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Next fall’s election shaping up to be an interesting one

BORN TO RIDE

Candidates with agendas looking to unseat incumbents in several local races BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN COUNTY – It looks like next fall’s election is shaping up to be an interesting one as several local offices have incumbents facing challengers.

OROVILLE SCHOOL BOARD For Oroville area voters the most stacked race is for Oroville School District, with two candidates looking to push out incumbent Rocky DeVon, including a former school board chairman and former Oroville High School teacher. Phil Barker, who served in DeVon’s current spot, wants a second chance on the board in Director Position 5. Saying people did not like his “John Wayne style” of governance, Barker resigned his board position without serv-

Above, and right members of the Columbia River Harley Owners Group roar into Oroville after a 150 mile ride from Wenatchee. As many as 165 riders took part in this year’s Run for the Border charity ride to raise money for a worthy cause. The event has been taking place for the past 13 years and riders on all types of motorcycles are welcome to take part. While there was some construction on Highway 97, it was much less than last year and the weather was great for riding, according to participants. Several riders enjoyed Oroville for a few hours, grabbing lunch and looking around town, before heading back south. Several stayed and went to the Rally at the Border Blues Festival at Deep Bay Park, now in it’s second year. For more on the ride and the blues festival, see page A2.

ing the full four-year term at the end of May 2012. Ryan Frazier, a social studies teacher, did not have his contract renewed last year after a bad evaluation by Superintendent Steve Quick. After some heated public meetings, including protesters outside the board room, the directors voted to not reverse the superintendent’s decision and Frazier was let go. There is also a three- way race for Director Position 2, which is a two-year unexpired term. Seeking the seat held by the longest serving member of the board are Patricia Maher, Kolo Moser and Becky Lewis. Wise did not file to run for the office again. The other two positions, that of Director Positions 1 and 4 will only have the names of the incumbents, Todd C. Hill and Mike Egerton, respectively. Position 1 is for a full four-

SEE FILINGS | PG A3

Council sets hearing for transportation plan BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Council’s second meeting in June will include a public hearing for the Six Year Transportation Plan. The community is invited to come and express any needs they see at the meeting about roads in the city of Tonasket. The needs are prioritized every year, and filed with county agencies for future funding. The public hearing is set for the June 23 meeting, which begins at 7 p.m. Tammy Tatum of Okanogan Properties and manager of River Road Mobile Park (formerly John’s Landing/Oaks Trailer Park) appeared before the council at their Tuesday, May 12 meeting, to request ten new septic connections. The city is currently in the process of updating the

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

septic system at Parry’s Acres, including a rebuilding of the lift station. Mayor Plumb said Tatum’s timing in making her request was very good and the city would consider it. Tatum said the the owner, Gary Fant, was considering expanding the trailer park. She said they still needed approval from the Department of Health and the building permits, but approval for the septic connections was the first step. “We haven’t started that project yet, so if we could spend a little more money on it and give you more service in order to provide more affordable housing in that area, it’s a win-win situation,” said Plumb. Public Works Supervisor Hugh Jensen said “the way the pump hours are right now we could handle the extra ten or

SEE COUNCIL | PG A8

North Valley Hospital hires new CEO U.S. Rep. Dan Newhouse tours NVH BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital (NVH) Board of Commissioners moved to appoint Mike Zwicker of Harlowton, Montana, as CEO-Administrator/ Superintendent at the May 14 Board of Commissioners meeting. The motion was made by Clarice Nelson and seconded by Herb Wandler. The appointment will be acted upon at the next meeting, May 28, with the position commencing May 29. Compensation offered Zwicker includes a salary of $150,500 per year. According to the Revised Code of Washington, appointment of a superintendent to a public hospital district is made by commissioners by resolution; introduced at a regular meeting and adopted at a subsequent regular meeting by a majority vote. Zwicker was serving as CEO of Wheatland Memorial Healthcare in Harlowton when offered the position at

Chief Financial Officer Helen NVH. According to Nelson, a member of the Long Range Focus Committee, Verhassselt has been filling in as Acting Zwicker has been at that hospital several Administrator. Board Chair Helen Casey said the years, starting out as a rehab technisearch for the new cian. Harlowton is a administrator, headrural community with ed by Jim Passage a population of 994 as “A lot of times when of Passage and of July 1, 2014. they are looking at Associates, looked at Nelson said after Zwicker’s interview budget cuts, it seems resumes of 40 applicants. at NVH, the Board of like the rural health“Some of them Commissioners met with the committee care comes under the were not serious; were from other May 13 and decided to fiscal axe and we just some countries, and some offer him the position. Zwicker takes over wanted to underscore got scared off when they got the phone the position left vacant with Rep. Newhouse call saying, ‘This realby former CEO Linda the importance of rural ly is a rural area, and Michel, who was put you have to drive five on paid administrahealthcare” hours after you get tive leave February Kelly Cariker, Information Officer off the airplane,” said 26, 2014. Michel had North Valley Hospital District Casey. resigned from her position that included a salary of $176,966 per year. NEWHOUSE VISITS NVH Ron O’Hallaoran, retired CEO of U.S. Representative Dan Newhouse Ferry County Hospital, stepped in as visited North Valley Hospital (NVH) Interim Administrator April 1 on a tem- Wednesday, May 6 during a first-time porary contract with a monthly salary tour of his district after taking office in of $10,250. January.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 21

Submitted photo

U.S. Representative Dan Newhouse shakes Emergency Department Coordinator Katrina Kindred’s hand during a tour of the North Valley Hospital Emergency Department May 6. Also pictured is Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb, who is also a hospital employee. Newhouse toured the facility and sat down and talked with staff and senior leaders for over an hour about issues pertaining to the hospital and long term care facility currently being discussed in

SEE NVH | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Washington, D.C. “I thought it was really awesome he took the time to come up to this hospital without an agenda,” said Tonasket

News A2 Schools A3, A8 Cops & Courts A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Sports B1-2

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PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Six bands did their interpretation of the blues at the second annual Rally at the Border Blues Fest on the shores of Osoyoos Lake last Saturday in Oroville’s Deep Bay Park. Clockwise from above, Randy Oxford (the trombone man) and Lady A sing under the lights; CD Woodbury takes it to the people; Jesse Weston; hot harmonica and vocals; Lady A; and shaking it to Steve Bailey and the Blue Flames. Also appearing were Royce-Govedare High Rollers and the VooDoo Church of Blues.

Osoyoos Lake serves as ‘beautiful’ backdrop for Blues Fest Performers pay tribute to the late B.B. King BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – They may have left singing the blues, but no one who attended last Saturday’s Rally at the Border Blues Fest left unhappy. Between 350 and 400 people attended the festival, now in it’s second year. That represents an increase in attendance by more than 100, according to organizers. Visitors came from as far away as Vancouver BC, Seattle and Twin Falls Idaho. “The only thing we would change next year is the weather. We couldn’t have asked for more memorable music festival weather all day Saturday. Then, just as the festival was winding down and campers were about to settle in, the downpour started,” said Vicki Hinze, who heads up the Rally at the Border Blues Fest Committee. “Twenty-seven tourists camped at Deep Bay, and the poker run got rained out, but everyone we talked to seemed to take it in stride,” she adds.

Committee member Mark Morris, who arranged for the six talented bands, said he couldn’t be more pleased. “All the bands gave 100 percent and knocked it out of the park as far as I’m concerned. Everyone I talked to thought that each and every one of the bands put on a great show. Audiences got to hear Chicago style, Delta and Texas style blues, with periodic tributes to the late blues legend, B.B. King.” Hinze and Morris both say they heard nothing but positive feedback and predictions the event will continue to grow. “From all the positive feedback the committee received, I think we can expect that our audience and reputation will keep growing,” said Hinze. “People loved it, they absolutely loved it. I kept hearing from those who came and from the bands ‘you know this is going to grow... it’s going to grow big,’” added Morris. “The bands all loved it and want to come back. They kept saying what a beautiful venue it is.” This years bands were: The Randy Oxford Band – Featuring Lady A, Steve Bailey and the Blue Flames, The CD Woodbury Band, Jesse Weston Band, Voo Doo Church of Blues and Royce-Govedare High Rollers

Morris said Randy Oxford, one of the lineup for the festival has been spreading the word about the Rally at the Border Blues Fest. “He’s really promoting us and Steve Bailey is a really good guy and puts on a great show,” Morris said, adding that other bands were ‘bummed’ that they couldn’t make it. “It would be hard to step it up any better, but we’re looking to find bands all along the Pacific coast,” he said. Morris also gives much of the credit to those working behind the scenes – the sound and stage guys, for making the festival a success this year. He said he hopes to have an even greater line-up next year, casting his net further to bring in some other great bands. “This year, we knew much more about how to put on a blues festival than we did in our inaugural year. We couldn’t have done it without the time and energy of our 75 plus tireless volunteers. Pulling off an event of this magnitude will always be challenging, especially without any paid staff,” adds Hinze. Following the festival, people were invited to attend a jam session at the Pastime, with

the Deep Water Blues, a local band, and many of the musicians from the festival sitting in. “The Pastime was packed from 10 p.m. until closing. The jam session gave folks a unique opportunity to hear musicians from different bands playing together and everyone seemed to have fun. It was great to see Main Street so alive again,” said Hinze, who owns the Pastime Bar & Grill with husband Brant. “Randy Oxford and members of his band made the jam session so much more fun. How fantastic that amateur musicians got to play alongside musicians of this caliber. We’ll likely be hearing more from a couple of the promising young guitar players who joined in,” Morris adds. The blues festival was conceived as a way to keep some of the riders from the Run to the Border charity motorcycle ride in town for the weekend. This year 165 riders made their way to Oroville from Wenatchee, where the ride starts. The annual ride, in it’s 13th year, is a way for members of the Columbia Harley Owners Group to raise money for various charities. This year the funds they raise go toward the CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) for Children Program of Chelan and Douglas County.


MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Outreach program grabs attention of state auditors BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s Outreach Program received recognition for their success as an Alternative Learning Program (ALE), with the State Auditor’s Office requesting an on-site visit as part of a longitudinal study of ALEs across the state. “This is quite an honor,” said Outreach Program Director Carol Lanigan. “Outreach was one of ten schools chosen for a site-visit based on high student outcomes in the 2012-2013 school year.” The State Auditor’s Office assessed 80 ALEs throughout the state before choosing ten of the most successful programs for further study, and will continue to study Tonasket for the next three years. Tom Ferguson and Elle Watts from the Auditor’s Office visited the school Tuesday, May 12, and met with administrators, a school board member, Outreach staff, school counselors, students and parents. “In 2013, the state legislator approved a number of rules to govern ALE programs, with accountability and transparency in mind,” said Tonasket High School Principal Jeff Hardesty. “Within a particular bill, the State Auditor’s Office was required to audit ALE programs and analyze academic outcomes and post-high school data of ALE students in comparison to traditional educational programs. During the initial phase of the audit, the State Auditor’s Office found a number of positive indicators about the Tonasket Outreach Program. Our ALE program was identified for further study because they would like to know what it is we are doing in comparison to other programs. They visited on May 12th to conduct the qualitative component of their research. We are very excited about being identified for our quality performance, as well as for the opportunity to provide feedback for how ALE programs across the state might improve.” There are 363 ALE programs across the state. “The Board is proud of the accomplishments of our Outreach students, and grateful for the

PAGE A3

NVH | FROM A1 Mayor and NVH employee Patrick Plumb. “We were one of the first hospitals in this area to be toured. He listened to us, and a staff member of his took four pages of detailed notes. I was really impressed.” According to NVH Chief Information Officer Kelly Cariker, this was the second critical access hospital (CAH) Newhouse visited this week in Washington State. “Between the two of us (critical-access hospitals) he picked up a lot of information on the differences between rural and urban healthcare, and how we have drastically different needs,” said Cariker. “There are a lot of things that are being proposed as fiscal cuts at the national level, and sometimes rural healthcare is targeted because it is perceived as being more expensive than in an urban setting.” Cariker said the opposite was true; rural healthcare provides more cost effective care for services provided, compared to the

same services in an urban setting. “A lot of times when they are looking budget cuts, it seems like the rural healthcare comes under the fiscal axe, and we just wanted to underscore with Rep. Newhouse the importance of rural healthcare,” said Cariker. The Office of Inspector General is proposing cuts to CAHs. CAHs are hospitals that have 25 or fewer beds. Joe Carlson, writing for Modern Healthcare.com, quotes CEO of the National Rural Health Association Alan Morgan as stating deep cuts to medicare funding “would effectively kill rural healthcare.” “Looking at CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaide Services) data, critical-access hospitals do primary care, and that is where we want our health system headed,” Morgan said. “If those patients are not being seen in a rural hospital, are they expecting the patient to go to urban facilities? Or are they

expecting them to not seek care? There is a larger issue that is not being talked about here.” “We asked Newhouse to keep in mind the old adage, ‘When you see one Critical Access Hospital, you’ve seen one,” said Interim Hospital Administrator Ron O’Halloran. “You can’t do this tweaking under one blanket motion.” O’Halloran said as CMS looks to refine or tweak conditions of participation, they look at each hospital individually as to how it will affect access to care and how closures would affect the economic viability of the community it serves. “The hospitals often help support long term care beds,” O’Halloran added. Cariker said several issues, including the importance of the swing bed program, were discussed with Newhouse. “We try to stay pretty apprised of what is happening in the State and National level and give input when we can,” Cariker said.

been vocal about the way the city has been running the ambulance service, especially after former ambulance coordinator Debra Donohue refused to put him on the Oroville crew. All three offices are for four-year terms.

Oroville); Kenneth D. Ripley, Commissioner Position 3 for Fire District 1 (Oroville, Rural); Duane Van Woert and Jack Denison, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 4 (Tonasket area) Mark Robanske for Position 3, for Fire District 12 (Swanson Mill); Michael Woelke and Robert K. Bauer, for Commissioner Positions 2 and 3 respectively, for Fire District 16 (Aeneas Valley) and Guy D. Fisher, Leland “Lee” Chapman and Mike Cantwell, for Commisioner Positions 1, 2 and 3, respectively for the Lake Osoyoos Water District.

FILINGS | FROM A1 Photo by Carol Lanigan

Tom Ferguson and Elle Watts from the Washington State Auditor’s Office visited Tonasket’s Homeschool Outreach Program Tuesday, May 12, to discover what makes the program so successful. excellent teachers, mentors, and volunteers who are doing such stellar work. We offer them our congratulations on being made an example of what can be done to support families who have chosen to homeschool,” said Tonasket School Board member Catherine Stangland. Lanigan pointed out the program, in operation for 18 years, has developed and grown over the years to meet the needs of the students. “We are proud of the work our students, families and staff do to make our students successful,” Lanigan said. “The audit was a testiment to the quality program that Carol and her staff have developed over the years,” said Superintendent Paul Turner. The Auditors were very interested on the workings of our program.” “Our Outreach program pro-

vides expertise, high standards, and effective curriculum along with individualized direction and guidance,” Stangland said. “TSD is committed to meeting the diverse needs of students, and pleased to offer this program as one way to do so.” “Simply put, there are a lot of great things taking place in the Tonasket District,” said Hardesty. The Auditor’s Office will publish their first full report in late 2015, evaluating ALE students statewide and comparing their outcomes from the 2013-14 school year to those of a matched set of students receiving only traditional instruction. A second report, planned for late 2016, will follow the matched student cohorts through the 2014-15 school year. A third report, planned for late 2018, will follow these students through the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years.

year term, while Position 4 is for a two-year unexpired term.

TONASKET SCHOOL BOARD In Tonasket, Catherine Stangland and Jerry Asmussen are asking a return to the Tonasket School Board in Director Positions 2 and 5, both fouryear terms. In Director Position 3, another former school board member, as well as a retiring Tonasket teacher, Joyce Fancher, wants to unseat current incumbent Ty Olson for a four-year term.

TONASKET CITY COUNCIL Claire Jeffko’s seat at the table seems secure, as the incumbent will run unopposed for Tonasket Council Position 5. Also running unopposed are Jensen Sackman for Position 2, currently held by Scott Olson and Maria Moreno for Council Position 4, which is currently Lois Rice’s seat. All are four-year terms.

OROVILLE CITY COUNCIL The Oroville City Council is guaranteed to see some changes as Ed Naillon, who has had some recurring health problems, has decided to not run for Position 3 on the council. Robert Fuchs and David “Mac” McElheren have thrown their hats in the race for the position. Incumbent Neysa Roley faces a challenge from Chris Allen for Council Position 5. Allen, who tried to displace Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth in the last election, has

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Herbert Wandler will find himself back on the board for Hospital District 4. The current North Valley Hospital District Commissioner is running unopposed for another six-year term in Position 3. Candidates for other offices include: Gary Nelson, Cemetery District 4 (Riverview,

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2015

COPS & COURTS

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SUPERIOR COURT

Criminal Brandon William Cate, 28, Tonasket, pleaded guilty May 8 to second-degree burglary, attempted second-degree theft, first-degree criminal trespassing and second-degree criminal trespassing. Cate was sentenced to 10 months in jail and fined $600 for the Jan. 24 crimes. Gordon Lester Dick Jr., 40, Omak, pleaded guilty May 12 to attempted theft of a motor vehicle (lesser included of theft of a motor vehicle) and attempt to elude a pursuing police vehicle. The court dismissed three additional charges: third-degree DWLS, hit-and-run (unattended vehicle) and conspiracy to commit second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). Dick was sentenced to 32.25 months (2.7 years) in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Sept. 7, 2014 crimes. Alfonso Cardenas Jr., 57, Omak, pleaded guilty May 12 to violation of a no-contact order (third or subsequent violation of a similar order). Cardenas was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,210.50. Jose Miguel Niebla Plata, 46, Okanogan, pleaded guilty May 12 to four counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The court dismissed an additional count of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Niebla Plata was sentenced to 50 months (4.16 years) in prison and fined $3,370.50. The crimes occurred between April and May of 2014. James Michael Eriksen, 32, Riverside, pleaded guilty May 12 to residential burglary, thirddegree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. Eriksen was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the June 11 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Jeremy John Lavender, 29, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine). The crime allegedly occurred May 5. The court found probable cause to charge Justin Shane Rogers, 25, Okanogan, with POCS (methamphetamine) and second-degree unlawful hunting of wild animals. The crimes allegedly occurred May 5. The court found probable cause to charge Rosalino Sanchez Sanchez, 41, Oroville, with first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crime allegedly occurred March 6. Juvenile A 16-year-old Oroville boy pleaded guilty May 6 to two counts of third-degree malicious mischief (DV) and one count of third-degree theft. The boy was sentenced to three days in detention with

credit for three days served, and fined $100 for the April 21 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for July 29. In a separate case, the same boy pleaded guilty May 6 to thirddegree theft. The boy was sentenced to two days in detention with credit for two days served, and fined $100 plus an additional $50 in restitution. The crime occurred Jan. 15. A 16-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The girl was sentenced to 16 hours of community service and one day in detention with credit for one day served. She was fined $75 for the March 19 crime. Civil The state Department of Labor and Industries fined Curtis Construction Services, Omak, $7,404.96 in unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and fees.

DISTRICT COURT Kerry William Louie, 51, Omak, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Louie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $768. Clomiat Annemaude McCraigie, 39, Omak, guilty of firstdegree DWLS. McCraigie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 94 days suspended, and fined $808. Tami Jean McCraigie, 35, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Joseph Edward McEthmar, 49, Tonasket, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of third-degree DWLS and DUI. McEthmar received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $2,361. Yvonne Delene McMillan, 48, Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree theft. McMillan was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,576. Cory James Michels, 23, Omak, had two charges dismissed: third-degree malicious mischief and fourth-degree assault. Michels was fined $200. Tommy Eugene Moore, 48, guilty of third-degree DWLS and third-degree theft. Moore received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined a total of $1,876. Brenden Joe Ostby, 20, Oroville, guilty of carrying a loaded pistol in a vehicle. Ostby received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $318. Justin Mikel Pearson, 32, Tonasket, guilty of fourth-degree assault, second-degree criminal trespassing and two counts of violation of a no-contact order. The court dismissed a third-degree malicious mischief charge. Pearson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,649. Garret t Thomas Peterson, 21, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Lacey Ann Picard, 24, Omak,

guilty of three counts of thirddegree theft. Picard was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 175 days suspended, and fined a total of $794. Alexis Sara Porter, 23, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Alan Forbes Price, 41, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Price was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $658. Steven Wayne Raynes, 30, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Raynes was fined $500. Jose Luis Rosas Cipriano, 34, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Alisha Ann Russell, 22, Omak, guilty of DUI. Russell was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 173 days suspended, and fined $1,681. David Sanchez Hernandez, 21, Oroville, guilty of thirddegree theft. Sanchez Hernandez was sentenced to 180 in jail with 173 days suspended, and fined $708.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, May 11, 2015 Robbery on Dayton St. in Omak. Fraud on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Warrant arrest on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Threats on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Harassment on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Broser Way near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Tonasket Shop Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Ellisforde. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Harassment on N. Main St. in Omak. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Theft on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Threats on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Derek Justin Allen, 34, booked for felony eluding and thirddegree DWLS. Matthew Russell Carden, 28, booked for obstruction. Billy Dale Anderson, 48, DOC detainer. Robert Trevor Richardson, 35, booked on POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, and two State Patrol FTA warrants: both for POCS (methamphetamine and heroin). Anthony Robert Jolly, 37, booked on six FTA warrants: five for third-degree DWLS and one for third-degree theft. David Allen Gorr, 56, DOC hold. Lacey Ann Picard, 25, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin), pos-

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Wednesday, May 13, 2015 Domestic dispute on N. Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Recovered vehicle on Rocky River HUD Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Benton St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Joaquin Rendon Tomas, 27, booked for second-degree unlawful recreational fishing, obstruction, third-degree DWLS, a Douglas County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and a USBP hold. Bernardino Saldana Rodriguez, 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault.

Thursday, May 14, 2015 Warrant arrest on Okanogan Airport Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Boating accident on Sinlahekin Rd. near Conconully. Theft on Main St. in Riverside. Firearm reported missing. Burglary on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Bluebell Lane near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Oak St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Main St. in Oroville. Rodolfo Valdovinos, 24, booked for attempted to elude a pursuing police vehicle, thirddegree DWLS, an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for criminal trespassing, a prosecutor’s FTA warrant for forgery and a DOC detainer. Joe David Allen Gorr, 20, booked on an FTA warrant for MIP/C. Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 51, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Brisia Andrade Carrasco, 26, booked on four counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (cocaine) and POCS (methamphetamine). Clifford Benjamin Williams, 61, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Friday, May 15, 2015 One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Eighme Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Wolf Dance Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Sex offense on Okanogan Cemetery Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Pine St. in Omak. Theft on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Spare tire cover reported missing. DWLS on E. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Kristina M. Grooms-Sloan, 41, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Jennifer Louise Ballesteros, 44, booked for a drug court violation. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, DOC detainer. Matthew James Blackledge, 49, booked for violation of an anti-harassment order and cyber stalking. Saturday, May 16, 2015 One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan.

Theft on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Chainsaw reported missing. Burglary on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public urination on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Drugs on Pine St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Lost property on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Purse reported missing. Domestic dispute on N. Elm St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Derrick Ryan Boggess, 25, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and a Spokane County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Sunday, May 17, 2015 Vehicle prowl on Hanford St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Fatality reported. Found property on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Jetski recovered. Sex offense on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on W. High Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on Hubbard Rd. near Riverside. Domestic dispute on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Automobile theft on Pine St. in Omak. Fraud on S. Birch St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Pinyon Place near Omak. Mailboxes reported damaged. Burglary on Ferry St. in Oroville. Harassment on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on N. Elm St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Flood on Fir St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Central Ave. in Oroville. Leif Ragnar Gustafson, 47, booked for DUI. Charles Francis Shirley, 47, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Key: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Wed., May 27, 2015

Bonaparte starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Tuesday, May 12, 2015 Warrant arrest on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. DWLS on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Drugs on Queen St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Theft on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Third Ave. in Omak. Assault on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Koala Dr. in Omak. Assault on Columbia St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Juniper St. in Oroville. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Ernest Lee Knight, 51, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Randy Lee Timentwa, 34, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for unlawful display of a weapon. Janalda Lynn Warbus, 24, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jory L. Vallee, 25, booked for third-degree DWLS, an ignition interlock violation and on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Jason Lee Buchanan, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Dustin Rex Hawley Hennigs, 21, booked for third-degree rape. Marcos Florention Rosas, 30, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia and a DOC detainer.

Marti Lynn Worrell, 35, court commitments for POCS and possession of drug paraphernalia. David Thomas Kay, 34, DOC detainer. Lisa Louis Best, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault.

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MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Remembering Mount St. Helens

Can you believe it’s been 35 years since Mount St. Helens blew her top? May 18, 1980 had many different impacts on those living in the Pacific Northwest depending on where you were. Most of us still remember what they were doing when they heard the news. For myself I was on my way back from Spokane, a city that was greatly affected by the volcanic eruption. The Friday before I was home in Oroville for the summer from Gonzaga. I drove to Wenatchee to pick up my brother Dante, as well as a couple friends who were competing in district tennis in Wenatchee. I had offered to take them to Spokane to march in the Oroville High School band for the Lilac Festival. On Sunday we crammed ourselves back into the Datsun for the return trip. As radio reception had been so-so, we mostly listened to cassettes and watched what looked like a storm rolling Out of in. Little did we know, until we switched to the My Mind radio, that the volcano had erupted. It didn’t Gary A. DeVon really affect our travels home, but it was pretty exciting news. My friend Mark Schultz had to wait it out in the Davenport Hotel in Spokane. This was back in the days before the hotel was renovated, so we’re talking about a tiny, old-fashioned room, not something luxurious. That’s where the Army used to put you up before you headed out to boot camp. If memory serves me right he wasn’t able to leave for a couple of weeks because no planes were flying out of Spokane International because of all the ash and poor visibility. While some ash settled in Okanogan County, several other counties in Washington and Oregon bore the brunt of the messy stuff. It made it hard to breath in some areas and ash clogged car radiators. Later, as the dust began to settle, so to speak, it became more of a curiosity with everyone having their mason jar or other container full of ash. While for most of us the eruption was more of a fascinating natural occurrence, that got us thinking about what else in the Pacific Ring of Fire could explode, there were long lasting repercussion from the explosion. As Sen. Patty Murray writes in her statement last Monday about the eruption, “May 18, 1980, is a day many of us from the Pacific Northwest will never forget. In an instant, the catastrophic eruption on Mount St. Helens took the lives of 57 people, decimated wildlife populations, flattened forests, and forever altered the landscape. Ash darkened our skies, making the morning seem like night.” She goes on to say, “But while the story of Mount St. Helens is a story of destruction, it is also a story of renewal. Over the past 35 years we’ve seen an incredible return to life. The mountain has become not only a premier destination for nature lovers and adventurers, but also an important laboratory for scientists who come from all over the world to learn valuable lessons about nature’s power to both destroy and regrow. “We should honor those who died 35 years ago today by continuing to learn from the eruption and by dedicating the resources it takes to predict and effectively respond to natural disasters. We must also be ready to act on the things we can control. Recent news that the Spirit Lake Tunnel on the mountain is in need of significant repair reminds us that we must remain vigilant to the continued dangers that exist for surrounding communities. So as we remember the devastation of 35 years ago, we must all keep working to make sure communities have the resources they need to do everything possible to protect families and homes from future disasters.”

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR May Festival takes a tremendous effort Dear Editor, Having moved back to Oroville at the end of last year, I felt a great need to jump in and give back to the community in which I grew up. In 1988 I had the honor of representing Oroville as a May Festival Princess, so of course, May Day seemed like the perfect

place to use my extra energy towards helping my home town. Back when I was a teenager I was far too young and naïve to understand what a tremendous amount of work goes into making May Day a success. The May Day Committee works throughout an entire year to make sure the many events go off without a problem. But sometimes a glitch can occur, and it is not one persons fault. Everyone is giving of their

Join us in saying farewell to the Seamans

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Dear Editor, Good Day all OBHS Members and Friends, On Tuesday, May 26 at 5:30 p.m. there will be a Potluck Farewell in the basement of the Immaculate Concepiton Catholic church to honor Bob and Mary Seamans for all the service and work they have done in this community over the years. Please join us to help show our appreciation and to wish them well in their future. Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society Board of Directors Oroville

SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Reporter/Production Katie Teachout katheriner@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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own time and works very hard at the task in which they volunteered. I am absolutely in awe of the work that goes in to making May Day a success. I look forward to learning from the more seasoned volunteers and continuing to volunteer my time for an event that has had an impact my entire life, and teaching my children the value of giving back to the community they now call home. I would urge anyone that has never helped with Selection Night, Coronation, or any of the events that occur on that special Saturday in May to consider coming to a May Day Committee meeting and see where their time could be put to use. Sincerely, Dana Kernan-McCoy May Festival Committee Member

A cancer among us OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIO-POLITICAL WRITER

Sociologists say everyone on welfare is just an unfulfilled laborer. But you wonder. You hear a construction company owner lament that she can’t get anyone to take a job she offers. Partyline, Craigslist, job ads. Nothing. Not just no qualified applicants... no applicants. You run into your friend who runs a county facility. Know anyone looking for work? he asks. Got four positions. Can’t get anyone to apply. At a local office supply firm you hear the owner tell a friend, got two jobs. No Bill Slusher responses to ads. Another friend is opening a bar, can’t get help. A restaurant manager friend says I got four openings. No one applies. At the drive-up window they ask for aps they can give the unemployment office to get their dole checks but they don’t actually interview. A worker quit last week. Says she can make more on social security, WIC and unemployment for watching TV at home than I can pay her and compete. You think about your own kids, three of them out of work for layoffs during the recession at least twice, but only for a couple of weeks until they found – went out and scoured – another job. Every... time. A guy calls cold from Spokane, says he does car glass, has references I check out. I hire him to replace two windshields which he does in my yard, in the cold wind, working out of his van. Excellent work. Got laid off from construction, windshield-guy says. Me and the wife, we’re starting this glass repair business. My people don’t do welfare. My people don’t do welfare.

Windshield-guy? He wants to work. But most folks... not so much. Technically, there’s not anything wrong with not wanting to work, because it’s true of us all. Oh yeah, you too. Sure, some of us enjoy and are fulfilled by our work more than others, but regardless, most of us would not work if we could afford to buy what we need and want without working. Nope, we’d spend all that work time with our kids or other loved ones, traveling, hunting, fishing, sports, working on our homes, helping others, some creative endeavor, or a hobby we enjoyed more than work. Noble protestations notwithstanding, nobody really... truly... wants to work. Give almost anyone enough money to have what they want and they’ll quit work and do something they enjoy more or that they obtain more fulfillment from. It’s why we retire. It’s human nature and, again, up to a point, there’s nothing wrong with it. But once you accept this reality it quickly eviscerates most politically correct social theory as to work. Most disturbingly, it destroys the notion that people on the dole will ever voluntarily get off of it if the dole meets their needs. They won’t. Our society gags with millions who – apparently happily – live generations on someone else’s earnings extorted from those workers through excessive taxation. It comes so naturally to them that they not only feel no shame or self-disgust, they feel... entitled. When this happens, and it has, there festers a fatal cancer in our nation. Accomplishment gives way to endless creative plots to justify the artificial transfer of someone else’s earnings to people who haven’t earned it. This gives rise to endless welfare dependency. It manifests in minimum wage laws and union strikes where one is somehow supposed to be paid more for their labor than it

can be bought for elsewhere on a competitive market. These employees earn only a portion of their artificially inflated wage and obtain the rest from earnings stolen off others in higher taxes and prices. Preposterous rationales are fictionalized like a ‘gender wage gap’ where women are supposedly paid less for the exact same – apples to apples – quality/time unit of labor. As the eminent Stanford economist, Dr. Thomas Sowell, has written, this is patently impossible for, as profits rule, employers would long ago have fired all their male workers and hired all allegedly cheaper female labor. Think domestic outsourcing. Like minimum wage laws, the ‘gap’ is just another shell-game construct to attempt to justify taking the earnings of one person and giving it to (read: bribing votes with it from) someone who hasn’t equally earned it. The same is true of affirmative-action quotaism. They’re all toxic schemes to substitute contrived social scamsterism for indispensable merit. If our great American experiment is to survive, we must end this post-modern fetish for replacing performance with the perfumed theft of ‘income redistribution,’ for the latter corrodes us from within and without. The social parasite says why achieve when government will support me? The worker says why achieve when government will steal my earnings to bribe votes from they who will not work? At that point, a fatal social metastasis is underway. William Slusher’s latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to atwilliamslusher@live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Roses know regardless of the weather I wouldn’t even need a calendar to know that it is very near Memorial Day, (or Decoration Day as it was called where I grew up) as the old fashioned yellow rose bushes are a mass of golden blossoms. Somehow they know, regardless of the weather. Also the beautiful pink wild roses are in bloom along the country side. I’m hoping I have better luck with the computer this week. I just am not into this electronic age and I really get agitated when things go amiss, when I do the same thing, week after week, and then the machine, suddenly “eats” the whole article, after I’d been typing for over an hour. Oh! Well! This too shall pass.

We’ve had lotsa rain and then ers in the garden shop, for a lot of years. Heavenly sunshine after, making the It is easy to be critical... but really, did grass grow and the humming sounds of the fellow that wrote the letter to the the neighbors lawn mowers editor last week being critican be heard in all directions. cal of the emcee at the recent Sounds of summer I suppose May Festival Coronation need the thunder and lightening we to criticize the young lady, had last Saturday night is the who took time from the busy tail ends of some of the tornaschedule she keeps, to give a does that have been raging in hand when asked to do the the Midwest, again. job. She doesn’t pretend to be Have you noticed how a professional and perhaps it many really large ravens there would have been beneficial are in our area? to her had she been given How about that person- THIS & THAT copy of the participants, in a alized ad from Hughes Ace Joyce Emry timely order, instead of just Hardware with our own Doris minutes before the program. Hughes all over the cover? Is she a star or Criticizing someone only tends to make what? And in that same advertisement, them say “NO” the next time they are what a thoughtful thing to do, giving asked. This function happens yearly and kudos to the late Forrey Boyer and his volunteers are always welcome. wife, Joyce, for being such great care takThe May Day Barbecue needs more

It was reported to me, that Mimi Chinn, wife of Raleigh, had once again had a trip to the hospital, in Wenatchee, this time to have a pacemaker installed, and hopefully that will correct her heart rhythm problems. It’s graduation time. We’re so proud of our grand daughter’s husband, who has just finished law school and was selected, class speaker, at the Seattle University School of Law and was chosen by his fellow students to be the speaker. And a great nephew graduated in Idaho, with honors. Too often, it is said that the young people of today are “no good” but hasn’t that often been said of the younger generations?

help next year, too. As Mr. Andrews says, “Oroville comes through at the crucial time, but it needs more volunteer leaders, not just workers.’’ We are saddened to learn of the death of Carol (Dietrich) Burton. Although it did not come as a terrific shock as she had been quite ill for the past few weeks, but we still expected that she would recover, while in Swedish hospital in Seattle. But, she had too many strikes against her, from multiple problems through the years and just didn’t have the strength to fight off the serious infection that had invaded her body. Condolences to her parents Dave and Betty Dieterich and all other family and friends. Take time to stop in and visit with Bob Hirst. “It’s lonely down there” and you know how he likes to talk. Sorry to learn that Gary Sorenson, has some serious health issues. Also, Barbara Shaw, went to Wenatchee hospital for further tests and evaluations, stemming from heart issues.

GETTING CAMPY

Terrific Kids Once again the Kiwanis Club of Tonasket is proud to be sponsoring the Terrific Kids program at the Tonasket Elementary School. Standing with the Terrific Kids are Warner Bartelson and Rosemary Stevens submitted photo

Motorbike raffle was successful SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT Gary DeVon/staff photo

Oroville sixth-graders spent last week at Lost Lake for the annual Sixth Grade Camp. The kids learned several different skills, enjoyed nature and wildlife and made art projects. On Thursday, it was parents’ night and family and friends were invited to the camp to see what their kids had been up to. After a chili dinner the kids put on several skits, like the one above where those who didn’t get the king the right “paper” received the axe. The audience jumped as one by one those subjects who displeased the king were marched outside and an axe swing by the outside window could be seen before landing with solid thump. Camp coordinator John Ragsdale thanked his camp councilors, students from Oroville High School, as well as those who volunteered their time to teach the kids during the five day camp.

Red Hat Ladies go ‘round at Republic

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Well, here it is Sunday evening already and I am sitting here at the computer wondering what to type. To start off last week, our Red Hat Ladies made a trip to Republic to join the ladies up there for lunch and a ride on the merry go ‘round at the Fair Grounds. It is always a treat to visit with the ladies and have someone else prepare the lunch. Of course the ride on the merry go ‘round was the best. We were given a history lesson of where it started and how it came to Republic. You can rent the ride and the adjoining room and kitchen for receptions or private parties. Other times it is open at fair time. I know our ladies had a good time. As always we did some shopping at the local stores. I am sure we will go again. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday were spent getting our potluck items ready for the rest of the week. On Friday we attended the Celebration of Life for Ted

EAGLEDOM AT WORK Officer installation planned for May 31 SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

May Day is over as is The Run to the Border and the Aerie election. The Eagles Auxiliary will elect on Tuesday, May 26. At this time installation of officers for the new term will be Sunday, May 31. Then we can all go fishing. It’s time to pay dues! Come on in and get ‘um while they’re hot! On Friday, May 22 Star Connection Karaoke Show will be with us again. Be there to join your friends for fun music. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw and Tacos. We are People Helping People!

Hilstad at the Molson Grange Hall. Ted was a Good Man and liked every one and they all liked him. Thank you to all that said prayers and sent cards. There will be a Celebration of Life for both Amos and Judy Coffelt on Saturday, June 6 at 2 p.m. in the Community Building in Chesaw. This will be a dessert and light snacks potluck to share. Also in June, to all Friends of Fiona, this summer Fiona Gallery will be open only for special events during the season. Sandy Vaughn said she appreciates the interest and support that has come her way over the years with this little experiment in the Okanogan Highlands. She says it is time to move on and see what the next phase will be. The next special event will be the “GreenStock” Garden and Plant Sale, Saturday and Sunday, June 6 and 7, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. This will be your opportunity to get plants for your garden that have been lovingly tended in the Highlands, both vegetables and flowers. During this event,

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Fiona will be open, with art on the walls, the gift and second hand shop open and espresso and treats ready. Come check it out. Watch for future events. Call 509485-2281 for info. On Friday evening we went to Molson again. This time for Bingo. As luck would have it we both won a Bingo. That does not happen very often. We will go again, I’m sure. Saturday was over to Molson again. This time it was for a Celebration of Life for Nita (Mountain Ma Ma) Myrick. Nita was a MaMa to every one she met. If you needed applesauce, she was there with her peeler. If you needed phone calls made, she was already dialing the numbers. She made many friends from all over the world when she worked at the School Museum over the years. Thank you Nita for being there for all of us. I have been telling you for weeks about the Yard Sale on Saturday, May 23. The sale will start at 9 a.m. and go until 2 p.m. Lunch is going to be taco salad, served by the Ladies of the Knob Hill Club of Chesaw. Judy will have her wonderful “World Famous” Cinnamon Rolls. That is our world. Many venders will be there with their products. See you there.

Our motorbike raffle went swell. The winner of the bike was Erik Loera. Lucky fella. I want to thank all who donated their hard earned dollars. Oroville truly has a generous citizenry. It was great fun meeting you all. The money earned went towards repairing our furnace, which is now back on line. An especial Thank you all. Computer classes have progressed to the next level. Times and signup sheets are in the lunchroom. Our school days picture contest is progressing, as Seniors go, so don’t forget to bring yours for

Next Nursing Home Forum is May 27 SUBMITTED BY NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

The Nursing Home Success Team members received enthusiastic appreciation for the informative forum sessions they presented last month. The Success Team panel gave an analysis of the issues the Nursing Home (North Valley Extended Care) faces, explored ways the community can become involved in helping to solve problems, and answered questions from the interested audience. One of those questions was a request for more of the sessions to be held, and so the team is offering two more forums to be held on Wednesday, May 27. The first forum will be at the Tonasket Senior Center, at 12:20 p.m., fol-

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lowed by another session at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket at 7:00 p.m. Hopefully, all those interested will be able to attend one of the meetings. Do you have questions about our Community Nursing Home? Are you interested in working to protect the future of community elders and seniors? Perhaps the North Okanogan County could be a model for how a community can come together to help heal our broken health care system. For those of you who have been wondering what has happened to the Nursing Home News updates that have been in the Community

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display. Give it to Betty Steg. I attended a conference in Wenatchee last Tuesday with Adult and Aging Care. We learned how to find volunteers and that any number between one and nine, when multiplied by nine, if the resulting digits are added together they add up to nine again. So, if you call nine volunteers seven times the total number of calls is 63. By adding the digits 6 and 3 together again, you get 9. And, there was something about Denmark and gray elephants, I think. All that thinking just wore me out. Oh, yes. And then there was this totally confusing, made no sense,

312 S. Whitcomb

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Conflict Resolution talk. I took notes, but nothing else seemed too significant, except for 288 miles and a long day, and maybe we could get some discretionary funding somehow or someway. Oh, yes, there is farmers market vouchers for some Seniors, but nowhere to use them in Oroville. Lucky us. All in all, though, it was a good conference, and getting to know other Seniors representatives was worthwhile. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Ed Craig; Pinochle, Ed Craig; High Man, Dave; High Woman, Betty Steg and Bev Storm. Pinochle Last week: Door Prize, Ed Craig; Pinochle, Danny, and Barb; High Man, Ed Craig; High Woman, Danny Wietrick I understand that when the Mongols conquered China, the wise men of China were brought into the royal court. The result was Confucian. Section of the Gazette-Tribune, know that we have not stopped submissions to the paper, but had to slow down. We do plan to submit updates or items having to do with the Nursing Home in the future, but not every week. The Nursing Home Success team is very thankful to the Gazette-Tribune for giving us the space as we have needed it and we are so thankful to community members who have been supporting our efforts. We look forward to seeing you at one of our forums.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

PAUL BLART MALL COP

SAT - SUN - MON - TUES, MAY 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20

THE AGE OF ADELINE

THURS.-FRI. MAY 21-22. SHOWTIMES ON FRI.@ 7:00 & 9:10 P.M.

AVENGERS AGE OF ULTRON FRI.- SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES.,THURS.-FRI. MAY29-30-31,JUNE 1-2,4-5 ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY @ 7:30 P.M.

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

TOMORROWLAND 130 min ACTION / ADVENTURE / MYSTERY STARRING GEORGE CLOONEY, BRITT ROBERTSON, HUGH LAURIE FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00,6:00, 9:00. SUN.*3:00, 6:00, 9:00. MON.*3:00, 6:30. TUES- THURS.: 6:30

PG

Goodbye, Child Care Costs ... Hello, College Savings Opportunities FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

If you’re a working parent, you know firsthand about the difficulties of finding quality, affordable care for your children. But eventually, your kids head off to school, and those child care bills go away, or at least diminish greatly. When that happens, you could start putting away money for another one of your children’s milestones: college. Just how expensive is child care? Costs vary greatly among the 50 states, but the national average for a 4-year-old at a child care center is approximately $7,880 per year, according to Child Care Aware of America, a child care resource and referral agency sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. What could you do with this money once your child enters kindergarten? Of course, not all schools provide all-day kindergarten, so you still may have some child

care costs. For the purposes of illustration, let’s presume you can finally say “goodbye” to child care costs when your child is in first grade, and let’s also assume your child is attending a public school. If you invested that $7,880 every year for 12 years, until your child reaches 18, you could accumulate more than $150,000 in a taxadvantaged college savings account, such as a 529 plan — assuming the money was placed in a hypothetical investment that earned 7% per year. (Keep in mind, though, that the word “hypothetical” means exactly that, because whenever you put money in any variable investment, there are no guarantees.) Actually, earnings in a 529 plan accumulate and are distributed tax free, provided they are used for qualified higher education expenses. (529 plan distributions not used for qualified expenses may be subject to federal and state income tax and a 10% IRS penalty on the earnings.) Also, your 529 plan contributions may be deductible from your state taxes. However, 529 plans vary, so be sure to check with your tax advisor regarding deductibility. A 529 plan offers other benefits, too. For one thing, the lifetime contribution limits are generous; while these limits vary by state, some plans allow contributions well in excess of $200,000. And a 529 plan is flexible: If your child decides against college or vocational school, you can transfer the

unused funds to another family member, tax and penalty free. A 529 plan is a widely used choice for college savings, but it is not your only option. You could also consider a Coverdell Education Savings Account, which, like a 529 plan, can generate tax-free earnings if the money is used for higher education expenses. You can typically only put in a maximum of $2,000 per year to a Coverdell account, but it lets you use the funds on K-12 and college expenses. Whichever college-savings vehicle you choose, it will take discipline on your part to continue investing in it, year after year. And after freeing yourself from those child care bills, you can certainly think of other ways to use this “found” money. That’s why you might want to automatically move money from your checking or savings account to your 529 plan, Coverdell account or other investment earmarked for college. As your income rises over the years, you can increase the amount of these automatic transfers. In any case, once those child care bills stop, you can put that money to work on your children’s behalf. Make the most of this opportunity. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD 120min

R

PITCH PERFECT 2

PG13

ACTION ADVENTURE THRILLER STARRING TOM HARDY, CHARLIZE THERON, NICHOLAS HOULT. FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. SUN *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. MON: 3:00, 6:30.TUES-THURS 6:30 115min

COMEDY STARRING ANNA KENDRICK, REBEL WILSON, HAILEE STEINFELD. FRI: 6:30, 9:30. SAT. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. SUN. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00 . MON-. *3:00. TUES-THURS. 6:30

AVENGERS AGE OF ULTRON 141 min

PG13 ACTION / ADVENTURE / SCI-FI STARRING ROBERT DOWNEY JR., CHRIS EVANS, MARK RUFFALO. FRI. 6:30, 9:45 SAT. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. SUN *3:00, 6:00, 9:00 MON. *3:00, 6:00. TUES - THURS. 6:30.

Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR TONASKET - Music at the View will be holding their Spring Fair Concert on May 22, 23 and 24 at the Howell Canyon Estate near Tonasket. For more information see www.musicattheview.com.

GARRET MARTIN TO PERFORM AT WINERY OROVILLE - Garret Martin, vocalist and guitarist from the Omak area, will perform at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday evening, May 21. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861. Check the events calendar on the websit at www.estherbricques.com to view upcoming weekly performances. MOLSON/CHESAW YARD SALE MOLSON - The annual Molson/Chesaw Yard sale is going to be at the Grange Hall in Molson on Saturday, May 23 starting at 9 a.m. with lunch (Taco Salad) served by the Knob Hill Ladies of Chesaw at 11 am. Tables are still available, call Penny at 509-485-2343. There is no charge for tables. OROVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, May 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096 OKANOGAN DEMOCRATS TO MEET TWISP - The Okanogan County Democrats May meeting will be held on Saturday, May 23 at the TwispWork in Twisp Wash. at 1:30 p.m. FAREWELL TO SEAMANS OROVILLE - There will be a Potluck Farewell to honor Bob and Mary Seamans on Tuesday, May 25 at 5:30 p.m. in the basement of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Oroville for all the service and work they have done in this community over the years. The board of the Borderlands Historical Society asks people to join them to help show their appreciation and to wish them well in their future. SCHOOL RETIREES ASSOCIATION OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will hold a no-host luncheon meeting at 11 a.m., Tuesday, May 26, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. Okanogan High School science teacher, Kathleen Ferguson and students will discuss the rehabilitation of salmon habitat on Conservancy Island and the “Oden Road Fire Study.” Information: 509-422-2954. STORY TIME AT LIBRARY OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The

Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, May 27 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children.

NURSING HOME EDUCATIONAL FORUM TONASKET - On Wednesday, May 27, there will be two Nursing Home Educational Forums in Tonasket. The first forum is at the Tonasket Senior Center at 12:20 p.m., and the second will take place at the Cultural Community Center (CCC) at 7 p.m. Please come and take advantage of this great opportunity to collaboratively work with North Valley Hospital District for the common goal of preserving this essential service. Do you have questions about the Nursing Home? Come and ask, OKANOGAN COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board will hold their Regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, May 27 at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. If you have questions or need additional information please contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041. LIBRARY BOOK SALE TONASKET - The Tonasket Library Board will be having their semi-annual book sale during the week of the Founders Day celebration. The book sale is Thursday, May 28 and Friday, May 29. Both days the time is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Tonasket City Council room at 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, Wash. All proceeds go to fund Library needs. WINE AND WOOL NITE OROVILLE - There will be a Wine and Wool Nite on Friday, May 29 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. It is sure to be a fun night, with lots of information about the North American Wool Cooperative’s future and a chance to share your thoughts with your community members. Contact Sonja Myklebust at 425-241-0151 WVC SPRING FLING OMAK - Wenatchee Valley College at Omak invites the community to the first ever Spring

Fling on Friday, May 29, at 2 p.m. at the Omak Civic League Park. This event will feature WVC at Omak clubs, academic programs and community programs and will highlight exciting events happening on the Omak campus. Admissions, financial aid services, and other new student information will be available. The Spring Fling includes musical performances by The Ruby Scene at 4 p.m. and The Outer Space Blues Band at 4:30 p.m. This event is free to the public and is sponsored by WVC at Omak Associated Student Body.

REGGIE MILES AT CCC The CCC presents award winning musician, singer and songwriter, Reggie Miles, from Seattle on Friday, May 29 at 7 p.m. Cost for this event will be $10 for members and $12 for non-members. A pizza dinner available for $5; Judy Linety will be the chef. Refreshments will be served throughout the evening by donation to the CCC. TONASKET FREEDOM 5K AND 1 MILE TONASKET - There will be a Tonasket Freedom 5K and 1 mile kids event on Saturday, May 30 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. starting and finishing at the Tonasket High School track (north of Elementary School). Contact Heather Brownlee at ncwgreenmom@ gmail.com or call509-560-0736 OKANOGAN VALLEY FIBER FESTIVAL OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org. CELEBRATION OF LIFE CHESAW - There will be a Celebration of Life for both Amos and Judy Coffelt on Saturday, June 6 at 2 pm in the Community Building in Chesaw. This will be a dessert and light snacks potluck to share. GREENSTOCK GARDEN AND PLANT SALE CHESAW - The next special event will be the “GreenStock” Garden and Plant Sale, Saturday and Sunday, June 6 and 7, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.This will be your opportunity to get plants for your garden that have been lovingly tended in the Highlands, both vegetables and flowers. During this event, Fiona will be open, with art on the walls, the gift and second hand shop open and espresso and treats ready. Watch for future events. Call 509-4852281 for info. 4-H LEADER’S COUNCIL SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISER OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County 4-H Leader’s Council will be holding a yard sale on Saturday, June 6 from 9am-3pm at 531 2nd Ave. North, Okanogan. Funds raised at this event will support the Council’s scholarship

fund. For more information, or to donate yard sale items, please contact Marnee at 509-422-2130 or 509-557-8523

TONASKET FOOD BANK TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. OROVILLE FOOD BANK OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386. LISTING YOUR ITEM Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

SUBMITTED BY SCOTT FURMAN OKANOGAN COUNTY ASSESSOR

The Okanogan County Assessor’s Office will mail out approximately 8,500 notice of value change forms May 29, 2015 to property owners primarily located within the Omak School District as well as some landowners in the Tonasket and Oroville School District. The State requires that onesixth of the county be physically inspected each year. Most of the land within the Omak School District was located in this years’ physical inspection area. Some neighborhoods in the Tonasket and Oroville School District were also adjusted to reflect the real

EMS Week recognized SUBMITTED BY WAYNE WALKER

OKANOGAN / N. DOUGLAS EMS COUNCIL

OKANOGAN - In 1973, President Gerald Ford authorized Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Week to celebrate its practitioners and the important work they do in responding to medical emergencies. A lot has changed over the past four decades. EMS is now firmly established as a key component of the medical care continuum and plays an important role in saving lives from sudden cardiac arrest, stroke and trauma. Today, EMS agencies bring the ER to you with highly trained, skilled personnel and highly technical medical equipment to transport the sick and injured to the best equipped

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

(509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

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OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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hospital to treat the problem. These professionals do all this while showing care and compassion to their patients. Though they often do not make the news EMS professionals are there for their communities at their greatest time of need, often at great personal sacrifice. As chairman of the Okanogan/ North Douglas County Emergency Care Council and on behalf of the Council in observance of EMS Week, I would like to extend a sincere and heartfelt Thank You to all the volunteer and paid EMS professionals in Okanogan and North Douglas Counties. The Council would also request the public to take a moment to reach out and thank the many individuals and agencies which serve our communities.

FAMILY PRACTICE

DENTISTRY

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

FISHING!

estate market in that area. Changes in value varied based upon location with some assessments staying in a similar range as the prior value while others were adjusted to reflect sales that have occurred in that particular neighborhood. These new values will affect taxes paid in 2016. The Assessor’s Office encourages anyone who has questions on their assessment to call the office at 509-422-7190. Appeals must be received by the Okanogan County Board of Equalization by Monday, July 1, 2015. Appeal forms can be accessed from the web: www.okanogancounty.org or you can call the Board of Equalization at 509-422-7100 and they can mail a form to you.

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

MUSIC AT THE VIEW

Assessor mails out notices of changes in value

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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501 (C) (3) public charity www.AnnieAmerika.org www.AnnieAmerika@gmail.com gofundme.com/AnnieAmerika

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2015

Spring Barrel Tastings

Slippery Slope sang the blues Saturuday, May 16, while visitors to Esther Bricques Winery enjoyed Spring Barrel Tastings. Left, Chuck Oakes on guitar and vocals; above, Ron Champagne on bass, Dave Wheatley on congas and harp, Jim Attwood on drums and Oakes entertain guests on the patio. Right, Linda Colvin serves samplings of 2013 and 2014 white wines from stainless steel tanks and 2013 reds from French Oak barrells to (left to right) Marcia and Terry Peterson, Harriet Stangland, LeeAnn Peterson and Karen Stangland. Esther Bricques Winery holds summer tasting hours Thursday through Monday from 1:00 p.m. to 5 p.m., and Thursday Eve Music Socials at 6 p.m. Copper Mountain Vineyard also held a Spring Barrel Tasting Saturday, May 16, from 1-5 p.m. Katie Teachout/staff photos

Okanogan Valley

COUNCIL | FROM A1 fifteen” connections. Soccer organization representatives requested a presence at the May 12 meeting. Jean E. Ramsey was the only one present, and wanted to know why the city shut down parking along the road into and out of Chief Tonasket Park. Mayor Patrick Plumb responded it was impossible to get an ambulance in there with cars parked along the road. Ramsey was told there are parking lots available for visitors to the park, and once the Splash Park opens it will have designated parking. The Splash Park is scheduled to open the first week of June.

YEAR OF THE AIRPORT Lee Orr and Don Colbert of the Tonasket Airport Improvement Club said the airport courtesy car was no longer usable. Plumb said the city had delivered a surplus police car over to OK Chevrolet, and suggested that be used as the courtesy car. Council member Scott Olson said it would be a good deal, as the city was not going to do anything else with the car. Audience member and former council member Ramsey said as a passenger car it held up fine. Orr next requested the city assist the Airport Improvement Club with an insurance issue. He said there was a privately owned aircraft fuel station at the airport that the city was requiring liability insurance on. Orr said the insurance was so cost-prohibitive it would cost them more than going to Omak to buy the fuel. “All the other cities that have fuel, the system is owned by the city,” said Orr. “We approached the council years ago and they nixed the idea, so we put in the private system, co-oped by 23 people now.” Orr suggested the city take over the fuel system, but if they did they would need a card lock system, which would cost between six to ten thousand dollars. Plumb suggested the Airport Improvement Club meet with the Transportation Committee, made up of Claire Jeffko and Jill Vugteveen. Orr then said the Airport Improvement Club would like to put up a permanent pavilion in their park to use for the Fly-in BBQ. He said they would build it in stages as they could afford to, starting with a pole building. Orr said they would like to take on all costs of building it, and then give it to the city so they wouldn’t have to pay property tax or pay for permits. Plumb said they would need to work with both Jensen and Christian Johnson, the City Building Inspector. “Let’s have 2015 be the year of the airport,” said Plumb. A motion was made by Jeffko and seconded by Lois Rice to have Tonasket join the Airport Managers Association, with City Planner Kurt Danison as representative and Jensen as alternate. ECONOMIC ALLIANCE LOOKING AT N. COUNTY Danison reported the

Economic Alliance Committee was planning a tour of the Oroville Reman and Reload on 9th Ave. “The Economic Alliance is looking at trying to maintain some presence up here,” said Danison. The Reload plant was chosen because it is a successful and growing business in the north part of the county that has experienced some infrastructure and land use issues. Danison said the Executive Director will be scheduling meetings with folks in the northern part of the county interested in the Alliance and how it may be able to help. Persons wanting to meet with Roni should call the Alliance at (509) 826-5107. The Okanogan County Council of Governments (OCOG) met May 11 and approved the program for how they would spend the $28,000 Okanogan County portion of the RTPO funds provided by the legislature. The OCOG adopted a Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP), a requirement for obtaining and spending the money. “The money will be used to defray administrative costs of the OCOG and pay for consultant time to prepare a Regional Transportation Plan,” said Danison. The $28,000 is an annual allocation and can be rolled from the first year of the biennium to the second, but must be expended by the end of the biennium or be lost. Danison also reported the Geneesee and Wyoming Railroad (GWRR) agreed to allow the City to develop the primitive crossing located at the south end of the County Shop property. The City will next need to prepare a petition to the Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) requesting a permit for the crossing, hopefully accompanied by a letter from the GWRR requesting that the requirement for a UTC public hearing be waived. Danison said after July 1 he will be able to apply for grant funds from the UTC to get the dollars needed to design the new crossing to the satisfaction of the GWRR. He said the City would identify and pursue a variety of funding sources for the construction of the road/railroad crossing and pedestrian facility to access the park. Danison said the project would entail rebuilding the county shop road and putting in a paved pathway from downtown to Chief Tonasket Park that will tie in with the Armed Forces Legacy Park on US 97. “It’s still a couple years out, but considering it was 25 years ago when we first petitioned them, it’s pretty exciting,” said Danison.

OTHER BUSINESS Vugteveen expressed concern over flood damage that may have occurred for area businesses during Monday’s (May 11) storm. She said a video was made showing a wave in front of Lee Franks whenever a car went past. Jensen

said Public Works was having difficulty keeping the storm drains cleared of Chinese Elm leaves. Vugteveen asked if documentation was being done to get storm water issues dealt with by the DOT. Plumb said the DOT didn’t have any funding, and Vugteveen said Tonasket projects were often given low priority. Interim Police Chief Darren Curtis reported receiving lots of positive community feedback over proactive patrols at the school. “We’ve got unmarked cars up there, and multiple community members have come by and thanked us for the extra patrols, which have led to a decrease in activity around the high school and alternative school,” said Curtis. He also reported looking into purchasing a surplus Fish and Wildlife vehicle to be used for animal control. Stray animals cannot be transported in the same vehicle compartment as prisoners, and the Crown Vics have only one compartment. While approving bills to be paid, Vugteveen questioned the city spending $66 for a 60-day supply of methocarbamol for a prisoner who had a short stay in jail last month. “Why are we providing prisoners with more medical care than just the time they are in jail?” Vugteveen asked. Plumb reported being pleased with U.S. Representative Dan Newhouse’s May 13 visit to North Valley Hospital. “We conveyed to him the importance of protecting jobs there,” said Plumb. “I also invited him to utilize city hall here for monthly meetings they hold in Omak. Staff said half the issues they are dealing with are veteran issues, and we have a lot of veterans here.” Plumb said he also saw the tour of the hospital as “a good thing for the community to go in and see the hospital. “We supported the bond, so it’s good to come in and see the money at work,” said Plumb, an NVH employee. The council declared May 23, 24, 29 and 30 as “Poppy Days” for the American Legion Auxiliary. According to the proclamation, the poppy grew wild on the battlefields of Flanders, flourishing among shelled buildings and the bomb-scarred landscape. Its brilliant red bloom, so much like the blood which had been shed there, became a sign of hope and renewal for World War I Veterans who lived and walked away from the battlefields. For those who would never leave, it was a perpetual memorial to their bravery. The nine-piece crepe paper poppy, made by veterans, serves as physical and psychological therapy. The Memorial Poppy contributions are devoted entirely to rehabilitation and assistance for veterans and their families. The poppies will be available for purchase at local businesses in Tonasket during Poppy Days.

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Trinity Episcopal

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

To place information in the Church Guide

call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts, 509-486-4531 Open doors affirming deversity and welcoming to all


MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Tonasket softball keeps surprising run alive BY BRENT BAKER OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

EPHRATA - May 16, 2015 - Tonasket’s softball team won its first post-season game in 12 years on Saturday, but that doesn’t come close to describing the improbable run that the Tigers suddenly find themselves on. Where does one start? A 15-5 win over Waterville will someday show as just a line in the scorebook, but for a program that has struggled since the most of the players in uniform on Saturday were in pre-school, it wasn’t something anyone could have predicted even a few weeks ago. It took half the season to shake off the mentality that comes with a league-game losing streak so long that no one really remembered when it started. Granted, there were a couple non-league victories sprinkled into most every season, but through several coaching changes and all the different permutations of the Caribou Trail and Central Washington Leagues, the Tigers hadn’t won a league contest since 2007. That was 111 straight games, a streak that ended emphatically with a pair of mercy-rule wins over Manson a few weeks ago. The improvement has been there in fits and starts. But that is what one might expect on a team with just four returning players, a lone senior that only had slow-pitch softball experience, and several others that hadn’t ever played the game before. “The Streak” was broken with two mercy-rule wins over Manson. Later in the season a superb effort in a 7-3 loss to Pateros was followed by a 21-4 loss to the Nannies. A doubleheader sweep at Oroville was followed by two disspiriting losses to Bridgeport. Surviving two games at Lake Roosevelt on Tuesday, May 12, set the Tigers up for their dramatic three-way playoff victories over the Fillies and Hornets the next day (see story below). The reward? A matchup with powerful Kittitas, with its 17-1 record, ranked in Scoreczar. org’s computer rankings as the No. 2 Class 2B team in the state, that had played only three games all year that didn’t end early thanks to a 10 or 15-run margin of victory. What looked on paper to be a rout was anything but. The Tigers fell to the Coyotes 7-2, but in doing so likely played the best seven innings turned in by a Tonasket softball team in a decade. “I’m honest with the girls about everybody we play,” said Tonasket coach Emily Rimestad. “I said that if we worked hard, we could compete with them, that we could go down fighting. “But never in my wildest dreams did I expect to have a coach a little nervous

Terry Mills/submitted photo

The Hornets’ Courtnee Kallstrom winds up for a pitch during her team’s seasonending 10-5 loss to Liberty Bell in district tournament play on Saturday, May 16.

Hornets bow out BY BRENT BAKER

OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

Tonasket’s Trinity DeJong tags out Kittitas’ Natasha Vincett at home plate during the Tigers’ loss to the Coyotes on Saturday. at that level. The girls wanted it so bad, you could taste it in the air.” Kittitas took a 2-0 lead in the first, but Trinity DeJong prevented further damage with a bases loaded strikeout. DeJong worked her way out of several jams over the next several innings. “It could have gotten out of hand,” Rimestad said. “But the girls had the spirit of not wanting to just give it to them.” “I knew they were going to be really tough to beat,” DeJong said. “But going out there as a team, and pushing our hardest, really paid off.” Meanwhile, the Tigers put together a two out rally in the fourth. Megan Powell walked, Kayla Willis singled and Sam Keller walked to load the bases. DeJong followed with an RBI single, but Willis was thrown out trying to score what would have been the tying run from second base to end the rally. In the fifth, Madilynn Larson scored on Lexi Wahl’s RBI double, and Dayzi Keller followed with a single that put Wahl on third. That rally ended in frustrating fashion as Keller tried to steal second. Kittitas shortstop Brianna Shipley dropped the throw and landed on the ball while tagging Keller with her empty glove;

the umpire didn’t see the loose ball and called her out. Wahl safely reached home on the play, but with Keller called out the Tigers were denied the go-ahead run. “When I slid I felt her tag me,” said Keller, the team’s lone senior. “I was like, ‘Dang, I’m out,’ then I saw the ball there and started to get excited because I was safe. Then he called me out. I wasn’t sure what had happened, but people in the dugout were pretty mad.” Brita Stermetz’s two-run double in the bottom of the fifth put the Coyotes ahead for good. Stermetz later scored, and Kittitas added two more in the sixth. DeJong allowed four hits and six walks while striking out five. Kittitas went on to edge Okanogan 5-4 in the district semifinal. The Tigers took their frustration out on Waterville in a loser-out contest, with the 10-run win guaranteeing two more games next weekend, racking up 10 extra-base hits. Vanessa Pershing doubled in the first inning and Lexi Wahl followed with an RBI single that, with Alexa Sutton scoring on a wild pitch, gave the Tigers a 2-0 first inning lead. From there the Tigers pounded the

ball. Sam Keller hit a single, double, triple and scored on a four-base error (not quite hitting for the cycle); Sutton hit two triples and two doubles; and Pershing had a triple and two doubles. Pershing earned the win in the pitching circle, allowing five runs - four in the third inning - while striking out 11. With that win, the Tigers (9-13) move on to play CWL North co-champion Brewster to open tournament play at noon on Saturday. They’ll also have a 2:30 game - either for third and fourth place (if they beat Brewster) or a fifth place, winner-to-state/loser out contest. Needing just one win to get to the state tournament, especially with such an inexperienced squad, seemed unfathomable not too long ago. Now? “When we played Brewster before (in March), we made a lot of mistakes,” Rimestad said. “I don’t feel like we’ll do that now. We’re playing together as a true team. We’ve taken to heart that it’s not an ‘I’ sport. “Coach (Breanne) Hansen and I are just incredibly proud of what these girls have accomplished.” “If we play the way we did against Kittitas,” said Pershing, “we feel like we can compete with anyone.”

EPHRATA - A long week of ups and downs for the Oroville softball team came to an end on Saturday with a pair of losses at the 2B District 5/6 tournament as the Hornets lost to Brewster 28-1 and to Liberty Bell 10-5. There didn’t appear to be much left in the proverbial tank as the team took the field for its eighth and ninth games since last Saturday. That included their May Day doubleheader with Okanogan; a must-win, 8-4, 12-11 doubleheader sweep of Bridgeport on Tuesday; Wednesday’s tiebreak loss to Tonasket (see below); a trip to Ephrata on Thursday to defeat White Swan 23-16 in a district-play-in game; and Saturday’s two games in the double-elimination tournament that will see five of eight teams head to the state finals. The Hornets, matched up against CWL North co-champion Brewster, actually led 1-0 in the first inning as Rachelle Nutt came in to score on a wild pitch. Brewster’s 14-run second inning put the game out of reach. The Hornets had a much better outing in their loser-out game with Liberty Bell. They started out with a bang as Rachelle Nutt walked, and Faith Martin, Courtnee Kallstrom and Pie Todd followed with hits as the Hornets scored four runs in the first inning. Oroville (9-14 for the year) wasn’t able to cross the plate again until the seventh.

Tigers, Hornets survive 3-way playoff, mud bath BY BRENT BAKER OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OROVILLE - May 13, 2015 Softball may not be best played in the rain, but after Wednesday’s three-way tiebreak playoff, the Tonasket Tigers weren’t complaining. Oroville’s Hornets made the best of it, still reasonably happy after losing in extra innings to the Tigers as both teams lived to fight another day in the post-season. Bridgeport, which had to travel to Oroville for the second straight day after losing both ends of a doubleheader to the Hornets on Tuesday, didn’t have that consolation. The Tigers clinched their first district tournament berth since 2005 with a 6-4 victory over the Fillies in the loser-out, four inning mini-game. Oroville, which had a firstround bye (thanks to a pre-season number draw), rallied for four runs in the bottom of the fourth (and final) inning of the second game to force extra innings, but Tonasket scratched out a run in the fifth and held on for an 8-7 win. The Tigers headed straight to Saturday’s district tournament, while the Hornets had to play again on Thursday in Ephrata against White Swan in a district play-in game. “This really is a Cinderella story,” said Tonasket coach Emily Rimestad. “I’m so proud of the girls, I almost can’t believe this. “Coming in here, the girls were nervous because they’d just lost to Bridgeport on Saturday. They knew it would be tough, but they came with the attitude that they were winners, they wouldn’t give up and they wanted to be the team that proved they could make it to districts.” Most of both games were played in a driving rain that would have forced a postponement under most circumstances. But neither umpires nor coaches

seemed inclined to put things off due to the potential of disrupting the entire eight-team district tournament despite pools forming around third base and on top of home plate. Pitchers struggled to keep their grip on the ball throughout as coaches spent most of the game wiping off softballs with towels and shirts before returning them to play. Adding to the intrigue, the Tigers were missing three players who were in Pullman for state FFA competition, leaving them with exactly the nine girls needed to play. Considering most of them were in pre-school or kindergarten the last time Tonasket played a meaningful softball game, it probably never occurred to anyone until Tuesday night that there might be a scheduling issue. Though the Tonasket-Oroville matchup wasn’t a matter of survival, winning it did mean the winner avoided an extra trip to Ephrata the next day. Add to that the usual back-and-forth between rivals - including some pre-game social media sniping - and there was no lack of desire in either dugout. A seven-run third inning put the Tigers in solid, though as it turned out not secure, position. Four walks and an error got the rally started, with Kayla Willis’ two-run single, Sam Keller’s RBI hit and Vanessa Pershing’s run-scoring double providing the big hits. Rachelle Nutt threw out Keller at home on Pershing’s double to end the rally with the Tigers up 7-1. The Hornets rallied in the bottom of the third as Pie Todd plated Faith Martin with an RBI single and later scored on a wild pitch. The Hornets needed four to tie in the bottom of the fourth, and got them. Pershing’s control deserted her in the downpour as she hit two batters and walked five in the inning. But the Tigers caught a break when Alexis Allenby apparently scored on a wild pitch, but was ruled to have

Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

No one was safe from a good-natured Oroville softball squad after last Wednesday’s three-way tiebreak that was played in the muddiest conditions anyone could remember. Faith Martin spreads mud on willing victim Rachelle Nutt, while in the background coach Dane Forrester tries in vain to avoid a mud bath from another player. missed the puddle that was passing as home plate by that point. The Tigers gave that break right back. Pitchers had been tossing the ball to coaches between nearly every pitch to be dried off, had to be granted time out by umpires first. But when the Tigers failed to secure a time out before tossing the ball to the dugout, Martin came racing home from third base to tie the score. Pershing recovered to strike out two of the next three batters to retire the side and force extra innings. “The rain was awful,” Pershing said, taking no satisfaction in the fact that Bridgeport and Oroville pitchers struggled with it as well. “I was just trying to focus on my own game and not what the other team was doing. “Most of the time I can just focus on Lexi and throw it.”

Lexi Wahl, Dayzi Keller and Megan Powell walked to lead off the inning. The Hornets nearly got out of it on Kayla Willis’ grounder as first basemen Syd Egerton tagged Willis and fired to home plate in time for Martin to tag out Wahl trying to score from third. Dayzi Keller scored on a wild pitch to give the Tigers the lead, and Pershing struck out the final two batters with a runner on second to secure the win. The Hornets quickly shook off their disappointment, belly flopping in the mud around third base after the game and treating anyone within arms’ reach to a mud facial of sorts. “To be honest, we’d been told that even if we won yesterday we were done,” said Oroville coach Dane Forrester. “Then we got a call last night that there would be this playoff, which made sense.

“This was the muddiest game I’ve ever been a part of in my life. But if we didn’t play this out today, it would have been tomorrow and they’d have had to move the play-in game. No one wanted to play Thursday, Friday and then in districts on Saturday without a break. Typically they would have called these games pretty quick; everyone agreed, we were going to play it out.” Forrester was much happier with his team’s play than he had been during the Hornets’ doubleheader loss on May 1 that helped set the stage for the three-way tie. “I think we came in overconfident that first game,” he said. “We played better the seond game, but our heads still weren’t there. “Vanessa (Pershing) is a good pitcher. She puts the ball across the plate. We needed to be patient with her a couple of weeks ago

and we weren’t. Today we did a much better job.” Tonasket started against a Bridgeport team that had walloped them twice just four days earlier, 15-3 and 22-2. The Fillies jumped out to a 4-0 lead in the second inning. Viridiana Santana singled, and Brianna Rogers walked, with both eventually scoring on wild pitches. Jessica Quesada singled, and Tonasket pitcher Vanessa Pershing walked three straight batters to force in one run and had another score on a wild pitch. The rain, which had contributed to Pershing’s wildness, didn’t help Bridgeport pitcher Samantha Martinez, either. The Tigers’ two out rally in the third started with walks to Pershing and Alexa Sutton. Trinity DeJong singled home Pershing, and after Madilynn Larson walked, Lexi Wahl roped a two-run single to cut the deficit to 4-3. Larson came home with the tying run on a wild pitch. The Tigers won it in their final at bat in the fourth, as Kayla Willis and Sam Keller opened the inning both walked. With two outs, Sutton’s two-run double off the glove of a leaping Bridgeport outfielder brought home the gohead runs. Bridgeport put two runners on with one out in the bottom of the frame, but Pershing induced a groundout for the second out and Larson snagged Mari Hourie’s line drive to second to end the game. And so Tonasket (8-12) - shorthanded, youthful and inexperienced - earned a date with second-ranked Kittitas (17-1), which has won 15 games by the 10 or 15-run mercy rule. The Tigers would still have just nine available players. Rimestad didn’t care. “This is a whole new team from last year,” she said. “They’d never played together, a number of girls had never picked up a bat or thrown a ball to speak of. This is a real Cinderella story. To have a team with no experience, to this, is pretty cool.”


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2015

SPORTS Oroville’s Tori Kindred gets set to take the hand-off from Katie Egerton during last Wednesday’s CWB North Subdivision meet in Tonasket.

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Track season ramps up BY BRENT BAKER OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

TONASKET - Quantity and quality both count in the team scoring in track and field, and while the new, larger schools didn’t totally clean up on the 2B league holdovers, they certainly changed the dynamics of the CWL North Subdivision meet on Wednesday, May 13. Okanogan and Tonasket took the top two spots in the girls meet, with the Bulldogs doubling up on the Tigers’ score in a dominant team performance. Tonasket, in turn, ran twice the score of third place Manson while Oroville placed seventh out of eight teams. Bridgeport edged Okanogan and Liberty Bell for the boys team title. Tonasket was fourth, while the Hornets were seventh in that meet as well. “That was the most competitive sub-district meet that I’ve seen in years,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. Tonasket had success up and down the board. The Tigers’ inablity to keep pace with Okanogan had more to do with the Bulldogs placing two or more athletes in the top five of numerous events. While Tonasket nearly always had one top placer and several event wins, it wasn’t enough in terms of team scoring. The Tigers qualified 17 athletes in 30 events for the District 5/6 championship meet Friday, May 22, in Ephrata. Winning events for the Tigers were Rose Walts in the triple jump (34-0), long jump (15-8) and 100 hurdles (15.99); Katie Henneman in the 400 (1:05.43); Jenna Valentine in the 1600 (6:15.68); Henneman, Camille Wilson, Jaden Vugteveen and Alina Vlahovich in the 4x100 (52.70); and Ethan Bensing in the long jump (19-9). Also moving on to next week for the girls are Vlahovich (100, 200, triple jump); Henneman (100); the 4x200 relay team (Wilson, Alycia Tibbs, Morgan Tyus, Madyson Clark); the 4x400 relay (Henneman, Vugteveen, Wilson and Shyane Lewis); Alissa Young (javelin); Tyus (high jump); Vugteveen (pole vault, triple jump). The Tigers’ boys qualifiers include Smith Condon (200); Justin McDonald (400); Ryan Rylie (400); Abe Podkranic (800); Hunter Swanson (1600, 3200); the 4x100 relay (Condon, Rylie, Bensing, Johnathan Tellez); the 4x400 relay (Condon, Podkranic, Swanson, McDonald); Chad Edwards (shot put); Bensing

(high jump); and Lloyd Temby (high jump, long jump, triple jump). The Hornets only send five athletes to the regional meet, but had several near-misses as well. What bodes well for the Hornets’ future is that all five qualifiers are freshmen, highlighted by Katie Egerton, a winner in the pole vault (8-6) and third place finisher in the 400. Tylynne Watkins took second in the pole vault and Tori Kindred was fourth in the shot to round out the girls’ qualifiers. Seth Miller (110 hurdles, 2nd and long jump, 4th) and Brandon Baugher (300 hurdles and long jump, 5th in both) qualified in two events each. “Five freshman making it to the meet next week was an incredible feat on their part,” Jensen said. Thornton, the meet’s host, added, “Thanks to the many volunteers who gave their time for our kids.” The top four finishers in this Friday’s meet in each event advance to the state finals at Eastern Washington University in Cheney, May 28-30.

CWL NORTH SUB-DISTRICT Boys Team Scoring: Bridgeport 109,

Okanogan 105, Liberty Bell 96, Tonasket 80, Brewster 54, Manson 32, Oroville 17, Lake Roosevelt 12. Boys Individual - Top 5 finishers advance to regionals; Qualifiers and Tonasket/Oroville finishers listed 100 Dash - 1. Greyson Fields, OKAN, 11.53; 2. Mason Guerrette, OKAN, 11.58; 3. Jose Dominguez, LBEL, 12.15; 4. Elliel Roa, BREW, 12.32; 5. Spencer Ward, MNSN, 12.37; 6. Seth Miller, OROV, 12.48; 10. Justin McDonald, TONA, 12.76; 11. Johnathan Tellez, TONA, 12.79. 200 Dash - 1. Greyson Fields, OKAN, 23.54; 2. Wil Chandler, LBEL, 24.61; 3. Smith Condon, TONA 24.74; 4. Spencer Ward, MNSN. 25.46; 5. Justin McDonald, TONA, 25.46; 12. Johnathan Tellez, TONA, 27.13. 400 Dash - 1. Payton Staggs, OKAN, 53.43; 2. Ryan Rylie, TONA, 53.46; 3. Wil Chandler, LBEL, 54.38; 4. Matt Sonneman, BREW, 55.98; 5. Bladimir Martinez, BRPT, 56.58; 8. Zach Clark, TONA, 1:03.64. 800 Run - 1. Oren Cox, BRPT, 2:08.52; 2. Edgar Guzman, BREW, 2:14.16; 3. Jordi Hernandez, BRPT, 2:15.19; 4. Abe Podkranic, TONA, 2:15.94; 5. Carter Dornfeld, LBEL, 2:17.43; 9. Matus Sitar, TONA, 2:32.81. 1600 Run - 1. Oren Cox, BRPT, 4:43.65; 2. Ben Klemmeck, LBEL, 4:49.48; 3. Josiah Klemmeck, LBEL, 4:51.61; 4. Hunter Swanson, TONA, 4:54.28; 5. Edgar Guzman, BREW, 4:54.58. 3200 Run - 1. Oren Cox, BRPT, 9:59.00; 2. Ben Klemmeck, LBEL, 10:28.19; 3. Josiah Klemmeck, LBEL, 10:42.46; 4. Hunter Swanson, TONA, 11:00.22; 5. Edgar Alcantara, BRPT, 11:09.38. 110 Hurdles - 1. Micah Klemmeck, LBEL, 17:51; 2. Seth Miller, OROV, 17.86; 3. Bailey Evenson, BRPT, 18.34; 4. Michael Brown, BRPT, 18.64; 5. Spencer Cleveland, OKAN, 18.96; 7. Brandon Baugher, OROV,

20.54. 300 Hurdles - 1. Micah Klemmeck, LBEL, 43.83; 2. Bailey Evenson, BRPT, 45.04; 3. Nicanor Palacios, BRPT, 45.44; 4. Michael Brown, BRPT, 47.03; 5. Brandon Baugher, OROV, 47.61. 4x100 Relay - 1. Okanogan 44.84; 2. Liberty Bell 45.25; 3. Tonasket (Smith Condon, Ryan Rylie, Johnathan Tellez, Ethan Bensing) 46.81; 4. Brewster 48.22; 5. Bridgeport 48.76. 4x400 Relay - 1. Liberty Bell 3:44.99; 2. Bridgeport 3:48.10; 3. Brewster 3:48.40; 4. Tonasket (Smith Condon, Abe Podkranic, Hunter Swanson, Justin McDonald) 3:48.48; 5. Okanogan 3:51.83. Shot Put - 1. Octavio Alejandre, LROS, 49-1; 2. Chance Williams, BREW, 42-10; 3. Willy Picton, MNSN, 42-10; 4. Chad Edwards, TONA, 40-2; 5. Dakota Huff, OKAN, 39-9; 9. Dakota Haney, OROV, 34-4; 25. Zeke Silverthorn, TONA, 21-7.5. Discus - 1. Willy Picton, MNSN, 123-6; 2. David Cruz, BREW, 111-1; 3. Mason Cameron, MNSN, 110-2; 4. Marc Martinez, BRPT, 109-8; 5. Tyler Cox, OKAN, 101-4; 10. Dakota Haney, OROV, 87-11; 19. Riley Morris, TONA, 53-7. Javelin - 1. Austin Warren, OKAN, 1542; 2. Greyson Fields, OKAN, 140-6; 3. Brandon Bach, BREW, 137-5; 4. Marc Martinez, BRPT, 130-10; 5. Andrew Reggiatore, LBEL, 120-6; 15. Dakota Haney, OROV, 85-3; 19. Zeke Silverthorn, TONA, 64-7. High Jump - 1. Mason Guerrette, OKAN, 6-0; 2. Bailey Evenson, BRPT, 5-8; 3. Ethan Bensing, TONA, 5-2; 4. Lloyd Temby, TONA, 5-0; 5. Jordi Hernandez, BRPT, 5-0. Pole Vault - 1. Bailey Evenson, BRPT, 9-0. Long Jump - 1. Ethan Bensing, TONA, 19-9; 2. Payton Staggs, OKAN, 19-5; 3. Lloyd Temby, TONA, 19-2; 4. Seth Miller, OROV, 18-8; 5. Brandon Baugher, OROV, 16-9.5. Triple Jump - 1. Mason Guerrette, OKAN, 41-4; 2. Ethan Bensing, TONA, 41-1; 3. Andrew Reggiatore, LBEL, 40-5; 4. Lloyd Temby, TONA, 36-8; 5. Martin Trejo, BRPT, 32-3.5. Girls Team Scoring: Okanogan 221, Tonasket 118, Manson 57, Bridgeport 43, Brewster 34, Liberty Bell 34, Oroville 29, Lake Roosevelt 12. Individual - Top 5 finishers advance to regionals; Qualifiers and Tonasket/ Oroville finishers listed 100 Dash - 1. Cayden Diefenbach, OKAN, 13.61; 2. Alina Vlahovich, TONA, 13.66; 3. Katie Henneman, TONA, 13.78; 4. Keanna Egbert, OKAN, 13.86; 5. Baylee Ward, MNSN, 13.93; 20. Alycia Tibbs, TONA, 16.06; 24. Madyson Clark, TONA, 16.78; 200 Dash - 1. Jillyan Taylor, OKAN, 28.28; 2. Alina Vlahovich, TONA, 28.45; 3. Jasmine LeDuc, BRPT, 29.36; 4. Alexis Jones, OKAN, 29.46; 5. Faviola Pamatz, BREW, 29.93; 15. Alycia Tibbs, TONA, 33.31. 400 Dash - 1. Katie Henneman, TONA, 1:05.43; 2. True Downey, OKAN, 1:05.86; 3. Katie Egerton, OROV, 1:06.94; 4. Daicy Leyva, MNSN, 1:10.11; 5. Ana Garcia, MNSN, 1:13.70. 800 Run - 1. Karina Rincon, BREW, 2:29.95; 2. True Downey, OKAN, 2:37.31; 3. Alyssa Hannah, MNSN, 2:54.86; 4. Ari Martinez, BREW, 2:55.98; 5. Kate Stone, OKAN, 3:03.62; 6. Mary Naylor, TONA, 3:04.07. 1600 Run - 1. Jenna Valentine, TONA,

6:15.68; 2. Kate Stone, OKAN, 6:54.40; 3. Madilyn Tverberg, OKAN, 7:21.94; 4. Wiebke Seelieb, OKAN, 7:29.38; 5. Anahi Zabaleta,OKAN, 7:54.64. 3200 Run - 1. Kate Stone, OKAN, 14:24.0; 2. Alyssa Hannah, MNSN, 14:27.0; 3. Jennifer Gomez, BRPT, 14:39; 4. Madilyn Tverberg, OKAN, 15:07.0; 5. Ana Orozco, BREW, 15:24.0. 100 Hurdles - 1. Rose Walts, TONA, 15.99; 2. Satya Kent, OKAN, 17.28; 3. Natalie Treise, LBEL, 18.14; 4. Laila Kent, OKAN, 18.28; 5. Lauren Fitzmaurice, LBEL, 18.39. 300 Hurdles - 1. Satya Kent, OKAN, 51.71; 2. Laila Kent, OKAN, 53.38; 3. Lauren Fitzmaurice, LBEL, 55.67; 4. Camille Wilson, TONA, 1:01.22. 4x100 Relay - 1. Tonasket (Katie Henneman, Camille Wilson, Jaden Vugteveen, Alina Vlahovich), 52.70; 2. Okanogan 53.27; 3. Manson 54.62; 4. Brewster 55.20; 5. Liberty Bell 56.94; 7. Oroville (Katie Egerton, Tori Kindred, Tylynne Watkins, Mikaela McCoy) 59.89. 4x200 Relay - 1. Okanogan 1:52.70; 2. Manson 1:56.00; 3. Brewster 1:57.30; 4. Liberty Bell 1:58.50; 5. Tonasket (Camille Wilson, Alycia Tibbs, Morgan Tyus, Madyson Clark) 2:07.50; 6. Oroville (Bailey Griffin, Tori Kindred, Yessica Nemcio, Katie Egerton) 2:12.40. 4x400 Relay - 1. Okanogan 4:21.29; 2. Tonasket (Katie Henneman, Shyane Lewis, Jaden Vugteveen, Camille Wilson) 4:38.66; 3. Brewster 4:40.33; 4. Manson 4:43.18; 5. Bridgeport 5:17.81. Shot Put - 1. Jordan Peart, BRPT, 34-3; 2. Katelyn Schilling, LROS, 34-2.5; 3. Cayden Diefenbach, OKAN, 33-4.5; 4. Tori Kindred, OROV, 32-2.5; 5. Maddee Ward, MNSN, 30-10.5; 10. Alissa Young, TONA, 26-1; 12. Allison Glanzer, TONA, 23-9; 13. Kasey Nelson, TONA, 22-2; 18. Mikaela McCoy, OROV, 20-2; 19. Nicole Juarez-Zelaya, TONA, 19-5. Discus - 1. Jordan Peart, BRPT, 111-10; 2. Emmy Engle, OKAN, 110-0; 3. Raechel Vanderholm, MNSN, 106-1; 4. Katelyn Schilling, LROS, 96-3; 5. Itzel Muniz, BRPT, 86-7; 6. Alissa Young, TONA, 85-2; 9. Mikaela McCoy, OROV, 69-3; 12. Allison Glanzer, TONA, 62-0; 13. Mary Naylor, TONA, 58-1; 15. Kasey Nelson, TONA, 52-0; 16. Nicole Juarez-Zelaya, TONA, 48-10. Javelin - 1. Emmy Engle, OKAN, 125-8; 2. Sarina Williams, LBEL, 123-3; 3. Jana Russell, MNSN, 111-6; 4. Adilia Zunie, OKAN, 96-6; 5. Alissa Young, TONA, 88-10; 8. Jenna Valentine, TONA, 82-0; 11. Alexa Garcia, OROV, 77-3; 18. Nicole Juarez Zelaya, TONA, 43-1. High Jump - 1. Rachelle Hamilton, OKAN, 5-0; 2. Alexis Jones, OKAN, 4-8; 3. Lauren Fitzmaurice, LBEL, 4-6; 4. Olivea Oyler, OKAN, 4-4; 5. Morgan Tyus, TONA, 4-2. Pole Vault - 1. Katie Egerton, OROV, 8-6; 2. Tylynne Watkins, OROV, 7-0; 3. Jaden Vugteveen, TONA, 7-0; 4. Lupe Cancino, BRPT, 6-0. Long Jump - 1. Rose Walts, TONA, 15-8; 2. Rachelle Hamilton, OKAN, 14-7.5; 3. Samantha Butler, OKAN, 14-3.5; 4. Hailey Shiflett, OKAN, 143; 5. Carmen Fonseca, OKAN, 13-4; 6. Camille Wilson, TONA, 13-2; 9. Madyson Clark, TONA, 11-4.25; 10. Morgan Tyus, TONA, 11-2. Triple Jump - 1. Rose Walts, TONA, 34-0; 2. Jillyan Tahylor, OKAN, 32-9; 3. Alina Vlahovich, TONA, 31-2; 4. Jaden Vugteveen, TONA, 30-11.5; 5. Aylee Neff, MNSN, 29-10.5; 9. Mary Naylor, TONA, 27-4.

3 Hornets, Verhasselt advance in tennis OKANOGAN - Three Oroville Hornets and one Tonasket Tiger qualified for the District 5/6 Class 1A/2B tennis tournament by earning top-four finishes at Saturday’s Central Washington League meet. The four CWL qualifiers will be matched up against the top four Caribou Trail League finishers Tuesday and Saturday at the district tourney, played at Cashmere and Cascade. Oroville’s Nathan Hugus advanced to the championship match, falling to top-seeded Alberto Quezada of Entiat. Hugus, the second seed, defeated Stoney Hulon of Liberty Bell and Caeleb Hardesty of Tonasket to reach the finals. The Hornets’ doubles team of Joe Sarmiento and Connor BoCook also earned a district spot with a fourth place finish. They lost their second round match but came back through the consolation brackets to reach the third place match. That was highlighted by an upset of the second-seeded Rojas brothers of Pateros in an elimination match. Tonasket’s Aspen Verhasselt, seeded 10th coming into the tournament, is peaking at the right time. Verhasselt topped seventh seeded Anna Spencer in the opening round and secondseeded EmmaLee Luft of Pateros in the second round. Brianna Cox topped Verhasselt in the semifinals, but she defeated fifthseeded Tiger teammate Baillie Hirst to reach the third place match, where she fell to Luft in a rematch.

CWB TENNIS TOURNAMENT Oroville & Tonasket players and District Qualifiers Girls Singles - best of 3 except where noted Round 1 - Pro Set (no ad scoring) (5) Baillie Hirst (TON) def. (12) Ireland Looper (PAT) (4) Hanna Smith (OKA) def. (13) Lena Fuchs (ORO) (3) Lily Hilderbrand (ORO) def. (14) Tiva Ward (LBE) (10) Aspen Verhasselt (TON) def. (7) Anna Spencer (ENT) Round 2 (4) Hanna Smith (OKA) def. (5) Baillie Hirst (TON) (6) Brianna Cox (OKA) def. (3) Lily Hilderbrand (ORO) (10) Aspen Verhasselt (TON) def. (2) EmmaLee Luft (PAT) Round 3 - Semifinal (6) Brianna Cox (OKA) def. (10) Aspen Verhasselt (TON) Round 3 - Consolation (5) Baillie Hirst (TON) def. (9) Erin Frey (LBE) (2) EmmaLee Luft (PAT) def. (3) Lily Hilderbrand (ORO) Round 4 - Consolation semifinal (10) Aspen Verhasselt (TON) def. (5) Baillie Hirst (TON) Third Place (2) EmmaLee Luft (PAT) def. (10) Aspen Verhasselt (TON) District Qualifiers 1. Morelia Maravilla - White Swan 2. Brianna Cox - Okanogan 3. EmmaLee Luft - Pateros 4. Aspen Verhasselt - Tonasket Girls Doubles - best of 3 except where noted Round 1 - Pro Set (no ad scoring) (4) Mandi Wilson/ Johnna Terris def. (13) Delgado/Anguiano (WS) (6) Spoonhunter/Gutierrez (WS) def. (11) Brooke Nelson/Jensen Sackman (TON) Round 2 (4) Mandi Wilson/ Johnna Terris (TON) def. (5) Southard/Arias (ENT)

Oroville’s Nathan Hugus advanced to the finals of the CWB League tennis tournament and will be competing at the district tourney this week. Brent Baker/OK Valley Sports

Round 3 (1) Walker/Patrick (OKA) def. (4) Mandi Wilson/ Johnna Terris (TON) Round 4 - Consolation (6) Spoonhunter/Gutierrez (WS) def. (4) Mandi Wilson/ Johnna Terris (TON) District Qualifiers 1. Walker/Patrick - Okanogan 2. Beetchenow/Spencer - Okanogan 3. Morales/Karkkainen - Pateros 4. Spoonhunter/Gutierrez - White Swan Boys Singles - best of 3 except where noted Round 1 - Pro Set (no ad scoring) (9) Elijah Burnell (ORO) def. (8) Jordan Charles (LR) (4) Blake Chsledon (OKA) def. (13) Tim Frazier (TON) (6) Caeleb Hardesty (TON) def. (11) Alex Richards (OKA) (2) Nathan Hugus (ORO) def. (15) Spencer Southard (ENT) Round 2 (1) Alberto Quezada (PAT) def. (9) Elijah Burnell (ORO) (6) Caeleb Hardesty (TON) def. (3) Carlos Ceniceros (PAT) (2) Nathan Hugus (ORO) def. (10) Stoney Hulon (LBE) Round 2 - Consolation (4) Blake Chesledon (OKA) def. (9) Elijah Burnell (ORO) Round 3 - Semifinal (2) Nathan Hugus (ORO) def. (6) Caeleb Hardesty (TON) Round 3 - Consolation (4) Blake Chelsedon (OK) def. (6) Caeleb Hardesty (TON) Championship (1) Alberto Quezada (ENT) def. (2) Nathan Hugus (ORO) District Qualifiers 1. Alberto Quezada - Entiat 2. Nathan Hugus - Oroville 3. Josh Frey - Liberty Bell 4. Blake Chesledon - Okangan Boys Doubles - best of 3 except where noted Round 1 - Pro Set (no ad scoring) (8) Alexander/Rickenbaugh (LBE) def. (9) Eric Owsley/Joe Schell (TON) (5) Joe Sarmiento/Connor BoCook (ORO) def. (12) Lopez/Vasquez (WS) (2) Rojas/Rojas (PAT) def. (15) Ryan MarcolinJaxon Blackler Round 2 (4) Montgomery/Olmos (ENT) def. (5) Joe Sarmiento/Connor BoCook (ORO) Round 3 - Consolation (5) Joe Sarmiento/Connor BoCook (ORO) def. (8) Alexander/Rickabaugh (LBE) Round 4 - Consolation (5) Joe Sarmiento/Connor BoCook (ORO) def. (2) Rojas/Rojas (PAT) Third Place (1) Linklater/Cheeseman (OKA) def. (5) Joe Sarmiento/Connor BoCook (ORO) District Qualifiers 1. Montgomery/Olmos - Entiat 2. Schulz/Acord - Liberty Bell 3. Linklater/Cheeseman - Okanogan 4. Joe Sarmiento/Connor BoCook Oroville

OROVILLE MAY DAY 3 ON 3 CHAMPS Mens Open ~ BALL DON’T LIE ~Jeremiah Riggle/Omak, Gabe Aubertin/Wilbur, Ambrose Bessett/ Omak, Nick Verbeck/Omak Womens Opens ~ HAS BEENS ~ Janice Wilson/Tonasket, Kylie Dellinger/Tonasket, Ashley Baker/Riverside, Naomie Boesel/Malott Boys High School ~ DEEZ NUTS ~ Jesse Ramon/Tonasket, Jorden Thrasher/Tonasket, Adrian McCarthy/Tonasket, Raven Boyd/Omak Girls High School ~ JUST ELEVATE ~ Lily Hilderbrand/ Oroville, Hannah Hilderbrand/Oroville, Katie Egerton/ Oroville, Havannah Worrell/Oroville Boy 14 and Under ~ BULLDOGS ~ Gage Wilson/Okanogan, Levi Veenhuizen/Okanogan, Frank Vega/Okanogan, Gavin Cohen/Omak Girls 14 and Under ~ FAB 4 ~Madi Larson/Tonasket, Ellie Alberts/Tonasket, Masie Ramon/Tonasket, Alex Perez/ Tonasket Boys 12 and Under ~ THE ELITE 4 ~ Kyle Hendrick/Ephrata, Tyler Lybbert/Ephrata, Jacob Rawley/Ephrata, Owen Towry/Ephrata Girls 12 and Under ~ BAT GIRLS ~ Hadley Blasey/Oroville, Maddie Martin/Oroville, Kensie Hugus/Oroville, Emily Rawley/Oroville

Submitted photo

Oroville’s May Day 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament was again a big success, with perfect weather and a huge crowd on hand two weekends ago.


MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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SCHOOLS

FFA faces disappointment and distinction at state BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

PULLMAN - Several Tonasket FFA teams competed at State Convention May 14-16, with both individuals and teams rising to the top in multiple divisions. This was the 85th Washington FFA Convention, held at the WSU campus. Charlie Sanchez took first place in Fruit Production in Proficiency Awards, and was the sole State Proficiency Award winner to be forwarded to Nationals. Proficiency Awards are given in three categories, with Sanchez competing in Placement, or work experience. Sanchez said he put all his work experience over the last four years into a portfolio, including photos of him working. Additional Proficiency Award Winners were John Symonds, who took first place in Equine Science Entrepreneurship; Brock Henneman, second in Beef Production Placement; Colt Hatch, third in Agricultural Services; and Darbee Sapp, third in Agricultural Sales Placement. They received cash awards from nationwide sponsors ranging from $50 to $250. Hatch was the chosen Delegate to the convention. Other Proficiency Award Recipients this year are Jesse Manring, Fruit Production; Manny Puente, Fruit Production; and Brooke Nelson, Swine Production Entrepreneurship. Proficiency Award Recipients are students recognized for devoting additional time and energy to becoming experts in their chosen fields. Nine students received State Degrees, with Sanchez receiving the Star Award and taking second place in District 7 Star Agricultural Placement Program. This recognition involves all State Degree Recipients being narrowed down to the top nine, and from there the top four are chosen to present a slideshow in front of the 3,000 FFA kids present at State Convention. Other State Degree Recipients

this year are Henneman, Nelson, Hatch, Sapp, Manring, Puente, David Curtis and Morgan Obrien. Rade Pilkinton competed in Extemporaneus Speaking.

TYUS SELECTED AS TREASURER Senior Dallas Tyus was voted in as the FFA Washington State Treasurer. With 8,006 FFA members in 150 chapters, Tyus said this is the first year the FFA broke 8,000 members in quite awhile. He said his team includes President Julia Spangler of Wenatchee, Vice President Monica Haugen of Pullman, Secretary Mitch Jamison of Garfield-Palouse, Reporter Jason Wigen of LaCrosse and Sentinel Dan Lyng of Meridian. “I’m really excited to spend the next year with these people,” said Tyus. “We seem like we will mix really well.” Tyus said the team will be doing a lot of traveling, starting right after graduation, and be on the road throughout most of June. In the summer and early fall, the team will do Fair Visits. They’ll travel in pairs when the whole team can’t make it to an event. Tyus will attend a meeting in June with FFA Executive Director Abbie DeMeerleer “to learn more about responsibilities and expectations, and to get an idea of what the year will look like.” “It still hasn’t sunk in yet,” Tyus said Monday, May 18. “I’m still trying to wrap my head around it.” Tyus said everyone on the team will graduate from high school this spring, except Spangler, who graduated last year. “The FFA won’t let you serve as a State Officer when you’re still in high school because of all the time demands,” said Tyus. Delegate Hatch said he introduced people to Tyus at the convention, acting “kind of like an extension; an extra arm.” TEAM COMPETITIONS The Parliamentary Procedures (Parli Pro) Novice Team of Nichole Juarez, President;

Morgyne Hjaltason, Vice President; Katie Henneman, Treasurer; Madyson Clark, Reporter; Camille Wilson, Secretary; and Samantha Whitney, Sentinel took second place in the State Finals out of 24 schools. A second Novice Team of Morgan Tyus, President; Taylon Pilkinton, Vice President; Mikah Haney, Treasurer; Rycki Cruz, Secretary; Hayley Larson, Sentinel; and Alicia Tibbs, Reporter took fifth place. The top eight teams move on to finals. “The number one team goes to Nationals, and both our teams were pretty close to being able to go. Just a few points separated us,” said Henneman. “This is the first year for Tonasket to have two Novice teams qualify for finals.” The Parli Pro team of President Jordon Hughes, Secretary Rachel Silverthorn, Janelle Catone, Jenna Valentine, Dallas Tyus and Rade Pilkinton took third in finals out of 31 teams. Placing fifth was Parli Pro team President Deisy Alcauter, Secretary Seth Smith, LeighAnne Barnes, Hunter Swanson, Serenity Poletti, and Bonnie Siegfried. “All the Tonasket parliamentary teams went to State Finals this year, which is an accomplishment in itself,” said Henneman. The Meats Evaluation Team placed eighth out of 24 schools. The team, made up of Peterson, Puente, Karrer, Brendon Asmussen, Wyatt Pershing and Shelby Emery, competed in several events, including batch formulation, retail cut ID, and carcass judging. Valentine, Alcauter and Corinna Karrer competed in Prepared Speaking; and Hatch, Curtis, Swanson and Nichole Fletcher competed in Agricultural Issues. “We should’ve made finals but got beat out by a couple points by a team (Elma) that took seventh,” said Hatch. Sanchez, Henneman, Hatch,

Tonasket Alternative School to host its first ever reunion

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Parli Pro Novice Team demonstrated their Rituals proceedings at the Tonasket School Board meeting Monday, May 11, before going on to compete at State. Pictured, clockwise, are Samantha Whitney, Katie Henneman, Madyson Clark, Nichole Juarez, Camille Wilson and Morgyne Hjaltason. The team finished second in State. Curtis and Trevor Peterson competed in Farm Business Management. “We felt like we did good, but we didn’t make finals,” Hatch said. “But we think we weren’t far from it.” Candidates from Tonasket whose names were forwarded out of State for the American Degree, a National recognition, are Brisa Leep, Cassie Spear, John Symonds, Kathryn Cleman, Pete Valentine, Timothy Jackson and Elizabeth Jackson. The decision will be made in October, 2015.

RECOGNIZED FOR TEAM SPIRIT Keynote speaker Barrett Keene, PH.D. had his speech all prepared when he saw something noteworthy enough to include at the last-minute. Keene looked over to see Tonasket’s Parli Pro Novice team huddled together, both congratulating and consoling one another over their second-place finish.

Theme: Celebrate Tonasket These forms must be mailed to this address and arrive no later than May 28th. Do not return them to a place of business or a bank. If you need help call the number below. TONASKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE P.O. Box 523 TONASKET, WA 98855 509-429-3493 Fax: 509-486-1096

SUBMITTED BY CHELSEA FREEMAN, TEACHER

Spring Fling at WVC at Omak, May 29 Free public event sponsored by ASB SUBMITTED BY LIVIA MILLARD MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS COORDINATOR

OMAK - Wenatchee Valley College at Omak invites the community to the first ever Spring Fling on Friday, May 29, at 2 p.m. at the Omak Civic League Park. This event will feature WVC at Omak clubs, academic programs and community programs and will highlight exciting events happening on the Omak campus. Admissions, financial aid services, and other new student information will be available. The WVC at Omak science department will present handson science experiments by current students. Ornithology, environmental science, anatomy and physiology, microbiology and chemistry classes will share their experiences with the public. The event also features rescued birds by Linda Lindsay and the Fourth Annual Solar Oven Cook-Off by the environmental science class.

The Science Club will also sell hotdogs and soda pop. The Spring Fling includes musical performances by The Ruby Scene at 4 p.m., featuring WVC at Omak alumni Denny Richardson and The Outer Space Blues Band at 4:30 p.m. WVC at Omak alumni Cristina Del Rosario provides dynamic, soulful vocals as she fronts this tight ensemble, which also features

a keyboard/vocalist, drum, bass and guitar. Del Rosario describes her band’s jamming sound as “High energy blues, rocking blues, southern rock, soul and Motown groove.” Don’t miss this finale to the Spring Fling with perhaps the hottest new band around. This event is free to the public and is sponsored by WVC at Omak Associated Student Body.

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other.” Keene called it one of the best examples of leadership and teamwork he had ever seen. “That’s what is expected of these kids, to be selfless as a team,” said Deebach. “For the last 15 to 18 years, our whole chapter has acted that way. It’s a big positive for our school, as well as the community.” Deebach, who has been the Tonasket FFA advisor the past 19 years, said he really appreciated all the chaperones and support among the community members throughout the year “to make this end product happen.” School Board Member Lloyd Caton, who has chaperoned the FFA for several years, encouraged others to volunteer. “Your buttons are going to pop on your shirt because you are so proud of these kids,” said Caton. “Matt really runs a tight ship. To go down there and see what kinds of kids this district is producing is fantastic. If you ever get the chance to, go.”

80th TONASKET FOUNDER’S DAY PARADE ENTRY FORM

TONASKET ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL

The Tonasket Alternative High School (TAHS) first opened its doors to students in 1995. Since then, they have served an average of 30 students at a time; offering small classes, lots of one-on-one help and a caring atmosphere for students seeking a change in their education. For over 20 years, students who enrolled in TAHS have seen great improvements in their reading, writing and math skills. For most students, the extra attention and care they received at school translated quickly to higher grades, a more positive attitude about school and ultimately, graduation. TAHS has watched as students blossom, grow and find success in their educations. Now, they would like to celebrate this success by having an informal, 20-year reunion this spring. TAHS invites all past students and staff to attend. Are you a past graduate, curious to see how the old building has fared over the years? Are you a staff member who would like to connect with your previous students? During the reunion, there will be a short presentation showing how the program has evolved, followed by tours of the building, past yearbook and memorabilia viewing, time to chat and light refreshments will be served. The reunion will be held Friday, June 5, at 4 p.m. and will last until 7 p.m. or later depending on attendance.

“They were congratulating each other, and yet in tears,” noticed Keene. Tonasket’s Novice Parli Pro team won the state championship and the trip to Nationals the previous two years, and the Parli Pro team went on to Nationals in 2011. So a second-place finish at State was a bit of a disappointment. “They’ve raised their standards over the past few years to be pretty high now,” said FFA advisor Matt Deebach. Deebach said he was taken by surprise when Keene, who didn’t mention any other schools in his speech, talked of how selfless the team members were; not casting blame but being humble among one another. “I just witnessed this example of selfless leadership,” Deebach quoted Keene saying as he held Tonasket up as a prime example of teamwork and leadership. “It’s unbelievable to see how much the kids had sacrificed for each

PARADE LINE UP: 9:30 AM (Check-in at Wells Fargo) ***JUDGING AT 10:00 AM**NO LATE JUDGING PARADE WILL BEGIN AT 11:00 AM—SATURDAY—May 30, 2015 **ALL HORSE ENTRIES MUST HAVE YOUR OWN POOPER SCOOPERS** **STOPPING DURING THE PARADE TO PERFORM IS PROHIBITED** **HANDING OUT CANDY IS ALLOWED, BUT THROWING IT FROM VEHICLES IS PROHIBITED** **THROWING WATER BALLOONS IS PROHIBITED** NAME OF PARADE ENTRY: _____________________________________________________ ORGANIZATION/INDIVIDUAL: _________________________________________________ CONTACT PERSON: ____________________________________________________________ ADDRESS: ____________________________________________________________________ PHONE: _________________________________         EMAIL: _________________________ Brief Description of entry, i.e. band, float, horse and carriage, royalty, tractor/trailer, wagon, walking group, etc. ______________________________________________________________ If you have a classic car entry are you part of the car club? _______________________________ How long is your entry? (car, truck, Semi with trailer, 2 trailers)___________________________ I agree to make arrangements to clean up after any animals that are a part of our entry: _______________________________ _________________________________________(signature of parade rep.) Statement for MC—Write clearly and exactly what you want the MC to read as your parade entry approaches the center of town, please email statement to info@tonasketchamber.com INDEMINTY AND HOLD HARMLESS AGREEMENT In consideration of the acceptance of this application, applicant agrees to indemnify, hold harmless, and defend any action against the Tonasket Comancheros Rodeo Club, Tonasket Chamber of Commerce, and the City of Tonasket and all liabilities that arise out of its participation in the Tonasket Founder’s Day Parade, May 30, 2015. _____________________________________     ______________________________________ Print name of Organization/Individual                  Signature of person in charge _____________________________________      ______________________________________ Title of person in charge                                         Date This space donated by the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • May 21, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Okanogan County Realty, LLC member of the MLS has several listing; home, business, farm, recreational, waterfront and several at Veranda Beach. Kathy 509-429-2040, Ryan 509-429-8564, Brad 509-429-7466. Serving Okanogan County.

OROVILLE. 3 BR, 2 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN SEPTEMBER. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-0004.

TONASKET

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Announcements 2 BR, 2 BATH + UPSTAIRS BALCONY area. Full basement is unfinished. This house has charm, situated in Old Orchard Estates. $149,500. Shown by appt only. Call for details 509322-3471 or please leave message.

For Rent CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS $450-$795, Possible 1 month free. 3 BR HOME $750 & $850

Call Today Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

MANUEL FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF OROVILLE picnic / potluck / soft drinks June 6. from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. at Osoyoos State Park. Visiting and relaxing day.

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer. Subscribe to the...

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

25. Warm, so to speak

3. ___ Piper

26. Cheat

4. Artist’s stand

29. Duck’s home

5. Bag

31. Arm bones

6. Blubber

33. Artist Chagall

7. “Stop right there!�

35. Bakery buy

8. Egyptian fertility goddess

37. Belief in God based on reason, not revelation

9. Hindu deity, protector of worlds

39. Skating jumps

11. Western blue flag, e.g.

41. Bill and ___

12. Gangster’s gun

42. Taste, e.g.

15. Police officers’ badges

43. Japanese-American

18. English race place

44. Chinese dynasty

22. Wife of a raja (pl.)

46. Accommodate

24. Legislate

47. Power glitch

26. F.B.I. operative (hyphenated)

49. Tablet

27. Part of a plane (hyphenated)

51. Blonde’s secret, maybe

28. By reasonable assumption

52. Coquette

30. Sag

53. Checked item

32. English exam finale, often

55. Having flat polished surfaces, like on a gemstone

34. Divine

58. Ancient upright stone slabs bearing markings

38. Allocate, with “out�

62. Airline’s home base

ANSWERS

Across

63. Argue in protest 65. “Is that ___?�

1. Crow’s home

66. Insinuating

6. Gangster’s blade

67. Overthrow, e.g.

10. Fix, in a way

68. Carry on

13. Birdlike

69. Bring (out)

14. Desert sight

70. Grating

16. Victorian, for one Down

20. Bosses 21. Vacation souvenirs (hyphenated) 23. Shoestring

10. Held back

36. Bartender’s supply

Oroville Reman & Reload

Okanogan Estate and Vineyards Retail Store

submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

JOB FAIR

301 9th Ave., Oroville, WA

509-476-2935

We would like to invite individuals who are interested in working for a fast growing company to attend our job fair and take this opportunity to learn more about employment with us and the benefits we offer. Employment Opportunities Include: Lumber Pilers, Re-Saw Operators, Trim Pickers, Forklift Operators, Maintenance Employees, Clean-up Employees, Millwright Employees, Moulder/Planer Employees, Electricians, Mechanics and Office Staff. Please arrive at 11:00 or 1:30 to fill out an application or bring resume. Please wear sturdy shoes/boots to tour the facility.

COOK/CHEF, full time position. Experience in fine dining, steaks, seafood and lunch/dinner menu required. Innovative practices, precise cooking ability, ability to work well under pressure and people oriented are desired qualifications for this position. Submit application or resume to 615 Bonaparte Lake Resort, Tonasket or apply in person at same address. Wages DOE.

FREE NAC Class North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning July 6, 2015. This class will be completed in August, applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resources office or online at www.nvhospital.org. This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be accepted after June 10, 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Looking for 24 – 32 hrs/wk SALES ASSOCIATE.

Please send resume to Yvaldovinos@gold diggerapples.com or drop off resume at retail store 1205 Main St, Oroville

School Bus Driver Training Class The Tonasket School District is providing a School Bus Driver Training Class in late June. Upon completing the class, employment as a substitute bus driver in the district is available with the pay of $14.39 per hour. Persons interested in becoming school bus drivers, should contact Jeff Yeckel at 486-2665 or 486-2126, for additional information. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Wanted WANTED TO BUY: Paying Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. Spence: 509-429-4722.

Garage & Yard Sale NAME YOUR PRICE Garage Sale in Molson. Wally & Ruth Loe’s home. May 23, 2015, 9:30 a.m. Follow signs from Grange Hall. OKANOGAN

ESTATE SALE / MOVING SALE 50 plus years of treasures. It all goes! Sat 23rd & Sun 24th from 9am until ? Located at 420 East 7th Street. 509-486-0941. OROVILLE ANTIQUE SALE! May 29th and 30th, 8am to 4pm, 345 Eastlake. Antique chairs, writing desk, phonograph, cedar chest, dolls, jewelry, dresser with mirror, ice cream chairs, oak cabinet and more quality item! Tonasket Garage, Gallery and Tea Room. 20% to 50% off of artwork, antiques & misc. Marcy’s pies and cinnamon rolls. Havilah Flower Mill. Saturday, May 16th and Saturday May 23rd, 9am to 4pm.

Motorcycles 2009 HONDA SCOOTER CHF50 Metropolitan. White with only 64 miles on it. $1,000. One owner. Call 509-486-1397.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF MAY 18, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy

40. Washington and Franklin on the Constitution 45. Luster 48. Scope 50. Second of two 54. ___ cotta 55. Holding as much as possible 56. Arabic for “commander� 57. Birdbrain 59. 1968 Chemistry Nobelist Onsager

17. Bring back into original use 19. Be in session

Statewides

We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center Assistant HS dedicated to providing quality Volleyball Coach health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is The Tonasket School District welcome. is now accepting applications for an Assistant HS Volleyball We have the following Coach. Volleyball coaching opportunities available: experience preferred. PosiOKANOGAN: tion is open until filled. Please contact the District Office for Dentist an application or available on 2 Full time the districtĂ­s website at: Brewster Jay Ave: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. MA-C or LPN Tonasket School District, 35 Full time DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA Clinic Custodian 98855. Phone 486-2126. Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY Dental clinics EMPLOYER

Found

Crosswords

Help Wanted

Wed., May 27, 2015

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 800-388-2527

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

Help Wanted

11:00 to 1 p.m. & 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Oroville: 1 bedroom 1 bath, with laundry. $475 plus power. Includes w/s/g. Call: 509476-2077. Walking distance to everything.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Houses For Sale

Health General

For Rent

60. Above 61. Mysterious: Var.

1. Hawaiian tuber

62. Accident

2. “... happily ___ after�

64. After expenses

AUCTIONS COMING IN JUNE (WATCH FOR ADVERTISING & HANDBILLS)

******************************* Sun., June 7 - Tony Cowan Estate - Tonasket Rodeo Grounds Equipment - Vehicles - Tools - Collectibles

Sat., June 13 - Twin City Motors - Okanogan, Elmway Collectible Vehicles and Collectible Parts

Sat., June 20 - Malott Moving. Household, Tractor, Pickup, Tools

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 DAL DAGNON 486-2570

Licensed & Bonded

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED Drivers-We support every driver, every day, every mile! No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! Call Central Refrigerated Home. (888) 793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com. Want A Career Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Hands On Training! Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22hr. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 HELP WANTED-GOVERNMENT NAVY RESERVE Serve part-time. No military exp needed. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. $ for school. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days’ vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seatlle@navy.mil HIGH-TECH CAREER with U.S. Navy. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE training with U.S. Navy. Good medical/dental, vacation, great reer. HS grads ages 17-34. Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, jobs_seattle@navy.mil

Paid pay, caCall or

EDUCATION MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training can get you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-589-9683

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: DANIEL CHARLES SMITH, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00042-9 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: April 28, 2015. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: May 7, 2015. /s/Kodel Marie Mergens KODEL MARIE MERGENS Personal Representative continued on next page


MAY 21, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE May 21, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

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Puzzle 24 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

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Puzzle 21 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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Puzzle 15 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.72)

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Pumping Service Now Serving North Okanogan County

Serving you from the Canadian Border to Brewster!

We recently purchased Eisen’s Pumping Service and look forward to serving you!  Septic Pumping

509-422-3621

 Portable Toilets

MORGASE983JS

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Cell: (509) 322-4777

SUPPLIERS OF:

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Paint Sprayers n Bobcat Bobcatexcavators, Excavators excavators,n scissor lifts, Bobcat excavators, scissor lifts, Bobcat scissor lifts, Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! n All Contractor n Scissor Lifts Z booms, reach forklift, forklift, Party booms, Party ZZ booms, reach forklift, Party n Z Booms Rental, tents,tables, tables, Equipment chairs, Business: 250-495-6688 Rental, tents, chairs, paint Rental, tents, chairs,paint paint n Call Today! n Reach Forklift sprayersall allcontractor contractor equipment. Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 sprayers all contractor equipment. sprayers equipment. PARTY RENTALS: 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Credit Cards Accepted! 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tents, Tables, Chairs & More! Tonasket Tonasket Tonasket 11648 115th St., Osoyoos 509-486-2888 at the Buena Vista Industrial Park 509-486-2888 509-486-2888 509-486-2888 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

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Tonasket

509-486-2888

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Well Drilling

OKANOGAN VALLEY

“The Water Professionals”

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Chelan & Kittitas County

n Units 5x10 to 10x30 n Power / Fenced n Covered RV & Boat Parking n Video Monitored

Storage units are fully fenced, easy 24 Hr. access, close to town. 132 Clarkson Mill Rd.

Serving all of Eastern Washington... 509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

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Find out what property is for sale and lease in your area and much, much more in our real estate listings in the Classifieds.

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Real Estate Section.

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You wouldn’t have if you had read the real estate guide listings in the Classifieds.

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

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OROVILLE HOME

9

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Great recreational cabin near Wannacut Lake! Open layout upstairs with garage downstairs. Listing includes 23 ft trailer onsite ready to live in while you put the finishing touches on this dream space! Log home plans and package available for total listing of $119,000. MLS#787613 $105,000

DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION. - Motivated Seller. 2-Bdrm. 1-3/4 Bath. Bonus Room. Approx 1847 sq.ft. 1963 Brick Home. Appliances. Huge Living Room w/Floor to Ceiling Rock Fireplace. Sliding Glass Doors from Living Room to Rivers Edge. Plus Big Picture Windows. Approx 165 ft of OKANOGAN RIVER FRONTAGE. Large 2-car Garage w/enclosed room & big attic storage. Garden area. 2 City Lots. City Services. Perm Set Sprinklers in part of yard. Does need some TLC, but Value is here. Come Look for $183,000.00

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509/476-3378

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee Enjoy the views from this 3 bedroom 2 bath manufactured home on almost 17 acres. House has all new paint and floor coverings. This property features a 40X40 shop with roll up doors. There is a 30X50 pole building, a 14X16 shed, a 14X24 building and a 24X30 covered bldg. All buildings have electricity. 20+ gallon a minute well drilled in 2008. There is pasture that is fenced and cross fence for your horses. Plenty of wildlife in the area to enjoy. NWML#783533 $189,000

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Puzzle 23 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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Possible Seller Terms.

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$299,900

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Over 170 front feet of Lake Osoyoos lowbank waterfront, includes modest cottage. Excellent beach, completely private & nature filled. Older barn.

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Beautiful Waterfront View lot w/charming Park Model home & 45ft of Private Lake Osoyoos beach access. Giant 2 car + garage & shop.

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SUN LAKES 509-476-2121 REALTY Tamara Porter & Joan Cool & Shayne Thacker

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE #1 Top Producer Office in North County! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET. SEQ. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. TO: Lucky and Cindy Wilson; to any occupants of the property; and to all other persons or entities claiming an interest in the subject property. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: oThe statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission: Tollfree: 1-877-894-HOME ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) http://www.dfi.wa.gov/ consumers/homeownership/post_ purchase_counselors_foreclosure. htm OR http://www.wshfc.org/ buyers/counseling.htm United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to

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/s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Smith Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on May 7, 14, 21, 2015. #OVG631046

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Puzzle 21 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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fied mail on November 3, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on November 4, 2014, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the Owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: January 15, 2015 /S/Jerome A. Froland, Jerome A. Froland, WSBA 14916, as Trustee 8 - 164th St. SW, Bothell WA 98012 P.O. Box 13125, Mill Creek WA 98082 Telephone : 425-778-5297 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30 and May 21, 2015. #OVG628487

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ments beginning with the payment due 8/16/2013 -18 Payments of $200.78/month $3,614.04 Fees and Late charges $ 72.74 Total Amount in default, excluding Real Property Taxes: $11,667.59 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $73,136.52, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from July 14, 2004 and other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on May 29, 2015. The Default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by May 18, 2015 (11 Days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale by Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded Junior Lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: CINDY M. WILSON AKA CYNTHIA WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 CINDY M. WILSON AKA CYNTHIA WILSON AND JOHN DOE WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 LUCKY WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 LUCKY WILSON AND JANE DOE WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 CURRENT OCCUPANT 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 By both first class and either registered or certi-

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other housing counselors and attorneys: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819 http://nwjustice.org/what-clear I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on May 29, 2015, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock, a.m., at the OKANOGAN COUNTY SUPERIOR COURTHOUSE 149 3RD N., in the City of OKANOGAN, OKANOGAN COUNTY, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: The Southwesterly 77.0 feet of Lot 11, as measured along the Northwesterly boundary thereof of Kahlow’s Second Addition to North Alma, as per plat thereof recorded in the Office of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. (commonly known as 951 First Ave. S, Okanogan WA 98840) TAX ACCOUNT NUMBER: 1200110002. Which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated the 16th day of July, 2004, recorded the 14th day of July, 2004, in the mortgage records of Okanogan County, under Auditor’s File No. 3077291, records of Okanogan County, Washington, from : Lucky D. Wilson and Cindy M. Wilson, husband and wife, as Grantors, to The United States of America acting through the State Director, USDA, Rural Development for the State of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of United States of America acting through the Rural Housing service or successor agency, United States Department of Agriculture, as Beneficiary. Jerome A. Froland, P.S. DBA Alder Lynn Law office was appointed Successor Trustee Okanogan County Auditors File No. 3195363. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:- Failure to make monthly payments of principal and interest beginning with the payment due 8/16/2013 -3 Payments of $285.72 /month $857.16 -15 Payments of $474.91 /month $7,123.65 - Failure to make monthly escrow pay-

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 21, 2014

Share your America with exchange student

OBITUARIES wife Maryann; three daughters: Michelle, Tracie, and Gayle; five brothers and three sisters. He had seven grandchildren whom he adored. A remembrance will be held Saturday, May 30 at 4 p.m. at Lake Sacagawea in Longview, Washington at 4 p.m. This will be a potluck celebration of life, please feel free to bring a dish. The family is asking that donations to the VFW be made in lieu of flowers. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

RAYMOND JAMES BLYSTONE

Raymond James Blystone

Raymond James “Jim” Blystone was born in Penticton, B.C., Canada on November 24, 1946, he passed away on May 1, 2015. He moved to Vancouver, Washington in 1950. He loved working on cars and spent most of his life as a mechanic. He also loved fishing and building model airplanes. He is survived by his loving

Host families are needed now SUBMITTED BY NEYSA ROLEY PAX COMMUNITY COORDINATOR

OROVILLE – Oroville resident, Neysa Roley, invites local families to “Share Your America” with a high school exchange student sponsored by PAX, Program of Academic Exchange. There are a group of exceptional young people who are part of special State Department programs called FLEX and YES. These students compete for fully paid scholarships that fund their exchange year in America. These students are very intelligent and motivated students who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford to participate in student exchange programs. They come from small towns and rural communities, and they all share a strong desire

‘Click It or Ticket’ program includes buckling up kids SUBMITTED BY ANGIE WARD WTSC PROGRAM MANAGER

WENATCHEE - This year’s annual statewide “Click It or Ticket” campaign will take place between May 18 and May 31. During these dates, motorists in Washington can expect to see extra seat belt patrols, which will include an emphasis on children who are not properly restrained. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of unintentional deaths among children in the U.S. Between 2010 and 2012, in Washington State, 26 child passengers age 12 and younger died,

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and another 122 were seriously injured as a result of traffic crashes. The majority of these tragedies likely could have been avoided had these children been properly restrained, as dictated by Washington State law. On Aug. 27, 2013, Deputy Tyson Voss of the Grant County Sheriff ’s Office witnessed a motorist running a stop sign at an intersection just off Interstate 90 near George, WA. When Deputy Voss made contact with this motorist, he noticed two small children in the back seat who were not properly restrained. Deputy Voss had previously spent several years in the GCSO’s Motor Traffic Unit, where he actively participated in the Child Car Seat Project and knew the importance of properly restraining children in a motor vehicle. Before allowing the motorist to leave the scene, he instructed her to properly restrain her one-year-old and three-yearold children in their car seats. Within only a few miles and just minutes later, the motorist Deputy Voss had stopped fell asleep at the wheel. Her car careened off State Route 283, hit a light pole, vaulted over the intersecting county road, and ended up on its side. Had these two children not been properly restrained, the crash forces they sustained would most likely have killed or seriously injured them. Since they were in their

car seats correctly, the children sustained no injuries. Cesi Velez, Project Manager for Washington Child Passenger Safety, said, “Washington State law requires child passengers to be properly restrained until the motor vehicle safety belt fits properly. It also requires children under the age of 13 to ride in the back seat. Educating the public on Washington law can also be challenging for law enforcement. A new online child passenger safety training will be available to law enforcement officers prior to the start of the “Click It or Ticket” campaign. This training will assist officers to help ensure children are riding safely in the car.” For more information on Child Passenger Safety in Washington, visit http://washingtonCPS.com. Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Offices and the Washington State Patrol will be teaming up and participating in the extra patrols, with the support of the Chelan-Douglas Target Zero Traffic Safety Task Force. These and all extra patrols are part of Target Zero—striving to end traffic deaths and serious injuries in Washington by 2030. For more information, visit www. targetzero.com. Additional information on the Washington Traffic Safety Commission can be found on the website, www.wtsc.wa.gov.

to experience American life and culture as a way to enhance their own lives. The Department of State holds its scholarship students to the highest standards and considers them to be youth ambassadors. FLEX students come from eight former Soviet Union countries. This program was conceived with the idea that young people are the key to establishing democracy. These students are interested in learning about the richness of American life. They are the future business owners and government leaders in their home towns and countries. Every year there are 800 FLEX students who come to the United States. YES students come from countries with significant Muslim populations. Approximately 900 students from 40 different countries come to the United States each year. These young people believe that learning about each other’s culture will help to bring peace and understanding to the

world. They want to learn about American society and are excited to share their traditions with us. While these students are here, they are expected to participate in volunteer activities, take a full course of study, and participate in cultural and educational trips provided by the exchange organization. They are also expected to make presentations to the schools and community groups about their home countries. You can contribute to U.S. public diplomacy by helping exchange students develop a better understanding to the United States. When they return home, they, in turn, will teach their fellow citizens about life in the United States and the American people, fostering an atmosphere of mutual respect and understanding. All types of families are welcome to host. For more information, call Neysa Roley, PAX Community Coordinator at 509560-9220 or visit PAX.org.

Mushroom season in the National Forest SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN

USFS PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST

WINTHROP - Mushroom season is underway on National Forest Lands in Okanogan County. Commercial and personal use pickers are seeking out morel mushrooms that often grow in areas that have recently burned. The only area open to commercially harvest National Forest Lands in Okanogan County is last year’s Carlton Fire area. Permits required for commercial pickers are available at the Methow Valley Ranger District in Winthrop, the Okanogan Valley Office in Okanogan and the Tonasket Ranger District in Tonasket. Commercial pickers are encouraged to camp and utilize the facilities brought in for their

use at the North Summit and Black Canyon Sno parks. “We’ve added dumpsters and porta-potties to the sno parks to accommodate the increased use associated with commercial harvest,” said Mike Liu, District Ranger. “Mushroom season is pretty weather dependent,” said Liu. “Wetting rains followed by sunshine bring on a flush of mushrooms in a cycle that continues until conditions heat-up and dry out to the point that the mushrooms quit growing.” As a condition of their permits, commercial pickers are required to remove their garbage or utilize the dumpsters provided. “We’ve also increased law enforcement during commercial mushroom season,” said Liu. “Officers from other Districts are helping with patrols.” Law Enforcement officers

have seized several gallons of mushrooms and commercial permits from individuals picking outside the Carlton Fire area. Individuals who notice and would like to report violations are encouraged to contact the Methow Valley Ranger District at 509-996-4000. The reports are most useful when they include a description of the violation along with a description of the vehicles and individuals involved pictures, license plate numbers and State. “For your own safety, never confront a violator,” said Liu. “And for emergency situations, or those requiring an immediate response, please call 911.” Additional information about this year’s commercial or personal use mushroom gathering program is available at the Methow Valley Ranger District, 509-9964000.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 21, 2015  

May 21, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 21, 2015  

May 21, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune