. One goal was to provide services here, as a lot of kids we work with can’t afford to get to Omak for services; it’s the same all over the county.” Thayer reported a counselor was hired with Okanogan County Behavioral Health to come to Tonasket two days a week and Oroville two days a week to work with kids beginning next fall. “This position will actually be sustainable; as they are an actual employee of Omak Mental Health,” Thayer said. “In the past, with a grant funding the position, when the grant goes away the mental health professional goes away.” Phone calls and emails to Okanogan County Behavioral Health and the Okanogan County Youth Suicide Prevention Coalition were not returned before this article went to press.

HOSPITAL | FROM A1 Jan Gonzalez, Director of Human Resources, said an annual employee update covering twelve topics was attended by 180 employees out of 230. The hospital is required by law to update employees about issues including fire and safety, infection prevention and violence in the workplace. “We try to make it fun and get

it all done in one day. Employees attend information booths and take a quiz at each booth,” Gonzalez said. Employees who aren’t able to attend are given a packet to go through. Lunch was served and a pie auction raised $1750 for the employee fund. Gonzalez said over a dozen five-year pins were handed out, and Kathy Tomlinson was recog-

nized for working 35 years in the Long Term Care division. Commissioner Herb Wandler reported presenting a letter at the Caribou Trail meeting last month stating North Valley Hospital would like to withdraw from the organization. As of June 11, cash in hand at 38 days is $2,302,084 after payroll.

Charlene Helm/staff photos

Tim and Dianna Naillon will be leasing the Pastime Bar and Grill from owners Brant and Victoria Hinze. The couple hopes to open by next month.

The Pastime leased to couple with local roots THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Victoria and Brant Hinze, owners of the Pastime Bar and Grill, announced Monday that they have reached an agreement to lease the business to Tim and Dianna Naillon, former Northern Okanogan residents. The Naillons are originally from Oroville and Tonasket, respectively, and will be moving back to the valley from Yakima. They have served in key roles in several start-up and developing businesses. “We see the effort and passion that the Hinzes have put into the Pastime and are very excited to build on the foundation they’ve laid,” said Tim Naillon. The Hinzes purchased the former Pastime Tavern in early 2010 and did substantial renovations to the building before re-opening as a new farm to table restaurant and full service bar in the spring of 2013. “Our goal was always to add to the vitality of Main Street and contribute to the economic well-being of Oroville. We’re thrilled that the Naillons will pick up where we left off and make the Pastime into their own vision,” Victoria Hinze said of the transfer. The lease begins June 15. The Naillons will be making public their plans for a new menu, opening schedule and hours of operation in coming weeks.

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Classic cars and more coming to Tonasket Annual North Country Car Show enters its 26th year BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photo

A performer leaps atop the Wheel of Destiny at last week’s evening showing of the Culpepper and Merriweather Circus. The show was brought to town by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce and many free children’s tickets were provided by local businesses. Later the act was performed while the performer was blindfolded.

TONASKET - The 26th Annual North Okanogan Country Car Club and Cruise-In Car Show, featuring a Silent Auction, Swap Meet and Tractor Slow Drag takes place at the Rodeo Grounds in Tonasket this Saturday, June 20. Admission is free to spectators. If entering a vehicle, the entry fee is $15 for the first vehicle. Everyone who enters a car gets a dash plaque, with the winner of last year’s car show featured on this year’s plaque. Registration is at 8 a.m., and anyone may vote on their favorite entries up until noon. The awards ceremony takes place at 1:30 p.m. Vendors are welcome to sell items at the swap meet for a small fee. Cars will be parked on the grass, and participants are are asked to bring their own lawn chairs. There are some shaded areas to sit in, as well as a tent. Overnight camping is available on site at the rodeo grounds. The Commancheros will be providing lunch for purchase. Local businesses and individuals have donated items for the silent auction including scale

Patti Hill/submitted photo

Tom Bretz’, orange 1969 Chevy Comaro during this year’s Tonasket Founders Day Parad model cars, handmade jewelry, tools, resort stays at Spectacle Lake, antiques, hand crafted wood items, paintings, floral arrangements, home décor, restaurant gift certificates and a case of oil. Raffle tickets will be available for purchase, with 50% of raffle ticket sales awarded to the raffle winner, and 50% going back to the NCCC. In a separate raffle, Rob Nau has donated two steak dinners to be raffled off for the Father’s Day Fly-in Saturday evening, June 20. Awards for 1st, 2nd, 3rd place will be given out in 17 different classes, including Motorcycles,

Trucks, Tractors, Teenage, Antique and newer. Local businesses have sponsored trophies to be given out for the following Top Four categories: Best Paint, sponsored by Hickmans Body Shop; Best Engine, sponsored by Allen’s Auto Parts; Best Upholstery, sponsored by Bob Raymer’s Machine Works; and Best of Show sponsored by OK Chevrolet. NCCC has 50 members this year including spouses, and the annual car show has attracted people from Oregon, Idaho, the West Side and Canada. Contact Patti Hill 509-4292983 for further information.

Conscious Culture Festival set to light up the Highlands BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Okanogan Highlands Productions and Stonelove Rocks presents the 6th Annual Conscious Culture Festival (CCF) this weekend, June 19-21, at the Okanogan Family Faire/Barter Faire Site (Cayuse Mountain Rd. off Hwy 20) near Tonasket. Tickets can be purchased at Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, Main Street Market in Omak, Twisp River Pub, online at www. BrownPaperTickets.com or at the

gate. Features of this year’s event include Bibi McGill taking the Mainstage Friday evening with Zahira. McGill is the lead guitar player and music director for Beyonce’s all female 10-piece band, Suga Mama. McGill is also a devoted Yoga teacher. “On Friday night she will be inhabiting the role of our official musical and spiritual guide, as she presents a program of sacred chant music called Kirtan, along with singer and collaborator Gurunan Singh,” said festival founder BlueJay Hankins. “Soon

after sunset, McGill and Singh are destined to take CCF and their own performance to another level of harmonious interconnection. This is a show like none other that we have had the pleasure of promoting in our six-year history.” Musical events take place on four stages throughout the weekend. Other highlights of the weekend include The Rock Shop, a Rock Camp for kids that evolved in response to deep cuts to the arts in public schools.

“Rock Shop participants will learn more than just the infinite possibilities of twelve notes,” said Hankins. “They’ll also take home the beginnings of lifelong lessons about fostering teamwork and friendship. The Rock Shop has touched the lives of countless youth since its inception in Friday Harbor in 2006.” “Late morning classes encourage young folks to explore and develop basic skills, while mid afternoon workshops provide a safe welcoming environment for CCF kids to collaborate and learn to create music with others,” said

director Lynnette Cabrera. New youth bands formed over the weekend are invited to share the mainstage Sunday afternoon. Also new this year is an art space called The Garden. “We are creating a venue for underground heroes of the world to take their work to the next level,” Hankins said. “Expect to enjoy a few works based on a theme of sustainability. Some will simply dazzle in the night.” Featured artists include David Kitt, whose ‘Fusion Fire’ is an art installation inspired by an actual

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JUNE 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Hope that maybe one day you too will circle back

I’m sure someone has a bigger record – probably one of the teachers, but last Saturday I witnessed my twenty-seventh Oroville High School graduation. And that’s just counting the ones I’ve been to since working at the newspaper and not my own or those of my brothers and friends. Come to think of it, for a dozen years or so I was covering both Oroville and Tonasket so who knows how many north county classes I’ve seen take those first steps into the post high school world. It’s hard to remember just what it was like to be embarking on a trip into this new world, whether it be for job or going on to college. Like many I suppose it was a combination of nervousness and excitement on the prospect of starting a new life, and dare I say it, getting out of Oroville. Out of Well, I came back to “God’s Country” as dad My Mind liked to call it, nearly three decades ago. And Gary A. DeVon for the most part I haven’t regretted the decision. I know lots of my friends would like to move back, but the job market just doesn’t allow it. Like many of us we’re caught on the hamster wheel that is having to earn a living in this world. For some the grass always seemed greener on the other side of the fence, or state. While the pay might not be as high, for me there are still more good reasons to live here than anywhere else. My hope is that our little corner of the world has something to offer to all our graduates after they’ve had a go at conquering the world. We need entrepreneurs, skilled and educated people, to come back and share their skills with future generations of Hornets and Tigers. We need them to create jobs right here in their home towns and create opportunities for their friends and families. So, as you go forth and meet your next challenge, remember there are good people right here wishing you the best of luck on your journey. May you always find a bit of your hometown whereever you travel. Be good representatives of the people, communities and schools that helped to form you and always remember that you have a place to call home when you’ve accomplished what you wanted to do. Sometimes I wish I was taking those first tentative steps again – to have a fresh chance at maybe choosing a new path. But no matter which path I would have chosen, I know eventually it would have circled back to where I began and I hope that many of you that choose to wander will someday feel the same way. On a different note, not sure what happened to our letter writers this week. I guess all must be right with the world and no one has any complaints. I hope everyone has been enjoying the couple of color cartoons we’ve run in a few of this month’s issues. The price was right -- free and they made me laugh. Perhaps I need one of those remotes like in this week’s offering. I’ve still got my hair, but it’s defiantly grayer. Perhaps it’s time for an update picture too.

Protect farmers from costly retaliation BY U.S. REP DAN NEWHOUSE FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT, WASHINGTON

The clock is ticking for American farmers and manufacturers to avoid billions of dollars in sanctions and tariffs on U.S. exports to our biggest trading partners. On May 18, the World Trade Organization (WTO) rejected a U.S. appeal and ruled in favor of Canada and Mexico on mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) requirements for beef, pork, and chicken products. WTO found that COOL requirements for muscle meat cuts were in violation of U.S. obligations with our trading partners, Canada and Mexico. This is the fourth time WTO has ruled against the U.S. on COOL requirements. Why is this ruling significant? Unless Congress acts to protect American produc-

ers by bringing U.S. rules into compliance, Canada and Mexico have taken steps to retaliate within the next few weeks against the U.S. to the tune of $3 billion in annual sanctions on American agricultural and nonagricultural goods. Retaliation over COOL requirements will not just have a negative impact on American beef, pork, and chicken products: retaliation can apply to hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of Washington exports of apples, cherries, pears, potatoes, wine, and manufactured goods as well. In arguing against repealing COOL, some falsely claim that COOL requirements are really about food safety. However, meat products produced or imported in the U.S. are already subject to mandatory inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). Additionally, before arriving in the U.S., imported meat products are required to be produced with an equivalent food safety system to that of the U.S. The reality is that all meat products sold in the U.S., regardless of origin, must be inspected to equally rigorous standards. The repeal of COOL will have no impact on the FSIS food safety inspection program, ensuring that the U.S. continues to produce the safest food supply in the world. If COOL is not about food safety, does that mean it implies an economic benefit? Compliance with COOL actually adds additional costs for American packers, processors, producers, and ultimately consumers. Given Washington’s proximity to Canada, processors depend on Canadian cattle, but under the mandatory COOL requirement, U.S. and Canadian cattle must be processed separately, adding increased cost with no safety benefit. Further, even when repealing mandatory COOL, there is nothing preventing producers from continuing to market their products as U.S. cattle – it just is not a requirement. Congress must act quickly to prevent potentially devastating retaliation in the form of sanctions and tariffs, which is why I cosponsored legislation to repeal country of origin labeling requirements as an urgent response to the WTO’s ruling. Last week, I voted with the House on a bipartisan basis, 300 to 131, to pass this legislation to shield American farmers from retaliation by simply repealing the COOL meat cut provisions to make the U.S. compliant with our obligations. The U.S. must play by the rules we agreed to with our biggest trading partners and export markets. Time is running out to avoid the costly penalty of trade sanctions, which is why I urge the Senate to pass mandatory COOL repeal.

Save the Arfenbarkers! OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIO-POLITICAL WRITER

Post Vietnam, I was a flight instructor stationed at the Army’s helicopter base near Savannah Georgia. Savannah is a lovely, historical city but it’s also a semi-tropical town, mercilessly humid and hot much of the year. It almost never snows in Savannah. So I shook my head at a local television special run then about a local shopping-mall puppy mill selling ...Saint Bernard puppies. They were like animated teddy bears on TV, of course, precious, charming and cuddly. They quickly became all the rage among the many young Army Bill Slusher couples living in Savannah ...in apartments, trailers or starter homes. In a year or two these fluffy little balls of joy began to resemble grizzlies in size, appetite, and in suitability to hot climates, apartments, trailers and starter homes. Wikipedia lists the average weight as “140 to 264... pounds”. The grown Saints were more lovable than grizz by quite a margin, but they drooled copiously, broke furniture with their enormous weight and sweeping tails, shed hair everywhere, barked like a train horn and ate like a Sumo academy. Not to mention the waste issues. One young father swatted his impudent child on the butt and the little girl’s St. Bernard nearly ate his. Sadly, adult Saint Bernards started appearing in free-to-good-home ads, being abandoned in parks, or trekked to veterinary offices for euthanasia. I was reminded of this today as I enjoyed a

tour of No Paws Left Behind, a huge dog rescue operation near Oroville. Carrol Richards, the indefatigable honcho at Paws, recited stories about many of the (count ‘em, she does)... 40 ... dogs she currently shelters. She related histories of abuse, neglect, shameful irresponsibility or often just poor foresight on the part of their former human caretakers. They’d made the same mistake of pretending cute puppies never grow up to be adult dogs with all the needs and natures of ... dogs. At Rancho Slusho we have two pedigreed corgis (think Queen Elizabeth’s dogs), but we also love our two big brown, galumpfy ranch dogs of indeterminate but diverse ancestry whom we ‘rescued’, one from abandonment and one from a dog pound needle. As a ten year old walking to school in the Pleistocene Era I came upon a box of mangled puppies someone had tried to throw off a bridge from a moving car. For years, what I wanted to do when I grew up was track that person down and kill them deader than Bernie Madoff ’s Visa card. So I’m moved to offer these thoughts that I’d be grateful if you would share as widely as possible: Foremost, please, if you’re angry or disgusted with your dog or it’s just outgrown your situation, it happens. Don’t chain it to a tree, cage it in an apple crate, starve it, beat it or throw it off a bridge. And don’t allow it to churn out yet more unwanted puppies. I’d consider it a personal favor if you’d take it to an area rescue shelter, pronto. If necessary, call the shelter and one of us will come help you and the dog be free of an unhappy mutual problem. It’ll be easy. You’ll feel better. You’re probably not the guy who threw that box in Tennessee in 1955 so I won’t kill you, promise. It may shock you to learn, but nobody gets

rich running a dog shelter. There’s usually no government funding whatever, not enough in any case. People who run private shelters depend desperately on volunteer help and donations of dog food, straw, tarps, fencing and other kennel supplies. If you can’t donate any of these items don’t despair, cash or a check is just ducky, trust me. Ever try to house, feed, and medicate ... 40 ... dogs, many of which arrive injured, starved or diseased? Last but perhaps most importantly, adopt a dog from your local shelter. No, you probably won’t win best-of-breed at the Westminster Dog Show with a dog whose breed even the AKC couldn’t guess on its best day, but there are worse fates. What will happen is an expert like Carol will help you select a canine friend who will make your life richer. Someone who knows fuzzy-buddy’s personality and traits will help you choose what you are most likely to enjoy in a good dog. It’ll be healthy, have its shots, and it’ll be thrilled to see you. If you prefer expensive purebreds, no problem, just adopt a shelter mutt to keep your best-of-show winner company. You’ll all three be happier. Don’t forget those donations, and just a bit of your occasional volunteer help will be enjoyed by you, the shelter and the critters. Dogs don’t ask much for their immense loyalty and friendship, but what support they do need is vital and treasured. Helping out makes for a lot of feel-good all around! William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@ live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 18, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Remember dad Sunday for Father’s Day This Sunday is Father’s Day... I hope you folks that still have your dad around remembered to give him a hug or a phone call. My father died at a much too early age, and I think of all the pleasures he missed by not being around to watch my children and grandchildren mature. He was a great guy, who had little education, because he had to work to help support a large family of siblings and he would be so proud of the many college graduates in our family. When God measures a man, he puts the tape measure around the heart... not the head! Well, I just wasted another three hours watching a Mariner’s game. I can only imagine how bad they must feel when their star pitcher had to quit in the first inning, after the score was already 8 to 0. Sunday, June 14th was Flag Day. I watched as they raised the largest flag in the world on a bridge in New York state, (I think). It was the size of a basketball court, 60’ X 90’ and weighed 500 pounds. They display it on Flag Day and some other holidays, but other times is kept in a huge tube, stored on the bridge. What a sight!

The flags at the local shopping center were given a work-out last Friday as the North wind fiercely blew. So cherry harvest is under way. Some folks crops were effected by the elements while others are OK. I think the persons with coverings over their trees will be glad they do. There are many damaged cherries which doesn’t alter the taste but certainly keeps them from the markets. Another Friday and we went to Tonasket to the Extended Care barbecue and had the pleasure of eating with Bob Hirst and Margaret and of course many others. The weather again was very nice, before the wind took over. While there, we met Louise (Lehrman) Kitterman and her daughter who also had lunch with friends. Friends are like four leaf clovers – hard to find and lucky to have! A Mass was said for Betty Descateaux Friday morning with family and friends on hand. Betty had been a resident of Extended Care for quite some time, always with a book in her hands and a friendly hello. A Memorial will be held for Glen Hauenstein and son, Roger, on Saturday,

June 20, at the United Methodist Church. today, and the centipede said, “I heard Sorry to be out of town for that. you the first time, I am trying to get Our card group went to Wannacut my shoes on.” (that’s for you Brian, at Lake last Thursday to have lunch and Suncove). play cards. The road, which is usually We have so many gold finches at our quite dusty, was having an feeder. They have a gourapplication of “stuff ” applied, met appetite and those little which was kinda white and expensive seeds disappear like frothy and was called a stamagic. And they still fight to bilizer, to help with the dust see who gets to stay at the and fill in a few of the bumps. feeder and who must leave. I believe it will be a help, Well, the circus came to but Myrtle, our driver, was town and I didn’t go. When out washing her car the next I was a kid, an uncle used to morning. take me to the grounds where If you should happen to be the circus was going to set up at the restaurant at Wannacut, and it was such fun to watch and want a treat, have a des- THIS & THAT the elephants help set up the sert called “Cloud 9” and giant tent. It is such a lot of Joyce Emry you’ll be glad you did. work to do the preliminary There was a man who set-up and usually for a one wanted a pet, but he didn’t want just night stand, and it is usually HOT and any old kind, so he went to the pet store only for one night and all over the next and decided on a talking centipede (a day. hundred legged critter) in a little white And now I hear the Animal Rights box for his house. The next day was Group won’t let them use elephants in Sunday, so he went to the box and said, the circus anymore. We do have a lot of “Would you like to go to church with me people looking out for us! and meet some people?” No answer. He Our niece, Luanne (Emry) Billings went a second time and said, “Would you who had the misfortune to have a fall, like to go to church with me and receive leaving stroke like symptoms and was some blessings?” Still no answer. The seriously injured, had brain surgery, and man waited a while and decided to try is miraculously, making daily progress, one more time, so he went to the little in a rehab place, in Shoreline, Wash. white box and shouted, “Hey in there Cards are welcomed as it helps with her would you like to go to church with me reading and thinking process.

SHOPPING SPREE WINNER

Record numbers at last pancake breakfast

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

We had a record number of customers for our pancake breakfast last Saturday, thanks to the Jet Ski races and drop ins from the EMT group and the Free Methodists. We also had record numbers of volunteers, which made the task easier, but still a chore. A special thanks to Doris’ two daughters who travelled from

Submitted photo

Pictured above with Royal Neighbor, Bonni Maynard are Shari Lopez and her son Julian. Lopez was the first prize winner of the Oroville Royal Neighbors Of America Shopping Spree Raffle. The second and third prize winners were Leea Mathis and Jo Mathews also of Oroville. The lucky winners’ names were drawn by the 2014 raffle winner, Randee Welfare. Thank you to all local businesses who were generous and made this raffle possible. Also, thanks to those from our community and beyond who purchased tickets. Your support helps us to continue our annual projects such as Oroville Kite Day and the Community Coat Closet. We live in a wonderful community of “neighbors helping neighbors!”

20th Midsummer Festival this Saturday BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Remember the 20th Annual Molson Midsummer Festival is this Saturday in the Molson School Museum and Grange Hall areas. The day starts with an all you can eat pancake breakfast and the Run or Walk Race. The Grand Parade, featuring Grand Marshals Maurice and Bettie Reichel, begins at 10:30 a.m. The decoration of the May Pole, a Midsummer tradition, starts at 11 a.m. Throughout the day there will be music and arts and crafts in the Grange Hall and the Sitzmark Ski Club will have food concessions from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. In the afternoon there will be a horseshoe tournament, kids games and new this year, the Amazing Molson Challenge (includes a scavenger

HILLTOP COMMENTS hunt and so much more). The Ed Forthun Memorial Frisbee Golf Tournament begins at 12:30 p.m. Voting on your favorite classic cars must be turned in by 1:45 and awards will be given at 2 p.m. Door prizes will be handmade item from local residents (thank you all for your donations) Molson tee shirts available for purchase. The days proceeds go to the restoration of the mural on the west side of the Grange Hall. Please join us in making this a fun filled day for all to remember. Need a free table? Call Jeanette Lamont at 509-485-2035. Want to enter the parade? Call Joyce Forthun at 509-485-2163. Roller Skating will start at the Molson Grange Hall on June 26 – however, there will be no skating on July 3. The cost this year will be $1 for skate rental, 10 cents for candy, 50 cents for pop and water, and 25 cents for popcorn. Bring

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the family and have a great time again on July 10. Bingo will not be held on Friday, July 3, please mark your calendar for the following Friday, July 17. We have lost another one of our Hill Top folk. There will be a Memorial Service for Wayne Adams on Sunday, June 21 at the Grange Hall in Molson at 11 a.m. with a potluck supper to follow. The family has requested there be no flowers. Please make donations to the American Diabetes Association.

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Our Ladies Auxiliary #3865 gave scholarship monies to Lily Hilderbrand and Leonardo Curiel. Congratulation to them and to all of the graduates. The Oroville Eagles would like to congratulate and thank the parents of these young people. They couldn’t have done it without you! Thank you too, to the ladies of Auxiliary, for all the hard work

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you do all year to make these scholarships possible every year. Your efforts are recognized and appreciated. District #10 Installation of Officers will be on Sunday, June 28th, at 1: pm at our home Aerie. District meetings are always fun and informative. You needn’t be an officer to participate. All Eagles are welcome to come down and see what’s going on with your Eagles District #10. Opps! Omak Stampede is the second full week in August. The

Eagles Picnic will be on Aug. 22 at Thorndike’s Beach. I don’t know how many years we’ve been doing this there, but it’s always a good time. Start making plans to be there. Jeanie is coming in with her Karaoke Show on Friday, June 26. Come in and join in the fun! Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 pm to 7 pm every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw and Tacos. We are People Helping People!

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distant parts of the state in order to help out. Senior Center lunches next week are: Tuesday, cabbage patch stew; Thursday, chili; Friday, chicken. Meals are $8 for those who are under 60-years-old. Suggested donation for those who are over 60 is $3.50. Feel free to give more, if you can, to support a worthwhile program. Our lineup of Tuesday speakers are: June 23, Bergh funeral Home,

Gary Bergh/Scott Miller, 11 am.; June 30, Vickie Everheart/ Montigue, Farms/wool,11 a.m. The cat’s out of the bag by now. Ken and Jim, after 23 years of excellence, will play their last act, and will sing their last tune the end of June. I know there are tears shed at the thought that we will no longer see their faces in the kitchen, again, after June. We can’t thank these two enough for their excellent service. And, oh, the desserts. Never again to be. Instead of gold, Let this be your goal. Soul, oh soul, live on within those who have known those who have known you. And, don’t forget. “If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you!”

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Health is the thing that makes you feel that NOW is the best time of the year. We received word Saturday that Wayne Adams, had passed away in hospital in Spokane. Wayne and Cleta are residents of nearby Chesaw community, active Grange members and members of Oroville Senior Citizens. Sincere condolences go out to Cleta, as she too is battling serious health issues. We went to 2015 graduation ceremonies. Graduations aren’t the solemn, serious, formal affairs they were when I graduated, let’s see how many years has it been? Maybe, about 71 years. Oh! My gosh! The reception for Lily Hilderbrand was held at the home of Gary and Shirley Roberts, her grandparent’s. A lot of friends and relatives were on hand to wish her well. Lily was the recipient of numerous scholarships and awards and will be going to Everett Jr. College, furthering her basketball career. Reminder: A Celebration of Life, for Verle Harnasch, will be held at 12 p.m. at the American Legion on Saturday, June 27. Please join family and friends for remembering and reminiscing the life of Verle. And remember that Wendesday, July 8 is the date of the Red Cross blood drive to be held in the High School Commons, hosted by the United Methodist Church. Being held there because the churh is sometimes very hot in July. Until Next Week.

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000

July 17 & 18, 2015


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JUNE 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR NORTH COUNTRY CAR CLUB TONASKET - The North Country Car Club will be having their 26th Annual Car Show on Saturday, June 20 at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. Registration is at 8 a.m. Community Judging from 8 a.m. through 12 p.m.; Award Ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Awards for first, second and third in each of 17 categories, including: Motorcycles, Trucks, Tractors, Teenage, Antique and Newer. For more information call Patti Hill 509-429-2983. OYSC Fall Soccer Registration OROVILLE - Registration for Oroville Youth Soccer has begun. Go to www.ncwsoccer.om to register children four to 14-years-old. There is a one time $50 fee which allows players to play in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. The deadline to register is prior to July 31, 2015. Players who aren’t registered by then will not be allowed to play. Fall season runs from September to October. Those with questions should contact Jaden Taber at 509-560-3461.

Oroville Grange To Meet OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange #985 will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, June 17. The meeting will take place at the Grange 622 Fir St. The meeting begins with a Potluck dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the business meeting at 7 p.m. Topics to be discussed include Grange sponsored dances from Contra to Rock n’ Roll, bulk buying of organic fruits and vegetables, community outreach projects and the upcoming County Fair Grange Booth. The Grange is a long serving community organization. We welcome all new members and interest persons. For more information contact Joseph Enzensperger 509-476-4072 or email: jgenz4@gmail.com.

Mood Swings to Perform OROVILLE - The Mood Swings, a trio of three women vocalists backed up by keyboard and percussion, will perform at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, June 18. Judy Johnston, of Brewster, Cheryl Ann Crego of Chelan and Betsy Rainsford of Okanogan combine their vocal talents to bring music of the 20’s through the 60’s alive. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861. Check the events calendar on the website at www.estherbricques.com to view upcoming weekly performances.

Comic Artist at Oroville Library OROVILLE - The public is invited to meet a real comic artist at the Oroville Public Library on Friday, June 19 at 11 a.m. Chris McFann will discuss how to make your own comic book art in a hands on workshop. The presentation is part of NCRL’s 2015 Teen Summer Reading Program.

N. Country Car Club Show TONASKET - The North Country Car Club will be having their 26th Annual Car Show on Saturday, June 20 at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. Registration is at 8 a.m. Community Judging from 8 a.m. through 12 p.m.; Award Ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Awards for first, second and third in each of 17 categories, including: Motorcycles, Trucks, Tractors, Teenage, Antique and Newer. For more information call Patti Hill 509-4292983.

312 S. Whitcomb

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, June 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The market can now accept WIC and Senior checks, through the USDA and Washington State sponsored Farmers Market Nutrition Program. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096.

Oroville Depot Deck Sale OROVILLE - There will be an Oroville Depot Deck Sale on Saturday, June 20 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Miscellaneous items. Proceeds benefit Historical Society.

Democrats to Meet REPUBLIC - The Quarterly Meeting of 7th Legislative Districts Democrats will be on Saturday, June 20, at Northern Inn, 825 S. Clark Avenue, Republic, WA. Meeting will begin at 10 a.m. ALL Democrats are welcome.

Tonasket Father’s Day Fly-in TONASKET - Tonasket’s 26th Annual Father’s Day Fly-in is Saturday and Sunday, June 20 and June 21. On Saturday there is a steak barbecue from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday starts out with a breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.. There are free plane rides for kids age 8-15. Must register Sunday morning. Lunch Served 11:30 until ? Fun for the Entire Family. For more information call 509-486-4502.

Vacation Bible School TONASKET - Tonasket Free Methodist church in partnership with Hope Lutheran Church of Tonasket will put on a Vacation Bible School June 22-24 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Tonasket High School for children in Kindergarten-8th grade. Children will be challenged to always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks and to give a reason for the hope that they have.

Community Action Meeting OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, June 24 at 5:15 pm at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. If you have questions or need additional information please contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, 509-422-4041.

CELEBRATING A CENTURY

Park starts its annual summer series on Friday, June 26 at 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event takes place at History Park: on Locust Street, between West 1st street and West Jonathan Street. Music in the Park presents Ian McFeron with Nathaniel Talbot. McFeron is joined on tour by longtime friend and accompanist Alisa Milner on fiddle, cello, and harmony vocals. Fans of John Lennon, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and Jackson Browne will feel at home in his music.

Bruce Cool Bench Dedication OROVILLE - There will be a dedication to Bruce Cool on Friday, July 3 at 11 a.m. in Oroville Centennial Park. A bench is being placed in the park in his memory. Cool spent many hours working to make the park a dream and a reality for the communities enjoyment. Everyone is welcome; please come help us honor Mr. B. Cool. Attendees are encouraged to wear WSU crimson and gray.

OHS Class of 1975 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1975 will be having a Friday, July 24 get together from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. with drinks and appetizers. Picnic to follow on Saturday. Bring the family. Pass the word to other classmates or view my Facebook page for further details.

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Pauline Jensen, pictured with her sons Hugh (left) and John (right) celebrated her birthday Saturday, June 13, with family and friends at Whistler’s Restaurant in Tonasket. Jensen turns 100 Friday, June 19. “We had a good turnout, with a table full of relatives,” said daughter-in-law Shirley Jensen. Daughter-in-law Becky Jensen said people came from Whidbey Island, Wenatchee, Tacoma, Kettle Falls, Republic and Liberty Lake for the celebration. Pauline Jensen said she spent most of her life in Ellisforde, and some time in Bridgeport and Mansfield. She resides now in Tonasket at North Valley Hospital’s Extended Care.

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturay, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509476-2488.

Okanogan Valley

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville,,WA.98844.

Tonasket Music in the Park

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

TONASKET - Tonasket Music in the

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

509-486-0615

Valley Christian Fellowship

Go Fly a Kite!

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Colorful Kites for your Summer Satisfaction!

Celebrate Father’s Day By Investing In Your Children’s Future FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

Father’s Day is almost here. If you’re a father, especially one with young children, get ready to add to your collection of homemade cards, ties, golf tees or other such gifts designed to please you. Your greatest gift, of course, is your children — and you would doubtlessly get great satisfaction from knowing that you’ve provided them with financial resources that can benefit their lives in many ways. So, why not use this Father’s Day as a starting point for investing in your children’s futures? Here are a few methods for doing just that: UGMA/UTMA — If you would like to buy and sell securities for the benefit of a child, you may consider opening a custodial account known as either an UTMA (Uniform Transfers to Minors) or UGMA (Uniform Gifts to Minors) account. You would serve as the custodian for this account, giving you control of it until your child turns either 18 or 21 (depending on your state of residence), at which point he or she would take over ownership. Investment income from

an UGMA/UTMA account can receive favorable tax treatment. As long as the child is under age 19 (or under age 24 and a full-time student) and does not have earned income providing more than half of his or her support, the first $1,050 of investment income is tax-free, and the next $1,050 will be taxed at the child’s tax rate, which is typically 10%. Investment income above $2,100 will be taxed at the parent’s tax rate. Roth IRA — Even young children can contribute to a Roth IRA, as long as they have some type of earned income from babysitting, mowing lawns or any other type of employment. Your children can fund a Roth IRA and choose from several different types of investments — stocks, bonds, government securities, and so on — and withdrawals of contributions are tax-free. Roth IRA earnings are also tax-free, providing the investor is at least 59½ and has had the account for at least five years. A Roth IRA can be used to help provide retirement income for your children, but it also offers penalty-free withdrawals of earnings when the money is used for a first-time purchase of a home.

be sure to check with your tax advisor regarding deductibility. A 529 plan offers other benefits, too. For one thing, the lifetime contribution limits are generous; while these limits vary by state, some plans allow contributions well in excess of $200,000. And a 529 plan is flexible: If your child decides against college or vocational school, you can transfer the unused funds to another family member tax and penalty free. Living and Testamentary Trusts — If you would like to leave a financial legacy for your children, and even their children, but still maintain some control over when they receive the money and how they can use it, you might consider speaking with an estate-planning attorney about establishing a trust. Some individuals create a trust to offer long-term support to heirs or charities after death, whether for several decades or several generations. Before you decide on any of these plans, consult with your tax and financial professionals to make sure the arrangement you’ve selected is suitable for your needs.

But however you choose to help your children, 529 Plans — If you would like to give your child your generosity will make all the Father’s Days the gift of education , earnings in a 529 college to come even more meaningful for you — so savings plan accumulate and are distributed tax consider taking action soon. free, provided they are used for qualified higher education expenses. (529 plan distributions not Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors are not used for qualified expenses may be subject to estate planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. You federal and state income tax and a 10% IRS should consult your estate-planning attorney or qualified tax penalty on the earnings.) Another benefit to 529 advisor regarding your situation. plan contributions is that they may be deductible This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local from your state taxes. However, 529 plans vary, so Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

LOOMIS

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE18, 2015

OROVILLE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Class of 2015 Edward Rafa Angeles-Gutierrez Elena Rosalia Beltran Sarai Melissa Camacho Nicole Ann Castenada Leonardo M. Curiel **^^++ Kylee Renee Davis Zachary Davis Christian J. Diaz + Serina Mae Finley ^ Mick Austin Fulmer Jessica Galvan ^ Nahum Garfias ^+ Ezequiel HernandezDelgado Monica Gail Herrera Lily Desiree Hilderbrand ^+ Cesar Lozano Ricky L. Mathis Seven Leroy Maupin Dustin Dakota Nigg Andrea Perez Kali marie Peters *^^+ Bethany Riley Scott ^+ Daltonb Taylor Shaw Dylan Patrick Shaw Tevor Joseph Shearer + Jordan Scott Smith Cody Tibbs Lane Dalton Tietje + Brian Russell Wise ^+ Jetta J. Youker

Clockwise from top: enjoying the slide show --scenes from their younger days and before and during their time at Oroville High School; Leo Curiel tells his class to “Go do anything you want to do... because graduating proves you can do anything.” OHS teacher Tam Hutchinson was the Guest Speaker for the Class of 2015. Dustin Nigg gets some love from his parents; Lily Hilderband gets a hug from mom.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

KEY

** Valedictorian * Salutatorian ^^ Gold Honor Cord (3.75-4.00 ^ Silver Honor Cord (3.30-3.74 + Red Honor Cord (HSPI Scholar) Class Colors: Navy & White Class Flower: Stargazer Lily Class Motto: “Live each day as if your life has already begun.” Class Song: Back Home by Andy Grammer

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS PRESENTED TO OROVILLE GRADUATES Leonardo Curiel Glover Cup Award; Terry Taylor Award; Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Dr. Steiner, $1350; WSU Achievement Award, $2500; Destination WSU, $1000; Washington Success Foundation, $2500; Aurora Masonic Lodge, $500; Eaine Johnson Scholarship, $500; Lloyd Hughes Memorial Scholarship, $1000; Army Scholar Athlete Award; Oroville Coaches Association, $200; Dedication and Loyalty Award; Oroville Education Association, $700; Roberta Patterson Stowe, $500; Molson

Grange, $500; Oroville Eagles Auxiliary, $1000. Lily Hilderbrand Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Ed King, $800; Aurora Masonic Lodge, $1000; Oroville Booster Club; Elaine Johnson Scholarship, $500; Wheeler Memorial Scholarship, $200; Oroville Coaches Association, $200; Gold Digger’s Agriculture Scholarship, $750; Roberta Patterson Stowe, $500; Detlef Schrempf Foundation Tara L. Allen Schlarship, $1500; Kinross KettleRiver Buckhorn

Scholarship, $500; Oroville Eagles Auxiliary, $1000 WIAA Outstanding Scholastic Award. Kali Peters

Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Drummond; Army Scholar Athlete; Oroville Education Association, $500; Roberta Patterson Stowe, $500; Molson Grange, $500; WIAA Outstanding Athlete.

King, $700; Gonzaga Academic Achievement Award, $36,000. Kylee Davis Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Glen & Katherine Tracey, $700; Oroville Chamber of Commerce, $1000. Bethany Roley Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Dr. Chen & Kuntz, $1000.

Brian Wise

Serina Finley

Oroville Scholarship Foundation: OSF -Hulphr Christensen,

Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Yulah & Philip Schleif Award,

$1000 Nathum Garfius Oroville Scholarship Foundation: Hauenstein, $700 Jessica Glvan

Air Force Recruiting Service Kyle Scott WIAA Outstanding Scholastic Award


JUNE 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

LAKE OSOYOOS CUP

Photos by Gary DeVon

Ready, set, race Several watercross race teams turned out at Oroville’s Deep Bay Park Saturday and Sunday for the second annual Lake Osoyoos Cup. The vent attracted racers and their support teams, mostly family members, as well as spectators to the free-to-watch event. Watercross racing is like motocross on water, with high-speed straight-aways and hairpin turns. Since it’s on water, course conditions vary lap-to-lap. Race Director Roger Harnack said there were teams represented from the Pacific Northwestern states, as well as California. He added that there were also Canadian teams from British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan. Locally there were racers from Omak, including Harnack. The event was the season-opener for the Western Canadian Watercross Association and Rounds 5 and 6 for the Northwest Jet Sports Association, according to Harnack. Racing took place under sunny skies on Saturday and Sunday with just a bit of wind at times.

Race Results SATURDAY’S RESULTS PRO/AM STOCK 1. David Redinger 2. Steve Chestolowski 3. Curtis Pitman 4. Klete Kinser 5. Cory Rarick 6. Derrik Helm 7. Craig Thorsteinson 8. Brady Fischer 9. Scott Benson MASTER/VETERAN SKI 1. Dan Masters 2. Steve Chestolowski 3. James Beamish 4. Annie Bailey 5. Tristyn Duerr 6. Craig Torsteinson 7. Mike Morin 8. Doug Derrickson Pro/Am Ski GP 1. Derrik Helm 2. Brady Fisher 3. Dan Masters 4. Curtis Pitman 5. ‘Steve Chestolowski 6. Luke Bibeau 7. David Redinger NOVICE SKI LIMITED 1. Taylor Mishalanie 2. Derek Black

3. Doug Derrickson 4. Lana Bibeau 5. Ryan Mifflin

VINTAGE X2 1. Tanner Fijolek 2. Hudson Petek 3. Taylor Mishalanie 4. Glen Livermore 5. Dave Wight EXPERT RUNABOUT 1. Cory Rarick 2. Brady Fisher 3. James Carmichael WOMEN RUNABOUT LIMITED 1. Tammy Rarick Sport Modified 1. James Beamish 2. Darrell True 3. Roger Harnack NOVICE WOMEN’S SKI 1. Lana Bibeau 2. Alaina Fiske 3. Patricia Fiske BEGINNER SKI 1. Peyton Chestolowski 2. Dave Wight VINTAGE 550

1. Mark Fischer

VINTAGE 750 1. Nathan Clements AMATEUR/EXPERT SKI OPEN 1. Brady Fisher 2. Luke Bibeau 3. Doug Derrickson 4. Mike Morin 5. Annie Bailey NOVICE STOCK 1. Carson Hughes 2. Gabe Hooper 3. Tristyn Duerr 4. Trevor Dudeck 5. Taylor Mishalanie 6. Chris Overfelt JUNIOR SKI 10-12 LITES 1. Peyton Chestolowski JUNIORS SKI 13-15 LITES 1. Carson Hughes 2. Gabe Hooper 3. Alaina Fiske 4. Nathan Clements 5. Alexandria Benson SUPERJET CHALLENGE 1. Derrick Helm 2. Annie Bailey 3. Curtis Pitman 4. Klete Kinser 5. Gabe Hooper 6. Derek Black 7. Tristyn Duerr

8. Ryan Mifflin 9. Taylor Mishalanie 10. Carson Hughes Amateur Freestyle 1. Ryan Erskine

SUNDAY RESULTS PRO/AM STOCK 1. Curtis Pitman 2. Scott Benson 3. David Redinger 4. Steve Chestolowski 5. Derrik Helm 6. Tyler Riibe 7. Klete Kinser 8. Cory Rarick 9. Craig Thorsteinson 10. Brady Fisher MASTER/VETERAN SKI 1. Dan Masters 2. Steve Chestolowski 3. Annie Bailey 4. James Beamish 5. Scott Benson 6. Mike Morin 7. Craig Thorsteinson 8. Tristyn Duerr PRO/AM SKI GP 1. Brady Fisher 2. Dan Masters 3. Curtis Pitman 4. Steve Chestolowski 5. David Redinger 6. Derrik Helm

7. Luke Bibeau

NOVICE SKI LIMITED 1. Lana Bibeau 2. Ryan Mifflin 3. Doug Derrickson 4. Taylor Mishalanie 5. Trevor Dudeck VINTAGE X2 1. Tanner Fijolek 2. Tyler Riibe 3. Taylor Mishalanie 4. Hudson Petek 5. Curtis Pitman 6. Glen Livermore EXPERT RUANBOUT 1. Brady Fisher 2. Cory Rarick 3. James Carmichael SPORT MODIFIED 1. James Beamish 2. Darrell True 3. Roger Harnack

AMATEUR/EXPERT OPEN 1. Brady Fisher 2. Doug Derrickson 3. Luke Bibeau 4. Annie Bailey 5. Mike Morin 6. Lana Bibeau NOVICE STOCK 1. Gabe Hooper 2. Taylor Mishalanie 3. Trevor Dudeck 4. Tristyn Duerr 5. Carson Hughes 6. Scott Benson 7. Chris Overfelt JUNIOR SKI 10-12 LITES 1. Peyton Chestolowski Junior Ski 13-15 Lites 1. Carson Hughes 2. Gabe Hooper 3. Alaina Fiske 4. Nathan Clements 5. Alexandria Benson

BEGINNER SKI 1. Peyton Chestolowski 2. Dave Wight

SUPERJET CHALLENGE 1. Annie Bailey 2. Curtis Pitman 3. David Redinger 4. Gabe Hooper 5. Klete Kinser 6. Derrik Helm 7. Taylor Mishalanie

VINTAGE 750 1. Nathan Clements

AMATEUR FREESTYLE 1. Ryan Erskine

NOVICE WOMEN’S SKI 1. Alaina Fiske 2. Patty Fiske


JUNE 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B2

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Fishing Derby hits record numbers BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The 20th Annual Bonaparte Fishing Derby saw record numbers when 217 kids ages two to 12 pulled 430 fish out of Bonaparte Lake Saturday, June 13. According to wildlife biologist Matt Marsh with the USFS 395 of the fish were Rainbow Trout and 35 were Tiger Trout. “This is one of the most fun events we participate in,” said Ken Chapman of Okanogan Valley Bass Club, busy on the dock helping to bait hooks and net fish. Kids didn’t seem to mind waiting their turn in line for long stretches of time, especially when their peers were cruising off the dock with their allowed catch of two fish at record speeds. Over

600 fish were planted in the lake prior to the derby. Other stations spread around the campground to keep kids busy and informed included a boating safety station manned by Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputy Josh Petker, who said he taught close to 100 kids. Petker gave a ten-minute demonstration on hypothermia that involved putting participants’ hands in a bucket of ice water long enough for their fingers to go a little numb, and then asking them to try and grab pennies from the bottom of the bucket. “It’s a good demonstration of what happens to their whole body when hypothermia sets in, and the reason to wear a life jacket,” Petker said. An Aquatics station set up by

the boat launch included Fish and Wildlife with a shocker boat, and a stream table set up by Luke Cerise of the USFS to simulate erosion and how stream channels change. Dave Tobey, also with the USFS, showed off local bugs. “We looked at a lot of bugs and identified some that only live in good quality water. So they tell a good story of the lake,” Tobey said. An art station manned by volunteers Andre Corso, Krissy Vance and Matthew Danielson gave kids a chance to make fish imprints. “Some of the kids came through five times; they just couldn’t quit,” said Corso. “They kept us busy for a solid three to three and a half hours.” Generous donations by local

businesses including Scholtz Sporting Goods in Tonasket allowed for $3,000 worth of gear to be given away; fishing poles, tackle boxes and other fishing supplies. The Oroville Sportsman’s Club provided free lunch. The DFW provided the fish, with David Raines bringing in the Tiger Trout. Volunteers from several groups, including the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the Okanogan Valley Bass Club, Kin Ross Gold and American Legion Posts 82 and 84 kept the event flowing smooth despite the record crowds. “It’s neat to see the variety of groups working together to pull this off for the common good of the kids,” said Rick Lind.

Katie Teachout/staff photos

William Alden, age 4.5, shows off his catch with his father, Alden Ripley. Right, crowds wait for their turn on the dock. Below, George Rippee shows Caleb (age 6) and Chiosomo (age 5) Willson how to hold their fish.

Happy Father’s Day SUN., JUNE 21, 2015

Celebrate Father’s Day at Eva‛s Diner & Bakery

We Love Dad!

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Steak & Eggs, Dessert and More!

Father’s Day is a day of commemoration and celebration of Dad. It is a day to not only honor your Father, but all men who have acted as a Father figure in your life – whether as Stepfathers, Uncles, Grandfathers or Big Brothers.

HOURS: Tue.-Sat., 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Closed Mondays

OROVILLE GOLF CLUB  Open Daily: Apr. 1 - Oct. 31  Tee Times Required Power Carts Available!

IRONMAN: Sun., June 21, 2015

starting at 9 a.m. Pro Shop, Snack Bar, Putting Green!

2 mi. W. of Oroville on Nighthawk Rd. 509-476-2390 www.orovillegolfclub.com

Molson Midsummer Fest Saturday, June 20 SUBMITTED BY ELVA HELM

MOLSON MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

MOLSON – The community of Molson would like to invite everyone young and old, to come to the June 20th Molson Midsummer Festival, a Molson summer fun day that has something for everyone. Start your day at 8 a.m. with the pancake feed at the Grange Hall, all you can eat for $8.00. Sign up for the “Run, Walk or Shuffle race” at 9 a.m. and see the lakes. Park your classic car at the school house and get geared up for the parade at 10:30 p.m.

We would like to remind you that almost anything that walks or rolls is encouraged to participate in the parade; classic cars, tractors, you name it. The Grand Marshals for this year are Maurice and Betty Reichel. The traditional May Pole (bring in summer) will take place about 11: a.m. The family games, horse shoe tournament and scavenger hunt start right after the Maypole dance. Frisbee golf is on-going and self serve. Favorite car awards and drawings for quilt and picture will be at 2 p.m.. All day activi-

ties are; arts and crafts, vendors, drawings, and viewing the two museums Please call Mary Louise Loe at 485-3292 for more information and Jeanette LaMonte at 509-485-2035 for arts and crafts tables. Willy Penner is in charge of the door prizes. Sitzmark Ski Club will have the lunch concession from about 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Don’t forget to visit the Old Molson and School House Museums. Proceeds go toward the restoration of the mural on the Molson Grange Hall.

GRANT’S MARKET

North Country Car Club

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127

COKE 20 pack

26th Annual Car Show

Saturday, June 20th

6

$ .99

Western Family

SHRIMP

Tonasket Rodeo Grounds Register at 8 a.m.

Community Judging 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Award Ceremony at 1:30 p.m.

ors Spectat

FREE!

Awards for 1st, 2nd and 3rd in each category

17 Categories!

Including: Motorcycles, Trucks, Tractors, TEENAGE, Antique and Newer! For info. call Patti Hill at 509-429-2983

7

Bulk Coffee Bean

$ .98

6

$ .99

31 - 40 COUNT

Happy Father’s Day!

North Country Car Club Show TONASKET - The North Country Car Club will be having their 26th Annual Car Show on Saturday, June 20 at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. Registration is at 8 a.m. Community Judging from 8 a.m. through 12 p.m.; Award Ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Awards for first, second and third in each of 17 categories, including: Motorcycles, Trucks, Tractors, Teenage, Antique and Newer. For more information call Patti Hill 509-429-2983.

Tonasket Father’s Day Fly-In

TONASKET - Tonasket’s 26th Annual Father’s Day Fly-in is Saturday and Sunday, June 20 and June 21. On Saturday there is a steak barbecue from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday starts out with a breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.. There are free plane rides for kids age 8-15. Must register Sunday morning. Lunch Served 11:30 until ? Fun for the Entire Family. For more information call 509-486-4502.

Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant TONASKET - Father’s Day Specials on Sun., June 21. Breakfast 8 to 11 a.m. Bonaparte Benedict $8.95. Dinner 1 to 8 p.m. Smoked BBQ Pork Ribs, sides and dessert for $15.95. Dads over 80 eat half off. Ph. 509-486-2828.


PAGE B3

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE |JUNE 18, 2015

SPORTS & OUTDOORS Katie Teachout/staff photos

Left, Ella Gann, age 3, shows off her first-placewinning 18.1” trout with her dad, Audie Gann. Right, Killian Cariker (in plaid jacket) took second place with a 17.25” trout and Dakota Clough tied for third place with Halle Corum (not pictured) with 17” fish. Below right, Aaron and Savannah Coe, age 4, hook one. Manning the fish cleaning station were Rick Rose with Kin Ross Gold and Jim Parsons of Jim and Darlene of Nighthawk.

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OROVILLE - Oroville Golf Club will hold their annual Ironman Golf Tournament on Sunday, June 21, 2015 starting at 9 a.m. For more info. call 509-476-2390. FS 38 Gas Trimmer

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$

Low cost, heavy duty trimmer. MS 170 Chain Saw

179.

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OROVILLE - Father’s Day Sunday Brunch, June 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Steak, Eggs, Dessert and More!

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

Father’s Day

BBQ SPECIALS! Check out our

 Salads  Foods to go  Deli  Sliced Meats  Cold Drinks  More!

Ph. 509-486-2828

Tonasket’s 26 th Annual

Father’s Day

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June 20 & 21, 2015

Saturday

5 - 8 p.m. - Steak BBQ

7 - 11 a.m. Breakfast. 8 - 11 a.m. FREE plane rides for kids age 8-15 (must register Sun. Morning) Lunch Served 11:30 until ?

OROVILLE PHARMACY Unique Gifts & More

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615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Sunday Morning

PHOTO KIOSK American Expedition River’s Edge, Cards, Coffee Mugs & More!

DINNER: 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. Smoked BBQ Pork Ribs Sides & Dessert for $15.95. (Dads over 80 eat 1/2 off )

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183 7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Fun for the Entire Family!

For more information call: 509-486-4502


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 18, 2015

SCHOOLS

Five readers from Tonasket Elementary awarded bicycles

MAKING LEARNING FUN

Submitted photo

Oroville kindergarten teacher Cyley Moser reads to students during the Oroville Elementary School Literacy Night held Tuesday, June 12.

OES hosts Literacy Night Celebrating with Dr. Seuss

Tonasket most-improved readers are, left to right, Lyle Long-Sandoval, Arlee Esquibel, Brooke Jones and Shei Reid.

Readers rewarded by the PTO and Aurora Masons BY KATIE TEACHOUT

SUBMITTED BY ELLEN NEWTON

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket Elementary School students were motivated to improve their reading skills over the year when five new bicycles were donated by the Tonasket PTO and the Oroville Masons as prizes for the most-improved

OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Dr. Seuss came to Oroville Elementary School library, in Oroville on the night of Tuesday, June 9. Well not physically, but Dr. Seuss was the theme of our literacy night. Literacy Night was a time where members of Oroville Elementary School’s Washington Reading Corps (AmeriCorps) Nathan Haney and Ellen Newton as well as kindergarten teacher Cyley Moser provided books and entertainment for students and their families. “The night was great synergizing and a great way for our kids and families to ‘sharpen the saw!’” Moser stated. “The more you read the more things you know. The more that you learn the more places you’ll go.” This quote from Dr. Seuss sums up the reason for having a Literacy Night. This night is a fun way to get books into the hands of the students, and to help children and their families associate reading with enjoyment. Oroville Elementary School’s mission is to empower all students to reach their full potential. “We like to see the students reading and enjoying books,” commented Newton, WRC member. Reading is a keystone skill that enables all other learning, helping students to achieve their goals in school and life. June is the end of the school year and usually a very busy time, but the turnout for the Literacy Night was good with

Jamie Portwood/submitted photo

winners. “The bikes were introduced at an assembly at the beginning of the year, and hung in the lunchroom all year long so the kids could see what they were working toward,” said Reading Specialist Jamie Portwood. “The students were told they would be awarded the bikes based on three different reading assessments: the NWEA, the QRI and the AR/STAR test.” First grader Ivan Martinez from Todd Mathews class improved 41 points on the NWEA. He was given his bike early, as he moved

from the area before the assembly at the end of the year was held. Brooke Jones, from Brittany Lawrence’s second grade class, improved 39 points on the NWEA. Second grader Shei Reid from Lara Owsley’s class improved 41 points on the NWEA. Arlee Esquibel from Fay Aitcheson’s fourth grade class improved 48 points on the NWEA. Fourth grader Lyle LongSandoval from Jennifer Willson’s class improved 50 points on the NWEA.

Tonasket High School announces Honor Roll SUBMITTED BY TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL

The Tonasket High School Honor Roll for the spring semester was announced June 15. Seniors

about 30 parents and students

“One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Submitted photo

Oroville Elementary students try out a hat, like the one worn by the Cat in the Hat, one of Dr. Seuss’ most famous characters. attending. With an almost carnival-like atmosphere, those who attended enjoyed the Dr. Seuss theme by participating in games like put the fish in a fish bowl,

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Blue Fish”; stick a green egg onto a plate of ham as in “Green Eggs and Ham” or build your own “Cat in the Hat” hat. The most difficult game was tossing 4 rubber balls into a Dr. Seuss hat. There were other fun things to do, especially the Dr. Seuss read-aloud and students picking out their own book to take home. Each student took home a book just for them, a “Do not Disturb Me, I’m Reading “ door sign, and a bag of popcorn. It was reported that everyone had fun, possibly because the Grinch was not there. He was still in Whosville! Wonder who will come next year?

4.0: Abran Alvarez, Polina Gladkaya, Alexander Merson, Abraham Podkranic. 3.5-3.99: Dirrick Christensen, Allison Glanzer, Somer Hankins, Colt Hatch, Colton Leep, Jesse Manring, Mary Naylor, Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, Dalton Smith, Anna St. Martin, Shoshanna Thomas-McCue, Aspen Verhasselt, Alyssa Warner. 3.0-3.5: Deoha Braggs, Amber Burton, Devyn Catone, Hilda Celestino, James Coleman, David Curtis, Travis Deggeller, Chad Edwards, Diego Goudeau, Blaine Hirst, Matthew Josephson, Dayzi Keller, Emma Kuusela, Haley Montowski, Brooke Nelson, Jose Ortega, Sabrina Perez, Jensen Sackman, Charlie Sanchez, Michael Timm, Lucas Vugteveen, Alissa Young.

THE EFFECTS

4.0: Omar Calderon, Madeleine Graham, Rade Pilkinton. 3.5-3.99: Leighanne Barnes, Pablo Chavez, Nichol Fletcher, Jonathan Freese, Bryden Hires, Baillie Hirst, Alexee Howell, Jordan Hughes, Corrina Karrer, Sammantha Keller, Kasey Nelson, Trevor Peterson, Rachel Silverthorn, Matus Sitzar, Boaz Sphar, Kyra Whiting. 3.0-3.5: Janelle Catone, Melanie Christensen, Nicholas Crandall, Cayden Field, Cade Hocket, Vanessa Pershing, Alan Quintero Elizalde, Brennon Ramsey, Andreas Rosenkranz, Kasey Silverthorn. Sophomores

4.0: Thomas Nelson.

Kennedy,

Samuel

3.5-3.99: Elijah Antonelli, Bonnie Siegfried, Johnna Terris. 3.0-3.5: Brenden Asmussen, Jordan Brandt, Matthew Burton,

Amanda Drew, Bradley Keener, Ally Mershon, Tawan Murray, Breanne Nolan, Brenda Perez, Wyatt Pershing, Lorena Sanchez, Alexa Sutton, Hunter Swanson, Richard Temby, Katlen Wagner. Freshmen

4.0: Madison Gariano, Spencer Gariano, Nicole Juarez, Esmerelda Mathis, Kallysta Ray, Camille Wilson. 3.5-3.99: Griselda Alvarez-Torres, Tayler Anderson, Sydney Breshears, Chadwick Bretz, Cinthya Calderon, Madyson Clark, Ricki Cruz, Katie Henneman, Elsbeth Hjaltason, Hayley Larson, Justin McDonald, Riley Morris, Taylon Pilkinton, Jesse Ramon, Joseph Schell, Destin Sphar, Logan Thompson, Alycia Tibbs, Morgan Tyus, Alina Vlahovich, Brooklynn Ward, Jacob Wilson. 3.0-3.5: Megan Bolich, Jessie Burks, Samuel Flores, Mikah Haney Williamson, Meri Hirst, Sandra Magdaleno Espinoza, Nicole Moritz, Bryan Nolan, Joseph Ogborn, Rodrigo Ornelas, Zoe Rodriquez, James Silverthorn, Olivia Sutton, Dominique Wilcox, Myhe Williams.

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JUNE 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Dustin Rex Hawley Hennigs, 21, Okanogan, pleaded guilty May 12 to third-degree rape of a child. The court dismissed an additional charge of thirddegree rape of a child. Hennigs was sentenced June 9 to six months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the April 2014 crimes. Jesse Alan Wallace, 56, Ephrata, pleaded guilty June 9 to solicitation for POCS (lesser included of POCS [methamphetamine]). The court dismissed a use of drug paraphernalia charge. Wallace was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended with credit for one day served. He was fined $1,010.50 for the June 29 crime that occurred near Tonasket. Darryle Clint Gua, 30, Omak, pleaded guilty June 9 to attempted second-degree TMVWOP (lesser included of theft of a motor vehicle). Gua was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 285 days suspended and credit for 79 days served. He was fined $1,010.50 for the March 22 crime. The court issued an arrest warrant June 10 for Robert William Parisien, 43, Nespelem, for first-degree burglary (DV), second-degree assault (DV) and harassment (threats to kill) (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred June 6 near Omak. The court issued an arrest warrant June 11 for Fermin Sanchez Orozco, 23, Oroville, for second-degree rape of a child. The crime allegedly occurred in July 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Anthony Eisen, 26, Oroville, with residential burglary, POCS (methamphetamine), third-degree possession of stolen property, possession of burglary tools and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred May 28. The court found probable cause to charge Jeffrey Duke Clark, 60, Moses Lake, with residential burglary, third-degree possession of stolen property, POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred May 28 near Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Ernesto Eduardo Mendez Leon, 20, Okanogan, with residential burglary, third-degree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred May 28. The court found probable cause to charge Lorna Fay Bird, 58, Vancouver, B.C., with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred May 29 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Matthew Russell Carden Jr., 28, Omak, with second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin) and alteration of identification markers. The crimes allegedly occurred May 28. The court found probable cause to charge Wayne Dale Rieb, 28, Tonasket, with theft of a firearm. The crime allegedly occurred May 2. The court found probable cause to charge Ian Ray Tatshama, 45, Omak, with seconddegree assault (strangulation or suffocation) (DV), violation of a no-contact order (third or subsequent violation) (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 10, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Latisha Lavern Birdsong, 36, Tonasket, with firstdegree theft, three counts of forgery and two counts of second-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred between May 20 and May 27. The court found probable cause to charge Michel Louis Savoie, 60, Riverside, with POCS (oxycodone) and introduction of contraband. The crimes allegedly occurred June 3. The court found probable cause to charge Jon Anthony Pantaleon, 21, Oroville, with forgery and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred

June 4. The court found probable cause to charge Edward Sanchez, no middle name listed, 28, Okanogan, with POCS (heroin), DUI, obstruction and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred June 4. The court found probable cause to charge Cara Ann Campbell, 28, Omak, with seconddegree burglary, third-degree theft and second-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred May 28. The court found probable cause to charge Daniel Cody Pearcy, 26, Omak, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) and harassment. The crimes allegedly occurred June 3. The court found probable cause to charge Alejandro Jimenez Montalvo, 23, Yelm, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred June 7 near Riverside.

JUVENILE A 12-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty June 3 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years. The boy was sentenced to five days in detention with credit for five days served and fined $75. The crime occurred April 28. A 17-year-old Tonasket boy pleaded guilty June 3 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years. He was fined $75 for the March 16 crime. In a second case, the boy pleaded guilty June 3 to an additional charge of possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years. He was fined $75 for the April 23 crime. In a third case, he boy pleaded guilty June 3 to fourth-degree assault (DV). He was fined $75 for the April 29 crime. The boy was sentenced to a total of eight days in detention with credit for eight days served and 21 weeks of community service. A 16-year-old Tonasket boy pleaded guilty June 10 to harassment (threats to kill). He was fined $100 for the Nov. 18, 2014 crime. In a second case, the same boy pleaded guilty June 10 to fourth-degree assault (DV). He was fined $100 for the May 29 crime. The boy was sentenced to a total of 45 days in detention with credit for 45 days served.

DISTRICT COURT Douglas Glen Johnson, 48, Tonasket, guilty of disorderly conduct. Johnson received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $608. Robert E. Jones, 49, Tonasket, had an obstruction charge dismissed. Daniel Grant Keith, 60, Tonasket, found innocent of DUI. Cheyenne Rochelle Lezard, 19, Omak, guilty on three counts of third-degree theft. Lezard was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 170 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,266. Tena M. Lounsberry, 53, Oroville, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Lounsberry received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $258. Angel Martinez Ramirez, 19, Tonasket, guilty of MIP/C. Martinez Ramirez received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $518. Ryan Gabriel Meese, 28, Oroville, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Meese received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $1,018. Aaron Christopher Meyer, 33, Loomis, guilty of DUI. Meyer was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,861. Jodi Lee Meyer, 43, Omak, guilty of DUI. Meyer was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,381. Nelson James Montenegro, 24, Tonasket, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Sharon Eugenie Moses, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Moses received a 90-day suspended and fined $818. Sandina Marie Nelson, 20, Oroville, guilty of disorderly conduct. Nelson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $408. Monte Louis Nicholson, 47, Omak, guilty of first-degree

DWLS. Nicholson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $658. Jack O’Bryan III, 24, Omak, guilty of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. The court dismissed a thirddegree DWLS charge. O’Bryan was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Troy Steven Pierre, 19, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Pierre was sentenced to 90 days in jail days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $308.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2015 Theft on Len Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Mail reported missing. Warrant arrest on Elmway in Okanogan. DWLS on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Fraud on Fetters Lane near Riverside. TMVWOP on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Kermal Dr. near Omak. Threats on First St. in Riverside. Trespassing on Benton St. in Omak. Threats on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Shumway Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Assault on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Structure fire on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Joseph Alexander Felix, 20, DOC detainer. Stormy Rae Brenard, 26, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Reese Emerson Clark, 39, court commitment for first-degree DWLS.

TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 201 Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. Threats on Spokane St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Maple St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. Fraud on S. Main St. in Omak. Counterfeit bill reported. Public urination on W. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Theft on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Pan Vista Dr. in Omak. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Ricardo Guia Alvarez, 23, booked on two Tonasket Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Fawn Marie Palmer, 36, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI and second-degree DWLS. Cergio Santiago Britt, 54, DOC detainer. Rebecca Lynn Cabrera, 54, DOC detainer. Jonathan Stotts, no middle name listed, 22, booked on two warrants: third-degree malicious mischief and second-degree criminal trespassing. Reyes Melchor Hinojosa, 48, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and first-degree DWLS. Jason Brent Carpenter, 27, booked for third-degree DWLS. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 32, DOC detainer.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 10, 2015 Domestic dispute on Ell Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Canyon Creek Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Sex offense on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Littering on Ellisforde Bridge Rd.

in Ellisforde. DWLS on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Koala Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonsket. Assault on Dayton St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Pine St. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Theft on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Assault on Ferry St. in Omak. Drugs on Pine St. in Omak. Brandon Ray Valentine, 34, court commitment for DUI. Kristina Michelle Grooms-Sloan, 41, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: third-degree theft and fourth-degree assault (DV). Dakota Joseph Shaul, 19, booked for second-degree burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. David Michael Wood, 40, DOC detainer. Cullen Wayne Buzzard, 35, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV), violation of a nocontact order (DV), and two Snohomish County FTA warrants: theft of a motor vehicle and second-degree burglary. Jeffrey Van Weitman, 35, DOC detainer. Justin Kenneth Wilson, 31, court commitments for DUI, thirddegree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation.

THURSDAY, JUNE 11, 2015 Structure fire on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Elmway in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Wildland fire on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Theft on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Chainsaw reported missing. DWLS on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Assault on Columbia St. in Omak. Loitering on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Gas cans reported missing. Domestic dispute on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Harassment on Central Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Richard Cordell Woodruff, 74, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants for DUI and no valid

operator’s license without ID. Amanda A. Sanabia Hammons, 33, booked on a Superior Court warrant for POCS (methamphetamine). James Corwin Hoben, 39, DOC detainer. Douglas Kirk Sanders, 36, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for attempted thirddegree assault of a child. Bobby Saulmon, 67, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI.

FRIDAY, JUNE 12, 2015 Domestic dispute on Koala Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Sagebrush Trail in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Riverside. Malicious mischief on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on Columbia River Rd. near Omak. Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Automobile theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Juniper St. in Omak. Threats on Omache Dr. in omak. Loitering on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Burglary on S. Ash St. in Omak. Wildland fire on Engh Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Found property on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Wallet recovered. Constancio Vazquez Guzman, 50, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants, both for DUI.

SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2015 Illegal fireworks on Hubbert Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Seventh Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Tires reported slashed. Public intoxication on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Purse reported missing. Shannon Simpson, no middle name listed, 30, booked for obstruction and warrants for fourth-degree assault, thirddegree theft, DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Kyle William Johnson, 18,

booked for possession of a stolen motor vehicle.

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015 Assault on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Cameron Lake-Omak Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Threats on Pine St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Rodeo Trail Rd. in Omak. Graffiti reported. Warrant arrest on Garfield St. in Omak. Harassment on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Assault on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Dayton St. in Omak. Trespassing on Juniper St. in Oroville. Christopher Donald Moore, 61, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and fourthdegree assault. Loren Michell Joe Harry, 23, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and an OCSO FTA warrant for trafficking in stolen property. Stephen Wasson, no middle name listed, 66, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. George Scott Smith, 42, booked a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI and third-degree DWLS.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

LENDING A HAND

Izzy Broomfield/submitted photo

AmeriCorps volunteers on the Silver One team clear flammable brush from around a camp

AmeriCorps volunteers assist with fire recovery efforts BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

PATEROS—Eight members from AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) will be serving with the Carlton Complex Long Term Recovery Group to aid in recovery efforts in the PaterosBrewster area through July 19. They joined the recovery group June 3. The Carlton Complex Recovery Group has been working to restore the livelihoods of the effected communities, and to begin rebuilding the homes that were destroyed; over 300 in all.

The AmeriCorps NCCC team, known as Silver One, will be reconstructing fencing between the ranches, clearing debris and acting as volunteer coordinators. Silver One will be working on Saturdays, the busiest days for volunteering, to aid with coordinating efforts. As the Carlton Complex Long Term Recovery Group approaches its one-year mark, the team will also conduct a survey of the residents in the surrounding area to gauge the organization’s progress so far. This is the second AmeriCorps NCCC team to serve with the Carlton Complex. The previous

team, called Silver Five, worked with the recovery group from April 1 to May 21 of this year; and repaired over 13,000 feet of fencing, removed 9,120 pounds of debris, and collected and transported 2,450 pounds of donated household goods. They also aided in prescribed burns, clearing of unwanted vegetation, landscaping and refurbishing of campsites. “I think it is a once in a lifetime opportunity to get a chance to help the people of Pateros and Brewster, and to be able to see a noticeable impact in the community,” said Silver One team member Eric Cabage.


PAGE B6 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 18, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE â&#x20AC;˘ June 18, 2015

$MBTTJĂ FE%FBEMJOF/PPO5VFTEBZr$BMMPSUPQMBDFZPVSBE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discriminationâ&#x20AC;?. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale

For Rent

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces

CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS $450-$795, Possible 1 month free. 3 BR HOME $750 & $850

RV SPACE

Call Today Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

Announcements

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Busy Beavers

FIREWOOD

Providing Premium Firewood to the Sunny Okanogan! z Cord Wood z Campfire Wood Bundles

Call and Order Today!

Ph. 509-560-3064

or visit busybeaversfirewood.com

Okanogan County Realty, LLC member of the MLS has several listing; home, business, farm, recreational, waterfront and several at Veranda Beach. Kathy 509-429-2040, Ryan 509-429-8564, Brad 509-429-7466. Serving Okanogan County.

TONASKET

2 BR, 2 BATH + UPSTAIRS BALCONY area. Full basement is unfinished. This house has charm, situated in Old Orchard Estates. $149,500. Shown by appt only. Call for details 509322-3471 or please leave message.

UBI#601 422 863 21

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004. OROVILLE LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $435 per month. 509-476-3145

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

CHESTER & MARY HEMPHILL - MOVING AUCTION 4 Okanogan Street - MALOTT, WA. SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 2015 - 10:00 a.m.

Between Okanogan and Malott on Old Hwy 97, turn West on N. Malott Rd. and go to Okanogan Street. Sale on corner. NOTE - Chet & Mary have sold their home after 40+ years in Malott and will be moving. Good selection of Shop Tools and Items and some Household & Misc. PARTIAL LISTING BELOW

* **1983 * * 26-ft * * *Aluma * * *Lite * *XL* Motorhome, * * * * * * 454 * *Motor, * * * Self-contained, ********

New Water Tank * 1983 Ford 3000 Tractor w/Freeman Loader & Bucket * Woods Offset Mower * 6-ft Rotovator * 6-ft Blade * Forks * Honda EM 650 Generator * Lincoln Welder, 225 amp * Oxy-Acet Set w/Bottles & Cart * 2 Drill Presses * Craftsman Table Saw & Band Saw * Sanborne Air Compressor * DeWalt Reciprocating Saw * Bench Grinder * B&D Jigsaw * Impact Wrenches * Large Anvil w/Hardie * Grinders & Polishers * Battery Charger * Acme Circle Saw Sharpener * Wordworking Tools * MANY Hand Tools * Cub Cadet Riding Lawnmower * Yard & Garden Items * 2 Pickup Canopies * Picnic Table * Exercise Bike * Camping Items * Old Bicycle * Cream Can * Dining room Table & Chairs * Organ * Dishes * Pots & Pans * Breadmaker * Bedding * MUCH MORE CALL & WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL, OR FAX YOU A HANDBILL * Sales Tax Will Be Charged * No Buyers Premium * Food Available

Food & Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market

LICENSE NO. 2241

Serving North Okanogan County

Hang Em High Meat Shop

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 DAL DAGNON 486-2570

Licensed & Bonded

Republic, WA (509)775-8095 Custom Exempt Slaughtering and Butchering

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

Crosswords

Terry Koepke, Owner

26. Halftime lead, e.g.

7. Anticlimax

27. Contemptuous look

8. Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conveyance

29. Young seal 31. Setting for TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Newhartâ&#x20AC;?

9. Substance emanating from medium during trance

32. Economical

10. ___-tzu

34. Ed.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s request (acronym)

11. Chilled (2 wds)

35. After expenses

12. Defenders of causes

36. Plagiarizes

13. Large table centerpiece with branching holders

38. Cheese choice 40. Formerly known as 41. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;___ la vie!â&#x20AC;? 43. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolutely!â&#x20AC;? 44. C.S.A. state 45. 200 milligrams 47. Character 51. O. Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gift of the ___â&#x20AC;? 53. Examines closely

ANSWERS

14. Snake 21. Hints 24. Kosher ___ 28. Renaissance fiddle 30. N. Am. flycatcher 33. Murderers 36. Pale green-glazed Chinese porcelains

55. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That hurt!â&#x20AC;?

37. Substances used in chemical reactions

56. Bad day for Caesar

39. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotten ___ you?â&#x20AC;?

57. Wet slapping sounds 59. Drone, e.g.

40. African country whose capital is Windhoek

60. Dwarfed, ornamental tree

42. Excursion

62. Capable of being reduced

43. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Way to go!â&#x20AC;?

64. Sequentially (2 wds)

46. Burning

65. Sour cherry trees

48. ___ Space Telescope

1. Eating ___, e.g forks

66. Holdings

49. Feral feline

9. Runs off (with)

67. Cuspids

50. Expression of mild annoyance

Across

15. Guard 16. Appetizer

Health General

52. Any Time Down

17. Not morally pure

54. Gawk 58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let it standâ&#x20AC;?

18. One who works strenuously

1. Customary things

61. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A jealous mistressâ&#x20AC;?: Emerson

19. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much ___ About Nothingâ&#x20AC;?

2. Sinew

63. A pint, maybe

20. Physician

3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More!â&#x20AC;?

22. Be a kvetch

4. ___ power

23. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ of the Fliesâ&#x20AC;?

5. Thailand, once

25. Deck out (2 wds)

6. Atlas enlargement

Help Wanted Okanogan Estate and Vineyards Retail Store Looking for 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 32 hrs/wk SALES ASSOCIATE.

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

Please send resume to Yvaldovinos@gold diggerapples.com or drop off resume at retail store 1205 Main St, Oroville

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant 3 Full time and 1 Part time on an as needed basis, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. Dental Hygienist Full time. Position requires travel to Oroville OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Patient Navigator Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required. BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

TONASKET MEDICAL: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required due to business need. Twisp Medical: Patient Navigator Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Help Wanted Help Wanted Veranda Beach diner looking for Summer seasonal help. Servers, dishwashers needed immediately. Call Wendi 509485-2387 OCTN is accepting applications for COOK AND COOKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AIDE in Oroville: Both positions are 6 hours T, Th. Fri. Must be reliable, punctual, trustworthy, good natured, outgoing and skilled at detailed tasks. Must possess the ability to complete tasks within allotted time frames. Must be able to pass a pre-employment background check and obtain food handlers permit. Applications can be picked up at 431 5th Avenue W. in Omak, (509) 826-4391 or online at www.octn.org OCTN is an EOE

Accepting applications for: Cook Bartender z Wait Staff Dishwasher / Prep Assistant Previous experience preferred. Applications can be picked up at 1307 Main St., Oroville. Call (509) 731-5772 for an application pick up time.

Garage & Yard Sale Oroville Depot Deck Sale. Saturday, June 20th from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Misc items. Proceeds benefit Historical Society.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WEEK OF JUNE 15, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;make goodâ&#x20AC;?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ADOPTION ADOPTION: A Loving Financially Secure Family, Laughter, Travel, Beaches, Music awaits 1st baby. *Expenses paid* *1-800-362-7842*

Public Notices ARC NOTICE Important notice regarding Skyline Telecom: As mandated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), effective with the July 2015 bill, the Access Recovery Charge (ARC) will increase. For residential and single line business customers the amount will increase to $2.00 per month, per access line. Multi-line business customers will remain the same at $3.00 per month, per access line. The FCC is reducing the amount of support the Company receives from the federal universal service fund by the amount that is raised through the ARC. Under the rules adopted by the FCC, the Company must charge the ARC or lose the funds associated with the charge since that money can no longer be recovered through the federal universal service fund. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 18, 2015. #OVG638511

Public Notices PUBLIC AUCTION There will be a Public Auction at Budget Towing, 32156 Hwy. 97, Tonasket, WA 98855, Phone 509-5601056, on Thursday, June 25, 2015. Viewing Time will start at 11:00 a.m. with the auction at 12:00 p.m. Up for auction will be: 1) 2001 Yamaha, WA: 942199 2) 1997 Cherolet, WA: ADF3592 3) 1977 Buick, WA: 026TMA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 18th, 2015 #638318 Public Hearing Six Year Transportation Improvement Program The Tonasket City Council will hold a public hearing during the regular City Council meeting on Tuesday, June 23, 2015, 7:00 pm, in the City Hall, 209 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket, WA. The purpose of the hearing is to review and possibly adopt the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program for the years 2016-2021. Interested persons are invited to attend. Persons with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall at 509-486-2132, prior to the hearing. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Alice Attwood, Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 18, 2015. #OVG639403 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT NEWTON BRAMMER, Deceased. No. 15-4-00053-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 11, 2014 Personal Representative: Peter Crane P.O. Box 277 Brewster WA 98812 Attorneys for Personal Representative: Bryan J. Maroney, WSBA No. 36966 of Davis, Arneil Law Firm, LLP 617 Washington Wenatchee, Washington 98807 509/662-3551 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 11, 18, 25, 2015. #OVG638392 TS No WA05000954-14-1 APN 1700151602 TO No 8507473 NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Amended Notice of Sale is being recorded to correct the property address as shown on the Notice of Sale recorded March 16, 2015 as Instrument No. 3198476 in Okanogan County. Washington. All the other information remains in full effect. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on July 17, 2015, 10:00 AM, at the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, the undersigned Trustee, will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, towit: THE SOUTHERLY ONE-HALF OF LOT 16 AS MEASURED ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF BLOCK 15, LACOURT SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF OMAK, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK E OF PLATS, PAGE 12, OKANOGAN COUNTY RECORDS. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 1700151602 More commonly known as 532 IVY ST, Omak WA 98841 also appearing of record as 532 S. Ivy St, DISAUTEL, WA 98841 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of May 7, 2008, executed by KIMBERLY ANN TOULOUSE, WHO AC-

Legals Continued On Next Page


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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 3

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Puzzle 34 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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Puzzle 31 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

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Puzzle 28 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36)

Hard, difficulty rating 0.71

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Sponsored by

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509-476-3602

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Puzzle 25 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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Puzzle 29 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

ANSWERS

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Puzzle 32 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.45)

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Puzzle 35 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.55)

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Puzzle 25 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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ral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: (877) 894-4663 or (800) 606-4819 Website: www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; Dated: 3/19/2015 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By: Athena Vaughn, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps 1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Phone: (800) 409-7530 TDD: (800) 833-6388 For Reinstatement/Pay Off Quotes, contact MTC Financial Inc. DBA Trustee Corps TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.priorityposting.com P1134999 6/18, 07/09/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 18 and July 9, 2015. #OVG639416

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Puzzle 30 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.67)

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Puzzle 26 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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Puzzle 27 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.32)

QUIRED TITLE AS KIM MICHELSON, AS HER SEPARATE ESTATE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIMBERLY ANN TOULOUSE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM MICHELSON as Trustor(s), to secure obligations in favor of COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB as original Beneficiary recorded May 21, 2008 as Instrument No. 3132790 and the beneficial interest was assigned to Green Tree Servicing LLC and recorded July 5, 2013 as Instrument Number 3183628 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Okanogan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by Green Tree Servicing LLC, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: Green Tree Servicing LLC Contact Phone No: 800-643-0202 Address: 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, MAIL STOP T111, TEMPE, AZ 85283 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From August 1, 2011 To March 9, 2015 Number of Payments 12 Monthly Payment $646.82 27 $656.77 5 $747.48 Total $29,232.03 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION From August 1, 2011 To March 9, 2015 Total $394.80 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: May 7, 2008 Note Amount: $89,000.00 Interest Paid To: July 1, 2011 Next Due Date: August 1, 2011 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $85,329.08, together with interest as provided in the

TOULOUSE PO BOX 3453, OMAK, WA 98841 by both first class and certified mail on February 4, 2015, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and refer-

5

Note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on July 17, 2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by July 6, 2015, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before July 6, 2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the July 6, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, Green Tree Servicing LLC or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIMBERLY ANN TOULOUSE 532 IVY ST, DISAUTEL, WA 98841 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM MICHELSON 532 IVY ST, DISAUTEL, WA 98841 KIM MICHELSON 532 IVY ST, DISAUTEL, WA 98841 KIM MICHELSON 532 S IVY ST, OMAK, WA 98841 KIM MICHELSON PO BOX 3453, OMAK, WA 98841 KIMBERLY ANN TOULOUSE 532 IVY ST, DISAUTEL, WA 98841 KIMBERLY ANN TOULOUSE 532 S IVY ST, OMAK, WA 98841 KIMBERLY ANN

Public Notices

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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JUNE 18, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE June 18, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE Find The Right

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If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you. Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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If you’re putting your home on the market, home staging is an important element in preparing your home for sale. The idea is to spruce up inside and outside and pack away personal items that may distract a buyer. One family’s keepsakes are another family’s clunkers, so pack away cute photos, unusual artwork and accessories, and replace tired towels, bedding and curtains. Clean out overstuffed closets so they look roomier.

BUYERS WANT: Small home on 2 to 5 acres. Barn ? Omak to Malott. Cash Buyer. Up to $160,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 6 Mathews Lane Panoramic spectacular view of the river and hills. One level living, 3 bedroom 2 bath home with open floor plan. Glass French doors open up to office with built in desk. Garden tub in master bath. Main bathroom remodeled with new countertop and backsplash.. New tile floors in kitchen, laundry room and bathrooms. Hardwood floor in main living area. Fenced backyard with playhouse/swing set in sandbox area. 2 storage sheds, 10X16 and 8X12. Private driveway shared with neighbor. NWML#800155 $184,900

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

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Cell: (509) 322-4777

UPS - FedEx Drop Ship Mailboxes Mail Forwarding Prepaid Cellular Services

tonasketshippingpost@gmail.com

Email: avi_john@hotmail.com

Well Drilling

“The Water Professionals” 509-782-5071

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PAGE B8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 18, 2015

OBITUARIES

John L. Burbery “Dive in, help Tonasket Build a Pool. Let’s make the pool more than a memory,” reads a sign held by local kids who want a place to swim in the summer months.

Pool funding reaches one year mark SUBMITTED BY TONASKET POOL COMMITTEE

TONASKET - This week marks our first year of fundraising for the Tonasket Swimming Pool. To date we have raised $507,276!! This summer watch for more pool fundraisers. The first, “Round Up for the Pool” is going on now and will continue all summer. Any time you make a purchase in town, you can contribute your change to the pool building fund - all you have to do is ask the cashier. Also coming soon is the second Annual Duck Race to be held Aug. 22 during the Garlic Festival. Duck sales will start soon and first place is a two-man raft. The more ducks you have in the race, the better your chances are to win! Thank you for your support. The pool committee, along with the next generation of swimmers (in the photo), would like to thank all our donors: Alpine Environmental, American Legion Post 82 and the Sons of American Legion, BDK Engineering, Beyers Market, Bretz Excavation & Septic, Bronze Star Inc, Buchert Ranches LLC, Coleman Oil, Confluence Health, David Hannah Transportation, Double R Ranch, Fawn Creek Designs, Hanna Realty, Inland Professional Title, JandJ Orchards, Lee Frank Mercantile, Levine Plumbing, McDaniel Logging, McDaniel Properties, MGH Equipment,

Naylor’s Refrigeration, NW Farm Credit Services, NW Wholesale, Okanogan Family Faire, Silver Nickel Logging, Smith Bros Catering, Superior Auto, Tacos Jalisco, Tonasket Diesel Repair, Tonasket Garden Club, Two Sisters, Upper Valley Realty, Whistler Family Restaurant, Wilbur Ellis, Leon Alden, Bonnie Andrews, Howard Appel, Jackie and Patti Arbuckle, Wayne Asmussen, Billie Attwood, Betty Barnes, Robert Bartell, George and Patti Baumgardner, Richard and Loretta Beaughan, Jerry and Elaine Beeman, Jeff Bergh, Bruce and Sandra Bews, Alfred Biggs, Jerry and Sandra Brightbill, Marilyn and Dave Brown, Miriam Caddy, Helen and Raymond Casey, Roger and Suzanne Castelda, Linda and Terry Catlin, Betty and Jim Christian, John Colbert, Joan Cool, Geral and Sharon Cox, Norm Dahlquist, Sharon Danley, Dale and Doreen Davis, Douglas and Kyong Draves, Evelyn and William Duncalf, Jim and Patricia Early, Diane Fancher, Tom and Joyce Fancher, Ann Figenshow, Clair and Merrie Fisher, George Frank, Shelly Freeman, Jean Funston, Scott and Patricia Furman, Greg Gardinier, Jenny Gardinier, Kayla Gardinier, Joe and Bonna Gavin, Martha and Robert Gibeaut, Tyrone and Janet Glanzer, Gregory Green, Lorraine Green, Gerald and Pat Green, Greg and Mary Hamilton, Shana and Ron Hammett, Sid and Barbara Hansen, Norma Jean Hart,

Donna and Leonard Hedlund, Bob Henneman, Ruth Hegdal, Todd and Anne Marie Holmdahl, Franklin and Betty Holmes, Claire Jeffko, Gloria Jones, Laura Jones-Edwards, Floyd Kennedy, Aaron Kester, Dave Kester, Ryan and Stacey Kester, David and Hanna Kliegman, Billi and Bob Kuhlmann, Beverly and Jay Kuntz, Sandra and Grant Leavell, DealeyAnn Leggett, Jack and Elinor Lorz, Matt and Bobby Lorz, Steve and Linda Lorz, Virginia and Deb Lorz, Albert Losvar, Diane MacFarland, Chuck and Earlene McCallum, Richard and Jessica McNamara, JoAnn and Eugene Michels, Wally and Harlene Moore, Col. Jackie Moothart, Ed and Evie Pariseau, LeeAnn Peterson, Joyce Pier, Darrel and Fran Pierce, Ron and Gabriela Potter, Robert Pringle, Barry and Ann Rogers, Pam and Lawrence Rubert, Scott and Montie Smith, Thom Speidel, Judy Stalder, David and Cathy Stangland, Gordon and Harriet Stangland, Tracy Stevens, Ken and Phyllis Stone, Dale and Kathy Swedberg,   Donna Sylvester, Richard and Ruth Temby, Bob and Jane Thompson, Bruce and Sonja Thornton, Linda and Clark Topping, Danny and Kim Vassar, Lamoyne and Cheri Wahl, Tony and Sharon Walter, Herb and Bertha Wandler, Mike and Jennifer Ward, Jordon and Jennifer Weddle, Norm and Diana Weddle, Marija and Rick Welton and Rosemary Zook.

VENDORS NEEDED Produce, crafts, displays, non-profit organizations.

Fri., Aug. 21 from Noon - 8 p.m., Sat. Aug. 22 -10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Tonasket Community

the Celebrate

by the River Tonasket History Park

$20 - $35 Vendor Space

Harvest!

JOHN L. BURBERY John L. Burbery, age 87, died on Friday, June 12, 2015 at home in Tonasket.

HAUENSTEIN MEMORIAL A Celebration of Life for Glenn and Roger Hauenstein will be

Barbara Burbery of Tonasket; Chuck and wife Dickie Burbery of Tonasket; brother-in-law Buck Workman of Omak; sister-in-law Mary Burbery of Ukiah, CA.; four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife Mary; both parents; one brother, Harold Burbery; and three sisters, Iris Michels, Ellen Stotts and Joy Workman. Services will be held on Saturday, June 20, 2015 at 11 a.m. at the Loomis CommunityChurch with Lloyd Caton, officiating. Interment will follow at the Loomis Mt. View Cemetery. There will be a luncheon following the service at the Tonasket Eagles. Memorials may be made to the Charity of your choice. Bergh Funeral Services is in charge of arrangements.

held at 11 a.m., June 20th at the Oroville United Methodist Church, followed by a lunch at 2 p.m. There will be an American Legion service at Riverview Cemetery for Roger.

Donations in their memory may be sent to the Oroville Scholarship Fund or the American Cancer Society.

HOT SPOTS

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Monuments & Bronze

CEMETERY MARKERS

Want to know where the purrfect places are to shop for products and services in our community? Check out our Business & Service Directory!

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

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Sales Representative Joy Lawson

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

1-509-476-2279

1422 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

DENTISTRY

OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Dining

&

Entertainment

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

OPTICAL Now Open 7 days a week!

Toll Free

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

509-826-1800

(509) 826-6191

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

 Ophthalmology

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

24 Hour Crisis Line

www.wvmedical.com

Healthcare Services

 Behavioral

(509) 826-5093

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

CLINIC

 Radiology

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Anti

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Out on the Town...

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Psychiatric Services

OMAK

Please call the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket at 509-486-2061 or email at info@communityculturalcenter.org for applications and more information.

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Katherine Stangland/submitted photo

John was born on November 10, 1927 to parents Dick and Lula Burbery. John was raised in Horse Spring Coulee and graduated from Tonasket High School. John served in the United States Air Force. In 1950 he met Mary E. Albin and they married one year later on May 29, 1951. John and Mary raised four boys. John worked on a cattle ranch and at Regal Fruit Co. where he worked until retiring. John enjoyed spending time with family, hunting, fishing and spending time in his garden and growing and selling soft fruit and berries. He is survived by sons, Gene and wife Debbi Burbery of Tonasket; Chuck Burbery of Lewiston, Idaho; John A. and wife Wilma Richter Burbery of Tonasket; Jim and Jill Burbery of Chelan; brothers, Lloyd and wife

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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Prime Rib every Sat.

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PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

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starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

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EVERY WEEK

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

Call Charlene Helm 916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

509-476-3602 Ext 3050

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 18, 2015  

June 18, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 18, 2015  

June 18, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune