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SPRING MUSIC PROGRAMS AT

WATERCROSS RACING

OROVILLE AND TONASKET

Races take place on Lake Osoyoos this weekend June 13 & 14

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JUNE 11, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Oroville graduate Laura James wins her second Emmy

‘IF SOMETHING DOESN’T GO RIGHT, GO LEFT’

Seattle-based videographer wins award for work on ‘Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish’ THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SEATTLE – Videographer Laura James, a 1990 graduate of Oroville High School, recently won her second television Emmy® Award in Environmental Feature/Segment in the Northwest Region of the U.S. for her underwater video work on “Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish.” The program appeared was produced by KCTS9’s Katie Campbell and edited by Michael Werner. James, a Seattlebased videographer was presented with the Emmy on June 6. She won her first Emmy in 2014 in the Health/ Science Feature/Segment category in the Northwest Region for Sea Otters vs. Climate Change, produced by Michael Werner for Quest PBS. “The Emmy Awards in the Northwest Region are a favorite. It’s wonderful to see the team recognized for their continued excellence in the field of environmental reporting,” said James. “This was my third year attending and second year taking home an award for my contribution to a great story. The starfish story is special to me because I was directly involved in the event; documenting and helping build a citizen science reporting website related to the crisis. It really felt personal. This Emmy feels very well earned as we were up against several other brilliant stories in this tough category.” James has been contributing to local media stories for the past decade and sharing the underwater world with divers and non-divers alike. She is the director of www.tox-ick.org, a grass roots storm water education program dedicated to helping reduce the flow of polluted runoff into Puget Sound. She has spent the past two years building Beneath the Looking Glass’ project “Know What’s Below,” a curriculum

Above, Esmerelda Cano, Esgar Mendez and Rosemary Luna enter Tonasket High School’s gymnasium for graduation ceremonies Saturday, June 6. Below right, Terry Mills presents a Tonasket Community Scholarship to Co-Valedictorian Aspen Verhasselt, one of many scholarships awarded to Verhasselt. For more see pages A2, A3, B1 and B2.

Submitted photo

Seattle-based videographer Laura James, a 1990 Oroville High School Graduate, with her second Emmy. She won for her camera work on the KXTS9 production of “Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish. extension. “Know What’s Below” has been developed from the ground up with the mission of inspiring, connecting, preserving and protecting the underwater world. She uses multi-media, narrated video shorts, OpenROV builds with students, and presenting about the amazing marine ecosystem around the Pacific Northwest to deliver the program.www. btlgproject.com. About her time in Oroville, James said, “I started attending Oroville Elementary school in third Grade, Miss Villars class. My favorite teachers were George Thornton, he always encouraged my

SEE JAMES | PG A3

Oroville seeking Sen. Cantwell’s help regarding old border patrol station Council considers adoption of ATV ordinance BY GARY A. DEVON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The City of Oroville would like to take over the old U.S. Border Patrol Station on Main Street, but so far hasn’t had any luck in convincing the General Services Administration to let them use it for more than a police station. “They asked for their key back and to vacate the premises,” said JoAnn Denney, Oroville City Clerk. “The only reason we had the key was to clean it up before May Day.” The old Border Patrol Station on 1105 Main became redundant when the new $15 million, 22-acre complex was constructed north of Oroville and just south of the U.S. Canadian border. The Oroville station is responsible for 80 miles of international border located in Okanogan County. Included in the Oroville Station’s area of responsibility is

the Pasayten Wilderness Area. ing for her help in the matter.” Since moving out the station has taken The old station would be an ideal on an abandoned look with the lawn location for the police station with often in need of mowing and the plants fenced equipment yard, holding cells, in need of water. a sally port and many other attributes The GSA prefers to offer the build- that would work well with city policing. ing to government agencies first and The Main Street location would also in this case wanted to make the department offer it to Oroville as more visible downa new police station. town compared to “They asked for their However, according the current Ironwood to Denney, just using key back and to vacate Street location. it for a police station ATV ORDINANCE the premises.” doesn’t pencil out At the council’s financially and the Tuesday, June 2 meetJoAnn Denney, City Clerk City of Oroville city would like to use ing they also discussed the building for other a new ATV ordinance services. She cited the which would allow Oroville Building Department as one ATVs on Oroville’s streets. This would potential additional use, thus freeing connect Oroville to county roads where up the city to sell their current facility a similar ordinance has already been on Main Street, where the old Visitor approved by the County Commissioners. Information Center was located. “The council has been taking a positive “A letter was submitted to the GSA attitude toward some kind of ordinance. regarding our concerns and the GSA They are looking at Omak’s municipal responded by saying there would be no code to decide whether they would like negotiations on the use of the property, to adopt something similar to theirs,” requested the quitclaim deed and key said Denney. be returned immediately,” said Denney. Councilman Tony Koepke asked about “Chris Branch has forwarded correspon- the turn signal requirement. The gendence to (U.S.) Sen. Maria Cantwell ask- eral feeling of the council was that they

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 24

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The old U.S. Border Patrol - Oroville Station now sports a large “Government Property for Sale” sign. The City of Oroville has been trying to work with the U.S. General Services Administration to take over the no longer used facility for their police department and other agencies. liked Omak’s code and discussed referencing state regulations regarding turn signals, according to Denney. Omak

SEE ATV | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom: (509) 476-3602 ext. 5050 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Advertising: (509) 476-3602 ext. 3050 chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Mayor Chuck Spieth said city staff had reviewed the code and would like

News A2-3 Cops/Courts/911 A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community Classifieds Real Estate

A6-7 A8-9 A9

Sports Schools Obits

A10 A11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE11, 2015

TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Class of 2015

%

$

%

Abran Alvarez % * $ Elvira Alvarez Urapo % Blake Isaiah Ash % Ethan Wade Bensing Michael Gabriel Biernacki Deoha Jamar Braggs Kahlil Miguel Butler % $ Esmeralda Cano Devyn Wayne Catone * $ Hilda Celestino Flores % * $ Dirrick Anthony Christensen James Edward Coleman * $ Smith Alexander Condon % $ David Lee Curtis Travis Deggeller $ Chad Gregory Edwards % * $ Tiffany Lyn Ferdon Timothy Arron Frazier-Leslie Christian Mathis Garcia Polina Gladkaya ^ % Allison Jo Glanzer % * $ Diego Alejandro Goudeau Adam Corey Halvorsen % Somer RaeAnn Hankins Colt Robin Hatch $ Brock Michael Henneman Branden Michael Hicks Blaine Paul Hirst Johan Hjaltason Keeton Alec Hoines Jesse Allen Holan @ $ Reeccah Nicole Holberg Frank Sean Holfeltz % * $ Matthew George Josephson ^ Dylan Zachary Koel Kalista Dayzi Darlene Keller Austin Craig Knowlton Eithan James Knowlton Emma Katariina Kuusela ^ % Colton Bryce Leep % * $ Rosemary Luna % Jesse Rey Manring * $ Angel Martinez Esgar Noe Mendez Alexander David Mershon % $ Kallie Ann Mirick @ $ Haley Christine Montowski %

Clockwise from top: Austin Knowlton, Dallas Tyus and Eithan Knowlton enter the gym; Alissa Young receives the T-Club Award from Rose Walts; Diego Goudeau receives his diploma from Ernesto Cerrillo; Principal Jeff Hardesty hands Kallie Mirick her diploma; Emma Kuusela and Carlos Morena leave the gym as graduates; Terry Mills presents Mary Naylor with one of her many scholarships; THS teacher and football coach Jay Hawkins gives the Ole Drew Athletic scholarship to Chad Edwards; Salutorian Alex Mershon (left) keeps his address short and sweet; Co-Valedictorians Abe Podkranic (center) and Aspen Verhasselt address their fellow graduates.

Carlos David Moreno Mary Rose Naylor * $ Brooke Jane Nelson * $ Liberty Jane Newton Sydney Angelina Nielsen Morgan Max O’Brien Jose Andres Ortega Adrian Emmanuel Palomares

Sabrina Perez Abraham James Podkranic % *$ Manuel Puente Cesar Mariscal Reynoso % Jensen Talbot Sackman $ Maria Selena Salas Ramirez @ $ Antonio Sanchez Jimenez $ Charlie Sanchez Gabriela Esperanza Santana Darbee Christene Sapp Rachael LeeAnn Sawyer $ Dalton Jacob Smith % * $ Timmarica Dara Spellman @ Anna Noelle St. Martin % $ Johnathan Tellez Shoshanna Colleen ThomasMcCue $ @ Michael Brent Timm Dallas Jacob Tyus % Noe Alay Vazquez % Aspen Danielle Verhasselt % *$ Lucas William Vugteveen % * $ Alyssa Eileen Warner Marshall Valentine West Jeffery Gary Wilbur Isaiah Charles Yaussy-Albright Alissa Christine Young % $ KEY $ = Gold Honor Cord (3.3 GPA or higher) % = Advanced Placement Students @ = Running Start * = CWB Scholar Athletes ^ = Foreign Exchange Students

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS PRESENTED TO TONASKET GRADUATES $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $200.

Abran Alvarez

Community Foundation of North Central WA, Okanogan Masonic Lodge-Herbert & Elizabeth Davis, $1,000; Pacific Calcium, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $400. Ethan Bensing

U.S. Bank, $350; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $150. Devyn Catone

Avery Berg Foundation Trust, $500; Bonaparte Snowmobile/ ATV Club,$1,000; Community Foundation of North Central WA, Okanogan Masonic LodgeHerbert & Elizabeth Davis, $1,000; GoldDigger Apples, Inc. Agricultural, $500. Hilda Celestino

North Valley Hospital Guild, $250; Kiwanis Club of Tonasket, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $400. Travis Deggller

Compass

Group

USA,

Chad Edwards

Ole Drew, $500; Tonasket American Legion Auxilary Mildred Marchesseau, $500; Smith & Nelson-H.L. Smith Memorial, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $400. Allison Glanzer

Michael Dean Pyatt Memorial, $350; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $150. Jesse Holan

Aurora Masonic Lodge #201, $500; Washington State Honors Award (top 10% of 2015 WA State graduating class). Colton Leep

Bishop Fleet, $10,000; Columbia River Carbonates & Sawyer & Sawyer INC., $1,000; Holmdahl Family Scholarship, $5,000; Joan Inlow Hylton, $300; Kinross Gold Corporation, $1,000; North Valley Hospital Guild, $250; Tonasket Athletic Booster Club, $750; Whitestone

Church Women, $500; Loomis Similkameen Community Club, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $200. Rosemary Luna

Julia Dewey McCabe Nursing Memorial, $350; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $150. Alexander Mershon

Washington State Honors Award (top 10% of 2015 WA State graduating class) Kallie Mirick

American Legion Post #82, $1,000; Aurora Masonic Lodge #201, $500; Bishop Fleet, $10,000; Confluence Health Healthcare, $3,000; Hamilton Youth Foundation, $1,000; Kinross Gold Corporation, $1,000; Tunk Valley Grange, $1,000; Walt Kelley Memorial, $500.

$1,050; THS Alumni, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $200. David Moreno

The Junction, $350; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $150. Mary Naylor

Civic League, $300; Columbia River Carbonates & Sawyer & Sawyer INC., $4,000; George Washington Foundation, $1,050; Ken & Joan Smith, $500; Mt. Olive Grange, $500; Tonasket Okanogan Valley Lions Club, $500; University of Idaho Gold Level Scholarship, $24,000; Al & Peggy Seccomb, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $400. Morgan O’Brien

Dr. Rob Nau, $350; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $150.

Haley Montowski

Abraham Podkranic

Children’s Dance Theater, $500; George Washington Foundation, $1,050; WA State School Retirees’ Association,

Air Force Mathematics and Science Award; Washington State Honors Award (top 10% of 2015 WA State graduat-

ing class); Washington Student Achievement Council Award; Nancy Sullivan Memorial, $800; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $700.

$350; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $150.

Jensen Sackman

Air Force Mathmatics and Science Award; Pete Manring Scholarship, $250; Steiner Foundation, $1,350; Tonasket American Legion Auxilary Mildred Marchesseau, $500; Tonasket Athletic Booster Club, $750; Dale Johnson Memorial, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $200

Tonasket Eagles Aerie #3002, $1,000; Lorraine Grant Memorial, $700; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $500. Dalton Smith

Washington State Honors Award (top 10% of 2015 WA State graduating class). Anna St. Martin

Washington State Honors Award (top 10% of 2015 WA State graduating class). Aspen Verhasselt

Washington State Honors Award (top 10% of 2015 WA State graduating class); Kiwanis Club of Tonasket, $500; Tonasket Community Scholarship General Fund, $400. Lucas Vugteveen

Willie

Burton

Memorial,

Alissa Young

ALUMNI Kelly Cruz

Walt Kelley Memorial, $350. Norma Ramos

Walt Kelley Memorial, $350. Cassie Spear

National FFA Scholarship, $1,000. Jessica Puente-Arroyo

WAEF Delmar Memorial, $1,500; Nordic, $1,050.

Smith WAEF


JUNE 11, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Watercross racers hit Lake Osoyoos this weekend

SUBMITTED BY ROGER HARNACK

LAKE OSOYOOS CUP, RACE DIRECTOR

OROVILLE — About 50 watercross race teams are expected to fill Deep Bay Park this weekend for the second Lake Osoyoos Cup. “We’re excited to have Northwest Jet Sports racers coming back to Oroville,” event coordinator Raleigh Chinn said Monday, noting this year’s event features an international field with stand-up and runabout racers expected from both the U.S. and Canada. Chinn, Oroville Chamber of Commerce President Clyde Andrews and race director Roger Harnack have coordinated the event for two years. Watercross racing is like motocross on water, with high-speed straight-aways and hairpin turns. Since it’s on water, course conditions vary lap-to-lap. “The event is the season-

opener for the Western Canadian Watercross Association and Rounds 5 and 6 for the Northwest Jet Sports Association,”Harnack said. “Racers have preregistered from as far away as Saskatchewan in Canada and Twin Falls, Idaho.” Registration opens at 7 a.m. in the park, with racing expected to begin about 11 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday. Boaters and fishermen are encouraged to make plans to use a different launch during the race window each days. The event is free for spectators, but locals who want to try their hand at personal watercraft racing can get in on the action. Competitors must purchase an International Jet Sports Boating Association membership. Racers are required to wear helmets, life vests and back protection, and have kill tethers on their “boats.” They will compete in a variety of classes broken down by age, gender, skill level and watercraft.

Brent Baker/photo

The weather and water was perfect for the Watercross Races on Lake Osoyoos off Oroville’s Deep Bay Park. This year the races will take place earlier in the year, on June 12 and 13.

“We have a class for everyone,” Harnack said. Last month in Oregon, the X-2 class was the largest, with 13 racers. And in recent years, vintage skis — those general more than 20 years old — turned out en masse at some events. Harnack said there is likely to be a large junior class, featuring racers from 10 to 15-years-old, as well as large novice classes. Lake Osoyoos Cup racing will also likely draw a lot of Hydrospace entries from Canada. Hydrospaces are stand-up skis with four-stroke powerplants. Volunteers are needed to assist racers with scoring and safety in the park and on water, Harnack said. Anyone with a sit-down Jet Ski who wants to volunteer should come to Deep Bay Park by 9 a.m. each day. This is the first of two personal watercraft races in North-Central Washington this year. The next race will take place July 18 and 19 during the Apple Pie Jamboree in Pateros. In conjunction with the races, The Oroville Senior Center will be hosting breakfast at 1521 Golden St. from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Saturday morning. There is a nominal price for breakfast. In the park, a vender will be renting bikes and kayaks, and may also offer concessions, Chinn said. And on Saturday evening, America’s Family Grill, 1518 Main St., will be hosting a meetand-greet for racers, their families and friends, fans and community members. “We’re sure everybody is going to have a fantastic time,” Chinn said. “Come spend the day enjoying some fun in the sun,” Harnack added.

Molson Midsummer Fest Saturday, June 20 SUBMITTED BY ELVA HELM MOLSON MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

MOLSON – The community of Molson would like to invite everyone young and old, to come to the June 20th Molson Midsummer Festival, a Molson summer fun day that has something for everyone. Start your day at 8 a.m. with the pancake feed at the Grange Hall, all you can eat for $8.00. Sign up for the “Run, Walk or Shuffle race” at 9 a.m. and see the lakes. Park your classic car at the school house and get geared up

for the parade at 10:30 p.m. We would like to remind you that almost anything that walks or rolls is encouraged to participate in the parade; classic cars, tractors, you name it. The Grand Marshals for this year are Maurice and Betty Reichel. The traditional May Pole (bring in summer) will take place about 11: a.m. The family games, horse shoe tournament and scavenger hunt start right after the Maypole dance. Frisbee golf is on-going and self serve. Favorite car awards will be at 2 p.m.. All day activities are; arts and crafts,

vendors, drawings, and viewing the two museums Please call Mary Louise Loe at 485-3292 for more information and Jeanette LaMonte at 509-4852035 for arts and crafts tables. Willy Penner is in charge of the door prizes. Sitzmark Ski Club will have the lunch concession from about 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Don’t forget to visit the Old Molson and School House Museums. Proceeds go toward the restoration of the mural on the Molson Grange Hall.

PAGE A3

JAMES | FROM A1 University of Washington using equipment donated by KING-TV owner Dorothy Bullitt. In 1970, National Educational Television was absorbed into the newly created Public Broadcasting Service. KCTS 9 is seen throughout southwestern British Columbia on local cable systems, across Canada on the Bell TV, Shaw Direct satellite providers, as well as, on many other Canadian cable TV systems. The Emmy® Awards of the Northwest Region highlights each year’s regional activities with an award ceremony in June. Along with the Emmy® Awards, the chapter provides the region’s professionals with seminars, programs, and networking. The Northwest Chapter of The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences serves television and media professionals in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Washington.

Submitted photos

Seattle-based videographer Laura James, above, and her subject, right. curiosity; Lee Root, who made sure I knew how to compose and be literate and Coach ‘Chuck’ Ricevuto whose business education class is still hands down the most useful class I’ve ever taken,

at any level of education. I use what I learned from him on a daily basis.” KCTS 9 first went on the air on Dec. 7, 1954 broadcasting from the campus of the

ATV | FROM A1 to see Oroville’s code addressing snow removal in Place. Rod Noel, superintendent of public works, said he felt that Oroville’s snow removal laws regarding use of ATVs was modeled after Omak’s. The mayor also said he had no new update on the ambulance agreement with the Okanogan County Commissioners. In the past, an interlocal agreement between the city and rural parts of the EMS District was always left to city representatives and

the Rural EMS Commissioners, however, the county has stated since the EMS Commissioners are appointed, rather than elected, any agreement between the county and the city has to get the County Commissioners’ approval. In a related matter, Dale Gavin reported that he has worked on making repairs to the ambulance hall roof and explained what further repairs are needed, according to Denney.

The mayor appointed Councilman Walt Hart as the city’s voting delegate to the Association of Washington City’s Annual Business meeting.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 11, 2015

COPS, COURTS & 911 CALLS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Sonsaray Ellen Rean Wynne, 20, Loon Lake, pleaded guilty June 2 to POCS (methamphetamine). Wynne was sentenced to 90 days in jail and fined $1,100.50. The crime occurred April 14 in Omak. Mark Alan Altman, 40, Tonasket, pleaded guilty June 2 to harassment (threats to kill) and fourth-degree assault (DV). The court dismissed additional charges of harassment (threats to kill) and fourth-degree assault. Altman was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the April 5 crimes. Gilberto Valensuela Acasito, 48, Tonasket, pleaded guilty June2 to second-degree assault (DV) and first-degree criminal trespassing. Valensuela Acasito was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $600 for the Nov. 12, 2014 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Eric Gene Hendrickson, 29, Okanogan, with unlawful imprisonment (DV), fourth-degree assault (DV) and obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred March 27. The court found probable cause to charge Kenneth Ray Squetimkin Jr., 23, Omak, with second-degree criminal trespassing. The crime allegedly occurred May 28. DISTRICT COURT Regina Delores Cook, 53, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Cook received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Shawn Murice Cook, 37, Oroville, guilty of third-degree theft and third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed an obstruction charge. Cook was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,416. Alex Ryan Cornelius, 18, Tonasket, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Carlos Ivan Cortinas Guzman, 22, Omak, guilty of hit-andrun (unattended property). Cortinas Guzman was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $608. Tammy Jean Davidson, 52, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree malicious mischief. Davidson received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $868. Jesus de Aquino Oregon, 38, Oroville, guilty of fourthdegree assault. de Aquino Oregon was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 177 days suspended, and fined $1,183. David John Donovan, 59, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional charge: failure to stop and give information. Donovan was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $358. Nathanial James Edenso, 34, Tonasket, guilty on four counts of third-degree DWLS. Edenso was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined a total of $3,432. Bailey Elizabeth Elsberg, 18, Okanogan, guilty of fourthdegree assault. Elsberg

received a 364-day suspended sentenced and fined $483. Jennifer Marie Fleck, 42, Oroville, guilty of third-degree theft. Fleck received a 180day suspended sentence and fined $768. Dia Marie Gardner, 40, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: interfering with reporting (DV). Russell Ellis Gardner, 22, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Gardner was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined a total of $868. Kristopher Paul Graber, 38, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Graber was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. John Andrew Hilderbrand, 21, Omak, guilty of interfering with reporting (DV). Hilderbrand was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $908.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JUNE 1, 2015 Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on N. B Ave. in Conconully. Fuel reported missing. Public intoxication on 10th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Grainger Ave. in Omak. DWLS on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Central Ave. in Oroville. Burglary on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Mistia Alicia Clark, 27, booked for third-degree theft and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Melissa Delone Starzyk, 36, booked on an FTC bench warrant for a drug court violation. Rachelle Lorraine Moore, 31, booked for third-degree DWLS and a Grant County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Wayne Dale Rieb, 29, booked for theft of a firearm. James Edward Kiesecker Jr., 38, booked on OCSO FTA warrants for DUI and first-degree DWLS. Latisha Lavern Birdsong, 36, booked for first-degree theft, two counts of second-degree possession of stolen property and three counts of forgery. Ameera Elizabeth Parisien, 18, booked on an FTA juvenile warrant for criminal impersonation. Christopher Michael Cornett, 20, booked for obstruction, MIP/C and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2015 Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Drugs on Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Custodial interference on Sylvester Rd. near Tonasket. Robbery on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Sex offender registry on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Stage Coach Loop Rd. near Oroville. Fire on Pine Cone Dr. near Omak. Threats on Columbia St. in Omak. Harassment on Shumway Rd.

near Omak. Trespassing on S. Birch St. in Omak. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. DUI on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Drugs on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Gary Austin Vaughn, 47, booked for attempted to elude, fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree DWLS. Christine Angelique Ives, 44, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Brandy Marie Summers, 38, booked for third-degree possession of stolen property. Brittany Leigh Wilson, 34, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Samuel Benjamin Bates, 23, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Jacqueline Stotts, 52, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV).

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015 Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Conconully. Fuel reported missing. Harassment on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Theft on Seattle St. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Flood on Chiliwist Rd. near Okanogan. Structure fire on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Granite Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Granite Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Two-vehicle crash on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Vehicle prowl on W. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Found property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Oxygen recovered. Weapons offense on Fir St. in Oroville. Theft on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Arthur George Longdo, 61, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI. Jesse Ballesteros Garcia, 25, booked for obstruction and resisting arrest. Michel Louis Savoie, 60, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI, an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS, POCS, possession of a legend drug without a prescription and introduction of contraband. Rodger Alexander Cate, 51, court commitments for resisting arrest and DUI. Joshua Guy Track, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 2015 Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on Foggy Rive Loop Dr. near Riverside.

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Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

EVERY WEEK

SATURDAY, JUNE 6, 2015 Assault on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Assault on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Mill St. in Okanogan. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Laptop reported missing. Harassment on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Assault on Senna St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Omak Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Alcohol offense on Omak Ave. in Omak. Alcohol offense at Omak Lake near Omak. David Thomas Kay, 34, DOC detainer. Tiffany Yallup, no middle name listed, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Daniel Cody Pearcy, 26, booked for felony harassment (DV) and reckless endangerment (DV). John Leon Thomas, 63, booked on eight FTA warrants: five for third-degree DWLS and one each for obstruction, violation of a no-contact order and second-degree criminal trespassing. Cara Ann Campbell, 28, booked for second-degree burglary and second-degree criminal

trespassing. Laura Sue Walker Sifagaloa, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for two counts of POCS.

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015 One-vehicle crash on LoomisOroville Rd. near Loomis. No injuries reported. Harassment on Hi-View Lane near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. Harassment on Lemanasky Rd. near Tonasket. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Brock St. in Tonasket. Structure fire on Hanford St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Automobile theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Found property on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Wallet recovered. Charles Daniel Ross, 49, court commitment for DUI. Alejandro Jimenez Montalvo, 20, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Scott Thomas Hilke, 21, booked for fourth-degree assault. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Firefighters respond to two structure fires BY KATIE TEACHOUT

Now Open 7 days a week!

Balloon reported missing. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Ismael Tinoco Pio, 22, court commitment for supplying liquor to a minor. Samuel David Cuevas, 48, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Patrick Michael Murphy, 59, booked for DUI and hit-andrun (attended). Elizabeth Aguirre Cardenas, 24, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant third-degree DWLS and a Douglas County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tiffany Ladawn Lange, 29, booked for DUI.

Firefighters pour water on a structure fire south of Tonasket last Monday afternoon. The fire destroyed a shop , as well as several cars before it was brought under control.

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Bonaparte 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2015 Domestic dispute on Locust St. in Omak. Assault on Benton St. in Omak. Theft on 3300-100 FS Rd. near Tonasket. Custodial interference on Oak St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Skyview Dr. in Omak. Theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. TMVWOP on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on W. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Drugs on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Fraud on Lime St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak.

Fires near Tonasket and Ellisforde

Entertainment Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

Threats on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Fraud on Main St. in Riverside. Bad check reported. Two-vehicle crash on LoomisOroville Rd. near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Conconully St. in Okanogan. DWLS on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Ash St. in Omak. Fraud on Jasmine St. in Omak. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. hhAWildland fire on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on Central Ave. in Oroville. Burglary on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Edward Sanchez, 28, booked for POCS (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, DUI and resisting arrest. Alyssa Ann Descouteux, 21, DOC detainer. Russell Ellis Gardner, 22, booked for third-degree DWLS. Jon Antonio Pantaleon, 21, booked for forgery and thirddegree theft. Cyril Narcisse, 75, court commitment for reckless driving.

TONASKET - Tonasket’s Fire Department responded to a structure fire 359 Hwy. 7 Monday afternoon, June 8, a mile and a half south of Tonasket. They were called out at 3:42 p.m. A shop was fully engulfed when firemen arrived, but they were able to contain the fire before it spread to the house or neighboring properties. Assistant Fire Chief and Inspector Randy Clarke said the cause of the fire is still under investigation. The shop, and all of its contents were completely destroyed; along with a half dozen cars, a boat, and a truck. The fire, on property located right on the Okanogan River, burned through about an acre of brush.

Sixteen firefighters from Okanogan Fire District 4 (Tonasket) responded along with three paramedics from Tonasket EMS, one Tonasket Police officer, one Sheriff’s deputy, Okanogan County Public Works, PUD, the Omak Fire Department; and DNR, who helped contain the brush fire. Power was shut off prior to a power pole being burned, but the power had been turned back on to the houses. “The power feed to the shop is still off, and unfortunately that runs their well,” Clarke said. Units had all cleared the area by around 8:30 p.m., with two firefighters returning to the scene Tuesday morning, June 9, to finish mopping up hot spots. “We’ll keep an eye on it for the next couple of days,” said Clarke. Firemen were challenged with working in temperatures around 100 degrees. “At one point it was 101 degrees, and in the turnout (bunker gear) it felt like it was about

150 degrees,” Clarke said. “Oh, it was hot.” Clarke has been with Fire District 4 almost 15 years, with a total of two decades in fire service. Last week, on June 3, Tonasket Fire Department responded to a major structure fire at Owen’s Meat Packing on Hwy 7, near Ellisforde. The call came in around 8:45 p.m, with units on the scene until 1:15 a.m. Wednesday, June 4. Initial reports said a large smoker was on fire and had possibly spread to the building. When the firefighters arrived, the shop was filled with heavy smoke and fire; resulting in a total loss. They were able to keep the fire from spreading to an adjacent building and a house. Other units responding to the fire were the Oroville Fire Dept., Omak Fire Dept., Tonasket Ambulance, Okanogan County Public Works, and the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office.


JUNE 11, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

TPA strengthens Congress’ role in negotiating free trade agreements OPINION BY U.S. REP. JOHN NEWHOUSE FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT, WASHINGTON STATE

By now, you have probably heard at least some debate about trade promotion authority (TPA) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in Congress. Don’t get lost in all the acronyms. The fact is TPA passage is needed to improve negotiations of free trade deals so that they move forward with close consultation with Congress. Strengthening ties with U.S. trading partners through effectively-negotiated free trade agreements can offer major economic benefits to the nation as well as Central Washington agriculture growers and producers, small businesses, and manufacturers. Congress must secure America’s global trade advantage by approving TPA. What is TPA? TPA is a partnership between Congress and the Administration to secure the best trade deal possible. Currently, the President has constitutional authority to negotiate trade agreements. TPA would empower the legislative branch and keep the President accountable by requiring close consultation with Congress. Under TPA, Congress would be charged with setting 150 specific objectives for trade negotiations. Those categories include agricultural trade, labor standards, and many more. If the President does not follow Congress’ instructions, Congress can turn off TPA protections and remove the streamlined voting procedures. The text of any completed agreement must be made public for 60 days before a deal can be signed by the President. Congress must also vote on any final trade deal negotiated under TPA. In short: without Congressional approval and public transparency, there is no deal. What is TPP? TPP is a pending agreement that would create a free trade zone encompassing U.S. and Asia-Pacific nations. TPP would open markets by reducing tariffs and lowering trade barriers between the U.S. and 11 other countries in the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, Australia, NewZealand, Canada, and Mexico. In order to negotiate TPP effectively, American trade representatives first need approval of TPA. Additionally, this deal could greatly increase the United States presence in the region, providing a direct counter to China. TPP is still being negotiated and has not yet been presented to Congress. Approval of TPA would ensure that trade negotiators are fully complying with Congress’ intent to achieve the best trade deal possible. What is the impact of free trade on Washington State’s export economy? Washington businesses and agriculture growers and producers already engage in international trade with customers in Pacific Rim nations. More than 900,000 jobs in Washington depend on trade. As one of the most trade-supported economies in the nation, Washington has much to gain if Congress approves TPA and TPP. Foreign competitors are serious about approving their own trade agreements. Just last week, China approved a free trade deal with South Korea, lifting tariffs on 70 percent of agricultural goods between the two nations over two decades. America cannot afford to be left behind: in the U.S. overall, more than 38 million American jobs— one in five of all U.S. jobs—are tied to trade. America cannot miss the chance to level the playing field and improve trading ties with Pacific customers. To negotiate the best trade deals possible and open overseas markets to American exporters, Congress should approve trade promotion authority.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO EDITOR Grateful to volunteers

Navy Vietnam Veterans

Dear Editor, What a great community we live in. I would like to thank the volunteers who donated their time and expertise to help with Tonasket Choice High School’s “mock” job interviews. Students in ninth, tenth and eleventh grade participated in the interview process for jobs ranging from Ultrasound technician to Mechanic and from a fan fiction author to travel agent. We would like to thank Shawna Poletti, Bob Raymer, Leah Palmer, Mary Engle, Ephraim Brown and Preston Ray. Great leaders like you help mold the students in our community into successful leaders of tomorrow. Thank you, Annie Wilkison Tonasket

Dear Editor, It has come of a common opinion amongst Vietnam War Veterans that Congress tends to exclude mostly Blue Water Vietnam Veterans for VA benefits. This group of veterans never had boots on ground Vietnam, yet just the same they are sick due to Agent Orange exposure. It seems Congress and the VA consider these veterans not worthy. There are limited benefits to those who served in Country and those who served at sea are excluded, yet Agent Orange was in the drinking water onboard Navy ships causing sickness years later. How many more of us have to die in agony until there are so few of us left that the amount of dollars to care for those left won’t matter much. Is this what America is about no one caring attitude by our legislators? Where does it say in our Constitution and Bill of Rights that our veterans need NOT be cared for when in need? “A man who is good enough to shed

Congress non-caring for

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

additional P. O. Boxes to rent. Grocery Prices: Tuna Fish, large cans, 2 for $.27; Shredded Wheat, $.09 per bag; Nalley’s Potato Chips, 2 for $.25; Mother’s Cocoa, 2 lb. can, 2 for $.25; Corn Flakes, pkg. $.05; Catsup, bottle, $.11; Salad Dressing, qt. $.25.

The Oroville Gazette COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, June 21-June 28, 1940: Those who would like to mix an outdoor camping trip, celebration and picnic all in one, are being invited to come to Lost Lake, just south of Chesaw, for the annual Fourth of July celebration at that popular playground. Hundreds of people have attended this affair in the past several years and it will undoubtedly be true this year. The government remount services plan to purchase horses for the army in Washington State and they will be used for riding purposes so they must meet certain definite qualifications as follows: four to seven years of age; geldings; height 5 hands 1 inch, (51 inches) to 16 hands 1 inch, (61 inches); weight 970 to 1150 pounds; and colors Bay, Brown, Black and Chestnut, no other will be accepted. At the last meeting of the Town Council, it was decided to go ahead with the construction of the Town Hall and Jail with day laborers, with the town providing the materials. The reason for this move was that the project was budgeted to cost $4,000 and all of the bids were higher. By using day labor, some of the stringent requirements under the contract system could be eliminated and the building would continue until the $4,000 had been used, then vacated until more funds might come available. Governor Clarence D. Martin has issued a proclamation designating June 21 through June 29 as Surplus Food Week. This will help the farmers to dispose of surplus crops at a small profit to families who have not been able to purchase healthful and inexpensive foods. The government lease on the Oroville Post Office will expire January 31, 1941 and the government is calling for bids for a new lease of from five to 10 years. This office has been in the same location for many years and the lease was made to F. V. Covert, who now lives out of state. Patrons of the Post Office have increased considerably during the past few years and will need

50 Years Ago: June 24 – July 1, 1940: Trouble has again plagued the Oroville–Tonasket Irrigation System as a section of flume had toppled over, making it necessary to work many long hours getting it back into operation again. This was about three miles south of Oroville on the east side of the river and an 1100 foot section of the flume collapsed. State Park Ranger, Dave Reynaud, has announced that the Lake Osoyoos State Park could hire five young men or women under the Neighborhood Youth Corps program. Applicants must be between the ages of 16 and 21. In order to qualify, an applicant must come from a family having $3,000 annual income or less. For each additional child, another $600 would be used. The work week will be 32 hours at $1.25 per hour. They must be in good physical condition for outdoor work and must furnish their transportation. The Public Works Subcommittee of the U.S. House Appropriation Committee has approved funds for the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation unit of the Chief Joseph Project in the amount of $1,000,000 of the $3,625,000 the project is estimated to cost. The system will include 8450 acres on both sides of the Okanogan River. The House group also allocated $210,000 for the advance planning of the Whitestone Project. The Oroville Garden Club held its annual Flower Show on Friday June 25 at the American Legion Hall. Response and interest in the show was very encouraging to the club members. Arrangements and displays in the show demonstrated the exceptional talents within the club as well as others who participated. Grocery Prices: Pork & Beans, 6 cans, $1.00; Tuna, 6 1/2 size tins, $1.00; Radishes and green onions, $.05 per bunch; Cantaloupe, 5 for $.99; Spareribs, $.39 per lb.; Chuck Steak, $.59 lb.; Ground Beef,$.79 lb.; Fresh Grade “AA” eggs, $.39 per doz. Watermelon, 4 1/2 per lb.

The Oroville Gazette

25 Years Ago: June 21 – 28, 1990: Upwards of 400 people were present for the Tonasket Airport

his blood for the Country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards” Theodore Roosevelt. Over 175,000 Navy veterans are the unsung casualties of the Vietnam War. It is not about Democrats and Republicans, it is about Americans who fought a thankless war. Maybe this is why Congress is reluctant to provide VA benefits, a Thankless War. Several years past, legislative Bills have been introduced for this group of sailors only to fail in committee. Presently there are two new Bills, House Bill HR-969 and Senate Bill S.681, both are titled The Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Agent Orange Act. If either of these Bills are passed, Navy Veterans will receive their VA benefits. The American people can help by calling and writing to your members of Congress and Senators to support these Bills. Sincerely, John Bury, USN Retired Vietnam War Veteran Media, Pennsylvania

Dedication on Father’s Day. The NCW Precision Parachute Team, from Twisp, jumped from 8000 feet and drifted to earth swinging from their colorful parachutes. Crop duster pilot, Bill Lockwood, flew his Schweitzer bi-plane, five feet off the ground at 100 miles per hour while the Lifebird helicopter, from Deaconess Hospital in Spokane, landed in a whirl of wind. The foundation has been poured and work continues steadily on 30 units of senior housing being constructed in Tonasket. The new low-cost units will be located on the site of the old Tonasket Youth Center. A picture in this issue is of the interior of the old Orpheum Theater in Oroville, with a date of 1915, which shows two rows of multiple hard wooden seats and the curtain with business advertisements. The theater was owned and operated by G. W. Bartell. Also co-owner of the Peerless Hotel. The picture is now in the archives of the Oroville Historical Society Museum. A familiar figure, often working behind the scenes for her community, Ruth Leslie will preside over this year’s Chesaw Fourth of July Rodeo as Grand Marshall. Ruth’s comment on the upcoming potential gold mining activity says she is taking a wait and see. During the depression people were mining by hand and usually found enough to buy a few groceries. May precipitation in the Okanogan-Methow was 361 percent of normal, the highest percentage of normal in the state, with water year-to-date at 105 percent of average. State and Federal wildlife biologists have located a second grey wolf den in Washington while conducting a howling survey on the Okanogan National Forest in North Central Washington. They observed and obtained howling responses from two grey wolf pups, Monday, June 18. Real Estate: 480 feet of lake frontage, 6 1/2 acres with potential residential or commercial site on shimmering Lake Osoyoos, $38,000; 16 x 24 cabin on 9 plus acres with 300 plus feet of creek frontage. Super buy, at $10,900, low down payment; Remodeled 4 bdrm home with fenced yard, nice deck, large kitchen & dining room, good central location, $45,000. get the win.” Real Estate: 40 acres with pond and trees near Molson, $29,500; 40 acres on Whiskey Mountain with well, $42,000; Brick home, great location, lovely 3 bdrm home has 2 ½ baths, large living room-dining room with great view-family room downstairs, wet bar, storage and furnace room, all appliances included, immaculate condition, $65,000.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 11, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Graduation time and time for decisions June and graduation ceremonies all around us. Some from high school and some from college. We have great grandchildren graduating from two year colleges and wondering, now, where do I go? And we have a new lawyer in the family. A whole new future ahead of them. Kinda scary, isn’t it? I know it isn’t July, but we have to get this reminder out to you good folks that donate blood for the Red Cross. The Oroville United Methodist Church, is usually the place for going to, to donate

Round up for Tonasket Pool SUBMITTED BY KATHERINE STANGLAND

blood, but since July is often very hot, and so is the church, it has been the practice, the past few years to go to the High School Commons, for the day. It is more comfortable for the workers and the donors. The Church will be the hosts and everything will be the same, except the location. That is Wednesday, July 8 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. This reminder will appear in this article, for the next few weeks. Saturday June 13 is the next pancake feed, sponsored by the Oroville Senior

TONASKET POOL COMMITTEE

TONASKET POOL COMMITTEE

May flowers are blooming and hot summer days are around the corner. The swimming pool project is moving forward. The pool design is posted around town, fundraising and planning for long-term pool maintenance are ongoing. We appreciate all who have given support to the idea of having a pool in Tonasket. A new fundraising campaign, “Round Up for the Pool”, will start Founder’s Day Weekend and run through the summer. Businesses around town will ask if you will “round up” your purchase to the next dollar (of course you are welcome to add a dollar or two as well), and your change will go to the pool savings account. Every little bit will help us get closer to a new pool. If we missed you, and your business would like to participate, please contact us. We welcome all questions and feedback. Please help us spread the word and encourage everyone to “Dive In” and donate. Thank you for your support. We are excited to report that we now have $500,000 in donations and pledges towards construction! Thank you for your

contributions (fundraising goal is $1.25 million)! If you have not yet donated, now is the time to spring into action and make that donation or pledge. As soon as we have enough money, we can finalize the plan, get the permits and hire a contractor to build the pool. Your donation is an investment in our community, and will help to create a facility that all of us can be proud of. The new pool cannot be built without a plan for maintenance. We want our shiny new facility to serve our community for the next 50 years, so we must ensure that it will be cared for every year. The pool will be a gift to the community from the many donors who have made this possible. A plan to create a Parks & Recreation District has been formulated. We are asking the community to “Dive In” and help with the annual maintenance costs of this new community asset. Every dollar collected will stay in our community. In November, 2015, there will be 3 measures on the ballot: 1. to establish the district, 2. to elect commissioners, 3. to approve a levy of 15 cents per $1000

Great turn out for Hwy. 20 clean up

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Hope everyone is enjoying the warm weather and staying cool in some way, give your animals lots of water including friends and family. We would like to thank everyone who worked on the road clean up on Highway 20 this last Sunday, It got very warm and 36 bags of garbage picked up (think before you throw garbage). A big thanks goes to those who volunteered and helped with the new and improved beer garden

flower pots a lot of work went into this. Stop by and take a look you will be amazed (great job). On Saturday, June 20 the Eagles will be hosting a Class Reunion for the class of 1949. That evening will also be the drawing for the MS170 Stihl Chainsaw, drawing will be at 10 p.m. tickets are one for $3.00, two for $5.00 and five for $10.00 – get them while they last. All proceeds goes towards scholarships. Also featured on Saturday we will be having music by the Mike Nelson band. There will be no kitchen on Friday, June 19 due

This year’s HILLTOP Molson COMMENTS Midsummer display • 10:30 a.m. - Parade with Festival is Grand Marshals Maurice Bettie Reichel Saurday, June 20 • and 11 a.m. - Decorate the May SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT

HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Twentieth Annual Molson Midsummer Festival will be held on Saturday, June 20 in the Molson School Museum and Grange Hall Areas. Schedule: • 8 a.m.-10 a.m. all you can eat pancake breakfast for $8. • 9 a.m. - Run or Walk Race ribbons and prizes awarded at end of race. • Classic Cars and more on

• •

Pole 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. - Food concessions by Sitzmark Ski Club 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Horseshoe Tournament, Kids Games and new this year, the Amazing Molson Challenge (includes a scavenger hunt and so much more) 12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. The Ed Forthun Memorial Frisbee Golf Tournament 1:45 p.m. - All voting for favorite classic cars and

COME SAY HELLO A no host get together to say “Hello” to two of Oroville’s old friends...

Margaret and Tom Neff

will be visiting Oroville June 16 & 17 and want to see their friends while in town. The no host get together will be held at America’s Family Grill from 6 - 8 p.m. on June 16th.

Citizens, in the dining hall at the Senior of Betty Descateaux, longtime Oroville Center, with serving time 8 a.m. to 10 resident and patient at the facility. Another death in the community is a.m. the husband of Joann Morrris Two of our faithful memMichael. He was an avid bers at the Senior Center are golfer, health permitting, but having difficult health issues, perhaps not as well known that being Wayne and Cleta as “Queenie Jo” who is more Adams. Wayne is in the hosactive in community affairs, pital, Spokane. Prayers and especially, The Royal neighgood thoughts are welcomed bors. Sincere condolences for these two folks. go to Joann and her family. While having a barbeSo the lady in Omak got cue lunch, at the Extended her marijuana store opened. Care Facility, Tonasket, last And I read that there can Friday, where the brightly THIS & THAT be five stores in Okanogan shining sun on the lovely County. Wow, aren’t we the patio, it was so good to see Joyce Emry lucky ones! the residents that were able, Rain, rain, go away! And it to enjoy their lunch outside. It was there we also learned of the death did. Now to see how quickly the gardens

We ask for your support of these ballot measures. Frequently Asked Questions: What is the cost? The levy cost will be 15 cents per $1000, so $15 a year for a $100,000 taxable value of a property. This will bring in an estimated $60,000 per year for 6 years. Who is included in the district? The district includes people who own property in the voting precincts that lie within 15 miles of the city of Tonasket. What will the district do with the funds it collects? Support the city in its maintenance and operation of the new pool and some upgrades to existing parks. Who will run for the commissioner positions? Good question! Are you interested? Is someone you know interested? The five commissioners will represent five areas within the district (similar to the school board). Commissioners are not paid, and serve 4-year terms during which they will create and oversee the budget and recreation plan. If you have further questions or input about the proposed parks and recreation district please contact the pool committee. We can be reached through our website, www.tonasketpool.com, or tonasketpool@gmail.com, P.O. Box 1217, Tonasket, WA 98855 or 509-486-2517. to State Convention but there will be Bingo. The Pick 8 is over $15,000 – you can’t win if you don’t play. Joker Poker is still growing , come in on Saturday night buy your tickets you could win at 7 p.m., you must be present to win. It’s getting time to pay your dues, be a Early Bird and pay now. Pinochle scores are as from this last Sunday are as follows: first and second place tied: Neil Fifer and Ward Seim. Low score to Dale Byers and last pinochle went Nellie Paulsen and Sue Wisener. We wish al those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. other must be turned in. 2 p.m. - Car Awards; drawings for quilt and picture, announcement of winners for candy jar guess (at the Grange Hall). • 2:30 p.m. - Please pick up any unclaimed door prizes at this time. Other afternoon activities: softball/volleyball. All day activities include music, arts/crafts. Door prize tickets will be drawn every half hour from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Door prizes will be handmade item from local residents (thank you all for your donations) Molson tee shirts available for purchase. The days proceeds go to the restoration of the mural on the west side of the Grange Hall. Please join us in making this a fun filled day for all to remember. Need a free table? Call Jeanette Lamont at 509-485-2035. Want to enter the parade? Call Joyce Forthun at 509-485-2163. •

312 S. Whitcomb

and lawns dry out. I’m pleased to announce that LuAnne (Emry) Billings, has been moved from hospital care to Anderson House, 17201, 15th Ave. N.E. Room # 1, Shoreline, WA 98155, for rehabilitation and recovery, after a serious health issue. Doris Hughes had the misfortune to take a fall over her lawn mower and a lawn chair, ending up with some places hurting that she didn’t even know she had. So, when you see her walking much slower than she normally does, you’ll know why. You can tell how healthy a man is by what he takes two at a time... stairs or pills. Nothing upsets a housewife more than when her friends drop in unexpectedly to find the house looking like it usually does.

Ernie Wisdom and Debra Shanks Eagles of the Year

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM

respectively. Thank you Ernie and Debra for all you do for us. The Eagles would like to especially thank Jon Avis and Danny Oliver. They put out our flags at the cemetery on Memorial Day. And they have done it faithfully and respectfully for many years. Thanks guys! District #10 Installation of Officers will be on Sunday, June 28, at 1 p.m at our home Aerie. District meetings are always fun and informative. You needn’t be an officer to participate. All Eagles are welcome to come down and see what’s going on with your Eagles District #10. Keep an eye out for our new reader board. It’s going up soon and will be visible from Main St

OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

It’s time to pay dues! You have until Monday, June 15th. Get ‘er done! Oroville Eagles Aerie and Auxiliary #3865 would like to welcome our new and returning officers. It’s going to be a great year for all our brothers and sisters and the Eagles. The new officers in the Aerie are all trustees and we are expecting good things from these guys. Many of the officers in the Auxiliary are new to their positions. Our expectations of these ladies are high. Good luck girls! Our Eagles of the Year are Ernie Wisdom and Debra Shanks from the Aerie and Auxiliary,

Pancake breakfast scheduled for Saturday SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our Pancake Breakfast is scheduled for this coming Saturday. That’s June 13, at 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Don’t miss a scrumptious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, milk. All for $8, cheap. Bring a friend. Our lineup of speakers and events are: June 16, business meeting, 11 a.m.; June 23, Bergh Funeral Home, Gary Bergh/ Scott Miller, 11 a.m. and June 30, Vickie Everheart/Montigue

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Farms/Wool,11 a.m. Mark your calendars. Thank Ruth LaFrance, and pray for her speedy recovery from knee surgery. We’ve concluded our “School Days” picture contest. It was fun getting to know you better. Thank Betty Steg for that idea. Senior Center lunches next week are: Tuesday, Chicken Cacciatore; Thursday, Meatloaf; Friday, Chicken Cordon Bleu. Suggested donation is $3.50, or $8 for those who are under 60 years, or those who feel that they can give more to support a worth-

and on Golden. For long term planning, mark this one on your calendar! The Eagles Picnic will be on August 15th at Thorndike’s Beach. I don’t know how many years we’ve been doing this there, but it’s always a good time. Start making plans to be there. Has every one seen the new paint job on our building? Jeanie is coming in with her Karaoke Show on June 12, that would be this Friday, and on June 26 as well. Come in and join in the fun! Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw and Tacos. We are People Helping People!

while program. I was reading a study the other day that 80 percent of elder males will eventually develop enlargement of the prostrate. They claimed that pollen extract improved symptoms in 87 percent of the cases. There were big words, such as: 5-lipoxygenase, and diclofenac, which means they know what they’re talking about. With all our dandelions I think we hit the jackpot. Don’t forget to sign up for computer classes. Sign up sheet is in the lunchroom. And thank Tillie Porter. Pinochle Report: Door Prize Bev Holden; Pinochle, Nellie Paulson; High Man, Jim Fry; High Woman, Evelyn Dull. I guess I’m already rich, because, “He is richest who is content with the least.” - Socrates

Tonasket All School Reunion, June 20, 21 Inside picnic at THS Commons on Saturday and breakfast Sunday SUBMITTED BY HELEN CASEY TONASKET ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

TONASKET – The sixth Tonasket All Class Reunion is set for this summer, June 20 and all former THS students are invited to attend. The reunion will be held at the Tonasket High School Commons on Saturday, June 20 with an inside picnic starting at 11:30 a.m., with food served at noon until 4 p.m. The reunion continues on Sunday, June 21 with breakfast at 8:30 a.m., served from 9 a.m until noon. Although only those classes that have held their 50th reunion have been given notices, everyone is invited to attend. It is difficult to keep up with address

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

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changes for all classes so we need to depend on some good old Tigers networking. Pass the word and look for notices in all the valley newspapers, radio stations and the school website- www. tonasket.wednet.edu. Both events will be handicapped accessible with a wheelchair available. We will have a photographer to the take large and all smaller class group pictures. Our attendance numbers are declining because we have fallen behind in receiving class rosters. We need rosters for Classes of 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964 and 1965. Assistance in contacting members from those classes for their rosters will ensure the continuation of representative class groups for future all class reunions. We look forward to a great turnout to re-connect with old friends and to meet new ones. Both meals are $14 each. Checks may be made payable to the Tonasket Alumni Association,

please indicate how many of which meals and for who you are making a reservation for easier accounting. Mail checks to Susan Williams, P.O. Box 41, Tonasket, WA 98855. Questions? Call Joe Buchanan 425-868-4896 or email jbuck590@aol.com

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PAGE A7

JUNE 11, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OROVILLE SENIOR BREAKFAST OROVILLE - The Oroville Senior Center Pancake Breakfast is scheduled for this coming Saturday, June 13, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Don’t miss a scrumptious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, milk. All for $8. Bring a friend.

OROVILLE - Ruby Marchand and Kyle McConnell will perform together at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, June 11. Ruby’s keyboard and vocals combined with Kyle’s vocals, guitar, harmonica, and violin will bring a unique blend of sound to the stage. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-4762861. Check the events calendar on the website at www.estherbricques.com to view upcoming weekly performances.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, June 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096.

Soil Scientist to Lead Discussion CHESAW - Soil Scientist Luke Cerise will discuss the soil environment at the Triple Creek site north of Chesaw on Sunday afternoon, June 14. In this event, Reading the Story of the Land through Soils, community members will learn about the living layer of the earth: soil – where air, water, minerals, and a vast array of macro and microscopic organisms make life on land possible. Climatic processes (such as freeze-thaw and weathering) have acted upon geologic processes (such as glaciation and volcanism) over billions of years to create sand, silt, and clay that make up what is considered soil. This event is free of charge to the community. Due to the nature of the outdoor event, participation is limited, and priority registration will be offered for OHA members. A waiting list is being generated on a first-come, first-serve basis. To begin or renew OHA membership and be first in line to register for the summertime events, community members can visit www.okanoganhighlands. org/support, or contact OHA for more information. Details: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw; email julie@okanoganhighlands.org or call 509-476-2432.

Celebrating Tugboat Captain

shaped signs. No smoking out of your vehicle, alcohol or other drugs. Call Margo Thompson at 509-485-2011 or 509-560-3409 for more information.

Oroville Grange To Meet OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange #985 will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, June 17. The meeting will take place at the Grange 622 Fir St. The meeting begins with a Potluck dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the business meeting at 7 p.m. Topics to be discussed include Grange sponsored dances from Contra to Rock n’ Roll, bulk buying of organic fruits and vegetables, community outreach projects and the upcoming County Fair Grange Booth. The Grange is a long serving community organization. We welcome all new members and interest persons. For more information contact Joseph Enzensperger 509-4764072 or email: jgenz4@gmail. com

longtime friend and accompanist Alisa Milner on fiddle, cello, and harmony vocals. Fans of John Lennon, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and Jackson Browne will feel at home in his music.

Bruce Cool Bench Dedication OROVILLE - There will be a dedication to Bruce Cool on Friday, July 3 at 11 a.m. in Oroville Centennial Park. A bench is being placed in the park in his memory. Cool spent many hours working to make the park a dream and a reality for the communities enjoyment. Everyone is welcome; please come help us honor Mr. B. Cool. Attendees are encouraged to wear WSU crimson and gray.

OHS Class of 1953 Reunion OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1953 will be having their class reunion on Saturay, Aug. 15 at Jerry Forney’s home. A letter to follow. More information at 509-476-2488.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

North Country Car Oroville Food Club Show Bank TONASKET - The North Country Car Club will be having their 26th Annual Car Show on Saturday, June 20 at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. Registration is at 8 a.m. Community Judging from 8 a.m. through 12 p.m.; Award Ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Awards for first, second and third in each of 17 categories, including: Motorcycles, Trucks, Tractors, Teenage, Antique and Newer. For more information call Patti Hill 509-429-2983.

Tonasket Father’s Day Fly-in TONASKET - Tonasket’s 26th Annual Father’s Day Fly-in is Saturday and Sunday, June 20 and June 21. On Saturday there is a steak barbecue from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday starts out with a breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.. There are free plane rides for kids age 8-15. Must register Sunday morning. Lunch Served 11:30 until ? Fun for the Entire Family. For more information call 509-486-4502.

Vacation Bible School TONASKET - Tonasket Free Methodist church in partnership with Hope Lutheran Church of Tonasket will put on a Vacation Bible School June 22-24 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Tonasket High School for children in Kindergarten-8th grade. Children will be challenged to always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks and to give a reason for the hope that they have.

Tonasket Music in the Park

CHESAW - The proud mother of Paul Thompson is having a www.edwardjones.com potluck to celebrate his making TONASKET - Tonasket Music tugboat captain. The event is in the Park starts its annual sumSunday, June 14 at 11 a.m. at the mer series on Friday, June 26 North Country Christian School at 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event campus where he lived and grad- takes place at History Park: on uated high school. The school is Locust Street, between West 1st located at 737 Mary Ann Creek street and West Jonathan Street. Rd., 18 miles from Oroville Music in the Park presents Ian toward Chesaw; 2 1/2 miles from McFeron with Nathaniel Talbot. Chesaw. Justnotfollow heartWhy start athe new holiday tradition? McFeron is Make joinedthis on the tour by

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. Congratulations, Add an ImportantGift Item to Give a Holiday Graduates Your Back-to-school List. That Doesn’t End When “The future belongs to those the Batteries Run Out..” who believe in the beauty of their dreams

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Did you know? We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper

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for theother holidays, call– or visit today. child’s education. Edward Jones can goal – ortocollege savings goals youdeduction stay on track. *Contributions a 529that plan may behelp eligiblecan for ahelp state or credit in success and prosperity. time of year you save fortax a child’s college work with you to develop a strategy to save for certain states for those residents. Start your financial future with a solid strategy. education. Sandra Rasmussen college. One option a 529 college savings To learn more about youriseducation savings options, To learn more, call or visit today. Financial Advisor call orwhere visit today. today’s gift have Edward Jones can work with can you gift to develop abenefits strategy Toplan, make your college savings in tax time for you, members and the child.* to save forfamily college. One option is a 529 college savings 32 N Main St Suite A Sandra Rasmussen

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for the holidays, callforor today. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible a statevisit tax deduction or credit in certain states for those residents. Omak, WA 98841 Advisor plan, where Financial today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, 509-826-1638 32 N Main Suitechild.* A family members andStthe Sandra Rasmussen .

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*Contributions to a 529 plan may be Financial eligible for aAdvisor state tax deduction or credit in 509-826-1638 certain states. for those residents. . www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Congratulations,

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32 N Main St Suite32AN Main St Suite A Graduates “The future belongs to those 98841Omak, WA 98841 believe in the beauty of their dreams.” makeOmak, yourWAcollege savingswhogift in time 509-826-1638 Eleanor Roosevelt

To 509-826-1638 for the holidays, call or visit today.

May your future be full of good health, happiness, success and prosperity. Start your financial future with a solid strategy. To learn more, call or visit today.

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Sandra Rasmussen

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 11:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

www.gazette-tribune.com

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Oroville Free Methodist

OKANOGAN VALLEY

Loomis Community Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Subscribe to the...

LOOMIS

Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

Seventh-Day Adventist

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings where giftsave can for have tax benefits for you, timeplan, of year thattoday’s you help a child’s college family members and the child.* education.

plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, To the make your savings gift in timefor a this time of college year that you help save Developing afuture strategy for achieving your education savings family members and the child.* May your be full of good health, happiness, Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the

Okanogan Valley

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

time of year that you help save for a child’s college education. www.edwardjones.com

*Contributions to a 529 plan mayseason be eligible for a state deduction or credit in For parents, back-to-school means it’stax time to stock certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy up on school supplies. But it can also be a good time to think to save for college. One option is a 529 college savings about how save for child’s future education. Eleanor RooseveltMake Why nottostart ayour new holiday tradition?

Submitted photos

Richard and Margaret Blanchard of Oroville will be celebrating 50 years of marriage with a small family celebration in Wenatchee. The Blanchards were married on June 19, 1965 in Tacoma, Wash. They spent most of their married life in Quesnel, BC Canada and Wenatchee before moving to Oroville in 1995. He is a retired dentist and she a homemaker. They have two children, Jennifer Blanchard of Rock Island, Wash. and Ann Marie (Blanchard) Batdorf of Wenatchee.

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Think Green!

Marchand and McConnell at EB Winery

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 9 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 11, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • June 11, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

2 BR, 2 BATH + UPSTAIRS BALCONY area. Full basement is unfinished. This house has charm, situated in Old Orchard Estates. $149,500. Shown by appt only. Call for details 509322-3471 or please leave message.

For Rent

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CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS $450-$795, Possible 1 month free. 3 BR HOME $750 & $850

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Call Today Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

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Okanogan County Realty, LLC member of the MLS has several listing; home, business, farm, recreational, waterfront and several at Veranda Beach. Kathy 509-429-2040, Ryan 509-429-8564, Brad 509-429-7466. Serving Okanogan County.

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 24 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

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with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

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Puzzle 21 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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Puzzle 17 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

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Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

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Puzzle 14 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

Down

54. Dearie

55. City on the Yamuna River 56. “That’s a ___!�

15. ___ vera

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for two BILINGUAL SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTOR PARAPROS. Bilingual, Bilterate, Bicultural Spanish preferred. Applicants must have an AA degree or higher; or 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment Positions will remain open until filled with the position starting on June 22, 2015. Please apply through the online application on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126. An Equal Opportunity Employer

OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant 3 Full time and 1 Part time on an as needed basis, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required. OROVILLE DENTAL: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis. Bilingual preferred. BREWSTER JAY AVE: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics BREWSTER (INDIAN AVE): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time BRIDGEPORT MED/DENTAL: MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Patient Navigator Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required.

TONASKET MEDICAL: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

www.gazette-tribune.com

16. ___ pneumonia

1. Animal hides

57. And others, for short

17. Luxurious, chauffeur-drivern car

2. “Four Quartets� poet

60. Infomercials, e.g.

19. A Muse

3. Buzz

61. After expenses

20. “___ bad!�

4. 1969 Peace Prize grp.

21. Catch, as flies

5. Fine, soft goat wool

22. Affixes in a scrapbook, say

6. Assumed name

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Estate Sales Tonasket

Okanogan County Department of Public Works is recruiting for the position of

Engineering Technician IV For more information go to www.okanogancounty. org/HR or call 509-422-7300 Okanogan Estate and Vineyards Retail Store Looking for 24 – 32 hrs/wk SALES ASSOCIATE.

Please send resume to Yvaldovinos@gold diggerapples.com or drop off resume at retail store 1205 Main St, Oroville

School Bus Driver The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for A SCHOOL BUS DRIVER. Current CDL, passenger and S endorsements, first aid, and drug testing required. Position will remain open until filled. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126.

Wanted WANTED TO BUY: Paying Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. Spence: 509-429-4722.

ESTATE SALE: Gerald Oakes. June 12-13-14. 9am- 5pm Friday & Saturday 9am - 3pm on Sunday. CA Storage room FULL. Off Longanecker Rd, watch for signs. CA rooms behind Rodeo Grounds. (509)486-0955

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JUNE 8, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ADOPTION

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Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

57. “... or ___!�

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BILINGUAL SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTOR PARAPROS

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45. Calendar square

24. American symbol

Announcements

We have the following opportunities available:

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Puzzle 23 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

22. Congratulations, of a sort

43. Safe to fly

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

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18. Grammar topic

41. Resides

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Help Wanted

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Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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14. Twelfth month of the Jewish calendar

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37. Face-to-face exam

67. Rip

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10. Ridge of land between two parallel faults

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Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

58. Basic monetary unit of Romania

1. “Frasier� actress Gilpin

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28. Witty remark

38. Little people

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26. “Act your ___!�

7. Marathon

8. “Malcolm X� director

40. A chip, maybe

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ANSWERS

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25. Butter up?

62. Carries on

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59. Annoy

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www.gazette-tribune.com

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Crosswords

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509-476-3602

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Sponsored by

ORCHARD WORK during cherry harvest, in Oroville. Approx. June 18th till end of harvest. Sorting and misc chores, 5 AM till finished. Male or female Age 15 and above. Call 509-476-2350 8

ANSWERS

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RV SPACE

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OROVILLE LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $435 per month. 509-476-3145

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Health General

TONASKET

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BALTA, NORTH DAKOTA 1037 acres, on bids contact: grosslandsale@aol. com, (1) Legal-lots 2,3 & 4, Section 4-154-73, containing (120) acres, tax parcel 03954000, taxes $752; (2) Legal S1/2SW1/4, NW1/4SE1/4, NE1/4SW1/4, Section 4-154-73, (160) acres, tax parcel 03959000, 2014, taxes $890; (3) Legal S1/2NW1/4, NW1/4SW1/4, Section 4-154-73 (120) acres, tax parcel 03957000, 2014, taxes $680; (4) Legal S1/2NE1/4, section 5-15473, (80) acres, tax parcel 03964000, 2014 taxes $576; (5) Legal NW1/4SE1/4, NE1/4SE1/4, Section 5-154-73, (80) acres, tax parcel 03965000, 2014 taxes $674; (6) Legal N1/2SE1/4, SW1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NE1/4, Section 18-154-73, (160) acres, tax parcel 04043000, 2014 taxes $244; (7) Legal S1/2SE1/4, Section 18154-73, (80) acres, tax parcel 04049000, 2014 taxes $116; (8) Legal, E1/2NE1/4, LESS SOO, RT W2A, Section 19-154-73, (78) acres, tax parcel 04050000, 2014 taxes $215; (9) Legal SW1/4, Section 27154-73, (160) acres, tax parcel 04099000, 2014 taxes $354; This information was taken from the 2014 tax statement of Pierce County, ND, bids will be considered on all or any parcel, there will not be any set bidding & sellers waive all bidding & selling irregularities, bids may be emailed to grosslandsales@aol.com , sellers consulting firm, jjlarueconsultingfirm, Jack Hoffner owner. Total cash rent 2014, $33,993....701-799-9151

CHESTER & MARY HEMPHILL - MOVING AUCTION 4 Okanogan Street - MALOTT, WA. SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 2015 - 10:00 a.m.

Between Okanogan and Malott on Old Hwy 97, turn West on N. Malott Rd. and go to Okanogan Street. Sale on corner. NOTE - Chet & Mary have sold their home after 40+ years in Malott and will be moving. Good selection of Shop Tools and Items and some Household & Misc. PARTIAL LISTING BELOW

* **1983 * * 26-ft * * *Aluma * * *Lite * *XL* Motorhome, * * * * * * 454 * *Motor, * * * Self-contained, ********

New Water Tank * 1983 Ford 3000 Tractor w/Freeman Loader & Bucket * Woods Offset Mower * 6-ft Rotovator * 6-ft Blade * Forks * Honda EM 650 Generator * Lincoln Welder, 225 amp * Oxy-Acet Set w/Bottles & Cart * 2 Drill Presses * Craftsman Table Saw & Band Saw * Sanborne Air Compressor * DeWalt Reciprocating Saw * Bench Grinder * B&D Jigsaw * Impact Wrenches * Large Anvil w/Hardie * Grinders & Polishers * Battery Charger * Acme Circle Saw Sharpener * Wordworking Tools * MANY Hand Tools * Cub Cadet Riding Lawnmower * Yard & Garden Items * 2 Pickup Canopies * Picnic Table * Exercise Bike * Camping Items * Old Bicycle * Cream Can * Dining room Table & Chairs * Organ * Dishes * Pots & Pans * Breadmaker * Bedding * MUCH MORE CALL & WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL, OR FAX YOU A HANDBILL * Sales Tax Will Be Charged * No Buyers Premium * Food Available

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

ADOPTION: A Loving Financially Secure Family, Laughter, Travel, Beaches, Music awaits 1st baby. *Expenses paid* *1-800-362-7842* HELP WANTED Drivers - No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! We support every driver, every day, every mile! Call Central Refrigerated Home. (888)793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com

Public Notices Civil Service Exam The City of Tonasket Civil Service Commission will be testing for a Chief of Police eligibility list on Friday July 10, 2015. Call 509-486-2132 for an application packet or write to City of Tonasket, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 pm, July 6th, 2015. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer

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JUNE 11, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY June 11, 2015 |• O KANOGAN V ALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Civil Service Secretary Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG636938

The above Court has appointed Kevin James Myrick as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 28, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Kevin James Myrick, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG634032

Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 28, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for William R. Jarrell III, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG634033

the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 28, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Richard L. Forrester, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173, Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG634034

court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this timeframe, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. /s/Jane E. Gilbertsen Jane E. Gilbertsen, Personal Representative Attorneys for Personal Representative and address for mailing or service: Dean V. Butler, WSBA #9649 Carney Badley Spellman, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Phone: (206) 622-8020 Fax: (206) 467-8215 Court of Probate Proceedings: King County Superior Court 516 Third Avenue Seattle, Washington 98104 Probate Cause Number: 15-4-03039-3 SEA Date of Filing with Court: May 18, 2015 Date of First Publication: May 28, 2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG635017

RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 11, 2014 Personal Representative: Peter Crane P.O. Box 277 Brewster WA 98812 Attorneys for Personal Representative: Bryan J. Maroney, WSBA No. 36966 of Davis, Arneil Law Firm, LLP 617 Washington Wenatchee, Washington 98807 509/662-3551 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 11, 18, 25, 2015. #OVG638392

Okanogan County Notice of Final Decision Project: LPA 2015-1 “Nickel Cove Subdivision & Rezone” Proponent: Elmer & Ricka Nickel Decision: Approved Appeal Deadline: July 1, 2015 The Okanogan County Hearing Examiner approved the above-noted project. Within 21 calendar days of the publication date, parties with standing may appeal this decision to Okanogan County Superior Court pursuant to OCC 2.65.140 and RCW 36.70C. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 11, 2015. #OVG638259 PUBLIC NOTICE SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Notice is hereby given that the Oroville City Council will hold a public hearing for the purpose of reviewing and adopting the Six Year Transportation Program for the years 20162021, at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, June 16, 2015 in the City Council Chambers. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG636961 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of JUANITA LEE MYRICK, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00044-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of MARGARET E. JARRELL, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00043-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed William R. Jarrell III as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a)

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In re the Estate of: STEPHEN LIGHTNER NOURSE, Deceased. NO. 15-4-03039-3 SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The person named below has been appointed as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Stephen Lightner Nourse, the above-entitled decedent (“Decedent”). Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of BARBARA JEAN FORRESTER, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00036-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Richard L. Forrester as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT NEWTON BRAMMER, Deceased. No. 15-4-00053-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS

REAL ESTATE GUIDE Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

SUN 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA LAKES 509-476-2121 REALTY Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker 17 OrO Beach #4

Beautiful Lake Osoyoos Waterfront Lot in Oro Beach resort Lot is directly on 500+ feet of sandy beach. Includes 2nd building lot. Water, sewer & power to both lots are ready for your new beach home.

$98,900

32 BLackLer rd.

163 ft of prime beach frontage on West Lake Osoyoos. One level home , additional small cottage for extra guests and/or storage. convenient location. a MUST See!

$429,900

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

HILLTOP REALTY OMAK BUILDING LOT: 1.08 acres per survey. Sand Flat Road.

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Truly beautiful acreage with great lake views! Nearly 20 acres with well. Great hunting and fishing in the many lake recreation area. MLS#683232 $49,900

Level. Power. Domestic & Irrigation Water. Can Build Duplex or Private Home. No others like it. Good Value. $40,000.00 BUYERS WANT: Small home on 2 to 5 acres. Barn ? Omak to Malott. Cash Buyer. Up to $160,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

www.windermere.com

Find The Right

509/476-3378

HOME

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

514 Golden

4 bedroom home with a fully fenced, large backyard. Floors in kitchen and dining room have been replaced with laminate. Room in back to add a garage. Close to elementary school. NWML#773162 $160,000

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602

To advertise in the Real Estate Guide call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Attorney

GUNN LAW OFFICES RYAN W. GUNN Attorney at Law

n Family

Law

n Criminal

n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil

Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

Building Supplies

Equipment Rental

Concrete

MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

Quality Supplies Since 1957

Midway Building Supply

RENTAL RENTAL RENTAL

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Email: ryan@gunnlawoffices.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Storage

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ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC LIC.#ALLVAVI945DC

Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Installed Fiberglass Insulation / Blown & Batt Ask about our spray foam  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced, Professional Service 

SUPPLIERS OF:

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates! – Pumping Truck Available –

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SPORTS & OUTDOORS

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 11, 2015

Reading the story of the land through soils OHA Presents: Summertime Highland Wonders SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OKANOGAN HIGHLANDS ALLIANCE

CHESAW - On Sunday, June 14 Soil Scientist Luke Cerise will discuss the soil environment at the Triple Creek site north of Chesaw. In this event, community members will learn about the living layer of the earth: soil – where air, water, minerals, and a vast array of macro and microscopic organisms make life on land possible. Climatic processes (such as freeze-thaw & weathering) have acted upon geologic processes (such as glaciation & volcanism) over billions of years to create sand, silt, and clay that make up

what is considered soil. “Soil without microbes is just weathered rock,” Luke says. “Soil organisms consume plant material, recycle and make nutrients available, filter and purify contaminates out of water moving through the soil profile, and many other ecosystem services; it is truly where the magic happens.” The Okanogan Highlands have a rich geologic history that very few were witness to, but we can look for clues hidden within the soil and compare that with contemporary geologic information to read the land for clues into the past. “Soils help to tell the story of a particular place, like reading a book, and this event will provide a way to help see the pages.” Luke Cerise earned a Bachelor of Science in Forest & Range Ecology from the University of Idaho, and went on to earn a Masters degree in Soil & Land

Resources, from the same university. Between the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the USDA Forest Service, Luke has worked seven years as a professional soil scientist. He was drawn to study soil science because it is the foundation of terrestrial ecology and provides us with so many ecological services; fiber, food, clean water and countless others, but soil is still shrouded in a certain mystery of how these intricate processes function. Due to the nature of the outdoor event, participation is limited, and priority registration will be offered for OHA members. A waiting list is being generated on a first-come, first-serve basis. To begin or renew OHA membership and be first in line to register for the summertime events, community members can visit www.okanoganhighlands. org/support, or contact OHA for

more information. This event will take place in the afternoon to accommodate a greater cross section of the community; further details will be provided to those who register for the field trip. To sign up for this event, email julie@okanoganhighlands.org or call 509-476-2432. OHA is a non-profit organization that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The Highland Wonders educational series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources by helping increase awareness of local natural history. Donations are always welcome. Details are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw.

Submitted photo

Luke Cerise, a soil scientist, will talk about soil environment on the Triple Creek site near Chesaw on June 14.

PNTA celebrates National Trails Day BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Volunteers from the Oroville chapter of the Pacific National Trails Association (PNTA) braved high temperatures Saturday, June 6, to celebrate National Trails Day by working on the Whistler Canyon Trail. An afternoon bike ride up the Similkameen Trail to Enloe Dam was attended by just four people robust enough to endure the afternoon heat for the eightmile pedal. “The bike ride was in the heat of the day, but a lot of the trail was shaded and there was a nice breeze,” said Dave Tobey. A cookout was held at the

Oroville Visitor Center afterward, with prizes given out including National Trails Day T-shirts and other items from the American Hiking Society. National Trails Day events took place in every state across the country and included hikes, biking and horseback rides, paddling trips, birdwatching, geocaching, gear demonstrations, stewardships projects and more. All events are listed at www. nationaltrailsday.org. The next meeting of the Oroville Chapter of the PNTA will be on June 24 at the Oroville Grange Hall. A meet, greet, and eat is scheduled for 6:00 p.m., with the business meeting starting at 7:00 p.m. New members are always welcome.

Photo by Trygve Culp

Volunteers (left to right) Peggy Swanberg, Phil Christy, Mark Swanberg, Dave Tobey, Sharon Pearl, Steve Shimmel, Stuart Pearl and (not pictured) Trygve Culp performed trail work on the Whistler Canyon Trail Saturday, June 6, as part of National Trails Day.

Tennis players named to CWL All League Six tennis tennis players from Oroville and Tonasket were named to this year’s Central Washington “B” League All League Teams. Coaches across the league vote on the ten best players for First Team. The next bet ten players are named to Second Team, and the third group of ten are given Honorable Mention.

2015 CWL Boys’ Tennis All League Nathan Hugus of Oroville was named to First Team for Boys Singles. Joseph Sarmiento and Connor Bocook of Tonasket were named to Second Team Boys Doubles. Tonasket’s Caleb Hardesty received Honorable Mention.

2015 CWL Girls’ Tennis All League Aspen Verhasselt of Tonasket was named to Second Team Girls Singles, and Ballie Hirst of Tonasket was named Honorable Mention for Girls Singles. In Girls Doubles, Tonasket’s Mandy Wilson and Johnna Terris were given Honorable Mention.

HORNET GOLF TRIO BACK FROM STATE

James Glover/submitted photo

Cayden Field, Jordyn Smith and Bryce Glover have returned from state competition at Columbia Point Golf Course in Richland, Wash. Smith and Field each made it to the second day of play, while Glover did not. Field, who attends Tonasket High School, finished sixth and Smith finished nineth. All three were named to the Central Washington 2B All League Team, according to their proud coach, DeHaven Hill.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville Hornet Faith Martin was named to Central Washington “B” League All League Softball’s Honorable Mention, along with teammates Rachelle Nutt and Courtnee Kallstrom. Martin’s photo was left out of the All League photo collage in the May 28 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune. We regret the error.


APRIL 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SCHOOLS Tonasket Eighth Grade Promotion

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachou/staff photo

Tonasket Middle School students show off certificates of promotion from eighth grade to the high school Monday, June 8. The motto of the 2019 graduating class is “Don’t tell me the sky’s the limit when there are footprints on the moon.”

TMS Principal Jay Tyus was very surprised during the Eighth Grade Promotion when he was given a plague that read “Presented to our Principal Jay Anthony Tyus in heartfelt appreciation of your dedication and service to all the students and families of the Tonasket School District. Thank You! June 8, 2015.” Shown here presenting the plague to Tyus is Brianna Guiterrez Carbajal.

Music and dance from around the world at Tonasket Elementary TES hosts multicultural celebration BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket Elementary School’s Spring Music Program was a multicultural celebration of song and dance from several countries. All grade levels sang a traditional song and danced a traditional dance, with kindergartners representing the United States with the Bunny Hop, first graders showcasing Cuba with the Conga, second graders highlighting the United States with the Cupid Shuffle, third graders celebrating

Mexico with the Mexican Hat Dance, fifth graders honoring Israel with the Zum Gali Gali Dance, and fourth graders showcasing France with song, dance and selections on recorders; performing France’s La Guimbarde Scarf Dance. Ms. Arlene Johnson accompanied the singers on piano, and Mr. Jay Aitcheson served as Sound Man. AmeriCorps members helped with set-up and entertainment of students off-stage. Music Director Gail Morris put the program together in a few short months; leading the children through dances during the performance and calling out the steps during the Scarf Dance.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket Elementary School Music Director Gail Morris leads First Graders through a Conga during last Thursday’s (June 4) Spring Multicultural Music Program.

FAMILY MAKES MEMORIAL DONATION Submitted photo

During the 81st Annual May Festival the Milicia Family presented the Oroville High School Marching Band with a Drum Major Mace in memory of Sarah Milicia, class of 1957. The current Drum Major for the OHS Marching Band is Maxwell Turner, Sarah’s great-nephew, seen here with Oroville Music Director Eric Stiles. The Milicia Family called Oroville home from 1945-1965 and six of the nine siblings graduated from OHS between 1951 and 1965.

SPRING CONCERT AT OROVILLE ELEMENTARY

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Students from the fourth, fifth and sixth grades at Oroville Elementary School performed in a Spring Concert at the end of May under the guidance of Music Director Eric Stiles. The younger students played the recorder, while the older students played a variety of traditional brass, wind and percussion instruments.

Reading Corps coming to town Early childhood literacy program will replace current K-12 AmeriCorps positions Program Director Nick Porter. “We are more broad and can do more things with more people. Tonasket School District We can help students with math, received a Washington Reading science and history; and our Corps grant for the 2015/2016 members this year and in previous years would take it upon school year. This grant will provide four themselves to go to the monthAmeriCorps member slots to the ly PAC meetings and help out district to support K-3 literacy in with a lot of projects serving in the school and the elementary ommunity school and its “I think the Reading citself. ” early literacy/ Corps program...will Porter said school readiness program. be good for Tonasket A m e r i C o r p s been in “We are very because of the large has the Tonasket excited about population of English School District this opportunity to supas a Second Language for over fifteen years. port not only Students.” “I think the students at our Nick Porter Reading Corps elementary Program Director program, speschool, but also New Alliance AmeriCorps cialized in just parents with reading, will children ages be good for zero to five,” said grant writer Bob Ashmore. Tonasket because of the large “This program will provide free population of English as a Second books to families, family literacy Language students,” said Porter. Anyone interested in becomnights, after school tutoring and ing a volunteer with the Reading summer programs.” The K-3 Reading Corps pro- Corps program is invited to stop gram will replace the AmeriCorps by the Tonasket School District program currently in the school, Office or the elementary school which worked with students in office to pick up an application form. grades K-12. AmeriCorps volunteers receive “We are very versatile in what we can do in the K-12 education a small living stipend and a $5,000 program, whereas the Reading education award after completion Corps program is very focused of service that can be used to in just literacy-based programs,” attend college or to pay back stusaid New Alliance AmeriCorps dent loans. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE |JUNE 11, 2015

OBITUARIES

Elizabeth “Betty” Descoteaux

ELIZABETH ‘BETTY’ DESCOTEAUX Elizabeth “Betty” Descoteaux, age 87 of Oroville, passed away

Verle Harnasch

VERLE HARNASCH Verle Harnasch passed away on Monday, May 4, 2015 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center, Richland, Washington. He was born in Chesaw, Washington on August 15, 1916, the third of seven children, to William and Lucille Harnasch.

Walter ‘Walt’ Joos

Thursday, June 04, 2015 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. She was born December 15, 1927 in Montreal, Quebec Canada to parents Harry and Annie Cowling. Betty grew up in Montreal and Kitchener, Ontario. She met Albert Descoteaux in Montreal and they married in May 1946 in Concord, New Hampshire. Her husband, Albert, served with the U.S. Air Force and together they lived in several different places. In 1957, they moved to Oroville where Betty worked in the Apple Warehouses and later as a cook at the School Cafeteria. She enjoyed knitting, reading, walking, picnics and family celebrations. Betty was a member of Immaculate Conception Catholic Church and was a Past President of the Catholic Altar Society. She was also a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, the Oroville Grange and the Oroville Senior Citizens Center where she was the site director for a number

of years. Surviving relatives include sons: John (Beth) of Chatham, Ontario, Gene (Patricia) of Omak, Joe of Omak and Adrian of Seattle; sister: Stella Hudson of Nova Scotia; nine grandchildren and 16 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband Albert, daughter Joanne, two grandsons, Chris and Ray and three brothers, Harry, Ken and Oliver. A Rosary will be held on Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 7 p.m. and A Mass of Christian Burial will be Friday, June 12, 2015 at 10 a.m. Both will be held at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Oroville with Father Jose Maldonado officiating. Interment will be at Oroville Riverview Cemetery. A potluck luncheon will follow in the church basement. Memorials may be made to Immaculate Conception Catholic Church.

In April 1921 the then family of seven moved to Oroville, Wash. by horse and wagon and settled on a small farm just north of town off the road to Canada. Verle worked throughout his school years on the family farm and helped his dad when hired by others in ranching or agriculture. He graduated from Oroville High School in 1935. After high school he worked in the orchards except for a short time away from Oroville working on the Northern Pacific Railroad in the Tri-Cities and Pullman areas. While working on the railroad he became engaged to Norene Sherwood, whom he had met in Oroville. They were married in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho on July 4, 1942. Verle became the manager of Bee Kay Orchards, owned by James C. Kernan, Sr. and moved on the property in February 1948. Retiring in 1981, Verle and Norene remained living on the property, enjoying 19 years of winters in Arizona, until they moved to an independent living facility in Kennewick, Wash. in 2013.

Verle always kept busy whether it was with working in the orchard, growing his vegetable or flower gardens, or building or repairing something. He enjoyed fishing, boating and water skiing in his more active days. He will always be remembered for his loyalty, his friendly nature - never meeting a stranger, and his quick wit. Verle is survived by his wife of almost 73 years, Norene, Kennewick, his two daughters, Marsha (Mark) Kuntz, Kennewick, and Nancy Harnasch, Redmond, WA, three grandsons, one granddaughter, their spouses, six great grandchildren, one step great grandchild, and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and six siblings. A Celebration of Life will be held at 12 p.m., Saturday, June 27, at the American Legion in Oroville. Please join in remembering and reminiscing about the joy and fun Verle brought to his family and friends. Donations in his memory can be made to City of Oroville Ambulance, P.O. Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844

WALTER ‘WALT’ JOOS

and that is where he wanted to be and was when he passed away. Winters made it difficult to get to the cabin, but he stated he was going to do all he could to be there this winter... That will absolutely happen now! Walt has two sons, Michael (Mike) and Daniel (Dan); three grandsons Tylor, Joseph and Spencer; loving brother Anton (Tony) and sister-in-law Maria; niece Christine and nephew Martin. A memorial service will happen in July and those close to him will be notified prior to the event! We would like to thank the whole town for the hospitality and friendship you gave Walt. You truly gave him a place that felt like home!

Walter “Walt” Joos was loved by many and cherished by many more. He had a gentle, giving sole and would help anyone he could... even if it meant going without himself. He loved his neighbors and friends on the hill and his local morning meeting table at Shannon’s where he would learn all he could about life in Tonasket. For all of his life, he loved being outdoors. Camping and fishing topped his list of loves, but he always held a dream in his heart for a cabin nestled in the woods that he could call home. A few years back, that dream came true

Community urged to prepare for early fire season

Boy Scouts offer their assistance BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Council Member Jill Vugteveen, a USFS employee, reported at the May 25 council meeting that it was time to start thinking about fire danger. “We are about a month and a half ahead of the season. And with the Fourth of July coming up, you have the source to ignite that stuff,” she said. “That stuff ” she referred to includes any “ladder fuels” around properties. Vugteveen suggested people back stuff away from their homes and garages, and cut down any brush. “Look behind your sheds, behind your fence lines. Look for continuities,” suggested Building Official/Fire Marshall/Permit Administrator Christian Johnson. “Like Jill said, fire season is early.” Dallin Good spoke up and volunteered help from Boy Scout Troop #27 out of Oroville for anyone needing help clearing brush and stuff from around their homes. To reach the troop, call Steve Quick at (509) 560-3641 or Brent Timm at (509) 429-7690.

STORM WATER PLAN ADDRESSED Johnson reported four property owners suffering damage due to the run off after the last storm, and said the city has drain problems due to weather changes resulting in an increase in storms. He said he met with City Superintendent Hugh Jensen and the two of them came up with a solution that would cost about $10,000 for the next ten years and involve placing subsurface structures under the roads that would capture water and hold it until the

DENTISTRY

Keith “Squeak” Grey

KEITH ‘SQUEAK’ GREY

He later married Alice Anderson (Cook) and they had one son. Keith was preceded in death by his parents, one son, John; brother, Don Defrain and sister, Deloris. He is survived by his wife, Florence; two sons, Ray of Wauconda and Alan (Wilma) of Tonasket and one daughter, Virginia (Mark) Gordon of Anchorage, Alaska; sister-inlaw, Donna Defrain of Tulelake, Calif.; and seven grandchildren; eight great grandchildren; one great great grandchild and many nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held August 15, 2015 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Eagles.

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OTHER BUSINESS Johnson reported “exhausting all neighborly directive requirements” to owners of an abandoned building and property on Tonasket Ave South, and has issued a work order to Jensen to abate the building. “By your next meeting, you should have some bids to do the project, so you should plan on moving some money to pay for about two days worth of work and about $1,000 worth of dump fees,” said Johnson on May 25. The work order includes reducing the fire and health hazard potential by removing the garbage and debris; and securing the building from entry. A property on West Jonathan Street lacking maintenance and sitting next to an open field with

dry grass and a large dead tree was also discussed, with Johnson reporting the owners have been sent three letters a year for the last six years. According to Johnson, a shoreline permit was expected to be issued the first week in June to begin work on the pedestrian bridge near Legacy Park. Olson circulated a list of rules submitted by Linda Black regarding the Splash Park for the council to look over, with the anticipation of the park opening sometime in June. Olson said one bid had been received for building a road into the park, and they were trying to get a couple others. Vugteveen said she would enlist volunteers to paint the park restrooms if there was money available to purchase the paint. Interim Police Chief Darren Curtis said he was approached by people at Chief Tonasket Park wanting handicapped parking along the stretch of road now closed to parking. “They said since there was no designated spot, then someone with a handicap placard should be able to park wherever they want; I told them no, but I would bring it up at council,” said Curtis. Options were discussed, including building a handicapped viewing space for people to sit in their cars to watch the games. Johnson said with a viewing spot only, the city is not responsible for guaranteeing the ground around it as safe for walking. Curtis asked if a spot was designated for handicapped viewing, and the person left their car, would they then be eligible for a ticket? Olson said traffic flow would change with the opening of the Splash Park; and again in a couple years with the opening of the south entrance, so he didn’t see the sense in building a parking spot. It was decided since the park is in flux, handicapped viewers could be offered use of one of the four parking spots available near the restrooms.

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Care Credit

Keith Leroy Grey, 86, of Tonasket, Washington, passed away May 21, 2015 at his home. He was born August 20, 1928 in Onida, South Dakota to Ralph and Lillian (Grove) Grey. He came to Okanogan County in 1944. He then began working at Dwinnell Brothers Orchard. He helped support the family and put his siblings through school. He went to work in the woods and was a cat skinner until he retired. He was the last of a long line of old time loggers. He loved to read and took advantage of his library card. Squeak was a member of the Tonasket Eagles and Legion. He married Muriel (Mert) Talbot and together they had three children.

rest of the water passed out and the water held could be released. Johnson said the project would work within budgetary constraints and show incremental improvements over the next few years, with water coming from uphill taking longer to flow down. “Every year we would install one, and after about five years we would see improvement,” Johnson said. “It’s a project small enough where when regular things come up, we can leave it and tend to immediate needs without having the whole city torn up.” Mayor Patrick Plumb said now that the city’s population is over 1,000 there should be funds available from WADOT. Tonasket’s population was 994 at the 2000 census and increased 3.8% to 1,032 at the 2010 census. “We need to have a storm water facilities plan in place to be eligible for certain funds,” said Plumb. “We have to sit down and really look at numbers, as we have to have matching funds set aside.” Council Member Scott Olson said any money spent on incremental improvements should count as matching funds for a grant.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 11, 2015  

June 11, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 11, 2015  

June 11, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune