Page 1

Local athletes heading to

WINE AND WOOL NITE

State competitions

Gathering of fiber producers on Friday, May 29 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Pastime

See Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Cougar makes early morning appearance in Tonasket

NEVER FORGET

Here’s what to do if you encounter a big cat BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

After a moving ceremony at Oroville’s Riverview Cemetery, members of the American and Canadian Legions stop on the 12th Street Bridge to drop wreaths into the Similkameen River, to honor the memory of those servicemen and women lost their lives at sea.

TONASKET - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDF&W) Police received a call about a cougar treed by a dog on Seventh Street in Tonasket Thursday, May 20. Sargent Dan Christensen said the dog’s owner heard his dog barking, and noticed the cougar in the tree around 4 a.m. He saw it jump down and head up Highway 20 about 20 minutes later. Christensen said WDF&W police officer Troy McCormick responded to the call, and notified both school and police about the incident. The area the cougar was in is close to a trail used by students to access the school from Seventh Street. “We will obviously continue to monitor the area,” said Christensen, adding that a sighting was just a sighting; not necessarily a danger. “The good sign is, the cat went up the tree instead of becoming aggressive with the dog,” he said. “If people want to be concerned for their kids’ safety, there are a lot more dangerous things to worry about, such as the sex offender hanging out at The Junction a couple weeks ago.” Christensen said both he and McCormick were part of the community, with kids attending the Tonasket schools; so they, too, were invested in monitoring the area. According to Christensen, there’s only been three recorded fatalities from cougars in Washington since we became a state and only one was from a cat in the wild; the other two got killed by cougars they were keeping as “pets.” “He could be just passing through. It’s a really dry year, so the critters are going to go to the water, and Bonaparte

Creek is right along Seventh Street,” said Christensen, adding that the biggest killer of cats is other cats; and with all the domestic cats roaming the area, it becomes a bit of a “McDonald’s for cougars.” Christensen said cougars generally roam a 150-square mile radius; with one male, three females and their offspring occupying the same area. “The good habitat is taken over by the big, experienced male cats; so we generally see the young and inexperienced cats in marginal areas close to people,” he said. Tonasket Elementary School Principal Jeremy Clark said police would have “a visible presence in the neighborhood through dismissal time” on May 20, and the school district put out a public service announcement on the radio. Clark also advised parents and staff to review the ‘Encountering a Cougar’ release from the state. Christensen, who said nine out of ten calls are not legitimate, advised people sighting cougars to call the Washington State Patrol at 509-422-3800. Some things to remember in case of an encounter: • Stop, pick up small children immediately, and don’t run. Running and rapid movements may trigger an attack. • Remember, at close range, a cougar’s instinct is to chase. • Face the cougar and talk to it firmly while slowly backing away. Always leave the animal an escape route. • Try to appear larger than the cougar. Get above it (e.g., step up onto a rock or stump). If wearing a jacket, hold it open

SEE COUGAR | PG A4

Founders Day celebrates 80th year of traditions BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s 80th Annual Founders’ Day is going to be all about ‘Celebrating Tonasket!’ The fun begins Thursday, May 28, at the Rodeo Grounds with a BBQ at 5:30 p.m. and kids’ games at 7 p.m. The Founders’ Day Rodeo, hosted by Tonasket Comancheros Inc., features Touring Pro Division Bull Riding, along with ranch style romp riding with local riders; local team, ropers and barrel racers. Friday’s (May 29) rodeo events begin at 7 p.m. at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds, and Saturday’s (May 30) events begin at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for kids ages six to 12. Contracted to bring in all the stock for the rodeo is Mike Cory, formerly of Tonasket. “He’s one of the nation’s best stock contractors, and we got him so we would be more locally involved,” said Tonasket Comancheros President Roger Sawyer. “The PBR, as of last word from Colorado, says we’ve got ten of the top 15 trained pro division riders in the nation coming.” Reigning over this year’s rodeo is Sarah Quinlan of Chesaw, crowned Miss

Tonasket Rodeo 2015 last fall. Quinlan said she has been busy traveling around the state and county promoting “our hometown rodeo and sharing the sport of rodeo with others.” Other royalty to watch for at Founders’ Day are Okanogan County Junior Rodeo Association Queen Emily Stevens, Junior Miss Rodeo Washington Riata Sage Marchant, Okanogan County Fair Queen Lexi Howell, and, new this year Miss Republic Royalty Ericka Ricard representing the city of Republic and the Republic Chamber of Commerce. A full day of events in town kick off Saturday morning with the Tonasket Freedom 5K Community Fun Run, hosted by the Tonasket Lions. It takes place on the high school track, with registration at 7:30 a.m. and the run starting at 8 a.m. There is also a 1K run for kids. The 6th Annual Vendor Fair on 3rd Street will feature vendors of all types, including food, crafts and artwork; with booths set up at 9 a.m. and some staying open until 9 p.m. A plant sale takes place at the Tonasket Visitor Center from 9 a.m. until noon. The Tonasket Library holds their book sale Thursday, May 28 and Friday, May 29 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in city hall council chambers, next to the library.

Parade line-up begins at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, with check-in at the Wells Fargo Bank parking lot. Judging takes place at 10 a.m. and the parade begins at 11 a.m. Founders’ Day Grand Marshals Ray and Victoria Attwood will be waving to parade spectators from a seat in a classic automobile. “The most exciting thing about Founders’ Day I am looking forward to is getting to ride in one of Ken McLean’s Model A Fords,” Ray Attwood said after being chosen Grand Marshal. Last year’s parade featured over 50 entries. Celebrations in town continue long into the evening, with the Second Annual Street Dance and Beer Garden. “It was a hit last year,” said Tonasket Chamber of Commerce President Julie Alley. “But people wished it was longer, so we’re going to give them longer,” added Kari Alexander, last year’s Grand Marshal and ongoing parade organizer. The street dance shut down at 9 p.m. last year, but this year it will continue until 11 p.m., featuring two local bands The North Half begins playing at 5 p.m., and the Outer Space Blues Band takes the stage at 8:30 p.m..

Katie Teachout/ staff photo

Sarah Quinlan of Chesaw, seen here at this year’s Tonasket Junior Rodeo, is the 2015 Miss Tonasket Rodeo. The weekend’s musical celebrations begin Friday night with the Outer Space Blues Band at the Eagles from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., D.J. Karl at The Kuhler, and Reggie Miles performing at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center beginning

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at 7 p.m., following a 6 p.m. pizza dinner. Saturday night’s music continues after the Street Dance, with The Company Band playing at the Kuhler from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m., and Karaoke with Linda at the Eagles.

PLLC • Probate

Omak Office: 7 N. Main Street, Omak, WA 98841 • Chelan Office: 312 E. Trow, Chelan, WA 98816 • P.O. Box 532 Omak, WA 98841

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 22

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

News Business Cops & Courts

A2 A3 A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Sports A10-11

Classifieds Real Estate Schools

A10-11 A11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 28, 2015

WELCOME Schedule of Events

Queen: Sarah Quinlan

to the

Thursday, May 28 BBQ and Kids Games at the Rodeo Grounds

Friday, May 29  PBR at 7 p.m.

at the Rodeo Grounds

 Live Music at the Eagles

8 p.m. - 2 a.m. Outer Space Blues Band  DJ Karl will be at The Kuhler

80 th TONASKET FOUNDERS DAY Celebrate Tonasket

Saturday, May 30

 Freedom 5K 8 a.m.

Photos by Katie Teachout

Festivities Include:

Vendors of all types throughout town! Cotton Candy, Pop and Water Visitor Center Plant Sale, 9 a.m. - Noon Library Book Sale on Thurs. & Fri., May 28 & 29, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

at the THS Track (sponsored by the Lion’s Club)  Vendors on 3rd Street, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.  PARADE 11 a.m.  PBR at 2 p.m. at the Rodeo Grounds  Concessions and a Beer Garden will be open at the Street Dance...  Live Music at The Kuhler 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. The Company Band  Karaoke with Linda at the Eagles

Street Dance at 5:30 to 11 p.m. on 3rd Street. With music from North Half 5:30 to 8 p.m. and Outer Space Blues Band 8:30 to 11 p.m. Tonasket Chamber of Commerce supporting local businesses

www.tonasketchamber.com

Grand Marshals Ray & Victoria Attwood

Rodeo hosted by Tonasket Comancheros

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Enjoy Tonasket’s Annual Founders Day Rodeo & Parade!

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MAY 28, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Extreme Adventures and Juggernaut Rocks and Minerals team up Planning for Founders Day Grand Opening BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Ed Lawrence and Don Kilpatrick have teamed up to convert the Old Solar Shop near Tonasket’s Fourth Street Bridge into a storefront for dual businesses—Lawrence’s Extreme Adventures Rentals and Guide Services, and Kilpatrick’s Katie Teachout/staff photos Juggernaut Gems and Minerals. Kilpatrick is excited to show Ed Lawrence (left) of Extreme Adventures and Don Kilpatrick of Juggernaut off his rocks—everything from stand in front of Lawrence’s fishing tackle and Kilpatrick’s display case of petrified woods, agates, geodes favorite rocks. The storefront is located at 306 Fourth Street in Tonasket. and thundereggs to Helenite, a gem produced from the heated He tells the story of a meteorite sports, including all levels of volcanic rock of Mt. St. Helens. in his collection that hit a moving whitewater rafting and kayaking Kilpatrick pick-up near over the past twenty years. He’s drove school C o n c o n u l l y, run the Methow, Similkameen bus for both r a s h i n g and Wenatchee Rivers, as well as Oroville and “What’s in a rock? The cthrough the the Hoh River on the Olympic To n a s k e t Pennisula, where he ran a raftwhole universe!” hood before before going ing business from 1995 to 1999. coming to rest Don Kilpatrick, owner on to trucking. Moving here in 2002, he had Juggernaut Gems and Minerals on the engine. Now he’s going a storefront on Main Street in “When’s the professional last time you Oroville before moving to with what he held a meteorite in your hand?” Tonasket. calls “a hobby gone wild.” He has four eight-man rafts, “I want to wow the locals and Kilpatrick asks. He invites people along with river tubes and jet tourists with the ‘Halo Child’ to come into the store and do so, skiis. He rents paintball equipand the Seven Wonders,” said and while there, grab a picture ment for up to 32 players, providing space for the games on Kilpatrick, referring to a collec- with the Sasquatch out front. Kilpatrick would like to see 200 acres ten miles outside of tion of seven rocks with particularly fascinating and unique fea- Tonasket have a rock and gem Tonasket. There he has plans for tures discovered when the rocks club, and invites anyone inter- a Zipline coming soon. ested to “join forces” with him. “I’ve got the cable and everywere cut into. “Juggernaut means unstoppable thing, I’m just waiting on the “Up until now the ‘Halo Child’ has only been presented to pri- force,” he said. He hopes to boot safety designer to come out,” vate audiences,” Kilpatrick says up his business to include pol- Lawrence said. “Safety is everyof a rock with an eerily realistic ishing equipment along with thing. I got twice the size cable image of a baby’s face inside. “I’ve his rock saws, and is planning a required. I’ll probably have one of the longest Zipline Canopy Tours seen all levels of excitement and grand opening for sometime in in the state.” June or July. emotions from viewers. One man Lawrence said future plans An open house is scheduled in Oroville almost fainted, and include possibly building a big another woman was gasping for for Founders Day, right after the treehouse as a rec center at the parade from 1 p.m. until dark air.” zipline site, and installing a ropes Other treasures in the collec- Saturday, May 30, and will feature course. tion include a fossil that looks door prizes including a grand “I have a history of doing ropes like a smiling face, and rocks cut prize of purple earrings made courses at kids’ camps with the to reveal ‘Dante’s Inferno,’ ‘Santa,’ from Mt. St. Helens ash. Boy Scouts and Boys and Girls and the ‘Blessed Virgin.’ Club, as well as church groups,” “I was hiking in Arizona when EXTREME ADVENTURES READY TO Lawrence said. “I also teach water safety courses; I’m non accredI stepped on ‘Mother Mary.’ I OUTFIT YOUR FUN ited, but I used to work as a thought, there’s something in Ed Lawrence calls his shop Swiftwater Rescue Technician that, and threw it in my pack,” said Kilpatrick. He cut into it to ‘The Total Outdoor Store,’ and with Okanogan County Search discover an image that looks like claims, “If we have it, we’ll rent and Rescue.” it; and if we don’t have it, we’ll try At the storefront, Lawrence a glowing Mother Mary. also does vinyl graphics. “What’s in a rock? The whole to find it.” Lawrence has been involved “We’re trying to keep busiuniverse!” Kilpatrick exclaims. in an assortment of outdoor nesses advertising locally and get the printing done locally,” he said. He takes orders for posters. flyers, business cards, truck signage, banners, magnets, custom t-shirts and mugs. Lawrence also has his hand in helping to organize local music events with what he calls a ‘fullon production company’ that includes stage and canopy rentals. “We did all the sound for the County Fair last year, and the Conscious Culture Festival,” he said. Lawrence can be reached at (509) 322-9747 or www.tubewashington.com. Extreme Adventures also services sporting goods. Got a leak A lighted display case shows off some of Kilpatrick’s favorite pieces. Included in your raft or a bow out of alignis a photograph of the ‘Halo Child,’ the image of a baby’s face displayed deep ment? Bring it in. inside a rock.

PAGE A3

NVH finances gets annual review BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - A financial overview of 2014 was presented by Shar Sheaffer and Tristi Cohelan Of Dingus Zarecor & Associates, a public accounting firm out of the Spokane Valley specializing in rural healthcare. Assistant State Auditor Traci Walker attended on conference call. “The amount you have turned around, very few do. You should be very proud of yourselves,” Sheaffer said. Cohallan, who works on site with audit and cost reports, presented the basic financial statements from December 31, 2013 and 2014. “You guys have turned yourselves around and it is reflected here,” Cohallan agreed; adding the hospital district’s liabilities decreased, with the joint venture with Caribou Trails written off as an impaired investment. Cohallan reported outstanding warrant, almost four million a couple years ago, to be at zero; and accounts payable to be half of last year’s. Cohallan also reported the hospital to have had “a good healthy year” in revenue, resulting in net operating income with a positive bottom line. Positive cash flow from services left a net increase this year of nearly one million dollars, with cash and cash equivalents at $1.4 million at the end of 2014. An audit of internal controls, which looks for any deficiencies to be reported, just recommended tightening up of reconciliations with less time spent journaling.

Sheaffer called 2014 “a bang up year,” including a $500,000 grant for the generator project and a $400,000 payout in Electronic Health Records E.H.R. revenue. Sheaffer said over the last two years, the hospital has put more back into capital equipment than has been depreciated.

COMMITTEE REPORTS Herb Wandler reported not making any progress on raising money for the hospital foundation, and they’ve decided to drop the price of a 22-acre piece of property in Waucanda they are attempting to sell. Linda Holden said Dixie Brown reported an $18,000 donation was received to go towards the purchase of a new tub for the long term care facility. Dick Larson reported Coast to Coast doing a good in the emergency room. He said with Obama Care in place, the emergency room use has substantially increased, and having the Coast to Coast staff available leaves doctors able to work their regular shifts without being exhausted from working on-call in the emergency room. Helen Casey reported having a strategic planning finance meeting with Wandler and the senior leaders. “It was very positive. Instead of being reactive we are now proactive,” said Casey, adding that she appreciated seeing cash on hand of $2,110,247 at 35 days as of May 14. Interim CEO Ron O’Halloran reported attending a community forum at Three Rivers Hospital in Brewster, and said the hospital district there hoped to copy what NVH has been doing. The board approved Patient Financial Services Manager Jana Symonds’ request to purchase software called CPSI Unlimited Commericial Electronic Remits at a cost of $8,300.

“The ammount you have turned around very few do. You should be very proud of yourselves.” Shar Sheafer, Accountant Dingus Zarecor & Associates

Looking at trends in accounts receivable, Sheaffer said the hospital had gone from taking an average of 71 days to get a bill paid in 2010, to about 48 days in 2014. Next Sheaffer compared employee salary and benefits to patient service revenue. She reported NVH having 109 full time equivalent (two part time employees would equal one full time) employees in 2014. From the lowest paid to the highest paid, the hospital paid, on average, $79,000 per month; with long term care averaging $53,000 per month in salaries and benefits. NVH net patient service revenue per full time employee in 2014 was $155,803 per month. “And that is where you found your bottom line,” Sheaffer declared.

LYNCH AND SCOTT TO MARRY Parents Jay Lynch and Terry and Susie Mann, as well as her grandparents, Zeke and Judy Miller and Jane Lynch, are pleased to announce the upcoming wedding of Amber Lynch to Jared Scott. The wedding will take place at Big Lake, Alsaska, on Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015 at 4 p.m. Scott’s parents are Steve and Lori Scott of Chugiak, Alaska. He works on the slope. She is a 2007 Oroville High School Graduate who received her Bachelors in Early Childhood Development from the University of Alaska. She currently works at Costco.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 28, 2015

COPS & COURTS

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Clifton Robert Scroggins, 42, Okanogan, pleaded guilty May 15 to distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crime occurred June 23, 2014. In a separate case, Scroggins pleaded guilty May 15 to POCS (methamphetamine), first-degree DWLS, resisting arrest and unlawful possession of a deadly weapon. Those crimes occurred March 7, 2014. In a separate case, Scroggins pleaded guilty May 15 to two additional counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Those crimes occurred Feb. 26 and March 3. Scroggins was sentenced to 20 months in prison and fined a total of $3,550.50. Lacey Ann Picard, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty May 19 to second-degree burglary. The court dismissed a thirddegree theft charge. The crime occurred Aug. 15, 2014. In a separate case, Picard pleaded guilty May 19 to second-degree burglary. The court dismissed another third-degree theft charge. In a separate case, Picard pleaded guilty May 19 to POCS (heroin). The court dismissed a POCS (methamphetamine) charge. Picard was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined a total of $2,310.50. Thomas Edward Isakson, 41, Okanogan, pleaded guilty May 19 to two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin). Isakson was sentenced to 14 months in prison and fined $1,010.50 for the Jan. 7 crimes. Martin Antonio Aguilar, 26, Riverside, pleaded guilty May 19 to four counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin). Aguilar was sentenced to 20 months in prison and fined $1,867. The crimes occurred in February and March of 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Marcos Florentino Rosas, 29, Okanogan, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred May 12. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Trevor Richardson, 34, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin) and obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred May 11. The court found probable cause to charge Derek Justin Allen, 34, Omak, with attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and third-degree DWLS. The court found probable cause to charge Barry J. Collins, 30, Tonasket, with attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred April 24. The court found probable cause to charge Deena Jean Lazard, 27, Omak, with POCS (heroin), POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 26, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Tammy Jeanette Cohen, 47, Omak, with firstdegree trafficking in stolen property and making a false or misleading statement. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 1.

tenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,851. Tamara Rene Sheldon, 26, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Dane Adam Stalder, 26, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional third-degree DWLS charge. Stalder received a 90-day suspended sentence, and fined a total of $786. Seth Adam Stough, 36, Omak, guilty of disorderly conduct. Stough was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $409. Clarence Swindle III, no middle name listed, 36, Omak, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI and reckless driving. Swindle was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,436. Johnnie R. Sylvester, 64, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Sylvester was fined $1,125. Chace Kenneth Clarence Taber, 23, Okanogan, guilty of second-degree vehicle prowl. The court dismissed a seconddegree criminal trespassing charge. Taber was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 173 days suspended, and fined $808. Heather Mae Taizan Kilgour, 40, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Taizan Kilgour was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 176 days suspended, and fined $908. Norman Emery Thomas, 55, Oroville, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional thirddegree DWLS charge. Thomas was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $818. Alana Lee Van Brunt, 29, Omak, guilty of use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Van Brunt was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $608. Cruz Viveros, no middle name listed, 20, Oroville, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Viveros was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,058. David Wayne Waddell, 54, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Waddell was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Beverly M. Walsh, 69, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of third-degree theft. Walsh was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,326. Dawn Leann Webber, 35, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: supplying liquor to minors. Webber was fined $400. John Robert Weddle, 64, Tonasket, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI. Weddle was fined $1,240. Natasha Renee West, 21, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. West was fined $400. Ned Gail Wheat, 58, Okanogan, guilty of unlawful display of a weapon. Wheat was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $558. Jacob N. Wilson, 34, Okanogan, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS

Structure fire on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Leader Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Sterling Lane near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Domestic dispute on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Foggy River Loop Rd. near Riverside. Threats on Burton St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Two reports on theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Augustina Flores Purser, 24, booked for theft of a motor vehicle, third-degree DWLS and possession of drug paraphernalia. Elizabeth Patricia Bauman, 26, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Rodney Allen Fisk, 27, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault. Justin William Nanpuya, 39, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Threats on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Bonaparte Campground Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on N. Kirkpatrick Rd. near Omak. Littering on Buzzard Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Sex offender registry on Paradise Point Rd. near Tonasket. Sex offender registry on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. DWLS on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on Golden St. in Oroville. Burglary on Pine St. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Central Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Cheyenne Rosemary Lezard, 19, court commitments for three counts of third-degree theft. Irwin Gayton Balderrama, 21, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for fourth-degree assault. William Richard Simmons, 58, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for reckless endangerment. Kevin Michael Clark, 34, booked on a DOC warrant. Monte Lewis Marchand Sr., 45, booked on an Tribal FTA warrant for violation of a nocontact order. Travis Lee James, 20, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Shawn Murice Cook, 37, booked for obstruction and third-degree DWLS. Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Domestic dispute on Pine St. in Omak. Weapons offense on S. Second Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Bide-AWee Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Bentham Rd. near Omak. Assault on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Fraud on N. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Upper Reevas Basin Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Eagles Bluff Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. Fraud on S. Birch St. in Omak. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Kristina Michelle GroomsSloan, 41, booked for fourthdegree assault (DV). Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michelle Lynn Carden, 27, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Barry J. Collins, 30, booked on nine FTA bench warrants: second-degree TMVWOP, first-degree burglary, two counts of residential burglary, two counts of second-degree malicious mischief, seconddegree burglary, first-degree theft, theft of a firearm, second-degree theft and seconddegree malicious mischief. Tammy Jeanette Cohen, 47, booked for obstruction and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Robert Matthew Harris, 43, booked for residential burglary, second-degree burglary, second-degree theft, seconddegree malicious mischief and second-degree criminal trespassing. Mika Robert Brown, 24, booked on two counts of third-degree theft. Gregory C. Maynard, 61, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Billy Dale Anderson, 47, DOC detainer. Trevis Mayfred Munson, 40, DOC detainer. John Leon Thomas, 63, booked for third-degree DWLS, resisting arrest and obstruction. Richard Lee Dixon Jr., 51, court commitment for DUI. Thursday, May 21, 2015 Drugs on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Ell Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Mail reported missing. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Duck Lake Rd. near

Friday, May 22, 2015 Harassment on Engh Rd. near Omak. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Frosty Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Fire on Emery St. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Charles Reuben McNeil, 30, booked for DUI and firstdegree DWLS. Mark Morris, no middle name listed, 37, booked for seconddegree assault (DV), thirddegree malicious mischief (DV) and failure to register as a sex offender. Joseph Alexander Felix, 20, DOC detainer. Shawn Dennis Fadden, 46, booked on a drug court violation. Saturday, May 23, 2015

Two-vehicle crash on Kermal Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on Bluebell Lane near Tonasket. DUI on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Assault on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Kristopher Paul Graber, 47, booked for third-degree DWLS and a DOC detainer. Camerino Mendoza Rosales, 57, booked for DUI. James Anthony Vignali, 64, booked for first-degree assault. Sunday, May 24, 2015 Domestic dispute on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Montvue St. in Riverside. Trespassing on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Dalton Rd. near Omak. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Elmway in Okanogan. Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Threats on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Threats on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Loitering on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Charles Daniel Ross Jr., 49, court commitment for DUI.

Key: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

COUGAR | FROM A1 to further increase your apparent size. If you are in a group, stand shoulder-to- shoulder to appear intimidating. • Do not take your eyes off the cougar or turn your back. Do not crouch down or try to hide. • Never approach the cougar, especially if it is near a kill or with kittens, and never offer it food. • If the cougar does not flee, be more assertive. If it shows signs of aggression (crouches with ears

back, teeth bared, hissing, tail twitching, and hind feet pumping in preparation to jump), shout, wave your arms and throw anything you have available (water bottle, book, backpack). The idea is to convince the cougar that you are not prey, but a potential danger. • If the cougar attacks, fight back. Be aggressive and try to stay on your feet. Cougars have been driven away by people who

have fought back using anything within reach, including sticks, rocks, shovels, backpacks, and clothing-even bare hands. If you are aggressive enough, a cougar will flee, realizing it has made a mistake. Pepper spray in the cougar’s face is also effective in the extreme unlikelihood of a close encounter with a cougar. More information can be found at http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/cougars.pdf

Monday, May 18, 2015

DISTRICT COURT Timothy James Sargent, 47, Omak, guilty of DUI. Sargent was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 309 days suspended, and fined $2,361. Michael Louis Savoie, 60, Riverside, guilty of seconddegree DWLS. Savoie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $243. Shannon Lee Schweitzer, 33, Tonasket, guilty of carrying a concealed weapon without a permit and guilty (other deferral revoked) of fourth-degree assault. Schweitzer was sen-

Omak. Electronics reported missing. Fraud on Hopfer Rd. near Omak. One-vehicle crash on Koala Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on Frosty Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Columbia St. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Fir St. in Omak. Malicious mischief at Deep Bay Park in Oroville. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Loren Mitchell Joe Harry, 23, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Byron D. Iukes, 23, booked on a DOC detainer, POCS (methamphetamine) and resisting arrest. Joseph Vernon Smith, 18, booked on two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), one count of delivery of a controlled substance (heroin) and unlawful possession of a dangerous weapon. Carrie Ann Clark, 34, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA for violation of an antiharassment order. Gene Charles Olsen, 41, DOC detainer. Charles Lee Desautel Jr., 28, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS. John Carden, no middle name listed, 43, court commitments for second-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation.

North American Wool Cooperative with Esther Bricques & Copper Mountain

Wine & Wool Nite 501 (C) (3) public charity www.AnnieAmerika.org www.AnnieAmerika@gmail.com gofundme.com/AnnieAmerika

at:

Pastime Bar & Grill on Main St. in Oroville, WA.

Friday, May 29 4-7pm

Thank You

Oroville May Festival Queen Ellamae would like to sincerely thank Gold Digger Apples Akins Harvest Foods Frontier Foods Subway Pastime Bar and Grill Oroville Chamber of Commerce as well as all of the private donors and volunteers who helped make the Royal Ball a huge success!


MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Circus packs a lot of family fun into 90 minutes

I have fond memories of watching the Wenatchee Youth Circus when it used to come to town. As a kid it was one of the special events that remains in my memories today and I was disappointed that they did not come to town more often. While Oroville’s Chamber of Commerce president, I had the pleasure of helping to bring the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus to Oroville – an every-other-year tradition that was started by my predecessors. As a chamber board member I’m happy we are able to offer this opportunity to the kids in our area once again. It’s a great chance for families to share an hour and a half enjoying something together. Thanks to the sponsorship of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce the Culpepper and Merriweather Circus will be coming to Oroville on Wednesday, June 10 at Oroville City Park between 17th and 19th Out of streets. There are two scheduled performances My Mind at 5 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. And the morning of the circus friends and Gary A. DeVon family are invited by the circus to watch as the park is transformed into a bustling Circus City. Culpepper & Merriweather describes it like this, “Activity swirls around the grounds as animals are unloaded, the Big Top is erected, and rigging is prepared for performances later in the day. Enjoy the magic and tradition of the American Circus with your family and create memories that will last a lifetime. Between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m. come watch the raising of the Big Top, then stay for the free tour. This presentation offers a unique face-to- face opportunity for families, schools, and interested community members to meet and learn all about the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus family and includes a walking tour of the circus grounds. Learn interesting facts about our performers, the history of our show and the different species of animals in our Circus Family. In this presentation we will also address topics such as hygiene, grooming and the veterinary care all of our animals receive. In recent years the Tent Raising and Morning Tour has become a popular program for families and interested community members. It is presented in a way everyone, young and old can learn many interesting facts about the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus Family and now we have a brand new tent! This is a special part of Circus Day that should not be missed.” Several businesses in Oroville and Tonasket have agreed to sell tickets again this year, including Oroville Pharmacy, The Camaray Motel, Prince’s Center and Tonasket Interiors. Those that buy tickets in advance save money too, especially on the adult tickets. In addition,m Chamber President Clyde Andrews wanted to remind folks that thanks to the generous contribution of local businesses, there are free children’s circus tickets available at the Camaray Motel for children who qualify for free or reduced lunches at school. No verification process required... just come and get them with your adult tickets. While this is a fundraiser for the organization, I like to think of it as a way to give something back to the community – a family friendly event that will light up a child’s eyes and create some happy memories for the whole family.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Katie Teachout katheriner@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Thank our local police Dear Gary, I have (and I’m fairly positive that most people reading this letter have) over the past months read some newspaper articles as well as listened to TV news reports concerning police action in various cities. Most of the reporting has emphasized negative police action that may or may not be true. I’m not involving myself in debating about areas I know nothing about nor do I know anyone living in those areas. Because of all that negativity, I feel compelled to speak out in support of police departments in our local communities. I have absolutely no reservations about the conduct and integrity of the police departments of Oroville, Tonasket, Omak, Brewster and other towns in our county. My experience has been that they are quality people enforcing, with firmness but with courtesy, the laws of our cities, county and state. These local police departments are supported by quality county deputies who are backed with the integrity of our State patrol. So I encourage you to take the opportunity to extend your hand and sincerely thank these men and women for the work they do as they control traffic and protect the citizens of our

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, May 17 - 31, 1940: Twenty men and two trucks answered the call of the Oroville Park Committee for help in a tree planting “bee” on Sunday, and as a result of their efforts, about 30 trees wee planted and nearly an acre of ground was cleared of brush and trees on the new park site north of the fair grounds. The reading on the State Highway sign at the entrance to the Tonasket bridge, “Canadian Line 71 miles,” will no longer confuse travelers coming north on Highway 10, as Wednesday of this week, a painter was changing this part to read “Danville, 71 miles. The new bus schedule for the Okanogan Valley Bus Lines will allow persons wishing to go to Spokane to board the bus in Oroville to make the connection in Tonasket leaving at 7:45 a.m. and arriving in Spokane at 12:30 p.m. or if they wish to go by Grand Coulee Dam, they can take the train to Omak, connecting with the bus leaving Omak at 8:10 a.m. and arriving in Spokane at 12:56 p.m. The preliminary announcement of the results of the 1940 census giving Oroville’s population at 1195 as compared to 806 in 1930 for a gain of 395 for the period. It is hoped that by the time the final results are in that we could reach to 1200. It has been reported that less than 1,000,000 cubic yards of concrete remains to be placed in the Grand Coulee Dam. Most of this amount will be poured in 1940 with the final 27,000 yards to finish the dam. George O. Noel, owner of the Golden Glo Dairy of Oroville, whose ranch is six miles south of Oroville on Highway 10, has decided to go out of the dairy business and is holding a sale of his dairy stock on Thursday, June 6 at his ranch. The Town Council opened the bids for the new Town Hall and Jail at their special meeting Monday night. Only two bids were received: Walter Weaver & Son for $4,688 and Steve Krusoff for $4,000. Since both bids were over the amount budgeted, the item

county. Sincerely, Randy Middleton Tonasket

Appreciate your efforts

Dear Gary, As Mayor of The City of Oroville I would like to sincerely thank all of the volunteers who have donated their time and energy to the beautification of Oroville prior to the May Day Festival; your dedication to the improvement of our community is greatly appreciated.” A special Thank You to Lynn Chapman for your endless hours of dedication to the many projects you are involved with for the enhancement of Oroville.” Or streets have never looked better. Thanks, Chuck Spieth Oroville

Why not Okanogan?

Dear Editor, Wondering why there aren’t more articles about Okanogan? Find it odd there’s so little coverage. Surely the delightful community isn’t that boring. It certainly wasn’t the nearly was tabled until the next meeting. Grocery Prices: Dole Pineapple Juice, 46 oz. can, $.25; Florida Grape Juice, 46 oz. can, $.17; Shredded Wheat, $.09 per pkg.; Alaska Pink Salmon, 2 cans, $.27; Campbell’s Tomato Soup, $.06; Miracle Whip, $.33 qt.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: May 20 - 27, 1965: If Oroville is to have a tourist information booth this year, it will have to be an “Operation Bootstrap,” as the State Department of Commerce and Economic Development has allotted no money for Oroville this year. Fifty-nine sixth graders from the Oroville Grade School spent last week in the annual Outdoor Education Program at Tokiwanis Camp at Lost Lake as regular campers and accompanied by Principal Flint Howell. Included in the classes were: Nature Study, Tool Safety, Forestry Practices and Fire Protection, Pottery and Native Stone Crafts, Conservation, Pollution Control and Game Management. The Theta Rho Girls, in Oroville, each year spend many hours on the annual cleanup of Potter’s Field Cemetery pulling weeds, raking rocks and decorate some 60 graves in the little cemetery adjacent to the Riverview Cemetery. Many people didn’t know of the cemetery until 18 years ago when the group started their big project of the year, making the area pretty for Memorial Day. Nearly complete returns indicated this week that the Okanogan County Red Cross Chapter has raised only about 60 percent of its $7,000 goal. In Tonasket, three ministers, Ensign, Wood and Larson, stepped in for the lack of a chairman and raised $614 of a $900 quota and since there had been no chairman in Oroville, Esther Monroe canvassed the businesses and raised $200 of a quota of $900. The $7.00 campground bumper sticker will entitle the driver and one passenger of a private noncommercial auto to enter the following campgrounds in Okanogan County: Bonaparte Campground, Lost Lake Campground and picnic area, Salmon Meadow Campground in the Conconully District and Black Pine Lake Campground in the Twisp District. North Cross State Highway will open up the scenic North Cascades area to tourists including George Lake on the west side. The year was 1953 and the place was Oroville, Wash. when some 90 pupils registered for the first grade, the largest ever in the history of Oroville. Twelve years later, in 1965, 74 graduated from high school. (Now they

6 years I lived there. I was one of those Forest Service brats, the term used for students who’s fathers worked for Okanogan National Forest. (back in those days it was just men). I attended first grade at O’keefe moving up to the “big school” on the hill - Virginia Grainger. It was the beginning of 6th grade dad was transferred again. Last June I was invited to the Bulldog’s 40th high school reunion. What a thrill it was to introduce my husband to childhood friends, visit old neighborhoods and share memories with several who remembered me. I wear my OHS tee-shirt with pride. So I think you really ought to be publishing more about the town that formed me in those early years. What a great place to grow up. I am so blessed to have been a part of that community at an important time in my life. Jakki McDonald Eugene, Oregon Editor’s Note: While we have covered the City of Okanogan in the past, after we agreed to continue providing news to the now defunct Okanogan Independent’s subscribers for the remaining six months of their subscriptions, we focus our resources on news of interest in the North Okanogan County area as we have since 1905. G.A.D.

have celebrated their 50th Class Reunion with between 35 and 40 attending in 2015.) Grocery Prices: Watermelon, $.10 per lb.; Prime Rib roast, $4.89 per lb.; Nalley’s Potato Chips, $.49; Canned Pop, 12 for $1.00; Ground Beef, $.39 per lb.; Strawberries, 3 cups, $.87; Young Tender corn, 4 ears $.39.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: May 17 - 31, 1990: Work has started on the refurbishment of the Tonasket Municipal Pool. The first part of the project will be to start the addition to the east end of the bathhouse, to re-do the roof and to work on the pools heating and filtration system. The Okanogan County Historical Society, will be erecting a sign entitled, “The Story of Molson” written by Harry Sherling. The sign will be unique, first because of its beauty then because of its dovetail construction without the use of nails and it will be covered by a shake roof. There were more than 50 people in attendance at a Forest Service meeting at the Old Depot to discuss the “Crown Jewel” gold mine exploration being done on Buckhorn Mountain. Many questions were asked including “is the mine going to be developed on the property, much of which is on Forest Land” and “Will the core drilling on the mountain release radioactivity into the atmosphere?” The Board of Directors of the Oroville Senior Citizens has selected Gary Allen to paint the outside of the building and it is hoped that he will be able to start soon. After learning that Oroville could keep its own dispatching, the council here voted to throw its support behind an effort to put a county-wide 9-1-1 referendum to the voters. The Oroville Youth Soccer Association had a work day last Saturday to begin the clean up for the athletic fields planned behind the Oroville Depot. The third Annual Pony Express Friendship Ride between Tonasket and Princeton, B. C. galloped along smoothly despite inclement weather. The skies may have cloudy, but the spirit of the riders and spectators were bright and upbeat. Congratulations to the Oroville High School Class of 1990. A total of some 44 young people have completed their education to this point and Congratulations to the 56 high school graduates from the Tonasket High School. Between the two communities, we have provided the opportunity for these 100 bright, young students some of the best years of their lives and the communities wish them well.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 28, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Hanging baskets on Main looking good Another month has almost ended. They surely do fly! We’ve had some rain. Hard rains, lots of sunshine and the Similkameen River is beginning to look like chocolate milk. And is is said there will be a shortage of irrigation water this summer. But of course we can always count on rain during cherry harvest. And already in some areas I hear the gun shots that supposedly scare the birds away from the cherries. There are so many beautiful flowers in the nurseries and I have a difficult time not buying too many, almost forgetting the more I plant the more there is to water and take care of. While I am mentioning florists I will write that I am sorry, if when I wrote that I heard that Blossom and Briar might be moving back into their former building, it was misconstrued. I should have checked more closely. They are not moving. but are very much in business on North Hwy. 97. The former building

ebrating takes away from the true mean- he was shoeing the horse in preparation ing of some of the reasons the day was set to ride in the annual May Day parade aside. Usually, our family has visitors, but and he ended up with a dislocated hip, this year, it appears it will be a quiet time. and had some bone fragments which Kudos to the American required surgery, in Spokane. Legion workers who place the He is home, and the key word white crosses, flags or poppies is patience, as he isn’t to put at the graves of the departed weight on his for quite some military folks. time. It’s sometimes hard to Oroville’s Riverview make a cowboy listen. Cemetery is the last place any We have been enjoying corn of us want to go, but it is so on the cob the past couple of well kept, and especially at weeks. It has been excellent. Memorial Day it is a beautiWe fix it in the microwave ful sight. The caretakers do a oven with the shucks on, for good job. 4 minutes per ear, take it out Every year since Robert THIS & THAT of the oven, cut off the big Kelly Sr. died, which was Joyce Emry end about a half inch. Then about 1954, his daughters, hold it by the end with the Roberta (Harrah), Spokane silks on and twirl in around, and Patty (Ludeman), Waterville, have and gently pull on the other end and the made sure there are live geraniums on corn will slip out of the shucks, with no his grave, for Memorial Day. Many years silks left on. Be very careful as it will be later, their mother, Ethel Kelly died and VERY HOT. Oven gloves are best but if the same tradition has been carried on. you don’t have any use a heavy kitchen It has become a gathering day for lunch, towel. So good when the melted butter when the girls come and since we are drips off your chin! cousins, Barbara Shaw, Bill Greene and Americans have more food to eat than Rick Kelly and I meet with them and any other people on earth, and more catch up on happenings over the year. diets to keep them from eating it. Ken Ripley is doing very nicely after his Last Saturday was a gathering of famhorse went one way and he went another ily and friends at the Free Methodist (that’s not exactly what happened) but Church to remember Gene Harnasch Sr.,

is now called Adventures and is a rental shop for water toys, bicycles and lots of other interesting looking stuff. The hanging baskets on Main street are “lookin good!” Streetscape folks at work again. I’m happy to report that it was a malfunctioning pacemaker that was causing the heart issues with Barbara Shaw, and it is now in good working order. Just read the article requesting host families for exchange students. I hope folks don’s pass up a great opportunity. It is one of the most rewarding times of our lives. We hosted over a dozen students and three teachers, from Mexico, Brazil, Germany, France, Japan and Argentina. We still correspond with several of them. We’ve had too many birthdays to do it now. Please give it some thought and I think you’ll be glad you did. Lots of sales at the different business places, preparing for a busy holiday weekend. I believe, sometimes, the cel-

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Bring your ‘school days’ photos in

who passed away recently. All who knew Gene would have to have a smile, as he was someone who just naturally made us laugh. Being the (shoe man) at Prince’s dry goods store, since it was located on south Main St. upstairs, he’d made a lot of friends throughout the years, (44 to be exact) As I’ve written many times, why do we wait until death has taken a good friend when it would have been so much more meaningful if we had visited them while they were alive. Old habits don’t die easily!! And, yes, I am sorry I never did get a lemon pie to him. I know of the shortage of EMT’s in our city, and I’m happy to say there are folks who are in training classes, at the local Senior Center to help increase the staff. A Mr. Greene from Tonasket is teaching the classes. The only way to keep your good health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not do. I learned last week that there is indeed a place in town that does gel nails, right on Main St. at the Two Brunette’s shop. Very friendly young ladies, so now I’m back in business. ‘Til next week.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Thursday morning when I arrived at the Senior Center, the cooks were waiting for me outside. The kitchen range is acting up again. The left oven is putting out nothing but soot. I spent Thursday and Friday afternoons working on the element. The final verdict: a soot plugged venturi. (Not Jessie Venturi.) So, here we go again, by the time my term is up every appliance will be rebuilt and like new, I can only hope. Whoever takes the helm next year can just sail on Lake

Looking for ideas for summer classes

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Tonasket Farmers Market opened Thursday, May 21, and while vendors generally reported a slow start, some did sell out. “I’m down to three loaves of bread,” said Donna Alma of Mary and Donna’s Home Baked Goods. Babe’ Towels reported making expenses and having fun meeting people again. Annie Greene of CD Farms, pictured above, will be selling plant starts through June. Market Master Tom Cloud said vendors can show up at 1 p.m. to set up booths with produce and products grown or made here in Okanogan or Ferry County. First time vendors can have a one-time booth while awaiting approval of applications from the board.

Tonasket Farmers’ Market opens with 16 vendors SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

“Mistress Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden grow?” “Quite well, thank you,” she replied, “I bought all my vegetable and flower plants at Tonasket Farmers’ Market!” Last Thursday, May 23 marked the opening day of the weekly market season. Under blue and sunny skies, 16 vendors shared space in Triangle Park, making it the best opening day ever. As to be expected this early in the season, there was a plethora of plants. Annie Greene brought tons of healthy vegetables and flowers, most notably a broad selection of lilies. Olga Diaz had a selection of herbs and oldfashioned flowers, including four o’clocks, zinnias and marigolds. Mariah Cornwoman featured healthy strawberry plants, both bare root and potted. As there really is not enough space here to list all, these are just a few of the many growers who are selling plants to help give your home garden a jump start. Lest you think it is all “grow-it-yourself,” Fred Fowler brought the first

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Osoyoos and do nothing. We will be having our famous pancake breakfast again the second Saturday of June. Mark your calendar. Don’t forget to give your “school days” picture to Betty Steg for display. I am receiving conflicting information concerning Farmers’ Market Senior Vouchers and Certification of venders. It appears that three local farmer’s market venders did apply for Certification, and are waiting for processing at this time. On

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C

THE LEARNING TREE

NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Spring quarter is winding down fast! There are just a few more classes left before summer vacation. Before you all take off on vacation however, North Valley Community School would like to pick your brain. We need class ideas! NVCS wants to know what new subjects you would like to see turned into classes. Are there old subjects you would like to see a new twist on, or more detailed classes on? Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 and let her know what class subjects you would find interesting! Summer is coming, and along with it, boating season! Would you like to get out

TONASKET MARKET REPORT ready-to eat local tomatoes and cucumbers to market. During the winter when farmers are waiting for spring, local crafters are plenty busy. Three new vendors offer a broad variety of items. For sheer whimsy, check out the welded pieces made by Michael Orcutt, everything from yard art, cell phone holders and tequila shot/salt holders made from repurposed everyday uten-

sils. Wyatt Hansen has leather and feather hair barrettes, pouches and knives as well as sage smudge sticks. The Bear Family Woods booth features custom log furniture made from lodgepole pine plus a variety of smaller hand made wooden and antler items. In this season of graduations and weddings, you can surely find a unique gift direct from our North Okanogan crafters. So now, Mistress Mary (or Mr. Gary) it’s time to get busy planting! The Tonasket Farmers’ Market is open every Thursday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Plan on getting there as soon as you can for the best selection of bedding plants. See you at the market!

Newspaper for Details

509-476-3602

Snowbirds back from warmer climes SUBMITTED BY ESTHER CATON TONASKET SENIOR CITIZENS

nice to see and visit with friends and classmates. Have you noticed Kathy’s garden at our front entry? She has made a ‘silk purse out of a sow’s ear.’ What an improvement! Thank you Kathy, you are a true asset to our center. The coffee pot threw sparks at the cooks, so it is history. Bob went to Lee Franks and came back with a sparkling new one. The vacuum cleaner threw a bearing, so it is history too. Jerry found a used one at a reasonable price. We hope nothing else ‘throws’ something for awhile. We have a table set up for jigsaw puzzles and don’t forget to visit our country store tables. Congratulations to Ray and Victoria, our Grand Marshals this year. They will represent our community well at the rodeo and parade. There will be lots going on this weekend. There will be a parade, rodeo and activities for all to enjoy.

www.gazette-tribune.com 312 S. Whitcomb

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Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Playing the Ukulele for Fun Monday, June 1 at 6 p.m. Learn to play the Ukulele! With only four strings, learning the ukulele is quick, easy and fun! You don’t need musical knowledge to take this class, beginners welcome! Mexican Meatballs -Tuesday, June 2 at 5:30 p.m. Meatballs prepared with tomatillo, garlic, onion, tomato and chipotle, served in a savory soup... my apologies for the drool, I hope I didn’t soak your newspaper too badly. Stop the Invasions of Lake Osoyoos! - Thursday, June 3 at 6 p.m. Lake Osoyoos is being threatened by a variety of invasive species. Learn about these nonnative species, how to identify them, and how to stop them. To sign up for these classes and more call Ellen at 476-2011 or visit our website atnorthvalleycommunityschools.com.

TONASKET SENIOR NEWS

Our “snow birds” are back from the sunny south. Welcome home to Bob, John, Betty, Joe and Judy. We hope Judy is soon “up and running” after her surgery and that John has a speedy return to good health. We think of you and send our prayers. Our substitute cook is getting Reach Reach Your Constituents acquainted with our kitchen and 2.7 Million We’ve Got You Covered has kept us well fed during Lola’s absence. Thank you Dan and welReaders YOU NEED HELP – They need work.come aboard. Reach over 2 million readers with many We had a mini-reunion with Advertise inadvertising throughout Washington YOUskills NEED HELP – They byneed work. Community your job in 106 Community Newspapers! a few members of the class of Reach over 2 million readers with many ‘54. Hazel came for a visit from Newspapers, LOWthroughout COST • Washington ONE CALL aby • Key ONE BILL skills advertising southern California. We enjoyed Source of Local Region or the Entire State! your jobBuy in a106 Community Newspapers! Political News dinner here at the center with Request a free information kit today: LOW COST •Call ONE• One CALLPayment • ONE BILL her and Patty, Colleen, Carmen, One 509-476-3602 Buy a Region or the Entire State! Elaine, Esther and Ted. Was so Call this Request a free information kit today:

on the lake once in a while but don’t have a boat? Tamara Porter has generously offered to donate her time and boat to raise money for operating costs for NVCS. Charter Captain Tamara and her boat for one hour for $119, or a three hour cruise for $249. Tamara’s Tours can accommodate as many as 6 people per trip! Call the Captain at 476-2121 to book your boat tour of Lake Osoyoos!

the other hand, the head of that program said, at last Monday’s Wenatchee conference that it was too late to apply this year. I e-mailed the head of Adult and Aging Care, asking him to expedite the pending certifications, as we need venders in Oroville. Not withstanding, we still have to go to Tonasket for vouchers. Senior Center lunches next week are: Tuesday, german sausage and sauerkraut; Thursday, pork chops; Friday, baked fish. Pinochle: High Woman, Nellie Paulson; High Man, Dave R. Are the dandilions taking over? I mowed them twice last week, and there are more than ever. Forget the weed and feed, there’s too many. I’ll just embrace the dandelions, as millions of wishes, if you wish.

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No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


MAY 28, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

Annual yard sale dampened by weather worries

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT

and the School House Museum also opened on Saturday for the season so there was a lot to do on our beautiful green Hilltop. We did end up getting the rain, but not until late afternoon on Sunday. Boy, did it rain. We need it, so we were glad to have it pour. According to the weather girl there might be another storm tonight. Come to the Bible Study with Beth Bricker on Tuesdays at 11 a.m. In Chesaw at the Community Building. For answers to your questions call Beth at 509-4852397.

HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The big Molson/Chesaw yard sale was this past weekend. The crowd this year was not as big as it usually is. I think the weather forecast had something to do with that. It was predicted that we would get thunder, lightning and rain. That in itself kept shoppers away for a while. When the sun came out and the temperature peaked in the high seventies more folks came to see what we were all about. There was another sale going on up the road

Do you have wool that needs processing? Well, gather it up and bring it into the Havillah Pines Carding Mill to Sandee or Bonnie at 2035 Chesaw Road or call 509485-2268. The first three pounds are free. The services they provide are skirting, washing, carding to batts for spinning or felting. They also purchase raw fiber. They can spin limited quantities into yarn. The fibers they will work are, alpaca, buffalo, llama, sheep, yak and more. You can see both of these ladies at the Fiber Festival on May 30 and 31 (Saturday through Sunday) from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. in the Agriplex at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds. They are offering a service to the fiber people. There will be demonstrations by local fiber artists.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Celebration of Life for both Amos and Judy Coffelt on Saturday, June 6 at 2 pm in the Community Building in Chesaw. This will be a dessert and light snacks potluck to share.

WINE AND WOOL NITE OROVILLE - There will be a Wine and Wool Nite on Friday, May 29 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Pastime, located at 1307 Main St, Oroville It is sure to be a fun night, with lots of information about the North American Wool Cooperative’s future and a chance to share your thoughts with your community members. Contact Sonja Myklebust at 425-241-0151.

Story Time at Library

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, May 27 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children. Nursing Home Forum

TONASKET - On Wednesday, May 27, there will be two Nursing Home Educational Forums in Tonasket. The first forum is at the Tonasket Senior Center at 12:20 p.m., and the second will take place at the Cultural Community Center (CCC) at 7 p.m. Please come and take advantage of this great opportunity to collaboratively work with North Valley Hospital District for the common goal of preserving this essential service. Do you have questions about the Nursing Home? Come and ask. Community Action

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board will hold their Regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, May 27 at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. If you have questions or need additional information please contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041. Library Book Sale

TONASKET - The Tonasket Library Board will be having their semi-annual book sale during the week of the Founders Day celebration. The book sale is Thursday, May 28 and Friday, May 29. Both days the time is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Tonasket City Council room at 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. All proceeds go to fund Library needs. Swanson to Perform Winery

OROVILLE- Harvey Swanson will take the stage at Esther Bricques Winery’s Tasting Room Thursday evening, May 28, performing his original vocal/guitar works. Music begins at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information regarding this and future events, please call the winery at 509-4762861 or check the Events page at www.estherbricques.com. WVC Spring Fling

OMAK - Wenatchee Valley College at Omak invites the community to the first ever Spring Fling on Friday, May 29, at 2 p.m. at the Omak Civic League Park. This event will feature WVC at Omak clubs, academic programs and community programs and will highlight exciting events happening on the Omak campus. Admissions, financial aid services, and other new student information will be available. The Spring Fling includes musical performances by The Ruby Scene at 4 p.m. and The Outer Space Blues Band at 4:30 p.m. This event is free to the public and is sponsored by WVC at Omak Associated Student Body.

Garden & Plant Sale

Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, May 30 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096 Tonasket Freedom Run

TONASKET - There will be a Tonasket Freedom 5K and 1K kids event on Saturday, May 30 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. starting and finishing at the Tonasket High School track (north of Elementary School). Contact Heather Brownlee at ncwgreenmom@gmail.com or call509-5600736 Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival

OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org.

CHESAW - The next special event will be the “GreenStock” Garden and Plant Sale, Saturday and Sunday, June 6 and 7, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.This will be your opportunity to get plants for your garden that have been lovingly tended in the Highlands, both vegetables and flowers. During this event, Fiona will be open, with art on the walls, the gift and second hand shop open and espresso and treats ready. Watch for future events. Call 509-4852281 for info. 4-H Leader’s Scholarship

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County 4-H Leader’s Council will be holding a yard sale on Saturday, June 6 from 9am-3pm at 531 2nd Ave. North, Okanogan. Funds raised at this event will support the Council’s scholarship fund. For more information, or to donate yard sale items, please contact Marnee at 509-422-2130 or 509-557-8523 Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386. Listing Your Item

N. Vallley Hospital Foundation

Our Community Bulletin TONASKET - The next regu- Board generally allows listing lar meeting of the North Valley your event for up two weeks Community Health Association, prior to the day it occurs. If space “North Valley Hospital allows it may be included prior to Foundation” will be Monday, the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazetteJune 1, at 7 p.m. in the hospitribune.com allows the event to tal Board room. New members be listed for much longer periand volunteers are encouraged to ods. Calendar items must include attend and help us improve the day, date, time and location, as health care in our hospital dis- well as a for further information trict. For more information call phone number. You may place Dixie Brown at 509-486-4324 an event on the online calendar by going to our website and Story Time at Library clicking on the “Add an Event” OROVILLE - The Oroville button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day Public Library will be having or days of its occurrence. Once Story Time at the Library “The your request is submitted, it can Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, take up to 48 hours for the event June 3 at 10 a.m. This free event to appear on the calendar. Online will take place each Wednesday submissions don’t always go into and there will be stories, songs, the hardcopy edition, so it helps crafts and fun for young children. if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Celebration of Life or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the CHESAW - There will be a 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out.

time of year that you help save for a child’s college education. www.edwardjones.com

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Selected for Honor Flight BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET Gordon Goesch, a veteran of the Korean War, has been selected for Inland Northwest’s Honor Flight to Washington, D.C., June 3-4. The Honor Flight Network honors veterans with trips to visit the war memorials. The trips are completely free for the veterans, paid for by donations. Goesch said he received the call last Saturday, May 16, inviting him to go. “World War II Veterans get to go first, then Korean Vets,” said Goesch, age 82. “The woman who called said I got to go because of a cancellation. I called my family the next day to tell them.” Inland Northwest has taken 982 veterans on the Honor Flight since the program began in November 2009. Goesch enlisted for the Navy right out of high school in 1952. The Korean War had already been going on for over two years, and wouldn’t end until 1955. He went to work as a machinist mate on the Destroyer William M. Wood, DDR 715. “I worked with the boilers that ran the engine,” said Goesch. He wasn’t sent to Korea, although he wanted to go. “I got all the privileges from that, but I didn’t get sent.” Goesch said he next tried to put in for a transfer onto the USS Walton, a destroyer escort named

after his cousin; a marine who died as a war hero. But he ended up spending his four years on the William M. Wood, traveling all over the Mediterranean and Carribean. He said a favorite trip was to Holland.

Gordon Goesch holds the flag from the ship he served on during the Korean War. Pictured with him is his son Marshall Goesch, visiting from California. Marshall was in the Coast Guard from 1977-1981. “It was a nice trip; Holland is a nice clean country and we could drink the water and milk there,” said Goesch. He said he went through Washington, D.C. while in the Navy, but hasn’t been back to see the war memorials yet. “I’m looking forward to seeing everything. I had a class-

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

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Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

.

for the needs. holidays, callforor visit today. to us. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be Get eligible a state tax know deduction or credit in certain states for those residents.

LOOMIS

Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

*Contributions to a 529 plan mayseason be eligible for a state deduction or credit in At Edward Jones, the level For parents, back-to-school means it’stax time to stock

certainJones statesservice forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy of receive up on school supplies. Butyou it can also be a good time to think depends your personal to save for college. Oneon option is a 529 college savings about how to save for your child’s future education. Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make needs and preferences, plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, To the make your college savings gift in timefor a not onof the size of your this time year that you help save Developing a strategy for achieving your education savings family members and the child.* investment portfolio. Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the

mate (from high school) on the Vietnam wall,” Goesch said. He said he was also looking forward to meeting and hearing stories from other veterans. “There will be a lot of sea stories; at least, that’s what the sailors call them,” said Goesch. He said he first heard about the Honor Flights on T.V., and then his friend Annie Wilkison signed him up for a flight several months ago. Wilkison has been selected to make the trip as his guardian. “It’s a busy, not a relaxing vacation,” said Goesch as he pulled out the agenda. The flight departs Spokane at 8 a.m. June 3, arriving at the Dulles airport in time for a trip to the Marine Corps Memorial and Air Force Memorial before heading to the hotel. The next morning, they head to Arlington National Cemetery, where they’ll witness the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknowns. They’ll visit the Women in Military Service Museum at Arlington before boarding a bus to the World War II Memorial. From there they head to the Korean and Vietnam War Memorials, and on to the Navy Memorial. Then they head to the airport to catch a 5 p.m. flight home, arriving back in Spokane in the early evening. “I’m excited to go,” said Goesch. “I’m meeting Annie (Wilkison) tonight at the Eagles to go over some of the details. She has gone before as a guardian.” He smiles, adding, “I call her Den Mother.”

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-3541 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 28,, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • May 28, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS $450-$795, Possible 1 month free. 3 BR HOME $750 & $850

Call Today Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 Okanogan County Realty, LLC member of the MLS has several listing; home, business, farm, recreational, waterfront and several at Veranda Beach. Kathy 509-429-2040, Ryan 509-429-8564, Brad 509-429-7466. Serving Okanogan County. Oroville: 1 bedroom 1 bath, with laundry. $475 plus power. Includes w/s/g. Call: 509476-2077. Walking distance to everything.

Houses For Sale

OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004.

TONASKET

2BR, 2 BATH + UPSTAIRS BALCONY area. Full basement is unfinished. This house has charm, situated in Old Orchard Estates. $149,500. Shown by appt only. Call for details 509322-3471 or please leave message.

www.gazette-tribune.com We’re more than just print!

Visit our website.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Announcements MANUEL FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF OROVILLE picnic / potluck / soft drinks June 6. from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. at Osoyoos State Park. Visiting and relaxing day. Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Found

Help Wanted

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

FREE NAC Class

Lost LOST KEYS: Lost set of keys with fake padlock keychain. Please send to PO Box 1337, Oroville 98844 or take to the Police Department.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Help Wanted Assistant HS Volleyball Coach The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for an Assistant HS Volleyball Coach. Volleyball coaching experience preferred. Position is open until filled. Please contact the District Office for an application or available on the districtĂ­s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126.

Sat., June 13 - Twin City Motors - Okanogan, Elmway Collectible Vehicles and Collectible Parts

Sat., June 20 - Malott Moving. Household, Tractor, Pickup, Tools

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

Summer Substitute HS Custodian

Sign Up’s June 3rd 10:00am – 4:00pm 104 14th Ave, Oroville SORTERS PACKERS and BOX STACKERS needed

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Summer Substitute HS Custodian. Work schedule: June 1 – August 31, 2015. 8 hrs. per day, 5 days per week. Pay: $14.29 per hour. To apply: contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 509-486-2126.

Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required due to business need.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Crosswords

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

25. On fire

5. ___ transfer, British bill-paying method

26. Backstabber

6. Quick breads

27. Blue

7. Frau’s partner

29. “Anne of Green ___,� novel

8. Sundae topper, perhaps

30. “I’m ___ you!�

9. Culture medium (hyphenated)

32. Comfort

10. Reduction in prices by government action

23. ___ foot on a sewing machine

34. Leaving a car unattended next to another (2 wds)

Tonasket Rodeo Grounds - Tonasket, WA. Note: Most Items in Very Good Condition. A Lot of Items are Brand New.

* Big * *Selection * * * * *of*Collectibles, * * * * * *Equipment, * * * * * *Vehicles, * * * *Shop, * * *Misc. ***

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Dental Assistant 3 Full time, Must be able to work Saturdays. We will train you on the job. Travel may be required.

Subscribe to the...

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015 - 10:00 a.m.

LICENSE NO. 2241

We have the following opportunities available:

Duties include cherry lugs, dumping and sorting them. Involves heavy lifting and a lot of walking. Pays $11/Hr. Call 832.374.1764

TONY COWAN ESTATE

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC

We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

Need Workers For Cherry Harvest In Oreville

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

WILL RUN 2 AUCTIONEERS MOST OF DAY PARTIAL LISTING - Call and we will mail, e-mail or fax you a handbill EQUIPMENT & RANCH - 2 Forklifts - NH 1032 Swather - 9N Ford Tractor10-ton Hydr Log Splitter - North Star 6500 Diesel Generator on Wheels 15 KW Generator - 2 Honda 2500 Generators, New - Filson HD Live-stock Squeeze Chute - 2 Compactors - 20 Horse Stall Feeders - 25+ Steel Corner Stall Hay Feeders - Saddles - Horse Tack – MORE VEHICLES - 1998 Gooseneck 3-Horse Slant - 2005 Kubota Side-by-Side 69 Hrs - 2 1993 24-ft Dry Vans on Rubber - 2003 Kerr 5th Wheel Flatbed Trailer, Beavertail - 28-ft Terry Travel Trailer - 1993 Inter 4900 Dump Truck, recently overhauled 1989 Jaguar - 1997 GMC 4x4 Pickup, 5-sp - 1967 Jeep V-6, Runs - 1983 Cadillac Eldorado 1973 Ford F600 School Bus, Runs – MORE COLLECTIBLES - 3 Antique Barber Chairs, MUST SEE – Beckwith Player Piano, Works - 80 Piano Rolls - Complete Blacksmith Forge - Hames w/Brass Balls - Large Grindstone w/Pedestal - Singer Treadle Sewing Machine - Coca-Cola Water Bath Cooler – WAY TOO MUCH TO LIST MISC - New Solar Panels - Solar 8 cuft Freezer, New - Large Propane Refrig-Frzr Comb - MUCH MORE 2 Storage Units of Items We Have Not Seen Yet - -

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

www.gazette-tribune.com

LICENSE NO. 2241

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

www.gazette-tribune.com

Cherry Workers Needed

ANSWERS

Across 1. Removes condensed water vapor 7. Frost 11. “60 Minutes� network 14. Mushroom with umbrella-like cap and gills 15. “Cogito ___ sum� 16. Crumb 17. “10� music 18. “Get ___!� 19. “Comprende?� 20. Eventually (3 wds)

Wanted WANTED TO BUY: Paying Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. Spence: 509-429-4722.

Garage & Yard Sale

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

AUCTIONS COMING IN JUNE (WATCH FOR ADVERTISING & HANDBILLS)

*******************************

North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning July 6, 2015. This class will be completed in August, applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resources office or online at www.nvhospital.org. This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be accepted after June 10, 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185.

Health General

11. Pertaining to the ribs

39. Afternoon service

12. Gentle wind

40. Detective, at times

13. Cordwood units

42. Thought (archaic)

21. Gets the lead out?

45. “Absolutely!�

22. Even though

47. “Dilbert� cartoonist Scott Adams has one: Abbr.

23. Ace

48. Dog-bite disease

28. Stupid

49. Most agile

31. Surpass in cleverness

52. Permanent military bases

33. Most recent

55. “It’s no ___!�

35. Meropidae bird (hyphenated)

56. Drudgery

36. Southernwood (2 wds)

57. Regard as comparable

37. Junior, to Senior

60. Discouraging words

38. Castrated cats

61. Times to call, in classifieds

41. Back muscle, familiarly

62. Someone waiting in concealment

42. Like the Godhead

24. “We the Living� author

63. Dash lengths

43. Release of prisoner upon payment

64. Change

44. Haunt

65. “What fools these mortals be� writer

46. Pitches 50. Court game 51. Bury 53. Emulated Pinocchio

Down

54. “Not to mention ...� 58. P.I., e.g.

1. Apply gently 2. “I� problem 3. High-pitched male voice 4. Nabisco sandwich cookies

59. Victorian, for one

OROVILLE ANTIQUE SALE! May 29th and 30th, 8am to 4pm, 345 Eastlake. Antique chairs, writing desk, phonograph, cedar chest, dolls, jewelry, dresser with mirror, ice cream chairs, oak cabinet and more quality item!

Motorcycles 2009 HONDA SCOOTER CHF50 Metropolitan. White with only 64 miles on it. $1,000. One owner. Call 509-486-1397.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF MAY 25, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com SCHOOLS/TRAINING Want A Career Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Hands On Training! Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 hr. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497

Public Notices PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 06/02/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1990 Dodge Ram Van Lic# 966ZWA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, 2015. #OVG633962 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 6/2/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1986 Ford F250 Lic# KMZ965 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, 2015. #OVG632479 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of BARBARA JEAN FORRESTER, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00036-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Legals Continued On Next Page


MAY 28, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE May 28, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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ANSWERS

Sponsored by

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard. 1

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Puzzle 23 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of MARGARET E. JARRELL, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00043-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of JUANITA LEE MYRICK, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00044-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Kevin James Myrick as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In re the Estate of: STEPHEN LIGHTNER NOURSE, Deceased. NO. 15-4-03039-3 SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The person named below has been appointed as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Stephen Lightner Nourse, the above-entitled decedent (“Decedent”). Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serv-

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PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Richard L. Forrester as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 28, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Richard L. Forrester, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173, Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG634034

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

8

ing on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this timeframe, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. /s/Jane E. Gilbertsen Jane E. Gilbertsen, Personal Representative Attorneys for Personal Representative and address for mailing or service: Dean V. Butler, WSBA #9649 Carney Badley Spellman, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3600 Seattle, WA 98104-7010 Phone: (206) 622-8020 Fax: (206) 467-8215 Court of Probate Proceedings: King County Superior Court 516 Third Avenue Seattle, Washington 98104 Probate Cause Number: 15-4-03039-3 SEA Date of Filing with Court: May 18, 2015 Date of First Publication: May 28, 2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG635017

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claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 28, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Kevin James Myrick, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG634032

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The above Court has appointed William R. Jarrell III as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 28, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for William R. Jarrell III, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 28, June 4, 11, 2015. #OVG634033

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Legals Continued From Previous Page

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40 ACRES W/HOME & OUTBLDGS

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3 2 4

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3-bdrm, 2-bath Nice Manuf Home. Kitchen w/Appliances. Big Walk-in Pantry. 30x36 Garage/Shop. Equipment Shed w/attached Lean-to. Nice Storage Shed. Animal Barn. Corrals. Yard w/Perennial Flowers & Shrubs. Rock Work. Wonderful Views. Very Private. A NICE PLACE - $229,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

Puzzle 14 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

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Puzzle 15 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.72)

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MAY 28, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A10

SPORTS

Track and Field athletes heading to State BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

EPHRATA -The 1B and 2B District 5/6 Meet in Ephrata Saturday (May 23) saw two athletes from Oroville and 17 athletes from Tonasket qualify for the State Championship in Cheney next weekend (May 29-30). “The Tonasket Track and Field team had a GREAT district meet,” said Coach Bob Thornton. “The athletes didn’t let the pressure of the meet or the hour-long lightening delay keep them from competing their best.” The Tonasket Girls Team came in second place with 107 points, behind Okanogan in first with 184 points. Tonasket’s Boys Team came in fifth place with 77 points, behind Liberty Bell with 88, Bridgeport with 97, Kittitas with 100 and Okanogan in first with 104. Tonasket State Qualifiers are:

Rose Walts—100 hurdles, triple jump, long jump and 4x100 relay. Jaden Vugteveen—pole vault, 4x100 relay, 4x400 relay and triple jump-alternate. Katie Henneman—100, 400, 4x100 relay and 4x400 relay. Alina Vlahovich—100, 200, 4x100 relay and triple jump. Jenna Valentine—1600 and 4x400 relay. Camille Wilson—4x400 relay. Shyane Lewis—4x400 relay. Alissa Young—4x100 relay. Smith Condon—200, 4x100 relay and 4x400 relay. Ryan Rylie— 400, 4x100 relay and 4x400 relay. Abe Podkranic—4x400 relay and 800 alternate. Hunter Swanson—1600, 3200, 4x100 relay and 4x400 relay. Justin McDonald—4x100 relay, and 4x400 relay. Chad Edwards—shot put, alternate. Ethan Bensing, long jump, triple jump and high jump alternate. Lloyd Temby— long jump and triple jump. Jonathon Tellez—4x100 relay.

Headed to State from Oroville are Katie Egerton, who took first place in pole vault at Districts, and Tylynne Watkins, who took second place in pole vault. Other District finishers from Oroville are Brandon Baugher, fifth in 300 hurdles and 8th in long jump; Seth Miller, 7th in 110 hurdles and 7th in long jump; and Tori Kindred, fifth in shot put. At the May 15 District 6 North Subdistrict meet in Tonasket, personal records were broken by Tonasket athletes in the following 19 events: Ethan Bensing, triple jump; Zach Clark, 400; Justin McDonald, 200; Riley Morris, 1600 and discus; Abe Podkranic, 800 and 1600; Ryan Rylie, 400; Zeke Silverthorn, shot put; Matus Sitar, 800 and 1600; Johnathon Tellez, 100 and 200; Lloyd Temby, long jump; Madyson Clark, 100; Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports Katie Henneman, 100 and 400; Mary Naylor, 800 and triple jump; Oroville’s Tylynne Watkins placed second in Pole Vault at Districts in Ephrata Saturday, May 23. Her teammate, and Jaden Vugteeen, triple jump. Katie Egerton took first place in Pole Vault.

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

Ryan Rylie of Tonasket qualified for State in the 400, 4x100 Relay and the 4x400 Relay.

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

Seth Miller of Oroville took seventh place in long jump at the District Meet in Ephrata Saturday, May 23.

Tonasket’s Alina Vlahovich qualified for State in the 100, 200, 4x100 Relay and triple jump.

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

Oroville’s Tori Kindred placed fifth in shot put at Districts Meet in Ephrata Saturday, May 23.

Tiger softball out of play Record-breaker pulled out of Bonaparte Lake BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket finished their softball season at the quarter finals in Yakima Saturday, May 23, ending up in sixth place and just one game shy of going on to the State Tournament. Saturday’s first game, played against Brewster for third place in Districts, left the Tigers with a 0-22 loss. That put Tonasket up against Liberty Bell for the fifth and final State spot. The Tigers held their own better in this game; tied 2-2 after the third inning, leading 4-2 after four innings and behind by only one point at the top of the fifth inning before the Mountain Lions won the game 13-8. With only one senior this year, the team looks forward to another attempt at State next year.

Tiger Trout is second state record fish to come out of Bonaparte BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports photo

Tonasket’s Dayzi Keller grabs a grounder during the Tigers’ bid for a spot at State Saturday, May 23.

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports photo

Tonasket’s Madilynn Larson (center) and Vanessa Pershing (right) fought hard against Brewster and Liberty Bell Saturday, May 23.

For the second time in it’s history as a resort, Bonaparte Lake has given up a state record-breaking fish. Kelly Flaherty of Priest River, Idaho, was fishing from shore near the boat launch when he hooked this Tiger Trout on a mixture of bait called ‘Bacon and Eggs.’ It took him about fifteen minutes to land it. This beast, weighing 18.49 pounds and measuring 32.5 inches long with a girth of 21.75 inches, outweighed the last state record Tiger Trout by 3.45 pounds. The previous record was held by Kirk Herrin for a 15.04 Tiger Trout out of Roses Lake in Chelan County, caught April 11, 2012. “We are super excited to get a state record from Bonaparte Lake Resort,” said Kelly Flaherty’s wife, Randi Flaherty. “Our family has been going there for 20+ years. Great traditions.” Seems record-breaking fish are becoming a tradition of their own at Bonaparte; a previouslyheld state record for Mackinaw was secured with a 26-pound, 12-ounce giant caught in 1997. “It’s pretty exciting for us; big news for a town this size,” said Bonaparte Lake Resort owner Heather Cruz. “It was officiated by Fish and Game, and Lloyd from the Omak Hatchery was able to sample DNA and trace it back to fish planted in 2005.”

submitted photo

Kelly Flaherty broke the state record for Tiger Trout by 3.45 pounds when he pulled this monster weighing 18.49 pounds out of Bonaparte Lake. An artificially produced sterile hybrid, the Tiger Trout is produced by crossing a male brown trout with a female brook trout. Tiger trout are aggressive and

piscivourous (eat other fish) and can be landed using flies, spoons, spinners and bait. “Makes you think twice about swimming, though,” said Cruz.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 28, 2015

SPORTS

Locals named to All League BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Sixteen athletes from Tonasket and Oroville’s baseball, softball and soccer teams have been named to Central Washington “B” League All League Teams. Coaches across the league vote on the ten best players for First Team. Players’ positions are inconsequential, as it is an honorary appointment; not an actual team. The next best ten players are named to Second Team, and the third group of ten are given Honorable Mention. For baseball, Tonasket’s Adrian McCarthy made First Team, and Jimmy Coleman made Second Team. Oroville’s Brentt Kallstrom and Dustin Nigg received

Honorable Mention, along with Tonasket’s Zion Butler. “One of our goals this year was to study the game and become a more deliberate ball club. Adrian is the one that took that to heart and reinvented his swing. He led our team in all offensive categories. Pretty impressive, and the other coaches noticed as well,” Tonasket Coach Dan Vassar said of McCarthy. “Every year when the season starts, as a coach you wonder if the seniors are going to play like seniors and lead the team. Jimmy without a question did that for us on the mound,” Vassar said of Coleman. “He really set the tone and gave us a chance every time he went out there.” Regarding Butler, Vassar had this to say: “Zion was that

sneaky ball player that doesn’t have the big numbers, but also can’t be replaced behind the plate. He averaged one put out a game on base stealers. Those kinds of numbers can kill rallies for other teams before they start. I’m really glad he’s a sophomore.” Softball players receiving Honorable Mention are: Tonasket’s Vanessa Pershing, Lexi Wahl, Kayla Willis and Dayzi Keller; and Oroville’s Rachelle Nutt, Faith Martin and Courtnee Kallstrom. In soccer, Tonasket players named to First Team are Noe Vasquez and Hugo Sanchez. Abran Alvarez made Second Team, and Christian Garcia received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Oroville’s Dustin Nigg received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Adrian McCarthy made First Team

KKatie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Jimmy Coleman was named to Second Team Katie Teachout/staff photo

Brentt Kallstrom, seen here at shortstop, received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Zion Butler, seen here crossing home plate, received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Courtnee Kallstrom Honorable Mention.

received

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Dayzi Keller received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo Katie Teachout/staff photo

Kayla Willis received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Rachelle Nutt, seen here defending third base, received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Noe Vasquez, pictured here in gray sweatshirt along with Hugo Sanchez in red, was named to First Team.

Tonasket’s Lexi Wahl received Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Abran Alvarez was named to Second Team.

HEADING TO STATE Gary DeVon/staff photo

Cayden Field, Tonasket and Jordyn Smith and Bryce Glover, Oroville, at the Oroville Golf Club, their home course, as they prepare to golf in the state tournament at Columbia Point Golf Course in Richland. Smith and Glover are returning for the third time. Smith, who finished 10th last year made it into the second round, but Glover “got flustered” and didn’t make it to the second day, according to their coach, DeHaven Hill. While all three say they are excited to be going to state, Coach Hill says he’s excited for them. “Bryce is definately excited, he wants to go back and make it to the second day. Jordon wants to make it further,” said Hill. “It’s about good golf, if you play good golf your chances are higher,” said Hill, who gives a lot of credit to the Oroville Golf Course for preparing his golfers. “Oroville Golf Course.... what a great place to come and prepare, there’s a lot of ups and downs for set up and stances. When you go to flat courses it makes them seem like nothing.”

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Vanessa Pershing Honorable Mention.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Hugo Sanchez was named to First Team.

received

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Goalie Christian Garcia received Honorable Mention.

Mills takes first at NWAC BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

SPOKANE--Emily Mills of Oroville, a 2013 Tonasket graduate, took first place in the women’s 400m run at the NWAC Finals at Spokane Falls Community College, with a personal best time of 57:00. Mills runs for Olympic Community College, where she

received a track scholarship for both her freshman year and one for next year. She is their top sprinter and their third cross country runner. Mills and her teammates Kamina Flemming, Hannah Hudson and Jolene Millsap placed fourth in the women’s 4x100 meter relay with a time of 48:90. Their 4x400 meter relay team, consisting of Hudson, Marina

Harford, Mills and Millsap also took fourth, with a time of 4:01.80. Mills ran all four years for THS, going to State several times in her events. She credits her Coach, Bob Thornton as being a big encourager to her. She is pursuing a degree in English, is on the Deans List, and hopes to attend Eastern Washington University after completing her AA at Olympic.

submitted photo

Emily Mills, a 2013 Tonasket alumna from Oroville running for Olympic Community College, took first place in the women’s 400m at the NWAC Finals May 19.


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE MAY 28, 2015

SCHOOLS

TEACHER APPRECIATION WEEK

Dan Hodson D9 Photography/submitted photo

Grandforks, BC’s Victor Kienas launches his super-charged 1973 Chevy Vega from the starting light at Wine Country Racing Association’s first drag race of 2015.

During the first week of May Oroville School District celebrated Teacher Appreciation Week and recognized the time and effort our teachers put forth to educate their students. “Teachers spend long hours outside of the regular day coaching teams, advising clubs, correcting papers, preparing for classes, attending workshops, and taking college courses all with the intent of improving the education for our students,” said Superintendent Steve Quick. “We are very lucky in the Oroville School District to have a very dedicated staff who work extremely hard to help our students learn.” Above OES teachers front, l to r, Ila Hall, Michael Dettering, and principal Joan Hoehn, standing, Shelly Martin, Kelly King, Kelsey Smith, Cyley Moser, Amy Harris, Jessica Budzak, Jennifer Burgard, Julie Tyus, Donita VanWoert, Sarah Marlow, Pat Smith, Eric Stiles, DJ Rounds, Jodi Shirley, Heather Kelly, John Ragsdale, Jennifer Clark, Mary Willey, Lisa Bourn, Lynn Johnson, and Billy Monroe. left, OHS teachers, l-r, Harold Jensen, Cenah Whiteaker, DeHaven Hill, Chuck Ricevuto, Steve Colvin, Evangelina Johnson, Walt Arnold, Whitney Massart, Karla Kerns, Brett Fancher, Ed Booker, Steven Gunderson, Tony Kindred, Ed Naillon, Jay Thacker, and Jan Ottman. Not pictured: Linda Colvin, Tam Hutchinson, and Carol Byrum

Record breaking season opener for WCRA OSOYOOS - Last Sunday, May 24, the drag racers and spectators showed up in droves at the Osoyoos airport. Seventy-four cars put on a record-breaking 275 races, which brought the following people to the winners’ circle: SPORTSMAN BRACKET Kayle Shaw (black 1975 Chevelle), from Penticton, fought his way to the top over 43 other vehicles defeating Westbank’s David Scherk (blue 1986 Chevy pick-up). PRO BRACKET Oliver’s Shana Cachola (pink 1972 Chevrolet Nova) drove to

the top of the pack when she defeated Summerland’s Taylor Dean (grey 2007 GMC diesel truck). SUPER PRO Michael Stewart (white 1967 Chevy II) of Cloverdale, BC drove a long way to take the trophy from Sicamous, BC’s Brad Heppner (black 1989 ED Quay Dragster). BIKE/SLED Steve Clement (red and black 2006 Yamaha snowmobile), from Penticton, defeated Oliver’s Duane Hamm (orange 2009 Suzuki motorcycle). FASTEST REACTION TIME To get a perfect reaction time off of the starting light is an honour. This weekend two drivers

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

SUMITTED BY SHANA CACHOLA WINE COUNTRY RACING ASSOCIATION

get to boast about earning this trophy. Elvis Glenn of Osoyoos, BC (black 2001 Ford Mustang) Ben Dominato of Kelowna, BC (white 1981 Ford Mustang) Be prepared for more racing. The next event is only two Sundays away. The entire weekend of June 5, 6, and 7 can be filled with cars. Cactus Jalopies (www.cactusjalopies.ca) and Wine Country Racing Association (www.winecountryracing.ca) make for a carlover’s dream weekend. Gates open at 9 a.m. Drivers interested in racing need to show up early for registration. Cars start flooding the track at 11 a.m. Final elimination event starts at 1 p.m.

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

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(509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

24 Hour Crisis Line

509-486-2174

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Healthcare Services

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Tonasket’s middle school and high school bands and choirs performed a Spring Concert Wednesday, May 20, with the theme of ‘The River.’ “We worked really hard and also had a lot of fun,” said Director Mariliz Romano. Pictured is the high school choir singing ‘Martha’s Harbor’ with a solo by Melanie Christensen. Left to right are: Jessie Burks, Samantha Whitney, Logan Thompson, Joe Schell, Melanie Christensen and Shoshonna Thomas. The choir portion of the concert ended by singing ‘Happy Birthday’ to Christensen.

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Behavioral

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-8496

OMAK

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Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

TONASKET SPRING CONCERT

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

Funds being ‘rounded up’ for pool SUBMITTED BY THE TONASKET POOL COMMITTEE

TONASKET - May flowers are blooming and hot summer days are around the corner. The swimming pool project is moving forward. The pool design is posted around town, fundraising and planning for long-term pool maintenance are ongoing. We appreciate all who have given support to the idea of having a pool in Tonasket. A new fundraising campaign, “Round Up for the Pool,” will start Founder’s Day Weekend and run through the summer. Businesses around town will ask if you will “round up” your purchase to the next dollar (of course you are welcome to add a dollar or two as well), and your change will go to the pool savings account. Every little bit will help us get closer to a new pool. If we missed you, and your business would like to

participate, please contact us. We welcome all questions and feedback. Please help us spread the word and encourage everyone to “Dive In” and donate. Thank you for your support. We are excited to report that we now have $500,000 in donations and pledges towards construction! Thank you for your contributions (fundraising goal is $1.25 million). If you have not yet donated, now is the time to spring into action and make that donation or pledge. As soon as we have enough money, we can finalize the plan, get the permits and hire a contractor to build the pool. Your donation is an investment in our community, and will help to create a facility that all of us can be proud of. The new pool cannot be built without a plan for maintenance. We want our shiny new facility to serve our community for the next 50 years, so we must ensure that it will be cared for every year. The

Ve terans Memorial Park

Take a break at the Lake

Early season hours Fri~Mon 8 ~ 7 Tues~Thurs 11 ~6 Biscuits n gravy, pastries, hot drinks, hot dogs hamburgers, nachos, espresso, cold drinks hard ice-cream and more! Closed during bad weather. Hours will be extended as the summer arrives.

pool will be a gift to the community from the many donors who have made this possible. A plan to create a Parks & Recreation District has been formulated. We are asking the community to “Dive In” and help with the annual maintenance costs of this new community asset. Every dollar collected will stay in our community. In November, 2015, there will be 3 measures on the ballot: 1. to establish the district, 2. to elect commissioners, 3. to approve a levy of 15 cents per $1000 We ask for your support of these ballot measures. Frequently Asked Questions: What is the cost? The levy cost will be 15 cents per $1000, so $15 a year for a $100,000 taxable value of a property. This will bring in an estimated $60,000 per year for 6 years. Who is included in the district? The district includes people who own property in the voting precincts that lie within 15 miles of the city of Tonasket.   What will the district do with the funds it collects? Support the city in its maintenance and operation of the new pool and some upgrades to existing parks. Who will run for the commissioner positions? Good question! Are you interested? Is someone you know interested? The five commissioners will represent five areas within the district (similar to the school board). Commissioners are not paid, and serve 4-year terms during which they will create and oversee the budget and recreation plan. If you have further questions or input about the proposed parks and recreation district please contact the pool committee. We can be reached through our website, www.tonasketpool.com, or tonasketpool@gmail.com, P.O. Box 1217, Tonasket, WA 98855 or 509486-2517.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 28, 2015  

May 28, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 28, 2015  

May 28, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune