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The Daily Herald

Splash! May 15, 2015

Your guide to summer fun!

Fairs

Festivals

Concerts

More

Inside

Snohomish baseball clinches spot in state regional round C1

FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

EVERETT, WASHINGTON

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YMCA to buy Colby building Firmer The youth organization likely would tear down all of the structures and replace its facility in downtown Everett. By Chris Winters Herald Writer

EVERETT — The YMCA of Snohomish County has agreed to buy the Everett school district’s former administration building at 4730 Colby Avenue.

The youth organization is offering to pay $3.325 million for the 8.1-acre parcel, which includes the 51-year-old main building and two portable buildings. All the buildings would likely be torn down and replaced with a new YMCA, which will

replace the organization’s nearly 100-year-old facility in downtown Everett. YMCA CEO Scott Washburn said that if the deal closed, construction of a new facility would likely be three or four years away. The YMCA estimates a new building will cost at least $25 million to build. The nonprofit is in the middle of a capital campaign, with about

$3 million raised so far from a small number of donors. It plans to raise about $10.5 million and fund the remainder of the building with loans and some existing assets. The full purchase price for the Colby building will be due when the deal closes, which could take See YMCA, back page, this section

Singing Everett’s praises Fisherman’s Village Music Festival celebrates people and place

train law is signed

The new legislation requires advance notice of crude oil shipments as well as more training, but the governor says it’s not enough. By Jerry Cornfield Herald Writer

By Gale Fiege

Inside

Herald Writer

More about the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival is in today’s A&E section: ■ The best places to eat in Everett’s downtown core ■ The lineup of musical acts

Crowther and Steven Graham, the volunteers who run the festival, are optimistic about its long-term success. This year the event features 75 acts at five venues. “It’s the largest urban music festival north of Seattle,” Graham said. “People of all ages need

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the buzz

EVERETT — It takes a village to raise a music festival. Line up the bands and the stages, but without the support of the city, a legion of volunteers, the business community and local fans, it won’t go far. That’s the message from Eric Gilbert, who runs the successful Treefort Music Festival in Boise, Idaho. Gilbert believes Everett’s music festival is on track to becoming a sustainable event. The second annual Fisherman’s Village Music Festival runs through Sunday in downtown Everett. Everett Music Initiative’s Ryan

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Business . . . . .A9 Classified . . . . B1

Comics . . . . . .D4 Crossword . . .D5

to come out. You’re going to be impressed.” Crowther and Graham started the music initiative about four years ago to promote the independent music scene in Everett. It started with booking shows for local bands at clubs around the city, and pulling together the occasional outdoor concert. Today, the men are approached by people who book for other festivals, looking for Everett bands. “Everett Music Initiative has brought attention to music in Everett,” said Morgen Schuler, who writes for Seattle Weekly. Crowther and Graham hold down day jobs to support their music passion. In 2014, they

Kitchen debates His and hers campaign signs: A Bremerton City Council member who had filed for re-election was surprised to learn that his wife also is running for his seat. Roy Runyon said his wife, Kim Faulkner, as a citizen has every right to run for office (Page A4). Dear Abby. . . .D1 Horoscope . . . B6

beat their own expectations. Last year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival attracted more than 3,000 fans. The EMI venue, The Cannery, averages about 150 people for each show. A music festival such as Fisherman’s Village has a lot to offer a city such as Everett, Gilbert said. “In Boise, Treefort galvanized the community. It’s inclusive, respected and was named a cultural ambassador for the city,” he said. “I imagine that is something Fisherman’s Village is doing for Everett.” Carol Thomas, the city’s cultural arts director, praises

A word of advice for any incumbent who doesn’t want to face a spouse on the ballot: Make the time to keep your honey-do list up to date, or your spouse may help you find the time. Going to have to sell the Picasso: The average CEO was paid $13.5 million in 2014, 373 times the average

Lottery . . . . . .A2 Obituaries. . . .A6

Opinion. . . . .A11 Short Takes . . .D6

See TRAINS, back page, this section

See FESTIVAL, Page A2

worker’s $36,134 salary. But that disparity is less than what it was in 2000 when CEOs made 525 times what workers made (Page A9). We know; we felt bad for the CEOs, too. Should we start a GoFundMe account? Don’t know much about history: On this day in Sports . . . . . . . C1 Stocks . . . . . .A10

1937, the House and Senate chambers of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., were air-conditioned for the first time (Today in History, Page D6). It was a simple and inexpensive job and one that remains in use today; they just vented all the hot air to the outside.

—Jon Bauer, Herald staff

Ranging 64/49, C6

DAILY

GENNA MARTIN / THE HERALD

Scotty Smith of the Everett band Fauna Shade plays guitar out front of Bayside Bikes on Colby Avenue on Thursday afternoon, in advance of the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival this weekend.

OLYMPIA — Washington will hire more rail inspectors and let fire departments know ahead of time when train shipments of crude oil are coming though town under a new law signed Thursday. It also calls for more training of emergency responders, new analyses of risks posed by shipping oil on the Columbia River and additional contingency plans from railroads in the event of a spill. But while those changes mark progress in making the transport of oil safer in Washington, Gov. Jay Inslee said the federal government must do more to prevent catastrophic accidents involving oil trains, like those seen in the past few years. Federal authorities must require immediate replacement of older-model tank cars used to transport crude from the Bakken region of North Dakota, the governor said. And it must act to lower the speeds trains can travel through Washington. “I have to be honest with people that while this (new law) is a step forward, we still have an unsafe situation in our state. It demands federal action,” Inslee said after signing House Bill 1449. “These trains are a mile long, with very volatile material, they’re rolling though our neighborhood and they are not safe today.” The impetus for the new law is an explosive increase in oil shipments by train. As recently as 2011, no oil trains traveled through Snohomish County or the rest of the state. Oil arrived only in pipelines and by marine tanker. In 2013, 700 million gallons moved on rails through the state, Inslee said. That’s a result of the shale-oil boom in North Dakota. Washington attracts so many shipments because it is the fifth-largest refining state in the U.S. In a typical week, a dozen trains each carrying at least 1 million gallons of Bakken

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A2 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Vivid new crayfish species found The Washington Post See this little guy? He does not belong to realm of Lisa Frank trapper keepers. He actually exists, in reality, living on the very planet upon which you and I reside. An independent German researcher has for the first time described this crayfish as a new species and published his findings in the journal ZooKeys. The blue, pink and white crayfish from Indonesia has

The blue, pink and white crayfish from Indonesia has been dubbed Cherax pulcher. “Pulcher” is Latin for beautiful. CHRISTIAN LUKHAUP

LOTTERY POWERBALL: Wednesday’s drawing was for $100 million. Wednesday’s numbers: 1-2529-31-47, Powerball 7. The next drawing is Saturday for $110 million. MEGA MILLIONS: Tuesday’s drawing was for $140 million. Tuesday’s numbers: 14-30-33-3644, Megaball 2. The next drawing is Friday for $159 million. LOTTO: Wednesday’s drawing was for $3.2 million. Wednesday’s numbers: 1-13-18-3236-43. The next drawing is Saturday for $3.4 million. HIT 5: Wednesday’s drawing was for $100,000. Wednesday’s numbers: 10-11-21-2938. The next drawing is Saturday for $140,000. MATCH 4: Thursday’s numbers: 5-6-13-21. DAILY GAME: Thursday’s numbers: 6-2-2. KENO: Thursday’s numbers: 7-12-16-2027-31-37-38-42-46-5257-59-60-62-67-68-6972-74.

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been dubbed Cherax pulcher. “Pulcher” is Latin for “beautiful.” “I think it’s one of the most beautiful crayfish,” study author Christian Lukhaup told The Washington Post. “It’s very striking.” Lukhaup actually came across this crayfish more than a decade ago, via a photograph sent by a friend who had been collecting crayfish on New Guinea. He later found live examples of the crayfish in pet shops, as the creature was being sold

in Japan and Europe. Slowly, Lukhaup connected with locals in Southeast Asia to learn more about the animal. But it took many years to finish his research work, in part because it wasn’t clear from where, exactly, it originated. “If you look at the map, you don’t find the name of creeks on the map,” he said. “It’s not easy to find.” Finally Lukhaup, who also helped identify vampire crabs for the first time, was able to pinpoint the

colorful crayfish to the Hoa Creek in West Papau, which is part of Indonesia. Lukhaup said he recently received confirmation that the pulcher also lives in another nearby creek. The pulcher’s shape and colors differ from other crayfish in the Cherax subgenus, which are found in West Papua, Papua New Guinea and Australia, Lukhaup wrote in the paper. The bold coloring is more common among the male crayfish, Lukhaup said.

Festival: ‘It’s time to reverse the mind set’ From Page A1

Crowther and Graham every chance she gets. “The festival is such a great thing for Everett. Ryan and Steven are establishing a thriving music scene that is bringing new visitors to Everett. For emerging musical artists, it’s support that wouldn’t be there without those guys,” Thomas said. “What could be better than when volunteer citizens take it upon themselves to make this city a better place? I could not be more proud of them.” The festival has Snohomish County Tourism Promotion Area support. Crowther, 30, serves on the Snohomish County Public Facilities District board. Graham, 28, sits on the Everett’s Cultural Arts Commission. “If we’re going to be something the city and county want to promote, we have to show that our event has healthy success, that we can attach to the bigger goals of Everett and its growing population,” Crowther said. “With the

first year behind us, we appreciate the support of the city and the county. We also understand that we have to continue to deliver.” Well-known musician and showman Jason Webley, who closes the festival Sunday evening, calls Fisherman’s Village a quixotic project. “It’s the same idea as Volume in Spokane and Treefort in Boise: Take a not-major market and make a big event and bring tons of great bands in. It can go quite well,” Webley said. “The trick here is the not-major market is 23 miles from Seattle. Can that work? I don’t know. I have doubts, but I really support them and would love to see them succeed.” Graham said the festival is fortunate to have Webley’s support. “He is all in,” Graham said. While ticket sales pay most of the festival’s costs, sponsorships and partnerships are necessary, Crowther said. So far, sponsors of the festival include BECU, Hampton Inn, Scuttlebutt Brewing, Sno-Isle

Food Co-op, Homestreet Bank, Bayside bikes, KSER radio, KushMart and Leafly.com. Also encouraging Graham and Crowther are downtown restaurant and small business owners. Part of the challenge is creating a buzz about the festival among older audiences, especially the baby boom generation. Word is getting around among younger people who appreciate the fact that they don’t have to go into expensive Seattle to see some great Northwest bands, Graham said. “People are coming from Canada, Oregon, Idaho and other parts of our state,” he said. “But this is an event that celebrates Everett and Snohomish County and shows off our beautiful downtown, which is sometimes lost on people.” Graham, an Everett High School graduate, said he’s been guilty of not appreciating where he lives. “It’s time to reverse the mind set. We wanted the name of the festival to remind people of the beauty of this place and

what our heritage is here in Everett,” Graham said. “But a village is the beginning of something bigger. That’s where Everett is heading. The attention paid to this festival has benefitted the city, young artists and local fans, who are blown away that this is happening in their town.” The festival will continue to be a platform for local music, Graham said. The Everett band Fauna Shade, which just released an album and closes the festival’s program on Saturday night, was the recipient of a Mayor’s Arts Award in 2014 and is a “gem of a band,” he said. Other locals on the program include Preacher’s Wife, Hot! Donna, Shark the Herald, Born of Ghosts and the Juicy Jets, the winner of the recent Everett High School battle of the bands. “Juicy Jets is a funk party on wheels,” Graham said. “They have horns, choreography and sunglasses. So great. But, really, I am excited about the entire lineup. It’s gonna be hard

to be in three places at once at the festival.” Most of the other bands set to perform hail from Seattle, Portland and Spokane. On Monday, the day after the festival, Crowther and Graham have no plans to rest. “We are already working on next year,” Graham said. Fisherman’s Village will never be as big as Treefort in Boise, which is a university town, Crowther said. In March, the Idaho festival included more than 400 bands performing at about 20 venues around the city. “We went there for inspiration,” Crowther said. “We found out that it’s a community thing. Only about 25 percent of the tickets were bought by people from out of state. If Everett gets behind Fisherman’s Village, it will be part of the new Everett, the place people haven’t totally seen yet.” Gale Fiege: 425-3393427; gfiege@heraldnet. com. Twitter: @galefiege. A&E editor Aaron Swaney contributed to this report.


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FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

It’s semantics so far at special session Partisan posturing continues, as 830 budget issues wait to be ironed out at the negotiating table. By Jerry Cornfield Herald Writer

OLYMPIA — You can call them budget talks or you can call them budget briefings. Just don’t call them negotiations. That’s not what the House and Senate are doing in

the 30-day special session that crossed the halfway point this week. Democratic and Republican envoys from the caucuses in both chambers met for several hours Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday to discuss — not negotiate — roughly 830 differences in the

two-year spending plans passed by the Democrat-controlled House and Republican-run Senate. “We’re having conversations. We’re trying to understand each other’s budget,” Sen. Andy Hill, R-Redmond, chief architect of the Senate budget, said earlier this week. “As we go through and look at the differences, you can very clearly see what each side is doing.”

House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, D-Covington, calls them briefings because, he said, “We’re not making decisions.” Those involved agree on one thing. They are asking the state’s chief economist for a revenue forecast. It’s expected Monday, a month earlier than usual. “We think the forecast is going to be positive and it will give us more money to bridge the gap,” Hill said.

Sullivan said Democrats “don’t expect any miracles” and are focused on getting face-to-face negotiations under way. Given the impasse, there is mounting skepticism lawmakers can reach a deal by May 28, when this extra session will end. That would force a second special session and incite fear of a partial government shutdown July 1, See SESSION, Page A4

20 are punished for school food fight But rumors still fly long after the hurling ends. By Kari Bray Herald writer

shatter on the ground,” Washington State Patrol trooper Heather Axtman told the crowd. “Both vehicles are steaming.” Empty beer bottles rolled from opened doors. Senior Kyle Bailey played the role of the drunken driver. He stumbled from the scene as firefighter Rusty Hunt approached carrying an orange plastic backboard. Axtman continued to narrate: “(Kyle) wanted to go college,” she said. “Now he’s going to prison. Felony vehicular homicide.” The trooper described the fate of another student in the skit: “None of her family and friends will be able to see her continue her dreams,” she said. Medics led away two girls. Caylee Kearns wore a boy’s tuxedo jacket draped over her royal blue satin gown. After the play, Bailey, an

STANWOOD — Twenty students at Stanwood High School were suspended after a food fight during lunch Wednesday. Students and staff were hurt during the food fight and “involved students have received consequences for their participation,” according to a statement from the Stanwood-Camano School District. At least two people opted to go home after the food fight because they were hurt, said Maurene Stanton, executive director of human resources for the district. It does not appear that the injuries were serious. The district declined to specify how long the 20 students have been suspended for, but did confirm that the length is equal for each person involved. During their suspensions, students also are banned from sports and other extracurricular activities. Some students took to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter to voice their displeasure with the district. It also appears students might have planned the food fight, as well as a demonstration set for Thursday afternoon outside the district office. Students also made T-shirts and signs to protest their classmates’ suspensions. One of their concerns was that seniors who participated in the food fight would be barred from walking in their upcoming graduation ceremony. That’s a myth, district spokeswoman Joy Rusko said. “Rumors stating that

See DUI, Page A5

See FOOD, Page A5

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Monroe High School drama student Matthew Horsley is placed on a gurney by Monroe Fire Department personnel during a DUI re-enactment to raise awareness about drunken driving at Monroe High School on Thursday. Six drama students participated in the performance.

Dramatic lesson on drunken driving By Rikki King Herald Writer

MONROE — Their plans for college were read over the loudspeakers. Their school clubs. Their grades. Their hobbies. Drama students at Monroe High School on Thursday acted out a pretend drunken-driving crash on the football field. Their classmates filled the bleachers to watch. In the play, a student died. Another was critically wounded. The message was clear: There is too much ahead, and the future is too important, to make a bad decision on prom night. Monroe police and firefighters helped organize the drill, aimed at reminding students to stay safe before and after this weekend’s prom. That means no drinking and driving, and no getting into cars with impaired drivers, they were told.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Monroe High School drama students Caylee Kearns (in blue) and Morgan Skoog embrace during the DUI crash re-enactment

Even students too young for prom face that decision someday, Principal John Lombardi said. The assembly started with black tarps obscuring the cars,

which were positioned to resemble a T-bone wreck. As the tarps were lifted, the stadium filled with the young actresses’ cries and sobs. “Pieces of plastic and metal

For embattled young family, some good news E front porch

JULIE MUHLSTEIN

mily Fletcher turns 33 today. The new mom, who was featured in Sunday’s Daily Herald, is battling brain cancer while adjusting to parenthood and living with cerebral palsy. In time for her birthday, one burden has been lifted. “Things seem to be looking up for our financial situation,”

Buckle up, kids The annual law enforcement “Click It or Ticket” campaign runs Monday through the end of the month. Emphasis patrols will focus on seatbelt use, for children in particular. Participating agencies are the Snohomish County Sheriff ’s Office, the Washington State Patrol and the Edmonds, Everett,

Emily’s husband, Daniel Fletcher, said by email Wednesday. Harrison, the Everett couple’s 3-month-old son, was born Feb. 5 at EvergreenHealth Medical Center in Kirkland. He was delivered six weeks early after his mother, who has spent much of her life in a wheelchair, suffered a seizure and was found to have a

Lynnwood and Marysville police departments. See Mike Price: Retired football coach Mike Price is the keynote speaker at Everett Community College’s Athletic Hall of Fame induction dinner June 3. Price, who played football for Everett Junior College in 1964, will celebrate the accomplishments of the five

malignant brain tumor. Just days after their son was born, Emily had surgery to remove the glioblastoma multiforme tumor. She has undergone weeks of radiation treatments — 33 in all — and chemotherapy. Earlier this month, they were worried about a $30,000 bill for Harrison’s stay in the neonatal

athletes, one coach and two teams being inducted, and honor the legacy of his father, Walt Price, who was a coach and athletic director at Everett Junior College for more than 20 years. The event is open to the public. Dinner is $50 per person for adults, and $25 for youth, with reservations required. To RSVP, call EvCC at 425-3889535 by May 28.

intensive care unit at EvergreenHealth. Daniel Fletcher, 32, works in the mechanical insulation trade and is a union apprentice. But he was new on the job when Harrison was born and hadn’t yet qualified for employee health insurance.

Get fit: The third annual Health & Fitness Expo is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Edmonds School District Stadium, 7600 212th St. S.W. The free event is sponsored by Verdant Health Commission and Citrine Health. For more information, go to www.HFExpo.edmondswa.gov or 425-771-0268.

See MUHLSTEIN, Page A4

CONTACT US Home delivery: Call 425-339-3200. News tips: Call 425-339-3451 or email newstips@ heraldnet.com. Share photos: Submit shots to our reader galleries at www.heraldnet. com/yourphotos.


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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Law lets family ask judge to commit dangerous relative By Rachel La Corte Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Family members will be able to ask a judge to step in if a mental health professional will not involuntarily commit a relative they believe could be suicidal or a danger to others under a measure signed into law Thursday by Gov. Jay Inslee. Inslee signed “Joel’s Law” joined by Doug and Nancy Reuter, the parents of the man for whom the measure was named. Joel Reuter was suicidal when Seattle police shot and killed him during a standoff in July 2013. “You have parents who have just been heartbroken to not have a tool to really adequately address the danger to their

RACHEL LA CORTE / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gov. Jay Inslee shakes the hand of Nancy Reuter in Olympia on Thursday after he signed a bill named for her son, who was suicidal when he was killed in a police standoff.

children,” Inslee said after the signing. “This was a

reasonable step to provide that measure of protection

going forward.” Inslee signed the bill

with a pen that used to be Joel Reuter’s that had been handcrafted by his father. Nearby on the table was a hand-blown glass vase that Doug had also made for his son. “This is an unbelievable day,” Doug Reuter said after the signing, fighting back tears. The couple, who often traveled from their Dallas home to Washington in support of the bill, testified in support of the measure earlier this year, telling lawmakers they repeatedly tried to get the state to force their son into treatment but were turned away. Under Senate Bill 5269, a superior court judge can order detention if, after reviewing the family member’s petition and a statement and other

information from the mental health professional, the judge finds it is warranted. Doug Reuter said that if the law had been in place in 2013, after two incidents months before the fatal shooting, including a suicide attempt, “we could have possibly gotten Joel the help he needed.” The bill was one of several bills related to mental health signed into law by Inslee Thursday, including a measure on suicide prevention and another that allows involuntary outpatient treatment following a court order. Doug Reuter said that Joel’s Law, combined with the other measures, will “save dozens and dozens if not hundreds of lives in the state of Washington.”

Muhlstein

Session: Pact could mean quick close

From Page A3

From Page A3

The couple said the hospital asked that the $30,000 be paid within a year, which was way beyond the Fletchers’ means. But this week, Daniel said that most pressing financial issue has been resolved. “A social worker from the hospital that we have been working with found a Medicaid program that Harrison qualifies for, and it appears that it will retroactively cover all of his medical expenses,” he said. The hospital confirmed Thursday that it helped the Fletchers get Medicaid coverage. “Things are in good shape for the family,” said Chrissy Yamada, chief financial officer for EvergreenHealth. Yamada said the hospital was in the process of resolving the Fletchers’ coverage issues when their story was published in Sunday’s Herald. She said social workers at the hospital work to help uninsured patients qualify for Medicaid. “Evergreen always wants to do what we can to help,” Yamada said. “I know it’s confusing. I see the bills.” By Thursday, Daniel said he had spoken with someone from Washington Apple Health, which

How to help A GoFundMe account, “Emily Fletcher’s Fight,” has been set up to help Everett’s Emily Fletcher as she battles brain cancer. Donations may be made at: www. gofundme.com/emilyfletcher is the Medicaid program in our state, “and they confirmed it is going to happen.” “The NICU bill was $30,000, and it will be covered 100 percent,” he said. Going forward, they are covered by Aetna, Daniel’s employee insurance. Even with that, there are certain to be big out-of-pocket expenses as Emily’s cancer fight continues. For now, she is resting during a monthlong break from treatments. A girlhood friend is visiting from Australia and helping with baby care. Harrison, a smiley baby, gets bigger every day. There’s more good news. The online GoFundMe account established by Emily’s friend, Sarah Guenzler, has more than doubled in the past week. By Thursday afternoon, $8,581 had been donated to help the family.

the start of a new fiscal year when a budget is supposed to be in place. A similar drama played out in 2013 when an agreement came together hours before the deadline. Around the Capitol, no one wants to throw in the towel yet, even as partisan posturing continues unabated. Experienced lawmakers know that if an agreement is reached by late next week, the process of finishing could move swiftly. On Thursday, Sullivan and House Speaker Frank Chopp, D-Seattle, insisted that getting done in less than two weeks is possible once real talks get started. “We haven’t had one negotiating session. Not one,” Sullivan said. “At this point they are dragging us into a second special session.” The reasons for the stand-off are pretty much the same as when the Legislature ended the regular 105-day session on April 24. House Democrats have passed a $38.8 billion budget for the two-year cycle beginning July 1, while Senate Republicans approved a $37.8 billion spending plan. The Democrats’ plan is predicated on roughly $1.5 billion from a new capital gains tax and an

We haven’t had one negotiating session. Not one. At this point they are dragging us into a second special session.” — Pat Sullivan House majority leader

increase in the businessand-occupation tax paid by professional service firms. But House Democrats have yet to pass either tax, and Senate Republicans aren’t convinced they can. GOP leaders continue to insist that the Democrats make those changes before they’ll negotiate. In their view, the House budget spends money that doesn’t exist — at least not until tax measures are passed. By taking such votes, majority Democrats would prove the state can pay for everything in their budget. “You say you have the votes. Do you?” said House Minority Leader Dan Kristiansen, R-Snohomish. “If you are going to stand strong on your desire to spend that much more, then you should be prepared to show you can support that level of spending.” Republicans say no new or higher taxes are needed to fund state government. But the Senate, to balance its budget, relies on shifting

millions of dollars into the general fund from other state accounts. Democrats oppose some of the transfers and consider others to be gimmicks that need to be discarded and replaced with real dollars from new revenue. “They don’t want to vote for taxes, and we don’t think there is a reliable way to do the budget without a reliable stream of revenue,” said Rep. Ross Hunter, D-Medina, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. When you put the two parties’ budgets side by side, you will find 1,049 line-item funding decisions, of which 830 are in conflict, according to a chart compiled by nonpartisan staff of the House Office of Program Research. Some of those differences involve large sums of money and important questions of policy. Both the House and Senate provide teachers with a 3 percent wage

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increase over the course of the two-year budget. But the Democratic House plan offers an additional 1.8 percent and puts more money into health benefits for education employees. Those add up to $360.5 million. For state workers, the House wants to fully fund pay increases contained in collective bargaining agreements negotiated with the governor. Senate Republicans want to set aside the contracts and instead offer every employee a $1,000-a-year increase, which they say will be a bigger boon for lower-paid workers. It also works out to more than a $100 million difference. Most of the line-item disagreements involve small sums. The Senate spends $4,000 less on goods and services for the Public Disclosure Commission but provides $220,000 more for upgrading the agency’s information technology equipment. These are what budget negotiators from all four caucuses are discussing. Eventually they’ll be making decisions on each one. “That’s not unlike any other year,” Hill said. “Those are the pebbles. The bigger problems are the boulders.” They haven’t started negotiating on how to move those, yet.

Bremerton couple runs for council Associated Press BREMERTON — City Councilor for District 6 Roy Runyon filed Wednesday to run for re-election, according to the Kitsap Sun. His wife, Kim Faulkner, also filed for the same seat. Runyon said he was surprised his wife was interested in running, but said as a taxpayer and citizen she has the right. A third council candidate, Richard Huddy, said Faulkner’s candidacy just proves there is someone better for the job than the incumbent. Bremerton council seats are assigned by geographic district. There would be no way for Faulkner to run for a different seat. The three will face off in a primary election in August.


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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Oregon families should get $284 in tax rebates next year Associated Press

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon families should get an average of $284 in tax rebates next year, state economists said Thursday, citing a strong economy and a bump in job growth. Economists say the rebates will totally nearly $473 million, or $123 million more than was predicted in February, when economists said taxpayers would receive nearly $350 million in tax rebates. The steady economic improvements have led the state to collect slightly

Food From Page A3

involved seniors will not be allowed to participate in graduation are false,” according to the district statement. “Participation

more than projected in both corporate and personal income taxes. Unlike previous rebates, which used to be distributed as a check in the mail around Christmas, Oregonians will instead receive a tax credit and pay less when they file their returns in April 2016, said Josh Lehner, senior economist at the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis “It’s a credit on the tax return so you don’t get the check in the mail, you just get lower taxes to pay in April,” he said. Oregon’s one-of-a-kind “kicker” law is triggered

when tax collections exceed projections by at least 2 percent. When that occurs, the unanticipated revenue gets kicked back to taxpayers as income tax credits. The last time Oregonians got a kicker was in 2007, when they got back a total of more than $1 billion after a booming economy brought in revenue more than 19 percent higher than expected. Once the tax rebates are out, state economists said lawmakers will have an additional $463 million in resources to spend. The report of a

strengthening economy drew optimism from lawmakers who have said they’d invest some of that money in public education. Gov. Kate Brown said in a statement the robust economic growth translates into an extra $100 million for public schools. Senate Majority Leader Diane Rosenbaum said that means about 40 percent of the increased revenues will be dedicated to the K-12 budget. House Republican Leader Mike McLane, of Powell Butte, said while the revenue forecast was a sign the state’s economy was on

in graduation is dependent upon future conduct violations between now and the end of the school year.” In other words, if the suspended students cause any more trouble, they could be barred from walking, Stanton said. The food fight alone isn’t enough to trigger that

consequence. The district is continuing to investigate the food fight. Officials are looking for students who started or intentionally prolonged the chaos. They’re not sure how many more may have been involved. “It’s really hard to know because there were some

who were directly involved and some were caught in the crossfire,” Stanton said. It is clear that not everyone in the cafeteria wanted to be part of the food fight, she said. Afterward, at least five students came up to the custodian and offered to help clean up the mess.

the upswing, Democrats in the Legislature have been underfunding schools despite the additional revenue. In March, Democrats and Republicans butted heads over the education budget, with Republicans saying the state had plenty of money but that Democrats weren’t making education a high enough priority. “The Legislature doesn’t have a revenue problem, it has a leadership and priorities problem,” McLane said. “Oregon taxpayers know how to spend their money better than we do,” he added.

Despite the rosy outlook, news of the tax rebate drew chants and protests from students sitting in the committee hearing who wanted the money to be siphoned back into higher education. Shouting “the kicker has got to go,” a handful of protesters were escorted from the room, but kept up their chants outside the doors while economists continued with their report. A spokesman for the Oregon State Police said they arrested 10 people and charged them with interfering with legislative operations.

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“I was hoping this experience, and my friends seeing me in this situation, will push them not to make stupid decisions,” she said. A Monroe firefighter stopped by to invite the troupe to tour the fire station after school. The boys said they couldn’t go. They had to pick up their tuxes.

Port official in gov’s race Associated Press SEATTLE — Seattle Port Commissioner Bill Bryant has quietly launched his campaign for Washington governor. A website announcing the Republican’s campaign to challenge Gov. Jay Inslee in 2016 was live Thursday. Bryant has been on the Port of Seattle Commission since 2008. He also runs an agricultural export company.

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Everett teachers OK one-day strike Herald Staff EVERETT — Teachers in the Everett School District voted Thursday to walk off the job next week. The one-day strike May 22 is to protest the Legislature’s funding of public education in Washington, as well as not upholding the voterapproved mandate for

smaller classes. Everett Public Schools is canceling school that day. High school and middle school athletic practices and competitions will be held as scheduled. The YMCA will be open for its regular before- and after-school programs. The Boys & Girls Club before- and after-school programs will be moved

to the Everett Boys & Girls Cascade Club. The Everett School District suggests parents check individual school websites for evening activities. The school year will be extended one day to make up for the May 22 closure. The last day of school is now June 17. Specific to Everett, the walkout by the teachers

Teachers are planning strikes in east Snohomish County on Friday. About 400 red-clad Monroe teachers and another 100 Sultan educators are following colleagues in other districts who already have held walkouts. They want the Legislature to pay for smaller class sizes

at all grade levels and give teachers raises and better benefits. “We just feel like it’s time for us to stand up for our students,” Monroe Education Association President Shaerie Bruton said. “We’re worried about the future of public education.” The Monroe teachers plan to hold a rally at 9:30 a.m. in the parking lot of

the Galaxy Theater. They’ll be there at 7 a.m. to collect donations for the Sky Valley and Maltby food banks. The teachers also plan to spend the morning marching and waving signs along U.S. 2. School has been canceled, but most afterschool activities will go on as planned. Sultan School District teachers plan to start

waving signs and collecting food at 8 a.m. They’ll gather at the Red Apple market in Sultan and at the Gold Bar Family Grocer. Some educators will walk six miles from Gold Bar to Sultan to symbolize the six years they’ve gone with out cost-of-living pay raises. A rally is scheduled for 11 a.m. at River Park pavilion in.... Sultan.

Republican Sutherland joins race for executive Herald staff EVERETT — Snohomish County Executive John Lovick now faces a Republican challenger in his election bid, in addition to fellow Democrat Dave Somers, chairman of the

County Council. Republican Robert Sutherland, of Granite Falls, filed paperwork with the county Elections Division on Thursday. Sutherland, 55, is a retired biochemist who has never been elected to

public office. He ran unsuccessfully against U.S. Rep. Suzan DelBene last year and came in third during the primary. Filing to run for office continues through 4 p.m. Friday.

Ballots for the primary election will be mailed in July and are due by Aug. 4. The voters’ top two candidates for each race, regardless of party, move on to the Nov. 3 general election.

Washington, Oregon to update oil spill plan Associated Press VANCOUVER — Officials in Washington and Oregon are seeking public comments as they prepare to update an oil

spill response plan for the Lower Columbia River. The plan was published in 2003. The Columbian reported the Washington Department of Ecology and the

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No evidence of crime found in fire that killed brothers Herald staff ARLINGTON — Investigators have ruled out suspicious causes in a fire that killed two brothers near Arlington in January. Detectives are wrapping up their case. There was no evidence of a crime, officials said Thursday. There was not enough information to pinpoint the

exact cause of the fire. Brian and Charles Wiley, 58 and 63, died of smoke inhalation. The Jan. 19 fire destroyed their mobile home on Club Way, near the Jordan Bridge over the South Fork Stillaguamish River. Neighbors said the brothers had lived in the home for about a decade.

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Chuck is sur vived by his

union is in opposition to proposed changes to how school districts spend levy money on salaries. “It particularly hits Everett hard,” said Jared Kink, president of the Everett Education Association. “We utilize (levy) money more than any other district for salaries,” he said. There are 1,100 teachers represented by the union.

Monroe, Sultan teachers plan walkout Friday Herald staff

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS

Tribes fight coal terminal Associated Press SEATTLE — Leaders from nine Native American tribes have urged the Army Corps of Engineers to deny permits for a proposed coal-export terminal near Bellingham. The leaders from Washington, British Columbia and Montana met in Seattle on Thursday to oppose the Gateway Pacific Terminal at Cherry Point. That project would export as much as 48 million tons of coal each year from Montana and Wyoming to Asia. The Lummi Nation and others say the project would disrupt treaty-protected fishing rights and harm sacred sites. Bob Watters with project developer SSA Marine said the tribe has refused to participate in the federal environmental review and he urged the corps to continue its work. The corps is reviewing the environmental impacts of the project, while state and local regulators also doing a review. The tribes include the Lummi, Lower Elwha, Quinault, Yakama, Tulalip and Swinomish.

Charles “Chuck” Hamel Charles “Chuck” Hamel,

84, passed unexpectedly, in his sleep, following his usual hearty breakfast on April 9, 2015, under the watchful care of the wonderful staff of the Marysville Care Center. Though Chuck had the beginnings of Parkinson’s and Lewy Body Disease, he very fortunately had no pain. He was able to thoroughly enjoy his many visitors from all over the country. Chuck was born July 12, 1930, one of four children of Charles E. and Blanche Hamel, and raised in Watertown, Conn., number 18 of 35 first cousins. A s a yo u n g B oy s ’ S c o u t during World War II, in 1942-43 Chuck volunteered to take the late shift “watching the skies” for any foreign planes. In 1944 he earned a scholarship in Assumption Prep School in Worcester, Massachusetts. Days after graduation from Assumption in 1949, Chuck was on the Queen Mar y heading for the Universite de Montpellier, France. His family spoke Canadian French, but Chuck with an eye for the Foreign Service wanted to learn Parisian French. He served his military duty with the Military Intelligence Unit personally detached to the Second French Army Headquarters in Koblenz, Germany, translating the Allied Defense Plans for our American Generals. Between 1953 and 1955, following his military service, he was selected as Administrative of ficer for the Of fShore Procurement Program at the U.S. Embassy in Brussels, Belgium. In the fall of 1955, Chuck left Europe to begin graduate work at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. majoring in Foreign Trade. As a student he was employed by U.S. Senators Hubert Humphrey, Ralph Yarborough, and Senate Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson. Fro m 19 5 8 to 19 6 0 h e served as the youngest Administrative Assistant in the U.S. Senate to his own Senator Thomas J. Dodd of Connecticut. Fro m 19 6 0 to 19 6 9 h e was Vice President of Universal Shipping Co. as a tanker and vessel broker. From 1969 to 1972 he became Executive Assistant to his Prep School roommate, M i ke G r ave l , t h e n a U. S . Senator from the State of Alaska. I n 197 2 C h u c k l e f t t h e Senate to form his own businesses Charles Hamel & Associates, Intersea Shipping Inc., and Intersea Inc. as a cargo broker, a super tanker broker, an independent oil and shipping broker in joint venture with Geostock (Shell, BP, Elf and Total) for underground oil terminal design and construction. It was during this time that he began shipping oil with an independent oil company in Bar tlesville, Oklahoma, and an independent shipping company in New York City. And as they say, “the rest is histor y,” with hundreds of ar ticles in all the major newspapers covering the consortium of Alyeska (Exxon, British Petroleum, and ARCO) attempting to put Chuck out of business because he was able to deliver oil and make a good profit at nearly half the price of the big three. Please refer to Eric Stevick’s outstanding front page articles entitled “Businessman was a master at forcing big change” in the Wednesday, May 6, 2015, edition of The Herald for the full story of Mr. Hamel’s efforts. C h u c k wa s p r e c e d e d i n death by his mother, at age 94, and father; older brothers, Joe and Leo; and little s i s t e r, C l a u d e t t e M i c k e t w h o m h e a d o r e d , a n d by many cousins.

loving wife and dedicated p a r t n e r fo r 37 wo n d e r f u l years, Kathy; by three sons, James Alan, Charles David, and Jonathan Alexis Hamel; two grandchildren, Jennifer and Patrick (Stephanie) Hamel; and five great grandchildren, Clifford, Nico, Johnny, J o c e l y n , a n d P r e s to n Charles Hamel. A celebration of his life will take place this Sunday, May 17, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. at the Marysville United Methodist Church, 5600 - 64th Street, N.E. in Marysville. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Marysville United Methodist Church, 5600 64th Street, N.E. Marysville, WA 98270 in memory of Charles Hamel.

Shirley Jean Swindoll Shirley Jean Swindoll, 79, passed away May 9, 2015 in Everett, Wash. She was born on March 22, 1936 in Holly Springs, Miss. to Elva and Katie McMinn. Shirley was preceded in death by her husband, Roy A. Swindoll; her son, Clay Swindoll; and both of her parents. She is sur vived by three s o n s ; To n y S w i n d o l l o f S n o h o m i s h , Wa s h . , L a r r y Swindoll of Mill Creek, Wash. and Jim Swindoll of Anaconda, Mont.; also eight g r a n d c h i l d r e n , 14 g r e a t grandchildren, and one great-great grandchild.

Brian M. Johnson

May 15, 1971- August 3, 2014 Happy Birthday, Son. It’s been nine months since that tragic accident. We miss you and think about you every day. Life will never be the same. Love, Mom & Dad -Art and Cathy Johnson-

David Nathaniel Hanson

July 5, 1936 - May 10, 2015 David Hanson, 78, passed away at his home on Camano Island, Wash. on May 10, 2015, af ter suf fering several years of i l l n e s s e s m ay h e r e s t i n peace. D ave i s s u r v i ve d by h i s wife of 55 years, Shirley; daughters, Renee, Kimberley and Jennifer; granddaughter, Stephanie; grandsons, Austin, Justin and Brandon; great grandsons, Sean, Logan and Mason. Memorial services will be held at Peace Lutheran Church in Silvana, WA on Saturday, May 16, 2015 at 1 o’clock.

Eleanor Ann Schulz

Nov. 25, 1933-March 23, 2015 Eleanor Ann Schulz, long time resident of Lynnwood, Wash., lost her battle with lung cancer on March 23, 2015. A celebration of life will be held Sunday, May 17, 2015 from 2-5 p.m. at the E d m o n d s S e n i o r C e n t e r. Burial service will be at the Tahoma National Cemetery on May 18, 2015 at 11 a.m.


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 A7

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS Wanda Ruth Holscher

Hermann Ernst Wild, 78, passed away May 12, 2015. Hermann was born March 4, 19 37 to Herm a n n M a r t i n Wilhelm Wild and Ilse Dempsey Wild who immigrated from Germany. Hermann went to Masonic Homes in Elizabethtown, Pa. until 1955. He graduated from high school in 1956 in Philadelphia, Pa. In 1956 he enlisted in the US Air Force. During his eight years he ser ved in El Paso, Texas, Cheyenne W yo., Okinawa, P l a t t s b u r g h , N . Y. a n d Spokane, Wash. Hermann met and married Marjorie Pedersen Wild of Spokane on May 10, 1963. H e g r a d u a te d f ro m E W U, Cheney, Wash. in 1970 and went on to teach Social Studies in Mount Vernon, Wa s h . 1 97 0 - 1 9 9 9 . H e enjoyed teaching the 7th and 8th graders and they e n j oye d h i s h u m o r w h i l e learning. Hermann was passionate about sports cars, airports and sailboats, in addition to his beloved family and their activities - family road trips, sailing vacations and sailboat races. He grew up with a love of classical music which he encouraged his children to appreciate as well. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie Pedersen Wild; his children, Marjorie Kristine Wild, Martin Hermann Wild (Anne), and Susan Kimberly Edmundson (Chris); grandchildren, Gabrielle, Annaleise, Joshua, Brian, Andrew, Gunnar, Sierra, and Ky l i e ; a n d o n e s i s t e r, B a r b a r a W i l d We i s s e r o f Richboro, Pa. Hermann is predeceased by his parents. He will be long remembered and greatly missed but confident of his joy of his reunion with his family and his savior Jesus Christ. A memorial service will be Monday, May 18, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. at Gilbertson Funeral Chapel, Stanwood. Donations in lieu of flowers may be made in Hermann’s name to help fund research to the Alzheimer’s Association on his memorial page at www.alz.org or by calling (800) 272-3900. Arrangements under the direction of Gilbertson Funeral Home, Stanwood.

Max William Engfer Max William Engfer peacefully passed away with family surrounding him on A p r i l 2 8 , 2 01 5 a t Wa r m Beach/Stanwood, after his battle with cancer. Max was born to Max Otto & Alice Adell (Johnson) E n g f e r, J u l y 1 , 1 9 4 2 i n To l e d o , W a s h . , l i v e d i n Orting, Ashford, and Tacoma, were he graduated from Lincoln High in 1960. Soon after he joined the Air Force and served from 1960 to 1967 and was stationed at Fairchild AFB, where he met and married Katy Jensen, and were blessed with a son, Bobby. After leaving AF he moved to Everett to work for Boeing, later to marry Linda Meade and her two daughters Candy & Shellie, and they were blessed with a daughter Melissa Ardell (Missy). After a Boeing layoff t h ey m ove d to P a c k wo o d were he worked for Mt Adam L u m b e r ( 7 0 - 71 ) . A f t e r i t burned he was a Police reserve for Morton P.D. Max retired from Boeing after 24 yrs. Max loved fishing, hunting, the beach, BBQing, racing cars, and most of all, he never missed his Seahawks’ & Mariners’ games. We called him Coach “Engfer.” M a x c o l l e c t e d Yo s e m i t e Sam’s, Eagles and anything Seahawks. Max loved his family, he leaves behind his wife Jean and her daughters, Amy ( To m ) H a r r i s ( t w o b o y s ) , Amber (Dave) Escalante (two boys); his son, Bobby (Ann); his daughters, Candy (Dennis) (three boys), Shellie (four girls/one boy), Melissa (troy) (one boy). Max was preceded in death by his parents; as well as his and Linda’s baby girl, Sue Marie; and his faithful dog Sucki. We are have a Celebration of his Life on May 16, 2015 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at his house 10230 59th Dr NE, Marysville, Wa 98270. Please come in Seahawks or Mariner attire and with memories to share. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Providence General Foundation, P.O. Box 1067 Everett, Wa, 98206 or go to www.prov.org/everett.

Grace E. Norris

Nov. 27, 1941-May 2, 2015

In Memory of

Dorothy J. Adkins A gathering of friends and family will be held to honor the memor y of Dorothy J. Adkins on Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., at 1628 10th Street, Marysville, WA. Dorothy passed away on February 27, 2015. Please join us as we come together to remember Dorothy and celebrate her life.

Grace Norris passed away on May 2, 2015 at Providence Hospital. She was preceded in death by her sister, Ruth (Herman) Armstrong. S h e i s s u r v i ve d by h e r husband of 43 years, Dave Norris; daughter, Kimberly Struble; sisters, Patsy (Jerry) Belford, Shirley (Gar y deceased) Fulk, sister-in-law, Billie Bockwinkle; daughteri n - l aw, C a t h e r i n e ( M a r k ) Wark; grandchildren, Erin (John) Middlemist, Cory ( R o z a n a ) K i e f fe r, S h a w n Kieffer; also several nieces and nephews. At her request there will be no services. A get together of family and friends at the river is in the near future. (“Love you Mom”, Kim) Thanks to the Everett Providence CCU for the care and comfort she received.

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Jenny Louise Smith

Floyd Wayne Gregory

Floyd was born in Hasty, Arkansas on January 6, 1944 and was taken home to Heaven after a courageous battle with brain cancer on May 10, 2015 at the age of 71. Floyd was the sixth of 13 children born to Delbert and Ona Mae Gregory. He is survived by his son, David and Ellie Gregory and their two daughters, Trinity and Alexa whom he loved ve r y m u c h ; h i s d a u g h te r, Sandra (Naneo) and Todd Ruthruf f and their two children, Sierra and Dylan. Floyd is also sur vived by sisters, Edith (Kido) and Roy Moore, Peggy Gregory, Judy Engen, Mary Putney, Kathy a n d To m S to r y a n d Pa t t y and Mike Hale. He is sur v i ved by hi s b rother s: Don Gregor y, Bill and Lisa Gregory, Ken Gregory, John Gregor y, Bob Gregor y and D ave G r e g o r y ; a n d m a ny nieces and nephews. Af ter Floyd retired he volunteered at The “ Vo l u n t e e r s o f A m e r i c a ” Food Bank in Everett for 14 years where he had a lot of friends. He was loved by so many! The family would like to thank Hospice for the wonder ful suppor t they provided to Floyd and our family. We would also like to thank the amazing and wonder ful caregivers at “Summer Breeze Haven” for the love, respect and kindness they showed Floyd and his family these past 4 months. We couldn’t have asked for better care for him! We will all miss you Floyd! There will be a graveside ser vice on Saturday, May 16, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. at Restlawn Cemeter y in Robert I. Adams Edmonds, WA. A celebration Aug. 12, 1929 - March 28, 2015 o f h i s l i fe w i l l fo l l o w a t Canyon Creek Church 1122 R o b e r t “ U n c l e B o b b y ” 75th St. SW, Everett, WA A d a m s o f K e t t l e F a l l s , until 3:00 p.m. Washington passed away on March 28, 2015 at the age of 85. A celebration of his life will be held from 12-3 p.m. at The Maltby Community Club, 871 1 2 0 6 t h S t S E , Snohomish, Washington on Sunday, May 17, 2015. It will be a potluck, so please bring a dish. J e n ny L o u i s e S m i t h 91, passed away May 12, 2015. Born August 4, 1923 in Lakewood, Wash. daughter of George and Augusta Gregersen, she graduated from Arlington HS in 1941. She met her husband at a USO dance in For t Lewis, Wash. and married Bennett A. Smith on August 8, 1942. They lived in Kapowsin, then resided in Everett, Wash. She retired af ter 30 plus years from Bethany Home. J e n ny w a s p r e c e d e d i n death by husband, Ben; as well as siblings, Miller, Paul, Edna and Gladys. She is survived by brothers, Carl Gregersen, Roy Gregersen and Ar t Jewell; daughters, Sandra Markle, Cheryl Smith, Linda Moulton; and grandchildren, Cathy, Stacy, Pauline, Paula, Rone, Corrine, Brent, Ben a n d M a t t h e w, 1 2 g r e a t grandchildren, and four great-great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Jenny enjoyed camping and fishing with family on the Nor th Sky and Sekiu with Miller. There were many fond memories of traveling with Roy, Irene, Edna and GG. She always looked forward to her time with family and friends. There will be No memorial service. In lieu of flowers please donate to your local hospice.

Ray Dean Chaffee USAF MSGT RET Ray was born November 4, 1927 in Hamlin, Kansas. He passed away from P u l m o n a r y F i b ro s i s i n a Seattle Hospital with family at his side on May 6, 2015. He entered Heaven and Jesus his personal Lord and Savior said “Welcome Home my Good and Faithful Servant, Great is your Reward.” Ray was the only child of Austin and Viola Chaffee and graduated from Denton High School, Denton, Kansas in 1945. Ray married the love of his life, Miriam R. M c Ke r i c h e r o n A p r i l 2 0 , 1952 in San Anselmo, Calif. Ray ser ved 22 year s and r et i r e d f ro m t h e U S A F i n 1967. He then worked 26 years at Boeing as a supervisor in Flight Simulators and retired in 1993. He was the ultimate H u s b a n d a n d D a d d y, t h e most humble, patient and caring man one could know. R ay wa s a l way s a ve r y active church member, both in leadership and many Church building programs through the years. He was preceded in death by his son, Stuart Wayne. He is survived by his wife o f 6 3 ye a r s , M i r i a m ; h i s children, Deborah Chaffee, S u s a n ( M o n t e ) To n t z , d a u g h t e r- i n - l aw, P a t r i c i a Chaffee, and David (Loretta) Chaffee; also six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Till we meet again on that Glorious Day in Heaven. A Celebration of Life Service will be held on May 16, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. at Arlington 1st Baptist Church, 426 N. French Ave, Arlington, WA 98223.

“Please sign the Guest Book at www.heraldnet.com/ obituaries” indicates that an online Guest Book has been established under the name of the deceased. This will allow friends and family to express condolences and share memories. All entries are at no cost. 1226058

Marjorie Christensen Marjorie Christensen p a s s e d o n M ay 2 , 2 015 . She was born in July, 1921. A Memorial ser vice will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, May 16, 2015 at Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home 804 State, Marysville.

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Brian S. Ahlborn, 63, passed away on April 23, 2015 at home. He was born April 23, 1952, in Chicago, Ill. the son of Frances Tucker and Steven Ahlborn. A graduate of DeVr y Institute of Technology in Chicago, Brian worked for Automatic Electric/GTE and transferred to Seattle, Wash. in 1978 as a Project Engineer retiring at age 49 f ro m Ve r i z o n a s a S a l e s Engineering Manager. He was a member of the Pioneers Club, Stock Club and Pantera Owners Club of America. Brian was an enthusiast of fine a u to m o b i l e s . H i s a r t i s t i c talent led to creative cards enjoyed by many. He spent t i m e w i t h h i s s te p fa t h e r, C h e s t e r Tu c k e r o n t h e i r m o d e l t r a i n h o b by. B r i a n enjoyed life on the Island with his companion Samantha. He was preceded in death b y h i s p a r e n t s , Fr a n c e s Tucker, Steven Ahlborn, and stepfather, Chester Tucker. Brian is sur vived by his aunt, Lillian Nowakowski; many cousins; and companion, Samantha Acheson. Memorial donations can be made to the charity of your choice. A Ser vice will be held at 1:00 p.m., Monday, May 18, 2 015 a t t h e E ve r g r e e n Funeral Home, 4504 B ro a d way, E ve r et t , WA 98203.

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Wanda Ruth Holscher, 87, of Lake Stevens Washington, passed on to heaven with her family at her side, on Saturday May 2, 2015 while in hospice care at Everett Providence Hospital. She was born July 23, 1927 in Custer, South Dakota while her family traveled the west working. Wanda and family grew up in Emporia Kansas. After completing her schooling she was working at the Emporia Bus Depot when she met Leo Rober t Holscher as he was returning from the war. They m a r r i e d o n O c t o b e r 17 , 1947 and lived in Wichita, Kansas for most of the next 20 years, where they raised two sons and two daughters. In June of 1967, Wanda, Leo and the kids moved to Lake Stevens, Washington where Leo had taken a job at the then new Everett B o e i n g 747 P l a n t . S h e worked for Dant & Russell Expor t in Everett for many years and Seattle Snohomish Mill until retirement. Over the years she enjoyed her flower gardens, canning and freezing fresh ve g e t a b l e s . H e r a n d L e o were accomplished square dancers, and she was a member of the Mar ysville C h u rc h o f t h e N a z a r e n e . However, her passion in life was her children and watching her grandchildren and great grandchildren grow up. She attended their school and sporting events and especially looked forward to holidays and each of their special events. Wanda is preceded in d e a t h by h e r f a t h e r a n d mother, Frank & Zona Knapp of Emporia Kansas; two brothers and three sisters. She is sur vived by her husband of 68 years, Leo Rober t Holscher, of Lake Stevens Wash.; an older sister, Evelyn Ball of Nampa Idaho, and a younger sister Janice Wright of Frankfor t Kansas; her sons Gary { Ka t hy } o f Ya k i m a , Ro n o f Mar ysville, and daughters Linda Broome {Dean} and Carol Broome {Dave} both of Lake Stevens. She had nine grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. A special thanks to the caring and compassionate nursing staf f and hospice care at the Everett Providence Hospital, Colby campus. A family graveside service will be held this week, and a Memorial Service will take place on Saturday, May 16, 2 01 5 , a t 2 p . m . , a t t h e M a r y s v i l l e C h u rc h o f t h e Nazarene, 8240 64th Street NE, Marysville, WA 98270, 360-659-4629.

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Nation & World A8

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FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

Jeb Bush on Iraq invasion “I would have not engaged. I would not have gone into Iraq,” the likely candidate says. Associated Press TEMPE, Ariz. — After days of refusing to say whether, with the benefit of hindsight, he would have ordered the invasion of Iraq in 2003, Jeb Bush relented Thursday and said he would not have invaded. “If we’re all supposed to answer hypothetical questions, knowing what we know now, what would you have done?” Bush said with a twinge of annoyance while campaigning in Arizona. “I would have not engaged. I would not have gone into Iraq.” It was an answer the former Florida governor and likely

Republican candidate for president had refused to give in several public appearances this week, even as most of his GOP rivals did so and criticized him for sidestepping the question. Bush said Thursday his resistance was caused both by loyalty to his older brother, George W. Bush, who ordered the invasion as president, and to the families of those lost in the decade-long war. “I don’t go out of my way to disagree with my brother,” Bush said when asked about the shift. “I am loyal to him.” That loyalty could cast a shadow over Bush’s all-butcertain presidential bid, where his family name is both his strongest political asset and liability. He would become the third member of his family to serve as president should he follow his father and brother to the White House.

The Iraq war is among the most defining aspects of George W. Bush’s presidency. More than 4,400 U.S. service personnel died, with many more severely wounded, in a war that cost at least $1.7 trillion and was justified by faulty intelligence that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. None were ever found. The upcoming presidential contest will likely yield other moments when Bush is asked uncomfortable questions about his brother’s time in office. Among them: the No Child Left Behind education law and the federal government’s response to Hurricane Katrina. Bush said he had not spoken to his brother before talking about Iraq on Thursday, but said the U.S. needs “to reengage (in Iraq), and do it in a more forceful way.” Bush and

other Republicans in the presidential mix often argue that President Barack Obama erred by so completely withdrawing U.S. forces from Iraq in 2011. Obama has sent 4,200 military trainers and advisers back into the country to help the Iraqi military fight Islamic State militants, and the next president is sure to face ongoing issues of stability there and elsewhere in the Middle East. As Bush struggled this week to address the issue, several Republican presidential prospects said definitively they would not have invaded Iraq based on information known today. They include Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former technology executive Carly Fiorina, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and 2012 presidential candidate Rick Santorum.

Train sped up before curve The Washington Post PHILADELPHIA — The Amtrak train that derailed Tuesday sped up from 70 mph to more than 100 mph about a minute before derailing at a curve, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday. There was no explanation for that acceleration, but the train’s engineer has agreed to be interviewed by federal investigators. Investigators on Thursday pieced together the train’s final seconds — particularly why it hurtled into a curved section of track at 102 miles per hour when the posted maximum speed for the bend is less than half that. Although the engineer slammed on the emergency brakes, it was not soon enough and the Washington-to-New York train careened off the rails into a jumble of wrenched metal, blown-out windows and bloodied survivors. NTSB member Robert Sumwalt said the train’s forward-looking camera revealed that it was traveling at 70 mph 65 seconds before the derailment. Twelve seconds later it bumped up to 80 mph, the authorized maximum in the stretch of track before the curve. Twelve seconds after that it jumped to 90 mph, and 16 seconds later it accelerated to 100 mph. “Is that a rapid acceleration?” Sumwalt said. “I think that’s a subjective characterization. ... I just lay the figures out there, let them stand on their own.” A few seconds into the turn, “We could see the train tilting approximately 10 degrees to the right,” he said, “and then the recording went blank.”

Russ Feingold to run for Senate again WASHINGTON — Former Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold announced Thursday he will run for his old Wisconsin seat. “Today, I’m pleased to announce that I’m planning to run for the United States Senate in 2016,” Feingold said. Feingold, a three-term senator, was ousted in the 2010 Republican wave by now-Sen. Ron Johnson. His announcement that he will run to reclaim his old seat comes as no surprise — he has hinted at his plans and Wisconsin Democrats have long said they expected him to run. No other Democrat is expected to run for the seat.

Pennsylvania: Derailment State and city officials said 13 cars that derailed on a Pittsburgh freight train were empty and nobody was injured. The city’s director of operations said the 13 cars derailed shortly after 10 a.m. Thursday. Allegheny Valley Railroad officials confirmed the train is theirs but declined to comment further. The cars tipped over in the city’s Hazelwood section.

N. York: Amish girls’ rape An upstate New York couple will spend the rest of their lives in federal prison after pleading guilty to the kidnapping and sexual assault of two young Amish girls near Syracuse last year, law enforcement officials said Thursday. Stephen Howells, 39, and Nicole Vaisey, 25, have pleaded guilty to kidnapping, sexual exploitation and possession of child pornography, the St. Lawrence County district attorney said. After the girls were abducted, authorities scrambled to issue an Amber Alert but were unable to release photos to the media because most Amish shun modern technology.

Missouri: Leader resigns

MEL EVANS / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Investigators on Thursday stand on tracks at the scene of the deadly train derailment in Philadelphia.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Train engineer Brandon Bostian works as a conductor in 2007.

There were conflicting reports Thursday on how forthcoming the train’s engineer, Brandon Bostian, 32, had been when interviewed by police after the derailment. But Sumwalt said Bostian had agreed to speak with investigators in coming days. In such cases, Sumwalt said

he preferred to start off posing no questions, but rather presenting witnesses a figurative “blank sheet of paper, and allow them to paint us a picture of what they recall.” “And then we’ll start asking questions,” he said. Bostian’s lawyer, Robert Goggin, told ABC News that his client suffered a concussion and has no memory of the final few seconds before the accident that killed eight people and injured more than 200. He said Bostian was not under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and his cellphone was off and stored in a bag — per regulations. He also said Bostian consented to give a blood sample to authorities. “As a result of his concussion, he has absolutely no recollection whatsoever of the events,” Goggin said. He said he believes the engineer’s memory may return once the head injury subsides.

Meanwhile, as a cadaversniffing dog found an eighth victim beneath the twisted wreckage of the Amtrak train Thursday, attention turned to a missing safety system that would have prevented the accident. Though investigators continued to pursue multiple angles before concluding what caused an engine and seven passenger cars to bolt the track, there was tacit agreement that excessive speed was the primary culprit. The antidote to that problem — mandated by Congress to be installed by the end of this year — is a system called positive train control. “It would prevent the very type of an accident that we’re dealing with here,” said Sumwalt, who has been coordinating his agency’s efforts . “Had it been installed it would have prevented this accident,” Amtrak President Joseph Boardman said.

Drone puts White House on lockdown Associated Press WASHINGTON — The U.S. Secret Service apprehended a man who was flying a small drone Thursday afternoon in a park outside the White House, a violation of federal aviation rules. Secret Service spokesman Brian Leary said the drone, about the size of an iPad, was flying at about 100 feet over Lafayette Park, which is just across Pennsylvania Avenue from the north fence of the White House. Leary said the operator was detained and asked to land the device. He said the man complied and that the officers recovered the drone in the park. The Washington Metropolitan Police Department swept the drone and declared it safe. Leary said the man was

ACROSS THE U.S.

U.S. SECRET SERVICE

What appears to be a Parrot BeBop drone is seen in Lafayette Park across from the White House on Thursday.

turned over to the U.S. Park Police. The incident occurred shortly after 1 p.m. and placed the White House on lockdown for more than an hour. President Barack Obama was away at the time, hosting a meeting with Persian Gulf leaders in the Maryland presidential retreat

of Camp David. From a photograph released by the Secret Service, the drone appeared to be a Parrot BeBop drone, which is equipped with a high-definition camera for capturing video and photographs and is sold commercially for between $500 and $900.

The drone can stream images back to its remote controller over a wireless connection, allowing it to be flown for up to 11 minutes at speeds up to 45 miles per hour even outside the operator’s field of vision. Its engines are powerful enough to carry just under one-half pound of extra equipment. The incident occurred just one day after the Federal Aviation Administration launched an information campaign to remind the public that Washington and communities within a 15-mile radius of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport are part of a “No Drone Zone.” Those rules were adopted after the Sept. 11 attacks. “Anyone visiting the D.C. area should leave their drone at home,” FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said Wednesday.

State House Speaker John Diehl said Thursday he is resigning from the Legislature after acknowledging that he exchanged sexually suggestive text messages with a college student serving as a Capitol intern. Diehl said he is stepping down both from his House speaker’s position and from his elected job as a Republican representative from suburban St. Louis. Diehl’s resignation is expected to become official Friday, when a successor can take over. Diehl acknowledged “making a serious error in judgment by sending the text messages.”

Massachusetts: Gun Bible Police executing a search warrant at a drug suspect’s home said they found a gun inside a hollowed-out Bible on his nightstand. Police said an officer involved in Wednesday night’s raid in Springfield opened the Bible and found the pages had been cut out to make room for a 9mm Smith & Wesson semi-automatic handgun and a clip containing 10 rounds of ammunition. Police said they also found cocaine packaged for sale, scales, cash and other drug paraphernalia in Jimmie James’ apartment.

AROUND THE WORLD Israel: Expelling migrants As Europe struggles to stem a spring flood of migrants from Africa and the Middle East trying to cross a deadly Mediterranean Sea, Israel has begun to toughen its stance toward refugees, telling unwanted Africans here they must leave now or face an indefinite stay in prison. Authorities are sending letters to the first of 45,000 Eritrean and Sudanese refugees, informing them they have 30 days to accept Israel’s offer of $3,500 in cash and a one-way ticket home or to an unnamed third country in Africa, or face incarceration at Saharonim prison.

Nepal: Search for chopper The search for a helicopter from Camp Pendleton carrying six Marines and two Nepalese soldiers will enter its third day Friday, military officials said. The Marine helicopter was on a disaster relief mission in a rugged, mountainous area near Charikot on Tuesday when it disappeared without sending any message indicating trouble. The search for the UH-1Y Huey involves U.S., Indian and Nepalese aircraft. Also assisting are Nepalese ground troops, a specialforces platoon and a battalion-size unit, officials said. The missing Huey is from Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469 in California. From Herald news services


Herald Business Journal A9

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THE DAILY HERALD

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FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

Awards honor business leaders Senior Aerospace CEO and former PUD executive are recognized at Alliance Snohomish County meeting. By Jim Davis The Herald Business Journal

TULALIP — The CEO and president of Arlington’s Senior Aerospace won recognition Thursday for his success in business and community involvement in Snohomish County. Jerry Goodwin received the John M. Fluke Sr. Community Leader award at the Economic

Alliance Snohomish County’s annual meeting at the Tulalip Resort Casino. “We’re all leaders here in Snohomish County and I truly believe that it is important that we all lead by example,” Goodwin told the crowd of several hundred. “And ensure our county and region thrives during good times and also during very difficult times.” Steve Klein, who retired earlier this month as the general manager and CEO of Snohomish County PUD, was given the Henry M. Jackson Citizen of the Year Award. Also honored at the luncheon were Phil Bannan Sr., the owner

of Scuttlebutt Brewing, and David Beyer, president of Everett Community College. Bannan received The Herald Business Journal’s Entrepreneur of the Year award and Beyer won the paper’s Executive of the Year award. Goodwin was praised for his entrepreneural approach to bringing together Aerospace Manufacturing Technologies, Damar Aerosystems and Absolute Manufacturing under the umbrella of Senior Aerospace. He also served as United Way of Snohomish County’s campaign chair. More than 600 employees for his companies volunteer hundreds of hours of service each

year. After the Oso disaster, employees were deployed to gather and deliver supplies and helped open an emergency family resource center. During his speech, Goodwin said other parts of the world want the work that is being done in Snohomish County. He said that means that leaders at the luncheon need to make sure they do everything they can to keep the area competitive into the future. “I’m born and raised here and I want to make sure this area thrives into the future ...” Goodwin said. “Let’s make sure we’re naturally competitive in this area See HONORS, Page A10

Arctic rig arrives in Seattle Associated Press SEATTLE — The arrival in Seattle Thursday of an oil rig Royal Dutch Shell is outfitting for oil exploration in the remote Arctic Ocean marks a pivotal moment for an environmental movement increasingly mobilized around climate change. Activists paddling out in kayaks to meet the rig off Seattle’s waterfront said it’s their moment to stand against opening a new frontier of fossil fuel exploration. “Unless people get out there and put themselves on the front lines and say enough is enough, then nothing will ever change,” said Jordan Van Voast, 55, an acupuncturist who was going out on the water to confront the Polar Pioneer. “I’m hopeful that people are waking up.” A few people sit in tiny plastic boats, dwarfed by a 400-foot-long structure rising nearly 300 feet above the water. The image suggests how outmatched Shell’s opponents have been as they try to keep the petroleum giant from continuing its $6 billion effort to open new oil and gas reserves in one of the world’s most dangerous maritime environments. But environmental groups in the Pacific Northwest are sensing a shift in the politics that surround energy production, and have mobilized against a series of projects that would transform the region into a gateway for crude oil and coal exports to Asia. “These proposals have woken a sleeping giant in the Northwest,” said Eric de Place, policy director for Sightline Institute, a liberal Seattle think tank. “It has unleashed this very robust opposition movement.”

ELAINE THOMPSON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Washington state ferry sails in view of the oil drilling rig Polar Pioneer as the rig is towed toward a dock Thursday in Seattle.

Shell still needs other permits from state and federal agencies, including one to actually drill offshore in the Arctic and another to dispose of wastewater. But it’s moving ahead meanwhile, using the Port of Seattle to load drilling rigs and a fleet of support vessels with supplies and personnel before spending the brief Arctic summer in the Chukchi Sea, which stretches north from the Bering Strait between Alaska and Russia. Hurricane-force winds and 50-foot seas can quickly threaten even the sturdiest ships in the seas off Alaska. But Shell cleared a major bureaucratic hurdle Monday when the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, after taking public comments and reviewing voluminous reports, approved the multi-year

O

biz bits

Jobless claims at 15-year low, beat forecast Fewer Americans than forecast filed applications for unemployment benefits last week, pushing the average over the past month to the lowest level in 15 years and underscoring labor-market strength. Jobless claims decreased by 1,000 to 264,000 in the seven days ended May 9, a Labor Department report showed Thursday in Washington. The median forecast of 53 economists surveyed by Bloomberg projected 273,000. The fourweek average, a less volatile measure, was the lowest since April 2000. Fewer workers are being let go, a sign that demand for staffing remains robust and that a slowdown in economic growth was due to transitory factors, like bad weather and port disputes on the West Coast. Persistently low firings and greater employment gains should help wages pick up, supporting consumer spending.

Nordstrom profit below expectations

exploration plan. If exploratory drilling goes well, Shell plans to invest billions more in infrastructure to open this new frontier, building pipelines under the ocean and onto the tundra of Alaska’s north slope, along with roads, air strips and other facilities. Shell’s last effort to do exploratory drilling in the Arctic Ocean also left from Seattle, and ended badly. The Noble Discoverer and the Kulluk — a rig Shell had spent hundreds of millions of dollars to customize — were stranded by equipment failures in terrible weather, and the Coast Guard barely rescued the Kulluk’s crew. Federal investigations resulted in guilty pleas and fines for rig owner Noble Drilling. The Kulluk ended up on a scrap heap in China. Shell is leasing the

Polar Pioneer in its stead, again backed by the Noble Discoverer. But Shell says it gained has vital experience, and can safely drill on its leases in the Chukchi Sea, as well as the Beaufort Sea, an even more remote stretch north of the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge where it also has leases. Shell spokesman Curtis Smith called Monday’s approval “an important milestone and signals the confidence regulators have in our plan.” Officials in Alaska have welcomed the drilling, even flying to Seattle this week to lobby for Shell’s plan. Labor groups representing port workers noted that Foss Maritime is employing more than 400 people already to service the Shell fleet. See ARCTIC, Page A10

We can’t trust the economy to an algorithm n May 1, John C. Williams, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, gave a speech at Chapman University in Orange, California. That wasn’t unusual, but the subject of the speech was. He spoke of the “dilemma” of the Federal Reserve’s independence and of the increasing volume of commentary recommending “…more oversight and greater transparency.” He also spoke of the Congressional response to that commentary, in the form of, “… legislative proposals designed to constrain the Fed’s freedom of action in monetary policy and other spheres.” Just 390 miles north of

BRIEFLY

JAMES McCUSKER Chapman, at Stanford University, is the author of perhaps the most popular constraint, economist John Taylor, who recommends that the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy decisions be replaced by what is essentially an algorithm. Popularly called the “Taylor Rule,” it specifies the size of the interest rate change

Everett Community College’s Veterans’ Resource Center has new carpet thanks to a donation from Rubenstein’s. The Seattle-based commercial flooring company donated more than $4,000 worth of carpet and labor, replacing worn, stained carpet that was more than two decades old in Baker Hall, rooms 203 and 204. The

needed to respond to changes in the inflation rate and productive capacity utilization. The idea of a Federal Reserve staked out and bound, Gulliverlike, by rules appeals to some members of Congress, but we have to wonder sometimes how priorities are set in our Capitol. Sometimes the Congress seems to spend a lot of its time on what psychologists call “displacement activity.” Displacement activity works very simply. When there are important things to be dealt with we sometimes prefer to spend our time and energy on easier things. Writers facing deadlines sharpen lots and lots of pencils. Managers concoct unnecessary

center serves more than 500 military veterans and active duty military personnel every quarter. Alaska USA Federal Credit Union has provided scholarships for five high school students to attend Washington Business Week. The $5,000 sponsorships will allow

students to attend one of four week-long business camps at universities across the state this summer. Students participate in small teams and complete challenges with real-life business scenarios through production, marketing, and finance competitions. The students in the Auto

meetings or even interview candidates for non-existent jobs rather than complete performance reviews. Politicians pursue issues that lack organized constituencies and are unlikely to produce political blowback. The independence of the Federal Reserve fits in that category. Congress has lots of important things to debate and thorny problems to resolve, but instead some members choose to spend time worrying about lassoing the Fed because it’s just too darned independent. In other words, the Federal Reserve doesn’t depend on Congressional approval for either its operating budget or its See MCCUSKER, Page A10

Technology program at the Sno-Isle Tech Skills Center have 19 current General Motors transmissions to work on. This is thanks to a donation that was made possible through a partnership between General Motors and the Automotive Service Educational Program at Shoreline Community College.

Nordstrom Inc. on Thursday reported fiscal first-quarter net income of $128 million. The Seattle-based company said it had profit of 66 cents per share. The results did not meet Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 15 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 71 cents per share. The department store operator posted revenue of $3.22 billion in the period, which beat Street forecasts. Ten analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $3.15 billion. Nordstrom expects full-year earnings to be $3.65 to $3.80 per share.

CEOs paid 373 times as much as workers The average CEO made 373 times what the average American worker did in 2014, according to an annual study by the AFL-CIO. While that disparity seems extreme, it is less so than the disparity that existed in 2000 when CEOs were making 525 times more than the average worker. In 2013, CEOs took home 331 times what average workers were paid. Brandon Rees, in the investment office of the AFL-CIO, said the corporate scandals of the 2000s, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the 2008 recession and the DoddFrank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 all affected CEO compensation.

Bombardier cuts 1,750 employees Bombardier confirmed Thursday it will cut more than 1,750 employees in Canada and Northern Ireland over the coming months to adjust for weak demand for some of its business jets. About 1,000 of the lost jobs will be in Montreal, where Bombardier has its main operations, while 480 are in Toronto and 280 in Belfast. Bombardier said it is reducing production of its Global 5000 and Global 6000 aircraft, the largest of its business jets, to reflect conditions in some markets such as Latin America, China and Russia. From Herald news services

Amazon . . . 432.28 N/A Boeing . . . . 147.96 2.34 Costco . . . . . 142.60 -0.64 Crane . . . . . . 62.51 1.12 FrontierCom . . 5.42 -0.04 HeritageFin . 17.33 0.31 Microsoft . . . 48.72 1.10 Nordstrom . . 74.15 -2.02 Paccar . . . . . . 66.82 0.25 Starbucks . . . 50.56 0.97 WshFederal . 22.07 0.09 Zillow . . . . . . 95.51 -0.51 Zumiez . . . . . 30.70 -0.11 Market report, A10


Market Report THE DAILY HERALD MAJOR INDEXES Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transp. NYSE Composite (DJ) Dow Jones Utilities Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 S&P MidCap Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000 NORTHWEST STOCKS Alaska Air Amazon Avista Ballard Power Barrett Business Services Boeing Columbia Banking Columbia Sportswear ConocoPhillips Costco Craft Brew Alliance Cray Data I/O Electro Scientific Industries Esterline Technologies Expeditors International FEI FLIR Systems Heritage Financial IDACORP Itron Key Technology Key Tronic Lattice Semiconductor Lithia Motors Inc. Louisiana-Pacific Mentor Graphics Micron Technologies Microsoft Microvision Nautilus Nike Nordstrom Northwest Natural Gas Northwest Pipe Outerwall Paccar Penford Plum Creek Pope Resources Precision Castparts RadiSys RealNetworks Rentrak Sarepta Therapeutics Seattle Genetics Starbucks TTM Technologies Timberland Bancorp US Bancorp Washington Federal Weyerhaeuser Zumiez

Symbol Close .dji 18,252.24 .djt 8,598.51 NYA 11,207.33 dju 579.01 .IXIC 5,050.79 .inx 2,121.10 mid 1,531.99 W5000 22,387.05 rut 1,245.11 Symbol Close ALK 66.13 AMZN 432.28 AVA 32.16 BLDP 2.19 BBSI 37.10 BA 147.96 COLB 30.51 COLM 58.08 COP 65.42 COST 142.60 BREW 10.32 CRAY 30.29 DAIO 3.10 ESIO 5.63 ESL 112.44 EXPD 47.56 FEIC 77.35 FLIR 31.92 HFWA 17.33 IDA 59.18 ITRI 36.58 KTEC 12.70 KTCC 11.73 LSCC 6.14 LAD 103.93 LPX 17.34 MENT 24.67 MU 26.69 MSFT 48.72 MVIS 3.04 NLS 21.80 NKE 103.44 JWN 74.15 NWN 44.68 NWPX 22.62 OUTR 75.93 PCAR 66.82 PENX 18.98 PCL 41.67 POPE 65.00 PCP 207.61 RSYS 2.36 RNWK 6.10 RENT 63.31 SRPT 15.32 SGEN 40.24 SBUX 50.56 TTMI 9.50 TSBK 10.47 USB 44.38 WAFD 22.07 WY 32.53 ZUMZ 30.70

Honors From Page A9

and we can prosper together.” Klein was at his daughter’s graduation from college and could not attend the luncheon Thursday. He delivered a recorded video message after receiving the Jackson award, which is named after the longtime U.S. senator from Everett. “When I came into the energy industry, Sen. Jackson was chair of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources,” Klein said. “Firsthand I saw the great accomplishments he brought about for the Northwest and the country. Also some of my most dearest friends in the industry are people

Arctic From Page A9

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has proposed tough pollution limits on state industries and raised concerns about oil trains using the state’s rails. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, for his part, is strongly against hosting Shell’s

Change 191.75 39.00 90.33 6.46 69.10 22.62 16.07 227.12 12.83 Change 1.42 5.41 0.46 0.00 1.60 2.34 0.31 1.23 0.03 -0.64 0.14 0.83 -0.10 0.08 1.84 0.52 0.37 0.12 0.31 0.85 0.77 0.04 -0.03 0.07 0.90 0.33 0.46 -0.50 1.10 0.02 0.85 1.28 -2.02 0.76 -0.08 0.03 0.25 #N/A 0.50 2.00 -0.59 0.06 0.09 1.55 0.45 0.45 0.97 0.08 -0.03 0.24 0.09 0.50 -0.11

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52-week high 18,288.63 9,310.22 11,248.99 657.17 5,119.83 2,125.92 1,543.48 22,522.83 1,278.63 52-week high 71.40 452.65 38.34 4.52 63.45 158.83 30.61 64.92 87.09 156.85 17.89 35.81 3.83 7.95 122.51 49.51 93.38 36.36 18.09 70.48 43.67 14.10 12.49 8.50 109.33 17.76 25.43 36.59 50.04 4.23 22.16 103.79 83.16 52.57 41.43 77.94 71.15 19.09 45.45 71.00 275.09 3.67 8.38 87.40 35.45 44.95 52.09 9.64 11.58 46.10 23.43 37.04 41.81

WWW.HERALDNET.COM 52-week low 15,855.12 7,700.49 9,886.08 524.82 4,044.27 1,820.66 1,269.45 19,682.83 1,040.47 52-week low 40.69 284.00 30.35 1.41 18.25 116.32 23.59 34.25 60.57 113.51 9.89 24.23 2.53 5.42 98.70 38.14 72.74 28.32 15.19 51.70 34.11 11.50 7.50 5.87 63.05 12.46 18.25 25.25 39.27 1.58 9.75 72.37 60.51 41.81 20.50 51.17 55.34 10.71 38.70 59.00 186.17 1.79 5.92 43.62 11.33 30.05 34.64 5.59 9.02 38.10 19.52 29.76 26.00

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FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

Encouraging news on the U.S. job market and inflation helped lift U.S. stocks higher Thursday, snapping a three-day slump for the Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poor’s 500 index. Associated Press

MOST ACTIVE Volume SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (SPY) 83,149,997 VelocityShares 3x Long Crude 80,432,749 Bank of America (BAC) 46,417,470 AES (AES) 45,534,417 Market Vectors Gold Miners 40,312,353 iShares MSCI Emerging Market 37,858,267 Vale ADS (VALE) 37,831,063 Williams (WMB) 36,404,525 Zynga (ZNGA) 35,785,036

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Chg 57.84 36.53 23.66 20.10 19.71

LOSERS EZchip Semiconductor (EZCH) Ducommun (DCO) Orexigen Therapeutics (OREX) ResMed (RMD) VelocityShares 3x Inverse Silver

Chg -24.17 -19.91 -15.35 -15.13 -10.74

could not attend. Beyer was chosen this year for his role in leading EvCC, which opened the new Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center last year and for his work with Washington State University in its transition taking over the University Center. Beyer thanked his wife Janelle: “When you get in positions like this, to have a partner like her is pretty amazing,” Beyer said. He also praised partnerships between the college and the people in the room. “With partnerships with all of you, with a talented faculty and staff, we make a difference and we touch a lot of lives,” Beyer said. “I’m very honored to receive this, but I’m even more pleased to say it’s about Everett Community College and the faculty, staff and students there.”

fleet, warning that the port could face daily fines because it lacks the proper permit. Those fines would amount to no more than $500 a day for the port — a tiny drop in a very large barrel if Shell, one of the world’s largest companies, manages to recover billions of gallons of oil from the Arctic Ocean. Seattle’s environmentalists, however, have a sense that their time is

now. When the Kulluk was being prepared in 2012 for Shell’s last Arctic venture, “it wasn’t this big civic moment,” recalled KC Golden, a senior policy adviser for Climate Solutions, an organization advocating for renewable energy. But “now it is,” Golden said. “That’s a measure of how the awareness has grown. I think it’s a moment for Seattle.”

WASHINGTON — A sharp drop in the cost of gasoline and food pushed down overall U.S. producer prices in April. The Labor Department said Thursday that its producer price index fell 0.4 percent last month after rising 0.2

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have dropped 1.3 percent, the most since Labor revamped the index in late 2010. Wholesale energy prices dropped 2.9 percent from March, pulled lower by a 4.7 percent drop in gasoline prices. Food prices slid 0.9 percent last month; wholesale egg prices fell 25.3 percent, the most since June 2007.

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USD $1.14 $0.81 $1.58 $0.83 $0.16 $0.01 $0.07 $0.75 $0.02 $0.02 $0.12 $1.10

buys 0.88 1.24 0.63 1.20 6.20 119.20 15.10 1.33 44.53 50.02 8.24 0.91

INTEREST RATES 30-yr jumbo 30-yr fixed 15-yr fixed 30-yr refi 15-yr refi Prime Discount Federal Funds Treasuries 3-month 5-year 10-year

Today 4.26% 3.92% 3.08% 3.98% 3.15% 3.25 0.75 0.25 last 0.01% 1.51% 3.06%

1 Month 3.96% 3.76% 2.96% 3.83% 3.04% 3.25 0.75 0.25 previous 0.01% 1.56% 3.07%

Close 59.88 3.01 2.06 1,225.20 1,162.40 17.46 2.92 133.85 514.25 -368

Change -1.02% +2.49% +0.83% +0.57% +11.60 +1.42% -0.19% -2.65% +6.80% -+1.59%

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who who worked on the staff for Sen. Jackson. It’s very meaningful to be associated with him and this award.” Earlier this spring, a PUD worker accused Klein and others of steering lucrative contracts to a private consulting firm owned by a former utility employee. That is being looked into by an independent investigator. Bannan won the Entrepreneur of the Year award for his role in creating and expanding Scuttlebutt, one of the first microbreweries in Snohomish County. The brand is sold in more than 18 states and also in Canada, Japan, Taiwan and South Korea. Scuttlebutt is undergoing a major renovation that will double the size of its downtown Everett brewery, allowing the business to produce up to 24,000 barrels of beer. Bannan was at a family reunion and also

percent in March. But even excluding volatile food and energy categories, the core index slipped 0.2 percent last month, brought down in part by lower shipping costs. The index measures prices of goods and services before they reach consumers. Over the past year, wholesale prices

A10

STOCK MARKET SUMMARY

Producer prices fall in April; food, energy costs dip Associated Press

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■ Form your own portfolio ■ Stock updates throughout the day ■ The latest news on your favorite companies

YTD (%) 2.97 2.97 3.00 1.69 2.67 7.06 0.13 3.02 2.67 4.52 5.72 2.54 3.70 8.36 1.92 1.07 1.98 3.22 5.88 4.71 2.96 3.45

1 yr 12.82 12.64 12.77 10.32 12.83 17.32 2.07 12.77 12.85 15.09 14.17 6.06 5.67 2.78 7.62 9.37 9.79 10.67 5.99 11.06 0.44 7.65

5 yr 15.00 14.93 15.06 14.44 15.01 #N/A 4.33 15.07 15.04 15.05 14.36 11.39 10.07 10.28 11.20 15.54 15.12 13.78 11.36 16.68 9.23 10.20

Exp ratio 0.05 0.17 0.05 0.31 0.04 0.98 0.46 0.04 0.02 0.64 0.66 0.57 0.59 0.64 0.18 0.91 0.52 0.59 0.77 1.32 0.64 0.17

McCusker From Page A9

monetary policies. It works both ways, of course. Congress does not depend on the Fed to finance its operations, either — at least not directly. The costs of the chronic federal deficit are very closely related to the Federal Reserve’s actions in regulating interest rates. Railing about the Fed’s independence is something of a tradition in the Congress. In fact, as Mr. Williams points out in his speech, central bank independence has been a contentious issue in our country for the past century. And since the Fed will be just 102 years old this coming December, that pretty much takes care of its entire history. We might think that legislators would still be thanking the Fed for keeping Wall Street’s lights on during the financial crash, and for quietly financing much of the government’s economic recovery efforts in the aftermath of the crisis. But that is not how politics works. The Fed is a very powerful force in the American economy and to many citizens its operations are mysterious. More likely, though our central bank’s monetary policy actions are not wrapped in mystery but in econo-speak. Generations of America’s high school and college students have had the operations of the Federal Reserve explained to them by economists — whose legendary communications skills may be why so many people neither understand nor care about the Fed or what it does. Why do some people and some legislators,

then, still care so much about what the Federal Reserve and how it’s organized? There are basically two sometimes overlapping schools of thought. The first believes that the Fed’s failures prior to the financial system crash were systemic, that it is too close to the financial institutions it regulates and is influenced by their thinking. The second believes that responsibility for monetary policy belongs in the hands of our elected representatives in Congress. Both groups want to simplify the system, some by linking the currency to gold or some other metallic standard; and some by shifting monetary policy from discretionary actions to a fixed formula. Then there are those of us who believe that our sleep-walking economy and dreary employment picture encourage unfair criticism of the Fed’s performance. No one wants to recognize the limits of monetary policy to create prosperity. The best it can do is to encourage economic growth and hope that private individuals and industry take it from there. Right now there are too many unknowns and uncertainties in our knowledge of the economy to entrust our monetary system to an algorithm or to Congress. The wise choice, then, is to put our best people in position and let them make the decisions that are necessary to encourage economic growth and promote maximum employment, stable prices, and moderate long-term interest rates. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.


Opinion A11

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THE DAILY HERALD

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Move forward with trade bill We’ve shared these numbers before, but this is why this is important to Washington: Many of our jobs — 4 in 10 — are reliant on trade. As China looks to increase its trade position in the Pacific Rim it will be important for the United States to have deals in place with major trading partners around the rim, including Australia, Japan and Canada. Most Republicans in the Senate are supportive of the legislation, as have been Washington’s Democratic Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, who have expressed general support previously for Trade Promotion Authority and the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But both also joined all but one Democrat in the Senate to block debate when the issue came before the body on Tuesday. Representatives for both senators clarified

that the vote Tuesday wasn’t to kill fast-track authority but to get agreements from Republicans in the Senate to allow votes on amendments to the bill and on other traderelated issues, including an African trade agreement and customs enforcement, both of which passed the Senate on Thursday. Those intentions were made clear during a meeting Tuesday between Obama and 10 pro-trade Democratic senators, including Murray and Cantwell. Democrats had wanted one issue, currency manipulation by trading partners, to be included in the trade bill itself but settled for separate legislation on the issue. Countries that keep the value of their currency low make their exports cheaper, raising the price of American-made imports. The currency legislation may make it through

Senate and House but likely faces a veto by Obama who believes it would complicate current and future trade talks. The fast-track legislation isn’t expected to move swiftly through the Senate, particularly with the Memorial Day break approaching. Nor is its path forward assured in the House, where it faces more Democratic opposition. President Obama likely would be better served by more meetings with fellow Democrats than by picking fights with them, as he has with Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Washington state and the nation can benefit from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Adding conditions inside and outside of the Trade Promotion Authority bill can assure that the protections Americans want are included in the trade deals that follow.

controversially with a law formulated by fair-minded and knowledgeable people.

addressing the many issues why the Republican Party can’t change how it’s perceived by the majority of poor African Americans/Hispanic Americans who reside in the U.S. To quote Mr. K., “Hillary is a stationary target, you know what you are getting.” The same holds true for a Krauthammer column and the Republican party — you know what you are getting!

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ■■SHELL OIL RIG

Protesters won’t change a thing Regarding the article, “Protesters greet Shell oil-derrick ship in Everett”: It would be nice if the protesters of the oil rig Noble Discoverer would get a life of their own instead of trying to disrupt others. How do the manage to skip work to do these things? It’s a big waste of time on their part, because this is going to happen despite their efforts. This brings jobs to our area, including people who work for Foss. It will, in the long run, help the natives of Alaska. Why not just go to work, if you even have a job, and leave well enough alone? Shell has spent millions on the project already, and if you think your puny efforts will stop them, think again. Chuck Heinitz Snohomish

■■LEGISLATURE

Fulfill the law: fund education According to our state Constitution, one of our paramount duties is to support and fund education. For going on four years now, the Legislature has not fully funded education, despite the McCleary decision by the state Supreme Court that ordered them to do so. Voters statewide also approved the class size initiative this past fall. It is up to the Legislature, not citizens, to determine where the money comes from. Standardized testing, while necessary and important, sincerely needs to be reevaluated in terms of the high stakes attached to them. Since the Legislature is currently in special session, it is time to send a stronger message that we are united in supporting our students’ right to a better education. In addition, teachers are the only state employees who have not received a COLA for six years. In light of the Legislature earning an 11.2 percent raise for all the hard work they do, I hope they remember that others work just as hard serving young citizens. One of the many things I appreciate about my district is the letter they wrote to parents about a potential walkout, clearly explaining the issues and that the purpose of the walkout is not to protest against the district, but rather the Legislature for not fully funding education. The letter encouraged everyone who wants to have a say to contact his/her state representatives, which is really what all of us, teachers and community members alike, should be doing to model democracy in action for the students we are seeking to

Have your say Include your name, address and daytime phone number. E-mail: letters@heraldnet.com Mail: Letters section The Daily Herald P.O. Box 930 Everett, WA 98206

support. Now we hope they listen and do the job voters sent them to Olympia to do. Michelle Spivey Everett Monroe teacher

■■I-594

Lawsuit revealed flaws in the law On Monday, The Herald Editorial Board chose to crow over a court’s rejection of a suit challenging I-594. (“I-594’s foes fail to show harm.”) It would have been more appropriate to address the obvious faults of the law revealed by the suit. Clearly there is something wrong with a law that the police refuse to enforce (a violation of their oath to enforce all laws) and can’t be challenged or corrected until harm is done. It is difficult to believe that I-594 could not be constructed without unenforceable provisions. Obviously the authors failed to coordinate, ignored knowledgeable input, and were inept by choice or ignorance, either of which were avoidable. Quoting the Herald, “ — the reason we have laws on the books is to help everyone understand where the lines are drawn and what is expected.” All sounds great, but I-594 certainly fails that goal. Assuring background checks of firearms purchasers in Washington can be accomplished much less

Doug Staab Everett

■■POLITICAL PARTIES

Hillary critique also goes for GOP Regarding Charles Krauthammer’s April 17 column, “Clinton can’t change how she’s perceived”: As usual, Mr. Krauthammer has exposed his ideological bias, which favors the party of the rich and well connected. According to Mr. K., the number of “conviction politicians” — those who run not to be someone (Hillary Clinton) but to do something — is exceedingly small. In our lifetime: Ronald Reagan and arguably Barack Obama, although with him (as opposed to Reagan) a heavy does of narcissistic self-fulfillment is admixed with genuine ideological conviction. Why am I not surprised that Mr. K is praising the patron saint of the Republican Party and using code language to criticize President Obama because he has demonstrated a moral conviction to help the poor and dispossessed. For the life of me I can’t understand why all the criticism of Hillary and Bill Clinton because they have amassed wealth, which is a badge of honor for the Republican Party. I will remind Mr. K that the standard bearers of the Democratic and Republican parties will represent the legacies of their respective parties. I’m more concerned with policies that address the need for a reform of the criminal “injustice system,” education, accessible/ affordable health care, employment and decent/affordable housing for the indigenous poor who are citizens in the “land of plenty.” I would welcome a column by Mr. K

Josh O’Connor, Publisher Jon Bauer, Editorial Page Editor Neal Pattison, Executive Editor Carol MacPherson, Editorial Writer

FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

IN OUR VIEW | Trade Promotion Authority

It still faces a long slog, but after a defeat on a procedural vote in the Senate earlier in the week, a trade bill that could be a major benefit to Washington state jobs appears to again be moving forward. The Senate voted Thursday to begin debate on legislation to restore Trade Promotion Authority for President Obama as the U.S. continues trade negotiations with 11 other Pacific Rim countries as part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Also called fast-track authority, the legislation allows Congress the opportunity to make clear the protections for jobs, the environment and other issues it wants to set for trade deals before negotiations wrap up. Once the deals are done, Congress gets a final say in an up-ordown vote but can’t make amendments.

Editorial Board

Faheem Siddiq Everett

■■HUMAN DIET

Indeed time to ditch the meat Charles Krauthammer’s May 8 column, “How we treat animals reflects on our humanity,” begins by asking what future generations will see as similarly abominable to human slavery, and proceeds with his contention that the answer is eating meat. I think he’s right. Remember, other animals are made of flesh, blood and bone, just like human beings are. They have the same five physiological senses that we do, and they feel pain — in the same way, and to the same degree. Most of us would agree that eating a dog or a cat is morally unconscionable, and yet there is no rational difference between eating a dog or a pig, a cat or a chicken. And yet the average American consumes about 30 of these animals every single year — most of them after a horrible life and violent death. The choice for anyone who opposes cruelty could not be more clear — a vegetarian diet. Bruce Friedrich Director of policy for Farm Sanctuary, a national farm animal protection organization Washington, D.C.

GOP should back Obama on trade bill

T

hat free trade is advantageous to both sides is the rarest of political propositions — provable, indeed mathematically. David Ricardo did so in 1817. The Law of Comparative Advantage has held up nicely for 198 years. Nor is this abstract theory. We’ve lived it. The freetrade regime created after World War II precipitated the most astonishing advance of global welfare and prosperity CHARLES the world has KRAUTHAMMER ever seen. And that regime was created, overseen, guaranteed and presided over by the United States. That era might be coming to a close, however, as Democratic congressional opposition to free trade continues to grow. On Tuesday, every Democrat in the Senate (but one) voted to block trade promotion — aka fast-track — authority for President Obama, which would give him the power to conclude the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade deal being hammered out with 11 other countries, including such key allies as Japan, Australia and Singapore. Fast-track authority allows an administration to negotiate the details of a trade agreement and then come to Congress for a non-amendable up-or-down vote. In various forms, that has been granted to every president since Franklin Roosevelt. For good reason. If the complex, detailed horse trading that is required to nail down an agreement is carried out in the open — especially with multiple parties — the deal never gets done. Like all modern presidents, Obama wants a deal. But he has utterly failed to bring his party along. It’s not just because for six years he’s treated all of Congress with disdain and prefers insult to argument when confronted with opposition, this time from Democrats like Elizabeth Warren. It’s also because he’s expended practically no political capital on the issue. The trade deal itself will likely pass the Senate eventually, there being eight or so Democrats (of 46) who support the deal but want to extract certain guarantees before fast-tracking it. (They got the guarantees and on Thursday approved debate on fast track.) The problem is the House. Very few House Democrats will vote yes. House passage will require Republican near-unanimity. And it’s not there. One group of GOP opponents are traditional protectionists of the Pat Buchanan paleoconservative school of autarky. The others are conservatives so reflexively anti-Obama that they oppose anything he proposes, especially anything that appears to give him more authority. Having opposed Obama’s constitutional usurpations on immigration, health care, criminal justice and environmental regulation, I’m deeply sympathetic to that concern. But in this case, there is no usurpation. There is no congressional forfeiture of power. Fast track has been the norm for 81 years. And the final say on any trade agreement rests entirely with Congress. As for the merits, the TPP is a boon for America. It reduces tariff barriers to vast Asian markets and strengthens protection for intellectual property, America’s forte. To be sure, any trade deal, while a net plus overall, produces winners and losers. But the TPP will be accompanied by so-called Trade Adjustment Assistance, training and subsidies to help those negatively affected. Moreover, the overall gain is more than just economic. In our deadly serious competition with China for influence in the region, the TPP would anchor our relations with Pacific Rim nations. If we walk away, they will inevitably gravitate to China’s orbit. And one final consideration. Republicans have been telling the world that decline is not a condition but a choice, and that America’s standing will be restored when U.S. policy is entrusted to geopolitically serious people. Here is the GOP’s chance to show seriousness. The Democrats, inventors of the postwar free-trade regime, have now turned against it (and their own president). This is the Republicans’ chance to demonstrate that they can think large by advancing an important strategic objective: giving substance to Obama’s “pivot to Asia.” I wouldn’t mind seeing Obama sunk by his own arrogance in intraparty fratricide over trade. But the issue is bigger than Obama. In 20 months, he will be gone. Asia will not. And it will get away from us if Republicans don’t step up and step in where Obama and the Democrats have failed. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.


A12 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

First fully warm-blooded fish discovered By Chelsea Harvey The Washington Post

It’s one of the most basic biology facts we’re taught in school growing up: Birds and mammals are warmblooded, while reptiles, amphibians and fish are cold-blooded. But new research is turning this well-known knowledge on its head with the discovery of the world’s first

YMCA From Page A1

several months. But the YMCA’s cash position is strong, with $9.3 million on the books at the end of 2014. “We can write that check,” Washburn said. The district decided to sell the Colby building and also its historic Longfellow building last year. In January, the district issued a request for letters of interest. The district estimated the Colby building and its lot are worth between

Trains From Page A1

crude travel through Snohomish County to refineries in Skagit and Whatcom counties. A spate of fiery and deadly oil train accidents the past two years has fueled lawmaker concerns about the ability of railroads to safely transport the material and the capability of communities to

warm-blooded fish — the opah. In a paper published Thursday in Science, researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration describe the unique mechanism that enables the opah, a deepwater predatory fish, to keep its body warm. The secret lies in a specially designed set of blood vessels in the fish’s

gills, which allows the fish to circulate warm blood throughout its entire body. Scientists already suspected the opah was special, says Heidi Dewar, a researcher at NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center and one of the paper’s authors. Most fish who live where the opah does — that is, hundreds of feet deep, in some of the ocean’s darkest and coldest

places — are sluggish, thanks to the low temperatures. At these depths, even predatory fish tend to be slow-moving, waiting patiently for prey to come by rather than actively chasing it down. But the opah, which spends all its time in these deep places, has many features usually associated with a quick-moving, active predator, such as a large heart, lots of muscle and big eyes.

These characteristics made the opah “a curiosity,” Dewar says. The opah’s secret first started to come out when NOAA researcher and lead author Nicholas Wegner looked at a gill sample and noticed something intriguing. All fish have two kinds of blood vessels in their gills: vessels carrying blood in from the body to pick up

oxygen, and other vessels carrying oxygenated blood back out again. In the opah, the incoming blood is warm after circulating through the fish’s body. This is because the opah swims by quickly flapping its pectoral fins, rather than undulating its body like many other fish do, to propel itself through the water — a process that generates high heat.

$2.2 million and $3.9 million. There were six offers for Colby, ranging from $1.1 million to $3 million. The Longfellow building only drew one offer, which was not considered to be viable. Aside from the YMCA, which made the top offer, other offers came from developers seeking to subdivide the lot and build single-family residential housing, in one case for seniors only. Everett Public Schools Superintendent Gary Cohn said the price was the primary factor in selecting the YMCA, although they did want to sell to something that would benefit

the community. “We were hoping that whatever came to us in this process would be something that would be of value and make neighbors happy,” he said. The YMCA’s initial $3 million offer included a clause to consider a price up to 5 percent above the highest qualified competing final offer. “It was that big of a priority for us,” Washburn said. The district made counteroffers to the YMCA and Natural 9 Holdings LLC, a Lake Stevens-based developer that made the second-highest bid of $2.95 million. Natural 9 agreed to $3.3 million and the YMCA

agreed to the final purchase price of $3.32 million. The Everett School Board will be asked at its May 26 meeting to approve the negotiation of the purchase and sale agreement. It will likely take several months to close the deal. The YMCA’s aging downtown facility has 3,600 members, the smallest number of any YMCA in Snohomish County. Moving to the Colby building could increase the membership by about 15 percent, just by being closer to the geographic center of the city, Washburn said. Because the old YMCA has no elevator, about 30

percent to 40 percent of the 100,000-square-foot facility is only used for storage. The new YMCA would include an aquatic center, a youth and teen center for after-school and weekend programs, a gymnasium, a drop-in center for infants and children up to age 10, community rooms and fitness studios. It might have smaller square footage, but it would be more accessible and the large lot will allow potential future expansion. Plus, it’ll be new. “It’s going to be more energy-efficient, we won’t have the same repair issues, it’ll be a smarter investment of our resource

dollars,” Washburn said. Throughout the process of negotiating and selling the building, School Board member Ted Wenta has recused himself from all discussions and decisions because he works as the vice president of operations for the YMCA. Cohn, who also sits on the board of trustees for YMCA, took an extended leave of absence from that board while the sale process developed. “I haven’t attended a board meeting for a year or so,” Cohn said. Chris Winters: 425374-4165; cwinters@ heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ Chris_At_Herald.

respond to an incident. State lawmakers couldn’t pass a bill in 2014 but did pay for an exhaustive review of the safety of oil transportation in Washington. That study, completed in March, concluded that the state isn’t prepared for a major accident. It made 43 recommendations, and several are embodied in the new law. One is a requirement for refineries to give the state Department of Ecology seven-day advance notice

of planned oil deliveries by rail. Those notices must include the day as well as the amount and type of oil to be shipped. The state intends to pass the information to fire departments and other emergency responders so they can be prepared for a derailment, spill or other type of accident. The notice requirement is separate from a federal one for BNSF Railway and other firms to disclose the number of trains carrying Bakken crude that will

travel through the state each week. The new state law enables the Utilities and Transportation Commission to hire eight additional inspectors and empowers them to conduct hazardous materials inspections on private property. Another change is that railroads will now have to submit documents showing they can pay to clean up a bad oil spill. And the state will begin collecting a barrel tax on shipments of oil by train in addition to

marine tankers. “While there is more work to be done, we have made progress today,” Inslee said. The issue is getting attention in Washington, D.C. Last month, the U.S. Department of Transportation ordered a phase-out of older model tankers known as DOT111, which have been shown to be at high risk of puncture and fire in derailments. Other changes would force oil shippers to slow down trains in urban

areas and use better braking systems. Federal lawmakers are pushing for faster action. U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., introduced a bill in March to immediately stop the use of DOT-111 tank cars and replace them with newer models built with thicker shells, thermal protection, pressure-relief valves and other measures to lessen the chances of an explosion. Jerry Cornfield: 360-3528623; jcornfield@heraldnet. com.

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Friday, 05.15.15

B1

2015 BMW 2 Series M235i: driving perfection, fun ROAD TEST by Larry Lark Herald Special Sections Writer

I

was hoping for the convertible, but the 2015 BMW 2 Series M235i xDrive Coupe left a little for the imagination, if you know what I mean. Built to replace the now extinct 1 Series last year, the convertible is this year’s claim to fame. This is a driver’s car – plain and simple. The schedule blessed me with three extra days behind the wheel and I took full advantage, driving almost 700 fun-filled miles. This subcompact may be a bit tight for some, but I adjusted quickly. The two front seats can be molded to fit like a glove. They are bolstered and include multiple lumbar settings. The backseat is large enough for two adults, and for short trips, provides comfort. The trunk was large enough to squeeze in two golf bags, but not more. My tester was powered by a 3.0-liter, M performance, TwinPower Turbo inline six-cylinder, 24-valve engine with direct injection, Valvetronic and double VANOS variable valve timing. The engine is mated to a quick-shifting eight-speed sport transmission that includes steering wheel shift-paddles, allowing the driver

to intervene manually when desired, while a Launch Control function provides the best possible traction and dynamics when accelerating from standstill. This dynamic duo creates a throaty roar when pedal hits metal. And the M235i delivers from a standing start, when goosed at the speed limit, or when testing the outer limits of sanity. The M235i races from 0-to-60 in less than six seconds and still manages to provide 30 miles per gallon fuel economy down the highway, as rated by the EPA. Maximum power of 320 horsepower is generated between 5,800 and 6,000 rpm. Maximum torque of 330 lb.-ft. is available between 1,400 and 4,500 rpm. This car literally felt like an

extension of my hands and legs. Complete control at all times and all conditions. Tight corners, straight-aways, it doesn’t matter. Thanks to an adaptive M suspension, M sport brakes, driving dynamic control with five settings, dynamic brake and cornering brake control and xDrive all-wheel drive, the car rides, handles and brakes on command – with precision. It handles so well I found myself circling round-abouts a second time, just for the thrill. It handled Snoqualmie Pass and the roads around Suncadia like it was built for them. I found excuses to drive to North Bellingham (golf), Mount Vernon (retirement party), Bellevue (birthday dinner) – and it was as much fun getting there as the events themselves. The M235i looks the part as well. Front-end structuring comes courtesy of lines that

converge dynamically at the large, forward-slanting BMW kidney grille. The contours of the twin circular headlights narrow at their inner extremes and are replicated by the outlines of the outer air intakes. Other goodies include 18-inch wheels, moonroof, and Xenon headlights. And, for those who are not satisfied with driving perfection, creature comforts include AM/FM/CD player with HiFi sound system and high-def radio, automatic climate control, hands-free Bluetooth and USB port, dynamic cruise control, rain-sensing windshield wipers and ambiance lighting. The only thing missing was the wind mussing my reddish locks and the sun burning my whitish face. Maybe I’ll be lucky enough to score the convertible next time. Q

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B2 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Volkswagen Performance Golf R:

Fastest Yet By STEVE WHEELER AutoWriters Associates

F

resh off its “North American Car of the Year” award in Detroit, the Volkswagen Golf is experiencing significant increases in sales. A sales uptick is to be expected after winning such a prestigious honor, but the 2015 Golf — and all of its variants — continue to impress. The latest in the 2015 Golf lineup is the Golf R, described by VW as “the fastest and most powerful performance Volkswagen ever to be sold in the U.S.” When VW uses those words to introduce a vehicle, enthusiasts are going to take notice. The 500-unit pre-order for the Golf R sold out in less than 12 hours. So what’s got everyone ga-ga over the Golf R? For starters, VW has managed to add 36 more horsepower and 37 lb.-ft. of additional torque to the 2015 Golf R engine over the previous model. At the same time, the new Golf R also promises to take you 3 miles further down the highway on a gallon of gas.

The Golf R has a launch feature that will run you to 60 mph from a standstill in just 4.9 seconds. And while it’s doing that, the Golf R will get you an EPA-estimated 30 highway miles per gallon with its terrific new DSG dual-clutch automatic transmission. Two trims are available: the Golf R and the Golf R with DCC and Navigation. Pricing starts at $36,595 for the base Golf R with the DSG automatic transmission. A manual Golf R will arrive later in the year as a 2016 model. The technologyrich Golf R with DCC and Navigation starts at $39,090. The Golf R is powered by a moreadvanced version of the 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder engine in the Golf GTI: VW engineers boosted the output to 292 horsepower and 280 lb.-ft. of torque by modifying or redesigning the cylinder head, pistons, the high-pressure injection system, and the turbocharger. The Golf R features a sport suspension that takes it even lower to the ground than the GTI. Also, brakes in the Golf R are upgraded from the GTI, and a new

standard post-collision braking system helps bring the car to a stop if it is still moving after a collision. We were able to try out the new engine recently during Volkswagen’s West Coast launch event for the Golf R. Driving the new Golf R on the twisting, rolling hills outside of San Diego was an absolute blast. The Golf R has always had VW’s 4MOTION permanent AWD system, and the car felt planted to the road like weeds in a concrete driveway crack. Paddle shifters offered more driver involvement, but we’re still anxious to drive the upcoming six-speed manual transmission slated for later this year. The Golf R boasts a Driving Mode Selection feature that allows the driver to select from three modes in the base Golf R and four in the Golf R with DCC and Navigation. In the Golf R, programs include “Normal,” “Individual,” and “Race.” The Golf R with DCC and Navigation adds a “Comfort” setting. In “Race” mode, engine response and shift points are more aggressive for high-speed track driving. Top track speed for the Golf R is

155 mph. The new Golf R has a package of special features that distinguish it from other Golf variants, including specially designed bumpers, side skirts, and standard 18-inch aluminum-alloy wheels. It also offers available 19-inch wheels, Bi-Xenon headlights with LED daytime running lights, and quad chrome exhaust tips. Inside the cabin, the Golf R gets sport seats with leather surfaces and a leatherwrapped steering wheel with controls. The Golf R also has its own special ambient lighting and instrumentation. We found the five-passenger cabin spacious and comfortable: Headroom is 38.4 inches in front and 38.1 inches in the back seat, while legroom front and rear is 41.2 inches and 35.6 inches respectively. Trunk volume is 22.8 cubic feet and cargo space is 52.7 cubic feet with the rear seats folded down. The 2015 Golf R has six standard airbags but hasn’t yet been tested for safety by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. However, the IIHS gives the 2015 Golf its “Top Safety Pick” award.

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 B3

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CALL FOR DETAILS. GOOD LUCK!

1-866-901-2059 All vehicles one only and subject to prior sale. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Expires 5/18/15. See Dealer for details.

OVER 300 VEHICLES

MSRP................. $26,302 Roy’s Discount ..... $1,467

1984 MIDAS KINGSTON CLASS C

1990 ITASCA SUNDANCER 26’

1994 WINNEBAGO BRAVE 31’

1-866-662-1718

24,835

$

CLASS A MOTORHOMES

1994 Allegro Bay

#T4388B ................................................................................................. $14,999

2005 Fleetwood Flair 33’

#40A12299 ............................................................................................. $45,999 47k Original Miles

T4487A

T4291B Clean

#T15727A Was $19,999

SALE $6,999

SALE $12,999

SALE $15,999

2000 KODIAK VANGARD

2008 COACHMAN FREELANDER

2004 WINNEBAGO ADVENTURER 38G

2005 Tiffon Allegro 35TSA

Low Miles 1k #TP1609 ........................................................................... $49,999

2011 Winnebago Vista 26P, Short Class A

2 Slide Out, One Owner – Mint, #Tp16243 ............................................. $69,999

2013 Winnebago Lista 26HE

11K Miles, Was $69,999, #T4451B.......................................................... $59,999

CLASS C MOTORHOMES

2006 Itasca Spirit 25F

#TP16037 ............................................................................................... $42,999

#T4237A

#TP16043

58k Miles

2008 Itasca Impulse 28A

#T15687A

2006 Itasca Cambria

#TP16139 ............................................................................................... $45,999

SALE 19,999

SALE 39,999

SALE 44,999

2015 22R CLASS C WINNEBAGO MINNIE WINNIE

2015 WINNEBAGO MINNIE WINNIE* 27’ SLIDE OUT

2014 WINN TREND 23B

$

$

Fully Loaded Low Miles

17k Original Miles

#TP16090

#TP16088 Was $69,999

$

SAVE $20K

15+ MPG

#TP16176 Low Miles, Loaded ................................................................ $49,999

2015 Minnie Winnie 27Q

#TP16089 ............................................................................................... $64,999

2015 Minnie Winnie

31K Model # TP16266 ............................................................................ $69,999

2008 Jayco Senica 35GS

10K Miles #T16207 ................................................................................. $89,999

TRAVEL TRAILERS/ 5TH WHEELS

1 Only

#M4193 Was $91,433

SALE $49,999

SALE $64,999

SALE $67,995

1999 WINNEBAGO ULTIMATE 40’ DIESEL CLASS A

2005 EMBASSY TRIPLE E 34 CLASS A SLIDE OUTS

2013 PLEASUREWAY PURSUIT 22’

1993 Fleetwood Caribo

T16078C Was $12,999................................................................................ $6,999

1998 New Way Hitchhiker Premier 33’ 5TH W Double Side out

#TP1656 Was $19,999............................................................................. $13,999

2002 Alpine Luxury 5th Wheel 29RK

# T4398A Was $19,999 ............................................................................ $16,999

2005 Fleetwood Prowler

#T15637A ................................................................................................ $13,999

2006 Forest River Wildcat 5TH W 24k Original Miles, Like New

36k Miles, Like New

#TP16144, Was $69,999

SALE 59,999 $

#TP16230, Was $45,995

SALE 39,999 $

#T4411A

SALE 79,999 OBO $

#TP16047 ................................................................................................ $15,999

2001 Mallard 39” Travel Trailer

#T16142A ............................................................................................... $39,999

2012 Open Range Roamer 2450 Model

Was $25,999 ....................................................................................... MAKE OFFER

ROY ROBINSON PRE-OWNED

CHEVY STORE 1320998

Vin #F3321920 Model Code: FDB-01

Buy With Confidence From Snohomish County’s Used Car Sales Leader For 20+ Years

SUBARU STORE

EXIT 199 IN MARYSVILLE

1-866-668-1721


B4 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL OFFER! 30 Days, 4 Lines + Photo

To advertise, call 425.339.3100 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Autos

MagicNissanofEverett.com

1994 Mercury Sable GS Stk 352167A $1,499

2012 Dodge Journey Come see Great Room & Price Stk# 13684P $18,331 2013 Nissan Juke SV Stk 5003A $21,995 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

Budget Lot Used Cars 2012 Scion tC Stk #35950JA $16,456 Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2013 MINI Hardtop COOPER Stk 8452B $18,988

2013 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Stk #31496B $26,753

Klein Honda

2014 Nissan Sentra Stk P1246 $13,998

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2006 Kia Optima LX Stk C150249A $6,995 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

855-283-0990

ROY ROBINSON

2014 Nissan Versa Note S Plus Stk 4870A $10,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2013 Mazda Mazda3 i Grand Touring Stk P3092 $19,856

2006 Mitsubishi Eclipse GS Stk 243568B $7,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2003 MITSUBISHI Diamante - Silver 4dr Sdn, 4spd, Fwd, VR-X 3.5L, Auto, 121,000 mi. FULLY LOADED! Only $3199 Call for Details: 425.316.8136

2007 Nissan Versa Sedan SL Stk 4923A $8,995 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2012 Toyota Prius Plug in Both gas and plug in Great MPG’s. STK# 13680A $24,441

1997 Ford F-250 Stk T351154B $8,947

2009 Nissan Altima Stk T3679A $9,750 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 2010 Nissan Sentra S Stk 4892A $11,995 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

Wholesale prices! + Large Selection INVENTORY CHANGES DAILY 855-283-0990 KleinHonda.com

LEAF 0%

Starting at $10,988 3 - S Models in stock

2011 Nissan LEAF SL Stk P0588 $10,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

2001 Subaru Outback Stk 352202A $3,899

magicnissan ofeverett.com 1-800-776-5337

1994 Chevrolet Suburban 1500 Cheyenne Stk T351396B $2,347

MagicNissanofEverett.com

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2009 Toyota Camry Hybrid Stk #32823A $11,081 Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

855-283-0990

Looking for a car? 425.339.3100

ROY ROBINSON

Budget Lot Used Cars

855-283-0990

2003 GMC Sonoma 1-Owner, V6, Auto., Canopy, Low 65k Stk 28371TB $8,488

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

2008 Suzuki SX4 Stk p1254a $5,998

2005 Ford Expedition Stk T342247A $9,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2011 Toyota Camry Stk #32974A $17,126

2013 GMC Terrain Denali Stk #33031A1 $30,862

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE 360-436-4620

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

Klein Honda

360-436-4620

Getting a new car?

425.339.3100

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

1999 Oldsmobile Bravada Stk T352038CC $3,147

2010 Toyota Tundra 4x4, Certified, Tow, line x Stk 28373TB $26,988

2014 Toyota Avalon Stk #35977J $25,962

855-283-0990

1997 CHEVY 3/4 ton PU, custom made overheard camper 8.5’, fully self contained, $12,500. 425-359-4958

2014 Toyota Camry I4 Stk P0557 $17,750 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

855-283-0990

425.339.3100

2014 Toyota FJ Cruiser TRD Off Road Pkg, Rugged. Sale Stk 28406PD $20,988

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

ROY ROBINSON

2011 Toyota Tacoma Access Cab Certified, pwr seat, Low 32k Stk 27376TD $19,488

2011 Honda Element Stk P1197 $16,387

Stk T352176BB $3,699

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

360-436-4620

1997 Toyota RAV4

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE

2012 Toyota Prius Cert., 0% up to 36mos or 1.9% to 44mos Stk 28298TJ $16,488

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2012 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT 4x4, SLT trim, Matching Canopy, Premium Wheels Stk 28355TC $25,488

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

Klein Honda

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

425.339.3100 Recycle your old car! Place a classified ad today. Call us!

2012 Honda CR-V AWD, NAV, LEA, Roof, 25k Stk 28246PD $26,988

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2001 Chevrolet Express Base Stk T16203A $4,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE 360-436-4620

Honda Pilot Stk P1233 $16,988

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE

2004 Buick Rendezvous Tons of room Great Value Stk# 31329B $5,991 1997 Dodge Dakota

855-283-0990

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

Getting a new car?

425.339.3100

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Stk P3063 $20,664

Budget Lot Used Cars

Stk T352430A $4,699

Looking for a car?

2013 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Pwr Seat, Dual Pwr Sliders, Alloys, Stk 28424PD $17,988

360-436-4620

ROY ROBINSON

Getting a new car?

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

ROY ROBINSON

2014 Toyota Tundra Platinum Stk #32962A $45,528

In Everett

Looking for a car?

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

Honda CR-V Stk P1264 $9,988

Klein Honda

2006 Pontiac Grand Prix Stk 12599B $1,588 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2008 Honda Element Rear Sunroof, Sale Stk 28427TJ $13,988

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

*KleinHonda.com for details

2002 GMC Envoy Stk T352409AA $10,999

2012 Toyota Rav4 Sport ed, 4WD, sunroof, certified, 29K. Stk 28285PD. $23,988

Budget Lot Used Cars

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2012 Nissan Frontier Stk #36016J $19,372

2005 VW Beetle Only 91k Miles Fun and Sporty Stk#31691A $6,936

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

2008 Toyota Sienna Stk 155022A $18,998

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE

2013 VW Jetta Stk #33359A $22,841

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

2013 Toyota Prius Two Stk #32571A $16,538

2012 Nissan Rogue S AWD Stk P0559 $17,995 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2014 Toyota Corolla Stk #32642a $14,326

2013 Nissan Altima 3.5 SV Stk T1740 $17,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2005 Honda Odyssey EX-L EXL Tons of room Great Value Stk# 31730A $11,444

2008 Subaru Forester Stk #35975JA $10,356

2013 Volkswagen Turble Diesel Jetta 2 Stk 8506A $18,588

ROY ROBINSON

We want your vehicle! 2012 Nissan LEAF SL Stk P0590 $11,997 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

OVER 400 VEHICLES

Budget Lot Used Cars

Budget Lot Used Cars

2001 Ford Explorer XLT Stk 252465B $4,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

MAGIC NISSAN OF EVERETT

$1,000 Trade Assistance*

2002 Mazda Protege Awesome Ride Great Value Stk#13624A $5,991

855-283-0990

ROY ROBINSON

2013 Volkswagen Beetle Stk P3079 $15,646

4 - SL Models in stock 2011’s-2014’s

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

Klein Honda

2013 Mazda Mazda3 Bargain Buy Great Value Stk# 13652P $15,000

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

In Everett

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

17 PRE-OWNED AND CERTIFIED LEAFS IN INVENTORY

MagicNissanofEverett.com

Klein Honda

ROY ROBINSON

Budget Lot Used Cars

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2014 Mazda Mazda6 Touring Stk 7407A $27,798

855-283-0990

Klein Honda

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

for 60 months* *Must finance through NMAC on approval of credit.

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2015 Mazda6 i GT Stk 7880A $24,988

855-283-0990

855-283-0990

2012 Subaru Impreza Stk 7887A Call4Price

ROY ROBINSON

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

Budget Lot Used Cars

2012 Subaru Impreza Sedan Stk #33186A $16,423

2014 Mazda Mazda6 i Grand Touring Stk 8565A $24,454 MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

www.KleinHonda.com

2014 Jeep Cherokee Latitude Stk P3095A $24,930

ROY ROBINSON 2000 Mitsubishi Eclipse RS Stk 12792A $3,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

Budget Lot Used Cars

Klein Honda

2008 Toyota Sienna Excellent value, AWD. Stk# 13646P. $12,944.

Klein Honda

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2014 Nissan Versa Stk P1270 $13,998

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

2014 Mazda Mazda5 Sport Stk P3101 $18,132

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

Klein Honda

2013 Ford F-150 Nice Truck Loaded FX4 Stk# 31881a $38,620

855-283-0990

360-436-4620

2009 Kia Rio5 SX

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

Klein Honda

2002 Honda Odyssey Great Value Great Vehicle Stk# 13622A $3,999

1999 Ford Expedition Stk 252717B $3,991 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

Budget Lot Used Cars

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE

Stk 351955B $5,147

2013 Jeep Patriot 4WD, sunroof, low 32K, Deep Tint Stk 28297TB. $16,988

360-436-4620

2008 Subaru WRX Stk 7698A. $22,999.

Budget Lot Used Cars

2001 Ford Ranger Runs great, Stk 28421TD $6,988

HONDA OF MARYSVILLE

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

2012 Mini Countryman Very Nice Grea Value Stk# 13632P $18,991

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

2015 Scion FR-S Release series, Certified, Low 5K miles Stk 28237TT $28,988

FOOTHILLS (360)757-7575

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777

855-283-0990

2014 Toyota Yaris Certified, auto, premium alloys, 14k M Stk 28419TD $14,988

Klein Honda 2014 Nissan Altima 2.5 S Stk T3812 $17,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2008 Jeep Compass Sport Stk 252430C $7,588 HARRIS MITSUBISHI 877-270-6241

32

$

Klein Honda

ROY ROBINSON

2013 Hyundai Azera Stk 3663A $22,350 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

Only

Recycle your old car!

Recycle your old car! Place a classified ad today. Call us!

425.339.3100

MAZDA OF EVERETT 1-888-871-8777 2013 Jeep Compass Stk #33320A $18,025

Getting a new car?

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

425.339.3100

Recycle your old car!

C A S H f o r V I N TA G E CARS Mercedes convertibles, Porsche, Jaguar, Alfa, Lancia, Ferrari, C o r ve t t e s, M u s t a n g s. E a r l y Ja p a n e s e C a r s 714-267-3436 rstevensjr@gmail.com Other collector cars of significant value desired. (PNDC)


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 B5

Please Call For Monthly Specials! To advertise, call 425.339.3074 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Jobs

Automotive Painters/ Body Technicians Earn up to $1-2K a wk, Commission pd wkly, 1 yr exp req’d. 425-379-9119

Washington State University seeks a fulltime Student Services Coordinator/Advisor 2 to assist in the development, planning and implementation of programs for the student body located at its North Puget Sound at Everett location. Responsibilities include guiding prospective students through the transfer process, advising student organizations, retention, advising of existing students, and career services. Salary commensurate with experience. For details about the position and to apply visit wsujobs.com (#11846). Applications are due by May 26, 2015.

Diesel Mechanic Skagit Farmers Supply is seeking a diesel mechanic at its eet maintenance facility in Mt. Vern o n , W A . Responsibilities include: inspect, repair, rebuild & maintain a wide array of vehicles & mechanical equipment; test all working parts to ensure proper operation; respond to ser vice calls; prepare records & reports; order parts/supplies; and comply with laws/regulations. Qualifications: HS diploma/GED (college level or ASE certiďŹ cations preferred); diagnose/repair various types of vehicles including medium & heavy duty trucks, b o o m s, p r o p a n e / bu l k fuel deliver y systems (preferred), gas/diesel engines, electrical systems, hydraulics, brakes, drivetrain, etc.; experience using hand tools, diagnostic devices, hoists, electr ical test equipment, cutting/welding equipment, etc. FT, wage DOE. Competitive benefits package and generous employee discounts. A full job description & application instructions are avail at www.skagitfarmers.com/ careers

Engineering Technician V, Field Survey CREATIVE ARTIST Please visit our website (EVERETT, WA) for full job description: http://www.snohomishSound Publishing, Inc. countywa.gov/2553/Jobhas a Creative Artist poListings sition available at our Print Facility in Everett, GREAT SUMMER JOB! WA. Position is FT and Private camping club is the schedule requires looking for enthusiastic flexibility. Duties include s t a f f t o h e l p ove r s e e performing ad and spec pool area and help sudesign, trafficking ads & per vise Family Center providing excellent cus- activities. Job is seasont o m e r s e r v i c e t o t h e al from Memorial Day sales staff and clients. We e k e n d t h r u L a b o r Day Weekend with up to REQUIREMENTS: 40 hours per week. ApExperience with Adobe plicants must be able to Creative Suite 6, InDe- be outside on pool deck sign, Photoshop, Illustra- for part of the day and t o r, a n d A c r o b a t ( fo - have current Basic Wac u s e d o n p r i n t ) . ter Safety and CPR Excellent customer ser- cards, or be able to obvice, organization and tain them. Please email communication skills. resume to glenn@portAbility to work indepen- susancamping.com. dently, as well as part of Looking for a fun a team, in a fast-paced environment. Newspasummer job with per experience is pregreat perks? ferred but not required. Come work for Oki Golf AdTracker/DPS experiat any of our beautiful ence a plus! Must be golf courses located in able to work indepenthe Puget Sound area! dently as well as part of Visit our website at a team. If you can think www.okigolf.com outside the box, are well No experience required. organized and would like Please email resume to to be part of a highly en- recruiter@okigroup.com ergized, competitive and professional team, we want to hear from you! Please email your cover letter, resume, and a few work samples to: hreast@sound publishing.com ATTN: HR/CAEV Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the wor kplace. Check out our website to ďŹ nd out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Maintenance Laborer The Housing Authority of Snohomish County (HASCO) has two openings for Maintenance Laborer. Performs routine manual labor tasks and assists in maintenance and repair of buildings and equipment. Carries out a variety of routine janitorial, grounds keeping and maintenance duties. H.S. Diploma or GED required. Technical training in construction or maintenance preferred. 2 yrs relevant wor k exper operating light equipment and hand/power tools. Ability to perform tasks requiring physical exertion & lifting. Valid WA Driver’s License. Beginning salar y $ 1 5 . 0 3 / h r + b n f t s. Submit app, cover letter & resume by 4:30pm, May 20, 2015. Applications may be obtained at HASCO office, 12625 4th Ave W, Suite 200, Everett WA 98204, from our website at hasco.org or by calling personnel at (425)293-0534. EOE.

Manicurist Wanted for Afterglow Spa in Roche Harbor Perform natural nail services for Resort and Marina guests. Must have c u r r e n t Wa s h i n g t o n State Manicurist License, and excellent references. Seasonal position for minimum Memorial Day through Labor Day. Affordable employee housing available. Paid training provided for spa protocol. Commission paid at $25 per hour ser vice plus great tips. apply online at www.rocheharbor.com or send resume to afterglow@roche harbor.com 360.378.9888 REPORTER The award-winning newspaper Whidbey News-Times is seeking an energetic, detailedoriented reporter to write articles and features. Experience in photography and Adobe InDesign p r e fe r r e d . A p p l i c a n t s must be able to work in a team-oriented, deadline-driven environment, possess excellent writing skills, have a knowledge of community news and be able to write about multiple topics. Must relocate to Whidbey Island, WA. This is a fulltime position that includes excellent benefits: medical, dental, life insurance, 401k, paid vacation, sick and holidays. EOE . No calls please. Send resume with cover letter, three or more non-retur nable clips in PDF or Text format and references to hr@soundpublishing.com or mail to: HR/GARWNT Sound Publishing, Inc. 11323 Commando Rd W Everett, WA 98204

SALES - Wor k from home as an Independent Contractor and be your own Boss! Commission Only Based Program. Self-Starter, Motivated, Experience in Advertising Sales a plus. Send Resumes to cecel i a @ c n p a . c o m o r fa x 916-288-6022. No phone calls please! (PNDC)

Wa l t o n B eve ra g e i s looking for two Craft Beer Sales Reps for S n o h o m i s h C o u n t y. Skills needed: self-motivated & goal oriented, excellent communication skills, organize & prioritize workload. Min 3 yrs. craft beer sales w/ extensive knowledge of the craft beer industry, able to lift up to 75 lbs. and m o ve u p t o 1 6 5 l b s , read, converse and be understood in the English language. Good driving record is reStore Manager Wanted q u i r e d . E O E . Po s t i n g The Countr y Store is close May 15, 2015 at now accepting applica- 5:00 pm send resume to: tions for individuals inter- HR@WaltonBeverage.com ested in providing overall Or mail to Walton Beverleadership and manage- age 1350 Pacific Place ment of operations at its Ferndale, WA 98248. Sedro Woolley, WA location. Full time; Salary DO. The company offers a competitive benefits package including employee discounts, dental, Housekeeping l i fe , m e d i c a l & 4 0 1 k benefits upon meeting Positions eligibility requirements. Now hiring for Visit the careers section Full & P/T. at www.countrystore.net Must have own t o d ay t o l e a r n m o r e transportation. about this exciting caExperience reer opportunity and for 425-397-7161 instructions on how to Call Before 5:00 pm apply. Customer Service/OfďŹ ce Support person needed at our Paine Field ofďŹ ce in Everett, WA. Effective telephone, customer service, computer, math, organizational and communication skills required. Word and Excel experience a must. Must be a good listener and be able handle difďŹ cult customers. This full-time position includes excellent beneďŹ ts: medical, dental, life, 401k and paid holidays, vacation and sick days. EOE. Visit us on the web at www.soundpublishing.com. Please send resume and letter of interest to hr@soundpublishing.com or mail to HR/CSOS, Sound Publishing, Inc., 11323 Commando Rd. W, Main Unit, Everett, WA 98204 Multi-Media Advertising Consultant - Outside B e a p a r t o f t h e l a r g e s t c o m mu n i t y n ew s organization in Washington! * Do you have a proven track record of success in sales and enjoy managing your own territory? * Are you competitive and thrive in an energetic environment? * Do you desire to work in an environment which offers uncapped earning opportunities? *Are you interested in a fast paced, creative atmosphere where you can use your sales expertise to provide consultative print and digital solutions? If you answered YES to the above, then we are looking for you! The Daily Herald/HeraldNet.com is looking for self-motivated, results-driven people interested in a multi-media sales career. As part of our sales team you are expected to maintain and grow existing client relationships, as well as develop new client relationships. The successful candidate will also be goal oriented, have organizational skills that enable you to manage multiple deadlines, provide great consultative sales and excellent customer service. If you have these skills, and enjoy playing a proactive part in impacting your local businesses financial success with adver tising solutions, please email your resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com. This position receives a base salary plus commissions and beneďŹ ts package including health insurance, paid time off, and 401K. Position requires use of your personal vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. Sound Publishing is an Equal Oppor tunity Employee (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Siding Applicators/ Window Installers needed. Exp’d, licensed bonded and insured n e e d o n l y a p p l y. To p Pay. Well established company. Call 800-4994959 or fax resume 253804-0270 Window & Door Installations Asst. Must have 3 yrs. exp w/ vinyl & wood window installation. Send resume & cvr ltr, refs will be checked. Wage DOE.

rory@thewindowanddoorshoppe .com

$ 1 8 h r Pe r s o n a l C a r e Assistants needed to help disabled woman get r e a d y fo r w o r k a s a teacher, 1 or 2 morning shifts/week, 5 am-9 am, good part-time opportunity; Valid DL req, NS only. Other shifts avail i n c l . 2 : 3 0 - 7 p. m . @ $14/hr. 425-879-8807. CAREGIVER RNA, loving, compassionate. 24hr shifts, $200. Live in w/salary or hrly. Lk Stevens. (206)992-9799

CREATIVE ARTIST (Everett, WA) Sound Publishing, Inc. has a Creative Artist position available at the Daily Herald in Everett, WA. Position is PT and the schedule requires flexibility. Duties include performing conceptual design for ads, logos, page layout, marketing campaigns and collateral. The position will require providing excellent customer service to both internal and external customers. REQUIREMENTS: Experience with Adobe Creative Suite 6, which includes: InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Flash and Acrobat. Basic understanding of HTML, Flash animation and web layout preferred. Excellent customer service, organization and communication skills. Ability to work independently, as well as part of a team, in a fast-paced environment. Newspaper and agency experience is preferred but not required. If you can think outside the box, enjoy collaborative, creative-type brainstorming and would like to be part of a highly energized, competitive and professional team, we want to hear from you! Please email your cover letter, resume, and a few work samples to: hreast@soundpublishing.com ATTN: PTCA Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to ďŹ nd out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com CIRCULATION SALES MANAGER (Everett, WA) The Daily Herald, a division of Sound Publishing Inc., is seeking a Circulation Sales Manager. This is a position for a self-motivated goal oriented individual who loves working in the local community. RESPONSIBILITIES: Develop and execute sales programs and initiatives. Developing and overseeing single copy planning of store partnerships and promotions. Manage effective single-copy draw management. Liaison with independent contractors and third-party vendors. Reinforce retention efforts Involved in circulation revenue and expense budgets. Work with Audience Development Manager to coordinate corporate sales initiatives. Collect outstanding bills on single copy aging accounts. Design both internal and external solicitation efforts and measure results. Achieve and exceed circulation unit and revenue goals – monthly, semi-annually and annually. Works closely with Director of Audience to grow both digital and print audience. REQUIRED SKILLS TO PERFORM THIS JOB SUCCESSFULLY: The ideal candidate will have 2+ years’ experience in an outside sales B2B role designing and executing outside sales campaigns. The sales manager must be able to prioritize and execute multiple sales projects while maintaining excellent communication with the circulation team. Effective communication and leadership skills. Ability to effectively analyze data to make strategic decisions. Ability to set and meet sales related goals. Ability to assist customers and resolve concerns through prompt response. Ability to organize information and balance multiple tasks. Ability to effectively present information in one-on-one and small group situations to customers, clients and other employees. Flexible and adaptable to market changes and demands. Ability to maintain a cost-efďŹ cient budget and sales plan. Ability to learn specialized computer systems and Excel. Must be self-motivated, innovative and creative. Experience in newspaper circulation is preferred. Computer and mathematical skills. Good driving record and reliable transportation to fulfill duties of position.Valid Driver’s License and proof of current auto insurance. This position earns a base salary plus bonus. We offer a competitive beneďŹ ts package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match). To apply, please send a cover letter and resume to hreast@soundpublishing.com please include ATTN: CSMW in the subject line. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to ďŹ nd out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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FOR SALE Aprox 9.3 Beautiful Acres Property has Electricity, Septic System on it. Water goes by the property; Has 770 Feet of River Front on the South Fork of the Stillaquamish River located in Sudden View Development. Address: 18125 127th Ave NE, Arlington, WA 98223 Only $100,000.00 BEST: 425-252-6587 Cell: 425-344-3987

2011 mfg home in senior park near I-5 central Marysville. 2 br., 1 ba, 754 s f, n ew c a r p e t / p a i n t , covered parking, stora g e. $ 2 9 , 5 0 0 . O w n e r contract available with $10,000 down (OAC). Vacant, move-in ready. R e a s o n a bl e l o t r e n t , small pets welcome. Others Available We Specialize Call Randy McMillan 425-327-9015

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Small counseling/therapy office, furnished with shared walk through waiting & break rooms in Cumulus Park Professional Center in Smokey Point/Arlington. Transfer of lease can be done, furniture including seating for clients can be purchased at a great price. 360.651.0610

Social Media Producer (Everett, WA) The Daily Herald, a division of Sound Publishing Inc., is seeking a Social Media Producer to take our social media efforts to the next level and help grow our digital audience in Snohomish County, Washington. The ideal candidate is knowledgeable and passionate about social media, with professional experience on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest, preferably for a media website. You need journalism experience, excellent writing skills and strong news judgment. If you’re the right candidate, you know how to optimize a Web headline for SEO and social engagement, and you know how to use analytics to inuence your decisions. You’ll be part of our newsroom team, collaborating with reporters and editors to maximize the reach of our content. You’ll also collaborate with other departments on company initiatives to promote The Herald and its various products and grow our overall audience. Responsibilities: Lead day-to-day efforts on The Herald’s growing portfolio of social channels. Help our writers and editors package stories for social channels and audiences. Set best practices and tone of voice for The Herald’s social channels. Monitor trending topics and act on that information by communicating with staff writers or blogging and aggregating on your own. Track success through engagement rates, growth statistics and other metrics. Participate in live coverage of news events using social tools. Integrate with Herald marketing and audience development teams to help with broader company aims in social media. Desired skills and experience: 3-5 years of professional experience in journalismrelated social media. Proven track record running social for media outlets or brands preferred. The ability to exercise sound judgment is an absolute must. Extensive knowledge of mainstream and emerging social channels. Ability to track your own success and justify decisions with numbers. Familiarity with Snohomish County and the Puget Sound area. Experience with SEO/SEM, paid social advertising, or email marketing a plus. Experience using professional Web publishing tools, photo editing and video editing a plus. We offer a competitive compensation and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match). To apply, please send a cover letter, resume and examples of your work to hreast@soundpublishing.com ATTN: SMP Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to ďŹ nd out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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Cash for Lots, Plats & Houses. Robinett & Assoc Inc. 425-252-2500 We Buy Land, Lots, Plats & Houses. Mietzner Homes. 425-212-2490 x204

Multi-Media Advertising Consultant - Inside B e a p a r t o f t h e l a r g e s t c o m mu n i t y n ew s o r g a n i z a t i o n i n Wa s h i n g t o n ! T h e D a i l y Herald/HeraldNet.com, a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is looking for a self-motivated, results driven person interested in a career in multi-media sales. In this exciting role you will leverage your drive and creativity to develop, customize, and sell online and print marketing programs to local businesses and private party advertisers. Qualified candidate will be able to: Sell advertising to meet and exceed goals Make sales presentations and close sales over the phone Provide a high level of customer service to meet and exceed client expectations Prioritize w o r k f l ow a n d t h r i ve i n a ve r y fa s t - p a c e d environment with short deadlines Candidate must have a minimum of one year prior outbound p h o n e s a l e s ex p e r i e n c e. Yo u w i l l r e c e i ve thorough training on our products and solutions as well as successful sales techniques. We are committed to our team and actively promote from within, opening doors for your future growth. If you have the noted skills, please email your resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com. This position, which is based in Everett, receives base plus commissions and a benefits package including health insurance, paid time off, and 401K.Sound Publishing Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly suppor ts diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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Now accepting applications for PT/FT Meal Program Assistants. Will provide training. We are a family owned and operated facility that offers a relaxed atmosphere and a exible schedule. If interested, please apply in person at: Delta Rehab. Center 1705 Terrace Ave. Snohomish,WA 98290 360-568-2168

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3 bd 2 ba Top oor Private balcony with quiet overlook. Wood-burning ďŹ replace, full-sized W/D, master walk-in closet. Designated parking, vaulted ceilings. $1210 mo. + util By appointment only North Pointe Apts

npointeapts@yahoo.com

Granite Falls Newer 2 stor y Home, close to schools & Shopping, 3 bd, 2.5 ba, Fully fenced yard, front patio & back deck, Mt View, on quiet street, gas heat & fireplace & garage, NS, NP, $1475/mo, +dam dep $1200. 360.659.0003

Marysville Senior Living Live Life on Your Terms. Up-Scale 1 bd apts for adults 55 years of age or older. Windsor Square Independent Living Apts 360-653-1717 windsorliving.com

Quiet Park near Boeing. Off Airport Road. SPACE for Mobile home/Trailer/RV with Carport

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425-280-3251

ROOM FOR RENT $550/mo + $200 Dep & 1/2 Utils, Smokey Pt area 425.327.4120 ROOM For Rent, 55+Park. Smokr ok. Call M-W only for Details, NoTexting 425-773-9915

AFFORDABLE Senior Housing 55+ 1 & 2 bd apt homes. W/D, Pool, controlled Access. We Pay W/S/G. Vintage at Everett

425-259-5659

EVERETT WATERFRONT VIEW 1 Bdrm, Newly Remodeled, NS/NP, $750/mo 425-882-3635

Terra Verde Town Home Apartments

2 bedroom starting at $1150.00 Gated Community with Controlled Access Stainless Steel Appl., Granite Counters Hardwood Floors, W/D in every home For more info 425-347-2013

MARYSVILLE DUPLEX 10106 Shoultis Rd. Very nice older 2bd, 1ba Duplex w/carport, tranquil backyard, close to I-5, bus & shopping, Will rent to very clean quiet 1 or 2 person family, $900/ mo + $900 sec 360.659.4550

Help, lady in wheelchair, needs place to live. Studio to rent, or room in h o u s e . M a r y 425.232.6755


B6 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

To Advertise call 425.339.3100

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BORDER COLLIE. Working Farm Dog. Female, $800/obo. 360691-5340

ROTTWEILER *PUPPIES* Beautiful AKC Registered German Rottweiler Puppies~ 8 Weeks Old, Ready Today~ MicroChipped, Dew Claws Done, Tails Cropped and Up to Date on Vaccines~ Check Out Our website at www.luckyrottweiler.com for More pics and Info ~ Call-Text Nikki @ 425-359-0515

COCKER BABIES $850 & up, Terms/Trade 425-334-6100

World Champion Bloodline German shepherd puppies AKC 3 litters from VA1 & VA2 Champion German S h e p h e r d . 6 w k s, 3 wks, & 1 wk old, red & black. All parents are joint certiďŹ ed, all puppies are guaranteed. Come see for your self. negotiable. 360-568-5654

DAYVILLE HAY and GRAIN. Top Quality H ay . We g u a ra n t e e our feed! Many varieties and deliver y available...... www.dayvillesupply.com

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AKC Master Hunters Lab Pups, y/b, $1000 Hunting Machines ready now 360.629.0818 MINI Australian shepblueskylabradors.com herd Purebred Puppy’s, r a i s e d w i t h f a m i l y, smart, loving. 1st shots, wor med. Many colors. $550 & up. 360-2613354

AKC Yorkshire Terrier 8 w k o l d Yo r k i e M a l e Puppy Available. In Mukilteo area Parents on site. $850 in Mukilteo area 425-263-9114

4 Lines

Small Breed Pups for Active Families Chugs & Cheweenies, born 2/23, pics at Heraldnet.com $265 360-853-7186

PUPPIES: Pug/Chihuahua, ďŹ rst shots, wormed, very friendly, loving. $300 ea. 360-435-2333. PUPPIES: Purebred Bernese Mountain Dogs, parents on site, available for new homes on May 22nd. Visit us at www. valleyviewbernese.com $1,500. (360)708-9711

FOUND: Money Please call Sno Co Reg. Evidence Unit to claim at 425-388-7050 Refer Case#OO15-00299

Reduce Your Past Tax Bill by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800-791-2099. (PNDC)

All Breed Equine Rez-Q invites you to our SEABISCUIT

CELEBRATION! Sat., May 16th 11am - 4pm A Fun Day of activities for the whole family! Tour the farm to see our newborn baby donkey, Roseberry! Pony Rides, Bake Sale, Fire pit to cook hot dogs & S’mores, Games & Prizes! 2415 116th Street NE, Marysville go to allbreedhorse rescue.com to donate if you can’t make it to this event

To advertise, call 425.339.3089

NO. 15-4-00583-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY Estate of MARY L. CAMPBELL, Deceased. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Cour t has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By ďŹ ling the original of the c l a i m w i t h t h e fo r e g o i n g Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. T h i s b a r i s e f fe c t i ve fo r claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: May 1, 2015. LORI L. LOVE Personal Representative 24110 47th Ave. NE Arlington, WA 98223 P u bl i s h e d : M ay 1 , 8 , 1 5 , 2015. EDH630038

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Tiny Toy Poodle Pups, 1 apricot F, 2 blk F, shots, 10wk old, family raised, $800 360.434.1083

NO. 15-4-02890-9 KNT PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF KING In re the Estate of GEORGE P. WILDERMUTH, Decedent. The person named below has been appointed personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and by ďŹ ling the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal r e p r e s e n t a t i ve s e r ve d o r mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the c l a i m i s fo r ev e r b a r r e d , except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.51 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of ďŹ rst publication: May 15, 2015 DENNIS WILDERMUTH Personal Representative Attorney for Personal Representative: JUSTIN E. ELDER WSBA#42295 Address for Mailing or Service 31919 Sixth Avenue South Federal Way, Washington 98003 Published: May 15, 22, 29, 2015. EDH633089

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PROBATE NO. 15-4-00719-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) (NTCRD) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY In Re The Estate Of: EMMA E. ANDERSEN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and ďŹ ling the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The c l a i m mu s t b e p r e s e n t e d within the later of: (1) Thirty (30) days after the personal r e p r e s e n t a t i ve s e r ve d o r mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under R.C.W. 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four (4) months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in R.C.W. 11.40.051 and R.C.W. 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: May 8, 2015 PEGGY GETTLES, (PR) 1040 Northwest 196th Street Shoreline, WA 98177-2633 LYLE K. WILSON, WSBA #06321 Attorney for Estate 15408 Main Street, Suite 105 Mill Creek, WA 98012-9025 (425) 742-9100 Published: May 8, 15, 22, 2015.

1st donation: $50! Donate Blood-Plasma at Grifols Biomat USA 8413 Evergreen Way Everett, Wa. 98208

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Happy Birthday: Look beyond the surface. Let your intuition guide you to making the right choices and avoiding getting involved in situations that are a waste of time. Put your heart and soul into your own accomplishments and learn from past mistakes. Your numbers are 5, 12, 19, 24, 36, 41, 44. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Travel, physical activities and taking part in a learning process will help ease anxiety and get you on track. Negotiate contracts and set up interviews and you will bring about positive change. ��� TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You can’t reach your goals if you don’t participate in your own projects. Focus on what you are good at and use your skills to improve your position, security and future prospects. ��� GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You can make headway if you pick and choose your projects carefully. Your personal life will take a positive turn if you discuss your thoughts and plans with someone you love. ���� CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t let your emotions take over. Try not to share your intentions until you are sure you are doing the right thing and have some proof that what you are doing can be successful. �� LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take control at any function or event you attend and you will gain popularity. Your ability to initiate new projects and set an example for others will be an asset and attract positive interest in what you are trying to accomplish. �����

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AKC English Lab Pups $650. Black Labs with blocky heads. Great hunters or companions. Playful, loyal & healthy. Family raised & well socialized, OFA’s lineage, first shots, de-wormed and vet checked. Parents on site. 425-4222428. And 1 female rare m i s m a r ke d L a b r a d o r. They’re walkin eating and ready to meet people!

7 DAYS

Please Call For Pricing And Deadlines

Auction by Tillmon & Daughter at ABC Self Storage 511 Pine Ave., Snohomish Friday, May 15, 2015 12:30 pm 360-568-4300 EDH632713 Published: May 14, 15, 2015.

425-267-9800 biomatusa.grifols.com

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Make changes that will affect your financial situation. A residential move or an investment will pay off. Consider ways to cut your overhead and bring in more cash. ��� LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t think about change; make it happen. Take charge by making the first move. Your ideas are good, but don’t forget the importance of following through. A ��� SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Make creative changes at home based on information or philosophies that have recently intrigued you. Spending time with someone special will spark your imagination. ��� SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Travel, excitement and adventure will entice you. Making changes to the way you do things, where you live or the people you interact with will give you a whole new perspective regarding your life. ����� CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take a back seat and be observant. Watching how others react to situations as they unfold instead of being the instigator will help you decipher the best move. �� AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Develop ideas and organize a space at home that is conducive to achieving your goals. Discuss your plans with the people who will be affected by the choices you make. ���� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let other people’s demands stand between you and your achievements. Concentrate on making personal changes that will alter your surroundings or the way you present who you are and what you have to offer. ��� Universal Uclick

Severe Allergies? Earn $185 Donate Plasma plasmalab.com 425-258-3653 Spring Garden Gala Come join the fun in our 1st ever Spring Garden Gala! Free festivities include: Monroe High School Plant Sale, WSU Master Gardner, Bake Sale, Kids Planting Station, Green Alternatives, and much more! May 16th 9-3 Purdy and Kerr w/ Dawson, 409 W. Main Street Monroe, WA. 98272 Thank you St. Jude for answered prayers D.L.D. Thank you St. Jude, Y, Betty, Ohahae, Lynn

A

Notice of Public Auction Friday, May 15, 2015 11:00 a.m. at Everett Secure Storage 11330 4th Ave. W Everett, WA 98204 425-353-8500 Tillmon & Daughter Auctions Published: May 13, 14, 15, 2015. EDH628452

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Found Black Cat Frylands Area Monroe. Cat has been coming around our home for months. Has micro chip Unable to locate owner. If we cannot ďŹ nd owner we will adopt him 206.909.8358

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CITY OF EVERETT, WASHINGTON CHILDSTRIVE WINDOW REPLACEMENT NOTICE TO BIDDERS Notice is hereby given that sealed bid proposals will be received by the City of Everett’s Community Housing Improvement Program (C.H.I.P.) at the C.H.I.P. Office, 8th Floor Wall Street Building, 2930 Wetmore Ave, Suite 8B, Everett, Washington 98201, until 10:00 am, on June 5th, 2015 for window replacement at ChildStrive and will then and there be opened and publicly read aloud. This project is being assisted with federal grant funding, therefore all Contractors shall be required to comply with Federal Labor S t a n d a r d s, a s we l l a s D av i s B a c o n wa g e a n d r e p o r t i n g requirements. The wage rates paid shall be the higher of either the State Prevailing Wage or the Federal Prevailing Wage (Davis Bacon). All documentation shall be made available to the City, upon request, to verify compliance. Reporting assistance will be available, if necessary. T h e s c o p e o f w o r k w i l l i n c l u d e : W i n d o w R e m o va l a n d Replacement; site, wage and contact information will be provided in the bid packet. A bid packet and speciďŹ cations may be obtained from the City of Everett’s C.H.I.P. Office, 8th floor Wall Street Building, 2930 Wetmore Ave, Suite 8B, Everett, Washington, 98201 (425-2578735). Bid submittal requirements are noted in the bid packet and must be followed in order for your bid to be deemed eligible. The contractors may contact Martin McLean at ChildStrive @ 425760-9503 for a pre bid walkthrough of the project from 5/15/15 thru 6/5/15 between the hours of 8:00AM to 2:30PM; some exibility is available upon request. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any irregularities or informalities. No bidder may withdraw his bid after the hour set for the opening thereof. The City further reserves the right to make the bid award as deemed in the best interest of the City and ChildStrive. The Contractor will be required to comply with all local, State, and Federal laws and regulations pertaining to affirmative action and equal employment opportunities, including Executive Order 11246 as amended by Executive Order 11375. Minority owned and/or women owned businesses and Section 3 businesses are encouraged to bid. For additional questions regarding this project, contact Dan Erickson, C.H.I.P. Housing Inspector (425-257-7181). Published: May 15, 2015. EDH633093

LEGAL NOTICE On May 12, 2015 the Snohomish County Road Engineer approved the following COUNTY FORCES PROJECT for the 2015 program year. All construction estimates include the cost of labor, materials & equipment. Details are on file with the Snohomish County Department of Public Works. CRP# RC7416- Burley Drive Sidewalk (Goblin Lane) Construct 175 feet of sidewalk on the north side of Burley Drive, east of Goblin Lane. Pave approximately 175 feet of shoulder on the south side of Burley Drive. The total estimated construction cost is $65,326.00. 107024 Published: May 15, 2015. EDH632870

NO. 13 2 03518 7 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON CITIMORTGAGE, INC., PLAINTIFF, VS CASCADE VISTA HOMES ASSOCIATION; THE UNKNOWN SALE OF REAL PROPERTY HEIRS AND ASSIGNS OF JERRY LINTON DEAN; THE UNKNOWN DEVISEES OF JERRY LINTON DEAN; ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY COMMONLY KNOWN AS 20512 32ND DR. SE, BOTHELL, WA 98012-1400, DEFENDANT. TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND ASSIGNS OF JERRY LINTON DEAN; ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES CLAIMING ANY AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY COMMONLY KNOWN AS 20512 32ND DR. SE. BOTHELL, WA 980121400, THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE SHERIFF OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY TO SELL T H E P R O P E RT Y D E S C R I B E D B E L OW TO S AT I S F Y A J U D G M E N T I N T H E A B OV E E N T I T L E D AC T I O N . I F DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 20512 32nd DR. SE, BOTHELL, WA 98012-1400. THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 6/26/2015, IN THE FRONT DOOR LOBBY AREA OF THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, EVERETT, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $251,762.81, TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED 4/30/2015 DOCKET # 15002459 TY TRENARY, SHERIFF SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE T. MURPHY, CIVIL DEPUTY EVERETT, WASHINGTON, 98201 (425) 388-3522 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 58 AND THE NORTH 18.33 FEET OF LOT 59, CASCADE VISTA ESTATES. ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN VOLUME 30 OF PLATS, PAGE 66, RECORDS OF SNOHMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. PURSUANT TO THE CITY OF BOTHELL BOUNDARY LINE ADJUSTMENT NO. 2002-00005 RECORDED UNDER AUDITORS FILE NUMBER 200209055006, SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH. STATE OF WASHINGTON. A S S E S S O R ’ S P RO P E RT Y TA X PA R C E L O R AC C O U N T NUMBER; 00386000005800. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20512 32ND DR. SE. BOTHELL. WA 98012-1400. 107192 Published: May 15, 22, 29; June 5, 12, 19, 2015. EDH632732

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE MOUNTLAKE TERRACE PLANNING COMMISSION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held by the Mountlake Terrace Planning Commission on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at 7:00 pm in the Interim Mountlake Terrace Council Chambers, 6100 219th Street SW, Suite 220, to consider and make a recommendation to the City Council on: 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update A p r o p o s e d o r d i n a n c e t o u p d a t e t h e C i t y ’s c u r r e n t Comprehensive Plan, a major update to cover the period 20152035, to provide for projected population and employment growth targets, revise narrative and data to match current conditions, and be consistent with local, regional and state requirements. Any person that may be affected by this proposal may appear at the public meeting and be heard in support of or in opposition to this proposal. If you are unable to attend the meeting, written comments to the Planning Commission will be accepted until Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at 4:00 pm and will become part of the permanent record. On occasion, meetings may be postponed or items removed from the agenda. To conďŹ rm the meeting, agenda items, or to receive additional information, contact the Planning Commission Secretary at 425.744.6207 or mharvey@ci.mlt. wa.us. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE PLANNING COMMISSION MITCHELLE HARVEY, Secretary Dated this 15th day of May. 2015 The City of Mountlake Terrace strives to provide access and services to all members of the public. Please notify the City at least one week prior to the event if reasonable accommodations are needed. Large print and audiotape are available upon request. Published: May 15, 2015. EDH633077

LEGAL NOTICE On May 12, 2015 the Snohomish County Road Engineer approved the following COUNTY FORCES PROJECT for the 2015 program year. All construction estimates include the cost of labor, materials & equipment. Details are on file with the Snohomish County Department of Public Works. CRP# RC7424-184 St SE Sidewalk Improvement Construct 700 feet of sidewalk, a small wall and 1 ADA ramp on the south side of 184 St SE, west of 39 Ave SE. The total estimated construction cost is $121,275.00. 107024 Published: May 15, 2015. EDH632868

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Preliminary Short Subdivision

Project Name:

The Daniel Stetner Preliminary Short Plat Application Project Location: 9005 8th Street S.E., Lake Stevens, WA 98258 / APN 00476200100101 Project File No.: LUA2015-0025 Applicant: Mr. Daniel A. Stetner Proposed Project Description: The request is to create a (2) lot short plat in the High Urban Residential (HUR) Zone. The 0.48 acre site will be developed with a new duplex residence, and an existing approved duplex residence will be constructed on the remainder lot. The plat will be accessed from 8th Street S.E. via a private access tract. The proposed project is exempt from SEPA pursuant to the WAC 197-11-800 (6) (a). Permit Required: Preliminary Short Subdivision Date of Application: April 17, 2015 Completeness Date: April 22, 2015 Notice of Application: May 15, 2015 Public Review and Comment Period: Interested parties may view the project file at the City of Lake Stevens Permit Center, 1812 Main Street, Monday-Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm. Please contact Planning and Community Development to receive more information or to submit written comments. Phone number: (425) 377-3219 Email: spratschner@lakestevenswa.gov Mailing address: P.O. Box 257, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Upon publication of the Notice of Application, there is a 14-day period comment period. The deadline for public comments is 5:00 PM, May 29, 2015. It is the City’s goal to comply with the American with Disabilities Act. The City offers its assistance to anyone with special needs, including the provision of TDD services. Published: May 15, 2015. EDH632974

PUBLIC NOTICE Community Transit, 7100 Hardeson Road, Everett, WA in Snohomish County is seeking modiďŹ cation of coverage under the Washington Department of Ecology’s NPDES General Permit for Stormwater Discharges Associated with Industrial Activities at the industrial site, known as Kasch Park Operating Base located at 2300 Kasch Park Road in Everett. Activities requiring permit modification include installation of stormwater ďŹ lter vault and requesting an extension of the level 2 corrective action deadline. Stor mwater will continue to be discharged as it currently does to a series of un-named wetlands and ditches that ultimately empty into Swamp Creek. Any person desiring to present their views to the Department of Ecology concerning this application may notify Ecology in writing within 30 days from the last date of publication of this notice. Comments may be submitted to: Washington Dept. of Ecology, Water Quality Program – Industrial Stormwater, PO Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: May 15, 22, 2015. EDH633096


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PUBLIC NOTICE Mukilteo School District No. 6, c/o Keith Stefanson, 8925 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Depar tment of Ecology’s Constr uction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Voyager Middle School Field and Track Renovation, is located at 11711 4th Avenue W, in unincorporated Snohomish County. This project involves 4.59 acres of soil disturbance for the resurfacing of the existing natural grass field to synthetic turf, resurfacing of the track, and drainage and access improvements. The receiving water is North Creek. Any persons desiring to present their views to the department of Ecology regarding this application may do so in writing within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Comments shall be submitted to the department of Ecology. Any person interested in the department’s action on this application may notify the department of their interest within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology, Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater, PO Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: May 15, 22, 2015. EDH633070

The Proposals will be publicly opened and read aloud shortly after the time and date stated above. Proposals are to be submitted only on the form provided with the Contract Provisions. All Proposals must be accompanied by a certified check, cashiers check, money order, or bid bond payable to the “Lake Stevens Sewer District” and in an amount of not less than five percent (5%) of the total amount bid. Contract Provisions and Contract Plans may be examined at the office of the Lake Stevens Sewer District, local plan centers in the project area, or the office of the Project Engineer, Gray & Osborne, Inc. Licensed Contractors and Material Suppliers may obtain a copy of the Contract Provisions and Contract Plans, free of charge, in electronic format (PDF on compact disk(s)) along with registration as a planholder only at the Seattle office of the Project Engineer, Gray & Osborne, Inc., 701 Dexter Avenue North, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98109, (206) 284-0860. Request for Contract Provisions and Plans may be faxed ((206) 283-3206) or emailed (grayosborne@g-o.com). Request must include company name, physical address, phone and fax numbers, and email address. Registration as a planholder is required to obtain Contract Addenda. Contract questions shall be directed only to the office of the Project Engineer. A Prebid Conference is scheduled for Tuesday, May 26, 2015. The conference will begin at the Lake Stevens Sewer District Darwin Smith Wastewater Treatment Facility (new WWTP), 7110 9th Street SE, Lake Stevens, Washington 98258 at 10:00 a.m. (local time). Prospective bidders are encouraged to participate. Any other site visits shall be limited to 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and shall be coordinated through Michael Bowers, of the Lake Stevens Sewer District, by calling (425) 334 8588, at least 24 hours in advance of the visit. No unauthorized visits or unscheduled visits will be allowed. Financing of the Project has been provided by Lake Stevens Sewer District, Washington and the Washington State Department of Ecology. Neither the State of Washington nor any of its departments or employees are, or shall be a party to this contract or subcontract. The Lake Stevens Sewer District expressly reserves the right to reject any or all Proposals and to waive minor irregularities or informalities and to Award the Project to the lowest responsive, responsible bidder as it best serves the interests of the District. The successful bidder will be required to conform to the wage requirements prescribed by the federal Davis-Bacon and related acts which requires that all laborers and mechanics employed by contractors and subcontractors performing on contracts funded in whole or in part by SRF appropriations in excess of $2,000 pay their laborers and mechanics not less than the prevailing wage rates and fringe benefits, and determined by the Secretary of Labor, for corresponding classes of laborers and mechanics employed on similar projects in the area. (Signed) MICHAEL BOWERS, P.E. DISTRICT MANAGER Published: May 15, 22, 2015. EDH632928

days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 6/1/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 6/1/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOSHUA JAMES MCKINNEY, A SINGLE PERSON ADDRESS 23029 107TH AVE. NE, ARLINGTON, WA 98223 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 1/4/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: FEB. 06, 2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Mauricio Flores, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-536495-SH A-FN4508992 Published: May 15; June 5, 2015. EDH632711

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-14-628990-SW APN No.: 00461801701102 Title Order No.: 140140264-WA-MSI Deed of Trust Grantor(s): CHARLES W KINMAN, KAREN A KINMAN Deed of Trust Grantee(s): INTEGRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 200506281282 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/22/2015, at 10:00 AM On the steps in front of the North entrance to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 11 AND 12, B L O C K 1 7 , H A L L E R C I T Y, AC C O R D I N G TO T H E P L AT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 2 OF PLATS, PAGE 22, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON More commonly known as: 127 W 129 GILMAN, ARLINGTON, WA 98223 which is subject to that cer tain Deed of Trust dated 6/27/2005, recorded 6/28/2005, under 200506281282 records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from CHARLES W KINMAN AND KAREN A KINMAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of INTEGRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by INTEGRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE, INC. (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the United States of America. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Tr ust/Mor tgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $101,497.48 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $251,133.70, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/22/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME CHARLES W KINMAN AND KAREN A KINMAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 127 W 129 GILMAN, ARLINGTON, WA 98223 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 11/4/2014. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction =searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY I N F O R M AT I O N O B TA I N E D W I L L B E U S E D F O R T H AT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: JAN. 21, 2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-7302727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-628990-SW A-FN4506717 Published: April 24; May 15, 2015. EDH627043

PUBLIC NOTICE Mukilteo School District No. 6, c/o Keith Stefanson, 8925 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Depar tment of Ecology’s Constr uction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Harbour Pointe Middle School Field and Track Renovation, is located at 5000 Harbour Pointe Boulevard in Mukilteo, in Snohomish County. This project involves 3.68 acres of soil disturbance for the resurfacing of the track and field, installation of a subsurface drainage system and other track and field amenities. The receiving waters are Big Gulch Creek and an upper tributary to Big Gulch Creek. Any persons desiring to present their views to the department of Ecology regarding this application may do so in writing within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Comments shall be submitted to the department of Ecology. Any person interested in the department’s action on this application may notify the department of their interest within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology, Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater, PO Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: May 15, 22, 2015. EDH633058 PUBLIC NOTICE Public Storage, Phil Williams, 701 Western Ave Glendale, CA 91201, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Mukilteo Public Storage, is located at 13505 Mukilteo Speedway in Lynnwood in Snohomish county. This project involves 2.5 acres of soil disturbance for Commercial, Utilities, Other (building and parking lot) construction activities. The receiving waterbody is Swamp Creek. Any persons desiring to present their views to the Washington State Depar tment of Ecology regarding this application, or interested in Ecology’s action on this application, may notify Ecology in writing no later than 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology, Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater, P.O. Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: May 8, 15, 2015. EDH631518 PUBLIC NOTICE Venture General Contracting, LLC, 2801 Alaskan Way, Suite 310, Seattle, WA 98121, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Oak Heights Urban Center (Ash Way Phase II) is located 15505 Ash Way, in Lynnwood, in Snohomish County. This project involves 2.38 acres of soil disturbance for commercial, residential, road and utility related construction activities. The receiving water(s) is/are Snohomish County conveyance system with eventual discharge to Swamp Creek. Any persons desiring to present their views to the department of Ecology regarding this application may do so in writing within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Comments shall be submitted to the department of Ecology. Any person interested in the department’s action on this application may notify the department of their interest within thirty days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology, Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater, PO Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published: May 8, 15, 2015. EDH631584 SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF ORDINANCE and NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Snohomish County Council will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at the hour of 10:30 a.m., in the Henry M. Jackson Board Room, 8th Floor, Robert J. Drewel Building M/S 609, 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, Washington to consider the following Ordinance. ORDINANCE NO. 15-031 MAKING A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TO GENERAL FUND 002 TO PROVIDE EXPENDITURE AUTHORITY FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES TO COMMUNITY TRANSIT AND THE CITY OF SNOHOMISH BE IT ORDAINED: Section 1. The County Council makes the following findings of fact: A supplemental appropriation to General Fund 002 in the 2015 budget year in the amount of $489,566 is necessary to provide expenditure authority for the costs associated with providing law enforcement services to Community Transit and the City of Snohomish. These law enforcement services are funded by revenue received from Community Transit and the City of Snohomish. Section 2. The unit and allocation detail for the supplemental appropriation described in Section 1 are as follows: EXPENDITURE: 002 General Fund 530 132 1011 Salary $235,628 530 132 1012 Overtime $15,509 530 132 1013 Benefits $83,477 530 132 2300 Uniforms $2,550 530 132 3101 Supplies $102,438 530 132 4205 Cellular Phone $1,377 530 132 9503 ER&R $39,016 530 111 1012 Overtime $854 530 192 1012 Overtime $82 530 195 1012 Overtime $4,407 530 140 3101 Supplies $3,682 530 140 4935 Training $546 Total Supplemental Appropriation $489,566 REVENUE: 002 General Fund 330 113 3821 Contract Services $489,566 Total Revenue $489,566 Section 3. The County Council further finds that there is a need for such supplemental appropriation authorized by this ordinance because the funds that support the law enforcement services were unanticipated at the time of adoption of the 2015 budget and have not been previously appropriated. At said time and place anyone interested may be heard either for or against the above-described matter. Accommodations for persons with disabilities will be provided upon request. Please make arrangements one week prior to the hearing by calling Randy Reed at (425) 388-3901, 1(800)5624367, or TDD # (425) 388-3700, or e-mail to randy.reed@snoco.org. Dated this 6th day of May, 2015. SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington Randy Reed, MMC Asst. Clerk of the Council 107192 Published: May 8, 15, 2015. EDH631502

#JET 3'2T 3'1T MONROE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 103 NOTICE OF SURPLUS The Monroe School District has declared a variety of textbooks, library resource materials and books, technology items, and furniture and miscellaneous items as surplus. Anyone who wants to purchase the surplus items must submit a sealed bid to the district by June 14, 2015. Purchaser must agree that subsequent disposal of the surplus items will be accomplished in a manner consistent with local, state and federal law. The surplus items may be viewed by appointment only; please contact the district at (360) 804-2571 for an appointment. Bids are to be submitted in a sealed envelope to the attention of Brenda Hunt, Executive Director of Fiscal Services, Monroe School District, 200 East Fremont Street, Monroe, WA 98272. Envelope must be clearly labeled “Sealed Bid, Surplus”. District is not responsible for premature opening of envelopes not labeled. Brenda Hunt Executive Director of Fiscal Services Published: May 15, 2015. EDH633087 CALL FOR BIDS LAKE STEVENS SEWER DISTRICT BIOSOLIDS REMOVAL PROJECT ENGINEER’S ESTIMATE $4,500,000 TO $5,500,000 Sealed Proposals will be received by the undersigned at the Lake Stevens Sewer District, 1106 Vernon Road, Suite A, Lake Stevens, Washington 98258, up to 2:00 p.m.; local time on Wednesday, June 3, 2015, for furnishing the necessary labor, materials, equipment, tools, and guarantees thereof to construct Biosolids Removal Project. The work includes dredging, screening, hauling, and utilizing 4,700 dry tons of biosolids from four aeration basins and one humus pond that have been out of service since 2012, and all associated work as described in the Specifications. The quantity is approximate and the actual quantity may vary. The Contractor is encouraged to verify the quantity of biosolids to be removed through independent sampling and measurements. The location of work is the site of the former Lake Stevens Sewer District’s lagoon wastewater treatment plant. The work also includes providing, installing and operating a temporary liquid/solids separation treatment system to treat lagoon supernatant and centrate/filtrate from the biosolids dewatering operation prior to discharge to Lift Station No. 20 in the District’s collection system. The temporary liquid/solids separation treatment system shall include a filtration system with a maximum pore size of 10 microns and shall be capable of meeting an effluent total suspended solids limit of 10 mg/L. Furthermore, the treated effluent being discharged to Lift Station No. 20 shall be pH adjusted to 7 ±0.5 standard units with a maximum discharge pumping rate of 500 gpm. The Work shall be substantially complete within 75 working days after the commencement date stated in the Notice to Proceed. All bidding and construction is to be performed in compliance with the Contract Provisions and Contract Plans for this project and any addenda issued thereto that are on file at the office of the District Manager, District Office, Lake Stevens, Washington.

'PSFDMPTVSFT NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-592927-TC APN No.: 004971-000-129-00 Title Order No.: 130189400-WA-MSI Deed of Trust Grantor(s): DERRY L. MACHADO Deed of Trust Grantee(s): HOMEFIELD FINANCIAL, INC. Deed of Tr ust Instr ument/ Reference No.: 200410120134 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/22/2015, at 10:00 AM On the steps in front of the Nor th entrance to the Snohomish County Cour thouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State char tered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 129 LEGION PARK ADDITION TO EVERETT DIVISION NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 12 OF PLATS, PAGE 4, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON More commonly known as: 2303 7TH STREET, EVERETT, WA 98201 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/4/2004, recorded 10/12/2004, under 200410120134 records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from DERRY L. MACHADO, A S A S E PA R AT E E S TAT E , a s G r a n t o r ( s ) , t o F I D E L I T Y NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY OF WASHINGTON, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of HOMEFIELD FINANCIAL, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by HOMEFIELD FINANCIAL, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Tr ust/Mor tgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $67,805.94 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $137,815.36, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 1/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/22/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME DERRY L. MACHADO, AS A SEPARATE ESTATE ADDRESS 2303 7TH STREET, EVERETT, WA 98201 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally ser ved, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such ser vice or posting. These requirements were completed as of 12/1/2014. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction =searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUA L I T Y M AY B E C O N S I D E R E D A D E B T C O L L E C TO R ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 01/20/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Mauricio Flores, Assistant Secretar y Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Ser vice Cor p. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-592927-TC A-4506405 Published: April 24; May 15, 2015. EDH627047 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-536495-SH APN No.: 31060600102000 Title Order No.: 120384703-WA-GTI Deed of Trust Grantor(s): JOSHUA JAMES MCKINNEY Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 200601250430 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 6/12/2015, at 10:00 AM On the steps in front of the North entrance to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington, to-wit: THE SOUTH 122 FEET OF THE WEST 357 1 FEET OF THE NORTH 403 FEET OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE N O RT H E A S T QUA RT E R O F S E C T I O N 6 , TOW N S H I P 3 1 NORTH, RANGE 6 EAST, WM, M SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON EXCEPT ANY PORTION THEREOF WHICH MAY HE WITHIN 107TH AVENUE NORTHEAST. More commonly known as: 23029 107TH AVE. NE, ARLINGTON, WA 98223 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 1/20/2006, recorded 1/25/2006, under 200601250430 records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from JOSHUA JAMES MCKINNEY, A SINGLE PERSON, as Grantor(s), to WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, INC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Fannie Mae (“Federal National Mortgage Association”). II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $48,755.98 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $223,565.45, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 1/1/2013, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 6/12/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 6/1/2015 (11

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-14-636733-SW APN No.: 008060-000-009-00 Title Order No.: 02-14039815 Deed of Trust G r a n t o r ( s ) : J O H N M C L AU S D e e d o f Tr u s t G r a n t e e ( s ) : MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ( M E R S ) A S N O M I N E E F O R WAU S AU M O RT G AG E CORPORATION Deed of Tr ust Instr ument/Reference No.: 200511151181 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 6/12/2015, at 10:00 AM On the steps in front of the North entrance to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or cer tified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real proper ty, situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 9, SUNNYSIDE EAST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 53 OF PLATS, PAGES 184 AND 185, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON A.P.N.#. 008060000-009-00 More commonly known as: 6301 55TH PLACE NORTHEAST, MARYSVILLE, WA 98270 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/7/2005, recorded 11/15/2005, under 200511151181 records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from JOHN M. CLAUS, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Grantor(s), to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation i n fa vo r o f M O RT G AG E E L E C T R O N I C R E G I S T R AT I O N S Y S T E M S , I N C. ( M E R S ) A S N O M I N E E F O R WAU S AU MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (MERS) AS NOMINEE FOR WAUSAU MORTGAGE CORPORATION (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to U.S. BANK NATIONAL A S S O C I AT I O N , A S T RU S T E E F O R B A N C O F A M E R I C A FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-A. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiar y of the Deed of Tr ust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Cour t by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Tr ust/Mor tgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $106,290.44 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $233,076.93, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 6/12/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 6/1/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 6/1/7015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 6/1/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME J O H N M . C L AU S, A M A R R I E D M A N A S H I S S O L E A N D S E PA R AT E P R O P E RT Y A D D R E S S 6 3 0 1 5 5 T H P L AC E NORTHEAST, MARYSVILLE, WA 98270 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally ser ved, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such ser vice or posting. These requirements were completed as of 12/31/2014. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction =searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY I N F O R M AT I O N O B TA I N E D W I L L B E U S E D F O R T H AT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: FEB. 06, 2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Mauricio Flores, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-7302727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-636733-SW A-4509211 Published: May 15; June 5, 2015. EDH632719

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-14-632561-SW APN No.: 008363-000-049-00 Title Order No.: 02-14035466 Deed of Trust Grantor(s): JACOB A MUSGRAVE Deed of Trust Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (MERS) AS NOMINEE FOR GLOBAL ADVISORY GROUP, INC. DBA MORTGAGE ADVISORY GROUP, A WASHINGTON CORP O R AT I O N D e e d o f Tr u s t I n s t r u m e n t / R e f e r e n c e N o. : 200902190781 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/22/2015, at 9:00 AM On the Steps in Front of the North Entrance at the Snohomish County Superior Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington, to-wit: Unit 49, Phase II, HIGHLAND PARK, a condominium, according to the Declaration recorded under Recording Number 9412080064, and any amendments thereof, and in Survey Map and plans recorded under Volume 58 of Plats, Pages 41 through 45, inclusive, records of Snohomish County, Washington. More commonly known as: 500 ELM WAY UNIT 49, EDMONDS, WA 98020 which is subject to that cer tain Deed of Trust dated 2/17/2009, recorded 2/19/2009, under 200902190781 records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from JACOB A MUSGRAVE, AN UNMARRIED PERSON, as Grantor(s), to PACIFIC NW TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (MERS) AS NOMINEE FOR GLOBAL ADVISORY GROUP, INC. DBA MORTGAGE ADVISORY GROUP, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (MERS) AS NOMINEE FOR GLOBAL ADVISORY GROUP, INC. DBA MORTGAGE ADVISORY GROUP, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $17,696.17 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $174,138.14, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 2/1/2014, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/22/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JACOB A MUSGRAVE, AN UNMARRIED PERSON ADDRESS 500 ELM WAY UNIT 49, EDMONDS, WA 98020 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/20/2014. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission:


B8 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

'PSFDMPTVSFT Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: JAN. 19, 2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Mauricio Flores, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-632561-SW A-4505917 Published: April 24; May 15, 2015. EDH627037 Trustee Sale # 003211-WA Title # 02-13029217-01T NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/ hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA& filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1800-606-4819 Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, CLEAR RECON CORP, 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100, Mercer Island, WA 98040, Trustee will on 5/29/2015 at 10:00 AM at AT THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, OUTSIDE THE NORTH PLAZA ENTRANCE, 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVE, EVERETT, WA 98201 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State char tered banks, at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 47, PARKWAY CROSSING DIVISION 4, 5 AND 6, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED I N VO L U M E 5 7 O F P L AT S, PAG E S 9 7 T H RO U G H 1 0 3 , I N C L U S I V E , R E C O R D S O F S N O H O M I S H C O U N T Y, WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT, WA 98205 APN: 008305-000-047-00 which is subject to that cer tain Deed of Tr ust dated 12/13/2006, recorded 12/15/2006, as Auditor’s File No. 200612150176, records of Snohomish County, Washington, from DAVE R CALVO AND KARIN M CALVO, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to LAWYERS TITLE AGENCY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of BENEFICIAL WASHINGTON INC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by U.S. Bank Trust, N.A., as Tr ustee for LSF8 Master Par ticipation Tr ust, under an Assignment recorded under Auditor’s File No 201403310498. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary’s successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 1 2 / 1 3 / 2 0 0 6 N o t e A m o u n t : $ 3 0 3 , 7 5 9 . 8 0 I n t e r e s t Pa i d To : 1 1 / 1 8 / 2 0 1 1 N e x t D u e D a t e : 1 2 / 1 8 / 2 0 1 1 PAY M E N T I N F O R M AT I O N F R O M T H RU N O. P M T A M O U N T TOTA L 12/18/2011 6/18/2014 31 $1,979.45 $61,362.95 6/19/2014 7 $ 1 , 9 7 9 . 6 2 $ 1 3 , 8 5 7 . 3 4 A DVA N C E S / L AT E C H A R G E S DESCRIPTION TOTAL Accrued Late Charges $12,420.49 Fees (Receivable/Post) $4,625.84 ESTIMATED FORECLOSURE FEES AND COSTS DESCRIPTION TOTAL Trustee’s Fee’s $1,350.00 Posting of Notice of Default $75.00 Posting of Notice of Sale $50.00 Publication of Notice of Sale $900.00 Record Appointment of Successor Trustee $14.00 Record Assignment of Deed of Trust $15.00 Record Notice of Sale $78.00 T.S.G. Fee $1,158.57 Title Datedown Fee $100.00 Mailings $600.90 TOTAL DUE AS OF 1/14/2015 $96,601.01 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $288,260.30, together with interest as provided in the Note from 12/18/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/29/2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5 / 1 8 / 2 0 1 5 , ( 1 1 d ay s b e fo r e t h e s a l e d a t e ) t o c a u s e a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/18/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/18/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the or the Grantor’s successor interest or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT “1” by both first class and certified mail on 8/5/2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If you are a servicemember or a dependent of a servicemember, you may be entitled to certain protections under the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and any comparable state laws regarding the risk of foreclosure. If you believe you may be entitled to these protections, please contact our office immediately. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: 1/28/2015 CLEAR RECON CORP, as Successor Trustee For additional information or service you may contact: Clear Recon Corp. 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100 Mercer Island, WA 98040 Phone: (206) 707-9599 EXHIBIT “1” NAME ADDRESS DAVE CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT, WA 98205 DAVE CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 DAVE R CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT Washington 98205 DAVE R CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT, WA 98205 DAVE R CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 DAVID CALVO 9506 16TH PLACE NW LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 DAVID R CALVO 9506 16TH PLACE NW LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258 DAVID R CALVO 9506 16TH PLACE NW LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 DAVID R. CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT, WA 98205 DAVID R. CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 KARIN CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT, WA 98205 KARIN CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 KARIN CALVO 9506 16TH PLACE NW LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 KARIN M CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE EVERETT Wa s h i n g t o n 9 8 2 0 5 K A R I N M C A LVO 1 2 1 5 8 5 T H D R N E EVERETT, WA 98205 KARIN M CALVO 1215 85TH DR NE LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 KARIN M CALVO 9506 16TH PLACE NW LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258 KARIN M CALVO 9506 16TH PLACE NW LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258-2490 Published: April 24; May 15, 2015. EDH613390 WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on June 19, 2015 at 9:00 AM on the Steps in Front of the North Entrance to the Snohomish County Superior Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 located at Snohomish County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Snohomish County, State of Washington, to-wit; LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT NO. 17 (1-82), RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NO. 8207010172, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON, BEING A PORTION OF TRACT 5, BLOCK A, SUNNYSIDE LAND COMPANY’S ACRE TRACT ADDITION TO SNOHOMISH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 5 OF PLATS, PAGE 28, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON; SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 24X56 FOOT 1981 KENTWOOD MANUFACTURED HOME BEARING VIN No. KW 9454 AND MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN TITLE ELIMINATION TO THE DEED OF TRUST FILED WITH THE AUDITOR OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON ON December 23, 1993 UNDER RECORDING/AUDITOR’S NO. 9312230250. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 15, 2008, recorded December 30, 2008, under Auditor’s File No. 200812300017 records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Emmett L Musselwhite, also appearing of record as Emmett Musselwhite, an Unmarried Man, and Jill M Hatcher also appearing of record as Jill Hatcher, an Unmarried Woman, as Grantor, to Recontrust Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB and its successors and assigns as Beneficiary. Nationstar Mortgage LLC is now the beneficiary of the deed of trust. Said Deed of Trust was most recently modified on September 19, 2013 by an instrument recorded under Auditor’s File No. 201312240156. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Amount due to reinstate by February 18, 2015 Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 05/01/2014 through 02/01/2015: 2 payment(s) at $1,228.47

'PSFDMPTVSFT 8 payment(s) at $1,248.22 Total: $12,442.70 Accrued Late Charges $69.40 Escrow Advances in Excess of Escrow $132.23 Recouped from Past-Due Payments NSF Fee $10.00 Corporate Advances $1,575.87 TOTAL DEFAULT $14,230.20

IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $182,818.69, together with interest from April 1, 2014 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on June 19, 2015. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by June 8, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before June 8, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after June 8, 2015 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): Emmett L Musselwhite aka Emmett Musselwhite 4622 109th Ave SE Snohomish, WA 98290

Jane Doe, Unknown Spouse of Emmett L Musselwhite 4622 109th Ave SE Snohomish, WA 98290

Jill M Hatcher aka Jill Hatcher 4622 109th Ave SE Snohomish, WA 98290

John Doe, Unknown Spouse of Jill M Hatcher 4622 109th Ave SE Snohomish, WA 98290

by both first class and certified mail on October 16, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on October 16, 2014, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objection if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary. XI NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS AND PARTIES WHO ARE GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THIS DEED OF TRUST: (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSNG COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.wshfc.org/buyers/counseling.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm? webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&fiIterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear DATED: February 13, 2015. BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. Successor Trustee By: WILLIAM L. BISHOP, JR., President 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 State of Washington ) ) ss. County of King ) On this 13 day of February, 2015, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared William L. Bishop, Jr., to me known to be an Officer of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., the corporation that executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned, and on oath states that they are authorized to execute the said instrument. WITNESS my hand and official seal hereto affixed the day and year first above written. DARLA TRAUTMAN NOTARY PUBLIC in and for the State of Washington at: King County My Appt. Exp: April 9, 2016 Published: May 15; June 5, 2015. EDH632952

WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on May 29, 2015 at 10:00 am on the steps in front of the North side to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, in the City of Everett located at Snohomish County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Snohomish County, State of Washington, towit; UNIT 30, CROSSWATER, CONDOMINIUM, SURVEY MAP AND P L A N S R E C O R D E D U N D E R AU D I TO R ’ S F I L E N U M B E R 200505195247 AND AMENDED BY AFFIDAVIT OF MINOR CORRECTION RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NUMBER 200506060895, WITH PHASE 2 RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NUMBER 200508255004 AND PHASE 3 RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NUMBER 200510125220 CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION RECORDED UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NUMBER 200505190543, AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated January 13, 2006, recorded Januar y 18, 2006, under Auditor’s File No. 200601180122 records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Ted Alan Craig, an Unmarried Man, as Grantor, to Chicago Title Insurance Company, Everett, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender and its successors and assigns as Beneficiary. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for GSAA Home Equity Trust 2006-5, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-5, is now the beneficiary of the deed of trust. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:

i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Amount due to reinstate by January 28, 2015: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 02/01/2011 through 01/01/2015: 1 payment(s) at $1,680.39 12 payment(s) at $2,101.21 5 payment(s) at $1,719.94 7 payment(s) at $1,696.38 3 payment(s) at $1,661.87 9 payment(s) at $1,575.69 11 payment(s) at $1,542.96 Total: $83,508.65 Accrued Late Charges $198.96 Corporate Advances: $1,430.16 TOTAL DEFAULT $85,137.77 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $280,661.00, together with interest from January 1, 2011 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V

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The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on May 29, 2015. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es):

2. Angel Manuel Arzate Mora, father of Sabina Marie McLeod, d.o.b.05/27/05, Dependency Petition 15-7-00278-0 filed 02/12/15. 3. Angel Manuel Arzate Mora, father of Angellica Lynn McLeod, d.o.b.05/27/05, Dependency Petition 15-7-00286-1 filed 02/12/15. 4. R i c h a r d L . S m i t h , fa t h e r o f K ay d e n P i e r c e S m i t h , d.o.b.11/24/11, Dependency Petition 14-7-00826-7 filed 10/09/14. 5. Terry Lee Cunningham, father of Raiden Phoenix Cunningham, d.o.b.07/30/06, Dependency Petition 14-7-00451-2 filed 04/17/14. 6. U n k n ow n b i o l o g i c a l fa t h e r o f P r e s t o n O ’ N e i l J o n e s, d.o.b.05/09/11, Dependency Petition 15-7-00282-8 filed 02/10/15. 7. Matthew Morris, alleged father of Matthew Michael Morris Jr., d.o.b.12/30/14, Dependency Petition 15-7-00246-1 filed 01/22/15. 8. Unknown biological father of Matthew Michael Morris Jr., d.o.b.12/30/14, Dependency Petition 15-7-00246-1 filed 01/22/15. 9. Jennifer Andrea Garin, mother of Jaylen Francisco Garin, d.o.b.03/28/08, Dependency Petition 15-7-00275-5 filed 02/05/15. 10. Jennifer Andrea Garin, mother of Jordan Emanuel Coria, d.o.b.10/04/05, Dependency Petition 15-7-00274-7 filed 02/05/15. 11. U n k n o w n b i o l o g i c a l fa t h e r o f B r o n x R oy W y s o c k i , d.o.b.12/09/14, Dependency Petition 15-7-00356-5 filed 03/13/15. 12. Unknown biological father of Sarah Mardorf, d.o.b.09/09/09, Dependency Petition 14-7-00620-5 filed 06/20/14. 13. Jeanne Rose White, mother of Samuel Taylor White, d.o.b.02/11/09, Dependency Petition 14-7-00333-8 filed 10/08/14. 14. Unknown biological father of Mason Daniel Peterson, d.o.b.12/09/14, Dependency Petition 14-7-00917-4 filed 12/11/14. 15. Nicole Amber Merz, mother of Elijah Merz aka Baby Boy Merz, d.o.b.01/30/15, Dependency Petition 15-7-00287-9 filed 02/11/15. 16. Jared Thomas Merz Sr., father of Elijah Merz aka Baby Boy Merz, d.o.b.01/30/15, Dependency Petition 15-7-00287-9 filed 02/11/15. 17. L a n c e J. A l l e n , fa t h e r o f D a ko t a C h eye n n e R o g e r t , d.o.b.07/30/98, Dependency Petition 14-7-00694-9 filed 07/31/14. 18. U n k n ow n b i o l o g i c a l fa t h e r o f A s h e r D av i d M i n i ke n , d.o.b.07/31/08, Dependency Petition 15-7-00253-4 filed 01/28/15. 19. Unknown biological father of Riley Carlson, d.o.b.01/18/15, Dependency Petition 15-7-00248-8 filed 01/23/15. A Preliminary Hearing on July 7, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. and a Fact Finding hearing on July 23, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. will be held on this matter at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. These hearings will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. THE ABOVE NAMED INDIVIDUALS ARE SUMMONED TO APPEAR at both of said hearings regarding your child. If you do not appear at the first (preliminary) hearing, the court may cancel the second hearing and take evidence and enter an order without further notice to you. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, and/or to view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY SONYA KRASKI, Clerk of the Superior Court; T. BROWN, Deputy Clerk Published: May 1, 8, 15, 2015. EDH630240

Jane Doe, Unknown Spouse of Ted Alan Craig 2521 88th Dr NE Everett, WA 98205

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Ted Alan Craig Ted Alan Craig 2521 88th Dr NE 2521 88th Dr NE Everett, WA 98205 Lake Stevens, WA 98258

by both first class and certified mail on October 2, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on October 2, 2014, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objection if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary. XI NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS AND PARTIES WHO ARE GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THIS DEED OF TRUST: (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSNG COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.wshfc.org/buyers/counseling.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm? webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&fiIterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear DATED: January 27, 2015. BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. Successor Trustee By: WILLIAM L. BISHOP, JR., President 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 State of Washington ) ) ss. County of King ) On this 27 day of January, 2015, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared William L. Bishop, Jr., to me known to be an Officer of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., the corporation that executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned, and on oath states that they are authorized to execute the said instrument. WITNESS my hand and official seal hereto affixed the day and year first above written. DARLA TRAUTMAN NOTARY PUBLIC in and for the State of Washington at: King County My Appt. Exp: April 9, 2016 Published: April 24; May 15, 2015. EDH626994

4VNNPOT Case No. 14-2-06763-0 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AS TO DEFENDANTS THE ESTATE OF RICKY AMATO, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RICKY AMATO, DECEASED; AND JOHN AND JANE DOES, I THROUGH V, OCCUPANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL P RO P E RT Y, A N D A L S O A L L OT H E R P E R S O N S O R PARTIES UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, INTEREST, LIEN OR ESTATE IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2006-11, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF RICKY AMATO, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RICKY AMATO, DECEASED; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A.; COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A.; THE RIDGE AT HIGHLANDS EAST CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; JOHN AND JANE DOES, I THROUGH V, OCCUPANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY, AND ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, INTEREST, LIEN OR ESTATE IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO: DEFENDANTS THE ESTATE OF RICKY AMATO, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RICKY AMATO, DECEASED; AND JOHN AND JANE DOES, I THROUGH V, OCCUPANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY, AND ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, INTEREST, LIEN OR ESTATE IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this Summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 24th day of April, 2015, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled cour t, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2006-11, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff, Justin T. Jastrzebski and Katherine A. Christofilis of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. at their offices below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of said action is to judicially foreclose on the following described real property: UNIT 1, BUILDING 14, THE RIDGE AT HIGHLANDS EAST, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED UNDER SNOHOMISH COUNTY AUDITOR’S FILE NUMBER 200111015004, CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER(S) 200111010324, AND AMENDMENTS RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER(S) 200203290439 AND 200205140915, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. Commonly known as 14007 69th Drive, SE Unit PI, Snohomish, WA 98296 DATED this 22 day of April, 2015 BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. By: KATHERINE A. CHRISTOFILIS Justin T. Jastrzebski, WSBA #46680 Katherine A. Christofilis, WSBA #42584 Attorneys for Plaintiff Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 Fax: (206) 622-0354 Published: April 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015. EDH628664 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH JUVENILE COURT SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION DEPENDENCY THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN AND TO: 1. Michael Paul Hack, father of Jesse Allen Hack, d.o.b.05/13/10, Dependency Petition 14-7-00899-2 filed 11/19/14.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH JUVENILE COURT SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TERMINATION THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN AND TO: 1. Ashley Mar ie Camacho, mother of Terrance Raymond Intermill, Jr., d.o.b.09/16/13, Termination Petition 14-7-009204 filed 12/12/14. 2. Unknown biological father of Terrance Raymond Intermill, Jr., d.o.b.09/16/13, Ter mination Petition 14-7-00920-4 filed 12/12/14. 3. Courtney Elizabeth Beasley, mother of Grace Dawn Peters, d.o.b.11/25/06, Ter mination Petition 15-7-00367-1 filed 03/19/15. 4. T h o m a s L e e Pe t e r s , fa t h e r o f G r a c e D aw n Pe t e r s , d.o.b.11/25/06, Ter mination Petition 15-7-00367-1 filed 03/19/15. 5. Tommy Lee Sleet, alleged father of LilyAnn Marie Swope, d.o.b.06/04/13, Ter mination Petition 14-7-00929-8 filed 01/14/15. 6. U n k n ow n b i o l o g i c a l fa t h e r o f L i l y A n n M a r i e S wo p e, d.o.b.06/04/13, Ter mination Petition 14-7-00929-8 filed 01/14/15. 7. Mitchell Richardson, Alleged Father of Noah Mitchell Richardson, d.o.b.07/12/13, Termination Petition 14-7-007635 filed 08/28/14. 8. Unknown biological father of Noah Mitchell Richardson, d.o.b.07/12/13, Ter mination Petition 14-7-00763-5 filed 08/28/14. 9. Mitchell Richardson, alleged father of Rachel Sueann Merie Richardson, d.o.b.07/28/12, Termination Petition 14-7-007627 filed 08/28/14. 10. U n k n ow n b i o l o g i c a l fa t h e r o f R a c h e l S u e a n n M e r i e Richardson, d.o.b.07/28/12, Termination Petition 14-7-007627 filed 08/28/14. 11. Rachel Morgan Chapman, mother of Ashier Jayden Guzman, d.o.b.07/11/13, Ter mination Petition 15-7-00316-6 filed 02/23/15. 12. Alber t Guzman, Jr., father of Ashier Jayden Guzman, d.o.b.07/11/13, Ter mination Petition 15-7-00316-6 filed 02/23/15. 13. Mar isa Leanne Graham, mother of Aubr iella Rochelle Graham, d.o.b.12/20/13, Termination Petition 14-7-00912-3 filed 12/10/14. A Termination Hearing will be held on JULY 21, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. You are notified that a petition has been filed in this matter requesting that your parental rights to the above-named child be terminated. You have important legal rights and you must take steps to protect your interests. This petition could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. THE ABOVE NAMED INDIVIDUALS ARE SUMMONED TO APPEAR at said hearing regarding your child. If you fail to appear at the hearing, the court may take evidence against you, make findings of fact, and order that your parental rights be terminated without further notice to you. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, and/or to view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/TRM SONYA KRASKI, Clerk of the Superior Court; T. BROWN, Deputy Clerk Published: May 8, 15, 22, 2015. EDH630940

No. 14 3 02808 5 Summons by Publication (SMPB) Superior Court of Washington County of Snohomish

In re: Francisco Perez Petitioner, and Eva Perez Respondent. To the Respondent: Eva Perez 1. The petitioner has star ted an action in the above cour t requesting: that your marriage or domestic partnership be dissolved. 2. The petition also requests that the court grant the following relief: 3. You must respond to this summons by serving a copy of your written response on the person signing this summons and by filing the original with the clerk of the court. If you do not serve your written response within 60 days after the date of the first publication of this summons (60 days after the 10th day of April, 2015), the court may enter an order of default against you, and the court may, without further notice to you, enter a decree and approve or provide for other relief requested in this summons. In the case of a dissolution, the court will not enter the final decree until at least 90 days after service and filing. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned person, you are entitled to notice before an order of default or a decree may be entered. 4. Your written response to the summons and petition must be on form WPF DR 01.0300, Response to Petition (Marriage). Information about how to get this form may be obtained by contacting the clerk of the cour t, or by contacting the Administrative Office of the Courts at (360) 705-5328, or from the Internet at the Washington State Courts homepage: http://www.courts.wa.gov/forms 5. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. 6. One method of serving a copy of your response on the petitioner is to send it by certified mail with return receipt requested. 7. Other: This summons is issued pursuant to RCW 4.28.100 and Superior Court Civil Rule 4.1 of the state of Washington. Dated: 4-7-15 FRANCISCO PEREZ Petitioner File Original of Your Response Serve a Copy of Your with the Clerk of the Court at: Response on: Snohomish County Clerk Petitioner MS 605, 3000 Rockefeller Francisco Perez Everett, WA 98201 102 77th Pl. SW Everett, WA 98203 Published: April 10, 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 2015. EDH625773

NO. 14-7-00658-1 NOTICE AND SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION (DEPENDENCY) STATE OF WASHINGTON WHATCOM COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT JUVENILE DIVISION IN RE THE WELFARE OF: GAVIN WANG DOB: 04/27/06 TO : G A RY Q I A N G WA N G FAT H E R O F G AV I N WA N G : A Dependency Petition was filed on November 25, 2014; a Fact Finding Hearing will be held on this matter on: June 9, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. at Whatcom County Juvenile Cour t, Whatcom County Cour thouse, 311 Grand Avenue, Four th Floor, Bellingham, Washington. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 360/416-7200 or 1-800-785-5582. To view i n fo r m a t i o n a b o u t yo u r r i g h t s i n t h i s p r o c e e d i n g , g o t o www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. DATED this 28th day of April, 2015. David L. Reynolds Leon F. Henley Jr. COMMISSIONER Clerk of the Superior Court By: Carol A. Blunck Deputy Clerk WHATCOM COUNTY JUVENILE COURT Courthouse -- 311 Grand Avenue Bellingham, WA 98225 (360) 676-6780 Published: May 1, 8, 15, 2015. EDH630049


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 B9

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B10 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

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Sports SECTION C

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM/SPORTS

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Panthers stun Knights Hal Uderitz heads in a goal with less than a minute to play as Snohomish beats Kamiak for 4A district soccer championship, C3

FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

Patience with Zunino is Mariners’ best option Despite hitting woes, catcher is still big part of Seattle’s future

S

ELAINE THOMPSON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle catcher Mike Zunino in action against San Diego on Wednesday.

EATTLE — When you see a young You’ll see a better hitter this year. ... It’s not catcher blasting 400-foot home runs, just the hits. There have been some at-bats it’s easy to understand why the Seattle where he’s put some real tough pitches Mariners made Mike Zunino the third overin play, and that’s important as well. It’s all pick in the 2012 MLB draft. coming.” And when Zunino strikes out multiple For now, patience with Zunino is the times in a game, oftentimes looking lost Mariners’ best, and really their only, way at the plate while hitting below .200, to go. Even if Zunino improves upon his it’s easy to understand fans’ frustration JOHN BOYLE 22 home runs in 2014, a club record for with the Seattle catcher. a catcher, he needs to get on base more Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon knows that and strike out less often to be a productive piece of somewhere in between Tuesday’s two-homer game the lineup. As maddening as some of those threeand that .188 batting average is the player Zunino pitch strikeouts can be, it’s worth remembering the can become. accelerated path Zunino took to the big leagues. “It hasn’t shown up in the box score yet, but In 2013, Zunino’s first full season in the minor he’s getting better,” McClendon said. “He’s getting See BOYLE, Page C4 better, and I think in the end he’s going to pay off.

Snohomish captures district title TONIGHT’S GAME

Boston at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

TV: ROOT (cable) Radio: ESPN (710 AM)

Mariners stumble in 9th, lose to Red Sox By Bob Dutton The News Tribune

“We were throwing the ball around the ballpark (during warm-ups),” Snohomish head coach Kim Hammons said. “... We were so nervous and so tight it was unbelievable.” Snohomish scored three runs in the fourth and added two insurance runs in the sixth to clinch the victory and the Panthers’ first district championship in six years.

SEATTLE — A pair of misplays by a long-time infielder playing left field torpedoed the Seattle Mariners in the ninth inning Thursday night in a 2-1 loss to the Boston Red Sox at Safeco Field. And, no, it wasn’t Brad Miller, who made his outfield debut when he started the game in left field. The culprit was Rickie Weeks, who had just replaced Miller the previous inning as a pinch hitter. Weeks badly overthrew second base on Brock Holt’s leadoff double and dropped Mookie Betts’ routine one-out fly with runners on first and third. The drop actually had little effect on the outcome. Betts’ fly was, almost certainly, deep enough to score Holt with the goahead run. Weeks simply muffed the catch while trying to position himself for a throw to the plate. It put a sloppy end to what had been a tight pitchers duel between lefty Roenis Elias and Boston right-hander Joe Kelly for much of the evening. Matt Barnes (2-0), who escaped a jam in the eighth inning, got the victory when Koji Uehara worked a scoreless ninth for his eighth save in nine chances. Rodney (1-2) was the loser.

See PANTHERS, Page C2

See MARINERS, Page C5

DOUG RAMSAY / FOR THE HERALD

Snohomish’s Ben Dmochowsky (left) reacts after hitting a two-run double in the fourth inning as Lake Stevens’ Jacob Eason looks on Thursday night.

Panthers stay undefeated, beat Lake Stevens 9-4 for district championship By David Krueger Herald Writer

EVERETT — Even the Snohomish baseball players can’t believe the streak anymore. The Panthers keep playing games and keep racking up wins. Snohomish’s 22nd consecutive victory clinched a district title for the Panthers, who defeated Lake Stevens 9-4 in the 4A District 1 championship game Thursday night at Everett Memorial

Stadium. Snohomish clinched a berth in the regional round of the state tournament with the victory. Lake Stevens will play Monroe in a winner-to-state game at 10 a.m. Saturday at Everett Memorial Stadium. “I just can’t believe that. That just doesn’t happen in baseball,” said Snohomish senior Ben Dmochowsky. “But when you execute the way we do — we just look at it one game at a time

— and we’ve just come up with a ‘W’ every single time. I can’t believe it. It feels incredible.” Snohomish (22-0) took a fourrun lead in the first inning and never looked back. The Panthers plated four runs on two hits and four hit batsmen, forcing Lake Stevens to change pitchers before the end of the opening inning. The early lead helped calm the Snohomish players, who were a little excited during infield practice before the game.

Seahawks LB Irvin: ‘Atlanta is where I want to be’ Free agent in 2016 tells website ‘I’m going to be in Atlanta next season.’

Seahawks linebacker Bruce Irvin (51) celebrates after sacking Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during Super Bowl XLIX on Feb. 1 in Glendale, Ariz.

By John Boyle Herald Writer

RENTON — Seattle Seahawks linebacker Bruce Irvin is under contract for one more season in Seattle, but while attending an Atlanta Hawks playoff game this week, he made no secret of his plans once he hits free agency in 2016. “I’m going to be in Atlanta next season. I’m ready,” Irvin told the website blacksportsonline.com. “Atlanta is where I want to be. Believe that.” Irvin has never been shy about

MICHAEL CONROY / ASSOCIATED PRESS

INSIDE: NFL, C2

|

Preps, C3

|

Baseball, C5

|

speaking his mind, and he took to Twitter to express his unhappiness with the Seahawks not picking up his fifth-year option, which would have paid him $7.8 million in 2016 (under the league’s current collective bargaining agreement, teams can exercise a fifth-year option on first-round picks, but have to do so after year four of their deals). Seahawks general manager John Schneider and coach Pete Carroll both said during draft weekend that they want Irvin to be in Seattle’s long-term plans, but there’s a difference between wanting Irvin and being willing to pay what it takes to keep him in free agency. The Seahawks also declined the option on James Carpenter,

NBA Playoffs, C6

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their 2011 pick, said it wasn’t a reflection of their opinion of him, then let him walk in free agency. They also talked over and over again about how much they wanted to keep Golden Tate, but they simply couldn’t afford what Detroit was willing to pay on the open market; same thing with Byron Maxwell this offseason. Letting those players go doesn’t mean the Seahawks were lying about their desire to keep them, just that they couldn’t afford to do so under the restrictions put in place by the league’s salary cap. As for why Irvin would declare his desire to play for the Falcons, he is from Atlanta, and going there would allow him to play for

Weather, C6

See IRVIN, Page C2


C2

Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Brady appeals suspension; Pats rebut NFL

CALENDAR MAY

FRI 15

SAT 16

Boston 7:10 p.m. ROOT

Boston 6:10 p.m. ROOT Vancouver 4 p.m. FOX,13 Home

Away

TELEVISION TODAY

AUTO RACING 9 a.m. FS1 Sprint Cup practice 10:45 a.m. FS1 Sprint Cup practice 1 p.m. FS1 Sprint Cup qualifying 2:30 p.m. FS1 Truck Series qualifying 4 p.m. FS1 Sprint Showdown 5:30 p.m. FS1 NC Lottery 200 BASEBALL 4 p.m. PAC12 WSU at Arizona State 7 p.m. PAC12 Oregon St. at Stanford 7 p.m. ROOT Boston at Seattle BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN Atlanta at Washington 7:30 p.m. ESPN Golden St. at Memphis BICYCLING 2 p.m. NBCS Tour of California BOXING 6 p.m. ESPN2 Clay vs. Ojeda 7 p.m. TRUTV Friday Night Knockout HORSE RACING Noon NBCS Black-Eyed Susan Stakes 8 p.m. NBCS Black-Eyed Susan Stakes GOLF 6:30 a.m. GOLF Open de Espana 9:30 a.m. GOLF Regions Tradition Noon GOLF Wells Fargo Champ. 4 p.m. GOLF BMW Charity Pro-Am 4:30 a.m. GOLF Open de Espana SOCCER 2 p.m. ROOT Bayern Munich vs. Barcelona 4 p.m. ROOT Real Madrid vs. Juventus 4:45 a.m. NBCS Southampton vs. Aston Villa SOFTBALL 4 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Regional

SATURDAY

AUTO RACING ABC,4 Indianapolis 500, qualifying 4 p.m. FS1 NASCAR All-Star Race, qualifying 6 p.m. ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying 6 p.m. FS1 NASCAR All-Star Race BASEBALL 10 a.m. FS1 Atlanta at Miami 1 p.m. FS1 Pittsburgh at Chi. Cubs 1 p.m. PAC12 Oregon at Utah 4 p.m. PAC12 Arizona at UCLA 6 p.m. ROOT Boston at Seattle 7 p.m. PAC12 Wash. St. at Arizona St. BICYCLING 1:30 p.m. NBCS Tour of California EQUESTRIAN 11:30 a.m. NBCS Preakness Stakes Prep. 1:30 p.m. NBC,5 Preakness Stakes GOLF 10 a.m. GOLF Wells Fargo Champ. Noon CBS,7 Wells Fargo Champ. Noon GOLF Regions Tradition 2 p.m. GOLF Kingsmill Championship 4 p.m. GOLF BMW Charity Pro-Am 4 a.m. GOLF Open de Espana HOCKEY 10 a.m. NBC,5 Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers 10 a.m. CBUT Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers MOTORCYCLE RACING 4 p.m. NBCS Hangtown MX Classic 4:30 a.m. FS1 French Grand Prix SOCCER 7 a.m. NBCS English Premier League 9:30 a.m. NBCS Liverpool vs. Crystal Palace 4 p.m. FOX,13 Seattle at Vancouver 5:30 a.m. NBCS Swansea City vs. Manchester City SOFTBALL 9 a.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 11:30 a.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 1:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 2 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 4 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 6:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 1 p.m.

RADIO TODAY 7:10 p.m.

710

BASEBALL Boston at Seattle

SATURDAY 4 p.m. 6:10 p.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

AUTO RACING 1380 NASCAR All-Star Race BASEBALL 710 Boston at Seattle EQUESTRIAN 950 Preakness Stakes SOCCER 97.3 Seattle at Vancouver

PREPS TODAY

BASEBALL 2A District Tournament—Archbishop Murphy vs. Anacortes at Volunteer Park, 6 p.m. SOFTBALL Darrington at La Conner, 3:30 p.m.; Sultan at Archbishop Murphy, Granite Falls at Cedar Park Christian-Bothell, Cedarcrest at Lakewood, Coupeville at South Whidbey, all 4 p.m. TRACK AND FIELD 2A Sub-District Meet at Cedarcrest H.S., 4 p.m.; 1A District Championships at King’s H.S., 4 p.m.; Wesco 3A North Finals at Oak Harbor H.S., 5:30 p.m.; Wesco 3A South Finals at Edmonds Stadium, 5:30 p.m.; Wesco 4A Finals at Snohomish H.S., 5:30 p.m. GIRLS TENNIS Wesco 3A South Tournament at Glacier Peak H.S., Wesco 4A Tournament at Snohomish H.S., both 1 p.m.; 2A Sub-district championship at Granite Falls, 3:30 p.m.

By Howard Ulman And Jimmy Golen

The team says: McNally used the term “deflator” refer to his desire to lose weight, as in the text, “deflate and give somebody that jacket.” And the needle was necessary because McNally was sometimes responsible for getting an inflation needle to referees for pregame testing.

Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Super Bowl MVP Tom Brady appealed the four-game suspension he was handed for his role in using deflated footballs during the AFC championship game, and the players union urged Commissioner Roger Goodell to appoint a neutral arbitrator to hear the case. The expected appeal was filed by the NFL Players Association on Thursday about an hour before a 5 p.m. Eastern deadline. The league’s collective bargaining agreement stipulates that it will be decided by Goodell or a person he designates. But the players union said in a news release that “given the NFL’s history of inconsistency and arbitrary decisions in disciplinary matters, it is only fair that a neutral arbitrator hear this appeal.” The union did not detail the basis for the appeal. But in a 20,000-word rebuttal posted online by the Patriots’ lawyers earlier Thursday, the team disputed the conclusions on matters of science, logic and law. Attorney Daniel Goldberg’s response claims the league’s conclusions are “at best, incomplete, incorrect and lack context,” claiming as one example that the “deflator” nickname used by a ballboy and cited in the discipline was about weight loss, not footballs. Goldberg represented the team and was present during all of interviews of team personnel. Patriots spokesman Stacey James confirmed that the site wellsreportcontext.com was genuine and “approved/supported by the team.” The NFL suspended the quarterback for four games on Monday, also fining the defending Super Bowl champions $1 million and taking away two draft picks. Brady’s appeal only deals with the suspension and must be heard within 10 days. The team has not said if it will appeal its penalties, which include a firstround draft pick next year and a fourth-rounder in 2017, before a

The science The NFL says: The footballs provided by the Patriots lost more air pressure between the pregame test and halftime than could be explained by nonnefarious reasons. The team says: The league cherry-picked readings from two different gauges to create the biggest gap between pregame and halftime measurements. That overshadowed a difference in air pressure in some of the balls that could be explained by atmospheric conditions.

Who is “he”?

ELISE AMENDOLA / ASSOCIATED PRESS

New England quarterback Tom Brady holds a football during warm-ups before the AFC Championship game against Indianapolis in January. On Thursday, Brady appealed the four-game suspension he was handed for his role in using deflated footballs during the AFC Championship game.

May 21 deadline. League-appointed investigator Ted Wells found that Brady was “at least generally aware” of plans by two team employees to prepare the balls to his liking, below the league-mandated minimum of 12.5 pounds per square inch. But the team’s rebuttal presented its own science that would explain the loss of pressure in a more innocuous way. “The most fundamental issue in this matter is: DOES SCIENCE EXPLAIN THE LOSS OF PSI IN THE PATRIOTS FOOTBALLS?” Goldberg wrote before concluding, also in all capital letters, that it does. The rebuttal also alludes to other incidents of ball-tampering that were not dealt with as

harshly. And it says increased communication between Brady and the ballboys after the scandal broke were just normal expressions of concern, rather than evidence of the quarterback’s guilt. Here are some more of the claims and counter-claims in the Wells report and the Patriots’ rebuttal:

The deflator The NFL says: Texts in which locker room attendant Jim McNally refers to himself as “the deflator” are an indication that he was taking air out of footballs after they were inspected by the referees. His texts with equipment assistant John Jastremski also include a reference to a providing him with a needle.

The NFL says: It’s Brady. A text message from Jastremski to McNally says: “Talked to him last night. He actually brought you up and said you must have a lot of stress trying to get them done.” The Patriots say: It is a leap of logic to conclude that the stress was related to football deflation. They refer, Goldberg wrote, to “Mr. Jastremski’s friend, as the investigators were told, and the conversation involved issues relating to Mr. McNally’s stress relating to reselling family tickets.”

Cooperation The NFL says: Brady obstructed the investigation by refusing to turn over his cellphone records. The team refused to make McNally available for a follow-up interview. Failure to cooperate in a league investigation is considered conduct detrimental to the league, and it opens the team and player up to severe penalties. The team says: The league already had access to Brady’s texts and calls with McNally and Jastremski through their phones. Also, if Wells’ investigators failed to ask all the questions the first time, it’s their fault.

Panthers

Irvin

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“We haven’t done it since 2009. It’s sweet,” Hammons said. “It’s always fun to compete against Lake Stevens. They’re a quality group (with) good coaches, good players. They are a very exciting team.” In fact, for the Snohomish players, there was nobody else they’d rather face, with Dmochowsky looking at the Lake Stevens team and pointing out, “that’s our biggest rival.” “It can’t be more fun than this: Lake Stevens-Snohomish in the district championship,” Dmochowsky said. “It’s something that I’ve wanted for years. I’m so happy just to get the opportunity.” The Snohomish catcher said that even though others may assume there’s a lot of pressure on the Panthers, they just take each game — and victory — in stride. “We’ve never looked at it as, ‘We’re defending 22-0,’” Dmochowsky said. “People look at you like all the pressure’s on us but we don’t see it that way. We see it as, ‘We have two equal teams going into a game, one of us is going to come out on top and if we execute it’s going to be us.’” Dmochowsky had a tworun double in the game, Ryan Sandifer hit an RBI double and Mulholland added an RBI double for Snohomish, which had seven players get hits in the contest. “Kyle Sandifer, Andrew Kane, Connor Thompson, all of these guys that no one even knew existed have just come in,” Dmochowsky said, “and they’re the reason we’re 22-0.” “It’s been a new hero every game for us,” Hammons said. “That’s just the way the whole season has been.” The nine runs were plenty for Mulholland, the Panthers’ pitcher. Mulholland struck out 10 batters — including all three in the second inning — and

former Seahawks defensive coordinator Dan Quinn, now Atlanta’s head coach. Declaring those intentions now, however, probably won’t go over well with Seahawks fans, presuming Irvin isn’t traded between now and the 2015 season. Irvin’s agent is also likely to disapprove of his client seemingly removing leverage from future negotiations in free agency. One thing these comments would seem to make clear is that Irvin won’t negotiate on an extension with Seattle prior to becoming a free agent, not unless the Seahawks blow him away with a huge offer, a highly unlikely scenario considering they weren’t willing to pick up his option.

DOUG RAMSAY / FOR THE HERALD

Snohomish pitcher Jake Mulholland delivers a pitch during the 4A district championship game at Everett Memorial Stadium on Friday.

didn’t allow a hit until the third inning. The junior, who has verbally committed to Washington State, improved to 9-0 with the victory. “He’s a stud. He competes. He’s a program-changer,” said Snohomish assistant coach Nick Hammons, who played with the Panthers before graduating in 2007. “He’s that type of player. ... He’s just a phenomenal player and works hard every day. Kids rally around him.” Dmochowsky, the Snohomish catcher who is good friends with Mulholland, ribbed the pitcher a little bit after the game. “Today was probably one of his worst pitching days all year, honestly, and he got it done,” Dmochowsky said with a laugh, quickly adding: “It’s the only time you’ve ever given up four runs.” Mulholland shrugged and said his team gives him confidence every time he goes out to the mound. “I don’t consider it a great outing, by any means, but I know I can give up four runs because my team’s going to score,” Mulholland said. “And that’s what we did.” Snohomish, ranked No. 1 in 4A by WashingtonBaseballPoll.

com, looks to remain undefeated when the Panthers face the District 2 No. 2 team in a state regional game at 10 a.m. May 23 at Everett Memorial Stadium. The winner will play again later that afternoon for a trip to the 4A state semifinals. Dmochowsky likes the Panthers’ chances. “We’ve got that 1-2, Ryan Sandifer-Mulholland punch and we’re going to see what we can do with it,” Dmochowsky said. The Lake Stevens offense put up three runs in the fifth inning with an RBI double by Justin Brown who scored on a single by Skyler Swords. Lake Stevens (14-9) added another run on a groundout by Tyler Billings to respond after Snohomish scored three runs in the inning before. “I didn’t feel secure because I knew they were going to battle back,” Dmochowsky said. “We came and we added more. We didn’t settle, which is big.” “They never stop,” added Mulholland. “They’re loud from the first inning to the seventh inning, whether they’re up by 10 or down by 10, they’re never going to stop. That’s something you’ve got to respect. They’re a great ballclub and they always work hard. They’re always tough.”

Turbin undergoes hip surgery Seahawks running back Robert Turbin, Marshawn Lynch’s backup for each of the past three seasons, is recovering from offseason hip surgery, though he is expected to be ready for the start of the season, a league source confirmed. Turbin, a fourth-round pick in 2012, is entering the final year of his rookie contract, and despite the Seahawks picking Christine Michael in the second round of the 2013 draft, Turbin has remained Seattle’s No. 2 behind Lynch while also being the regular back in the two-minute offense. Turbin appeared in all 16 games last season, starting three, and also played a bit of fullback following an injury to Will Tukuafu. Turbin rushed for 310 yards on 74 carries and had 16 catches for 186 yards and two touchdowns. If Turbin isn’t ready for the start of camp or preseason games, Seattle should have plenty of bodies at the position, having added undrafted rookies Thomas Rawls and Rod Smith, as well as Demitrius Bronson, who spent time with Seattle last offseason.


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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Monroe extends season By David Krueger Herald Writer

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

EVERETT — The Monroe baseball team is used to one-run baseball games by this point in the season. Monroe’s seventh onerun game of the season was its most important, with the Bearcats holding off Mount Vernon 3-2 in a 4A District 1 loser-out game Thursday afternoon at Everett Memorial Stadium. The win sends the Bearcats to a winner-tostate game against Lake Stevens at 10 a.m. Saturday at Everett Memorial Stadium. The loss ended Mount Vernon’s season. Monroe’s Andrew Chartrand started the scoring for Monroe with an RBI double in the top of the third inning. Alex Spahman followed that with a two-run double to score Chartrand and Justin Folz to give the Bearcats a 3-0 lead. The Bearcats would need all three of those runs to hold off the Bulldogs.

Kamiak goalkeeper Tristan Bratvold blocks a shot with teammates Dominik Smith, Eric Koegler and Snohomish’s Kristian Barney trailing Thursday night in the 4A District Tournament championship game at Goddard Stadium. Snohomish won 2-1 on a late goal by freshman Hal Uderitz.

Late goal hands Panthers district title By Aaron Lommers Herald Writer

EVERETT — The Snohomish boys soccer team had eight corner kicks in Thursday’s 4A District 1 championship game, but none more important than the final one. With time being kept on the field and no more than a minute to play, Snohomish freshman Hal Uderitz headed in a corner kick from sophomore Colman French for what turned out to be the game-winning goal in a 2-1 win over Kamiak. “It was a great feeling,” Uderitz said. “Just to score the game-winning goal with no time left, it’s just the best feeling. It’s only my third goal of the season, so hopefully I’ll have more.” The goal happened so quickly that

Snohomish head coach Dan Pingrey didn’t even see it, but that didn’t stop him from celebrating. “I was asking who scored because all I saw was the ball go in the net,” Pingrey said. “I had no idea who hit it or anything else. That’s exciting stuff.” The defending state champion Panthers are the district champions, while Kamiak has to play Mount Vernon in a winner-tostate/loser out game on Saturday. Both teams had a lot of chances, but Thursday’s championship game remained scoreless until the 64th minute. Kamiak senior Garrett Peterson fired a left-footed shot from about 25 yards into the left side of the net on an assist from junior Eric Koegler to give his team a 1-0 lead. “He put a laser shot into

the side netting,” Kamiak head coach Kosta Pitaroulis said. “The goalie didn’t have a chance. He hit really hard and just in a straight line. It was beautiful.” The way the game had gone it seemed the goal might hold up, but Pingrey made all the right moves in the final 16 minutes. Snohomish changed formations four times and it paid off with two goals and the win. “Every time we switched we ended up getting a goal out of it, so it worked,” Pingrey said. “But we literally played four different formations just to adjust, but it was fun and it made them have to adjust.” Snohomish’s first goal came in the 72nd minute when sophomore Jason Fairhurst scored off of a throw in by senior Blake Crutchfield. The goal

BASEBALL

Monroe 3, Mount Vernon 2 At Everett Memorial Stadium Mount Vernon 003 000 0 — 3 10 1 Monroe 001 010 0 — 2 6 0

bounce back after getting falling behind late in the game. “After we got that goal scored against us they stepped up like a champion,” Pingrey said. “If you’re going to be a champion, you’ve got to and they stepped up. I’m proud of them. It was fun.” Pitharoulis has the challenge of getting his team prepared to play a game against Mount Vernon on Saturday that it must win. The Knights have defeated the Bulldogs in each of their two meeting this season. “We’ve had good success against Mount Vernon this season,” Pitharoulis said. “Mount Vernon is coming off a win and they’re very excited and we have to come off of a loss…It’s hard to beat a team for the third time.”

Leah Shin 87, Chloe Shelton 99, Abby Holmberg 99, Serena Nguyen 106, Heidi Stedman 114; Snohomish: Vreni Todd 80, Emily Roberts 87, Kailee Mydske 95, Annika Roberts 99, Hannah Baylor 109, Bailey Green 122; Mount Vernon: Annie Gilbert 95, Elizabeth Urban 114, Lindsey Simcock 122, Allison Marken 136; Cascade: Abby Lyon 86, Elise Detloff 102, Morgan McBride 103, Charlotte Lemke 105; Monroe: Lupe Gutierrez 109.

Johnson 6-1, 6-1.

EVERETT — After nearly 73 scoreless minutes, Mount Vernon took advantage of a Mariner own goal and held on to beat the Marauders 1-0 in a 4A District 1 loser-out game on Thursday. “When your back is against the wall you come out and you do what you’ve got to do,” Mount Vernon head coach Tony Dabbs said. Mariner had its chances in the first half, but in the second half opportunities were more difficult to come by. The Bulldogs advance to play Kamiak in a winner-to-state/loser out game on Saturday.

2A Sub-District Tournament

3A Districts

GIRLS TENNIS

Daniel Murphy and Austin Rogers. Cooper Nelson, Ryan Fredrickson (6) and Gabe Beuckman. WP—Murphy (4-1). LP—Nelson. 2B— Justin Folz (M), Andrew Chartrand (M), Alex Spahman (M), Noah Miller (M), Jason Mustappa (MV), Hayden Schmidt (MV). Records—Mount Vernon 12-10. Monroe 11-11.

4A District Tournament

Snohomish 9, Lake Stevens 4 At Everett Memorial Stadium Lake Stevens 001 030 0 — 4 7 2 Snohomish 400 302 x — 9 7 2 Sam Pyzer, Riley Crane (1), Quinlan Hayes (5), Max Gluck (6) and Andrew Bustard. Jake Mulholland and Ben Dmochowsky. WP—Mulholland (9-0). LP—Pyzer. 2B—Easton Funk (LS), Ryan Sandifer (S), Dmochowsky (S), Mulholland (S). Records—Lake Stevens 14-9 overall. Snohomish 22-0. Saturday’s game Lake Stevens vs. Monroe, 10 a.m.

BOYS GOLF Wesco 4A Tournament At Echo Falls G.C. 18 holes, par 70 Team scores: Snohomish 369, Lake Stevens 416, Cascade 424, Jackson 448, Kamiak 455, Monroe 460, Mount Vernon 507, Mariner 513. Medalists: Luke Kuna, Snohomish, 69, Ben Gardner, Snohomish, 69. Team District quailfiers: Snohomish (Kuna 69, Gardner 69, Ethan Casto 72, Keegan Willis 74, Nolan Armbruster 85, Dylan Schuurma 87); Lake Stevens (Brayden Webb 79, Jake Rasmussen 83, Austin Bogart 84, Braden Whitney 84, Spencer Raub 86, Garrett Glick 92). Individual District quailfiers: Cascade: Jon Cisneros 80, Andy Wilson 82, Brevin Brown 83, Matthew Slaven 86, Dylan Straus 93; Jackson: Arnold Ha 74, Jordan Brajcich 77, Norbu Sangpo 92, Matthew Lauer 102); Kamiak: Tanner Mohr 79, Tyler Farris 83, Mark Carter 88, Michael Baker 88; Monroe: Owen Fenner 76, Mikke Wittenberg 88, Chase Pack 90, Jake Job 91; Mount Vernon: Austin Darnell 78, Kevin Teeter 96, Mariner: Raza Khan 90, Justin Good 96, Tyler Hanning 100, Nick Mayfield 102.

BOYS SOCCER

4A District Tournament Thursday’s games Mount Vernon 1, Mariner 0 Snohomish 2, Kamiak 1

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Kamiak’s Brandon Wright (left) and Snohomish’s Blake Crutchfield vie for the header Thursday night during the 4A District Tournament championship game. Alex Fairhurst. Records—Kamiak 11-5-2. Snohomish 15-2-1.

Mount Vernon 1, Mariner 0 At Goddard Stadium Goals—Mariner own goal. Assists: none. Goalkeepers–Mount Vernon: Eli Strom. Mariner: Silvan Katynskiy. Records–Mount Vernon 10-9-0. Mariner 10-8-1. Saturday’s game Mount Vernon vs. Snohomish, 2 p.m. 3A District Tournament Shorewood 2, Arlington 1 Mountlake Terrace vs. Meadowdale

Shorewood 2, Arlington 1 At Shoreline Stadium Goals—Callahan Gobel (S), Abdulie Danso (S), Wyatt Bierer (A). Assists—Sam Anschell (S). Goalkeepers—Arlington: Nick McDonald. Shorewood: Isaac Whitaker. Records—Arlington 9-73, Shorewood 12-5-2. Saturday’s games Meadowdale vs. Shorewood, 4 p.m. Edmonds-Woodway vs. Glacier Peak, 6 p.m. 2A District Tournament Thursday’s game Shorecrest 2, Squalicum 1, 20T

Snohomish 2, Kamiak 1

Shorecrest 2, Squalicum 1 (2OT)

At Goddard Stadium Goals—Garrett Peterson (K), Jason Fairhurst (S), Hal Uderitz (S). Assists—Eric Koegler (K), Blake Crutchfield (S), Colman French (S). Goalkeepers—Kamiak: Tristan Bratvold. Snohomish:

At Sedro-Woolley H.S. Goals—Haitem Moussaddak (SC), Anton Resing (SC), Ben Peterson (SQ). Assists—Nick Shively (SC), Kevin Musar (SC). Goalkeepers— Shorecrest: Matthew Wheaton. Squalicum: Not

reported. Records—Shorecrest 11-1-0 league, 16-2-1 overall. Squalicum, 10-0-2. 14-2-3. Saturday’s games Shorecrest vs. Anacortes, TBD Archbishop Murphy vs. Sedro-Woolley, TBD 1A Bi-District Tournament Thursday’s game Seattle Academy vs. South Whidbey

South Whidbey 3, Seattle Academy 1 At Sultan H.S. Goals—Andy Zisette (SW) 2, Jeff Meier (SW), (SA stats not reported). Assists—Davin Kesler (SW). Goalkeepers—Seattle Academy: not reported. South Whidbey: Charley Stelling. Records—Seattle Academy not reported, South Whidbey 15-4-0. Saturday’s games South Whidbey vs. University Prep, 1 p.m. King’s vs. Overlake, 3 p.m.

GIRLS GOLF Wesco 4A Districts Day 1 At Walter Hall G.C. 18 holes played, par 72 Kamiak: Renee Kwak 75, Hannah Lee 81, Shawna Cabanda 85, Simran Handa 86, Olivia Kim 86, Rachel Ponting 91; Lake Stevens: Anna Lundquist 87, Mak Sundvor 89, Amanda Mirante 92, Kaitlyn Kurisu 103, Nicole Hornung 105, Gillian Egelstad 106; Jackson: Sydney Majors 86,

Bulldogs win on own goal

seemed to take a little pressure off the Panthers, who continued to push as time ticked down. The game appeared headed to overtime when the Panthers capitalized on their final corner kick. Both goalkeepers, Snohomish senior Alex Fairhurst and Kamiak senior Tristan Bratvold played well throughout the game and made key saves. Bratvold had six and Fairhurst finished with four. Fairhurst has split time with junior Cameron Beardsley in goal most of the season, but Fairhurst has played the entirety of the last two games. “He’s been great,” PIngrey said. “He’s stepped up. He’s fantastic and the guys love him because nothing fazes him.” Pingrey was particularly happy to see his team

PREP | Scoreboard 4A District Tournament Thursday’s games Monroe 3, Mount Vernon 2 Snohomish 9, Lake Stevens 4

DISTRICT SOCCER | Roundup

At Snohomish H.S. SINGLES First round: Emily Sandquist (J) def. Rachel Wallace (Mo) 6-0, 6-0; Miranda LeDuc (MV) def. Emily Gonzalez (C) 6-3, 6-2; Torrianna Hoult (LS) def. Angela Lee (K) default; Katie Peterson (S) def. Eveleen Reddy (Ma) 6-0, 6-0; Nicole Castro (J) def. Phung Ly (Ma) 6-0, 6-0; Ellie Flitsch (S) def. Audrey Taber (C) 6-0, 6-1; Monica Pilchard (LS) def. Hannah Levine (MV) 6-1, 6-0; Elizabeth Norris (K) def. Taylor Rowe (Mo) 6-0, 6-0. Quaterfinals: Sandquist def. LeDuc 6-1, 6-3; Peterson def. Hoult 6-1, 6-2; Castro def. Flitsch 6-2, 6-1; Norris def. Pilchard 6-1, 6-1. DOUBLES First round: K. Doucette-M. Flitsch (S) def. A. Stowell-S. Remely (Mo) 6-0, 6-1; S. Holtzlider-L. Tra (Ma) def. A. Leong-A. Reiner (J) 6-2, 6-4; J. Moores-P. Gear (MV) def. C. McGhehey-A. Cizek (C) 6-3, 6-1; Huot-Barnes (LS) def. H. Lee-T. Nguyen (K) 6-2, 6-1; B. Ferguson-B. Jacobson (S) def. T. Pham-P. Pineda (Ma) 6-0, 6-4; C. Han-H. Mietzner (J) 6-2, 6-1; A. Nelson-J. Cooley (MV) def. D. Sharma-S. Vaid (K) 7-5, 6-3; A. Green-T. Gipson (LS) def. C. Kingery-M. Godina-Ruiz (Mo) 6-2, 6-0. Quarterfinals: Doucette-Flitsch def. Holztlider-Tra 6-0, 6-1; Huot-Barnes def. Moores-Gear 6-3, 7-6 (3); Han-Mietzner def. Ferguson-Jacobson 6-1, 4-6, 7-5; Green-Gipson def. NelsonCooley 6-1, 6-1.

Wesco 3A South Tournament At Glacier Peak H.S. SINGLES First round: Leona Aklipi (EW) def. Amy Buswell (SW) 4-6, 6-4, 6-2; Alisha Chand (M) def. Ayana Traylor 6-0, 6-1 (MT); Nicole Ung (EW) def. Kristina Shalatova (MT) 6-1, 6-2; Simran Rai (M) def. Kiya Ingram (L) 6-2, 7-5. Quarterfinals: Monica Kwong (L) def. Aklipi 6-0, 6-0; Chand def. Michelle Baldini (GP) 4-6, 6-0, 6-1; Jelena Bojic (SW) def. Ung 6-1, 6-1; Madeline Mahler (GP) def. Rai 6-1, 6-0. Semifinals: Kwong def. Chand 6-1, 6-2; Mahler def. Bojic 6-2, 6-1. DOUBLES First round: Olivia Nguyen-Cristi Phan (L) def. Kaitlyn Anderson-Meron Abay (MT) 6-3, 6-0; Taylor Monroe-Jones-Sara Coppa (M) def. Micah Flood-Issy Koehler (GP) 6-2, 6-3; Hailey Rehnfeldt-Olivia Olson (EW) def. Catherine Pham-Tiffany Daniggelis (M) 3-6, 6-4, 6-0; Genevieve O’Malley-Jenny Ahn (SW) def. Reilly WalshTaylor Fahey (L) 6-0, 6-1. Quarterfinals: Myint-Zu Kyaw-Hanna Rehnfeldt (EW) def. Nguyen-Phan 6-1, 6-0; Ellie Allen-Hatch-Emily Wright (SW) def. MonroeJones-Coppa 6-3, 6-7, 6-2; Anna Sneesby-Marissa Johnson (GP) def. Rehnfeldt-Olson 7-6, 6-2; Nicki Bouche-Tina Liu (MT) def. O’Malley-Ahn 6-1, 6-1. Semifinals: Kyaw-Rehnfeldt def. AllenHatch-Wright 6-0, 6-4; Bouche-Liu def. Sneesby-

At Granite Falls H.S. SINGLES First round: Emma Loney (GF) def. Ji Hae Hong (S) 6-2, 6-1; Hannah Krutsinger (L) def. Danielle Coleman (GF) 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4; Laura Gilbertson (GF) def. Madelyn Hoban (AM) 6-0, 6-4; Bianca Dang (S) def. Cyera Charles (L) 6-4, 6-2. Quarterfinals: Courtney Skalley (AM) def. Loney 6-2, 6-1; Elizabeth Parsek (S) def. Krutsinger 6-3, 7-6 (2); Christina Barber (L) def. Gilbertson 6-0, 6-4; Lauren Braswell (AM) def. Dang 6-3, 6-0. Semifinals: Skalley def. Parsek 6-3, 6-1; Braswell def. Barber 6-1, 1-6, 6-3. DOUBLES First round: Borsma-Romeis (L) def. MotaSoriano-Curry (GF) 7-6 (4), 6-4; Wolfe-Deyoung (L) def. Williams-Kunz (AM); Farnam-Li (S) def. Espeland-Desmond (L) 6-0, 6-1; Camilleri-Van Hollebeke (AM) def. Nguyen-Zhao 4-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Quarterfinals: Stevens-Rutter (S) def. Borsma-Romeis 7-6 (4), 6-4; Hart-Meyer (GF) def. 4-6, 6-3, 6-0; Corbett-Herrera (AM) def. FarnamLi 2-6, 6-2, 7-5; Arndt-Gresli (GF) def. CamilleriVan Hollebeke 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. Semifinals: Stevens-Rutter def. Hart-Meyer 6-0, 6-0; Arndt-Gresli def. Corbett-Herrera 6-0, 6-1.

SOFTBALL Lake Stevens 4, Jackson 0 At Lake Stevens H.S. Jackson 000 000 0 — 0 7 1 Lake Stevens 000 220 0 — 4 9 0 Sophie Frost and Kayla Ellis. Sarah Johnson and Tehya Harney. WP—Johnson. LP—Frost. 2B—Cassidy Fifield (L), Taylor Adams (J). Records—Jackson 11-3 league, 16-5 overall. Lake Stevens 11-3, 16-5.

Mountlake Terrace 5, Glacier Peak 2 At Glacier Peak H.S. M. Terrace 130 001 0 — 5 8 1 Glacier Peak 010 010 0 — 2 3 1 Gabby Calhoun and Ashley Fitzgerald. Ashley Slemmons, Bella Macmillan (1) and Emma Bollinger, Corall Hjert (3). WP—Calhoun. LP— Macmillan. 2B—Kira Doan (M) 3, Fitzgerald (M), Abby Doney (G). Records—Mountlake Terrace 10-8 league, 12-9 overall. Glacier Peak 10-8, 11-10.

Cedarcrest 6, Archbishop Murphy 4 At Cedarcrest H.S. A. Murphy Cedarcrest

000 040 0 — 4 2 1 200 103 x — 6 9 3

Baylee Robertson and Alyson Matriotti. Cassidy Derieg, Lauren Rich (4) and LuAnn Townley, Rachel Kent (4). WP—Rich. LP—Robertson. 2B— Kayla Blakeslee (C) 2, Hayley Lacher (C), Alyson Matriotti (A). HR—Lacher (C), Rich (C). Records—Archbishop Murphy 12-5 league, 13-6 overall. Cedarcrest 15-2 league, 16-3 overall.

Herald Staff

Shorewood 2, Arlington 1 SHORELINE — Shorewood’s Abdulie Danso headed in the game-winning goal in the 74th minute Thursday night to help the Thunderbirds advance in the 3A District Tournament and end Arlington’s season. Callahan Gobel scored the first goal of the game for Shorewood. Shorewood plays Meadowdale at 4 p.m. Saturday in a loser-out, winner-to-state match.

2A Districts Shorecrest 2, Squalicum 1 (2OT) SEDRO-WOOLLEY — Shorecrest senior forward Anton Resing scored the game-winning goal in the second overtime period against top-ranked Squalicum on Thursday night to clinch a state tournament berth for the Scots. Resing headed the ball in off a cross from Kevin Musar in the 87th minute. Shorecrest will face Anacortes on Saturday in a match to decide the third and fourth seeds in the state playoffs.

1A Bi-Districts South Whidbey 3, Seattle Academy 1 SULTAN — South Whidbey’s Andy Zisette scored two goals Thursday night to help the Falcons advance in the 1A District Tournament.


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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SOUNDERS | Notebook

Martins has X-ray for undisclosed injury By Don Ruiz The News Tribune

TUKWILA — Obafemi Martins was held out of Seattle Sounders training Thursday while being examined for an undisclosed injury. “We had to send him for an X-ray,” coach Sigi Schmid said. “He’s got a little bit of a complaint. We want to make sure with

BASEBALL

the X-ray, and then we’ll see and make a determination (Friday).” Schmid declined to disclose what body part was being X-rayed, joking “I’m being Bruce Arena,” the Los Angeles Galaxy coach Schmid sometimes chides for being secretive. Martins is second on the team and tied for third in Major League Soccer with six goals this season. Seattle’s Clint Dempsey and

Columbus’ Kei Kamara have seven. The Sounders return to MLS play at 4 p.m. Saturday at Cascadia rival and Western Conference-leading Vancouver. Schmid also declined to say who would take Martins’ forward spot alongside Dempsey. However, the most obvious possibilities would be forward Chad Barrett or midfielder/forward Lamar Neagle.

Dempsey, Martins and Neagle are the only players to have scored goals for Seattle nine games into this season.

Added time The Sounders will train Friday morning at Starfire Sports in Tukwila before traveling to British Columbia by bus. ... If Sounders 2 beats the Kitsap Pumas in their U.S. Open Cup second-round match Wednesday at Starfire Stadium, S2 will also host the

ab r h bi ab r h bi Memphis (Cardinals) 13 21 .382 9 Polanc rf 4 0 0 0 Revere lf 5 1 1 0 Nashville (Athletics) 13 21 .382 9 JHrrsn lf 4 1 3 0 Galvis ss 3 2 3 0 Thursday’s games American League NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 Albuquerque 9, Fresno 8 West Division Marte cf 4 1 3 1 Howard 1b 4 1 3 1 Colorado Springs 8, Memphis 7 W L Pct GB PAlvrz 1b 3 0 0 1 CHrndz 3b 3 0 0 1 Iowa 6, Nashville 4 Houston 22 13 .629 — Kang 3b 2 0 0 0 Sizemr rf 4 0 1 1 Reno 5, El Paso 2 Los Angeles 17 17 .500 4½ Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Giles p 0 0 0 0 Round Rock 8, Omaha 5, 1st game Seattle 15 19 .441 6½ McCtch ph 1 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Oklahoma City 6, New Orleans 4 Texas 15 20 .429 7 Stewart c 3 0 0 0 OHerrr cf 4 0 1 0 Round Rock 2, Omaha 0, 2nd game Oakland 13 23 .361 9½ Worley p 1 0 0 0 Rupp c 3 0 2 0 Salt Lake 2, Tacoma 0, 1st game East Division Lmrdzz ph 1 0 0 0 Harang p 2 0 0 0 Sacramento 6, Las Vegas 5 W L Pct GB Liz p 0 0 0 0 Francr ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Salt Lake at Tacoma, 11:35 p.m., 2nd game, New York 21 15 .583 — Hart ph 1 0 1 0 late Tampa Bay 20 16 .556 1 LFrms p 0 0 0 0 Friday’s games Astros 6, Blue Jays 4 Boston 17 18 .486 3½ Totals 31 2 7 2 Totals 33 4 11 3 Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Toronto 17 19 .472 4 Toronto Houston Nashville at Iowa, 5:05 p.m. Pittsburgh 000 000 002—2 Baltimore 15 17 .469 4 ab r h bi ab r h bi Omaha at Round Rock, 5:05 p.m. Philadelphia 201 010 00x—4 Central Division Travis 2b 4 0 1 1 Mrsnck cf 5 0 0 0 Memphis at Colorado Springs, 5:35 p.m. W L Pct GB Dnldsn 3b 4 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 3 2 2 0 Fresno at Albuquerque, 6:05 p.m. E—N.Walker (1), Mercer (2), Galvis (5). DP— Kansas City 22 13 .629 — Bautist dh 3 1 1 1 Valuen 3b 4 0 1 1 El Paso at Reno, 6:35 p.m. Pittsburgh 2, Philadelphia 3. LOB—Pittsburgh Detroit 21 14 .600 1 Encrnc 1b 4 1 1 1 Springr rf 3 0 0 1 Sacramento at Las Vegas, 7:05 p.m. 5, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Marte 2 (5), O.Herrera Minnesota 19 16 .543 3 Pillar cf 4 1 1 0 ClRsms lf 4 0 0 0 Salt Lake at Tacoma, 7:05 p.m. (7), Rupp (1). HR—Howard (7). SB—Galvis (3). Chicago 14 17 .452 6 Colaell lf 4 0 2 0 JCastro c 3 1 1 0 CS—J.Harrison (2), Marte (2), Revere (3). S— Cleveland 12 21 .364 9 Goins ss 4 0 0 0 Carter 1b 2 1 0 0 Harang. Thursday’s games Thole c 2 0 0 0 Tucker dh 4 1 3 1 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis 2, Cleveland 1 Carrer rf 1 1 0 1 Villar ss 3 1 1 2 Worley L,2-3 4 8 3 1 1 0 NBA Playoffs Detroit 13, Minnesota 1 Totals 30 4 7 4 Totals 31 6 8 5 Liz 3 2 1 1 2 3 Kansas City 6, Texas 3 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS LaFromboise 1 1 0 0 0 1 Toronto 201 000 100—4 Tampa Bay 6, N.Y. Yankees 1 (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO Houston 100 001 40x—6 Houston 6, Toronto 4 EASTERN CONFERENCE Harang W,4-3 8 5 0 0 1 6 Boston 2, Seattle 1 1 Cleveland 4, Chicago 2 E—Thole (1). DP—Toronto 1, Houston 3. LOB— ⁄ 3 2 2 2 0 0 Giles Friday’s games 2 Thursday: Cleveland 94, Chicago 73 Toronto 3, Houston 7. 2B—Travis (9), Colabello ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Papelbon S,8-8 L.A. Angels (Weaver 1-4) at Baltimore Atlanta 3, Washington 2 (3), Altuve (9), Valbuena (5), Tucker 2 (2), Villar HBP—by Harang (Kang), by Papelbon (Kang). (W.Chen 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Friday: Atlanta at Washington, 4 p.m. (1). HR—Bautista (6), Encarnacion (8). SB—CarPB—Rupp. T—2:40. A—29,205 (43,651). Cleveland (B.Chen 0-1) at Texas WESTERN CONFERENCE rera (1), Altuve 2 (13). SF—Carrera. (W.Rodriguez 1-1), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Clippers 3, Houston 2 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO Reds 4, Giants 3 N.Y. Yankees (Pineda 5-0) at Kansas City Thursday: Houston 119, L.A. Clippers 107 Hutchison 6 5 2 2 1 9 (C.Young 2-0), 5:10 p.m. Sunday: L.A. Clippers at Houston, 5 or 6:30 San Francisco Cincinnati Loup L,1-2 BS,1-1 0 3 4 3 1 0 Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 3-2) at Minnesota p.m. ab r h bi ab r h bi Osuna 1 0 0 0 1 2 (P.Hughes 2-4), 5:10 p.m. Golden State 3, Memphis 2 GBlanc lf 2 2 2 0 BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Delabar 1 0 0 0 3 2 Toronto (Dickey 1-4) at Houston (Keuchel Friday: Golden State at Memphis, 6:30 p.m. Susac ph-c 0 0 0 0 Cozart ss 3 1 1 0 Houston IP H R ER BB SO 4-0), 5:10 p.m. Panik 2b 3 1 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 R.Hernandez 61⁄3 6 4 4 3 0 Detroit (Greene 3-2) at St. Louis (C.Martinez 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Fields W,2-0 Pagan cf 3 0 1 1 Frazier 3b 2 1 1 0 Rockets 119, Clippers 107 3-1), 5:15 p.m. Neshek H,8 1 1 0 0 0 0 Posey c-1b 4 0 1 1 Byrd lf 2 1 2 3 Chicago White Sox (Rodon 1-0) at Oakland HOUSTON (119) Qualls S,4-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Belt 1b-lf 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 (Hahn 1-3), 7:05 p.m. Ariza 4-12 2-2 13, Smith 5-9 5-8 19, HowLoup pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Maxwll rf 4 0 1 0 B.Pena c 4 0 2 1 Boston (Buchholz 2-4) at Seattle (Happ 3-1), ard 7-12 6-16 20, Terry 3-8 0-0 7, Harden 5-20 WP—Delabar. T—2:48. A—15,777 (41,574). BCrwfr ss 4 0 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 0 0 0 7:10 p.m. 11-11 23, T.Jones 6-8 3-3 16, Brewer 6-14 5-7 McGeh 3b 4 0 1 0 Cingrn p 0 0 0 0 19, Prigioni 0-3 0-0 0, Capela 1-1 0-0 2. Totals National League Linccm p 2 0 0 0 Ju.Diaz p 0 0 0 0 37-87 32-47 119. Tigers 13, Twins 1 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Mesorc ph 1 0 0 0 East Division L.A. CLIPPERS (107) Aoki ph 1 0 0 0 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 W L Pct GB Minnesota Detroit Barnes 4-12 0-0 9, Griffin 12-20 3-7 28, Machi p 0 0 0 0 Cueto p 3 1 1 0 New York 20 15 .571 — ab r h bi ab r h bi Jordan 2-5 4-6 8, Paul 10-19 10-11 31, Redick Romo p 0 0 0 0 Negron 2b 1 0 0 0 Washington 19 16 .543 1 Dozier 2b 3 0 1 0 Gose cf 5 2 4 0 4-13 4-4 15, Crawford 4-13 0-1 9, Davis 0-1 2-2 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Miami 16 19 .457 4 Bernier ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 5 2 2 1 2, Rivers 2-8 1-1 5, Hawes 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38Totals 31 3 7 2 Totals 29 4 7 4 Atlanta 15 19 .441 4½ KSuzuk c 3 1 0 0 HPerez ph-2b 1 0 0 0 91 24-32 107. Philadelphia 13 23 .361 7½ Mauer dh 4 0 0 0 MiCarr 1b 5 3 3 5 San Francisco 101 000 010—3 Houston 25 37 17 40—119 Central Division Plouffe 3b 4 0 1 0 Romine 1b 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati 000 120 01x—4 L.A. Clippers 29 35 28 15—107 W L Pct GB EdEscr lf 3 0 1 1 JMrtnz dh 4 1 2 0 DP—San Francisco 2, Cincinnati 2. LOB—San St. Louis 24 10 .706 — KVargs 1b 3 0 0 0 Cespds lf 4 1 0 1 3-Point Goals—Houston 13-32 (Smith Francisco 5, Cincinnati 8. 2B—G.Blanco (6), Chicago 19 15 .559 5 ERosar rf 3 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 3 2 2 1 4-7, Ariza 3-8, Brewer 2-5, Harden 2-6, T.Jones Frazier (5). 3B—Panik (2). HR—Byrd (8). SB— Cincinnati 18 17 .514 6½ Hicks cf 3 0 1 0 RDavis rf 5 1 3 1 1-1, Terry 1-4, Prigioni 0-1), L.A. Clippers 7-30 Votto (5), Frazier (6), Bruce (3). CS—Panik (1), Pittsburgh 17 18 .486 7½ DSantn ss 3 0 1 0 Holady c 5 1 3 3 (Redick 3-9, Griffin 1-1, Crawford 1-4, Paul 1-5, Cozart (2). Milwaukee 12 23 .343 12½ JIglesis ss 5 0 1 1 Barnes 1-8, Rivers 0-3). Fouled Out—Griffin. ReSan Francisco IP H R ER BB SO West Division Totals 30 1 5 1 Totals 42 13 20 13 bounds—Houston 73 (Howard 21), L.A. Clippers Lincecum 42⁄3 5 3 3 5 4 W L Pct GB 1 53 (Barnes 10). Assists—Houston 19 (Terry 5), Minnesota 000 100 000—1 Lopez 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 2 Los Angeles 22 11 .667 — L.A. Clippers 19 (Paul 11). Total Fouls—HousDetroit 301 013 32x—13 Machi 1 0 0 0 0 1 San Diego 18 17 .514 5 1 ton 22, L.A. Clippers 31. Technicals—Harden, ⁄ 3 1 1 1 1 0 Romo L,0-2 San Francisco 17 18 .486 6 E—Plouffe 2 (3). DP—Minnesota 1, Detroit 2. 2 Howard, Prigioni. Flagrant Fouls—Howard. ⁄ 3 1 0 0 0 1 Affeldt Arizona 15 18 .455 7 LOB—Minnesota 3, Detroit 10. 2B—Kinsler (9), A—19,417 (19,060). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Colorado 11 19 .367 9½ R.Davis (3), Holaday (1). 3B—Gose (2), Kinsler Cueto 7 5 2 2 3 9 Thursday’s games (2). HR—Mi.Cabrera 2 (8), Castellanos (3), Hola1 ⁄ 3 2 1 1 1 0 Cingrani BS,1-1 St. Louis 2, Cleveland 1 Cavaliers 94, Bulls 73 day (1). SB—D.Santana (3). SF—Cespedes. 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Ju.Diaz W,2-0 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 2 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO CLEVELAND (94) A.Chapman S,7-7 1 0 0 0 0 2 Chicago Cubs 6, N.Y. Mets 5 2 Pelfrey L,3-1 4 ⁄3 10 5 4 2 1 James 7-23 1-2 15, Thompson 4-11 5-5 13, HBP—by Lincecum (Frazier). WP—Lincecum. Cincinnati 4, San Francisco 3 2 ⁄3 3 3 3 1 0 Duensing Mozgov 2-6 3-4 7, Irving 2-2 1-2 6, Shumpert Balk—Cueto. T—2:58. A—21,792 (42,319). Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late 2 ⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 Pressly 5-14 1-2 13, Smith 3-6 3-3 12, Jones 3-6 0-0 Washington at San Diego, late Graham 2 6 5 5 0 3 9, Dellavedova 7-11 2-2 19, Harris 0-0 0-0 0, Interleague Friday’s games Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Perkins 0-0 0-0 0, Miller 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-79 Pittsburgh (Locke 2-2) at Chicago Cubs An.Sanchez W,3-4 8 5 1 1 1 9 16-20 94. (Hendricks 0-1), 11:20 a.m. Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cardinals 2, Indians 1 CHICAGO (73) Arizona (C.Anderson 0-1) at Philadelphia T—3:03. A—31,785 (41,574). Dunleavy 3-9 0-0 7, Gasol 3-8 2-2 8, Noah St. Louis Cleveland (Billingsley 0-2), 4:05 p.m. 1-2 2-2 4, Rose 7-16 0-0 14, Butler 8-22 2-2 20, ab r h bi ab r h bi Atlanta (Teheran 3-1) at Miami (Phelps 2-0), Gibson 1-3 0-0 2, Hinrich 0-1 0-0 0, Mirotic 3-8 Royals 6, Rangers 3 Bourjos cf 3 1 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 2 0 4:10 p.m. 1-2 7, Brooks 2-4 0-0 4, Snell 1-3 2-2 5, McDerMCrpnt 3b 4 1 1 2 CSantn 1b 4 0 0 0 Milwaukee (Lohse 2-4) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon Kansas City Texas mott 0-0 0-0 0, Mohammed 0-2 0-0 0, Moore Hollidy dh 3 0 0 0 Brantly lf 3 1 1 1 6-1), 4:10 p.m. ab r h bi ab r h bi 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 30-80 9-10 73. MAdms 1b 4 0 0 0 Moss rf 3 0 1 0 San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-2) at Cincinnati AEscor ss 5 2 3 3 Choo rf 4 0 3 0 Rynlds lf 4 0 2 0 Raburn ph-rf 1 0 0 0 (Marquis 3-2), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland 33 25 15 21 —94 Mostks 3b 5 0 1 0 Andrus ss 3 0 0 1 Wong 2b 3 0 2 0 Chsnhll 3b 4 0 1 0 Detroit (Greene 3-2) at St. Louis (C.Martinez Chicago 31 13 16 13 —73 Hosmer 1b 5 1 3 2 Fielder dh 2 0 1 1 Molina c 4 0 2 0 Swisher dh 4 0 0 0 3-1), 5:15 p.m. KMorls dh 4 0 2 0 Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 12-27 (Jones 3-6, Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0 Bourn cf 4 0 2 0 Colorado (E.Butler 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers (KerAGordn lf 5 0 0 1 Morlnd 1b 4 0 0 0 Smith 3-6, Dellavedova 3-6, Shumpert 2-4, Irving Kozma ss 3 0 0 0 RPerez c 2 0 0 0 shaw 1-2), 7:10 p.m. Infante 2b 5 1 2 0 Peguer lf 4 0 0 0 1-1, James 0-4), Chicago 4-20 (Butler 2-6, Snell DvMrp ph 1 0 1 0 Washington (Zimmermann 2-2) at San Diego Orland rf 4 1 1 0 Field 2b 4 1 1 0 1-1, Dunleavy 1-5, Hinrich 0-1, Mohammed 0-1, JRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 (Despaigne 2-1), 7:10 p.m. Butera c 3 1 2 0 Corprn c 4 1 1 0 Mirotic 0-3, Rose 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Re Walters ph 1 0 0 0 JDyson cf 2 0 0 0 DShlds cf 2 1 1 1 bounds—Cleveland 60 (Thompson 17), Chicago Totals 32 2 7 2 Totals 34 1 8 1 Totals 38 6 14 6 Totals 31 3 7 3 Cubs 6, Mets 5 41 (Noah 11). Assists—Cleveland 20 (James 11), St. Louis 000 000 020—2 Chicago 17 (Rose 6). Total Fouls—Cleveland 16, Kansas City 100 203 000—6 New York Chicago Cleveland 000 001 000—1 Chicago 18. Flagrant Fouls—Mirotic. A—22,695 Texas 000 020 100—3 ab r h bi ab r h bi (20,917). Grndrs cf 5 0 2 0 Fowler cf 3 3 2 1 DP—Cleveland 1. LOB—St. Louis 6, Cleveland 9. E—Corporan (1). DP—Kansas City 1. LOB— DHerrr 2b 5 1 1 0 Rizzo 1b 2 0 1 1 2B—Reynolds (6), Kipnis (8), Moss (8), ChisenKansas City 9, Texas 8. 2B—K.Morales (13), InDuda 1b 4 1 2 0 Bryant 3b 4 0 1 1 hall (6). 3B—Bourn (1). HR—M.Carpenter (6), fante (10), Butera (1). HR—Hosmer (7). CS—A. Cuddyr lf 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 Brantley (4). CS—Wong (2), Chisenhall (1). Escobar (2). S—Butera, J.Dyson, Andrus. SF— Mayrry rf 4 0 1 2 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Andrus. PGA Flores ss 4 1 1 1 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Wacha 5 5 1 1 2 7 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO Recker c 4 2 2 2 JRussll p 0 0 0 0 Siegrist W,2-0 2 1 0 0 1 2 Guthrie W,3-2 5 6 2 2 0 1 Wells Fargo Championship 1 Goeddl p 0 0 0 0 Coghln lf 0 0 0 0 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Choate H,3 Madson 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 Tejada 3b 2 0 0 0 Soler rf 4 1 1 0 Thursday ⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Maness H,5 1 ⁄3 1 1 1 1 1 Hochevar DnMrp ph 1 0 1 0 Szczur lf 3 1 1 1 At Quail Hollow Club Rosenthal S,12-13 11⁄3 1 0 0 0 3 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 K.Herrera H,5 Niese p 3 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Charlotte, N.C. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO W.Davis H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Robles p 0 0 0 0 MMntr ph-c 1 0 0 0 Purse: $7.1 million 10 Bauer 71⁄3 4 1 1 3 G.Holland S,7-8 1 0 0 0 2 0 Lthrsch p 0 0 0 0 T.Wood p 1 0 0 0 Yardage: 7,562; Par 72 (36-36) Rzpczynski L,1-1 BS,1-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 Texas IP H R ER BB SO 2 Monell c 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 First Round ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 McAllister Detwiler L,0-5 5 9 3 3 1 3 D.Ross ph-c 3 0 0 0 Robert Streb 33-32—65 B.Shaw 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 ⁄3 2 2 2 0 0 Bass HRndn p 0 0 0 0 Patrick Reed 32-34—66 Rzepczynski pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. S.Freeman 12⁄3 1 1 1 0 1 ARussll 2b 3 1 0 1 Kevin Chappell 33-33—66 Wacha pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Fujikawa 1 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 5 10 5 Totals 31 6 6 5 Webb Simpson 34-33—67 WP—Bauer. T—3:12. A—15,865 (36,856). Claudio 1 2 0 0 0 1 Ricky Barnes 32-35—67 HBP—by Guthrie (Fielder, Fielder), by DeNew York 010 220 000—5 Pacific Coast League Michael Thompson 34-33—67 twiler (J.Dyson). WP—Guthrie. PB—Corporan. Chicago 000 140 10x—6 Stewart Cink 32-35—67 T—3:11. A—33,818 (48,114). Pacific North Division Chesson Hadley 34-33—67 E—Flores (8). LOB—New York 6, Chicago 5. W L Pct. GB Billy Hurley III 34-33—67 2B—Duda (11), Szczur (2). HR—Flores (5), Fresno (Astros) 18 16 .529 — Rays 6, Yankees 1 K.J. Choi 34-34—68 Recker 2 (2), Fowler (3). SB—Granderson (3), Sacramento (Giants) 18 17 .514 ½ Carl Pettersson 33-35—68 Coghlan (4). New York Tampa Bay Reno (Diamondbacks) 17 18 .486 1½ Patrick Rodgers 34-34—68 New York IP H R ER BB SO ab r h bi ab r h bi Tacoma (Mariners) 14 20 .412 4 Matt Jones 32-37—69 Niese L,3-3 61⁄3 6 6 4 1 2 Ellsury cf 4 0 2 0 Kiermr cf 3 0 0 0 Pacific South Division 2 Kevin Streelman 35-34—69 ⁄ 3 0 0 0 0 0 Robles Gardnr lf 3 0 1 0 SouzJr rf 4 2 2 0 W L Pct. GB J.B. Holmes 35-34—69 Leathersich 0 0 0 0 1 0 ARdrgz dh 4 1 2 1 Longori 3b 4 0 1 1 Las Vegas (Mets) 24 11 .686 — Hideki Matsuyama 34-35—69 Goeddel 1 0 0 0 0 1 Teixeir 1b 3 0 0 0 Loney 1b 3 0 2 1 El Paso (Padres) 19 16 .543 5 Bill Lunde 35-34—69 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO BMcCn c 4 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 4 0 1 0 Salt Lake (Angels) 14 19 .424 9 1 Shawn Stefani 34-35—69 T.Wood 4 ⁄3 7 5 5 1 5 CYoung rf 4 0 0 0 DeJess lf 3 1 1 0 Albuquerque (Rockies) 14 21 .400 10 2 Brendan Steele 36-33—69 ⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Motte Headly 3b 2 0 0 0 Guyer ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Steven Alker 34-35—69 Grimm 1 0 0 0 0 3 Gregrs ss 3 0 0 0 ACarer ss 3 1 0 0 American North Division 2 Justin Thomas 35-34—69 ⁄ 3 1 0 0 0 2 J.Russell Pirela 2b 3 0 0 0 JButler dh 3 1 1 0 W L Pct. GB Martin Flores 35-34—69 Strop W,1-2 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 2 Rivera c 4 1 2 4 Oklahoma City (Dodgers) 23 11 .676 — Russell Knox 35-34—69 H.Rondon S,8-9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Totals 30 1 5 1 Totals 32 6 10 6 Iowa (Cubs) 17 17 .500 6 Geoff Ogilvy 34-35—69 Leathersich pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Omaha (Royals) 17 17 .500 6 New York 000 000 001—1 Angel Cabrera 34-35—69 HBP—by Niese (Rizzo, Rizzo). PB—Recker. Colo. Springs (Brewers) 13 21 .382 10 Tampa Bay 130 100 10x—6 Kevin Kisner 36-33—69 T—2:49. A—31,496 (40,929). American South Division Will MacKenzie 35-34—69 W L Pct. GB E—B.McCann (2). DP—New York 1, Tampa Bay George McNeill 36-33—69 Round Rock (Rangers) 22 12 .647 — Phillies 4, Pirates 2 1. LOB—New York 5, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—Souza Scott Gutschewski 35-34—69 New Orleans (Marlins) 17 15 .531 4 Jr. 2 (6). HR—A.Rodriguez (9), Rivera (2). SB— Pittsburgh Philadelphia John Huh 35-35—70 Ellsbury (12), A.Cabrera (1). CS—Loney (1). S— Gardner. New York IP H R ER BB SO Whitley L,1-2 12⁄3 2 3 3 2 0 E.Rogers 31⁄3 5 2 2 2 3 D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 1 Shreve 1 3 1 1 0 2 Pinder 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO E.Ramirez W,1-1 5 1 0 0 2 4 Andriese S,2-2 4 4 1 1 0 4 WP—Whitley, Andriese. T—2:45. A—11,977 (31,042).

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leagues, the Mariners cautioned about rushing him along too quickly. Then when injuries continued to mount at catcher, Zunino found himself making his major-league debut after just 443 minor-league at-bats. There was raw power in Zunino, to be sure, but he needed more time to learn to become a complete hitter, time he didn’t get both because of injuries and because his game behind the plate is developed well beyond his years. “It’s hard up here,” McClendon said. “The next step for Mike is understanding the competition, understanding who’s on the mound and who can do what to you. There’s some pitchers where you need to get off early on, and there’s some pitchers you can be

patient with. “But what you have to understand is that he’s relatively very young at this level. He hasn’t had a lot of at-bats. Even to this date, every day is a new day for him, a new experience. He’s learning pitchers, he’s learning this staff, it’s starting to slow down a little bit for him. ... He’s 22 years old, and he’s got more big-league atbats than he’s got minor-league at-bats. That’s tough, not many hitters can say that at that age. If you’re in the big leagues, most of the time you’ve probably got somewhere around 1,500 to 2,000 minor-league at-bats; I think he had 300; that’s tough.” Yes, McClendon was exaggerating some, or just off a bit on his numbers. Zunino is actually 24, not 22, and he had just over 400 minor-league at-bats, not 300. But McClendon’s point doesn’t change. On a better team, one with better depth, Zunino wouldn’t have been in the big

leagues in 2013, and maybe not have been to start last season either. Given more time to understand professional pitching, Zunino likely wouldn’t strike out so often or be fighting a losing battle with the Mendoza Line. That’s all in the past, however, and Zunino, warts and all, is the best option for the Mariners right now and still a very promising piece of their future. He is also someone who is learning on the job, and making a lot of outs in the process. “It’s tough and you’ve got to take each night as a learning experience and try to separate your frustration from what you can learn from,” Zunino said. “... I was able to get a couple of pitches to hit (Tuesday). “It’s just building blocks. I’ll be the first to tell you that you’re not going to figure it out and turn it around like that,” he continued, snapping his fingers. “You’ve got to take at-bats for what they are

Bo Van Pelt Gary Woodland Padraig Harrington Hunter Mahan Andres Romero Brian Stuard Cameron Percy Freddie Jacobson Michael Putnam Sangmoon Bae Rory McIlroy Jason Gore Carlos Ortiz Jonathan Randolph John Peterson Ryan Moore Lucas Glover Alex Cejka Mark Wilson Scott Brown Phil Mickelson Nick Taylor Daniel Berger Danny Lee Gonzalo Fdez-Castano John Merrick Adam Scott Boo Weekley Chad Campbell Ryo Ishikawa Blayne Barber Oscar Fraustro Jim Herman Matt Thompson

third-round match May 27 at Starfire against the winner of the Timbers 2-Michigan Bucks game. If the Pumas win, they would travel for the third-round date at either Portland or Michigan. That May 27 date coincides with a Sounders MLS match against the Colorado Rapids at CenturyLink Field. ... U.S. Soccer announced Thursday that Commerce City, Colorado; Kansas City, Kansas; Carson, California; and Sandy, Utah, will be the sites for the CONCACAF Olympic qualifying championship in October.

36-34—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 38-32—70 34-36—70 37-33—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 32-38—70 35-36—71 37-34—71 38-33—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 33-38—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 37-34—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 34-37—71 40-31—71 37-34—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 33-38—71

Champions Regions Tradition Thursday At Shoal Creek Shoal Creek, Ala. Purse: $2.3 million Yardage: 7,231; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Jeff Maggert 31-36—67 Kevin Sutherland 33-35—68 Tom Watson 34-35—69 Colin Montgomerie 35-34—69 Wes Short, Jr. 33-36—69 Tom Byrum 36-34—70 Gil Morgan 35-35—70 Gene Sauers 35-35—70 Kenny Perry 36-34—70 Fred Funk 34-36—70 David Frost 33-37—70 Esteban Toledo 34-36—70 Michael Allen 35-35—70 Guy Boros 36-34—70 Scott Hoch 37-34—71 John Cook 34-37—71 Olin Browne 34-37—71 Tom Pernice Jr. 35-36—71 Jay Don Blake 34-37—71 Billy Andrade 35-36—71 Mark O’Meara 34-37—71 Kirk Triplett 35-36—71 Russ Cochran 37-34—71 Jeff Hart 36-35—71 Brian Henninger 35-37—72 Brad Bryant 35-37—72 Tom Purtzer 34-38—72 Peter Senior 34-38—72 Joey Sindelar 36-36—72 John Riegger 37-35—72 Scott Dunlap 35-37—72 Ian Woosnam 37-35—72 Joe Daley 37-35—72 Woody Austin 36-36—72 Morris Hatalsky 37-36—73 Bob Tway 37-36—73 Joe Durant 36-37—73 Brad Faxon 37-36—73 Bart Bryant 37-36—73 Jose Coceres 36-37—73 Mark McNulty 36-37—73 Bernhard Langer 35-38—73

LPGA Kingsmill Championship Thursday At Kingsmill Resort, River Course Williamsburg, Va. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,349; Par 71 (36-35) First Round a-denotes amateur Joanna Klatten 31-34—65 Pat Hurst 34-32—66 Alison Lee 35-31—66 Morgan Pressel 34-32—66 Jacqui Concolino 35-32—67 Paula Creamer 32-35—67 Perrine Delacour 33-34—67 So Yeon Ryu 35-32—67 Katie Burnett 32-36—68 Austin Ernst 34-34—68 Nannette Hill 35-33—68 Mi Jung Hur 35-33—68 Minjee Lee 35-33—68 Sarah Jane Smith 35-33—68 Angela Stanford 34-34—68 Mariajo Uribe 36-32—68 Yueer Cindy Feng 36-33—69 Christina Kim 36-33—69 Sei Young Kim 35-34—69 P.K. Kongkraphan 35-34—69 Stacy Lewis 36-33—69 Brittany Lincicome 34-35—69 Paula Reto 36-33—69 Christel Boeljon 35-35—70 Eun-Hee Ji 37-33—70 Jennifer Johnson 34-36—70 Moriya Jutanugarn 36-34—70 Hyo Joo Kim 35-35—70 Pernilla Lindberg 33-37—70 Catriona Matthew 38-32—70 Paola Moreno 35-35—70 Haru Nomura 35-35—70 Anna Nordqvist 36-34—70 Ji Young Oh 36-34—70 Ryann O’Toole 36-34—70 Pornanong Phatlum 36-34—70 Kris Tamulis 36-34—70 Ayako Uehara 36-34—70 Jing Yan 35-35—70

HOCKEY NHL Playoffs CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary)

and hopefully progress and go in the right direction. You want to think you can come here and produce right away, obviously, but when you hit those bumps in the road, you know you have to take them for learning experiences. You know there may be more hiccups than usual and the learning curve of learning yourself and the league is going to take a little while.” What Zunino hasn’t done is allow his struggles at the plate to carry over to his duties behind it. Despite his inexperience, Zunino is well respected by Mariners pitchers for his ability to call a game, and is the best defensive catcher the Mariners have had in years. “It takes a special player to do that,” McClendon said of Zunino’s ability to compartmentalize. “There’s a lot of stuff that goes into catching,” Zunino said. “Obviously you’re responsible for helping the pitchers get through

EASTERN CONFERENCE Saturday: Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 10 a.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Sunday: Chicago at Anaheim, noon

SOCCER MLS

WESTERN CONFERENCE W D L GF GA Pts Vancouver 6 2 3 14 9 20 FC Dallas 6 2 2 17 13 20 Seattle 5 1 3 15 9 16 San Jose 4 2 4 10 11 14 Sporting K.C. 3 5 2 13 13 14 Los Angeles 3 5 3 11 11 14 Rea Salt Lake 3 5 2 9 11 14 Portland 3 4 3 9 9 13 Houston 3 4 4 13 14 13 Colorado 1 7 2 9 9 10 EASTERN CONFERENCE W D L GF GA Pts D.C. United 6 1 3 21 13 8 New England 5 2 3 18 14 10 New York 4 1 4 16 14 9 Columbus 4 3 2 14 15 10 Toronto FC 3 5 0 9 12 13 Chicago 3 5 0 9 7 10 Orlando City 2 5 3 9 9 14 New York City FC 1 6 3 6 7 12 Philadelphia 1 7 3 6 10 21 Montreal 0 3 2 2 3 8 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Friday’s games Chicago at New York City FC, 4 p.m. New York at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Saturday’s games Real Salt Lake at Montreal, 1 p.m. Seattle at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Toronto FC at New England, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Orlando City, 2 p.m. D.C. United at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.

NWSL

W L T Pts GF GA Chicago 3 0 1 10 9 4 FC Kansas City 3 2 1 10 5 4 Portland 2 0 2 8 9 5 Seattle 2 2 1 7 11 7 Washington 2 2 1 7 9 9 Sky Blue FC 1 2 2 5 4 6 Houston 1 2 1 4 5 6 Western New York 1 3 1 4 4 8 Boston 1 3 0 3 5 12 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Thursday’s game Western New York 0, FC Kansas City 0 Friday’s game Chicago at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s game Portland at Boston, 1 p.m. Sky Blue FC at Washington, 4 p.m.

DEALS

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed RHP Justin Masterson on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Recalled LHP Robbie Ross from Pawtucket (IL). Assigned 3B Luis Jimenez outright to Pawtucket. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Optioned INF Micah Johnson to Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS —Assigned RHP Anthony Swarzak outright to Columbus (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Traded C Blake Forsythe to Philadelphia for cash. Sent LHP Sean Doolittle to Stockton (Cal) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Claimed RHP Preston Guilmet off waivers from Toronto and optioned him to Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS — Optioned RHP Spencer Patton to Round Rock (PCL). Reinstated RHP Kyuji Fujikawa from the 15-day DL. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Placed OF Kelly Johnson on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Todd Cunningham from Gwinnett (IL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned RHP Jim Henderson to Colorado Springs (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Placed RHP Buddy Carlyle on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled LHP Jack Leathersich from Las Vegas (PCL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Placed OF Jon Jay on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sunday. Recalled 1B Xavier Scruggs from Memphis (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent RHP Erik Davis to Harrisburg (EL) for a rehab assignment. BASKETBALL USA BASKETBALL — Named Sean Miller coach and Ed Cooley and Archie Miller assistant coaches for the 2015 USA basketball men’s U19 world championship team. Women’s National Basketball Association MINNESOTA LYNX — Signed F Asjha Jones. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Signed G John Miller and RB Karlos Williams. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Agreed to terms with TE C.J. Uzomah, S Derron Smith and WR Mario Alford. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed DB Ifo Ekpre-Olomu. DALLAS COWBOYS — Released LBs Keith Smith and Will Smith. Signed S Danny McCray, LB Donnie Baggs and TE Geoff Swaim. DETROIT LIONS — Signed DE Corey Wootton to a one-year contract. Promoted Lance Newmark to director of college scouting, Cedric Saunders to senior vice president of football operations and Scott McEwen to senior personnel executive. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Signed TE Jesse James to a four-year contract. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms with RBs David Cobb and Jalston Fowler. Named Jimmy Stanton vice president of communications. Promoted Ralph Ockenfels to vice president of marketing and broadcast and digital rights, Gary Glenn to senior director of digital media and Robbie Bohren to senior director of media relations. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed OL Tyson Pencer and PK/P Zackary Medeiros.

an inning, and if you take those struggles out there, it could turn into more. It could dictate a game if you’re not fully committed to calling a game and knowing and studying and trusting the reports and doing all of that. You could get to a point where the game’s on the line, and you can’t be thinking about your last at-bat, you have to be focused on helping your pitcher. “It’s sort of been a good thing too, because I’ve been able to focus on that when the hitting hasn’t been where I want it, so I can feel like I’m productive and can help the team in other aspects.” Zunino won’t hit .188 forever, nor will he hit prodigious home runs on a nightly basis. Eventually, McClendon and the Mariners are convinced, he’ll settle into something more consistent. In the meantime, patience is the Mariners’ only option. Herald Columnist John Boyle: jboyle@heraldnet.com


Baseball C5

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM

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FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

MARINERS | Notebook

MARINERS | Update

Cruz feasting on left-handed pitching One big reason the Seattle Mariners pursued free-agent outfielder Nelson Cruz in the offseason was to limit their vulnerability against opposing left-handed pitchers. It hasn’t really worked overall; the Mariners are just 3-5 against left-handed starters, but ... it sure isn’t Cruz’s fault. He entered Thursday’s series opener against the Red Sox with a .591 average against lefties (13-for22) with six homers and eight RBI. Add a .667 on-base percentage and a 1.545 slugging percentage — that’s not a misprint, it’s really 1.545 — and he has a 2.212 OPS. Four uniforms The Mariners are putting on a fashion show for their four-game weekend series against the Red Sox by wearing four different uniforms. • Thursday’s opener: standard home whites. • Friday: Northwest Green. • Saturday: Seattle Steelheads replica uniforms in a tribute to the Negro Leagues. • Sunday: The home alternate cream uniforms with the club’s original color scheme. Minor details The numbers say outfielder Alex Jackson, the organization’s top prospect, is struggling at Lo-A Clinton: a .157/.240/.213 slash (batting average/on-base percentage/slugging percentage) through 28 games. Just part of the growing process, general manager Jack Zduriencik insisted. “One of the things I’ve seen over the years with so many guys when you look at the Midwest League,” Zduriencik said, “is they’ll struggle early. Cool temperatures. “This kid a Southern California guy. He’s not used to that. Now, he’s playing every day, and it’s cold. He’s taking long bus rides, really, for the first time. The whole environment of his life changes.” Jackson, 19, was the sixth overall pick in last year’s draft, and club officials debated in spring training whether he was ready for the Midwest League after just 24 games in the Arizona Rookie League. The average age in the Midwest League is more than two years older than Jackson. The Mariners expected, at least early on, that he would be challenged and possibly overmatched. They saw that as a positive in his overall development. “What I’ve found,” Zduriencik said, “is there will be a point in time when it all becomes part of his routine. Sometimes, it’s the halfway point. Sometimes, it’s two months in. “All of a sudden, you begin to see these young talented players begin to take off. I expect that will happen with him. I haven’t worried about him. He’s out there playing, and that’s what he’s there for.” Looking back It was 19 years ago Friday — May 15, 1996 — that the Mariners rebounded from a no-hit loss to Dwight Gooden by pounding out 19 hits in a 10-5 victory over the Yankees in New York. Eight players had multiple-hit games as the Mariners rallied from an early 4-0 deficit. Edgar Martinez’s RBI double capped a five-run fourth inning that put the Mariners on top to stay. Short hops Mariners starting pitchers, entering Thursday, had not allowed more than three earned runs over the previous eight games and had a 2.52 ERA in that span. ... Logan Morrison, through Wednesday, was on an 18-for-48 surge since April 29 with five homers and eight RBI. ... The Mariners, prior to Thursday, were 8-7 in one-run games but 3-6 in two-run games. On tap The Mariners and Red Sox continue their four-game series at 7:10 p.m. Friday at Safeco Field. Lefty J.A. Happ (3-1, 3.29) will face Boston right-hander Clay Buchholz (2-4, 5.73). The game can be seen on Root Sports and heard on 710 ESPN. Bob Dutton, The News Tribune

TODAY’S GAME

Boston at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

TV: ROOT (cable) Radio: ESPN (710 AM)

Probable starting pitchers: M’s left-hander J.A. Happ (3-1, 3.29) vs. right-hander Clay Buchholz (2-4, 5.73)

Thursday’s game Red Sox 2, Mariners 1

ELAINE THOMPSON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Mariners’ Brad Miller had never played in the outfield as a professional until Thursday night.

Miller makes debut in left By Bob Dutton The News Tribune

SEATTLE — Brad Miller took the next step Thursday in his evolution into a new role as the Seattle Mariners’ super-utilityman by starting in left field for the series opener against Boston at Safeco Field. “No real emotion, I guess,” he said. “Just go out there and do it.” Miller lost his job as the starting shortstop May 4 when the Mariners recalled Chris Taylor from Triple-A Tacoma. The plan, as outlined by manager Lloyd McClendon, is to try to turn Miller into a player with the versatility of Oakland’s Ben Zobrist, a two-time All-Star who plays a variety of roles. For Miller, that meant spending a lot of pre-game work over the last 10 days in the outfield, where he had never played professionally — before Thursday. “It’s been a crazy experience,” he said, “but definitely one that’s not new in the baseball world. I’m just trying to take everything in stride, which is easier said than done.

“You show up and you bury yourself in your work and you keep going.” Miller’s bat, at this point, is forcing the Mariners to find a spot for him. He had a homer and an RBI double that produced the club’s only runs in Wednesday’s 4-2 loss to San Diego. A day earlier, Miller had two doubles and a walk in four plate appearances in an 11-4 victory. Miller was the designated hitter in those games, but that stemmed primarily from center fielder Austin Jackson being on the disabled list because of a sprained right ankle. McClendon compensated for Jackson’s injury by using experienced outfielders on defense ... again, until Thursday. And McClendon sought, prior to the game, to minimize the significance of Miller’s outfield debut. “Listen,” McClendon said, “you catch a popup at shortstop; you catch a popup in left field. He can screw up at short; he can screw up in left. It’s the same thing. It’s baseball. “It’s that simple. ... If it’s hit to

you, catch it. If you screw it up, pick it up and throw it back in.” Even so, a longer-term question already looms: What happens when Jackson returns? That should occur, barring a setback, within the next week, and it will require the Mariners to make a space-clearing roster move. Does Miller head to Tacoma at that point to hone his outfield skills under a less-harsh spotlight? The Mariners, barring an injury, appear to have few viable roster alternatives beyond simply jettisoning a veteran such as Willie Bloomquist, Rickie Weeks, Justin Ruggiano or Dustin Ackley. A productive Miller over the next week might force club officials to take a hard look at those veterans. The Mariners have scored fewer runs than all but two American League clubs. Shipping out a hot bat would be tough. “I want to take advantage of my opportunities,” Miller said. “When I’m in there, (I want to) really bear down and try to get something going.”

Mariners From Page C1

Holt opened the Boston ninth with a liner to left and never hesitated in trying for a double. He made it easily when Weeks, who had just entered the game, airmailed the throw way beyond the base. After Holt went to third on Xander Bogaerts’ sacrifice, the Red Sox went to their bench for Pablo Sandoval. And Rodney plunked Sandoval with a firstpitch fastball. With runners at first and third, the Mariners dropped their infield to double-play depth for Betts, who sent his decisive fly to left. All that came after the Mariners missed a chance in the eighth against Barnes when one-out singles by Robinson Cano and Nelson Cruz put runners at first and second. Cruz’s single was a nubber to the right side that Barnes boxed in trying to make a pickup. It didn’t matter. The opportunity slipped away when Kyle Seager grounded into a double play. Both clubs missed opportunities earlier in the game. The Mariners had just tied the game by scoring a run in the sixth inning when Bogaerts started the Boston seventh by lining a single into center. Bogaerts moved to second when Blake Swihart executed a two-strike sacrifice bunt. That also finished Elias; the Mariners brought in Mark Lowe to face the top of the Red Sox’s lineup. Lowe struck out Betts but walked Dustin Pedroia, after being ahead 1-2 in the count. That brought Charlie Furbush into the game for a left-on-left matchup against David Ortiz. Ortiz hit a liner to center that Dustin Ackley ran down, which closed the book on Elias: 61⁄3 innings, eight hits, one run and a

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .234 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .276 Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 1 0 .218 H.Ramirez lf 5 0 4 0 0 0 .284 Bradley Jr. lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Napoli 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .165 Victorino rf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .178 B.Holt 3b-ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .309 Bogaerts ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254 S.Leon c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Swihart c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .125 c-Sandoval ph-3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .285 Totals 32 2 10 2 4 5 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Smith rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267 a-Ruggiano ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 B.Miller lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .253 b-Weeks ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .268 N.Cruz dh 3 1 3 0 1 0 .361 Seager 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .246 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 1 1 0 .237 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .180 Ackley cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .191 C.Taylor ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .143 Totals 32 1 7 1 3 2 Boston Seattle

000 100 001—2 10 0 000 001 000—1 7 1

a-flied into a double play for S.Smith in the 7th. b-grounded out for B.Miller in the 8th. c-was hit by a pitch for Swihart in the 9th. E—Weeks (1). LOB—Boston 11, Seattle 7. 2B—H.Ramirez (1), B.Holt (4). HR—Victorino (1), off Elias. RBIs—Betts (21), Victorino (3), Morrison (11). CS—H.Ramirez (2). S—Bogaerts, Swihart. SF—Betts. Runners left in scoring position— Boston 5 (Bogaerts, B.Holt, Ortiz, H.Ramirez 2); Seattle 5 (Seager 2, Ackley 2, Zunino). RISP—Boston 0 for 7; Seattle 0 for 6. Runners moved up—Pedroia, Morrison. GIDP—Napoli, Seager. DP—Boston 2 (Victorino, Napoli), (Bogaerts, Pedroia, Napoli); Seattle 1 (Seager, Cano, Morrison). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 5.58 J.Kelly 61⁄3 5 1 1 3 2 91 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.89 Layne Barnes W, 2-0 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 1.42 Uehara S, 8-9 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 1.64 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 3.24 Elias 61⁄3 8 1 1 2 2 89 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 10 2.70 Lowe 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.80 Furbush Ca.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 2 13 1.08 Rodney L, 1-2 1 1 1 1 1 0 31 5.65 Inherited runners-scored—Layne 1-0, Lowe 1-0, Furbush 2-0. HBP—by Rodney (Sandoval). WP—J.Kelly. T—2:53. A—20,172 (47,574).

BASEBALL | Notebook

Red Sox put Masterson on disabled list Associated Press BOSTON — The Boston Red Sox have placed right-handed starter Justin Masterson on the 15-day disabled list and recalled left-handed reliever Robbie Ross Jr. The Red Sox said Thursday that the struggling Masterson has right shoulder tendinitis. In seven appearances this season, he is 2-2 with a 6.37 ERA. On Tuesday night, he gave up six runs on six hits in 21⁄3 innings in a 9-2 loss to the Oakland Athletics. In the offseason, Boston signed Masterson as a free agent from the St. Louis Cardinals. Ross began the season with Boston and was 0-0 with a 6.17 ERA in 13 outings before being optioned to Triple-A Pawtucket last Sunday.

Hamilton moves to Double A

TED S. WARREN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mariners left fielder Rickie Weeks drops a sacrifice fly hit by the Red Sox’s Mookie Betts in the ninth inning of Thursday’s game.

no-decision. Kelly exited after a one-out walk in the seventh to Chris Taylor. When lefty Tommy Layne replaced Kelly, the Mariners countered by pinch-hitting Justin Ruggiano for Seth Smith. Ruggiano sent a drive to deep right that Shane Victorino reached in the corner, caught, turned and threw to first for a double play. Just a terrific play. Kelly gave up one run and five hits in 61⁄3 innings and, like Elias, got a no-decision. The Red Sox opened the scoring on Victorino’s two-out homer in the fourth inning after Elias had induced a double-play grounder from Mike Napoli. Victorino turned on a 92-mph fastball and drove it over the leftfield wall for a 1-0 lead. It was his fifth homer in nine career starts against the Mariners.

Kelly quickly found trouble in the bottom of the inning. The Mariners loaded the bases on a walk to Logan Morrison after oneout singles by Cruz and Seager. And nothing. Mike Zunino struck out, and Ackley grounded out — although that final out required a nifty play by Pedoria, who gloved a carom off Napoli’s glove and flipped to Kelly at first. The Mariners finally pulled even in their sixth after Cruz drew a one-out walk, and Seager followed with a single. A wild pitch moved the runners to second and third with one out. Morrison delivered the tying run with a slow grounder to second that forced the Red Sox to settle for the out at first. Just the one run, though. The Mariners left Seager at third when Zunino took a third strike.

ARLINGTON, Texas — Josh Hamilton is getting closer to the Texas Rangers’ home ballpark. The Rangers said Thursday that Hamilton will report to Double-A Frisco after the end of Triple-A Round Rock’s homestand. The Express had a scheduled doubleheader Thursday night, and a game Friday. Hamilton joined Round Rock last Sunday after some time in extended spring training in Arizona. Texas re-acquired Hamilton in a trade from the Los Angeles Angels on April 27. The 2010 AL MVP and five-time All-Star, who had shoulder surgery in February and didn’t go to spring training with the Angels, went to Arizona the day after the Rangers got him back. When the Express head to Colorado for their next series, Hamilton is expected to play Saturday and Sunday for Frisco, which plays in a Dallas suburb only about 40 miles from the Rangers’ ballpark in Arlington. He will take Monday off before scheduled games with the RoughRiders Tuesday and Wednesday. The Rangers will then determine whether Hamilton needs more games in the minors or is ready to get back to the major leagues.

Rangers activate Fujikawa ARLINGTON, Texas — Right-hander Kyuji Fujikawa has been activated from the 15-day disabled list, setting the stage for the Japanese reliever’s debut with the Texas Rangers. The 34-year-old Fujikawa was signed as a free agent last winter. He was placed on the disabled list before the season because of a right groin strain. Fujikawa signed with Texas after spending the last two seasons with the Chicago Cubs.

Seatt durin playi


C6

Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald TODAY

Western WA Northwest Weather

64°49°

Partly sunny today; pleasant on the Olympic Peninsula. Partly cloudy tonight. Sunny to partly cloudy tomorrow.

Bellingham 67/51

Morning clouds, isolated shower

TOMORROW

59°50° Mostly cloudy with isolated showers

SUNDAY

Mountains

Stanwood 64/52

Arlington Eastern WA 67/49 Granite Some sun today. A passing Falls afternoon shower in the Marysvile 66/50 east; pleasant elsewhere. 66/51 Partly cloudy tonight; a Langley EVERETT Lake Stevens passing shower in the 64/49 63/51 66/50 east. Mukilteo Snohomish Gold Bar 62/51 67/51 67/51 Lynnwood Mill Creek Index Monroe Sultan 66/50 66/50 66/50 67/51 67/51 Kirkland Redmond 67/51 67/51 Seattle Bellevue 67/51 69/54

65°51° 70°53° Warmer, partly sunny

TUESDAY

68°52° Scattered showers

Mount Vernon 66/50

Oak Harbor 62/53

A few scattered showers

MONDAY

Partly sunny today. The freeair freezing level will rise to near 7,500 feet. Partly cloudy tonight.

Port Orchard 68/49

Puget Sound

Wind west at 7-14 knots today. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Wind west 12-25 knots tonight. Seas 1-3 feet. Partly cloudy.

Everett

Time

High Low High Low

Almanac

2:47 a.m. 9:34 a.m. 4:19 p.m. 9:37 p.m.

Feet

11.3 0.0 10.0 4.4

Port Townsend High Low High Low

Time

Everett

Arlington

Whidbey Island

Air Quality Index

Pollen Index

Sun and Moon

Yesterday’s offender ....... Particulates

Today

Sunrise today ....................... Sunset tonight ..................... Moonrise today ................... Moonset today .....................

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 60/48 Normal high/low ....................... 62/47 Records (1939/1964) ................. 78/33 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 29.92 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.09” Month to date ............................. 0.38” Normal month to date ............... 0.84” Year to date ............................... 10.96” Normal year to date ................. 14.20”

Good: 0-50; Moderate: 51-100, Unhealthy (for sensitive groups): 101-150; Unhealthy: 151-200; Very unhealthy: 201300; Hazardous: 301-500 WA Dept. of Environmental Quality

More Information

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 63/48 Normal high/low ....................... 62/47 Records (2014/2009) ................. 77/38 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 29.92 F 24 hours ending 5 p.m. .............. Trace Month to date ............................. 0.25” Normal month to date ............... 1.59” Year to date ............................... 19.18” Normal year to date ................. 19.75”

World Weather City

Road Reports:

www.wsdot.wa.gov

Avalanche Reports:

www.nwac.noaa.gov

Burn Ban Information: Puget Sound: 1-800-595-4341 Website: www.pscleanair.org Forecasts and graphics, except the KIRO 5-day forecast, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015

Today Hi/Lo/W Amsterdam 58/43/pc Athens 83/64/pc Baghdad 94/69/s Bangkok 92/80/pc Beijing 78/51/s Berlin 65/40/pc Buenos Aires 71/61/pc Cairo 84/63/s Dublin 59/44/pc Hong Kong 91/82/pc Jerusalem 77/52/s Johannesburg 78/53/s London 63/53/pc

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 58/46/sh 81/63/pc 94/70/s 93/80/pc 85/61/s 65/44/pc 73/63/s 85/65/s 54/43/pc 90/83/sh 83/58/s 75/49/pc 63/45/pc

8.7 0.4 7.0 3.7

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 61/49 Normal high/low ....................... 59/46 Records (1958/1964) ................. 82/30 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 29.96 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.08” Month to date ............................. 0.47” Normal month to date ............... 0.66” Year to date ................................. 8.43” Normal year to date ................... 7.68”

New May 17

Source: NAB

Feet

2:13 a.m. 8:40 a.m. 3:51 p.m. 8:26 p.m.

First May 25

Full Jun 2

5:31 a.m. 8:40 p.m. 4:18 a.m. 5:54 p.m.

Last Jun 9

City

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Madrid 75/49/s 82/54/s Manila 94/80/pc 96/81/s Mexico City 73/57/t 76/56/t Moscow 57/43/r 53/43/r Paris 62/44/pc 64/46/pc Rio de Janeiro 77/66/c 78/67/pc Riyadh 102/77/s 99/74/s Rome 77/57/pc 72/58/t Singapore 90/80/t 90/80/t Stockholm 50/36/pc 57/42/pc Sydney 65/58/pc 67/57/sh Tokyo 80/66/pc 77/65/r Toronto 61/53/pc 75/54/c

Vancouver

65/52

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Washington Bellingham Colville Ellensburg Forks Friday Harbor Moses Lake Ocean Shores Olympia Port Angeles Pullman Spokane Seattle Tacoma Walla Walla Wenatchee Yakima Idaho Boise Coeur d’Alene Sun Valley Oregon Astoria Bend Eugene Klamath Falls Medford Portland

67/51/pc 76/46/pc 75/51/pc 62/49/pc 65/48/pc 79/53/pc 55/51/pc 66/49/pc 63/48/pc 67/45/c 73/50/pc 67/51/pc 67/49/pc 72/52/c 78/55/pc 80/49/pc 61/48/t 72/47/pc 54/39/t

65/48/sh 69/47/pc 55/40/sh

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Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Three big crashes in Indianapolis 500 practice this week have raised one big question. Are the new oval aero kits, along with speeds that have topped 230 mph, the cause? “We’re still learning, to be honest,” Helio Castroneves said. “There are so many little details with the new aero kit that we’re just starting now to go through that phase. My teammates are going through that phase as well and we’re just starting.” The three-time Indy 500 winner lost control of his car before it hit the wall, went airborne and flipped Wednesday. On Thursday,

Josef Newgarden flipped his car in the latest crash. Newgarden, the 24-yearold Tennessee driver, was checked, cleared and released from the speedway’s medical center. Team Penske’s Simon Pagenaud led Thursday’s practice with a fast lap of 228.793 mph. Colombia’s Carlos Munoz had the secondfastest time at 228.126, American Sage Karam was third at 228.126, New Zealand’s Scott Dixon was fourth forth at 227.634, and Brazil’s Tony Kanaan was fifth at 227.527. Newgarden lost control of the CFH Racing entry car going into the first turn at Indianapolis Motor Speedway and the car flipped and rested on its side after it

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slapped into the wall. “I’m still trying to gather my thoughts from it,” he said. “It definitely surprised me. Just lucky that everything’s good and the Dallara tub held up pretty well.” That seemed to be a common theme at Indy on Thursday as IndyCar and Chevrolet worked to determine if the new oval aero kits were the cause of a crash that sent Castroneves’ car airborne Wednesday. Both Castroneves and Newgarden drive Chevrolet cars and both crashes were similar — they happened near the same part of the track, and both cars flipped when the car turned backward. “It’s definitely

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Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 81/60/sh 59/42/t 76/49/pc 58/42/pc 83/68/t 75/68/pc 86/70/t 87/67/t 83/72/t 50/39/r 81/67/t 65/48/sh 73/56/sh 73/60/c 75/55/c 83/66/pc 85/64/pc 86/62/pc 58/40/t 78/63/t 81/63/pc 80/64/pc 81/64/pc 81/68/t 61/41/t 79/67/t 81/65/c 76/52/s 79/67/t 73/44/pc 78/59/t 91/70/t 75/53/pc 78/64/c 85/63/pc 79/60/sh 83/69/s 87/74/t 78/65/pc

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Today Hi/Lo/W Raleigh 81/61/pc Rapid City 61/47/t Reno 55/44/sh Richmond 79/62/s Sacramento 70/51/pc St. Louis 83/69/t St. Petersburg 91/72/t Salt Lake City 61/46/t San Antonio 78/70/t San Diego 66/59/r San Francisco 63/52/pc San Jose 65/52/pc Stockton 71/49/pc Syracuse 75/57/pc Tallahassee 86/70/t Tampa 90/73/t Tempe 74/57/t Topeka 76/63/t Tucson 75/55/t Tulsa 83/65/t Washington, DC 80/66/s Wichita 79/64/t Winston-Salem 81/61/c Yuma 69/54/t

35/30/pc 73/44/pc 68/43/s 65/50/pc 77/45/r 62/50/pc 63/48/pc Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 87/63/pc 72/44/pc 65/45/pc 89/68/pc 73/49/pc 82/70/t 89/72/t 60/48/sh 84/72/t 66/59/pc 64/52/pc 65/51/pc 74/48/pc 77/57/c 87/70/t 88/72/t 73/58/c 76/64/t 72/54/pc 80/67/t 88/71/t 74/62/t 85/63/pc 82/62/pc

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(for the 48 contiguous states) High: Winter Haven, FL ................... 96 Low: Saranac Lake, NY ................... 23

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NBA | Playoff roundup

Rockets stun Clippers 119-107 to force Game 7

concerning,” CFH Racing owner Ed Carpenter said. “We haven’t had cars doing that ever in my career. But there’s a lot different this year. I don’t know that we understand why it’s going on at this point and really I don’t know that we understand that it’s just a problem for Chevy cars, either. Pippa Mann is the only driver with a Honda car that crashed this week, but still takes full responsibility for the crash that sent her car spinning into the wall Wednesday. “My crash, it didn’t have anything to do with the aero kits at all,” the English driver said. “My accident would have happened with those circumstances with last year’s aero kit, with the 2011 car. It was just one of those things.” The cars have only been on the track for five days with the oval aero kits, including test day held on opening day at Indy. After Castroneves’ crash, Team Penske owner Roger Penske raised his concern almost immediately about the front wicker pinning the front of his car down as it went airborne.

Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Corey Brewer scored 15 of his 19 points in the fourth quarter and the Houston Rockets erased a 19-point, second-half deficit to stun the Los Angeles Clippers 119-107 on Thursday night to force a Game 7 in the Western Conference semifinals. James Harden, who played less than a minute in the fourth quarter, scored 23 points — making all 11 of his free throws — and Dwight Howard added 20 points and 21 rebounds for the Rockets, who have won two straight games. Game 7 is Sunday in Houston. The Clippers were cruising with a 19-point lead in the third quarter, seemingly assured of earning the franchise’s first berth in the conference finals. The Rockets scored nine straight to cut it to 13 heading into the fourth. Houston hit seven

3-pointers in the fourth and stymied the Clippers offensively. Blake Griffin, who finished with 28 points, didn’t score in the final quarter.

Cavaliers 94, Bulls 73 CHICAGO — No dominant performance by LeBron James. Not much from Kyrie Irving, either. Somehow, the Cleveland Cavaliers still found a way to advance to the Eastern Conference finals. James struggled to score 15 points, Irving limped off the court and the Cavaliers still beat the Chicago Bulls to clinch their semifinal series in six games. Matthew Dellavedova scored 19 points and Tristan Thompson added 13 points and 17 rebounds to help the Cavaliers advance to the conference finals for the first time since 2009 even though their superstar played like a mere mortal and their All-Star point guard hobbled to the locker room in the first half. Irving scored six points in 12 minutes before twisting his left knee when he came down on Thompson’s foot early in the second quarter. The score was 35-35 and he did not return.

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Community Extra SECTION D

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM/LOCAL

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FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

OPPORTUNITIES Get fit: Health expo in Edmonds on Saturday A community Health and Fitness Expo is set for 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Edmonds School District stadium, 7600 212th St. SW, Edmonds. The free event will feature more than 45 interactive booths, free health screenings, mammograms, healthy recipes, snack samples, an obstacle course, kids fun run, bike rodeo and much more. The event is sponsored by Verdant Health Commission and Citrine Health and is organized by Edmonds Parks and Recreation, Edmonds School District and Swedish Edmonds. More info: hfexpo.edmonds wa.gov

Pedal: Green power to the bicyclists In honor of National Bike Month, B.I.K.E.S. Club of Snohomish County is hosting Green Drinks, 5 to 7 p.m. May 20 at Sharing Wheels Community Bike Shop, 2531 Broadway, Everett. The shop and parking are at the back of the building. Green Drinks is a monthly networking and happy hour event for people working on environmental issues — in this case, bicycles. Light snacks and pedal-powered smoothies will be provided, along with free green mugs while they last. This month’s event is nonalcoholic. B.I.K.E.S. Club hosts local rides year-round, and supports bicycle events and advocacy in Snohomish County. More info: www.bikesclub.org

Cruise: Classic cars invited to hit Colby

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Lynnwood’s Douglas Kerley, 66, and his son, Paul, 25, both regularly donate their 0 negative blood at Bloodworks Northwest in Lynnwood, but this time Douglas will wait for another day when his iron level is a bit higher. Douglas has donated blood hundreds of times, and Paul is on his 94th round.

All in the family

Father and son have donated more than 70 gallons of blood By Rikki King Herald Writer

Cruzin’ to Colby returns to downtown Everett May 24-25, and Seattle Rod-tiques seeks classic car owners to participate in the annual community event. The first 400 registered cars will do a controlled cruise of Colby Avenue, 1-5 p.m. May 24. Registration is $30 per vehicle and includes numerous perks. The Show and Shine runs 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to the first 800 cars. More info: www.seattlerodtiques.com, 425-337-9335 or 425-710-7406

LYNNWOOD — The first time Douglas Kerley gave blood, it was during combat in Vietnam. He watched as a fellow soldier who’d been wounded regained his color after a transfusion of Kerley’s blood. To him, it seemed like a miracle, and that’s still the case. Now 66 and living in Lynnwood, Kerley’s a frequent donor at the local office of Bloodworks Northwest, formerly known as the Puget Sound Blood Center. He sees giving blood as his duty. He shares the habit of community service with his son, Paul

Reel ’em in: Kids fishing derby in Sultan

APPLAUSE

The Sultan Sportsmen’s Club’s annual kids fishing derby for kids ages 2-14 is set for 10 a.m. to noon May 23 at Ed Boucher’s ponds, located on East Wisteria Lane about two blocks north of the high school. Signs will be posted from U.S. 2. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Prizes will be awarded for the biggest catch and most catches in different age categories for boys and girls. Willow Creek Hatchery in Lynnwood offers free trout fishing May 30-31, and the Monroe Rod and Gun Club hosts its annual derby June 6. More info: 360-793-7764 (Sultan), 425-771-5970 (Lynnwood), 360-794-6317 (Monroe)

Enter: Edmonds history essay contest The Edmonds Historical Museum invites fourth-graders who live in the Edmonds School District boundaries to enter an essay contest held in conjunction with the city’s 125th anniversary, which will be formally celebrated Aug. 11. Entries should answer: “What were the three most important events in Edmonds’ history and why were they important?” The deadline to submit is May 22. There will be prizes, including $50 for the first-place winner. For more information and a complete set of contest rules, email Teresa Wippel at teresawippel@comcast.net.

Volunteers help wipe out graffiti The Lynnwood Police Department Community Health and Safety Section’s new Graffiti Removal Unit recently focused its efforts on a neighborhood that had been overrun by graffiti. Volunteers hailed from the police department’s volunteer programs and other community service programs. Many residents on 208th Street from 52nd Avenue West to Highway 99 also came out to help, wielding paint supplies of their own, refreshments and lots of energy. “We have a team of dedicated volunteers who make weekly patrols of the city. They are trained to remove graffiti on utility boxes, dumpsters, city signs or city property,” Sgt. T.J. Brooks said. The Lynnwood Police encourage homeowners to remove graffiti on their property as soon as possible to deter further destruction. In special circumstances, the department will assist residents and businesses who need more support for their clean-up. The Graffiti Removal Unit is nearly cost-free to the city thanks to the support of Miller Paint, which provides supplies and paint. A van was repurposed from the Public Works Department for the program. What to do if you find graffiti

INSIDE: Military Update, 2

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Donations Bloodworks Northwest serves 90 hospitals in the region, including every hospital in Snohomish County. It needs about 900 donors a day to maintain a stable supply. The closest donation centers are in Lynnwood and Everett. To learn more, go to blood worksnw.org or call 800-3987888. Kerley, 25. Both have O negative blood, making them universal donors — nearly everyone can use their donated blood.

Garden club celebrates grant The Snohomish Garden Club has received a $500 Grassroots Grant from Scotts Miracle-Gro to support the work of its members who, with help from local volunteers, grow tens of thousands of pounds of local produce every year at the Martha Perry Community Veggie Garden on land generously donated by Bailey’s Farm. The produce is then given to the Snohomish and Maltby food banks and the Snohomish Senior Center. The Snohomish Garden Club invites new volunteers to help grow food at the garden, Tuesday and Thursday mornings throughout the growing season. A small celebration and planting kick-off work party is set for 8-11 a.m. May 16. The garden is located in Snohomish on Springhetti Road next to Bailey’s Farm. For more information, contact Laura Hartman at 360-794-9121.

New viewing area, thanks to Scouts The city of Arlington recently thanked Eagle Scout candidate Keenan Braam for his work helping develop a new viewing area overlooking the Stillaguamish River. Keenan was looking for an Eagle Scout project. City Storm Water Manager Bill Blake suggested a bench at the top of the bluff overlooking Country Charm Park and Conservation Area. The city had some thick fir planks that had been sawed from a large fir tree that was taken down to make room for the new playground at Haller Park. The planks were saved to make benches and signs. The city had also stored a kiosk built by David Simbeck (who achieved the Eagle Scout rank in 2011). The kiosk was placed near Keenan’s bench and will

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Vitals, 2

don’t always align. Paul Kerley works in a gun shop and also does event planning. Giving blood is just part of his routine, and it’s not a huge time commitment, he said. “I like the people there. They’re nice and friendly,” he said. “There are long-running conversations with the staff and the staff rotates in and out.” For fun these days, Douglas Kerley likes going to gun shows and collecting military antiques. Sometimes, he’s the only person in the blood bank besides staff, he said. He reminds others to give, too. “The need remains,” he said. Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com.

tell the story about Country Charm. Keenan took charge of the project and even added a rose garden and split-cedar fence along the top of the bank. The bench is located at the corner of Alcazar and Gilman avenues. People out for a walk in the area are encouraged to sit and enjoy the view of Country Charm and the South Fork Stillaguamish River.

on your property: Call: Contact 911. An officer will take a report and photograph the damage. Remove: Studies show that removal of graffiti within 24 to 48 hours reduces a recurrence considerably. Record: To aid prosecution and restitution, be sure to document your estimates and costs of surface restoration. Interested in helping out with future clean-ups? Contact a crime prevention specialist at 425-670-5639 or 425-670-5635, or email NLi@ci.lynnwood. wa.us.

In Uniform, 2

“I feel extremely honored that he saw my duty and has chosen to pick that up,” Douglas Kerley said. Together, father and son have donated more than 70 gallons to Bloodworks, according to the nonprofit. Douglas Kerley was born and raised in Ballard. After serving in the U.S. Army, in infantry, he worked for the post office. Paul Kerley remembers going with both of his parents to the blood bank before he was old enough to understand. He started giving blood his freshman year at Meadowdale High School. Father and son have gone together, though their schedules

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Calendar, 3

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Peregrine Spane (left) and Dietrich Menzer, of Boy Scout Troop 46 of Camano Island, have qualified for the highest rank in scouting, Eagle Scout.

Scouts give state park’s trash a new look

Boy Scout Troop 46 of Camano Island will soon be awarding two scouts, Dietrich Menzer, 15, and Peregrine Spane, 18, the highest rank in scouting, Eagle Scout. One of the requirements to earn the rank is a service project. For their projects, Dietrich and Peregrine both built waste receptacle enclosures at Camano Island State Park. Peregrine’s is near the RV campsites, and Dietrich’s is down at the south end of the beach. The Scouts earned their ranks within two months of each other and will share an awards ceremony. To submit news for Applause, email newstips@heraldnet.com.

Puzzles, 4

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Abby, 5


D2 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Retirement choices are in sharper focus M

any current Reserve and National Guard members, particularly those who are younger and have fewer years of service, are likely next year to face a difficult choice of retirement plans. It will be a decision as complex as the one being prepared by Congress for their active duty counterparts. More details of that choice are emerging as architects of the new plan answer questions posed by military associations, veterans groups, congressional staffs and individual reservists. Some reserve component advocacy groups are delighted by the prospect that their members will be given the choice: to stay under their current retirement plan or accept a reduced defined benefit at age 60 in return for participating immediately in a 401(k)-like Thrift Savings Plan. The TSP would have government matching of contributions up to 5 percent of basic pay to include monthly drill pay. Also, at the 12-year mark, new plan participants, including Reserve and Guard, would be offered a continuation payment in return for obligating to serve four more years. For Reserve and Guard, the minimum one-time continuation payment would be set equal to a half month of active duty pay for their grade and years of service. That’s one-fifth the minimum of two-and-a-half months’ basic pay to be set for their active duty counterparts. “It’s insulting,” said retired Army Col. Robert F. Norton, deputy director of government relations for Military Officers Association of America, who, along with 21 other associations and veterans groups, have urged Congress not to shift future forces to the proposed “blended” retirement if the cost is a 20 percent cut in annuities called

TOM PHILPOTT MILITARY UPDATE “defined benefit.” The concern is that the TSP with government matching, and vesting of account balances after only two years, could create a future retention crisis, particularly in periods of sustained operations. The continuation payment, even if enhanced, might be no match for the pull of civilian life when members have portable TSP and face lowered annuities if they stay. Other groups, including the Reserve Officers Association and the Enlisted Association of the National Guard of the United States, support the retirement changes now moving through Congress as more fair and flexible with the potential to benefit even full-term careerists. The House next week will begin floor debate on the fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill (HR 1735) including the blended retirement plan. Most features are identical to the plan recommended in January by the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission. Next week the Senate Armed Services Committee is to begin marking up its own version of the defense bill. Its chairman, Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, signaled this week he largely supports retirement changes endorsed by the House committee and chairman Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas.

Commissioners are proud that their proposal to modernize retirement would more closely align active and reserve plans. But they join critics in emphasizing that its most compelling feature, the TSP, will not grow enough to make up for reduced annuities unless members receive enhanced financial education, commit to investing appropriately for their age, which would mean in faster-growing stock index funds, and do so with enough discipline to take advantage of both time and government matching. For example, under current reserve retirement, a typical senior enlisted (grade E-7) with 20 “good” years, including four on active duty and an average of 78 retirement points earned yearly, would draw annuities from age 60 to age 85 with total current value of $630,035. That same reservist under the blended plan would see that defined benefit fall by 20 percent to $504,028. But at 12 years, he or she would get taxable continuation pay of $1,464, which could be rolled into the TSP. Also, as a TSP participant the reservist would see a minimum government contribution of 1 percent of basic pay or drill pay monthly. They also would see the government match member contributions of up 5 percent drill or base pay. The commission calculates that with a 4 percent government contribution (4 percent of it from matching) and a 7.3 percent return on TSP accounts, government-sponsored lifetime earnings for that E-7 reservist would more than make up the $126,007 loss in defined benefit by age 85. Indeed the reservist would have $62,000 more to pass on to heirs. The 7.3 percent represents average returns on TSP accounts since 2001 if investments were 85

percent in stock index funds and 15 percent in less volatile government bonds and fixed income securities. If the reservist contributed less than 3 percent or saw a return below 7.3 percent, TSP values would be lower. For example, a 5.3 percent average return with 3 percent matching would wipe out the net gain in lifetime earnings and leave the reservist with almost $81,000 less than the accumulated value of annuities under their current retirement plan. Proponents tout the flexibility of having a portion of retirement in funds that can be withdrawn without penalty starting at age 59½, to pay off a mortgage or invest in a business. The commission sought even more flexibility with an option at retirement for active duty or reserve retirees to get a lump-sum payment if they elect to defer any military annuity until age 67. The House committee rejected that as too risky. Jeffrey E. Phillips, executive director of ROA, said he still finds a lot to like in the proposed plan, including more choice for members and a plan that forces their introduction “to the investment world” without “unreasonable risk” to their portfolios. The riskiest investment options under TSP are stock index funds that reflect broad market changes in the U.S. or overseas “I believe that if a service member makes good use of TSP matching, they can come out ahead on their retirement funds,” Phillips said. Both Phillips and Scott Bousum, legislative director of EANGUS, said the lump sum option wasn’t critical to their group’s endorsement. “We’ve very supportive that 100 percent of future service members — reserve and active components — will have

IN UNIFORM Veterans calendar Disabled American Veterans, Martin T. Sofie Sunshine Chapter 13: 7 p.m. first Thursdays, Lynnwood Elks, 6620 196th St. SW. Call 425-218-0034 or email don. whedon06@gmail.com. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 170: Branch meetings are held at 5 p.m. second Wednesdays, 6802 Beverly Blvd., Everett. Call 425-353-2600. The Military Order of the Purple Heart, Chapter 12: 7 p.m. fourth Tuesdays, Lynnwood Elks Club, 6620 196th St. SW. Call Keith Reyes, 844-4MOPH12.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO / U.S. COAST GUARD, CHIEF PETTY OFFICER KYLE NIEMI

Adm. Paul Zukunft (right), commandant of the Coast Guard, chats with Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Olson and his wife, Cyndy Olson, before the 2014 Coast Guard Enlisted Persons of the Year Banquet on 7 at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C.

Active Duty Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Olson, of Oso, was named the 2014 Coast Guard Enlisted Person of the Year, Reserve Component. Olson is a maritime enforcement specialist assigned to Coast Guard Port Security Unit 313 in Everett. In March 2014, Olson responded to the deadly mudslide in Oso, leading reconnaissance patrols and setting waypoints for what would become a portion of the grid map of the impacted area. Olson was honored at a banquet held May 7 in Washington D.C., where he was presented the Coast Guard Commendation Medal and received numerous gifts from sponsor organizations. Army Pvt. Daniel Miner has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Miner is the son of Guy Miner of Mountlake Terrace. Air Force 2nd Lt. Christopher Villanueva has graduated from Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training undergraduate pilot training. He is currently serving as pilot with 80th Operations Support Squardron, Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. Villanueva is the son of Lisa Villanueva of Riverside, Calif., and Steve Villanueva of Edmonds. Army Pvt. Zachary Young has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Young is the son of Timothy Young of Snohomish and Kimberly Johnson of Tonasket. He is a 2014 graduate of Lighthouse Christian Academy in Snohomish.

Veterans news The American Legion Post 178 in Marysville will honor past and present veterans at its annual Memorial Day service, set for 11 a.m. May 25 at the Marysville Cemetery, 8801 State Ave. An

open house with refreshments follows from 12-2 p.m. at the Post Hall, 119 Cedar Ave. The Snohomish County Central Memorial Committee will be honoring all Vietnam war veterans at its 97th annual Memorial Day Service, 11 a.m. May 25 at Evergreen Memorial Cemetery, 4504 Broadway, Everett. Homeless, unemployed veterans can get help through Workforce Snohomish. Help includes employment assistance, support services, help with VA benefits and housing. Call Gordon Meade at 425-921-3478 or write to gordon.meade@workforcesnohomish.org. The Veterans of Foreign Wars posts and auxiliaries of Snohomish County are looking for new members. Needed is your last separation certification or other proof of eligibility. Auxiliary members are wives, widows, mothers, etc. For more information about joining a local post, call 425-337-1559.

Coast Guard Auxiliary: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays, Port of Everett Conference Center, 404 14th St. Marie Porterfield, 425-6293241, 509-949-6715 or Marie.Porterfield64@gmail.com. Fleet Reserve Association and Ladies Fleet Reserve Association Unit and Branch 18: Lunch noon, meeting 1 p.m. second Saturdays, 23003 56th Ave. W., Mountlake Terrace. 425-771-2774. Veterans: A group of veterans of wars in foreign lands (not associated with VFW) meets at 1 p.m., second Wednesdays, Carl Gipson Senior Center, 3025 Lombard, Everett. Call 425-257-8780.

American Legion Legion Post 178: Marysville Post 178 and Auxiliary Unit 178 meets 7 p.m. third Thursdays at the Post Hall, Second Street and Cedar Avenue, Marysville. Social hour at 6 p.m. Service officer hours are noon to 4 p.m. fourth Mondays at the Post Hall. Call 360653-0155; email legionpost178wa@gmail. com or visit americanlegion178wa.cfsites.org Legion Post 127: Bothell American Legion meets 7 p.m. second Wednesdays at 21920 Highway 9 SE. The post has a service officer to help with veterans issues. Call Burt Marsh, commander, 206-999-3254. Legion Post 76: Arlington Post 76 and auxiliary meetings, 7 p.m. second Tuesdays. SAL meetings 6 p.m. first Thursdays. All meetings are downstairs at 115 N. Olympic Ave., Arlington. Call 360-4352492. Breakfast is served from 8 to 10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month for $6 a plate. Legion Post 58: Arthur Kincaid Post meets 7 p.m. third Tuesdays, Odd Fellows Building, 610 Lewis St., Monroe. Call Bob, 360-863-3544 or go to www.americanlegionmonroe.org. Legion Post 66: meets 6 p.m. third Mondays at the Edmonds American Legion Hall, 117 S. Sixth St. A light meal will be served at 5:15 p.m. Call Les, 206-5466831. Legion Post 234: 7 p.m. second Mondays, Legion Hall, 22909 56th Ave. W., Mountlake Terrace. Call Frank Martinez, 425-697-4102. Legion Post 37: 7 p.m. third Thursdays, Lynnwood Elks Club, 6620 196th St. SW. 425-585-0279. Legion Post 92: Stanwood offers prime

rib dinner, 4:30 p.m., third Fridays. Legion and auxiliary meeting, 7 p.m., second Mondays, 26921 88th Ave. NW. Service office, 360-629-8021, open 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays to help veterans. Legion Post 96: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays, Legion Hall, 1201 First St., Snohomish. Call 360-568-5340. Legion Post 6: 6 p.m. second Thursdays, the Fleet Reserve Association Club, 6802 Beverly Blvd., Everett. Call Marvin at 425-923-8172. Legion Post 181: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, Lake Stevens Community Center, 1812 124th Ave. NE. Call Tom at 425-314-5865, Tony at 360-631-3242, or Vern at 425-343-9637; email info@ post181.org; or go to www.post181.org.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Everett Old Guard VFW Post 2100: 6:30 p.m. third Tuesdays, 2711 Oaks Ave., Everett. Call Don Wischmann, 425-7609031. Ladies Auxiliary 2100 meets 6:30 p.m. second Mondays. Call 425-337-1559. Go to www.vfwpost2100.org. Gold Bar Martin-Osterholtz VFW Post 9417: 6 p.m. first Thursdays, 301 Third St., Gold Bar. Call Doug White, 425-870-7298. Ladies Auxiliary: 3 p.m. first Thursdays. Call Arden King at 360-7932786. Oak Harbor Whitehead-Muzzall VFW Post 7392: 360-675-4048 or go to vfwpost7392.org. Sultan VFW Post 2554 and Ladies Auxiliary: 7 p.m., second Thursdays, United Methodist Church, 211 Birch Ave., Sultan. Call 425-870-0235. Arlington Boyer-Daniel VFW Post 1561: 7 p.m. first Tuesdays. For meeting location, call 425-232-8453, 360-4356677 or go to vfw1561.org. Monroe VFW Post 7511: 7 p.m., second Thursdays, IOOF Hall, 610 Lewis St., Monroe. Call Ken, 425-315-3509. Edmonds VFW Post 8870 and Ladies Auxiliary: 6 p.m. third Tuesdays, with a light supper at 5:15 p.m., Edmonds American Legion Hall, 117 Sixth Ave. S., Edmonds. Fred at 206-940-7502, email quartermaster@vfw8870.org or go to www.vfw8870.org. Snohomish Gay Jones VFW Post 921 and Auxiliary: 1 p.m. second Saturdays, Boys & Girls Club, 402 Second St., Snohomish. Call 425-397-7111. Lynnwood VFW Post 1040: 7 p.m., first Thursdays, Alderwood Youth Club, 19619 24th Ave. W., Lynn­wood. Call Frank, 425-697-4102. Lynnwood VFW Post 1040 Ladies Auxiliary meets from 7 to 8 p.m. at the same location. Contact Myra Rintamaki, 206-235-0348 for more information. To submit news for this column, contact reporter Melissa Slager: mslager@heraldnet. com.

government-matched retirement contributions” from the time they enter service, Bousum said. Because everyone now in would be grandfathered from retirement changes unless they opt in to the new plan, “we’re not breaking faith … No one is giving up anything. You can’t break a contract with a young person who frankly is in high school right now.” Bousum said he accepts the commission’s argument that it set reserve continuation pay so low based on results of a sophisticated force retention model developed by the think tank RAND, which indicated a higher amount was unneeded to sustain current force profiles, a priority for military leaders. “If at some point that needs to be readdressed, there will be opportunities,” Bousum said. Retired Navy Vice Adm. Norbert Ryan, president of MOAA, questioned whether a 401(k)like TSP should be a priority for Congress, with most active duty members and activated reservists already leaving service today with valuable training and GI Bill benefits worth more than $80,000. In MOAA’s view the real driver of retirement reform, though denied by commissioners, is to save more than $5 billion annually in future retirement costs, at the expense of the future careerists who will serve 20 years and more and remain the backbone of the volunteer force. Defense officials told military associations last week they don’t oppose the blended plan, Bousum said, but need until July to decide whether to seek changes and how to implement by the targeted start date of Oct. 1, 2017. To comment, write Military Update, P.O. Box 231111, Centreville, VA, 20120 or email milupdate@aol.com or twitter: @ Military_Update

VITAL STATISTICS DEATHS Adams, Deborah, 62, Mountlake Terrace, April 18 Adams, Otilla, 81, Edmonds, April 29 Albin, Travis, 38, Sultan, April 25 Alcon, Sharon, 74, Lynnwood, April 26 Alf, Vernon, 87, Gold Bar, April 29 Anderson, Berniece, 97, Everett, April 30 Anneberg, Craig, 90, Aberdeen, April 27 Baker, Dennis, 70, Edmonds, May 4 Baker, Jr, Everette, 88, Shoreline, April 25 Berggren, Robert, 80, Lynnwood, April 28 Bianchi, Dorothy, 94, Lake Stevens, April 23 Blondell, Bobby, 76, Sultan, May 4 Boisse, Sheri, 60, Everett, April 30 Borgford, Thomas, 87, Granite Falls, April 26 Brown, Maxine, 85, Stanwood, April 26 Bruland, Myrtle, 91, Bellingham, April 28 Cash, Judith, 75, Monroe, May 2 Chamberlain, Edra, 86, Everett, May 3 Christensen, Marjorie, 93, Marysville, May 2 Cook, Arnold, 93, Stanwood, May 7 Cool, Bradley, 72, Granite Falls, April 25 Dahl, Harry, 98, Lynnwood, May 1 Dassinger, Mary, 76, Everett, April 16 del Valle, Esther, 90, Bothell, April 30 Delasan, Lerie, 70, Everett, April 28 Doddy, Gerald, 72, Seattle, April 26 Doramus, Patricia, 77, Lynnwood, May 5 Dudley, Rose, 61, Bothell, April 25 Dunn, Beryl, 78, Camano Island, May 5 Durant, Ida, 92, Lynnwood, April 27 Eng, Wah, 65, Edmonds, April 30 Engfer, Maxine, 72, Marysville, April 28 Eyrish, Barbara, 71, Lynnwood, April 27 Fair, Kyoka, 80, Edmonds, May 3 Flemmer, Dorothy, 91, Edmonds, April 29 Forbes, James, 92, Kirkland, April 30 Fuller, Frances, 96, Lynnwood, April 29 Fuller, Donald, 71, Edmonds, April 20 Gale, Aruthur, 94, Granite Falls, May 2 Gibson, Ronald, 69, Lynnwood, April 13 Glushak, Frederick, 59, Mountlake Terrace, April 25 Goodrich, Harold, 92, Marysville, May 2 Gorun, Mariana, 65, Lynnwood, May 4 Graber, William, 76, Stanwood, May 2 Greany, Virginia, 81, Everett, April 29 Hagglund, Vicki, 69, Everett, May 1 Hahn, Carol, 81, Edmonds, May 1 Haldeman, Frank, 62, Gold Bar, April 29 Hamilton, Lena, 97, Everett, April 27 Harivlin, Donald, 85, Lynnwood, April 5 Harrington JR, Carl, 74, Edmonds, April 29 Hein, Eddie, 67, Arlington, April 29 Heuer, Barbara, 80, Mill Creek, May 4 Higgins, Jane, 93, Lynnwood, April 26 Hinton, Bonnie, 85, Snohomish, May 3 Hoff, Ross, 77, Snohomish, April 28 Hoff, jr, Frank, 91, Clinton, May 3 Holscher, Wanda, 87, Lake Stevens, May 2 Hughes, Kathleen, 91, Lake Stevens, April 27 Hughes, James, 69, Shoreline, May 1 Jacoby, Alex, 70, Arlington, April 28 Jensen, James, 84, Mountlake Terrace, May 4 Jewett, Harold, 81, Snohomish, April 29 Kazen, Carrie, 93, Snohomish, April 28 Kelly, Ann, 73, Everett, May 4 Knowles, John, 81, Bothell, April 25 Kochubey, Valentina, 61, Everett, May 2 Lee, Bokhee, 90, Shoreline, May 2 Lewis, Marilyn, 68, Mukilteo, April 28 Liden, Kenneth, 72, Marysville, April 28 McClure, Ella, 102, Darrington, May 5 McDaniel, Rodney, 75, Lynnwood, May 2 McMackin, Edward, 94, Bothell, May 3 McNeil, Michael, 52, Everett, April 30 Melang, Leo, 85, Marysville, March 5/1901 Milam, Alma, 78, Monroe, May 1 Miller, Glenmarie, 63, Lynnwood, April 28 Miller, Gary, 67, Everett, May 2 Mittleider, Roy, 70, Snohomish, May 16 Nefedova, yelena, 67, Lynnwood, April 27 Ness, Iver, 79, Marysville, April 24 Nevills, Joanne, 82, Edmonds, May 4

See VITALS, Page D3


The Daily Herald

EVENTS Bike to Work: The Edmonds Bicycle Advocacy Group coordinates the Edmonds Bike to Work Day. Cyclists are invited to meet 6-9 a.m. May 15 at the commute station at the Copper Pot Indian Bar and Grill’s outdoor patio near the ferry terminal. Starbucks coffee, fresh-baked scones, bike safety checks, giveaways and more. For a celebration ride to the commute station, meet by 7:30 a.m. in the produce section of the Edmonds PCC. More info: www.edmondsbicyclegroup.org. Lip sync contest: The Sky Valley Chamber and VIC host their annual Lip Sync Contest, 7 p.m. May 15 in the Sultan High School Commons at 13715 310th Ave. SE. Fun for all ages as talented and fun-loving performers entertain. To participate, sign up from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Contestants must live in the Sultan School District; songs must be 5 minutes or less and family appropriate. Admission is $3, $2 for students. More info: 360-7930983. Hummingbirds: “First Flight: A Mother Hummingbird’s Story,” a free film and presentation, is set for 7 p.m. May 15 at the Northwest Stream Center at McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. Space is limited for this free event and reservations are required by calling 425-316-8592. Musical jam: Enjoy an evening of old-time music with fiddle, guitar, banjo and more at 7 p.m. May 15 (third Friday) at the Sisco Heights Community Club, 13527 99th Ave. NE, Arlington. Musicians welcome, or just come and enjoy the music. Hot coffee and refreshments provided. More info: Don King, 360-658-8107. Norwegian Pancake Breakfast: 7:30-10:30 a.m. May 16 (third Saturday, September to May) at Ebenezer Lutheran Church, 2111 117th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens. Cost is $5; children younger than 4 are free. Proceeds this month benefit Snohomish County Volunteer Search and Rescue. More info: 425-334-0421. Pancake breakfast: 8-10:30 a.m. May 16 (third Saturday) at the East County Senior Center, 276 Sky River Parkway, Monroe. Cost is $5, $3 12 and younger. Proceeds benefit the center. More info: 360794-6359. Chili cook-off: The annual Chili 4 Charity cook-off fundraiser will be held 3-7 p.m. May 16 at the Stanwood American Legion Hall,

Vitals From Page D2 Nguyen, Christopher, 18, Everett, April 27 Oakes, Jr, James, 95, Everett, April 28 Osterberg, Evelyn, 85, Marysville, April 30 Pederson, Jean, 84, Everett, May 3 Phillis, Verla, 92, Everett, May 3 Pinkerton, Dee, 84, Mill Creek, May 4 Pino, Ernie, 59, Lynnwood, April 30 Porter, Richard, 37, Marysville, May 1 Richards, Paul, 58, Arlington, April 29 Robbins, Joshua, 20, Marysville, April 26 Rogge, Hans, 84, Lynnwood, April 24 Sather, Joanne, 83, Arlington, May 4 Sou, Hok, 54, Lynnwood, Jan. 17 Spring, June, 93, Edmonds, April 16 Stotish, Emilia, 92, Kirkland, May 3 Sundman, Angelina, 88, Arlington, May 2 Svedlund, Janis, 70, Monroe, April 30 Taylor, Betty, 90, Edmonds, April 22 Theboy, Feckla, 77, Everett, April 24 Thompson, Julia, 68, Marysville, April 8 Thompson, Kenneth, 51, Everett, April 19 Thoreson, Kathryn, 87, Mountlake Terrace, April 26 Tissue, Stanley, 57, Everett, April 29 Turner, Kenneth, 52, Snohomish, April 29 VanNoten, Loretta, 78, Everett, April 26 Villasenor, Heliodoro, 40, Bothell, May 3 Visscher, Herman, 84, Everett, May 5 Walters, Robert, 72, Bothell, April 27 Williams, Herbert, 83, Everett, May 2 Wrenn, Ethan, 42, Arlington, April 27 Young, Kenneth, 92, Stanwood, April 29 Yu, Tae, 85, Lynnwood, May 3

COMMUNITY EXTRA

CALENDAR 26921 88th Ave. NW. This event will include chili tasting, live music, family fun, a silent auction and a raffle. All proceeds benefit the Stanwood-Camano YMCA. More info: 360-629-2181. Bingo karaoke: The Everett Senior Center Foundation’s next Sing-go bingo and karaoke fundraiser is set for 5:30-10 p.m. May 16 with a 1950s “Jailhouse Rock” theme. Ages 21 and older. Karaoke starts at 6 p.m., bingo at 7. Tickets are $16 pre-paid or $20 at the door and include a bingo sheet. Costume and karaoke contests, raffle, dinner available ($8). Proceeds benefit the Carl Gipson Senior Center of Everett. Also, bring old clothing and other textiles to donate. Tickets at the senior center, 3025 Lombard Ave., or at www.brownpapertickets. com. More info: Eric Wollan, 425257-7082. Boat checks: The Everett Sail and Power Squadron offers free U.S. Coast Guard vessel safety checks in conjunction with National Safe Boating Week activities at the Port of Everett Marina, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. May 16. Free, but registration required at ESPSVSC@gmail.com. Check in at the ESPS table near the Farmer’s Market location. Elwha film: A free showing of “Return of the River: Changing Course is Possible” is set for 7-9 p.m. May 16 at Edmonds Unitarian Universalist Church, 8109 224th St. SW. Co-director John Gussman will be on hand for discussion following the documentary. More info: Nancy Dolan, 425-891-8728 or nandol@ comcast.net. Motorcycle show: ABATE (A Brotherhood Against Totalitarian Enactments) of Washington Sky Valley Chapter holds its Antique and Classic Motorcycle Show, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 17 on First Street in downtown Snohomish. Free to watch; live music and vendors. More info: 360-568-7820. Feral cats: The Community Cat Coalition offers its next “Basic TNR: Trap, Neuter, Return” class, 1:303:30 p.m. May 17 at the Snohomish Library, 311 Maple Ave. Free but registration requested. More info: cccowaTNRclass@gmail.com or Penny at 425-750-2375. Oso photos: Photographer Phil Eidenberg-Noppe displays photos

DISSOLUTIONS Jeremy Osborn and Courtney Osborn Stephen Underwood and Eileen Underwood Michelle Noel and Gary Noel Kenneth Mcleod and Jennifer Mcleod David Wheeler and Kathleen Wheeler Tracey Gamboa and Jesse Gamboa Marni Mills and Ryan Mills Christina Bill and Michel Bill Susan Williams and Thomas Crowther Tanyana Ogorodnik and Anatoliy Ogorodnik Chera Hanson and Rod Hanson Christina Carbary and Meredith Carbary Chakriya Khou and Sreng Khou Daniel Abad and Diane Abad Lakisha Kleinbrook and Rick Kleinbrook Shawna Bardsley and Brian Bardsley Heidi Jensen and Patrick Jensen Bonnie Hyde and Daniel Hyde David Ussery and Erin Ussery Bobby Yesa and Gina Yesa Anjeanette Hanson and Michael Hanson Jr Joseph Stine Iv and Lauren Bates Chanphallyna Inn and Dina Lim Rebecca Pedersen and Peter Pedersen Andrew Fader and Amanda Fader Ashley Sargent and Collin Sargent Michael Walz and Leah Walz Mackenzie Watson and Eric Horne Sheena Shytle and Joseph Shytle Rebecka Kane and Krystofer Kane Jeffery Dehut and Nicole Dehut James Bosley and Cortney Bosley Natasha Moses-Kido and Mark Kido Randall Ward and Janet Ward Dominic Duenas and Melody Duenas Kaci Prevost and Robert Prevost Gladys Barrett and Evan Barrett

of Oso before and after the slide and answers questions, 3-5 p.m. May 17 at the Everett Public Library, 2702 Hoyt Ave. More info: 425257-7640. Sea shanties: The Stanwood Area Historical Society welcomes folksinger and historian Hank Cramer for its next H&H (Hors d’oeuvres and History) Program, 4 p.m. May 17 at the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW. All ages. Free. More info: 360629-6110. Holocaust Remembrance: Chabad Jewish Center of Snohomish County and the city of Lynnwood hold a Holocaust Remembrance Day, 4-5:30 p.m. May 18 at the Lynnwood Senior Center, 19000 44th Ave. W. Hear from Mayor Nicola Smith, Rabbi Berel Paltiel and third-generation Holocaust survivor Arik Cohen. More info: Rosamaria.Grazinani@ ci.lynnwood.wa.us. Multicultural crafts: Children ages 6 and up are invited to learn about different cultures and make fun crafts, 3:30-4:30 p.m. May 22 at the Monroe Library, 1070 Village Way. More info: 360-794-7851. Turtles: A “Save the Turtles Day” workshop is set for 1-3 p.m. May 23 at the Edmonds Wildlife Habitat Native Plant Demonstration Garden, 95 Pine St. Free and family friendly. Donations welcome to support turtle care.

WAYS TO HELP Viva Color: Help the city of Everett with its Viva Color planting days, May 15 and June 6. Volunteers of all ages are welcome to help. Gloves, trowels, refreshments and souvenir buttons provided. The May 15 event starts at 8:30 a.m.; meet at the corner of Hewitt and Colby avenues. On June 6, help plant flowers 9-11 a.m. along Mukilteo Boulevard. More info: www.everettwa.gov/663/VivaColor, 425-257-8300 ext. 2. Sew Thoughtful: The next Snohomish County Clothing and Textile Advisors Sew Thoughtful event is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. May 15 in the Cougar classroom behind the WSU Extension office at McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. This month’s project is to sew walker bags for those with mobility issues at Group Health Hospital rehabili-

Shawn Rothwell and Tammy Rothwell Thaiha Nguyen and Tien Ha Nicholas Moyers and Terry Moyers

MARRIAGE LICENSES Fields, Tavia Lea and Laberge, Erik Anthony Watson, Samuel Howard and Clark, Terry Lee Ocwieja, Christopher Norbert and Bly, Carolyn Marie Villa, Lopez Carlos Alveto and Lormendez, Saldana Claudia Woodbury, Jules Duane and Zhang, Xiaolan Riddle, William Butch and Moore, Anjeanette Marie Sanford, Joshua Kirk and Meyer, Sandra Hite, Aimee Jay and Van-Landingham, Adam Terris Wray, Brandon Lee and Swezey, Chelsea Anne Lambert, Nicole Lian and Hopkins, Miles John Dinsmore, Christian Jon and Jones, Kira Nicole Cooley, Travis Michael and Hubner, Megan Alissa Seratte, Kenneth Ray and Kamalii, Michaelle Joy Beidler, Hannah Brooke and Schunke, Erik William Rivas, Hernandez Berenice and Ramos, Caballero Jose Maria Person, Jason Taylor and Mckay, Chaunee Terese Jernigan, Angelica Michelle and Boyland, Marlon Terrell Arkhipchuk, Irina and Minchuk Aleksandr, Johnson, Robert Alan and Storm, Christine Ann

tation. Kits provided. Bring your sewing machine, tools, threads and lunch. More info: Arlene, 425-7430118 or afharris@juno.com.

Market will be held May 30 and sale items are needed. More info: Rochelle Skinner, 206-919-8074 or catterrific@gmail.com.

Blood drive: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 16 at Haller Park, 154 W. Cox St., Arlington.

Medical relief donations: Everett Community College nursing students are raising money and collecting donations of supplies for the college’s annual trip to the Dominican Republic to provide care for impoverished families. Students seek donations of over-the-counter medications, hygiene supplies and money to purchase medications, such as antibiotics. Supplies can be dropped off at Everett Community College, 2000 Tower St., outside Liberty Hall 361 or Parks Student Union room 209. More info: Candace Whedon, cwhedon@ everettcc.edu or 425-388-9462.

Mattress fundraiser, Everett: Cascade Bruins football, band and color guard, sponsored by the Cascade Football and Band Boosters, holds a mattress fundraiser, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. May 16 at the campus at 801 E. Casino Road, Everett. Test out 25 mattresses and then order in the size you need and get home delivery within two weeks. More info: http://bit.ly/Beds4Cascade. Volunteers needed: Village Community Services seeks volunteers to help with its annual Village Gala event set for May 16 at the Medallion Hotel. Help with set-up, table decorating, greeting, registration, check-out and takedown. More info: Michelle Dietz, 360-653-7752 ext. 14. Mattress fundraiser, Marysville: The Marysville Pilchuck High School Tomahawk Boosters holds a mattress fundraiser, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. May 17 at Marysville Pilchuck High School, 5611 108th St NE. More info: www.facebook.com. Fundraiser: The Stanwood Community and Senior Center holds a spaghetti dinner fundraiser, 1-4 p.m. May 17, to raise money for staff member Tracy Sandman, who is expecting a bone marrow transplant. Donations will help with medical bills. The community center is at 7430 276th St. NW. Suggested minimum donation is $10. Silent auction, too. More info: 360-629-7403. Hospice volunteers: Providence Hospice and Home Care of Snohomish County, 2731 Wetmore Ave., Everett, holds its next volunteer information session on May 20 (third Wednesday). Registration required. More info: Joanie at 425-261-4815 or Joan.Hemm@ providence.org.

Vendors: Cruzin to Colby seeks vendors for its annual Memorial Day weekend event. Food, craft and information booth vendors welcome. Costs vary from $50 to $150 and benefit the nonprofit Seattle Rod-tiques car club, which in turn supports various charities. Applications are at www. seattlerod-tiques.com. More info: 425-710-7406 or 425-337-9335. Bike work parties: Sharing Wheels holds work parties to prepare used kids bikes for an annual swap event in June. Remaining work parties are set for 6-9 p.m. May 28 and June 4 at Sharing Wheels, 2531 Broadway, Everett. Donations of working or repairable bikes also are needed. More info: 425-252-6952.

ASSISTANCE Health checks: Free health screenings will be available at a Health and Fitness Expo set for 9-11:30 a.m. May 16 at the Edmonds School District stadium, 7600 212th St. SW. To qualify for a free mammogram, call 888-6518931. Free admission and other activities. Over 45 booths, recipes, snack samples, kids activities and much more. More info: hfexpo. edmondswa.gov, 425-771-0268. Job Club: A drop-in Job Club will be held 3-4:30 p.m. May 21 at the Sultan Library, 319 Main St. Get advice from a WorkSource employment specialist that you can add to your resume. Food, beverage and door prizes. Free. Depression Bipolar: The Support Alliance meets 7-8:30 p.m. the second, third and fourth Mondays in the Rainier Room of the Medical Office Building at Providence Hospital Colby Campus, 1700 13th St., Everett. Supporting those with depression or bipolar disorder as well as their family and friends. More info: www.dbsasnoco.org or call 425-405-0786. Mental illness, family support: Meets 7:30-9 p.m. second Mondays at Mountain View Presbyterian Church, 5115 100th St. NE, Marysville. A group for family members of adults living with mental illness to share ideas about coping and becoming better caregivers for their loved ones. More info: Wendy, 206-790-0162. Mental illness, NAMI: A National Alliance on Mental Illness Connection recovery support group meets 7-8:30 p.m. second Thursdays in the conference room at Lake Stevens Fire Station 82, 9811 Chapel Hill Road. NAMI Connection offers free, confidential and safe support for those living with mental health challenges. More info: Kathy, 206-218-6449.

Flea market items: Spring cleaning? The Camano Animal Shelter Association’s annual Flea

Volunteers, Bothell: The Northshore Senior Center seeks volunteers for its Volunteer Employment Office, which connects seniors with needed assistance. Training provided. Three-hour shifts available. More info: Rub-

Gourley, Jared Ethan and Vorderstrasse, Amanda Riley, Ryan Edward and Stone, Jasmine Marie Kang, Maeng Ho and Yoon, Chin A Garcia, Rojas Enrique and Martinez, Garcia Maria Mcguinness, Amanda Lynn and Northrup, Jordan Joseph Horsman, Lucas Garret and Strange, Jaycie Marie Collins, Taurean Cornell and Perez, Bedolla Ladi Lorena Allington, Steve W and Montenegro, Tista Maria Luz Badley, Joan Stacie and Henin, Roland Gilbert Venhorst, Timothy-Andrew and Crain Sara, Elizabeth Wielenga, Beth Anne and Rodriguez, Marcus James Boehm, Steven Paul and Morse, Lisa Savchuk, Oleksandr and Yakovleva Zina, Genadivna Long, Cashmire Jasmine and Egan, Anthony Edward Freeman, Fay Ellen and Galovin, Robert Michael Harris, Jeffrey Allan and Perez, Rosary Rhea Nelson, Brian Ross and Zhang, Junmei Gardner, Matthew Jacob and Burns, Allyson Kate Guo, Kiera Sueng and Robinson, Samuel James Fernando, Aritha Dilshad and Mayberry, Jessica Rose Ohlinger, Christopher and Jacobsen, Deborah Noelle Johansen, Cathaleen Carol and Schmidmeister, Frank Adam

Stone, Jason Paul and Harris, Amber Starr Spiering, Stephanie Renee and De-Coteau, James Edward Drake, Clair Agnes Leola and, Bruington Daniel Roy Correa, Joshua Lee and Kelly, Reyna Joellen Alma Slade, Kirsten Anne Marie and, Angelocci Jason Mcclay Simonenko, Olesya and Doroshenko Mikhail, Sergey Via, Anthony Joseph and Dowd, Sarah Michelle Leclair, Ronald Gilbert and Guinn, Melodee Arlene Lorentzen, Erik Karl and Barrett, Gladys Muthoni Hendricks, Sean Patrick and Banta, Debra Sue Seimears, Tiffany and Trombley Jeff, Dustin Bosquez, Chad Motes and Holocher, Mary Anne Pratt, Faith Caroline and Rice, John-Mario Robert Mcginnis, Christine Ann and Kok, Jedidiah James Holman, Richard Roy and Fellows, Kelly Elizabeth Berger, Sarah Jean and Stahl, Alexander Ray Railey, Heather Marie and Sprague, Shawn Michael Campbell, Emily Liaha and Hardy, Joshua James Marshall, Mark Stephen and Hartman, Kimberly Ann Tucker, Corey Michael and Rome, Brittany Nicole Burns, Bruce Neil Jr and, Thornton Keshia Favilla, Stephan Joel and Lewis, Charisse Eileen

Rocchio, Ashley Rose and O’dell, Jeffrey Tyler Roberson, Eleanor and Morte Claire, Jennifer Dormier, Tera Alea and Naab, Tyler Anthony Fabricius, Tina Florence and Knien, Trevor David Lowery, Calia Dashawn and Shreve, John Benjamin Prichard, Sherilynn Kay and Hemphill, James Thompson Jr Mitterling, Sarah Kathleen and Potter, Cora-Jean Davis Vanderwoude, Louis Henry and Bernal, Lacroix Alicia Legaspi, Jose Edilberto and Paja, Almie Jane Rudolph, Paul Daniel and Simon, Shelia Faye Cervantes, Sanchez David and Gutierrez, Altamirano Edyell Maraveller, Adrianna and Zertuche Arturo, Caleb Pasillas, Cardenas Lourdes and Rodriguez, Venegas Bonifacio Wallawine, Jason Alan and Stevens, Jennifer Elizabeth Flores, Cruz Katherine and Mullis, Anastasia Hope Garcia, Banda Rosa Isela and, Lopez Rojas Jose Isabel Marshall, Tori Arlane and Strommer, Paul Edward Anderson, Carl Benjamin and Thompson, Regina Anne Krot, Pavel Aleksandrovich and Greben, Raisa Emanuilovna Tepley, Michael Richard and Claessen, Myrna Shirley

Benefit concert: Students from Fernwood Elementary School in Bothell play a benefit concert with Seattle jazz pianist Overton Berry at 7 p.m. May 21 at the Northshore Performing Arts Center, 18125 92nd Ave. NE, Bothell. Proceeds will help build literacy centers in Uganda. Suggested donation is $15. More info: Katherine Berry, kberry@nsd.org or 425-408-4563.

CAMPS • CONCERTS • SPECIAL EVENTS • GETAWAYS • FAIRS • FESTIVALS • MARKETS • MUSEUMS

COMING MAY 15! 1299304

Beach docents: Edmonds Parks and Recreation seeks volunteer beach docents this summer at the Olympic Beach Visitor Station. Application deadline is June 16 and training begins June 23. More info: Sally Lider, 425-771-0227 or sally. lider@edmondswa.gov.

bina, 425-286-1032.

Employment Network: 10 a.m.noon Fridays at the North Creek Presbyterian Church, 621 164th St. SE., Mill Creek. Free help with job searches, resume writing and interviewing. More info: 425-743-2386. Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS): Several local chapters of this nonprofit weight-loss club meet at different days and times across Snohomish County. Meetings include a private weigh-in, peer support, information and awards for progress. First meeting is free. More info: www.tops.org, or area captain Darlene Wascher at 360-658-1311.

Cool Happenings for Hot Summer Fun!

Look for it inside The Daily Herald or HeraldNet.com

Volunteers, Camano Island: Meals-on-Wheels drivers will be needed this winter at the Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road. Stop by on a Monday, Wednesday or Friday morning and talk to Nancy if interested. The Camano Center also seeks several volunteer drivers to provide seniors with rides to medical appointments. There are also a few volunteer positions available at the Second Chance Thrift Shop. More info: 360-3870222.

Friday, 05.15.2015 D3

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D4 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Travelers still waiting for ticket refund

DAILY CROSSWORD

Question: American Airlines made a data-entry error when my husband and I booked our airline tickets by phone. An agent entered our return dates as January 2016 — a full year after our planned dates of travel. The airline agreed to refund the tickets, but we’ve had no luck with getting the money back. Our original tickets were purchased in April 2014. Since then, we’ve been back and forth with the airline. Every piece of required documentation was enclosed with our letter. We meticulously followed the directions on its website for obtaining a refund. Finally, in desperation, we turned to American Airlines’ AAdvantage desk. A representative informed us that, despite what was stated on the website, the refunds department does not handle this type of refund request, and instead we should submit our documents to the customer-relations department. We were dismayed that after we had exhaustively followed the directions, the airline completely disregarded our refund request. Apparently, American Airlines had no intention of informing us that we needed to resubmit our claim, and had we not called, our inquiry

CLASSIC PEANUTS

CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

never would have been reviewed. The utter lack of customer regard, professionalism and attention to detail on the part of the airline baffles us. We have been flying with American Airlines for as long as we can remember, and we are shocked to have been treated in this manner. — Elaine Stokols, Alexandria, Virginia Answer: If an airline agent erred when entering your dates, the airline should have offered you an immediate, no-questionsasked refund. A one-year delay is unconscionable. At the very least, it needed to send you an answer of some kind, even if the answer was “no.” It looks as if you initially tried to take this up with American Airlines in writing, and it seems there was some confusion about who

Christopher Elliott is the ombudsman for National Geographic Traveler magazine and the author of “How to Be the World’s Smartest Traveler.” You can read more travel tips on his blog, elliott.org, or email him at celliott@ ngs.org (c) 2015 Christopher Elliott. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SUPER QUIZ

BIRTHDAYS

Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level. Subject: “____ IN” Each answer is a two-word phrase ending in “in.” (e.g., Visit, informally. Answer: Drop in.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. Consent reluctantly. 2. Break into a conversation. 3. Introduce gradually. GRADUATE LEVEL 4. Be socially compatible with others. 5. Gain access to a computer system. 6. Exhausted. PH.D. LEVEL 7. Fool or hoax. 8. Vigorously join in to help with a task. 9. Poke one’s nose into. ANSWERS: 1. Give in. 2. Butt in. 3. Phase (ease) in. 4. Fit in. 5. Log in. 6. All in. 7. Take (suck) in. 8. Pitch (jump) in. 9. Horn in. SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15-17 points — honors graduate; 10-14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4-9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1-3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you?

Judge Joseph Wapner is 94. Statesman Howard H. Baker Jr. is 88. Actor Ed Asner is 84. Singer Petula Clark is 81. Comedian Jack Burns is 80. Actress Joanna Barnes is 79. Actor Yaphet Kotto is 74. Actor Sam Waterston is 73. Classical conductor Daniel Barenboim is 71. Pop singer Frida (ABBA) is 68. Actor Bob Gunton is 68. Former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson is 66. Actress Beverly D’Angelo is 62. Director-actor James Widdoes is 60. Rock singer-producer Mitch Easter is 59. News correspondent John Roberts is 57. Former “Jay Leno Show” bandleader Kevin Eubanks is 56. Comedian Judy Gold is 51. Actress Rachel True is 47. Rapper E-40 is 46. Country singer Jack Ingram is 43. Actor Jay Harrington is 42. Actor Jonny Lee Miller is 41. Actress Sydney Tamiia Poitier is 40. Christian rock musician David Carr (Third Day) is 39. Thought for today: “News reports don’t change the world. Only facts change it, and those have already happened when we get the news.” — Friedrich Durrenmatt, Swiss author and playwright (1921-1990). Associated Press

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

TUNDRA

THE BRILLIANT MIND OF EDISON LEE

BABY BLUES

BUCKLES

DILBERT

WUMO

DENNIS THE MENACE

should process the refund. It’s unclear if the problem was related to American’s merger with US Airways, as I see some of the correspondence suggests, or if you just went to the wrong department. But what is clear to me is that someone should have responded to you and offered some guidance. In reviewing your correspondence, it appears that no one did. When an airline takes your money and doesn’t return it, don’t wait a year to ask for help. Do something right away. You could have escalated this to one of the executives at American Airlines. I list their contact information on my site (elliott. org/company-contacts/ american-airlines/). I contacted American on your behalf. It promptly refunded your airfare.

CORNERED

SIX CHIX

ZIGGY


The Daily Herald

Friday, 05.15.2015 D5

Woman lucky to be a wife, not a widow

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Dear Abby: My husband of 28 years had a bone marrow transplant, and six months ago he learned who his donor was. He now wants to meet up with the person. Turns out, it was a woman. I’m not usually a jealous person, but it’s all he ever talks about every single minute of the day. He wants to meet her two hours from where we live. I am fine with it, but I’m tired of hearing how “great” she is. — Wife Of A Transplant Dear Wife: Because of your husband’s donor, you are a wife and not a widow. A step in the right direction would be to regard her as the person who saved your husband’s life at a point when you could have lost him. Of course he thinks she is “great.” Not everyone is willing to be tested to see if it’s possible to BE a bone marrow donor. I think she is great, too. Calm down. With the passage of time, your husband will not feel the need to speak about her as often.

13 Laser or radar

Dear Abby: My boyfriend booked a cruise with his ex-wife to celebrate their son’s eighth birthday. They plan to share the same cabin. He has mentioned at least twice in the past that she wants him back, but now he denies having said it. I didn’t expect him to pay for my ticket (I can afford it), but an invite would have been nice. I have included him in my children’s celebrations and have stood by him through difficult times. I have yet to meet the ex, so there’s no animosity between us. When I suggested separate cabins would be appropriate and affordable considering they had RIP HAYWIRE

ACROSS

7 Without a contract

15 Manage 16 1942 Hitchcock thriller 18 Add to the rotation? 19 Moving

pictures?

DEAR ABBY booked a suite, and two regular cabins are about half the price, he flat-out told me I’m not invited. He says this isn’t about “us” but about his son, whom I get along with. I love this man and feel this isn’t just about trust, although he has been less than truthful lately. I don’t want to have to wonder what happened in that cabin when their son was asleep or at the kids’ club or when they had a bit too much to drink. Am I unreasonable in thinking sharing such close quarters with an ex is inappropriate? Should I jump ship from this relationship? — Waiting At The Dock Dear Waiting: When parents separate, most children hope and pray they will find a way to get back together. If your boyfriend and his ex are sure that isn’t going to happen, then it really isn’t right to bunk together and get their son’s hopes up only to be disappointed when the ship returns to shore. That this man acts like your feelings are irrelevant and isn’t always truthful are huge red flags and do not bode well for your future if you continue with him. I don’t know how much time you have invested, but if more of the same is what’s in store, you’d be better off to cut your losses and bail. Universal Uclick

36 Ricky Martin hit sung

by Puss in Boots and Donkey at the end of “Shrek 2”

1 Get down

21 ___ Brickowski

1

39 Asses

19

40 “Thou art the first

22

29

42 Country addresses:

36

Abbr.

45 Make a mess of

40

50 The Steelers’

42

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28 Oaxaca article 29 Came to 34 Small issues,

metaphorically

H A T C H

I N A N E

C H O E L E P L L A T E O D I B O Y 1ST C R A D S P R I T B L W H E T G U E E A S Y T A R G E S E O M N I T E L L M E S O L E T S N N U E V O C A I N R E M E R B A S E S L Y

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___ Field

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fame

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12

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44 51

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54 Most film festival films

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52 Actress of “Fame”

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56 Pen that’s no longer

used

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57 Roman general who

defeated Hannibal

PUZZLE BY DAVID PHILLIPS, 05.15.2015

59 Begins

58 What a priority call

P E T E R O U S E

E R E I R E S T

M O U R N

E S S E X

S A T L I E D A L P E 2ND H S A T H E E D

T H R O W

A M I N O A N C E I E D D I N N A E D S I S A

10 Magnetizable nickel-

iron combo

60 Blotto

arrives on

DOWN G E E D M S

by the Treaty of Versailles

L A I N G

F A L S E

G I N S U

3RD R A I L

12 Old Italian nobles

1 Boito’s Mefistofele,

e.g.

2 City between Citrus

37 2019 Pan American

14 Who said “My only

fault is that I don’t realize how great I really am”

competitor

46 Largish band

Daily Bridge Club

6 Peer group?

20 Rossini’s final opera

47 Wheel of Fortune, e.g.

Mad24bridge Video ___ party 48 One raising the bar?

“Johnny B. ___”

5 Lay to rest

Games site

43 Impertinent sorts 45 Gas-X

Springs and Silver Friday, May 15, 2015 Springs 17 Investment option after leaving a job 3 Trident alternative 4 Chuck Berry’s

33 Head docs? 35 U.N. agcy. created

11 “Nurse Jackie”

actress

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE C L E A T

6

26

41 Unction

22 Movie genre parodied

26 Misses in Marseille:

5

knave that ___ madest a duke”: Vincentio

38

25 Not tagged

4

16

38 “Nice thinking!”

(“The Lego Movie” protagonist)

23 Arabic leader?

3

13

44 Settled down

in 2011’s “Rango”

2

By FRANK 27 STEWART Horse-drawn Tribune Content Agency

vehicle

49 Put through hell

week, say

Scare target “My cousin29 theRed Queen of Hearts is jumps to three hearts. What do you 7 Yogi’s utterances terribly insecure,” the Queen of say? 51 Time, in Germany 30 Backstop makeup Diamonds said to Alice. ANSWER: Partner will usually 53 good CBShearts drama set16inorD.C. 8 ___ the Great of Like many players, Alice thought. have six with so children’s literature “She throws31a fitWent if her too card far doesn’t high-card points. You can evaluate in 55points, ___but Locks (Great Note: 1st = WHO/FIRST; 2nd = WHAT/SECOND; 3rd = I win a trick in every deal. I know that terms of a better course is 9 Races over losing a trick 32 can Maker of thethan Optima be better to visualizeLakes handsconnectors) for partner and DON’T KNOW/THIRD winning one.” imagine how many tricks he will take. “Yes, Your Majesty,” Alice said in A minimum such as 3, A K J 9 6 5, polite disbelief. A 10 6, Q J 2 will produce 12, hence “Deal the cards,” the Queen of I’d bid a direct six hearts, giving up Diamonds sighed. “I’ll show you.” on seven. So Alice dealtovertrick. as East, and the Mad East dealer the Mad Hatter became de- makes an easy Hatter became declarer at 3NT. West, N-S vulnerable clarer at 3NT. West, the DorDAILY QUESTION the Dormouse, led a heart, and the mouse, led a heart, and the You hold: ♠ A 7 6 4 2 ♥ 4 3 NORTH Hatter won with the queen, as the ♠A7642 of K Hearts triumph. Hatter won with the queen, as 2 ♦Queen J♣A 6 3.smiled Your inpartner “My cousin the Queen of 432 ♥ the Queen of Hearts smiled in opens one heart, you bid one ♦J Hearts is terribly insecure,” DIAMONDS triumph. Declarer had to make spade and he jumps to three ♣AK63 the Queen of Diamonds said something of the diamonds, hearts. Whathad dotoyou Declarer makesay? something of WEST EAST to Alice. the diamonds, so hewill led usulow to ♠ Q 10 8 3 so he led low to dummy’s jack. ANSWER: Partner ♠KJ Like many players, Alice dummy’s jack. Alice was about to ♥ KJ965 ♥ 10 8 7 Alice was about to take her allytake have six good hearts with her queen when she recalled the ♦ 9 8 thought. ♦ Q753 queen when she recalled the 16 Queen or so high-card points. of Diamonds’ words. So Alice ♣ 10 8 ♣QJ75 “She throws a fit if her card instead low. in terms of Queen of Diamonds’ words. You can played evaluate doesn’t win a trick in every The but Hattera was sunk.course He conceded SOUTH So Alice instead played low. points, better is a club, but when the clubs failed to deal. I know that losing a trick ♠95 The Hatter was sunk. He to visualize hands for of partner break 3-3 and the queen diamonds ♥ AQ can be better than winning didn’t fall under A-K,tricks he took conceded a club, but when and imagine howthe many A K 10 6 4 2 ♦ one.” If Alice wins ♣942 the clubs failed to break 3-3 heonly will eight take.tricks. A minimum suchthe first diamond, South makes an easy “Yes, Your Majesty,” Alice and the queen of diamonds as overtrick. 3, A K J 9 6 5, A 10 6, Q J 2 East South West North said in polite disbelief.

BRIDGE

“Deal the cards,” the Queen sighed. “I’ll show you.” So Alice dealt as East, and

didn’t fall under the A-K, he took only eight tricks. If Alice wins the first diamond, South

PICKLES

will produce 12, hence I’d bid QUESTION a direct DAILY six hearts, giving up on seven. You hold: ♠ A 7 6 4 2 ♥ 4 3 2 ♦ J ♣ A K 6 3. Your partner opens one heart, you bid one spade and he

Pass Pass Pass

1♦ 2♦ 3 NT

1♠ 3♣

Opening lead — ♥ 6 (C) 2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

POOCH CAFE MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM

STONE SOUP

PHOEBE AND HER UNICORN

JUMBLE

Pass Pass All Pass

SUDOKU

ZITS

RED & ROVER ANSWERS TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE


Short Takes D6

THE DAILY HERALD

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|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

FRIDAY, 05.15.2015

TELEVISION

The subtle things that made ‘Mad Men’ great By Frazier Moore Associated Press

“Mad Men” is nearing its end with grace and assurance as its characters already are scattering from view. After seven seasons barnstorming a long-ago decade, the series feels like it’s coming in for a landing, though just how smooth or rocky won’t be known for sure until touchdown (Sunday at 10 p.m. EDT on AMC). Even so, already there’s plenty to say in eulogizing this glorious drama, which monitored a swath of modern American life through the prism of the 1960s New York advertising business, led by the prismatic, enigmatic ad man Don Draper, played, of course, by series star Jon Hamm. Except what hasn’t already been said (and resaid) about “Mad Men,” which, in the hands of series creator Matthew Weiner, charted its own path, defying expectations while propelled by a peerless company of actors? Well, for starters, there’s that clarinet. Pinpoint the most affecting moments in “Mad Men,” and you’re likely to find a plaintive clarinet (or fellow woodwind) reinforcing the scene’s poignancy. “A mournful, lonely boy sound,” says series composer David Carbonara, whose contributions have reliably underscored, so to speak, what was taking

place onscreen without drawing attention to themselves or telegraphing an intended response. “I’m that kind of composer. I don’t showboat.” And unlike so much of TV, where so-called “background” music blankets the action, Carbonara was sparing with his music cues, whether a clarinet or more fullbodied interludes: “On ‘Mad Men,’ I tend to come in late and leave early,” he says with a laugh. Related duties have included producing song tracks, such as agency boss Bert Cooper’s rousing number, “The Best Things in Life Are Free.” Another component that nonetheless is often overlooked is how funny “Mad Men” was. The reigning mood of the series was somber. Meditative. Storytelling often with a lump in its throat. But leavening the heaviness was a generous helping of sight gags, droll exchanges and tragicomic story twists (two words: lawnmower amputation). All by itself, the ginsoaked silver tongue of Roger Sterling (as played by John Slattery) was always good for a laugh. Weiner says he and his fellow writers were committed to infusing their scripts with things “that would make US laugh, and that would not make that world too solemn.” Weiner can reel off one funny example after

Underwood snags 5 CMT nominations AMC

From left, John Slattery as Roger Sterling, Jon Hamm as Don Draper, Vincent Kartheiser as Pete Campbell, Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris and Kevin Rahm as Ted Chaough, in a scene from a recent episode of “Mad Men.”

another, but there’s none more virtuosic than, in season five, Lane Pryce’s thwarted suicide. As the agency’s disgraced financial officer, Lane (Jared Harris) made a desperate effort to asphyxiate himself inside his brand-new Jaguar. After tricking out a rubber hose from the car’s exhaust pipe, he planted himself in the driver’s seat and turned the key. But at the moment of truth, this luxury machine (already characterized in prior scenes as finicky and even “a lemon”) made good on its image. It refused to start. Beyond the action, music and words, “Mad Men” could trigger a

Only

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reaction in static ways — even from a glimpse of a long-forgotten object with which the viewer may have once been connected in real life. With its period look evolving through the ‘60s, the series offered viewers an almost tactile experience thanks to its props and art direction. “Mad Men” didn’t draw on the past as much as reclaim it. Products and brands (the stuff of advertising, after all) was its onscreen currency. “It was a story about objects being a part of our lives,” says Weiner, “and about memory and the feeling you get from recognizing them.” And, while the show

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maintained a lovely period sheen, what was on display was rarely fetishized or top-of-theline, Weiner says. It was the routine stuff. “The philosophy of the show was to reflect everyday life from another time — a slice of bourgeois, mostly white America,” he says. What were curated as props (whether bought, rented or borrowed) were the mass-produced consumables that people commonly owned: “Not the zebra, just the horse.” That depth of connection lives on thanks to so many moments “Mad Men” viewers will be left with after Sunday, when it leaves its audience behind.

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Friday’s highlights on TV include: We get winded just watching “The Amazing Race.” Fortunately, the final leg comes tonight, taking the teams from Peru to Dallas, where they have to rappel 500 feet down Reunion Tower. 8 p.m., CBS From Herald news services

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Carrie Underwood is the top contender for the 2015 CMT Music Awards with five nominations. Twelve videos are nominated for video of the year. Contenders include Florida Georgia Line, Luke Bryan, Sam Hunt and Jason Aldean. Lady Antebellum and Kenny Chesney, also video of the year nominees, have four nominations each. The CMT Music Awards will air live on June 10. Associated Press

TODAY IN HISTORY Today is Friday, Nov. 15, the 319th day of 2013. There are 46 days left in the year. Today’s highlight: On Nov. 15, 1942, the naval Battle of Guadalcanal ended during World War II with a decisive U.S. victory over Japanese forces. On this date: In 1777, the Second Continental Congress approved the Articles of Confederation. In 1806, explorer Zebulon Pike sighted the mountaintop now known as Pikes Peak in presentday Colorado. In 1889, Brazil was proclaimed a republic as its emperor, Dom Pedro II, was overthrown. In 1935, the Commonwealth of the Philippines was established as its new president, Manuel L. Quezon, took office. In 1937, the House and Senate chambers of the U.S. Capitol were air-conditioned for the first time. In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt laid the cornerstone of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. In 1948, William Lyon Mackenzie King retired as prime minister of Canada after 21 years; he was succeeded by Louis St. Laurent. In 1958, actor Tyrone Power, 44, died in Madrid, Spain, while filming “Solomon and Sheba.” (Power’s part was recast with Yul Brynner.) In 1961, former Argentine President Juan Peron, living in exile in Spain, married his third wife, Isabel. In 1966, the flight of Gemini 12 ended successfully as astronauts James A. Lovell and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. splashed down safely in the Atlantic. In 1969, a quarter of a million protesters staged a peaceful demonstration in Washington against the Vietnam War. In 1979, the British government publicly identified Sir Anthony Blunt as the “fourth man” of a Soviet spy ring. In 1982, funeral services were held in Moscow’s Red Square for the late Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev. Associated Press


The Daily Herald

Friday, 05.15.2015

www.heraldnet.com/entertainment

Music, food at Fisherman’s Village festival 7-9 Mad Max: Thrills to the point of exhaustion. 3

Mukilteo Orchestra: Finale goes to movies. 10

Festival films: Horton’s Sweet 16 picks for SIFF. 4

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2 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

TICKETS ON SALE XFINITY ARENA

Joe Bonamassa: 8 p.m. May 15 and 16, Paramount Theatre, $79 to $125; www. stgpresents.org.

Professional Roughstock Rodeo: 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. May 16, $10 to $37

Passion Pit: 8 p.m. May 19 and 20, Showbox, $35; www.showboxpresents.com.

Sesame Street Live “Let’s Dance!”: May 22 to May 24, $15 to $62 Celtic Woman: 7 p.m. June 3, $45 to $99

Wallace Roney Quintet: 7:30 p.m. May 19 and 20, Jazz Alley, $10; www.jazzalley.com.

Hot House Party 2: 7 p.m. June 18, $30 to $130

The Waterboys: 8:30 p.m. May 21, Showbox, $35; www.showboxpresents.com.

Endurocross: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, $10 to $45

Betty LaVette: 7:30 p.m. May 21, 22 and 24, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. May 23, Jazz Alley, $30.50; www.jazzalley.com.

Disney on Ice: “Frozen”: Nov. 18 to 22, $30 to $75

Sasquatch! Festival: May 22 through 25, Gorge Amphitheatre, $350; ticketmaster. com.

Tickets at xfinityarenaeverett.com/ or 866-3328499 or the box office at 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett.

Barry Manilow: 7:30 p.m. May 27 and 28, KeyArena, $17 to $125; ticketmaster.com.

EDMONDS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Kids in the Hall: 8 p.m. May 29, Paramount Theatre, $48 to $64.50; www.stgpresents.org.

The Mavericks: 7:30 p.m. May 21, $39 to $49 Boris Grebenshikov/Aquarium: 7:30 p.m. May 23, $55 to $70 The Manhattan Transfer: 7:30 p.m. May 29, $54 to $64 Seattle Repertory Jazz Concert: 7:30 p.m. May 30, $34 Sno-King Chorale “Disney Dreams”: 3 p.m. June 6, $20 Tickets at ec4arts.org or 425-275-9595.

HISTORIC EVERETT THEATRE Fisherman’s Village Music Festival: May 16 and 17, $49 Down Home Country Roundup: 7:30 p.m. May 29, $15 Main Attraction & The Coats: 7 p.m. May 30, $12 to $25 No Where Men (Beatles tribute): 8 p.m. June 6, $20 Alive She Cried (Doors tribute): 8 p.m. June 13, $18 to $35 Heart by Heart (Heart tribute): 8 p.m. June 20, $15 to $30 Al Stewart: 7:30 p.m. June 21, $40 to $45

JEFF DALY / INVISION

Joe Bonamassa performs at the Paramount Theatre on May 15 and 16.

Neutral Milk Hotel: 8 p.m. June 4, Paramount Theatre; www.stgpresents.org. All shows, unless otherwise noted, at The Cannery, 2820 Oakes Ave. Suite C, Everett. Ticket information: everettmusicinitiative.org/buy-tickets/.

TULALIP RESORT CASINO Rock the Empire: 8 p.m., May 24, $10 Wanda Sykes: 8 p.m. June 26 and 27, $45 Tulalip Amphitheater Summer Concert Series: July 3 through Sept. 3, The Tulalip Amphitheatre, $30 to $45. Boz Scaggs with special guest Aaron Neville, July 3; Hank Williams, Jr., July 8; Boyz II Men & Brian McKnight, Aug. 6; The Band Perry, Aug. 15; Huey Lewis and the News, Aug. 28; Sammy Hagar and the Circle, Sept. 3. Ticketmaster: ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000.

VILLAGE THEATRE “No Way To Treat A Lady”: May 8 to 24, $45 to $57

Sufjan Stevens: 8 p.m. June 10 and 11, Paramount Theatre; www.stgpresents.org. Shania Twain: 7:30 p.m. June 5, KeyArena, $60 to $160; ticketmaster.com. KUBE Summer Jam: Noon, June 20, White River Amphitheater, $49.50 to $75; ticketmaster.com. Kenny Chesney and Jason Aldean: 5 p.m. June 27, CenturyLink Field, $39.50 to $250; ticketmaster.com. Jim Jeffries: 8 p.m. June 27, Moore Theatre, $47.50; www.stgpresents.org. “Wicked”: July 8 through Aug. 2, Paramount Theatre, start at $45; www.stgpresents.org.

TICKET VENDORS Xfinity Arena: xfinityarenaeverett.com/ or 866-332-8499. Edmonds Center for the Arts: ec4arts.org or 425-275-9595.

Tickets at the box office, by phone at 425-2586766 or online at www.historiceveretttheatre.org/ ticket-window or etix.com.

Cabaret: July 10 to Aug. 2, $30 to $62

EVERETT MUSIC INITIATIVE

AROUND THE REGION

Seattle Theatre Group: stgpresents.org or 877-784-4849.

Fisherman’s Village Music Festival: May 15 through 17, $49

Jasper in Deadland: May 15 through 24, The 5th Avenue, $15 to $45; www.5thavenue.org.

Ticketmaster: ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000.

Ticket information: www.villagetheatre.org or call 425-257-8600.

What’s inside

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Penn & Teller: 8 p.m., May 29, Mount Baker Theatre, $45 to $99; www.mountbakertheatre.com.

Movie reviews . . . . . . . . . . Movie times . . . . . . . . . . . . Restaurant review . . . . . . . Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Family fun. . . . . . . . . . . . . Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visual arts. . . . . . . . . . . . .

15 16 17 18

Etix: etix.com. Live Nation: www.livenation.com.

Submissions

On the cover

Submit A&E calendar items to features@heraldnet.com. Deadline is noon Friday. Contact Features Editor Aaron Swaney at 425-339-3430

Find out who to hear and what to eat when the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival hits the sidewalks and venues of Everett May 15-17. Pages 7-9


movies

The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 3

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ will leave you exhausted By Brian Miller Seattle Weekly

Most film snobs are gross hypocrites. I know I am. I couldn’t care less about those wisecracking Marvel movies or DC’s brooding caped superheroes. But then there are the “Mad Max” pictures, George Miller’s crazy post-apocalyptic trilogy of Outback Westerns, which during the ’80s gained international recognition for Mel Gibson (no more on that subject, I promise), sand, speed and arid humor. They’re violent and nearly nihilistic cartoons, no more plausible than “The Avengers,” and I love them. After porking around in Babeland for the better part of three decades, Miller is now back with “Mad Max: Fury Road.” Tom Hardy takes the title role. Charlize Theron plays a buzzcutwearing, lethal, one-handed turncoat named Furiosa. Though this movie makes me feel like driving fast through the desert, there’s no way I’d stop to offer either of them a ride. Regardless how thrilling the action in this near-constant chase movie, Max and Furiosa haven’t got anything interesting to say. Hardy spends the first 30 minutes — after a prologue explaining Earth’s environmental ruin — silently wearing a muzzle. Recurring nightmares hint at Max’s tortured past, while Furiosa eventually explains her slavery and revolt. Miller and his co-writers have some sort of dense desert mythology in mind, with internecine conflict among rival families: one has the oil, another the water, the third the bullets. Or that’s my best guess. The accents and engine noise make the dialogue and exposition mostly unintelligible, and I don’t think Miller really cares. Max is swiftly captured by the water-controlling clan, led by a masked Geezer of Oz dubbed Immortan Joe. He rules his slave-labor kingdom with a pasty-white caste called the “War

“Mad Max: Fury Road” star Thomas Hardy outruns a fireball, just like Mel Gibson used to.

Boys,” who look like Nosferatu after bulking up at the gym. (Among these fanatical brainwashed mole rats, Nux — British actor Nicholas Hoult — will eventually switch sides.) Furiosa is the first to betray her master, stealing a tanker truck containing five of his nubile wives, at least one them pregnant. (Babies are male property, like gasoline and water.) Bound for her female-ruled homeland, Furiosa and Max inevitably form an alliance; the rest of the movie is essentially “Stagecoach” with explosions — though not much humor. (Miller’s still, silent moments have equal power, but he seldom pauses.) “Fury Road” is masterfully kinetic and often downright

“Mad Max: Fury Road” ★★★ The post-apocalyptic Aussie Western returns, with Tom Hardy in Mel Gibson’s old role and Charlize Theron as a one-handed killing machine with a buzzcut. The dialogue is unintelligible and the plot is full of holes, but that doesn’t really matter, thanks to director George Miller’s action-movie mastery and the super-buff stars. Rating: R, for nonstop, intensely violent action. Showing: Alderwood, Cinebarre, Everett Stadium, Galaxy Monroe, Marysville, Stanwood Cinemas, Pacific Place, Sundance Cinemas, Thornton Place, Woodinville, Cascade Mall

berserk, which oughtn’t be surprising. Miller’s first three movies, made between 1979 and 1985, were accomplished sans CGI. Now, without undercranking the camera’s frame rate, he

has the ability to throttle seamlessly between action fast and slow, shooting from any perspective. And because “Fury Road” is designed for 3-D (yes, worth the ticket price), that means endless

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

amounts of sand, car parts, spears, harpoons, grenades, chain saws, and fists being flung in your face ... I mean Max’s face. And, frankly, the more stuff being thrown in your face, the less time you have to worry about the plot holes or rushed heap of an ending. (An eager preview audience seemed too exhausted to applaud.) “Fury Road” will please fans of Miller’s original trilogy (which honestly turned rather campy come “Thunderdome”), of Hardy, and of Theron. As it did me. And yet for all the daredevil moments of dangling and leaping between speeding vehicles, I wish — speaking of Theron — the movie had taken a real risk. Why not Mad Maxine?


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4 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Horton’s sweet 16 picks for this year’s SIFF ROBERT HORTON “The Cut”: Fatih Akin (“Head-On,” “Soul Kitchen”) is on the short list of most intriguing 21st-century directors, and his latest effort “The Cut” travels into the realm of historical epic — namely the slaughter of Armenians by Turks during World War I. A Prophet star Tahir Rahim plays a survivor searching for family members. Adding intrigue is that Akin, a German of Turkish heritage, collaborates here with “Raging Bull” screenwriter Mardik Martin, an American of Armenian heritage. SIFF Cinema Egyptian, 4 p.m. May 25, 9:30 p.m. June 3 “Beyond Zero: 19141918”: The Great War remains a deservedly compelling subject during these centenary years, which might bring extra attention to experimental filmmaker Bill Morrison’s “Beyond Zero: 1914-1918.” Morrison (his Decasia was the first 21st-century film named to the Library of Congress Film Registry) makes hypnotic imagery from decayed film stock, and this 39-minute offering uses original WWI footage that has apparently never been shown before. Music by the Kronos Quartet accompanies the images. SIFF Film Center, 6 p.m. May 16, 7 p.m. May 17

“Best of Enemies”: One of the great ongoing duels of the counterculture era was the intellectual swordsmanship between William F. Buckley and Gore Vidal — the multisyllabic prince of conservatism and the erudite lefty born of political royalty. Sometimes the sparring wasn’t so much intellectual as nasty and low, as we will presumably witness in “Best of Enemies,” a documentary chronicle of the duo’s Crossfire-style set-tos. It’s very difficult to imagine this not being a hoot. SIFF Cinema Uptown, 6 p.m. May 16; Pacific Place, 1:30 p.m. May 17 “Cave of the Spider Woman”: This should be the grindhouse doublebill of the season. A recently-rediscovered Chinese silent picture from 1927, “Cave of the Spider Woman,” will be followed by its 1973 kung fu remake, “Cave of the Silken Web.” The story follows a Buddhist monk and his companions who are lured into a cave, where … well, spider women. Expert practitioner Donald Sosin provides live piano accompaniment for the silent film. Uptown, 6:30 p.m. June 3 “Electric Boogaloo: The Wild Untold Story of the Cannon Films”: And speaking of the grindhouse, anybody who survived ’80s cinema should be curious about “Electric Boogaloo: The Wild Untold Story of Cannon Films,” a documentary look at a film company that appeared — at the time and in retrospect — to be certifiably insane. Cannon, run by the tireless Menahem

a little softer in tone: It’s about a Norwegian scientist (Ane Dahl Torp) who must retain her northern reserve while attending a conference to establish the absolute weight of a single kilo. Uptown, 4:30 p.m. May 15; Harvard Exit, 9:30 p.m. May 17

PUBLICITY PHOTO

Tahir Rahim plays a survivor searching for family members after the Turks slaughter of Armenians during World War I in “The Cut.”

Golan and Yoram Globus, churned out yards of dreck featuring Chuck Norris and martial-arts nonentities (I have never really recovered from “Ninja III: The Domination”), but also bankrolled John Cassavetes and JeanLuc Godard. Hear it all explained in 105 almostcertainly-entertaining minutes. Lincoln Square, 3:30 p.m. May 28; Egyptian, 11:55 p.m. May 30; Uptown, 9:30 p.m. June 2 “Free Fall”: At some point Hungarian filmmaker György Pálfi is going to score a real international hit. Based on advance word, it sounds like “Free Fall” might not be it, but the director of the whimsical “Hukkle” and the outrageous “Taxidermia” can be counted on for something diverting. The movie is a collection of vignettes about the denizens of an apartment building, tied together by the efforts of a woman to climb back up the stairs of the place after throwing herself off the roof.

Harvard Exit, 11 a.m. May 17, 6:30 p.m. May 22; Lincoln Square, 8 p.m. May 26 “Charlie’s Country”: David Gulpilil is one of the most fascinating stars in world cinema, and his great project — since debuting at 17 in the 1971 classic “Walkabout” — has been tracking the complexities of Aboriginal life in the modern era. “Charlie’s Country” is his third collaboration with director Rolf de Heer (“Ten Canoes”), and it won Gulpilil a special acting prize at Cannes last year. Here he plays an old-timer who claims affinity with traditional ways but is stuck in the 21st century. Harvard Exit, 4 p.m. May 15, 9:30 p.m. May 16 “1001 Grams”: In his films “Kitchen Stories” and “O’Horten,” Bent Hamer stretched his Scandinavian deadpan to the point of almost cracking a smile. Those very droll outings are reason enough to take a shot with “1001 Grams,” which sounds

“Eden”: The electronic dance music boom in 1992 Paris may or may not be your thing, but Mia Hansen-Løve (“Father of My Children”) has quietly established a distinctive voice as a filmmaker. Therefore “Eden” holds some interest, and it might be a footnote to music-biopic history by being the first film yet to include characters based on the musicians who would become Daft Punk. Uptown, 9:30 p.m. June 4; Egyptian, 4 p.m. June 5 “The Price of Fame”: There are true stories that make one curious about what the hell, exactly, might have been going on behind the headlines. The bizarre theft of Charlie Chaplin’s body from its gravesite in 1978 is one of those stories. “The Price of Fame” seeks to dramatize this tawdry little event, with a cast that includes Chiara Mastroianni and Benoit Poelvoorde. It’s directed by Xavier Beauvois, whose 2010 “Of Gods and Men” was a surprise arthouse smash. Uptown, 7 p.m. May 27, 4 p.m. May 29; Kirkland Performance Center, 8:30 p.m. June 5 “Eisenstein in Guanajuato”: Peter Greenaway has been working in increasingly obscure margins of world cinema for 20 years, but it sounds like “Eisenstein in Guanajuato” is his wildest work

in some time. The film looks at the great Sergei Eisenstein’s interlude in Mexico in the early 1930s, evidently served up with flamboyant sex and jarring stylistic flourishes. Eisenstein never completed his Mexican film — nor ever recaptured the good graces of Soviet authorities. (SIFF will also screen the 1979 compilation of Eisenstein’s footage, “Que Viva Mexico!” — a stunning artifact in its own right — prior to the June 7 showing.) Egyptian, 7 p.m. June 6; Uptown, 5 p.m. June 7 “Heaven Knows What”: “Heaven Knows What” looks at junkie culture in Manhattan, observed at the microbudget level. This is the new film by Josh and Ben Safdie, whose previous work, including Daddy Longlegs, has been distinctively not-quitewhat-you’d-expect from their downtown indie pedigree. Uptown, 9 p.m. May 22, 2 p.m. May 24 African films: SIFF’s bulked-up survey of African films in recent years has been a welcome thing, and this year’s slate sounds strong. While looking at the new work, save time for archival restorations. One is Ousmane Sembene’s “Black Girl” (1966), a film long since afforded classic status. Harvard Exit, 7 p.m. June 1. Much rarer is “Alyam, Alyam,” a restored 1978 drama by Moroccan director Ahmed El-Maanouni. It’s about a young Moroccan who plans to escape his dreary rural existence by emigrating to France. Harvard Exit, 4:30 p.m. May 25


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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 5

Intimate ‘Animals’ chronicles lovers descent into addiction By Robert Horton

“Animals” ★★1⁄2

Herald Movie Critic

This look at addiction has a lot of grit and two committed performances: David Dastmalchian (who also scripted) and Kim Shaw play two lovers whose lives have declined into a cycle of scrambling for money to support their habits and then shooting up. Rating: Not rated; probably R for language, subject matter Showing: Grand Illusion theater

OSCILLOSCOPE LABS

Kim Shaw and David Dastmalchian star in “Animals,” which follows two lovers whose lives have declined into a cycle of scrambling for money to support their drug habits.

whose kindly night watchman reminds us that his volcanic performance in “Cutter’s Way” (1981) really was a lifetime ago. Less convincing is the movie’s attempt at paralleling the images of zoo animals with the bestial state inhabited by Jude and Bobbie during their time on the streets. This kind of movie can boost the fortunes of little-known actors, and it

OSCILLOSCOPE LABS

Dastmalchian, who plays Jude, wrote the screenplay, which publicists hint reflects his real-life experiences.

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He looks like a junkie, she doesn’t; but maybe that is the point. “Animals” seeks to humanize the struggle of a couple in the throes of addiction by depicting its two lovers as ordinary people who fell through the cracks. They drive an Oldsmobile, they go to the zoo, and every so often they run a scam or steal CDs and buy heroin with the proceeds. We don’t witness the days of wine and roses that preceded this condition, as Jude (David Dastmalchian) and Bobbie (Kim Shaw) are already living on the street — in the Olds, actually — and shooting up in diner bathrooms when we meet them. But they speak of their respectable middle-class backgrounds and they display enough humor to suggest they weren’t born into this grind. Addiction dramas tend to unfold along formulaic lines, and “Animals” is not an exception. It does have grit, and feels rooted in crummy details that lend authenticity. (The film’s publicity discreetly suggests that Dastmalchian, who also wrote the screenplay, drew upon his own experiences in creating this world.) Director Collin Schiffli takes a fittingly intimate approach — the film isn’t artful, in the way of Gus Van Sant’s superb “Drugstore Cowboy,” but Schiffli does get something haunting going in the vacant Chicago streets and the rapport of the two lead performers. The only other notable actor is John Heard,

should do that for Dastmalchian and Shaw. Her girl-next-door appearance suits the film’s everyday horror, and she has a great dead-eyed moment when Bobbie suggests that Jude’s best chance of stealing a woman’s purse is to threaten the unfortunate lady’s baby. Dastmalchian, whose ghostly appearance worked well as a Joker henchman in “The Dark

Knight,” is freakishly thin and ghoul-eyed; he could play a 19th-century grave robber, or maybe the Babadook. Throughout the film he wears an expression of dazed disbelief, just a beat or two behind the action. Whether shooting up in the Oldsmobile or mounting a staircase to score from an unfamiliar drug peddler, he looks as though he can’t understand — or remember — exactly how he got here.

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6 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

MOVIE TIMES SNOHOMISH COUNTY Alderwood, 425-776-3535 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 12:50-3:55-6:409:20 The D Train (R) 12:20 Get Hard (R) 2:45-5:10-7:40-10:15 Kingsman: The Secret Service (R) 6:50-9:50 Little Boy (PG-13) 12:40-3:20 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 1:00-3:40-7:00-7:3010:00 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 12:00-12:303:00-4:20-6:30-9:30-10:30 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 12:10-2:30-4:507:15-9:40 Alderwood Mall, 888-262-4386 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 10:15-12:151:15-3:45-4:45-6:45-7:15-8:15-9:45-10:15 Avengers: Age of Ultron — An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 9:15-12:45-4:15-7:4511:00 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 9:4511:45-1:45-3:15-5:15-8:45 Cinderella (PG) 10:00-1:10-4:00 Ex Machina (R) 10:40-1:35-4:25-7:25-10:40 Far From the Madding Crowd (PG-13) 9:2012:35-4:10-7:20-10:50 Furious 7 (PG-13) 9:40-1:00-4:20-7:35-11:00 Home (PG) 9:25-12:00-2:20-4:50-7:10 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 10:20-12:40-3:10-5:406:40-10:10 Monkey Kingdom (G) 9:35 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 9:30-10:30-11:3012:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30-5:30-6:30-7:308:00-8:30-9:00-9:30-10:00-10:30-11:10 Where Hope Grows (PG-13) 9:50-12:20-2:505:20-7:50-10:20 Woman in Gold (PG-13) 10:10-1:20-4:007:00-10:45 Cinebarre Mountlake Terrace, 425-6727501 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 12:30-3:30-7:0010:00 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 1:00-4:00-7:4010:30 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 12:50-3:50-7:30-10:15 Edmonds Theater, 425-778-4554 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 3:00-6:009:00 Everett Stadium, 425-353-3505 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 10:40-1:30-4:206:55-9:40 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 11:00-11:30-

SPECIAL FILMS EvCC hosts anime fest Everett Community College is hosting the Japanese Anime Arts Festival May 29 and 30 at Everett Community College. The festival runs from noon to 9 p.m. May 29 and 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. May 30. Learn about Japanese art, culture and history. Events include a drawing demonstration by Japanese manga artist Yoshimi Kurata, a presentation by manga

12:00-2:30-3:00-6:00-6:30-7:10-9:20-9:50 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 1:203:30-4:50-8:30-10:30 The Divergent Series: Insurgent (PG-13) 10:30-1:00 Ex Machina (R) 11:20-2:00-4:45-7:40-10:25 Furious 7 (PG-13) 12:30-3:40-7:05-10:15 Home (PG) 11:50-2:10-4:35-7:15 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 12:10-2:50-5:30-8:0010:35 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 12:20-1:40-3:207:30-9:10 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 10:50-1:10-4:104:40-6:20-7:00-10:00-10:20 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 11:05-1:35-4:056:40-9:00 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 11:10-11:40-1:502:20-4:00-4:30-5:00-6:50-7:20-7:50-9:3010:10-10:40 Unfriended (R) 9:45 Galaxy Monroe, 360-863-0909 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 10:20-1:25-4:257:10-9:55 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 10:30-10:5511:25-2:00-2:30-3:00-5:30-6:00-6:30-9:009:30-10:00 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 10:001:30-5:00-8:30 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 10:10-12:45-2:55-5:408:10-10:30 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 10:00-10:40-10:401:00-1:40-1:40-4:00-4:40-4:40-7:00-7:407:40-10:00-10:40-10:40 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 11:20-2:20-5:208:20 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 10:30-11:00-11:301:20-1:50-2:20-4:10-4:40-5:10-7:00-7:308:00-9:40-10:10-10:40 Marysville, 360-659-1009 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 1:05-3:45-6:259:10 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 12:30-12:503:40-4:00-6:50-7:10-10:10-10:20 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 1:104:25-7:40 The Divergent Series: Insurgent (PG-13) 3:30-6:30 Ex Machina (R) 12:45-9:30 Furious 7 (PG-13) 12:35-3:50-6:55-9:55 Home (PG) 1:40-4:40-7:15 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 1:50-4:10-7:25-9:50 Kingsman: The Secret Service (R) 9:35 The Longest Ride (PG-13) 12:30-3:25 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 12:40-3:40-6:409:40 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 1:20-4:20-6:207:20-9:20-10:20

translator and Japanese ghost scholar Zack Davisson and the opportunity to meet Seattle artist Enfu. Visitors are invited to wear their cosplay costumes and participate in a cosplay flash mob and parade just prior to opening ceremony. The festival is free and open to the public, except for tea ceremonies at the Japanese tea room, where matcha and sweets can be enjoyed for a fee of $5.

Sundance Movie Nights The Historic Everett Theatre is hosting

Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 1:45-4:45-7:5010:15 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 1:00-1:30-4:00-4:307:00-7:30-10:00-10:30 Stanwood Cinemas, 360-629-0514 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 1:20-3:50-6:359:05 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 1:00-3:206:20-9:15 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 3:30-9:00 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 1:10-3:40-6:45-9:25 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 12:50-6:30 Pitch Perfect (PG-13) 12:55-4:00-6:50-9:20

KING COUNTY Crest Cinema, 206-781-5755 McFarland, USA (PG) 4:00-6:45-9:20 The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG) 4:15-7:00-9:30 What We Do in the Shadows (R) 4:45-7:309:50 Wild Tales (R) 4:30-7:15-9:40 Guild 45th, 206-781-5755 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 2:20-4:45-7:20-9:45 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:40 Meridian, 206-223-9600 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 12:30-1:402:15-3:40-4:45-5:30-6:45-7:50-8:40-9:50 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 11:451:00-2:50-4:10-6:00-7:15-9:15-10:20 Bombay Velvet (Not Rated) 12:00-3:10-6:209:30 Cinderella (PG) 4:30-6:10-8:50 Ex Machina (R) 11:40-1:20-2:20-4:00-5:006:40-7:40-9:20-10:25 Far From the Madding Crowd (PG-13) 12:453:30-6:15-9:00 Home (PG) 1:00-3:25 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 11:50-2:10-4:30-6:509:10 It Follows (R) 7:10-11:00 Monkey Kingdom (G) 12:20-2:25 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 11:30-12:15-1:102:10-3:00-3:50-4:50-5:40-6:30-7:30-8:209:10-9:40-10:10 Where Hope Grows (PG-13) 12:45-3:15-5:458:15-10:45 Oak Tree, 206-527-1748 Always Watching: A Marble Hornets Story (Not Rated) 5:00-8:00 Ex Machina (R) 11:10-2:00-4:40-7:20-9:55 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-6:4510:20 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 11:20-2:20 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 10:45-11:30-1:302:10-4:15-4:55-7:00-7:40-9:00-9:40-10:15

Sundance Movie Night on the second Wednesday of each month, showing a film that was originally shown at the Sundance Film Festival. There will also be a wine tasting for $10. The movie is free. June 10: “Troubadours,” 7 p.m.

Funny Film Fest The Evergreen Cinema Society’s Funny Film Fest is a yearlong series of the funniest films ever made based on critics and the votes of Everett moviegoers. Films are screened at 1:30 p.m. (discussion to

Woman in Gold (PG-13) 10:55-1:40-4:207:10-9:45 Pacific Place, 888-262-4386 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-4:407:20-10:00 Dior and I (Not Rated) 11:00-6:10 Furious 7 (PG-13) 10:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:30 Kingsman: The Secret Service (R) 1:10-4:107:15-10:15 The Left Ear (Not Rated) 1:10-3:50-8:25-10:00 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 10:25-11:45-2:455:30-7:15-8:25-9:55-11:20 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 10:00-11:0012:45-1:25-2:00-3:40-4:15-5:00-6:40-7:458:50-9:30-10:45-11:40 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 11:10-1:30-3:506:30 Woman in Gold (PG-13) 11:00-1:40-4:207:00-11:10 Seven Gables, 206-781-5755 Clouds of Sils Maria (R) 4:30-7:10-9:45 Sundance Cinemas Seattle, 206-6330059 5 Flights Up (PG-13) 2:15-4:50-7:05-9:20 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 1:30-4:006:50-9:50 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 1:104:20-7:10-10:10 Ex Machina (R) 1:50-4:35-7:15-9:45 Far From the Madding Crowd (PG-13) 1:002:00-4:15-4:45-6:55-7:45-9:30 Iris (PG-13) 1:45-4:40-6:45-8:50 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:00 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 1:20-4:10-7:009:40 While We’re Young (R) 2:10-4:25-6:40-9:00 Thornton Place Stadium 14 + Imax, 206-517-9953 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 11:20-3:30-6:209:20 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 12:10-12:401:10-3:20-3:50-4:20-6:30-7:00-7:30-9:4010:10-10:40 Avengers: Age of Ultron — An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 1:30-4:40-7:50-11:00 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 11:503:00-6:10-9:20 Cinderella (PG) 2:30-6:40 The D Train (R) 11:10 Far From the Madding Crowd (PG-13) 11:301:40-4:30-7:20-9:00 Furious 7 (PG-13) 11:30-3:20-8:10-10:10 Home (PG) 11:20-1:20-4:30-6:00 Kingsman: The Secret Service (R) 5:10-11:10 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 12:30-1:50-4:004:40-6:50-7:30-8:20-9:40-10:30 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 11:30-12:10-

1:10-2:20-3:20-5:10-6:10-8:00-9:00-11:00 Monkey Kingdom (G) 11:20-2:20 Woodinville, 425-482-6538 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 10:50-1:40-4:207:10-9:50 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 10:00-1:104:20-7:40-9:40-11:00 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 11:002:10-5:30-8:50 Ex Machina (R) 9:50-12:30-3:10-5:50-11:05 Home (PG) 10:30-1:10-3:40 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 10:00-12:15-2:30-4:507:20-9:35 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 10:00-1:00-7:00-9:00 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 11:20-2:00-4:005:00-6:00-8:00-10:00-11:00 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 11:50-2:10-4:407:00 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 10:40-12:00-1:303:00-4:30-6:30-7:30-8:30-9:30-10:20 Woman in Gold (PG-13) 11:00-1:50-5:107:50-10:40

SKAGIT AND ISLAND COUNTIES Blue Fox Drive-In, 360-675-5667 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) Home (PG) Cascade Mall, 360-707-2727 The Age of Adaline (PG-13) 10:40-1:304:30-7:20-10:20 Avengers: Age of Ultron (PG-13) 11:3012:30-3:50-7:15-9:00-10:30 Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D (PG-13) 10:301:45-5:00-5:30-8:15 Ex Machina (R) 11:40-2:15-5:10-8:00-10:50 Furious 7 (PG-13) 12:50-4:15-7:50-10:10 Home (PG) 10:00-10:50-1:40-4:00-6:30 Hot Pursuit (PG-13) 10:20-12:40-3:00-5:207:40-11:00 Little Boy (PG-13) 2:45 Mad Max: Fury Road (R) 10:00-1:00-7:009:10 Mad Max: Fury Road 3D (R) 11:20-2:154:00-5:15-8:05-10:00-11:00 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (PG) 11:40-2:104:40-7:00 Pitch Perfect 2 (PG-13) 11:10-12:00-2:002:50-4:45-5:40-7:30-8:30-9:20-10:15 Woman in Gold (PG-13) 12:30-3:50-6:509:40 The Clyde, 360-221-5525 The Water Diviner (R) 7:30 Oak Harbor Plaza, 360-279-2226 Schedule not provided by theater; call theater for movies and times.

follow) and 5:30 p.m. at the Evergreen Branch Library. May 27: “The Graduate”

Organ will be played by Sharon Stearns. Cost is $15.

Silent Movie Night

Movies at the library

The Historic Everett Theatre brings back Silent Movie Night and Pipe Organ with the showing of “Metropolis” at 7:30 p.m. June 19. In a futuristic city sharply divided between the working class and the city planners, the son of the city’s mastermind falls in love with a working class prophet who predicts the coming of a savior to mediate their differences.

Bring your friends, have some popcorn and enjoy a movie at a branch of the Sno-Isle library system. Here’s a look at the upcoming schedule. May 15: “The Hundred Foot Journey,” Freeland, 2 p.m. May 16: “Birds, Backyard Habitat & Beyond,” Oak Harbor, 2 p.m. May 19: “Here Comes the Boom,” Granite Falls, 3:30 p.m. May 22: “Annie,” Arlington, noon.


dining

The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 7

Hungry during the festival? A guide to downtown dining Thousands of folks will be milling around downtown Everett during the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival, and many of them will be looking for a bite to eat. Here’s a quick look at some of the best places open this weekend in the city center: New Mexicans 1416 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-512-9705, www. thenewmexicans.com. Come for the Tex-Mex favorites like sopapillas and enchiladas, and stay for the barbecue, from brisket to pulled pork. Hours: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. El Delicioso Taqueria y Pupuseria 2934 Colby Ave., Everett, 425-366-2162. Dive in and order one of everything at this popular street food-style restaurant. Favorites include Salvadoran pupusas and tamales. Hours: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Closed Sunday.

El Paraiso Mexican Grill 2801 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-252-6026, elparaisomexicangrill. com. Grab a fresh tortilla from the woman making them near the door and go from there, enjoying the array of tacos, burritos and other Mexican favorites. Hours: 10:30 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday; 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday; Happy hour: 3 to 6 p.m., 9 p.m. to close. Cravin’ Cajun Grill 2915 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-374-2983; www. cravingcajunfood.com. Authentic Cajun food. Dive in. Fried green tomatoes, shrimp, grits, gumbo, hushpuppies, bread pudding, jerk chicken. Hours: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. Brooklyn Bros. Pizzeria 1919 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-258-6900; www. bbpmenu.com. New York-style pizza. Among the best are the

Bowery and the Bensonhurst pizzas. Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday and until 8 p.m. Sunday. Kama’aina Grindz 2933 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-322-5280; www.kamaainagrindz. com. Say “Aloha” to Hawaiian-inspired fare including mahi mahi fish tacos, poke, spam musubi. Hours: 11 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Closed Sunday. Tony V’s Garage 1712 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-374-3567; tonyvsgarage.com. Late-night music, karaoke, open mic and libations seven days a week. Seven bucks for an 8-ounce steak, eggs and hash browns breakfast on weekends. Baskets of burgers and fries. Pancakes. Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday; 9 a.m. to midnight Sunday.

Dipped in peanut sauce, the spring roll becomes a green salad you eat with your hands. Ideal for lunch or a quick dinner, with a menu of Vietnamese pho, bahn mi and Asian favorites. Go ahead, try an avocado smoothie. Hours: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday; noon to 8 p.m. Saturday; closed Sunday.

425-252-4000. Kick back with fried green tomatoes, smoked ribs, black jack prawns, jalapeno corn fritters. The list of Southern cuisine goes on. Hours: 3 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 4 to 9 p.m. Sunday. Petite Sweet 2613 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-258-1800; www. petitesweetbakery.com. Bakery serves breakfast and lunch fare. Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

Sol Food Bar & Grill 1405 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425- 241-7111; solfoodbarandgrill.com. Caribbean and South American dishes, with a full bar in the main dining room. Tall brick walls border an courtyard on three sides, creating a sense of shelter in a quintessentially urban setting. Hours: 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday; 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday.

Curry Bistro 1907 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-258-2900. Specializes in authentic Indian food. One taste of their butter chicken and it was love. Hours: 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday; 2 to 9 p.m. Saturday, and 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday.

Ole Soul Southern Creole 1105 Hewitt Ave., Everett;

Super Bowl Pho 3121 Broadway, Everett; 425-789-1100; superbowlphoeverett.com. As a Vietnamese sports bar, Everett’s Super Bowl Pho scores touchdown. Try one of the vermicelli noodle dishes. Hours: 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday and until 11 p.m. Sunday. YNot Sports Pub and Grub 2015 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-265-9668; ynotsportspubandgrub.com Mostly sports bar fare. Hours: 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday and until midnight Sunday. Prohibition Gastropub 1414 Hewitt Ave., 425-258-6100. The place where celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay did a nationally televised makeover. Good pub food. Hours: Open for dinner until 9 p.m. most days.

Pho Ha 2930 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-252-4002.

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8 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Helio Sequence: Big sound from a small band By Aaron Swaney Herald Writer

The Helio Sequence’s upcoming album started with a game. According to its website, the band’s Brandon Summers and Benjamin Weikel participated in a game with their friends in the Portland, Oregon, music scene called “The 20-Song Game,” in which songwriters would arrive at a studio, record 20 complete songs, play them back and discuss the process with friends. Summers and Weikel took the fruits of that labor and turned it into “The Helio Sequence,” the band’s sixth album. The Helio Sequence, a rock duo that gets every inch of sound from its limited numbers, will kick off its tour as headliners of this year’s Fisherman’s Village Music Festival. The Helio Sequence will put a cap on the second day, taking the stage at the Everett Historic Theatre at 11 p.m. May 16. The Helio Sequence’s new record releases May 19, so those who attend Saturday’s show are likely to get a sneak peek at a number of new songs, including “Upward Mobility,” the first single off the album. The other headliner for this year’s festival is Everett’s own Jason Webley, who is taking the occasion to get his former band back together. Having not played together since 2011, Webley, Michael McQuilken (drums), Jherek Bischoff (bass) and Alex Guy (viola) will bring a high-energy show that promises to be quirky. Webley, who has toured the world putting on shows with just

Eric Anderson of the Seattle band Cataldo, which performs May 16 at the festival.

an accordion, is a consummate showman in the mold of the one-man vaudeville shows from the past. He’s excited to have his friends join him on stage again for the final festival performance, at 10 p.m. May 17 at the Historic Everett Theatre. The band Wild Ones, a quintet from Portland, Oregon, which is touring the West Coast with Helio Sequence this summer, and the Seattle-based trio, Barcelona, will play before Webley. Telekinesis, which is Kenmore’s Michael Benjamin Lerner, will go on before The Helio Sequence on May 16. Telekinesis has put out three records on the

influential Merge Records label, including 2013’s “Dormarion.” Everett’s own Fauna Shade will close down The Cannery on May 16. Led by frontman Scotty Smith, Fauna Shade recently released its debut full-length album, “Baton Rouge,” a few months after winning EMP’s Sound Off! competition late last year. “We’re really excited they’re closing out The Cannery,” said Everett Music Initiative’s Steven Graham. “It’s the hometown guys playing their home court.” Another show at The Cannery is My Goodness, which was once a duo but has now added a bass player. The Seattle-based

HAYLEY YOUNG

HAYLEY YOUNG

Eric Anderson of the Seattle band Cataldo, which performs May 16 at the festival.

band closes out The Cannery on May 17, going on stage at 9:30 p.m. “People are saying they’re more of a dynamic band now (with the bass player),” Graham said. “Bring your ear plugs — it’s going to be loud.” For a full schedule of the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival, see Page 9. Five must-sees bands Fisherman’s Village Music Festival organizers Steven Graham and Ryan Crowther picked five bands they said festivalgoers shouldn’t miss this weekend. Joseph: 7 p.m. May 17, Historic Everett Theatre. Three sisters from Portland, Oregon. One plays guitar and all of them sing. It’s as simple as you can get and it’s just beautiful. — Graham Sisters: 8 p.m. May 16, Historic Everett Theatre. Duo from Seattle. They’ve had a meteoric rise. It’s the coolest musical project happening in Seattle right now. I’d compare them to Stevie Wonder meets Passion Pit. — Crowther Cataldo: 6 p.m. May 16, Everett Historic Theatre. This Seattle band’s record, “Gilded Oldies,” was on everyone’s top two or three records of last year. They deliver live. I can’t wait to see what they do next. — Graham Water Monster: 6:30 p.m. May 17, The Cannery. Duo from Spokane. They’re branded as experimental electronic pop. It’s like electronic stuff with soulful R&B vocals. — Graham Planes on Paper: 7:15 p.m. May 16, Cask & Vine. Band from Seattle. They’re folksy acoustic, with really strong melodies and great song writing. Really chill stuff. — Crowther


music

The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 9

Fisherman’s Village Festival music schedule Here’s a look at the music schedule for the upcoming Fisherman’s Village Music Festival May 15 through 17:

MAY 15 Gunpowder Stitches, 7 p.m., The Cannery; The Mama Rags, 7:30 p.m., The Cannery; Choir of Crickets, 8:30 p.m., The Cannery; Loser Boyfriend, 8:45 p.m., Tony V’s; Hot! Donna, 9:15 p.m., The Cannery; The Pro-Nouns, 9:30 p.m., Tony V’s; Tango Alpha Tango, 10 p.m., The Cannery; Albatross, 10:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Porter Ray, 11 p.m., The Cannery; Communist Eyes, 11 p.m., Tony V’s; Lucky Boys, 11:45 p.m., Tony V’s; Cuff Lynx, midnight, The Cannery; P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., 12:30 a.m., Tony V’s.

MAY 16 EHS Battle of the Bands winner, 1 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Crystal Desert, 1:30 p.m., The Cannery; Each + All, 2 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; The Winterlings, 2:15 p.m., The Bait Shop; Crater Lakes, 2:30 p.m., The Cannery; Ruler, 3 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Pepper Proud, 3:15 p.m., The Bait Shop; Spider Ferns, 3:30 p.m., The Cannery; Maiah Manser, 4 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Led to Sea, 4:15 p.m.,

The Bait Shop; Wind Burial, 4:30 p.m., The Cannery; Ravenna Woods, 5 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Marshall McLean Band, 5:15 p.m., The Bait Shop; Deep Creep, 5:30 p.m., The Cannery; Cataldo, 6 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Lonley Mtn Lovers, 6:15 p.m., The Bait Shop; Minden, 6:30 p.m., The Cannery; Say Hi, 7 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Planes on Paper, 7:15 p.m., The Bait Shop; Prom Queen, 7:30 p.m., The Cannery; Sisters, 8 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Fruit Juice, 8:30 p.m., The Cannery; Deep Sea Diver, 9 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Woodshed, 9:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Genders, 9:30 p.m., The Cannery; Telekinesis, 10 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Jpata, 10:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Murder Vibes, 10:30 p.m., The Cannery; Helio Sequence, 11 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; So Pitted, 11:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Summer Cannibals, 11:30 p.m., The Cannery; Staxx Brothers, 12:15 a.m., Tony V’s; Fauna Shade, 12:30 a.m., The Cannery.

MAY 17 Born of Ghosts, 12:30 p.m., The Cannery; Mts. + Tunnels, 1 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Shark the Herald, 1:30 p.m., The Cannery; Cathedral Pearls, 2 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Just Lions, 2:30 p.m., The Cannery; Preacher’s Wife,

3 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Gabriel Mintz, 3:30 p.m., The Cannery; Jess Lambert, 3:45 p.m., Silver Cup; Jherek Bischoff, 4 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Gibraltar, 4:30 p.m., The Cannery; Adventurous Sleeping, 4:45 p.m., Silver Cup; Brent Coles, 5 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Vacationeer, 5:30 p.m., The Cannery; Edmund Wayne, 5:45 p.m., Silver Cup; Lemolo, 6 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Water Monster, 6:30 p.m., The Cannery; Erin Austin, 6:45 p.m., Silver Cup; Joseph, 7 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; The Decoys, 7:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Nurses, 7:30 p.m., The Cannery; Barcelona, 8 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Double B and Laces, 8:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Brother from Another, 8:30 p.m., The Cannery; Wild Ones, 9 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Cloud Person, 9:15 p.m., Tony V’s; My Goodness, 9:30 p.m., The Cannery; Jason Webley and Band, 10 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre; Stubborn Son, 10:15 p.m., Tony V’s; Jhoff + The Rez, 11:15 p.m., Tony V’s. Locations: The Cannery, 2820 Oakes Ave., Everett; The Marina (Historic Everett Theatre), 2911 Colby Ave., Everett; Tony V’s, 1712 Hewitt Ave., Everett; The Bait Shop, 1901 Hewitt Ave., Everett; Silver Cup, 2707 Colby Ave., Everett

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10 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

CALENDAR CONCERTS Everett Norwegian Male Chorus: A good old Scandinavian sing-along, 3 p.m. May 15. Harbour Pointe Assisted Living Community, 10200 Harbour Place, Mukilteo. Overton Berry: The jazz legend and 2012 inductee into the Seattle Jazz Hall of Fame will perform 8 p.m. May 16, presented by the Edmonds Driftwood Players at the Wade James Theatre in Edmonds. Tickets, $25, are available at www.edmonds-driftwoodplayer. org or by calling 425-774-9600. North Cascades Concert

Band: The group offers a free “Sousa Style” concert at 3 p.m. May 16 in the Byrnes Performing Arts Center at Arlington High School, 18821 Crown Ridge Blvd. Preston Hardage, trombonist with the U.S. Marine Band, “The Presidents Own,” will be the featured soloist. The concert includes a Tommy Dorsey tribute and Disney tunes. Donations are accepted. More information is at www. nccband.org. Mukilteo Community Orchestra: Final season concert 2 p.m. May 17 at Rosehill Center. Admission is free. Jazz Jam: Bob Strickland hosts the all-ages jam from 5 to 8 p.m. May 17 at the new Anchor Pub, 1001 Hewitt Ave., Everett.

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Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road. Tickets are $20, but students with ID get in free. Call 360-3870222 for more information. The Manhattan Transfer: The vocal quartet, known around the world, performs at 7 p.m. May 29 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts, 410 Fourth Ave. N., Edmonds. Tickets are $64, $59, $54. Students admitted for $15. Call 425-275-9595. The late Tim Hauser started the Grammy award-winning group more than 40 years ago.

PUBLICITY PHOTO

The folksinging historian Hank Cramer performs sea shanties Sunday afternoon, May 17, in Stanwood.

Hank Cramer: Stanwood Area Historical Society presents a free concert by the folksinger/historian at 4 p.m. May 17 at the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center. Cramer plans to sing and talk about the history of sea shanties. Carolyn Cruso: The Orcas Island musician plays a folk, Americana and Celtic concert at 2 p.m. May 17 at Everett Public Library, 2702 Hoyt. The event is presented by the library and the Pacific Northwest Folklore Society. Learn more about Cruso at carolyncruso.com.

PUBLICITY PHOTO

Pacific Northwest Songstress Carolyn Cruso performs with her two guitars, hammered dulcimer, flute and voice at 2 p.m. May 17 at the Everett Library.

The Mavericks: The band that brought you “Dance The Night Away” performs at 7:30 p.m. May 21 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. For tickets, $49, $44, $39, call 425-275-9595.

pianist George Cables will arrive from New York to perform. Tickets available at Flowers by George, 335 N Olympic Ave., Arlington. Arlington High Jazz 1 also will perform.

An Evening of Jazz: The Arlington Arts Council presents the concert at 7:30 p.m. May 22, Byrnes Performing Arts Center, Arlington High School, 18821 Crown Ridge Blvd. Tickets are $15, or free for children. Six-time Grammy award-winning baritone sax player Gary Smulyan and

Edmonds Jazz Connection: The 15th annual festival is 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. May 23 at the Edmonds Masonic Center and Edmonds Conference Center in downtown Edmonds. Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Edmonds Daybreakers, the festival features performances by award-winning

high school jazz bands and choirs. High school musicians scheduled to perform include those from Arlington, Cascade, Edmonds-Woodway, Lynnwood, Mariner, Meadowdale, Monroe, Mountlake Terrace, Shorewood. Also performing are Edmonds Community College students. More information is at www.facebook. com/events/852203641511520. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged. Kate McGarry and Keith Ganz: Jazz concert 7 p.m. May 27,

“Basie Bash”: The 17-piece, award-winning Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra celebrates 20 years together with a concert of Count Basie’s music at 7:30 p.m. May 30 at Edmonds Center for the Arts, 410 Fourth Ave. N., Edmonds. The jazz band has begun regular appearances at the center after receiving critical acclaim and drawing a near-capacity crowd for its concert there in January. Tickets are available through srjo.org or edmondscenterforthearts.org or by calling 425-275-9595. Single tickets are $34. Fans ages 25 and younger admitted for $10. Darrington Day Music: The Whitehorse Musicians Guild hosts free, live music from noon to 6 p.m. May 30 in Old School Park in Darrington. Main Attraction and The Coats: Two of the Northwest’s premiere a cappella groups perform at 7 p.m. May 30 at the Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave., Everett. For tickets, call 425-258-6766.

Mukilteo Orchestra goes to the movies in season finale Herald staff The Mukilteo Community Orchestra will conclude its 2014-15 season with a concert at 2 p.m. May 17 with a program called “Mukilteo Goes to The Movies.” The concert, led by artistic director Trevor Lutzenhiser, is at Rosehill Community Center, 204 Lincoln Ave. in Mukilteo, and admission is free. The pieces selected for the concert were written

for movies or TV or were used in soundtracks. About 45 minutes before the concert begins, the Kamiak Quartet and the Everett Youth Symphony Orchestra Chamber Ensemble are scheduled to perform. The concert program includes “Magnificent Seven” written by Elmer Bernstein for the movie of the same name, the “Downton Abbey Suite” by John Lunn, and themes by John Williams written

for the movies “Jurassic Park” and “E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial.” Lyric soprano Sarah Davis joins the orchestra to sing the aria “Song to the Moon” from Dvorak’s opera “Rusalka,” which was used in several movies, including “Driving Miss Daisy.” Painist Laura Hendrickson, a senior graduating as a Running Start student at Everett Community College, joins the orchestra to perform the second movement of Rachmaninoff’s

Piano Concerto No. 2. in C minor. Again, numerous movies included the concerto in soundtracks. Eugene Choi, a 2014 Kamiak High School graduate, joins the orchestra to perform the second and third movements of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 A Major, used in several movies, including, of course, “Amadeus.” More information is at www.mukilteoorchestra. org.


music

The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 11

Luke Bryan brings country cool to Tacoma By Andy Rathbun Herald Writer

Luke Bryan didn’t seem like he would be the face of spring break when he started out. The country star launched his career with “I’ll Stay Me,” his 2007 album that, by drawing on more traditional country influences like Randy Travis, seemed to indicate Bryan wasn’t aiming for chart domination. But then something changed. Bryan started cranking out spring break themed EPs. He released an album called “Tailgates and Tanlines,” and another called “Crash My Party.” Now Bryan seems firmly established as one of country music’s barn-burners, a guy more than happy to hit No. 1 with songs like “Drink a Beer” and “Country Girl (Shake It for Me).” Bryan’s now headed to the Tacoma Dome at 7:30 p.m. May 16 on his “Kick the Dust Up” tour, which will find him headlining some of the nation’s biggest venues through at least October. Tickets are $39.75 to $69.75 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Passion Pit also is headed to the Northwest, as the lauded rock act plays a pair of concerts at the Showbox. The band is set to appear at 7 p.m. May 19 and May 20. With his synthesizer-steeped music, frontman Michael Angelakos has managed to make fans out of mainstream music listeners and rock critics alike. Though debut album “Manners” turned some heads, his act’s true breakthrough came in 2012 with the release of “Gossamer.” That effervescent album featured hit singles including “Take a Walk” and “Carried Away.” The album reached No. 4 on the Billboard 200. Now Passion Pit is back with a new album, April’s “Kindred.” Preceded by the single “Lifted Up (1985),” the album again showcased Angelakos’ ability at channeling personal reflection

FESTIVALS/SUMMER MUSIC Northwest Folklife Festival: Free. May 22 through 25, Seattle Center. The Spur Festival: June 26 through 28, Darrington (Bluegrass) Music Park. Whiskey River and other country music bands. More at www.thespurfestival. com. Darrington Bluegrass Festival: July 17 through 19, Darrington Bluegrass Music Park. More at www.darringtonbluegrass.com. Headliners include the Gibson Brothers, Gentlemen of Bluegrass and Gold Heart, along with North Country, Rural Delivery and the Darrington band the Combinations.

Spring break sensation Luke Bryan will perform May 16 at the Tacoma Dome.

into his bubbling 1980s-infused rock. Tickets are $35 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849. Joe Bonamassa also has multiple dates planned in the days ahead, as he winds down a threenight stand at the Paramount Theatre with shows at 8 p.m. May 15 and May 16. Billed as being the “guitar event of the year,” the concert will give fans a chance to see the young guitar great as he tours behind his latest album, “Different Shades of Blue.” That album hit No. 1 on the blues charts after its September release, and again showcased the 38-year-old’s ability to channel influences like Stevie Ray Vaughn into his own original music. Tickets are $79 to $125 at stgpresents.org or 877-784-4849. The Wombats, meanwhile, play the Neptune Theatre at 9

p.m. May 19. The group, based out of Liverpool, England, released its debut album, “A Guide to Love, Loss and Desperation,” in 2007, and followed that disc up with 2011’s “This Modern Glitch.” Both of those albums helped win fans with its sharp-witted lyrics and New Wave-steeped sounds. The act returned this year with “Glitterbug,” a slightly more somber outing from the often fun-loving act. Tickets are $17.50 at stgpresents.org or 877-784-4849. The Neptune Theatre will host rapper Nipsey Hussle at 9 p.m. May 15. Known for his gritty lyrics, the California-based emcee has been churning out mixtapes for the past decade. He is finally gearing up to release his much-anticipated studio debut, “Victory Lap,” which has been delayed more than a year since its originally

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planned release date. Tickets are $45 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849. Finally, the long-running British rock act the Waterboys will head to the Showbox at 8:30 p.m. May 21. The band got its start in the early 1980s in London, and established a sound that blended traditional Celtic folk with altrock infused pop. A string of minor hits on this side of the Atlantic pushed the group onto the charts in the late 1980s and early 1990s, although its albums never were huge chart successes. Nonetheless, its unique sound and ever-rotating line-up of skilled musicians helped win it a loyal following. The act, led by its one constant member Mike Scott, is touring now behind its latest album, “Modern Blues.” Tickets are $35 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849.

Summer Meltdown Festival: Aug. 6 through 9, at Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheater (also, Darrington’s bluegrass park). More at summermeltdownfest. com. Performers include STS9, Iration, Tycho, Greensky Bluegrass, Galactic, Nahko and Medicine for the People, Fruition and Flowmotion. The final five bands chosen to play at the festival will perform at 7 p.m. May 17 at the Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. NW, Seattle. Stillaguamish Festival of the River: Aug. 8 and 9, River Meadows County Park near Arlington. More at www.facebook.com/ stillyfest. Everett’s Music at the Marina: The lineup for the free concerts has been announced. Concerts are 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, June 25 through Aug. 27, and Saturdays, June 27 through Aug. 29, Port Gardner Landing, 1700 W. Marine View Drive. Most bands are local or regional. More at www.everettwa. gov. Tulalip Summer Concert Series: Boz Scaggs and Aaron Neville, July 3; Hank Williams, Jr., July 8; Boyz II Men, Aug. 6; Huey Lewis and the News, Aug. 28; Sammy Hagar, Sept. 3. More information at www.tulalipresortcasino.com/Entertainment/ TulalipAmphitheatre Evergreen State Fair: Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo, Aug. 31; Casting Crowns, Sept. 1; Lee Brice, Sept. 2; Jerrod Niemann, Sept. 2; Vince Gill, Sept. 4. More information at www. evergreenfair.org.


music

12 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

IN THE CLUBS

Cafe Zippy: 2811 Wetmore Ave., Everett; 425-303-0474. Live acoustic music. www.cafezippy.com. May 16: Scenic Detour (improv comedy)

Alexa’s Cafe: 10115 Main St., Bothell; 425-402-1754; www.alexascafe.com. Live music Saturdays at 7 p.m. May 16: Tweety & the Tom-Cats. The Anchor Pub: 1001 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-374-2580; anchorpub.comcastbiz.net. Jazz Jam with Bob Strickland 5 to 8 p.m. every third Sunday. Angel of the Winds Casino: 3438 Stoluckquamish Lane, Arlington, 360-474-9740; www.angelofthewinds.com. Acoustic Thursday 7 p.m. every Thursday. Live music 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday nights. Amici Bistro: 8004 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo; 425-4389544. Live music 7 to 10 p.m. Saturdays. The Austin: 2820B Oakes Ave., Everett; 425-212-9716; www. theaustinbarandgrill.com. School of Jam all ages open jam every Thursday at 7 p.m. Country Night with free line dance lessons every Saturday. Buzz Inn: 1801 Main St., Lake Stevens; 425-377-9599; www.buzzinnsteakhouse.com. 109 S. Granite Ave., Granite Falls; 360-386-9257. Live music every Friday.

The Cannery: 2820 Oakes Ave Suite C, Everett; www.facebook. com/EverettMusicInitiative. May 15 through 17: Fisherman’s Village Music Festival (for full list of bands and venues, see Page 9). The Conway Muse: 18444 Spruce and Main, Conway; 360445-3000; www.conwaymuse.com. May 15: Jill Newman, 7 p.m., $10. May 16: Joe T. Cook, 7:30 p.m., $10. May 21: Eric Apoe and THEY, 7:30 p.m., $10. Craving Cajun Grill: 2915 Colby Ave, Everett; 425-374-2983; www. cravingcajunfood.com. Dezi’s Bar and Grill: 11605 State Ave., No. 105, Marysville; 360-6599490. Marlin James, 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sundays. Eagles FOE: 19223 Highway 99. Lynnwood; 425-835-0890. El Tapatio: 803 Avenue D, Snohomish; 360-862-9530. Classical guitarist Paul Erickson, 6 to 8:30 p.m. second and fourth Fridays. Emory’s on Silver Lake: 11830 19th Ave. SE, Everett; 425-3377772; www.emorys.com. Everett Live music 9 p.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays, per-person cover. May 15: Hall Pass. May 16: Shaggy Sweet.

Engel’s Pub: 113 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds; 425-778-2900. Jam session with Lou Echeverri, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. Live music 8 p.m. Wednesdays and 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. May 15: Electric Hemingway, 9 p.m. May 16: Who’s UR Daddy, 9 p.m. Flights: 7601 Evergreen Way, Everett; 425-347-6659; www. reverbnation.com/venue/flightspub. All shows at 8 p.m. May 15: Rev 3, Swamp Doctor, 8 p.m. May 16: September Dogs, Cradleman, 8 p.m. Grazie Ristorante Italiano: 23207 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell; 425-402-9600; www. grazierestaurant.com. Live jazz 7 to 10:30 p.m. most weekends. May 15: The Christel Trio. May 16: Scott Lindenmuth Trio. The Hawthorne: 115 Avenue A, Snohomish; 360-563-5243. The Irishmen: 2923 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-374-5783; www. theirishmen.com. Irish Music Session every Monday. May 15: Alex Britton. May 16: Oliver Mulholland. May 21: The VooDoos. Jimmy Jack’s: 13428 Evergreen, Everett; 425-745-1590; All ages jam hosted by Rick Bowen, Teri Anne Wilson and Robert Baker, 7 to 11 p.m. Thursdays. The Jet Bar & Grill: 800 164th St., Mill Creek; 425-743-4593; www.jetbarandgrill.com. Live music Fridays and Saturdays, starts between 9 and 9:30 p.m.; $10

cover. May 15: Damon Collar. May 16: Mts. & Tunnels and The Papillion Sts. Kroakers: 3021 Rucker Ave., Everett; 425-258-9465. La Hacienda: 620 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett; 425-355-0858; www.lahaciendafmr.com. Live jazz Thursdays. Las Margaritas: 4131 Rucker, Everett; 425-252-3320; www. margaritasmexrest.com. Classical guitarist Paul Erickson, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturdays. Leatherheads Pub & Eatery: 10209 270th St. NW, Stanwood; 360-629-5555; www.leatherheadspub.com. Two Weeks Notice, 9 to 11 p.m. Fridays. Loco Billy’s Wild Moon Saloon: 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood; 360-629-6500; www. www. locobillys.com. DJ dance music, line dance lessons and live music. May 15: The Troy Fair Band, The Lowdown Drifters, 8 p.m., $10. May 16: Lori Hardman Band, Chris Lord and Cheatin’ River, 8 p.m., $10. Lombardi’s in Mill Creek: 19409 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell⁄Mill Creek; 425-892-2931; www.lombardisitalian.com. Live music every Thursday. Madison Avenue Pub: 905 Madison St., Everett; 425-3487402. Live music Saturdays. Tommy Crook Trio, 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays.

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Unbound and guests, 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Mirkwood and Shire Cafe: 117 E. Division St., Arlington; 360-4039020; www.mirkwoodshirecafe. com. $5 cover unless otherwise noted. Music begins at 7 p.m. Norm’s Place, A Bar & Grill: 7520 Beverly Blvd., Everett; 425374-8039. Old Stroker’s Cafe: 2816 Hewitt Ave., Everett; Saturday Night Showcase, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturdays. Local bands for all ages. One Eyed Jacks Roadhouse: 14019 Highway 99, Lynnwood; 425-743-5570. Live music Fridays and Saturdays. Oxford Saloon: 913 First St., Snohomish; 360-243-3060. All ages jam hosted by Rick Bowen, Teri Anne Wilson and Robert Baker, 7 to 11 p.m. Wednesdays. Papa’s Tavern: 120 E. Main St., Monroe. 425-232-0771. Live music. Port Gardner Bay Winery: 2802 Rockefeller Ave., Everett; 425-339-0293; www.portgardnerbaywinery.com. Live music, 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Cafe Louvre: 212 Fifth Ave S., Edmonds. 425-776-3778. www. facebook.com/edmondstunes. Live music and comedy 6 to 7 p.m. Fridays. No cover. The Red Sky Bar & Grill: 1508 Second St., Marysville; 360-3868875. The Repp: 924 First St., Snohomish; 360-568-3928; www.therepp. com. Live music 7 to 11 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays. May 15: Side Project. May 16: Reggie Miles. Rhodes River Ranch Restaurant: 22016 Entsminger Road, Arlington; 360-474-8313; www. rhodesriverranch.com. Live music begins at 6 p.m. May 15: Burnt Breakfast. May 16: The Packstring. Rocking M-BBQ: 1215 80th St., Everett; 425-438-2843; www.rockingmbbq.com. Old Strokers country jam, 7 to 10 p.m. Thursdays.

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Skagit River Brewery: 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon; 360-3362884; www.skagitbrew.com. Live music every Saturday.

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Sol Food Bar and Grill: 1405 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-2417111; www.solfoodbarandgrill. com. Live music various nights; no cover. Stewart’s Place: 709 First St., Snohomish; 360-568-4684. Live music 9 p.m. to midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Tony V’s Garage: 1712 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-374-3567. Comedy on Monday; open mic on Wednesday; karoake on Thursday; live music Friday and Saturday begins at 9 p.m. May 15: Lucky Boys, Problems, Communist Eyes. Hosting Fisherman’s Village Festival shows on May 16 and 17 (for full list of bands, see Page 9). Tulalip Resort Casino Canoes Cabaret: Quil Ceda Blvd., Tulalip, 360-716-6000; www.tulalipresortcasino.com. Free unless otherwise noted. May 15: Ron Stubbs, 8 p.m.; Gold Digger, 9:30 p.m. May 16: The Walrus, 5 p.m.; Radioactive, 9:30 p.m., $10. May 17: Steelhorse (Bon Jovi tribute), 8 p.m. May 20: The Popoffs, 10 p.m. May 21: The Afrodisiacs, 8:30 p.m.; The Disco Ballz, 8:30 p.m. Under the Red Umbrella: 1502 Rucker Ave., Everett; 425-2529193; www.undertheredumbrella. com. Live music 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays, $10 cover waived with food purchase. May 15: Ginger Ups, 7 p.m. Viking Bar & Grill: 8820 Viking Way, Stanwood; 360-629-9285. Live music 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays; no cover. Village Restaurant & Lounge: 220 Ash St., Marysville; 360-6592305; www.villagepie.net. Live music 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays; no cover. White Horse Saloon: 304 N. Olympic Ave., Arlington; 360-4353122. Live DJ Friday and Saturday nights at 8 p.m. May 9: Jodi Taylor and the Good Ol’ Boys, 9 p.m. Wild Hare Bar and Grill: 6504 Evergreen Way, Everett; 425-3223134; www.wildharebar.com/. Live music 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday; no cover.

Snack Shack: 320 112th St. SW., Everett; 425-347-4225 or 509308-0680; www.facebook.com/ SnackShackEverett. Open mic and acoustic jam, 5 to 9 p.m. Mondays.

Wild Vine Bistro: 18001 BothellEverett Highway, Bothell; 425-8771334; www.wildvinebistro.com. Most Wednesdays at 7 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. May 15: Chris Simpson. May 21: Battista Brothers.

Snohomish Eagles FOE: 606 Maple Ave., Snohomish; 360-5688406.

Winter Court: AC3, 7314 44th Ave., Marysville. Live music, 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays; no cover.


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 13

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music

14 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Local orchestras announce 2015-16 schedule Herald staff

EVERETT — Pacifica Chamber Orchestra and Everett Philharmonic Orchestra have announced their 2015-16 concert seasons. Fred Chu, Pacifica’s artist director, said the chamber orchestra will play five concerts. On Sept. 27, the concert program will include Telemann’s Concerto in F Major for Three Violins and Braham’s Sextet No. 2 in G Major for String Orchestra. On Dec. 13, audiences will hear Mendelssohn’s String Symphony No. 6, Vaughan Williams’ “Charterhouse” Suite for Strings, Cambini’s Wind Quintet in B flat Major and Fine’s

Partita for Wind Quintet. The Feb. 14 concert includes Britten’s “Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge,” Milhaud’s “Pastorale,” Skalkottas’ “Five Greek Dances” and Warren Chang playing “Red Plum Blosson” for the erhu, a Chinese string instrument. The spring concert on April 10 features Youngjjn Joo playing organ in Poulenc’s Concerto for Organ, Timpani and Strings, Ligeti’s “Six Bagatelles” and Andriessen’s “Kuhnau Variations.” On June 5, 2016, the chamber orchestra features Bloch’s Concertino for Flute, Viola and Strings with flutist Lynn Douglas-Nicolet and violist Agnes Chen, and Ibert’s “Divertisement.”

Buy season tickets before June 15 to receive a discount. More information is at www. pacificachamberorchestra. org or call 425-743-0255. Everett Philharmonic artistic director PaulElliott Cobbs has lined up his orchestra’s season, which begins Oct. 3 with the Masterworks concert. The program features the Shostakovish “Festival Overture,” George Steward playing Arutunian’s Trumpet Concerto, and Respighi’s “Pines of Rome.” The Imagine concert, directed at families, is Nov. 29. It includes works by Prokofiev, Rimsky-Korsakov and Tchaikovsky along with a “Star Wars” medly by John Williams and music from “Frozen.” The

winner of the orchestra’s annual concerto competition also will perform and children will have a chance to look at orchestral instruments close up. The annual Magnificent Mozart is Jan. 31. It includes Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante for Four Winds, Symphony No. 38 “Prague” and soprano Gail Neil performing a selection of arias. The Listener’s Choice program, May 14, 2016, includes Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever,” conducted by the winner of the 2016 Gala Auction, soprano Ellaina Lewis performing “Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5” by Villa-Lobos, pianist Alexander Ardakov playing Grieg’s Piano Concerto in A minor and Dvorak’s Symphony No. 8.

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PUBLICITY PHOTO

Everett Philharmonic’s Listener’s Choice program is May 14, 2006, and features soprano Ellaina Lewis performing Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 by Villa-Lobos.

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family fun

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Up in the air: Aviation Day is Saturday Herald staff Kids fly free at Paine Field Aviation Day on May 16. Just get there early for the event that runs 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free Young Eagles flights for ages 8 to 17 are on a first-come basis. People line up before the gates open to get a sequence number. Bring an adult to sign a waiver. The flights follow a set route: No aerobatics or unusual altitudes. Pilots volunteer their time, aircraft and fuel.

CALENDAR EVENTS “Click, Clack, Moo”: EverettPied Piper, 2 and 4 p.m. May 17, Everett Civic Auditorium, 2415 Colby Ave., Everett. When his granddaughter Jenny comes for a visit, Farmer Brown declares the farm a “tech-free zone” and confiscates her laptop. When the shivering cows find the computer in the cold barn, duck gives them an idea. All day long Farmer Brown hears “click clack moo, clickety clackety moo...” as the cows type up their demands and protest their working conditions. When Farmer Brown refuses their demands, the cows go on strike and the chickens join them in solidarity. “Cows that type? Hens on strike! Whoever heard of such a thing!” Farmer Brown cries. Recommended for kindergarten through 4th grade. The 4 p.m. show is “sensory friendly” for children with special needs. For more, call 425-257-8600 or go to www.villagetheatre.org. Discover the Fun of Engineering: Computer engineering and mechanical computers, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 16, Imagine Children’s Museum, 1502 Wall St., Everett; 425-258-1006. Included with general admission, $9.80. For more, visit imaginecm.org. Seabiscuit Celebration: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 16, All Breed Equine Rez-Q, 2415 116th St. NE,

There’s plenty to do while waiting. A firefighters pancake breakfast, Aircraft displays. Vendor booths. Meet pilots. View historic aircraft. Talk with flight schools. Warbirds fly at noon. Shuttles are available. Youth are free. For 18 and older, $10. Includes admission to Paul Allen’s Flying Heritage Collection and the Historic Flight Foundation. Parking is free. For more information go to www.painefield. com.

The P-51 and Spitfire at the Flying Heritage Collection.

Marysville. Fundraiser featuring Windy Land, who lives at the center and is a great-great-great-grandson of Seabiscuit, the famous racehorse. Farm tours, pony rides, raffles, bake sale, fire pit for cooking hot dogs and s’mores, kids activities and more. For more, go to www. allbreedhorserescue.com.

person. Jennifer Sundstrom leads a stroll through the park to greet the spring growth. Meet the plants (and weeds) to discuss food and medicinal uses, with a focus on wild edible plants. Tips for sustainable harvesting will be offered. Walk, rain or shine, so dress appropriately. Register online at goo.gl/bBIsrK.

Professional Roughstock Rodeo: 7:30 p.m. May 16, XFINITY Arena, 2000 Hewitt Avenue, Everett. The series showcases bareback riding, saddle bronc riding and bull riding. Tickets are $18 to $40 online at xfinityarenaeverett.com or by calling 866-332-8499. Special $13 kids price for ages 2 through 12 on select tickets. Gold Buckle Packages are $30 each and include early access to the venue, behind-thechutes tour and meet-and-greet with the athletes. Ticket prices increase $2 on the day of the event.

Tankfest Northwest: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 25, Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, 3407 109th St. SW, Everett. Restored tanks, military vehicles and artillery weapons. Driving and firing demonstrations. Puget Sound Military Vehicle Collectors Club parade. Family event features remote control tanks, reptiles and food. Free admission for veterans. For more, visit www. flyingheritage.com.

Storytimes: 11 a.m. Saturdays, Barnes & Noble, 19401 Alderwood Mall Parkway, Lynnwood. May 16: “Ballet Cat” by Bob Shea, a story of friendship, sharing and creating. May 23: “Dragons Love Tacos” by Adam Rubin, from a funny team advising against giving dragons salsa with their tacos. May 30: “Peanut Butter & Cupcake” by Terry Border, about foods that get lonely and need to find friends, a funny and silly photographic read aloud. Edible Plant Walk: 3 p.m. May 23, Mukilteo Library, 4675 Harbour Pointe Blvd., Mukilteo. Weeds, weeds, wonderful weeds. Plants are as individual and unique as each

PHOTO COURTESY OF LACY LEE

MUSIC Seattle Symphony Pay-WhatYou-Can Fridays: For all ages, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 15, Soundbridge at Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle. See, touch and play real instruments at the Seattle Symphony. Musical story time class for ages 2 to 5 at 10:30 a.m. $10 suggested donation. For more, go to www.seattlesymphony.org Symphony Kids, Stone Soup: 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. May 16, Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall. Join musicians of the Seattle Symphony and special guests for Once Upon a Symphony, an interactive concert featuring vibrant music, engaging storytelling and enchanting visuals, sets and costumes. This program

features the classic folk tale, Stone Soup. Once Upon a Symphony is a program of the Negaunee Music Institute at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Tickets are $12. All ages need a ticket, including babes in arms. Pre-concert activities begin 30 minutes before each performance in the Samuel & Althea Stroum Grand Lobby. For more, go to www. seattlesymphony.org.

STAGE “Anne of Green Gables”: Whidbey Children’s Theater, 723 Camano Ave., Langley. Classic story about an aging farm couple who decide to adopt an orphan boy to help with their farm but instead they get a strong-willed, redheaded girl. Shows are 7 p.m. May 15 and 16; 2 p.m. May 17. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors; and $8 for students. At the 7 p.m. May 16 show, all seats are $8. Recommended for ages 4 and older. No babes in arms or late seating. For more, visit www.wctmagic.org. Seattle Children’s Theatre: “Robin Hood” runs Thursdays through Sundays, through May 17. Call the box office at 206-441-3322. More information is at www.sct.org. Disney On Ice presents “Frozen”: Nov. 18 to 22, XFINITY Arena, 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett. Tickets are $30 to $85. Ages two and older must have a ticket. For more, go to www.xfinityareaneverett.com or call 866-332-8499.

See FAMILY FUN, Page 16

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16 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Red Curtain seeks donations to stay at its current location Herald staff MARYSVILLE — Red Curtain Arts Center has been living month-to-month at its current location on Grove Street. In January, the Red Curtain Foundation mounted an online fundraising campaign in response to the news that the lease on the property at 1410 Grove St. would not be renewed. “Our choices were to purchase the property or see it go back on the real estate market,” said Foundation board members in a press release. “While a significant amount of donations flowed in from community supporters, it wasn’t enough to cover the closing costs for the purchase transaction, so our lease arrangement became a month-to-month rental.” The tenuous arrangement doesn’t allow for long-term planning, but the board still has plans. Since January, the foundation has offered classes, hosted monthly open microphone events, produced a murder mystery play, hosted an exciting evening of music with Reggie Miles and the Banner Days, introduced

FAMILY FUN From Page 15 Performing Arts Show Biz Kids 4-H Club: 6:30 to 8 p.m. second Thursday of each month, Horseshoe Grange, 164th and Broadway, Cathcart/Clearview area. Call Jan Bond at 360-668-6681 or the 4-H office at 425-357-6044. The grange also is the home of drama, guitar and line-dance lessons.

EXHIBITS Star Wars and The Power of Costume: A behind-the-scenes look at some of the most iconic costumes in film history. First stop of the 12-city national tour with 60

audiences to two Readers’ Theatre events and served as a rehearsal and performance venue and meeting place for such groups as the Marysville City Bands, Sonus Boreal Choir, EagleWings disAbility, the Salvation Army, the Quil Ceda Carvers and the Marysville Arts Coalition. Summer arts program for kids are in the works and a new season of plays is sooner to be announced. Red Curtain is still looking for financial help from the community, board members said. Suggestions include using the Amazon Smile program and designating Red Curtain Foundation for the Arts as the beneficiary, or signing up for the Fred Meyer Community Rewards plan with Red Curtain Foundation (code 81864) as the designee. Making a donation with a matching gift from your employer is another way. The board of directors is planning a gala fundraiser event for the fall, and donations for the silent and live auctions are welcome. More information is at www. redcurtainfoundation.org or call 360-322-7402.

costumes and numerous artifacts is through Oct. 4 at EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle Center. Timed ticket entrance every 20 minutes, starting at 10 a.m. daily. For more, go to www.empmuseum. org. Imagine Children’s Museum: 1502 Wall St., Everett; 425-2581006; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Each third Friday of the month is the museum’s Free Friday Night Live. Play indoors with the kids from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at no cost. For more, visit imaginecm.org. Schack Art Center: 2921 Hoyt Ave., Everett; 425-259-5050. Go

CALENDAR THEATER Snohomish County “No Way to Treat a Lady”: Village Theatre’s production plays the Everett Performing Arts Center through May 24. The cast includes Village favorites Nick DeSantis, Bobbi Kotula, Jessica Skerritt, Dane Stokinger and Jayne Muirhead. For ticket information go to villagetheatre.org or call 425-257-8600. Oscar Wilde’s “Lady Windermere’s Fan”: Phoenix Theatre, 9673 Firdale Ave N., Edmonds, offers a free staged reading of the play at 4 p.m. May 16. Tea and cucumber sandwiches will be served. Donations will be accepted. Reserve a seat at 206-5332000. The cast includes community (and a few professional) actors Simone Barron, Melanie Calderwood, Susan Connors, Roger Curtis, Janice Fix, Eric Helland, Alyssa Kay, Phillip Keiman, Laura Kenny, Megan McKay, Ellen McLain, Terry Edward Moore, Asa Sholdez and Christine Mosere. “Cabaret”: Tickets are on sale now for Village Theatre’s production, which plays Everett July 10 through Aug. 2. Directed by Pulitzer prize winner Brian Yorkey, the show stars Billie Wildrick, who grew up in Snohomish, as well as other Seattle musical theater stars Brian Earp, Jason Collins, Anne Allgood and Peter Crook. For information go to villagetheatre.org or call 425-2578600.

Schools “Taming of the Shrew”: Everett High School presents the Shakespeare comedy, this time set in 1964, at 7 p.m. May 15 and 16 at the school’s Little Theater, 2416 Colby Ave. Kate Minola would rather protest at

to www.schack.org to learn about classes for kids and teens.

CLASSES & CAMPS Imagine Children’s Museum summer camps: 1502 Wall St., Everett. SUN-sational, for ages 3 to 5, meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 23. In this SUN-sational class preschoolers will learn all about the sun and its importance to people, plants and animals. Children will make sun prints, solar jewelry and more. Must be potty trained. Members $40; non-members $45. Stars and Stripes Stay-cation, grades 1 through 5, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 23. Take a vacation without leaving Everett. Children will go on a virtual trip across the

TRACY MARTIN

Bobbi Kotula, as Carmella, and Nick DeSantis, as Christopher “Kit” Gill, in Village Theatre’s “No Way to Treat a Lady.” UC Berkeley with Mario Savio than find a husband and cook with Betty Crocker, but her family has other plans. Tickets cost $5 with ASB, $7 general admission at the door. Half of proceeds will go to Nepal earthquake relief.

Seattle “Jasper in Deadland”: Directed by Brandon Ivie, the new musical plays at the 5th Avenue Theatre through May 24. For tickets and more information, go to www.5thavenue.org or call 206-625-1900. “If/Then”: Tony Award-winner Idina Menzel will star in the national touring production Nov. 3 through 8 at the Paramount Theatre. Menzel, who starred in the original Broadway hits “Wicked” and “Rent,” debuted “If/Then” on Broadway in 2014. Pulitzer prize winner Brian Yorkey, who has long worked with Village Theatre, wrote the lyrics for the musical. For ticket information, go to STGPresents.org/Broadway or call 888-451-4042.

U.S. while learning about crafts, games and geography. Members $45; non-members $50. Camps fill up fast. Call 425-258-1006, ext. 1012 or email education@imaginecm.org to register. For more, go to imaginecm.org. Children’s Summer Drama School: For ages 8 to 15, The Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave., Everett. Four weeks of acting, movement and voice projection. Students will perform in an end-of-session showcase. School is 3 to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday June 22 through July 16. Cost is $150 for first student and any addition sibling $125. For more, call 425-258-6766 or visit www.historiceveretttheatre.org.

OPERA “Ariadne auf Naxos”: A perfect first opera for people who haven’t gone before. A relatively short production, English captions, romantic music and lots of action. Through May 16 at McCaw Hall at the Seattle Center. Tickets start at $25. Call 206-389-7676.

DANCE Olympic Ballet School: The school’s annual student performances are 4 and 6 p.m. June 7 at Edmonds Center for the Arts, 410 Fourth Ave. N. Dancers as young as 3 will perform for the first time on a “real” stage. About 40 upper division students also perform with the nonprofit performing company, Olympic Ballet Theatre. Call 425-774-7570 or stop by the Olympic Ballet studios located in the Frances Anderson Cultural Center for more information. Pacific Northwest Ballet: “Carmina Burana,” May 29 to June 7, McCaw Hall, Seattle Center. More information is at www. pnb.org.

Summer Arts Enrichment Camps: Students work directly with professional artists, Edmonds Center for the Arts. One-week camps meet 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Seattle Shakespeare Company’s “Shakespeare As You Like It: Combat, Improv, & Acting,” July 6 through 10, ages 11 to 15. Book-It Repertory Theatre’s “Investigate, Adapt, Act!”, July 13 through 17, ages 7 to 11. Folklorico Dance Camp, July 27 through 31, ages 7 to 11. Hawaiian & Polynesian Cultural Camp, Aug. 3 through 7. Camps are $200. Scholarships available. To register, go to www. ec4arts.org or call 425-275-9595. The Burke Museum: Summer camps for grades kindergarten to eighth grade. Dinosaurs, earth-

quakes, gems, Ice Age, games from around the Pacific, archeology, forensic investigation and endangered animals are some of the topics. Fees range from $200 to $365. For more information, go to www.burkemuseum.org/education/ summer or call 206-543-9681.

BILLBOARD Snohomish County Children’s Choir: Open to all kids of all ages, the choir is enrolling new members. More information is available at www.snohomishcountychildrenschoir.com. Rehearsals are weekly at the Everett Music Hall in the Everett Mall.


dance dance

The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 17 The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 17

PUBLIC PUBLIC DANCES DANCES The 449 Club: 8 p.m. to 12:30 The Club: Zion 8 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. 449 Saturdays, Lutheran a.m. Saturdays, ZionSt., Lutheran Church, 4634 Alger Everett. Church, 4634R&B Algermusic St., Everett. Alcohol-free and Alcohol-free R&BCall music and dance; $5 cover. 425-343dance; cover. Call 425-3433232 or$5visit www.the449club. 3232 org. or visit www.the449club. org. Arlington Community Arlington Dance: 6:30Community p.m. fourth SaturDance: 6:30 p.m. Sisco fourthHeights Saturday of the month, day of the month, Heights Community Center,Sisco 13527 99th Community Center,No 13527 99th Ave NE, Arlington. partner Ave NE, Arlington. partner or lessons needed. No All ages or lessons Live needed. ages welcome. bandAll and caller welcome. band and caller will teach Live all dances. Contra, will dances. Contra, lines,teach Circlealland Square dance. lines, and Square$20 dance. Cost isCircle $7 per person, for Cost is $7 per person, $20 for

family. For more information, family. For more information, call 425-232-7237. call 425-232-7237. Ballroom dance: 1 to 3 p.m. Ballroom dance: 1 to 3Senior p.m. Wednesdays, Northshore Wednesdays, Center, 10201Northshore E. RiversideSenior Drive, Center, Riverside Bothell;10201 dance E. lessons withDrive, Bothell; danceand lessons withwith a extra charge dancing extra charge dancing live band; $4 and members, $6with non-a live band; 425-487-2441; $4 members, $6www. nonmembers; members; 425-487-2441; www. northshoreseniorcenter.org. northshoreseniorcenter.org. Dance party classes: Learn Dance classes: Learn the partyparty dances you need to the party dances youreunions need to know for weddings, know for weddings, reunions and cruises; instructor is Eleanor and cruises; instructor is Eleanor Leight, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, Leight, 7 to Senior 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, Snohomish Center, 506 Snohomish Senior Center, 506

Fourth St., Snohomish; all ages, Fourth St., Snohomish; allaages, no partners needed; $25 no partners needed; $25 a month; 360-568-0934. month; 360-568-0934. Darrington Community Darrington Dances: 5:30Community p.m. potluck, 7 Dances: 5:30 p.m. potluck, 7 p.m. instruction, 7:30 dancing p.m. instruction, 7:30 dancing on the second Saturday; Manson second1265 Saturday; Mansfordthe Grange, Railroad Ave., ford Grange,206-402-8646; 1265 Railroad $7 Ave., Darrington. Darrington. 206-402-8646; $7 requested donation. requested donation. Dudes and Dolls Square Dudes and Dolls Square Dance Club: Square and round Dance and round dancers;Club: CedarSquare Valley Grange, dancers; Cedar Valley Grange, 20526 52nd Ave. W., Lynnwood; 20526 52nd Ave. W., Lynnwood; $6 at the door. www.dudesand$6 at the door. www.dudesanddolls.com. 206-369-7131. May dolls.com. 206-369-7131. May

22: Casino Royale. 22: Casino Royale. Edmonds Senior Center: Edmonds Fling danceSenior with liveCenter: bands, 1 to Fling with live bands, 1 to 3 p.m.dance Fridays, Edmonds Senior 3Center, p.m. Fridays, Edmonds 220 Railroad Ave.;Senior $3 doCenter, Railroad necessary; Ave.; $3 donations,220 no partners nations, no partners $5 for a sampler classnecessary; of foxtrot, $5 for and a sampler class of foxtrot, swing waltz on Monday swing and waltz on Monday afternoons; 425-774-5555. afternoons; 425-774-5555. Everett Senior Swingers Everett Senior Swingers square dancing: 1 to 3 p.m. square dancing: 1 to 3Knien, p.m. Fridays with caller Dave Fridays Dave Knien, Everett with seniorcaller center, 3025 Everett Lombardsenior Ave., center, Everett;3025 donation Lombard Ave., Everett; donation suggested; 425-257-8780, 425suggested; 334-2919. 425-257-8780, 425334-2919.

Freewheelers Square Dance Freewheelers Square Dance Club: Freewheelers’ dances are Club: are now atFreewheelers’ the Mountlakedances Terrace now at the Mountlake Terrace Community Senior Center, Community Senior Center, 23000 Lakeview Drive. Dances 23000 Drive.third Dances are 7 toLakeview 10 p.m. first, and are 7 to 10Sundays. p.m. first,Cost thirdis and some fifth some fifth Sundays. is $7. Partners are not Cost required; $7. Partners are not welcome. required; singles and couples singles and couples welcome. A beginner’s dance classes will A dance classes will7 bebeginner’s offered Wednesday nights, be offered Wednesday nights, 7 to 9 p.m., $7 per class. For more to 9 p.m., $7 contact per class. For more information, Trisha, 206information, Trisha, 206523-1769 or contact seattlesquare@ 523-1769 seattlesquare@ aol.com fororclasses or Janice, aol.com for classes or Janice, 206-992-4932 or dancin624@ 206-992-4932 dancin624@ hotmail.com forordances. hotmail.com for dances.

Happy Hoppers Square Happy Hoppers Square Dance Club: Square and round Dance Square round dancers,Club: 7:30 to 10:30and p.m., first dancers, to 10:30 p.m., first and third7:30 Saturdays, Stillaguaand Saturdays, Stillaguamishthird Senior Center, 18308 mish Senior 18308 Smokey PointCenter, Bvd., Arlington. Smokey Point and Bvd.,cuers. Arlington. Guest callers Singles Guest callerswelcome. and cuers.Info: Singles and couples 425and couples welcome. Info: 425397-0535. 397-0535. Hayloft Dance Hall: 15320 Hayloft Hall: 15320 35th Ave.Dance W., Lynnwood; www. 35th Ave. W., Lynnwood; www. hayloftdance.com. hayloftdance.com. Line dance Stanwood: LesLine dance Stanwood: Les-3 sons on Thursdays. Beginners, sons Thursdays. Beginners, p.m., on intermediate, 3:45 p.m.; 83 p.m., intermediate, 3:45 p.m.; 8

See DANCES, Page 18 See DANCES, Page 18

August 27 - September 7, 2015

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visual arts

18 Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS EVENTS Camano Island Studio Tour: The 17th annual self-guided tour of art studios continues May 16 and 17. More information is at www.camanostudiotour.com. Sorticulture Garden Arts Festival: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 13 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 14, Legion Park, Everett. Whidbey Art Trail: Now in its fifth summer season, Whidbey Art Trail offers free, self-guided tours through the visual arts community of Whidbey Island. This year, 24 artists and galleries are featured. Go to www.WhidbeyArtTrail.com to find the roster of artist studios and galleries on the tour with hours of operation,

contact information and directions to the locations.

Snohomish County Anabel’s Framing & Gallery: 2531 Broadway, Everett; 425258-6402; www.anabelsgallery. com; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. Art Loft Sisters at Fisherman’s Market and Grill: 1032 W. Marine View Drive, Everett. In May and June, the gallery shows paintings by Janet Myer and Nicole Walker. Arts of Snohomish Gallery: 1024 First St., No. 104, Snohomish; 360-568-8648; www. artsofsnohomish.com; noon to 5

Chaim Bezalel shows his paintings Saturday and Sunday at Stanwood House Studio Gallery, 9915 270th St. p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. ArtWorks Gallery: 201 Second Ave. S., Edmonds. More informa-

tion at www.nwspecialartists. com. Book End Coffee Co. and Gallery: Located inside the Everett Public Library, 2702 Hoyt Ave. Bruning Pottery: 115 Ave. D, Snohomish. Call 360-568-2614. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Go to www. bruningpottery.com. Brushstrokes Art Supply: 5702 172nd St. NE, Arlington; 360-658-4044; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; www. brushstrokesartsupply.com. Citrine Gallery: At 2940 W. Marine View Dr., Everett. Call 425-259-9899; www.citrinehealth.org. Cline Jewelers: 105 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds. Creations by Edmonds artist Pat Brier are shown from 5 to 8 p.m. May 21 during the art walk. Photography, digital art, archivalinks on paper

and a fascination with aviation combine in her new pieces dedicated to the Beoing 747. Two prints are framed in actual 747400 windows. Cole Gallery & Artist Supplies: 107 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, noon to 3 p.m. Sunday; 425-697-2787; www. colegallery.net. Through June 1, see Becky Miller’s oil paintings “Abstracts in Kelp.” No, these are not photographs.

DANCES From Page 17 weeks $32; Starts April 30; Studio Z, 7009 265th St. NW, No. 105, Stanwood. Call instructor Kathy Leone at 425-205-0870. Line Dance Edmonds: Lessons on Wednesdays. Beginners, 10:30 a.m., intermediate 11:15 a.m. 4 weeks $36; Starts May 6; Harbour Square Athletic Club, 160 W. Dayton St., Edmonds. Call instructor Kathy Leone at 425-205-0870.

Join us for ECA’s

2015–2016 SEASON SNEAK PEEK!

Normanna Hall: 1 to 3:30 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays; dance to Bob’s Swing Band; $5; Normanna Hall, 2725 Oakes, Everett.

Wednesday, June 3, 6:00 pm | FREE

For more information and to RSVP, please contact Tina Stryker, Marketing & Communications Manager at 425.275.4484 or tina@ec4arts.org.

ec4arts.org | 425.275.9595 410FOURTHAVENUENORTH EDMONDSWA98020 1206112

Sit Down and Tone Up: Chair dancing is a seated exercise program that combines the health benefits of a total workout with the fun of moving to music. Classes offered Monday and Thursday, 1 to 2 p.m. at the Stillaquamish Senior Center (18308 Smokey Pt. Blvd,

Arlington). $3 per class (first free). For more information, call 425-232-7237. Skandia Folkdance Society: First Friday dance, 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. lesson, 8:30 to 11 p.m. dance, first and third Fridays, Cedar Valley Grange, 20526 52nd Ave. W., Lynnwood; $10 nonmembers, $7 members; www.skandia-folkdance.org or 206-784-7470. Sky Valley Whirlwind Square Dance Club: Round dance workshops, 7:30 p.m., plus mainstream dances, 8 to 10:30 p.m. third Fridays, $6, September to April and second Saturday in May. Tri Way Grange, 35th and Seattle Hill Road, Mill Creek; 360-794-8240. Sno-King International Folk Dance Club: Folk dance, 7 p.m. Saturdays and Wednesdays; Cedar Valley Grange, 20526 52nd Ave. W., Lynnwood; $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers on Saturdays, $5

on Wednesdays. No dance on May 23. Info: 206-524-7360, 360-387-9923 or 206-524-7360; www.sno-king.org. Veterans of Foreign Wars dances: Potluck dinners 6 to 7:30 p.m. last Saturdays; $5; free lessons 6:30 p.m., music and dancing 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesdays, Eddy Fukano Band performs; $5; VFW building, 2711 Oakes Ave., Everett; year-round; 425-252-2100. Washington Dance Club: Ballroom dancing, introductory lesson, 8 to 9 p.m. ($12), social dancing 9 to 11 p.m. Fridays ($12, free with dance lesson). The Verve Ballroom, 19820 40th Ave. W, Suite 102, Lynnwood. Call 206-628-8939. Woodinville Square Crow Dance Club: Dances at 7:30 p.m. first and third Fridays at the Sammamish Valley Grange Hall, 14654 148th Ave NE, Woodinville. Call Alice at 425-319-1093 or go to www.squarecrows.org.


visual arts

The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015 19

GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Covenant Art Glass: Stan and Colleen Price; 3232 Broadway, Everett; 425-252-4232; hours are 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, until 5 p.m. on Friday and until 4 p.m. on Saturday. Cristiano’s Pizza: 1206 State Ave. G, Marysville; 360-653-8356. “Visions of Italy” exhibit with pastel paintings by Vickie Stokes and plein air paintings by Laurie Crawford. Dragonfire Neighborhood Art Gallery: 529 Dayton St., Edmonds; 424-625-5878; www. dragonfire.gallery. Edmonds Arts Festival Gallery: Frances Anderson Center, 700 Main St.; 425-771-0228; 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Edmonds Community College art gallery: 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, until 2 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. weekends; third floor, Lynnwood Hall, 20000 68th Ave. W., Lynnwood; 425-640-1459; www. edcc.edu/gallery. Edmonds Library Gallery: 650 Main St., Edmonds; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Everett artist Jackie Cort, a self-taught artist working primarily in encaustic, the process of painting with pigmented bees wax, is featured through June 17. She is the Sorticulture poster artist this year. Everett Community College: The Russell Day Gallery, 2000 Tower St.; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fridays; closed Saturdays and Sundays; www.everettcc.edu.

Gallery North: 401 Main St., Edmonds; 425-774-0946; www. gallerynorthedmonds.com; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. The May show “Flights of Fancy” features Kathleen A. Johnson’s whimsical bird paintings. Glass Quest Studio: 31808 W. Lake Ketchum Road, Stanwood; www.glassquest.com; 360-6297005. A Guilded Gallery: 8700 271st St., Stanwood; 360-629-2787; www.stanwoodcamanoarts. com; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Many classes are offered. Featured artist through June is Hallie Price, an interior designer with a degree from Cornish School of Arts, who works in watercolors, acrylics, mixed mediums in abstract form she calls “almost abstract.” Hibulb Cultural Center: 6410 23rd Ave. NE, Tulalip; 360-7162635; www.hibulbculturalcenter. org. Through Sept. 13, see “Roots of Wisdom,” stories from four indigenous communities brought to life in examples of how traditional knowledge and Western science can blend together to provide solutions to contemporary concerns. Lynnwood Library Gallery: 19200 44th Ave. W.; 425-6705518; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Mixed-media artist Emelia Feldman, 11, of Everett, is the featured artist through May 28. An artist since she was old enough to hold a paintbrush, Emelia never leaves home without her sketch pad. Mountlake Terrace Library Gallery: 23300 58th Ave. W.,

Mountlake Terrace; 425-776-8722; www.sno-isle.org; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Jane Mayer’s pastels and oil paintings are displayed through June. Rosehill Community Center: 304 Lincoln Ave., Mukilteo. For more information, call 425-2638180. Hyeh-Yeon Hoffer, “Oriental Brush Painting” is displayed through June 24. Port Gardner Bay Winery: 2802 Rockefeller Ave, Everett; 425-339-0293; www.portgardnerbaywinery.com. Red Cup Cafe: 619 Fourth St. Mukilteo; 425-348-4825.

Way, Camano Island; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends, weekdays by appointment; 360-387-2759; www. matzkefineart.com.

Seagrass Gallery: 848 N Sunrise Blvd., Camano Island; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; call 360-6310688; www.seagrassgallery.com.

Koffman Art With a Smile: Danny Koffman’s art gallery is open noon to 5 p.m. on weekends at 578 E. North Camano Drive, in the former visitor information center on Camano Island, or people can call for an appointment, 360-348-6277. More at www.artwithasmile.com.

Skagit County Museum of Northwest Art: 121 S. First St., La Conner; www. museumofnwart.org. La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum: 703 S. Second St., La Conner; 360-466-4288; www. laconnerquilts.com.

Island County Matzke Fine Art Gallery and Sculpture Park: 2345 Blanche

Seattle Art Museum: Last weekend. Through May 17, see “Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection.” Drawings, sculptures, baskets, beaded regalia and masks. Exhibit tickets are required. Go to www.seattleartmuseum.org. The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday at 1300 First Ave., downtown Seattle.

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Schack Art Center: 2921 Hoyt Ave., Everett; 425-259-5050; www. schack.org. Go to the Schack’s website to learn about classes. “Saving the Environment — Sustainable Art” is displayed through May 30. The Sisters: 2804 Grand Ave., Everett; 425-252-0480; www. thesistersrestaurant.com; 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Through May, Elizabeth Person and Michael Webber display more than 40 pieces, including sketches, paintings and design projects. Person is an Everett-based graphic designer and artist who designs for the Everett cultural arts department and has served as a cultural arts commissioner for Everett since 2011. Webber keeps a sketchbook with him at all times and captures scenes from the Puget Sound area with pen and ink. He is on a mission to visit and sketch every state capitol building and hopes to someday illustrate a book about the adventure.

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Splash! May 15, 2015

Fairs

Festivals

The Daily Herald

Concerts

More


2

Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

A guide to fun, all summer long Welcome back to Splash!, The Daily Herald’s annual guide to all things summer in Snohomish County and beyond. We have your summer fun covered from now through early fall. Let us help you plan for the long, sometimes sunny days to come. Here’s where to start: We’ll tell you where to spend a day at the fair with the family or nights out on a beer and wine walk in our list of special events. Celebrate Independence Day with parades, fireworks and more in our Fourth of July section. Find music in local parks, amphitheaters, wineries and festivals on our concerts page. We’ll tell you which movies are playing under the stars this summer in outdoor movies. Escape the sun with our list of pools and spray parks in our water play section. Buy produce, baked goods and more from the grower or bakery around the corner in farmers markets. Visit lions, tigers, bears and more in our new animals page. Don’t leave your dog at home. Check out lists of dog parks and off-leash areas.

What’s inside Special events . . . . . . . 4 Fourth of July . . . . . . 16 Concerts . . . . . . . . . . 18 Water play . . . . . . . . . 22 Dog parks . . . . . . . . . 24 Museums . . . . . . . . . . 26 Animals . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Outdoor movies . . . . 29 Farmers markets . . . . 30

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FREE SHUTTLES AVAILABLE

September 11,12, 13, 2015 ★ Artist Booths ★ Food Booths ★ Music ★ Parade ★ Fireworks ★ Microbrew/Wine Garden ★ Lighthouse Tours ★ Fly Over Show ★ Salmon Bake ★ Children’s Activities ★ And Much More! Coming Soon! Run-A-Muk 5k/10k on August 29th!


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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL EVENTS MAY Viva Color! Volunteer Community Planting: Downtown planting 8:30 a.m. May 15, meet at Hewitt and Colby avenues in Everett; Mukilteo planting is 9 to 11 a.m. June 6 at E. Mukilteo Boulevard; gloves, trowels, refreshments and commemorative buttons provided; free shuttle available; www.everettwa.org/parks. Paine Field Aviation Day: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 16 at Paine Field; Fire Fighters Fly Day 5K at Future of Flight, 8415 Paine Field Blvd., Mukilteo; helicopter and biplane rides available for additional cost; free parking and shuttle service; $10 admission for adults, free for ages 17 and younger; www.painefield.com. Pilchuck Fuchsia Society sale: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 16, 2513 Cleveland Ave., Everett. Fuchsia baskets, large and small fuchsias, geraniums, tomatoes, hostas, grasses, lilies and other outdoor plants; Diane Woodard 425-252-6215 or email dlw48@ hotmail.com. Chinese Culture and Arts

Festival: May 16, Center House, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; folk dances, musicians and other performances, arts and crafts, food and games; free; 206-6847200; www.seattlecenter.com.

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Garage sale: Everett’s Harborview-Seahurst-Glenhaven Neighborhood Association sale, May 16 in locations around Everett; more than 25 homes take part in the sale that has been going on for about 20 years; maps are provided listing items for sale; www.harborseaglen.com.

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Edmonds Health and Fitness Expo: 9 to 11:30 a.m. May 16 at 7600 212th St., Edmonds; booths and activities, plus fun for kids in kindergarten through eighth grade at 10 a.m.; free; 425-7710230 or www.HFExpo.edmondswa.gov.

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Antique and Classic Motorcycle Show: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 17 on First Street in downtown Snohomish; free to watch; live music and vendors; 360-568-7820; www.skyvalleybikeshow.com. Celebration of Food Festival: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 17 at

DAN BATES / HERALD 2013 FILE PHOTO

A WWII vintage M4A1 Sherman Tank is taken to a hangar at Paine Field. Get a close look at tanks during Tankfest, which is May 25 at the Flying Heritage Collection.

“The counselors were really top notch.”

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Day Camps

Vaulting

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SPECIAL EVENTS Lynnwood Convention Center, 3711 196th Street SW; food and gardening demos, samples and more; free; 425-778-7155; www. edcc.edu/foodfest. Forest Park Hill Climb: Noon to 12:45 p.m. on May 20, June 17, July 15, Aug. 19 and Sept. 16; at at the Forest Park upper playfield, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., Everett; 12-hill challenge, 30-minute time limit; $5 suggested donation per event, registration begins at 11:45 a.m., 12:15 p.m. start; www. everettwa.gov. Northwest Folklife Festival: May 22 to 25, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; rain-or-shine event; live music, arts and crafts, dance demonstrations, art displays; free; 206-684-7300; www.nwfolklife. org/festival2015. Cruzin’ to Colby: 1 to 5 p.m. May 24 on Colby Avenue from Pacific to Everett avenues, and on Hewitt from Hoyt to Oakes; public dance with live music, 6 to 10 p.m. Sunday, $10; Show ‘N’ Shine, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 25;

stage entertainment, cruise and show, free for spectators; www. seattlerod-tiques.com. Tankfest Northwest: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 25 at Flying Heritage Collection, 3407 109th St. SW; tanks, military vehicles and artillery weapons with driving and firing demonstrations of tanks and artillery; www.flyingheritage. com. Arlington Memorial Day Parade: 10 a.m. May 25 on Olympic Avenue, downtown Arlington; sponsored by American Legion Arlington; www.arlingtonwa.gov. Edmonds Waterfront Festival: 3 to 10 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, May 29 to 31, Port of Edmonds Marina; children’s activities, arts and crafts, music, beer garden, classic yacht show; $3 admission, free for ages 12 and younger; www.edmondswaterfrontfestival.com. Spirit of Indigenous People Festival: 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 30, Armory, Seattle Center,

305 Harrison St.; celebrates American Indian and Alaska Native culture with native performers, music, food, speakers, workshops, a native art exhibit and pow wow; 206-684-7200; www.seattlecenter.com. Touch-A-Truck: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 30 at Monroe Christian School, 1009 W. Main St., Monroe; construction, police and other vehicles plus face-painting, pony rides and more; horn-free hour from 10 to 11 a.m. for kids with special needs; www.mcstouchatruck.com. Seattle Pug Rescue’s 20th annual Pug Gala: 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 30 at the Evergreen Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave SE, Monroe; parade of rescued pugs, raffles, pug talent show and agility; dogs get in free, but only pugs and pug mixes permitted; www.seattlepugs.org. Aloha Brewfest: noon to 5 p.m. May 30 in Mobius Hall at UW-Bothell campus, 18115 Campus Way NE; 17 breweries

Grab the Family and visit some of the best places in Snohomish County!

HERALD 2014 FILE PHOTO

Marie Samson, dressed in “pin-up girl” clothing, looks at cars at Cruzin’ to Colby in 2014. The event is May 24 and 25 this year, in downtown Everett. offer beers with an aloha spirit, including Big E Ales, Diamond Knot and SnoTown Brewery; live music; tickets $40 in advance, $50 at door; includes souvenir tasting glass and seven tasting tokens; www.alohabrewfest.org.

close; free; www.everettwa.gov.

Darrington Day: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 30 at locations around Darrington; market, gift shop and vendors; live music in Old School Park; www.darringtonwatourism. com.

Marysville Healthy Communities Challenge Day: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 6 at Allen Creek Elementary, 6505 60th Drive NE; activities, demonstrations, educational information; free; www. marysvillewa.gov.

Snohomish Wedding Tour: 10 a.m. May 31 at 21 locations in Snohomish; $5 per person; checkin begins 9:30 a.m. at Snohomish Center, 506 Fourth St.; www. mysnohomishwedding.com. Red Rooster Route Days: May through September at locations around Snohomish County; visit farms, berry and organic vegetable picking, farm animals, pioneer’s museum tour and prizes; www.redroosterroute.com.

JUNE

Check out who won in the winners section publishing July 1Oth

online at heraldnet.com/readerschoice

Kids’ Fishing Derby: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 6, Cama Beach State Park, 1880 SW Camano Drive; for kids 16 and younger; free fishing on a Discover Pass-free weekend; www.cwb.org/events. 1307050

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Mini Hydroplane Races: noon to 6 p.m., June 6 at Thornton A. Sullivan Park, 11405 W. Silver Lake Road, Everett; watch races and receive a pit pass to see boats up-

Artists’ garage sale: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 6, Schack Art Center, 2921 Hoyt Ave. and the street in front of the building; deals on artwork and art supplies; www. schack.org.

Anacortes Waterfront Festival: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 6, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 7, Cap Sante Boat Haven, 1019 Q Ave.; boat rides, boat and classic car show, swap meet and family activities; free; www.anacortes.org/wff. Pagdiriwang Philippine Festival: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 6 and 7, Center House and Mural Amphitheatre, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; cultural exhibits, live performances, food and games; free; 206-684-7200; www.seattlecenter.com. Sorticulture, Everett’s Garden Arts Festival: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 13 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 14, at Legion Memorial Park, 145 Alverson Blvd., Everett; garden art, plant sales, kids’ activities and gardening tips; free; www. enjoyeverett.org. Garden Extravaganza: Noon

to 6 p.m. June 12 at Country Village Bothell, 23718 Bothell-Everett Highway; garden and plant booths; 425-483-2250; www. countryvillagebothell.com. Arlington Show N’ Shine: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13 on Olympic Avenue, downtown Arlington; car show featuring antiques, hotrods and muscle cars; www. arlingtonwa.org. Sunsets in Snohomish Summer Wine Walk: 5 to 8 p.m. June 13, July 11, Aug. 8 and Sept. 12 on First Street in downtown Snohomish; $15: Debbie@ HistoricDowntownSnohomish.org orwww.historicdowntownsnohomish.org. Vintage Bothell Summer Wine and Beer Walk: 5 to 8 p.m. June 13, Main Street in downtown Bothell; sip from more than 15 local wineries; $20 to $25; includes 10 tasting tickets, additional tickets $1; 425-485-4353; www.explore bothell.com. Granite Falls’ One Day: June 13 at locations around Granite Falls; join teams of volunteers to fix, paint, plant, repair and clean parts of the city; 360-691-7733; sign up or suggest a project at www.granitefallswa.com. Hawaiian canoe races: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 13 at Thornton A. Sullivan Park, 11400 W. Silver Lake Road, Everett; traditional canoe


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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL EVENTS races, Hawaiian music and food; www.everettwa.org. Washington Brewer’s Festival: 4 to 9:30 p.m. June 19; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. June 20; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 21 at Marymoor Park in Redmond; open to ages 21 and older on Friday, all ages Saturday and Sunday; live music, more than 350 beers from 100 state breweries, kids playground, craft market and rootbeer garden; admission $25 to $30; $5 designated driver admission available at door; free to ages younger than 21 accompanied by parent; www. washingtonbeer.com. Marysville Strawberry Festival: Most activities are June 19 to 22, sites include Marysville Middle School, 4923 67th St. NE; and Asbery Field, Sixth Street and Alder Avenue; live entertainment; activity costs vary, festival admission free; 360-659-7664; www. maryfest.org.  Kids Day: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 13, Asbery Field  Berry Run: 8:30 to 10 a.m., June 14, Tulalip  Strawberry Festival Royalty Scholarship Fund Fashion Show: Noon to 1:30 p.m., June 16, Odd

Fellows Hall  Talent show: 6:30 p.m. June 18, Marysville Pilchuck High School Auditorium  Carnival: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. June 18 to 20; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 21; Marysville Middle School  Market: June 19 to 21, Asbery Field  Strawberry Shortcake Eating Contest: 1 to 3 p.m., June 20, Asbery Field  Car show: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 20, Asbery Field and adjacent baseball field  Rose planting ceremony: 10 a.m., June 20, Totem Middle School  Kid parade: 6 to 7 p.m. June 20  Grand parade: 7:45 to 10 p.m. June 20, fireworks show immediately follows 58th annual Edmonds Arts Festival: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 19 to 21, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 21, at Frances Anderson Cultural Center, 700 Main Street, Edmonds; more than 200 artists share and sell their fine art, artisan crafts and photography; live entertainment, food and kids’ activities; 425-771-6412; www. edmondsartsfestival.com.

Evergreen Arboretum Gardens of Merit Tour: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 20; tour gardens ranging in sizes and styles from small cottage gardens to larger, more formal gardens; tickets $12; plant sale and raffle 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the arboretum, 145 Alverson Blvd., Everett; www.evergreenarboretum.com. Whidbey Island Garden Tour: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 20. Tickets, which typically sell out, cost $10 to $25. 360-321-4191 or www. wigt.org. Mountain Loop Experience: Not happening in 2015. Biringer Farm Strawberry Fest: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 20 and 21, pony rides, inflatables, maze, face painting, more; www. biringerfarm.com. Festival Sundiata, Black Arts Fest: June 20 and 21, Seattle Center and Fisher Pavilion, 305 Harrison St.; celebration of African-American music and dance, including African dance workshop and traditional drumming rhythm lessons; free; 206-684-7200; www.festivalsundiata.org. Bothell, World Dance Party:

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Kaylee Kirkwood (center) hands her mother, Lesha, a container of strawberries to be added to the family’s bounty while her brother Peyton looks on at Biringer Farms in Arlington in 2014. Biringer Farms’ annual Strawberry Festival is June 20 and 21 this year. 6 to 9 p.m. June 26 at Northshore Senior Center; cha cha, electric slide and more for families; bring a potluck dish to share; 425-2861029; www.explorebothell.com/

world-dance-party. Emerald Queen Casino’s Taste of Tacoma: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. June 26-27, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 28, Point Defiance Park, 5400 N.

Pearl St.; music, art and activities; 26 restaurant booths and more than 20 food product companies; free admission; 425-295-3262; www.tasteoftacoma.com.

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

Fuel your education

SPECIAL EVENTS

this summer!

Take classes to: • count toward general university requirements, • prepare for college in the fall, • explore possible majors, or • fulfill major prerequisites.

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KEVIN CLARK / HERALD 2014 FILE PHOTO

Hannah Holden competes in the hand sawing logger competition during the Sultan Summer Shindig. This year the shindig is July 10 to 12. Animal Farm at Forest Park: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. from June 27 to Aug. 16 at Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., Everett; sheep, ducks and hens, rabbits, calves, pigs; free but donations accepted; www.everettwa.org/parks. Camano Crab Dash: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 27 at the Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island; check-in from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.; register online at www.camanocenter.org. Mill Creek Garden Tour: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 27 at six gardens in Mill Creek; benefits Mill Creek Garden Club’s “Giving through Gardening” school grants, civic projects and club operations; tickets $15; on sale May 15 at Li’l Sprout Nursery, Artisan Custom Framing and Sunnyside Nursery; www.millcreekgardenclub.com. Shoreline Arts Festival: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 27, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 28, Shoreline Center, 18560 First Ave. NE; live music, stage entertainment, juried art shows; free; www.shorelinearts. net. Camano Island Backyard Wildlife Habitat Garden Tour: Features landscaping for wildlife, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 27; maps at the Camano Multipurpose Center, 141 NE Camano Dr., the day of the event; free; www.camanowild-

lifehabitat.org. Skandia Midsommarfest: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 28 at St. Edward State Park, 14445 Juanita Drive NE, Kenmore; a summer solstice festival with music and dance, kids’ activities, food and crafts; pole-raising ceremony at 2:30 p.m.; www.skandiafolkdance.org. Mukilteo, Classic Car Show: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 28, Historic Flight Foundation, 10719 Bernie Webber Dr.; more than 125 cars, vintage aircraft and more; 425347-1456; www.mukilteochamber.com.

JULY Seafair: Tickets at www.seafair. com, details at 206-728-0123.  Seafair Pirates landing, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 27, Alki Beach; pirates land between 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free.  Seafair Milk Carton Derby, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 11, Green Lake.  Seafair Triathlon and Kids Triathlon, adult triathlon at 6:30 a.m., kids at 10:30 a.m. July 19, Seward Park.  Seafair Torchlight Spectacular, noon to 6 p.m. July 25; Seattle Center.  Michelob Ultra Seafair Pirate Run, 6:30 p.m. July 25, starting and finishing at the Seattle Center; post-race celebration at the

Summer quarter begins July 1. Registration starts May 26.

Seattle Center.  Alaska Airlines Seafair Torchlight Parade, 7:30 p.m. to midnight, July 25 in downtown Seattle. Jetty Island Days: Ferries from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays, July 5 to Sept. 7 at 10th Street and W. Marine View Drive, Everett; $3 fee for parking Thursdays through Sundays; suggested donation $2 for adults, $1 for kids; www. everettwa.org/parks. Arlington Fly-In: July 9 to 11, at 4700 188th Street NE Suite G, Arlington; more than 1,000 aircraft, daily air shows, hot air balloons and exhibits; www. arlingtonflyin.org. Artists in Action: Noon to 6 p.m. July 10 at Country Village Bothell, 23718 Bothell-Everett Highway; watch artists paint and sculpt with live music; 425-4832250; www.countryvillagebothell. com. Sultan Summer Shindig: July 10 to 12 at River Park, Sultan; street fair, parade, live music and more; www.skyvalleychamber. com. Seattle International Beerfest: July 10 to 12 at Fisher Pavilion and lawn at Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; live music, food and all-ages activities; admission

Find out more:

www.edcc.edu/getstarted

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Special SPECIALevents EVENTS $25 to $45; admission includes festival glass and 10 tasting tokens; www.seattlebeerfest.com. Arlington Street Fair: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 10 and 11; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 12; kids’ activities, entertainment, food and shopping along Olympic Avenue; www. arlingtonwa.org. Street Hockey Tournament: July 11, Clark Park, 2400 Lombard Ave., Everett; food, music, games; tournament open to teams of all levels; registration $140 per team; www.everettwa.org/parks. Poochapalooza: The ninth annual Marysville outdoor dog event: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 11, Strawberry Fields Athletic Park, 6100 152nd St. NE, Marysville; a county fair for dogs; “Fashions and Rescues” runway show, flying disk championship, dog dancing demonstration, “Best Kisser,” “Best Costume,” “Wackiest Pet Trick” and dog’s pie-eating contests; pet vendors and rescue booths; $5 entry donation includes goody bag to first 400 people; 425-268-5285; www. poochapalooza.org. Junk in the Trunk: 10 a.m. to

2 p.m. July 11, Municipal Court Parking Lot, 1015 State Ave., Marysville; more than 60 vendors with toys, clothes, collectibles, furniture and more; 360-363-8450; www.marysvillewa.gov.

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Polish Festival Seattle: July 11, Armory and Mural Amphitheatre, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; experience Polish culture and traditions through live music, dance performances, workshops, exhibits and children’s activities; 206-684-7200; www.seattlecenter.com.

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Run of the Mill charity 5K race: 9:30 to 11 a.m. July 11 at 15418 Main St. in the Mill Creek Town Center; registration starts 7:30 a.m.; early registration $15 to $25; late registration $35; www.mcrunofthemill.com.

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Rodz on 3rd Car Show: July 11 at Third Street from State to Union streets, Marysville; more than 200 classic cars, music and food; 425-330-3322; www.marysvillemerchants.com. Basketball Tournament: 3 on 3 tournament, July 11, 15720 Main St., Mill Creek. Divisions from third grade to adult. Regis-

HERALD 2012 FILE PHOTO

Daisha Ali and Anna Sanders hang out with Holly the cow at the Silvana Community Fair. The fair is July 25 this year.

A World of Fun!

NWLA SUMMER LANGUAGE CAMPS 2015 JULY AND AUGUST

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French • Spanish • Chinese • Japanese 360-321-2101 • nwlanguageacademy.com

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Providing immersion instruction for your child through fun, themed activities in a beautiful outdoor setting. These popular camps allow students to explore a country’s culture while learning the language with lasting results.

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Lodging available on-site at our B&B!

NWLA Cultural Center Nurturing Intercultural Understanding

www.nwlanguageacademy.com 1309388

360-321-2101

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The care you need.

SPECIAL EVENTS

For more than 30 years...

tration deadline June 12; www. cityofmillcreek.com. Art by the Bay: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 11 and 12, StanwoodCamano Community Fairgrounds, 6431 Pioneer Highway, Stanwood; concerts, fine arts, garden art; free admission and parking; www. stanwoodcamanoarts.com/art-bythe-bay. Mill Creek Festival and Street Fair: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 11 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 12; live entertainment, Kids’ Korner, arts and crafts; main stage and beer garden; free shuttle available from Jackson High School; www.millcreekfestival. com. Kla Ha Ya Days: 5 to 10 p.m. July 15, 3 to 10 p.m. July 16, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. July 17, 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. July 18, 10 a.m. to dusk July 19, in Snohomish; carnival rides, street fair, frog jumping and pie-eating contests, car show, airplane rides and more; free; 425493-7824; www.klahayadays.com. Sand sculpting contest: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 17 at Marina Beach, 650 Admiral Way S., Edmonds; form a team or build your own castle; amateur contest open to all ages; sign-up begins at 10 a.m.; judging, awards begin at 12:30 p.m.; bring buckets, shovels; 425-771-0230; www.edmondswa. gov. Bite of Seattle: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. July 17 and 18, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. July 19, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; more than 50 Seattle-area restaurants and 30 food companies; 425-295-3262; www.biteofseattle.com. Sequim Lavender Festival: Tours of various lavender farms July 17 to 19; street fair, food and entertainment; www.lavenderfestival.com. Mukilteo Quilt & Garden Tour: July 18 and 19; seven gardens on tour by Mukilteo Way Garden Club and the Mukilteo Lighthouse Quilters; 100 colorful quilts on display in residential gardens in and around Mukilteo; $15 advance or $18 on event day; www.mukilteogardenandquilttour.org. Arlington, Shakespeare in the Park: Last Leaf Productions “The Tempest” 6 p.m. July 18, Terrace Park, 809 E. Fifth St., Arlington; free; www.arlingtonwa. gov.

HERALD 2011 FILE PHOTO

A green fringed Picasso petunia grows in a garden. The Mukilteo Quilt and Garden Show is July 18 and 19. Darrington Rock and Gem Show: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., July 18 and 19 at Mansford Grange, 1265 Railroad Ave.; shop hand-crafted jewelry and more; www.darringtonwatourism.com/festivalsevents/rock-gem-show-sale. Brewest: 1 to 5 p.m. July 18 at Country Village Bothell, 23718 Bothell-Everett Highway; eight local microbreweries in parking lot; $20 admission; includes sample glass and six tasting tickets; 425-483-5105; www.countryvillagebothell.com. Edmonds in Bloom: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 19 at a variety of private gardens; tickets will be sold at businesses and on web, $15 in advance or $20 on day of event; www.edmondsinbloom.com. Aquafest: July 24 to 26, mostly in downtown Lake Stevens along Main Street; parade, carnival, fireworks and other events; festival information, map and directions available at www.aquafest.org. Gold Dust Days: 3 to 8 p.m. July 24, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. July 25, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 26, locations around Gold Bar; live music, food, Civil War re-enactors; 360-7930983; www.golddustdays.org. Tour de Terrace: July 24 to 26, Evergreen Playfield, 22205 56th Ave. W., Mountlake Terrace; carnival, live entertainment, beer garden, arts, crafts and food booths; www.tourdeterrace.org.  Parade at 7 p.m. Friday; starts on 234th Street SW and ends at Evergreen Playfield; map available online.  Pancake breakfast 8 a.m. to noon, Saturday  Car show 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday GenCare Annual Car Show and Family Picnic: July 25 in

Granite Falls; vintage classics and muscles cars on even ground for easy walking; entertainment and barbecue; free; 360-691-7733; www.granitefallswa.com.

VISIT US IN ARLINGTON AT

Nubian Jam: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 25 at Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., Everett; celebration of African-American culture with speakers, live performances and vendors; free; www.everettwa.org/parks.

326 S. Stillaguamish Avenue

FHC Skyfair: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 25 at Flying Heritage Collection, 3407 109th St. SW.; vehicle and plane demos, WWII re-enactors, RC tanks, kid’s activities and PC gaming; planes fly at noon; www.flyingheritage.com. 68th annual Silvana Community Fair: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 25 at Viking Hall, 1331 Pioneer Highway; live music at noon; food, farm animals and indoor exhibits; kids’ games; free; www. silvanafair.com. Snohomish Garden Club garden tour: Noon to 5 p.m. July 26 at gardens in the Snohomish area; $12; tickets available early July at several locations; 425-377-2084; www.snohomishgardenclub.com. Seafair Fleet Week: Seafair welcomes the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard and Canadian navy, July 29 through Aug. 2, Seattle waterfront; www.seafair.com. Seafair Weekend: Features Albert Lee Cup and Boeing Air Show, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 31, 8:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Aug. 1, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 2; Genesee Park at Lake Washington; www. seafair.com. Stanwood-Camano Community Fair: 9 a.m. to midnight July 31 and Aug.1, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 2, Stanwood-Camano Fairgrounds, 6431 Pioneer High-

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL EVENTS way, Stanwood; youth agriculture exhibits and competitions, live entertainment; free parking available at Stanwood High School, 7400 272nd St. NW; free shuttle every 15 minutes during fair hours; admission $7 to $10 daily, free for ages 5 and younger; carnival passes $20; 360-629-4121; www.stanwoodcamanofair.org.

AUGUST

Index Arts Festival: Aug. 1, 503 Ave. A, Index; outdoor painting, live music, crafts and

Fronderosa Frolic: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 8, 107th St. SE, Gold Bar; exotic plant fair; 360-7931472;www.fancyfrondsnursery. com.

Mutt Strut: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 8 at Langus Riverfront Park, 400 Smith Island Road, Everett; community dog walk, competitions and prizes; www.everettwa. org.

SeaScare Parade: Aug. 12 on Brier Road between 232 Street SW and 238 Street SW, Brier; theme is scary sea creatures, octopi, pirates, boats, etc.; KidsScare at noon, Aug. 7, kids can make something for the parade; free; seascare.com.

Iranian Festival: Aug. 8, Center House, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; cultural lectures, Iranian tea house, dance party, poetry, puppet shows and face painting; free; 206-684-7200; www.seattlecenter.com.

Mukilteo Waterfront Arts Festival: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 1 at Rosehill Community Center, 304 Lincoln Ave.; live entertainment, art booths and food; vendor proceeds go to high school scholarship fund; free admission with free parking available; 425-4230450; www.mukilteoarts.org. Granite Falls’ 35th annual Show N’ Shine: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 1 on Granite Avenue; more than 100 cars, trucks and motorcycles; food and craft vendors; inflatables for kids; free; 360-6917733; www.granitefallswa.com.

and 8, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 9 in downtown Marysville; more than 100 vendors with handmade and homegrown items; www.marysvillemerchants.com.

Raymond Hillaire takes a break from dancing during the Stillaguamish Festival of the River at River Meadows Park in Arlington in 2014. The Festival is Aug. 8 and 9 this year.

Stillaguamish Festival of the River and Pow Wow: Aug. 8 and 9 at River Meadows Park, 20416 Jordan Road, Arlington; entertainment, pow wow, live music, children’s activities; free; www. stillaguamish.nsn.us/festival.htm.

10 p.m. Aug. 6, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Aug. 7 and 8, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 9, 819 Camano Ave., Langley; 4-H activities, art displays; $5 and $8 daily, $15 and

Rock and Mineral Sale: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 8, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 9, 8802 196th St. SW, Edmonds; rough rocks, minerals, fossils, jewelry; free rocks for kids; www.maplewoodrockclub.com.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

more; free admission and parking; info@indexartsfestival.org; www. indexartsfestival.org. Whidbey Island Fair: Formerly Island County Fair, 9:30 a.m. to

$25 four-day passes, free for ages 5 and younger; 360-221-4677; www.islandcountyfair.com. Handmade and Homegrown Festival: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 7

Taste of Edmonds: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 14 and 15, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 16, Civic Playfield, 310 Sixth Ave. N., Edmonds; food and drink vendors, live music and kids’ activities; $4, 12 and younger free; www.atasteofedmonds.com. Antique tractor show: Aug. 14 to 16, Frohning Farm, 1524-A Tualco Loop Road, Monroe; details at www.skyvalleyantiquetractor. com. V-J Day Anniversary: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug 15 at Flying Heritage Collection, 3407 109th

Continued on Page 12

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

ON ! S W E T NO CK E TI AL S

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL EVENTS St. SW.; celebrate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II with iconic aircraft; planes fly at noon; www.flyingheritage. com.

S., Edmonds; interpretive program; see and touch live creatures brought to shore by volunteer scuba divers; dress warmly and bring a flashlight; free; www. edmondswa.gov.

Everett Craft Beer Festival: Noon to 7 p.m. Aug. 15 on Hoyt and Hewitt avenues in downtown Everett; more than 100 beers from more than 30 Washington state breweries, live music and food; tickets $20 to $25; $5 admission for designated drivers; www. washingtonbeer.com.

Scrub-A-Mutt: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 22 at Strawberry Fields Athletic Park, 6100 145th St. NE, Marysville; dog wash with goody bags, nail trims, demonstrations, pet and food vendor booths; $5 small dog and $10 large dog recommended donation for dog wash; free parking and admission; www.scrub-a-mutt.org.

Fresh Paint: Art fair, Aug. 15 and 16, Port of Everett Marina; pottery, glass, jewelry, more from more than 90 local artists; www.schack. org/events/fresh-paint. BrasilFest: Aug. 16, Fisher Pavilion, Center House and Mural Ampitheatre, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; music, dance and other performances; free; 206684-7200; www.seattlecenter. com. AquaSox Bark in the Park: Bring your dogs to the game against the Spokane Indians, Aug. 18; 425-258-3673; www.aquasox. com.

Tibet Fest: Aug. 22 and 23, Center House and Fisher Pavilion, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; group dance, music and visual arts; free; 206-684-7200; www. seattlecenter.com.

GENNA MARTIN / HERALD 2013 FILE PHOTO

Nate Schons of Orcas Island’s Island Hoppin Brewery pours beer at the Everett Craft Beer Festival in 2013. The festival is Aug. 15 this year. Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., Everett; free; www.everettwa.org/ parks; www.scdahlias.org.

Everett Dahlia Show: 1 to 6 p.m. Aug. 22, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 23 at Floral Hall at

Moonlight Beach Adventure: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Aug. 22 at Marina Beach, 650 Admiral Way

Evergreen State Fair: Aug. 27 through Sept. 7, Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe; arts and crafts, animal barns, carnival, concerts; $6 to $12; $10 one-day parking; www. evergreenfair.org. Wizard Festival: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 29 at Country Village Bothell; wizard shows, wizard

quests, fantasy authors and authors vendors; 425-483-2250; www.explorebothell.com/wizardfestival-country-village. Luftwaffe Day: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug 29 at Flying Heritage Collection, 3407 109th St. SW., Everett; iconic German aircraft of World War II including Bf 109 Messerschmitt and ultra-rare Focke-Wulf Fw 190; planes fly at noon; www.flyingheritage.com. Monroe Fair Days Parade: 11 a.m. Aug. 29 on Main Street; free; www.choosemonroe.com/ event/2015-monroe-fair-daysparade. NW Neighborhoods Mother of All Garage Sales: Not happening in 2015.

SEPTEMBER Vintage Aircraft Weekend: Sept. 4 to 6 at Historic Flight Foundation, 10719 Bernie Webber Drive, Mukilteo; 65 pilots and aircraft, big band dance and more; 360-348-3200; www.vintageaircraftweekend.org.

Continued on Page 14

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL EVENTS Washington State Fair (formerly Puyallup Fair): Sept. 11 to 27, Puyallup Fair and Events Center, 110 Ninth Ave. SW; animals, contests, carnival, live entertainment; separate admission for rodeo; general fair admission $8 and $12.50, free for ages 5 and younger; separate concert fees; additional parking fee; 253841-5045; www.thefair.com.

benefits the Providence General Foundation Cancer Patient Assistance Fund; www.wheelsonthewaterfront.com.

edmondswa.com. Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival: Sept. 13, Center House, Mural Amphitheatre and Fisher Roof, Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; music, arts, commemorative lei workshop and food; free; 206684-7200; www.seattlecenter. com.

Marysville, Touch-A-Truck: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 12 at Asbery Field, Totem Middle School, 1605 Seventh St. NE., Marysville; exhibition of trucks, fire engines and police vehicles; horns and sirens from 10 a.m. to noon; www. marysvillewa.gov.

Puget Sound Bird Fest: Sept. 11 to 13, Frances Anderson Center, 700 Main St., Edmonds. Guided field trips to other sites; free general admission; opening reception Friday at Edmonds Plaza Room, 650 Main Street; 425-7710227; www.pugetsoundbirdfest. org.

Pioneer Days: 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 19, Stillaguamish Pioneer Museum, 20722 67th Ave. NE, Arlington; try old-fashioned water pump, toys and butter churner, wool-spinning; 360-435-7289; www.stillymuseum.org.

Arlington Drag Strip Reunion Car Show: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 12 at the Arlington Airport, 18204 59th Drive NE; benefits local charities; 360652-6910; www.arlingtondragstripreunion.com.

Mukilteo Lighthouse Festival: Sept. 11 to 13, Lighthouse Park, 609 Front St., Mukilteo; live entertainment, food, children’s activities, fireworks, fishing derby and more; 425-353-5516; www. mukilteolighthousefestival.com. Wheels on the Waterfront Classic Car Show: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 12 at Waterfront Center, 1205 Craftsman Way, Everett;

Whidbey Island Farm Tour: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 12 and 13 at various locations around Whidbey Island; tour farms with educational displays and demonstrations; maps available online; www. whidbeyfarmtour.com.

FHC Battle of Britain: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 19 at Flying Heritage Collection, 3407 109th St. SW.; flying demos of planes that fought over Great Britain, including the hearty Hurricane, swift Spitfire, and the deadly Messerschmitt Bf 109; planes fly at noon; www.flyingheritage. com.

Edmonds Car Show: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 13 in downtown Edmonds; more than 300 classic cars; awards ceremony at 4:30 p.m.; 425-670-1496; www.

Seattle Fiestas Patrias: Sept. 19 to 20, Armory, Fisher Pavilion and other locations around Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; experience Latin America through

live performances, visual arts, hands-on activities, foods, games and more; 206-684-7200; www. seattlecenter.com. Snohomish Historic Home Tour: Noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 20 at locations around Snohomish; selfguided tour; tickets $10 to $15; 360-568-2526; www.cityofsnohomish.com. Italian Festival: Sept. 26 and 27 at locations around Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; a celebration of all things Italian with food vendors, crafts, puppet theatre, Italian films, a grape-stomping contest, a bocce ball tournament and more; 206-684-7200; www. seattlecenter.com. Return of the Salmon Celebration: Sept. 26 at Osprey Park, 801 First St., Sultan; activities and 5K salmon run; 360-793-0983; www.skyvalleychamber.com. Snohomish Hot Rod and Classic Car Show: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 27 in downtown Snohomish; more than 600 cars and trucks; www.cityofsnohomish.com.

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GENNA MARTIN / HERALD 2014 FILE PHOTO

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

Join us for the

84

th

ANNUAL STRAWBERRY

FESTIVAL!

Berry Run/Walk

JUNE 13TH THROUGH JUNE 21ST IN MARYSVILLE, WA.

Market In The Park

Royalty w Fashion Sho

We have something for EVERYONE!

Just look at some of the fun we have planned for you and your family:

Parade

• Kids Day, Party in the Park – Sat., June 13th, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm • Berry Run / Walk – Sun., June 14th, 9:00 am. New location is the Tulalip Amphitheater • Royalty Fashion Show – Tues., June 16th, 11:30 am • Talent Show – Thurs., June 18th, 6:30 • Market in the Park – Fri., June 19th, 2:00 pm to 9:00 pm                                          Sat., June 20th, 10:00 am to 9:00 pm                                          Sun., June 21st, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm • Beer Garden – Thurs. & Fri., June 18th & 19th, 5:00 pm to 10:00 pm Sat., June 20th, Noon to 10:00 pm • Carnival -- Thurs., June 18th thru June 21st, Time to be determined, weather permitting • Strawberry Shortcake Eating Contest –  Sat., June 20th, 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm Ferris Wheel • GRAND PARADE – Sat., June 20th -- 7:30 pm to 10:00 pm Strawberry • Fireworks Show – Shortcake Eating Sat., June 20th, Contest 10:00 pm to 10:30 pm

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Kids Play in The Park

“Made possible in part by assistance from the Snohomish County Hotel-Motel tax fund”

Talent Show

For more information, please visit: www.maryfest.org Or visit our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/marysvillestrawberryfestival

Beer Garden

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

FOURTH OF JULY Arlington, Frontier Days Fourth of July: Events are on July 4 at Haller Park, 1100 West Ave., unless noted below; call for details 360-403-3421; www. arlingtonwa.gov.  7 to 10 a.m. Pancake Breakfast at Haller Park, Arlington Heights Fire Department  8 a.m. Pedal, Paddle, Puff Triathlon at Haller Park  8:30, 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Kiwanis Auctions at Haller Park  Noon to 4 p.m. “Old Fashioned Fourth” at Legion Park  1 to 3 p.m. Apple Pie Social, Arlington Lion’s Club, Haller and Legion parks  4:30 p.m. Kids Parade  5 p.m. Grand Parade on Olympic Avenue  7:30 p.m. Rotary Duck Dash at Haller Park  9 p.m. Fireworks at Boys and Girls Club Bothell: Grand parade starts at noon July 4; routes head west on Main Street and then north on Bothell-Everett Highway to NE 188th Street. Children’s parade for up to age 12 starts at 11:15 a.m. Parents must accompany children

or meet them at end. Start area for both parades is at 103th Avenue and Main Street.  Pancake breakfast: 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Bothell Downtown Firehouse, 10726 Beardslee Blvd; 425-486-7430; www.ci.bothell. wa.us. An Edmonds Kind of Fourth: All events on July 4; free; www. edmondswa.com.  9 a.m. 5K fun run/walk  11:30 a.m. Children’s parade at Fifth Avenue and Walnut.  Noon, Grand parade  2:30 p.m. Edmonds firefighters waterball competition, City Park Third Avenue S. and Pine.  7:30 p.m. Evening entertainment and food vendors at Civic Stadium, Sixth and Bell  10 p.m. fireworks at Civic Stadium, Sixth Avenue and Bell. Everett AquaSox baseball: 7:05 p.m. July 4, Everett Memorial Stadium, 3900 Broadway; opponent is the Hillsboro Hops; post-game fireworks; game-worn hat auction; tickets at www. aquasox.com. Everett, Colors of Freedom

tives, crime scene investigators, robots, canine handlers and other officers at the Everett Police open house; search the department to complete a passport and receive a prize; www.everettwa.org. Everett, Star-Spangled celebration: Imagine Children’s Museum, 1502 Wall St., open noon to 4 p.m. July 4. Regular admission is $9.80 for everyone older than 1; free admission for active and retired military families; patriotic hat-making and other activities; 425-258-1006; www.imaginecm.org. IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Sporting red tutus and American flag headbands, identical twins Ryan (left) and Riley Strohl ride tricycles during the Edmonds Fourth of July celebration in 2014. celebration: Free events take place July 4; 425-257-8700; www.ci.everett.wa.us. No parking at Legion Park, so ride free Everett Transit shuttles and buses.  Downtown parade is at 11 a.m. on Colby and Wetmore avenues, between Wall and 26th streets; marching bands, clowns, dance and drill teams.  Festival is from 1 to 11 p.m.

at Legion Memorial Park, 145 Alverson Blvd.; live music, food fair, kids’ activities.  Thunder on the Bay Fireworks, 10:20 p.m. Best viewing locations are Grand Avenue Park, 1800 Grand Ave.; and Legion Memorial Park, 145 Alverson Blvd., Everett. Everett, Passport to the Police: Noon to 4 p.m. July 4, 3200 Wetmore Ave. Meet detec-

Everett, Xfinity Community Ice Rink, Fire on Ice: 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. July 4, 2000 Hewitt Ave.; $4 admission includes skate rental; 425-322-2600; xfinityarenaeverett.com. Everett, Yankee Doodle Dash: 1 mile, 5K, 10K and kids races on July 4 at Everett Family YMCA, 2720 Rockefeller Ave.; register at your local branch or online at www.ymca-snoco.org/ydd.  10K race starts at 8:30 a.m.  5K race starts at 8:45 a.m.  1 mile race starts at 8:50 a.m.  Kiddie Doodle Dash at 10 a.m.

Kenmore: Fireworks display: 10 p.m. July 4, Log Boom Park, NE 175th Street and 61st Avenue NE; free; guests advised to bring blankets and chairs; seating and activities begin at 8 p.m.; 425398-8900; www.cityofkenmore. com. Seattle, Red, White & Zoo: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. July 1 and 2 at Woodland Park Zoo, in several animals’ areas; enter at N. 59th and Evanston; N. 50th and Fremont Avenue N., or 55th and Phinney; watch animals eat watermelon and other treats; included with admission of $12.25 or $19.95; parking $5.25; 206-548-2500; www.zoo.org. Seattle, Seafair Summer Fourth: Noon to 11 p.m. GasWorks Park and 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. South Lake Union Park, July 4; games, festival-style food booths, interactive exhibits, live music and more; www.seafair.com/. Seattle, Star-Spangled Spectacular Chorus: 7:30 p.m., July 1, Benaroya Hall; Seattle Wind Symphony Fourth of July chorus; www. seattlewindsymphony.org.

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July 20-August 7 • Mon.-Fri. 9:30 am-3:30 pm at the Red Curtain Arts Center • Marysville RFOUNDATION ED CURTAIN Sponsored by 360.322.7402 redcurtainfoundation.org for the Arts www.redcurtainfoundation.org

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Theatre Day Camp for Ages 10-16


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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

Summer concerts SUMMER CONCERTS Arlington, Music on the Terraces: Free performances, 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursdays, Aug. 7 through 27, Terrace Park, 809 Fifth St., Arlington; 360-403-3448, www. arlingtonwa.gov/recreation.  Aug. 6: Red Classic Rock  Aug. 13: Stacy Jones Band, blues  Aug. 20: Folsoms, Johnny Cash tribute  Aug. 27: Dennis Agajanian, “worlds fastest flatpick guitar player”

PRESENTED BY

Bumbershoot: End-of-summer arts and music showcase, Sept. 5 to 7, Seattle Center, 305 TO N B URLI N GHarrison St.; details at www.bumbershoot. org.

B ERRY D AIR Y DAYS

Chateau Ste. Michelle SumE S T. 1 9 3 7 mer Concert Series: Outdoor JUNE 18 2015 concerts, Chateau Ste.-21, Michelle Winery, 14111 NE 145th St., Woodinville. Tickets at wine shop or through Ticketmaster, 800-745-3000; www.ticketmaster. com. 7 p.m. showtimes unless otherwise noted. Details at www. ste-michelle.com.  June 13: A Prairie Home Companion featuring Garrison Keillor, 2:45 p.m., $39.50 to $75

GENNA MARTIN / THE HERALD

Wayne Hay of Falls City plays guitar at his family campsite at the Darrington Bluegrass Festival in 2014. This year, the festival is July 17 to 19.  July 3: Gregg Allman, $39.50 to $59.50  July 8: An Evening with Sheryl Crow, sold out  July 11: An Evening with Lyle

 June 19: Smash Mouth, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Tonic, 6 p.m., $39.50 to $49.50  June 20: An Evening with Chicago, sold out

GRAND

PA R A D E

Lovett and His Large Band, $47.50 to $77.50  July 18 and 19: An Evening with Harry Connick, Jr., sold out  July 24: John Fogerty, sold out

 July 25: Festival of Jazz: Chris Botti, Bob James, Earl Klugh, Morgan James, 2 p.m., $45 to $65  July 26: Wine Country Blues Festival: Taj Mahal, Blind Boys of Alabama, Charlie Musselwhite, Doug MacLeod, 3 p.m., $45 to $65  Aug. 1 and 2: An Evening with Jackson Browne, 7:30 p.m., $50.50 to $70.50  Aug. 6: Brit Floyd: An amazing journey through five decades of Pink Floyd, $39 to $59  Aug. 7 and 8: An Evening with Steve Miller Band, sold out  Aug. 22: Michael Franti and Spearhead, $39.50 to $65  Aug. 23: Chris Isaak, $45 to $69.50  Aug. 28: Gipsy Kings featuring Nicolas Reyes and Tonino Baliardo, $42 to $72  Aug. 29: An Evening with Randy Newman, $43.50 to $69.50  Sept. 3: An Evening with Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, $49.50 to $79.50  Sept. 4 and 5: An Evening with Pink Martini, $45 to $75  Sept. 11 and 12: An Evening with Mark Knopfler, sold out

Darrington Bluegrass Festival: July 17 to 19. Darrington Music Park, three miles west of town on Highway 530. Weekend admission $45 before July 1, $55 after plus $35 camping fee per RV or tent. Daily admission is $20 Friday and Sunday, $25 Saturday; ages 12 and younger free with adult; 360-436-1006; www.darringtonbluegrass.com. Edmonds Summer Concerts in the Park: 3 to 4 p.m. Sundays, July 12 to Aug. 23 at City Park, Third Avenue S. and Pine Street; free.  July 12: Ballard Sedentary Sousa Band, marches  July 19: As You Like It, Seattle Shakespeare Co/Wooden O  July 26: The Fentons, alternative country  Aug. 2: Clave Gringa, Cuban jazz  Aug. 9: Bump Kitchen, soul and funk  Aug. 16: Te Fare O Tamatoa/ Te’a rama, Tahitian drumming and dance  Aug. 23: Bill Derry Band, pop rock Edmonds Hazel Miller Plaza concerts: noon to 1 p.m. on

FESTIVAL IN THE PARK

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PRESENTED BY

B URLI N GT ON

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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT E S T.

1937

JUNE 18-21, 2015

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( 3 6 0 ) 7 5 7 - 0F 9 I N G TO N - C H A M B E R . CO M R9 E4 E K I DBSU R LFIREWORKS

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United General Medical Center

KIWANIS SALMON BBQ ( 3 6 0 ) 7 5 7- 0 9 9 4

HERITAGE FLIGHT MUSEUM WILL SUPPORT THE PARADE WITH A FLY OVER – WEATHER PERMITTING

SPEEDWAY

B U R L I N G TO N - C H A M B E R . CO M

A SUMMER TO

REMEMBER YMCA Summer Programs

YMCA-SNOCO.ORG/CAMP

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SUMMER CONCERTS Tuesday shows and 5 to 6:30 p.m. on Thursday shows; Fifth Avenue S. and Maple Street; free.  July 9: Rouge, French café music  July 21: Roberto the Magnificent, juggling and comedy stunts  July 23: The Tarantellas, songs of Italy  July 28: Paul Lippert, folk songs and sing-alongs  July 30: Jacqueline Tabor Trio, jazz  Aug. 4: Eric Haines, one-man band  Aug. 6: Los Flacos, Latin  Aug. 11 Steel Drums with Obe Quarless, sounds of the Caribbean  Aug. 13: Restless Vocal Band, funky and fun a cappella  Aug. 18 Cap’n Arrr, pirate comedy show  Aug. 20: TBA  Aug. 25 The Shed Players, old time blues and roots  Aug. 27: Jaspar Lepak, folk/ Americana Evergreen State Fair: Concerts Aug. 31 to Sept. 4. Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE., Monroe; www.evergreenfair.org.

and soul  Aug. 27: US Air Force Band of the Golden West, big band classics

 Aug. 31: Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo  Sept. 1: Casting Crowns  Sept. 2: Lee Brice  Sept. 3: Jerrod Niemann  Sept. 4: Vince Gill Everett Children’s Concert Series: Free outdoor shows, 10 to 11 a.m. Thursdays, July 9 through Aug. 20, Thornton A. Sullivan Park, 11405 Silver Lake Road; www. everettwa.gov/808/ChildrensConcert-Series.  July 9: The Pop Ups, creative, catchy tunes  July 16 Tim Noah, Emmy-winning northwest favorite  July 23: Secret Agent 23 Skidoo, family hip-hop  July 30: Play Date, sparkly, rockin’ pop adventure  Aug 6: The Not-Its!, power-pop danceable hits  Aug 13: Recess Monkey, laugh out loud lyrics  Aug 20: Caspar Babypants, toetapping, sweet, lovable tunes Everett Pacific Chamber Orchestra Summer Concert: 3 p.m. June 7 at First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave.;

GORGE AMPITHEATRE

The Gorge Amphitheatre offers outdoor concerts all summer. www.pacificachamberorchestra. org. Everett, Music at the Marina: Free outdoor concerts, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, June 25 through Aug. 27, Port Gardner Landing, 1700 W. Marine View Drive; enjoyeverett.org.  June 25: Dusty 45s, honky tonk, jump blues, swing  July 2: Eli Rosenblatt and Si Limon, salsa and Son Montuno  July 9: Randy McAllister and Double Rectified Busthead, blue-

eyed, Cajun roadhouse soul  July 16: LeRoy Bell and His Only Friends, X-Factor finalist, rock’n soul  July 23: The Senate, rock and roll string band with killer vocals  July 30: TBA  Aug. 6: The Randy Oxford Band featuring Lady A, powerhouse trombone blues  Aug. 13: The Paperboys, countryfolk-Celtic-bluegrass, rock  Aug. 20: Eldridge Gravy and the Court Supreme, psychedelic funk

Everett Port Gardner Landing Saturday Evening Waterfront Concerts: Free outdoor concerts, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturdays, June 27 through Aug. 29, Port Gardner Landing, 1700 W. Marine View Drive; www. enjoyeverett.org.  June 27: The Wild Snohomians, original Americana, roots rock  July 11: Mark DuFresne Band, Americana roots steeped in blues  July 18: Clave Gringa, Cubanflavored Latin jazz  July 25: The Show Ponies, indiefolk with Old Time & Bluegrass Tendencies  Aug. 1: Gary Evans Collective, jazz, blues and pop  Aug. 8: Vaudeville Etiquette, roots rock, indie folk  Aug. 22: Jefferson Rose Band, world music dance party  Aug. 29: 20 Riverside, funky rock with a hip hop twist Fisherman’s Village Music Festival: 7 p.m. to midnight May 15, 1 p.m. to midnight May 16

and noon to midnight May 17 in downtown Everett; tickets $30 to $49; www.thefishermansvillage. com. The Gorge: Outdoor concerts, Gorge Amphitheatre, 754 Silica Road NW, George. Tickets through LiveNation; 800-745-3000; www. livenation.com. These 2015 dates were confirmed at press time:  May 22: Sasquatch  June 20: Nickelback  June 26: Paradiso  July 11: Zac Brown Band  July 25: Train, The Fray and Matt Nathanson  July 31 to Aug. 2: Watershed Festival, country music  Aug. 8: Sam Smith  Sept. 4 to 6: Dave Matthews Band  Sept. 12: Foo Fighters Lake Stevens Music on the Lake: Free concerts, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, July 2 through Aug. 13 at North Cove Park, behind City Hall, 1812 Main St.; 425-334-1012; www.ci.lakestevens.wa.us. Marysville Sounds of Summer Concert Series: 7 p.m.

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

SUMMER CONCERTS Fridays, July 10 through Aug. 14 at the Lions Centennial Pavilion in Jennings Memorial Park, 6915 Armar Road; free; 360-363-8400; www.marysvillewa.gov.  July 10: The Wild Snohomians, roadhouse Americana  July 17: Sly Mr. Y, classic rock July 24: Shaggy Sweet, pop, rock and blues  July 31: Layered System, jazz, soul and R&B  Aug. 7: Mealfrog, roots rock  Aug. 14: Cherry Cherry, Neil Diamond cover band

KING’S SCHOOLS IS THE PLACE TO BE

THIS SUMMER! DAY CAMP (AGES 5-12) Camp hours 9:00am -3:30pm with extended care available

Sports Camps

Music Classes

› Basketball

› Instrumental

› Cheerleading

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› Football › Soccer › Volleyball

Enrichment Camps › Robotics › Chess › Art › Academic Classes › and so much more

Contact us for more information and to register. KINGSSCHOOLS.ORG/SUMMER-CAMPS 19531 Dayton Ave. N. Shoreline, 98133 1302642

206-546-7595

www.kingsschools.org

Mill Creek Summer Children’s Concert Series: noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, July 22 through Aug. 19 at Library Park, 15429 Bothell-Everett Highway, Mill Creek; free, but nonperishable food items accepted; www. cityofmillcreek.com  July 22: Eric Herman and Puppy Dog Dave  July 29: Nancy Stewart  Aug 12: Buck and Elizabeth  Aug 19: Rolie Polie Guacamole Marymoor Park concerts: Concert series at 6046 W. Lake Sammammish Parkway NE, Redmond. Tickets 800-745-3000; www.AXS.com; www.marymoorconcerts.com.  June 14 and 15: A. R. Rahman, The Intimate Concert Tour  June 24: The Movie Music of John Williams with Seattle Symphony  June 27: Willie Nelson and Family, Alison Krauss and Union Station  July 13: David Gray and Amos Lee  July 16: The Decemberists  July 18: Tour de Compadres featuring NEEDTOBREATHE, Switchfoot, Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors and Colony House  July 22: Third Eye Blind and Dashboard Confessional  July 26: Barenaked Ladies with Violent Femmes  Aug. 6: Slightly Stoopid  Aug. 10: Walk the Moon and Milky Chance  Aug. 11: Wilco  Aug. 14: R5  Aug. 28: Peter Frampton and Cheap Trick  Aug. 29 and 30: Sublime with Rome  Sept. 15: Empire of the Sun Sasquatch Music Festival: The Gorge Amphitheatre, May 22 to 25; tickets typically sell out, check

Party, Dan + Shay, 9 p.m.  Sept. 14: “Weird Al” Yankovic  Sept. 15: Heart, Music = Love Tour 2015  Sept. 16: Fifth Harmony with special guest Bea Miller  Sept. 18: Terry Fator  Sept. 19: Keith Urban, Raise ‘Em Up Tour  Sept. 20: Chris Tomlin and Toby Mac  Sept. 21: Patti LaBelle with The Tacoma Symphony  Sept. 24: Jake Owen and special guest A Thousand Horses  Sept. 26: Jason Derulo  Sept. 27: Pitbull

COURTESY PHOTO

Melissa Etheridge performs July 21 at Woodland Park Zoo. website for availability; www. sasquatchfestival.com. Seattle Peace Concerts: Free concerts, noon to 6 p.m. Sundays, various Seattle parks; food bank donations accepted; www. seapeace.org.  June 14 and Aug. 9: Lower Woodland Park Shelter 1, Aurora Avenue N. and N. 59th Street  June 28 and Sept. 21: Gas Works Park, 2101 N. Northlake Way  July 12 and Sept. 6: Magnuson Park Beach Area  July 26 and Aug. 23: Volunteer Park, 1247 15th Ave. E. Shoreline Summer Concerts in the Park: 7 p.m. July 8 through Aug. 19 at locations in Shoreline and Lake Forest Park; free; rain or shine; www.shorelinearts.net.  July 8: The Wild Snohomians, covers and eclectic originals, Animal Acres Park  July 15: “As You Like It” Seattle Shakespeare Company, Richmond Beach Park  July 22: Cherry Cherry, Neil Diamond tribute band, Cromwell Park, Shoreline  July 29: Jessica Lynne, original country music, Animal Acres Park, Lake Forest Park  Aug. 5: Grupo Amoroso, classic bossa nova, Brazilian pop and jazz, Richmond Beach Park  Aug. 12: No concert.  Aug. 19: The Portage Bay Big

Band, swing, Cromwell Park Snohomish Taste of Music: Aug. 14 to 16. Details at info@ historicdowntownsnohomish.org or www.historicdowntownsnohomish.org. Summer Meltdown Festival: Multi-day festival Aug. 6 to 9 at Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheater, 42501 Highway 530, Darrington; Festival admission and camping details at summermeltdownfest.com. Tulalip Amphitheatre: Concerts start at 7 p.m., July 3 through Sept. 3; concerts for ages 21 and older; tickets on sale at www.ticketmaster.com or at the Tulalip Resort Casino; www. tulalipcasino.com.  July 3: Boz Scaggs with Aaron Neville,  July 8: Hank Williams, Jr.  Aug. 6: Boyz II Men and Brian McKnight  Aug. 15: The Band Perry  Aug. 28: Huey Lewis and The News  Sept. 3: Sammy Hagar and the Circle Washington State Fair: Concerts 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise listed, Sept. 11 to 27 at Washington State Fairgrounds, 110 Ninth Ave. SW, Puyallup; ticket price includes fair admission; www. thefair.com/concerts.  Sept. 11: Dancin’ in the Dirt Party, Colt Ford, 9 p.m.  Sept. 12: Dancin’ in the Dirt

White River Amphitheatre: 40601 Auburn-Enumclaw Road, Auburn; 877-598-6659; www. livenation.com. Concerts at various times. These 2015 dates were confirmed at press time:  June 20: KUBE 93’s Summer Jam: T.I., Kid Ink, Tech N9ne, E-40 and B.o.B  June 30: Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival: Slayer, King Diamond, Hell Yeah and Devil Wears Prada  July 5: Van Halen and Kenny Wayne Shepherd  July 9: Steely Dan, Elvis Costello and The Imposters  July 12: J. Cole, Big Sean, YG and Jeremih  Aug. 2: Fall Out Boy, Wiz Khalifa & Hoodie Allen  Aug. 8: Vans Warped Tour  Aug. 23: KISW Pain in the Grass: Slipknot, Lamb of God and Three Days Grace  Sept. 4: Tim McGraw, Billy Currington and Chase Bryant  Sept. 5: Kid Rock and Foreigner  Sept. 16: Def Leppard, Styx and Tesla Zoo Tunes at Woodland Park Zoo: June 19 through Aug. 16 tickets at www.zoo.org/ zootunes.  June 19: The Doobie Brothers  June 28: The B-52s  July 12: Indigo Girls  July 21: Melissa Etheridge and Blondie  July 22: Bruce Hornsby and The Noisemakers  July 26: Sweet Harmony Soul  July 29: Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell  Aug. 9: Ziggy Marley  Aug. 16: Trampled by Turtles and The Devil Makes Three  Aug. 19: Kenny Loggins


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

WATER PLAY Comeford Park spray pad: Water jets, sprinklers, dueling spray cannons and more; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. May 23 through Labor Day; Comeford Park, 514 Delta Ave., Marysville; 360-363-8400; www.marysvillewa.gov. Daleway Park spray park: Spray park hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. from the first weekend in June to Labor Day; 19015 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood; www. ci.lynnwood.wa.us. Forest Park Swim Center: The Rotary Centennial Water Playground has a 25-yard lap pool with an attached diving tank, an outdoor tot pool, hot tub and saunas. It’s open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. year-round. Swim times vary, call 425-257-8312 for schedule and admission info. Forest Park is at 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., Everett; www.everettwa.org.

DAN BATES / HERALD 2014 FILE PHOTO

Katie DuBose hurries through a watery obstacle course at the spray park at Comeford Park in Marysville.

Forest Park water playground: Play area with 16 interactive features and an area designed for toddlers. Open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. May 22 to Sept. 27; 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd.; www. everettwa.org. Lynnwood Recreation

EMPLOYMENT

Marysville Pilchuck Pool: The school district and community pool offers three heated pool sections for all swimming levels from preschoolers to advanced. There are open swim hours and a toddler pool. Admission ranges from $2 for younger than 2 to $8.50 for family swims. The pool is at 5611 108th St. NE, Marysville. Call 360-653-0609 or go to www. msvl.k12.wa.us for open swim times and class information. The pool is available for rent.

McCollum Park is at 600 128th St. SE, Everett. Call 425-357-6036 or check the Snohomish County Parks and Recreation website, www.snohomishcountywa.gov, for times as they change depending on the weather. The pool is available to rent. Mountlake Terrace Pool: The recreation center has a warm-water indoor leisure pool with a lazy river, plumbed spray toys, water basketball, floats and water toys. The pool is at 5303 228th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace. Call 425-7769173 for open swim hours and admission; www.cityofmlt.com. North Lynnwood Park spray park: This 6.3-acre neighborhood park, also known as Dragon Park, is north of Lynnwood Elementary School; spray park hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. from the first weekend in June to Labor Day; 18510 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood; www. ci.lynnwood.wa.us. Snohomish Aquatic Center: Includes competition pool, dive area, recreation pool, warmwater pool, spray-play area, surf-simulation machine, lazy river and slide. Open 5:30 a.m. to 9

McCollum County Park: The outdoor swimming pool with water slide is open daily all summer when the temperature is above 65 degrees. Admission is $4, free for children 2 and younger.

Head Start & Early Head Start

Now hiring!

Yost Pool: The city of Edmonds outdoor pool with a diving board offers swim lessons, aerobics, open swim and party rental beginning June 3 through Sept. 2. The pool is at 9535 Bowdoin Way, Edmonds. For daily schedules, call 425-775-2645 (the line will not be active until the pool opens). For general information and registration, call 425-771-1346. Details at www.edmondswa.gov.

HIRING IN EVERETT, MARYSVILLE & TULALIP

Hiring part-time and full-time teaching, admin, and food service positions! Check www.edcc.edu/birthtofive (jobs) throughout the summer.

1320576

www.sno-isle.org/employment

1320572

Willis Tucker Park spray pad: Water playground has soakers, cannons, spinners, domes and all manner of dousing equipment. There are sunshades adjacent to the water-play area for parents to relax. The spray pad is open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily, Memorial Day weekend through September. Willis Tucker Park is at 6705 Puget Park Drive, Snohomish; www. snohomishcountywa.gov.

WE WANT YOU!

SNOHOMISH COUNTY

Sno-Isle Libraries

p.m. weekdays; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and noon to 6 p.m. Sundays; $4.50 to $5.50; $17 for families; 2 and under free; 516 Maple Ave., Snohomish. Extra fee for surf machine. Punch passes available. Get detailed schedule at www.snohomishaquatic.com or call 360-568-8030.

Working In-home with Adults with Disabilities. Rewarding & challenging... A job you’ll love!

Snohomish School District is now hiring. Please visit our website for more information on becoming part of our team! www.sno.wednet.edu 1320578

$10.50 PER HOUR with a generous benefits package. email Mary for more information & an application: mmcpage@servalt-asl.com 1614 Broadway, Everett 98201 | 1(888)328-3339 EOE 1320581

OPPORTUNITIES

Center: Includes shallow, lap and wellness pools and water playground, inner-tube slide, a body slide, a 50-gallon bucket dump and a lazy river; indoors; 5:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. weekdays, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sundays; $4.25 for kids, seniors and disabled, $4.75 for teens, $5.25 for adults, $16.25 families; 18900 44th Ave. W.; 425-670-5732; schedule available online; www.PlayLynnwood.com.

O’HARA CORPORATION 1320569

Now hiring for fish processors in Alaska. Please see

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NOW LIVE!


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

DOG PARKS Cavalero Hill Community Dog Park: Three-acre off-leash dog area with one-quarter-acre shy-dog area at 27032 79th Ave., Lake Stevens; 7 a.m. to dusk; bring your own water. 425-3886600; www.snohomishcountywa. gov; contact.parks@snoco.org.

Edmonds: Off-leash dog park with swimming area and agility equipment at 498 Admiral Way, Edmonds; www.olae.org.

Clover Valley: Off-leash area near baseball fields at 799 Ault Field Road, Oak Harbor; water spigot available; 360-321-4049; http://bit.ly/1J0oGj9.

Howarth Park: Off-leash area with beach access at 1127 Olympic Blvd., Everett; north beach area only; 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Oct. 31 and 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. after Nov. 1; www.everettwa.org.

Double Bluff: Beach access with waste bags, water fountain and rinse station at 6325 Double Bluff Road, Freeland; off-leash area begins 500 feet from parking lot where a windsock on a flagpole marks the boundary; 360-3214049; http://bit.ly/1KTZb1S or www.fetchparks.org/doublebluff. html. Eagle Park: Dog park with grassy area, shade and separate small dog area at 701 E. Galena St., Granite Falls; www.ci.granitefalls.wa.us.

Lake Stickney Park: Fullyfenced off-leash dog area; 13521 Manor Way, Lynnwood; 425-7454553; www.snohomishcountywa. gov. Loganberry Lane: Off-leash woodland trails at 18th Avenue W. (Loganberry Lane), Everett; 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Oct. 31, 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. after Nov. 1; www. everettwa.org. Lowell Park: Fenced off-leash area north of tennis courts at 4605 S. Third Ave., Everett; 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Oct. 31 and 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. after Nov. 1. www. everettwa.org. Marguerite Brons Memo-

Mountlake Terrace: Threequarter-acre fenced off-leash dog park in the woods with double gate system, benches, information kiosk and waste disposal container at 5303 228th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace; dawn to dusk daily; www.cityofmlt.com or www.mltdog.org. Oak Harbor dog park: Fenced off-leash area with water station and waste bags; Technical Drive on Whidbey Island; 360-321-4049; go to www.fetchparks.org/technical.html for directions. Patmore Pit: Fenced off-leash area with separate, fenced agility area and small dog area at 530 Patmore Road, Coupeville; toys, water and waste bags provided; 360-321-4049; www.islandcounty. net or www.fetchparks.org/ patmore.html. Strawberry Fields for Rover: Off-leash three-acre fenced park

1302650

Ebey Island: Privately-owned dog park on Ebey Island, one mile east of I-5 and downtown Everett; 425-257-8300.

Gold Bar: Small, unfenced field along Highway 2 at Sixth Street in Gold Bar; 360-793-1101; www. cityofgoldbar.us.

rial Park: Fenced area with a large, open meadow, wooded trails and small dog area at 2837 Becker Road, Clinton; includes a water station, bulletin board, toys and waste bags; 360-321-4049; www.islandcounty.net or www. fetchparks.org/brons.html.

1302643

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Michelle Hall throws a tennis ball to her dog at the off-leash dog park area of Cavalero Hill. at southeast corner of the Strawberry Fields Athletic Complex, 6100 152nd St. NE, Marysville; www.m-dog.org. Tails and Trails Japanese Gulch Dog Park: Fenced threequarter acre park with agility equipment and more at 1130 Fifth

St., Mukilteo; www.japanesegulch.org. Tambark Creek Park: Off-leash dog area at 17217 35th Ave SE, Bothell; www.co.snohomish.wa.us. Wiggly Field: Off-leash fenced area with agility equipment at Sky River Park, 413 Sky River Parkway,

Monroe; www.monroewa.gov. Willis Tucker Park: Off-leash fenced dog area with six-acre meadow, more than one acre of forest area and shy-dog area at 6705 Puget Park Drive, Snohomish; 7 a.m. to dusk; www. co.snohomish.wa.us.


The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

Quil Ceda Village

Where Fun is a Priority

Experience it here! Seattle Premium Outlets

®

Legendary Brands, Real Savings

Cabela’s

World’s Foremost Outfitter

Amphitheatre

Tulalip Concert Series and More

Tulalip Resort Casino

4 Diamond Luxury & Excitement

One location, Quil Ceda Village www.quilcedavillage.com www.Facebook.com/quilcedavillage

Quil Ceda Village is conveniently located on the I-5 corridor. Use exits 200 and 202 and turn west. For more information call 360-716-5010. 1305530

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

MUSEUMS Blackman House Museum: 118 Ave. B, Snohomish; 360-5685235. Noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; free but $5 donations accepted for guided tours.

www.monroehistoricalsociety. org. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. Donations accepted.

Edmonds Historical Museum: City Hall building, 118 Fifth Ave. N., Edmonds; 425-774-0900; www.historicedmonds.org. 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Admission $5 for adults, $2 for students; group tours available. Flying Heritage Museum: 3407 109th St. SW, Everett (Paine Field); 206-342-4242; www. flyingheritage.com. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Memorial Day through Labor Day; Tuesdays through Sundays, Labor Day through the rest of the year. $10 to $14, ages 5 and younger free; group rates available; tickets at 877-342-3404. Future of Flight Aviation Center & Boeing Tour: 8415 Paine Field Blvd., Mukilteo; 425-4388100, information and reservations at 800-464-1476; www. futureofflight.org. Aviation Center open 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily. Boeing Tour on the hour, 9.a.m to 3 p.m. $12 to $18 through Sept.

HERALD 2014 FILE PHOTO

Sabastian Azwol, 7, observes a model lumber mill at the Edmonds Historical Museum. 30. Children must be 4 feet tall for tours. Granite Falls Historical Society Museum: 109 E. Union St., Granite Falls; 360-691-2603; www.gfhistory.org. Noon to 5 p.m. Sundays; free but donations accepted.

Imagine Children’s Museum: 1502 Wall St., Everett; 425-2581006; www.imaginecm.org. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. General admission $9.80; $4.90 for all ages from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursdays; free for

those younger than 1. Lake Stevens Historical Museum: 1802 Main St., Lake Stevens; Friday and Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m.; 425-334-3944. Monroe Historical Society Museum: Old City Hall, 207 E. Main St., Monroe; 360-217-7223;

Lynnwood, Heritage Park: 19921 Poplar Way, Lynnwood.  Heritage Resource Center: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Formerly superintendent’s cottage and water tower, only surviving structures from Alderwood Manor Demonstration Farm. Moved to Heritage Park in 2003 and reopened in 2005 as resource center, 425-775-4694; www.alderwood.org.  Wickers Building: The first general store and post office in Alderwood Manor, was moved to Heritage Park in 2003. Now South Snohomish County Visitor Information Center, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays; 425-6705502.  Interurban Car 55: Car 55 is a 1909 Interurban singleended wooden electric rail car that provided commuter service from Alderwood Manor to Seattle and Everett from 1910 to 1939. Tours

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. first Saturdays June through September; by appointment October through May; 425-670-5502.  Humble House: Original residence built in 1919. The park site’s original residence was built in 1919. Now houses Sno-Isle Genealogical Society’s genealogy research library. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 1; 425-775-6267. Stanwood Area History Museum: 27108 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood; 360-629-6110; www.sahs-fncc.org. 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays; also by appointment; donations welcome. Stillaguamish Valley Pioneer Museum: 20722 67th Ave. NE, Arlington; 360-435-7289; www. stillymuseum.org. 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays through October; check website for holiday closures; $2 and $5.

SKAGIT COUNTY La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum: Inside Gaches Mansion, 703 S. Second St., La Conner;

Matt Pain

360-4 nerqu Wedn and b and T for no free.

Skag Mus Conn skagi a.m. Sund youn

SEA

Burk Histo Stree camp www a.m. p.m. 4. $7

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

COME EXPLORE SUMMER

MUSEUMS

at the BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS

;

• Theme Weeks • Field Trips • Sports Camps • Technology • Game Rooms

ys

• Specialty Camps • Healthy Snacks • Arts & Crafts • Gym Activities • Teen Camps

Visit www.bgcsc.org for more info

ys;

r

360-466-4288; www.laconnerquilts.com. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays and by appointment Mondays and Tuesdays; $5 for members, $7 for nonmembers; 12 and younger free. Skagit County Historical Museum: 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner; 360-466-3365; www. skagitcounty.net/museum. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. $4-$10; ages 5 and younger free.

SEATTLE Burke Museum of Natural History & Culture: NE 45th Street and 17th Avenue NE, UW campus, Seattle; 206-543-5590; www.burkemuseum.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. first Thursdays; closed July 4. $7.50 to $10; 4 and younger

free; first Thursday admission free for all. Children’s Museum: 305 Harrison St., Seattle; 206-441-1768; www.thechildrensmuseum.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; $7 to $8.25; younger than 1, free. Experience Music Project/ Science Fiction Museum: 325 Fifth Ave. N., Seattle; 206-7702700; www.empsfm.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through May 22. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily May 23 through Sept. 1. $15 to $21. Museum of Flight: 9404 E. Marginal Way S., Seattle; 206-7645720; www.museumofflight.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. first Thursdays (free after 5 p.m. first Thursdays); $12 to $20; free ages 4 and younger.

Nordic Heritage Museum: 3014 NW 67th St., Seattle; 206789-5707; www.nordicmuseum. org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. Sundays; $6 to $8; 5 and younger free. Pacific Science Center: 200 Second Ave. N., Seattle; 206-4432001; www.pacificsciencecenter. org. Weekdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; weekends and holidays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. $11.50 to $19.50, free for 2 and younger. IMAX film costs are separate from admission.

SNOQUALMIE Northwest Railway Museum: Depot at 38625 SE King St., Snoqualmie; 425-888-3030; www. trainmuseum.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day; free admission.

Find out if we have a club in your neighborhood!

Camp Killoqua

• Alderwood Club • Arlington Club • Cascade Club • Coupeville Club • Edmonds Club • Everett Club • Granite Falls Club • Lake Stevens Club • Marysville Club • Monroe Club • Mukilteo Club • North Kitsap Club • Oak Harbor Club • Snohomish Club • South Everett/Mukilteo Club • Sultan Club • Trailside Club • Tulalip Club

Day and resident camp sessions for kids in grades K-12. Caring staff, exciting programs, adventures every day!

425 258 KIDS www.campkilloqua.org

GREAT FUTURES

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er;

MARK MULLIGAN / HERALD 2013 FILE PHOTO

Matt Orn (right) and his daughters Kaitlin (left) and Rebecca look out at Paine Field and the Paine Field control tower at the Future of Flight Museum.

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

ANIMALS SNOHOMISH COUNTY Outback Kangaroo Farm: 10030 State Route 530 NE, Arlington; 360-403-7474; www. outbackkangaroofarm.com. Guided tours 10 a.m., noon, 2 and 4 p.m.; $8 to $10. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Open through Oct. 30. Reptile Zoo: 22715 Highway 2, Monroe; 360-805-5300; thereptilezoo.org. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; $6.50 to $8.

SEATTLE Seattle Aquarium: 1483 Alaskan Way, Seattle; 206-3864300; www.seattleaquarium.org. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; $14.95 and $21.95; free for ages 3 and younger. Woodland Park Zoo: 5500 Phinney Ave N, Seattle; 206-5482500; www.zoo.org. 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; $12.25 to $19.95; free for ages 2 and younger.

BEYOND Camel Safari: 5435 Sand Road, Bellingham; 800-836-4036; www. camelsafari.com. 11 a.m. to 5

Jumoke the gorilla plays in her habitat at the Woodland Park Zoo. p.m. daily; camel rides $40 to $99; camel encounters $25, free for kids 3 and younger; other activities available. Cougar Mountain Zoological Park: 19525 SE 54th St., Is-

saquah; 425-391-5508; www. cougarmountainzoo.org. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays; $9 to $12.50; free for kids younger than two. Northwest Trek Wildlife Park: 11610 Trek Drive East, Eatonville; 360-832-6117; www.nwtrek.org. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends through June 26; 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, June 27 through Sept. 7; $9.25 to $19.75. Olympic Game Park: 1423 Ward Road, Sequim; 360-683-

GENNA MARTIN / THE HERALD

4295; www.olygamefarm.com. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays, Memorial Day through Labor Day; $11 to $12; free for kids ages 5 and younger. Point Defiance Zoo: 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma; 253-591-5337; www.pdza.org. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. through May 22; 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. May 23 to Sept. 7; $8.75 to $17; free for ages 2 and younger; zoo tickets count toward $3 off admission at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park.

RENTALS List it or find it in The Daily Herald.

www.heraldnet.com

425-339-3100

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

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OUTDOOR MOVIES Arlington Outdoor Cinema: Terrace Park, 809 Fifth St. Thursdays at dark, around 9 p.m.; Karaoke at 7 p.m. before movie.  July 16: “Annie” (PG)  July 23: “Big Hero 6” (PG)  July 30: “Juniper Ascending” (PG-13)

 July 18: “Strange Magic” (PG)  July 25: “Despicable Me 2” (PG)  Aug. 1: “The Box Trolls” (PG)  Aug. 8: “Into the Woods” (PG)  Aug. 15: “Big Hero 6” (PG) Monroe, Movies Under the Moon: 8 p.m. Fridays at Lake Tye Park, 14964 Fryelands Blvd.; 360863-4559; www.monroewa.gov.  Aug. 7: “Big Hero 6” (PG)  Aug. 14: “Maleficent” (PG)  Aug. 21: “Guardians of the Galaxy” (PG-13)  Aug. 28: “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay” (PG-13)

Edmonds Outdoor Movie Nights: Movies begin around 8:30 p.m. at the Frances Anderson Center Playfield, 700 Main St. Refreshments available for purchase; 425-771-0230; www.ci.edmonds. wa.us.  July 31: “How to Train Your Dragon” (PG)  Aug. 7: “The Truman Show” (PG) Everett, Cinema Under the Stars: Thornton A. Sullivan Park at Silver Lake at Camp Patterson field, 11405 Silver Lake Road, Everett. Friday evenings. Entertainment starts at 7:30 p.m. Movies begin at dark, between 8:30 and 9:13 p.m. Popcorn, hot dogs and drinks available to buy; 425-2577117 or www.everettwa.org.  July 31: Cap’n ARRR, pirate comedy, followed by “Frozen” (PG)

Movies Under the Stars at Swedish/Edmonds: Not happening in 2015.

DISNEY-MARVEL

See Chris Pratt in “Guardians of the Galaxy” on a big screen outside on Aug. 20 in Seattle and Aug. 21 in Monroe.  Aug. 7: Imagine Children’s Museum arts and crafts followed by “Maleficent” (PG)  Aug. 8: Reptile Man followed by “Paddington” (PG)  Aug. 15: Imagine Children’s

Museum arts and crafts followed by “Cinderella” (PG) Flicks at the Falls: Not happening in 2015. Marysville Popcorn in the

Park: Movies begin around 9 p.m. Saturdays July 11 through Aug. 15 at Jennings Memorial Park, 6915 Armar Road; free; 360363-8400; www.marysvillewa.gov.  July 11: “Paddington” (PG)

Seattle, PEMCO Movies at Magnuson Park, Seattle: Seating at 7 p.m., movies at dusk on Thursdays, July 9 through Aug. 27 at the Warren G. Magnuson Park Athletic Fields, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle; live acts, movie trivia, food trucks; premovie seating $5; dogs welcome; www.moviesatmagnuson.com.  July 9: “Back to the Future” (PG)  July 16: “Crazy, Stupid, Love”

(PG-13)  July 23: “Big Hero 6” (PG)  July 30: “Zoolander” (PG-13)  Aug. 6: “10 Things I Hate About You” (PG-13)  Aug. 13: “UP” (PG)  Aug. 20: “Guardians of the Galaxy” (PG-13)  Aug. 27: “The Princess Bride” (PG) Snohomish County, Willis Tucker Community Park: Thursdays, July 9 to Aug. 13; open seating on the grass begins at 7:30 p.m. Bring low-back lawn chairs or blankets, 6705 Puget Park Drive, Snohomish; 425-3886600. Free admission, but donations for Snohomish County Parks will be accepted. Popcorn and pop are available for purchase; www. snohomishcountywa.gov.  July 9: “Paddington” (PG)  July 16: “How to Train Your Dragon 2” (PG)  July 23: “Planes Fire and Rescue” (PG)  July 30: “Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb” (PG)  Aug. 6: “Wreck-It Ralph” (PG)  Aug. 13: “Despicable Me” (PG)

ECA SUMMER ARTS ENRICHMENT CAMPS

JULY 6–10

“Shakespeare As You Like It” with Seattle Shakespeare Co.

JULY 13–17

“Investigate, Adapt, Act!” with Book-It Repertory Theatre

JULY 27–31

Folklorico Dance Camp with Bailadores de Bronce

AUGUST 3–7 Hawaiian & Polynesian Cultural Camp

Monday–Friday | 9 am–3 pm | $200 per week | Scholarships available! To register, visit www.ec4arts.org or call the ECA Box Office at 425.275.9595. For information about scholarships, please contact Gillian Jones, Education & Outreach Manager, at gillian@ec4arts.org or 425.275.9483.

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NEW! Extra care: 6:30–9:00 am & 3:00–6:30 pm at the Boys & Girls Club of Edmonds. Please contact the Boys & Girls Club directly at 425.774.0630 to reserve your child’s space in the program. Rates: $100/week ($20/day) plus $30 one-time membership fee (if applicable). ECA staff will walk with your child to and from the Club.

ec4arts.org | 425.275.9595 410FOURTHAVENUENORTH EDMONDSWA98020

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FARMERS MARKETS Arlington Farmers Market: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturdays, July 11 to Sept. 26, Legion Park, 200 N. Olympic Ave., Arlington; 425-3306105; www.afmwa.com. Bayview Farmers Market: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 31, Bayview Corner, Highway 525 and Bayview Road, Whidbey Island; 360-321-4302; www. bayviewfarmersmarket.com. Biringer Farm Arlington: Strawberry and raspberry sales and U-pick berries daily, mid-June through July, 21412 59th Ave. NE, Arlington; 425-259-0255. See www.biringerfarm.com for updates and satellite berry sale locations.

munity Hall, 6411 Central Ave; info@clintonthursdaymarket.com; www.clintonthursdaymarket.com.

tober 16; 2 to 7 p.m. June through August; 2 to 6 p.m. September and October; 8825 Viking Way, Stanwood; 360-202-3932; www. portsusan.org.

Edmonds Museum Garden Market: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through June 13, Fifth Avenue and Bell Street in the public safety parking lot; 425-776-7201; www.historicedmonds.org.

Sedro-Woolley Farmers Market: 3 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays, May 20 to Oct. 14, Hammer Heritage Park, Metcalf and Ferry streets, Sedro-Woolley; 360-202-7311; sedrowoolleyfarmersmarket@ gmail.com; www.sedrowoolleyfarmersmarket.com.

Edmonds Museum Summer Market: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays, June 20 through Oct. 2 (except July 4 and Aug. 15), Fifth Avenue and Main Street in downtown Edmonds; 425-7767201; www.historicedmonds.org/ summer-market.

Bothell Farmers Market: Noon to 6 p.m. Fridays, June 5 through Oct. 2, 23718 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell; 425-483-2250; www. countryvillagebothell.com.

Everett Friday Farmers Market: 3 to 7 p.m. Fridays, June 12 to Sept. 25, in the Everett Mall Sears parking lot; 425-422-5656; fridayfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.fridayfarmersmarketeverettmall.com.

Carleton Farm Produce: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily through Nov. 1, 630 Sunnyside Blvd. SE, Everett; 425-334-2297; www.carletonfarm.com.

Everett Sunday Farmers Market: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays, May 10 to Oct. 18, 1600 W. Marine View Drive; www. everettfarmersmarket.net.

Clinton Thursday Market: 3:30 to 7 p.m. Thursdays, July 2 through August 27; Clinton Com-

Greenbank Farm Sunday Farmers Market: Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, June through Au-

A young girl smells a flower at the Everett Farmers Market in 2014. gust, Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road, Whidbey Island; 360-6787700; www.greenbankfarm.biz/ summer-sundays.

www.thirdplacecommons.org/ farmers-market.

Lake Forest Park Farmers Market: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays May 10 through Oct. 18, Highway 522 and Highway 104, Lake Forest Park; 206-366-3302;

Marysville Farmers Market: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, June 27 to Oct. 3; 1035 State Ave.; 425760-9632; www.marysvillefarmersmarket.blogspot.com.

Lynnwood Farmers Market: Not happening in 2015.

HERALD FILE PHOTO

Snohomish Farmers Market: Thursdays, 3 to 7 p.m. May 7 through June 25; 3 to 7:30 p.m. July 2 to Aug. 20 and 3 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. from Aug. 27 to Sept. 24 at Cedar Avenue between First and Pearl streets, in downtown Snohomish; 425-366-1171; www. snohomishfarmersmarket.com.

Mukilteo Farmers Market: 3 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays, June through September, 609 Front St., Mukilteo; 425-320-3586; www. mukilteofarmersmarket.org. Free shuttle from Third Street and Lincoln Avenue.

South Whidbey Farmers Market: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 25, South Whidbey Tilth’s Sustainable Agriculture Center, 2812 Thompson Road, Highway 525 and Thompson Road, 6.7 miles north of the Clinton ferry landing; 360-632-4451; www.southwhidbeytilth.org.

Port Susan Farmers Market: runs on Fridays from June 5 to Oc-

Willis Tucker Farmers Market: Not happening in 2015.

JUNE 19-21 More than 200 Artist Booths Juried Gallery Exhibition and Sale Free, Live Entertainment Fabulous Festival Food Children’s Art Activities and Student Art Exhibit 700 Main Street Downtown Edmonds

www.edmondsartsfestival.com 1321174

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The Daily Herald Friday, 05.15.2015

IT ALL STARTS HERE REGISTER TODAY AT SOUNDERSFC.COM/CAMPS

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Friday, 05.15.2015 The Daily Herald

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Everett Daily Herald, May 15, 2015  

May 15, 2015 edition of the Everett Daily Herald

Everett Daily Herald, May 15, 2015  

May 15, 2015 edition of the Everett Daily Herald