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OROVILLE FBLA COMPETES,

SPRING BARTER FAIRE

TORI KINDRED STATE

At the Okanogan Family Faire Grounds, May 1, 2 & 3

PRESIDENT... See Page A3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Tonasket man arrested for attempting to lure 8-year-old girl into car

PLANTING THE FUTURE

Man alleged to have knives and other weapons in car BY GARY A. DEVON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – A Tonasket man was arrested after he allegedly tried to lure an eight-year-old Oroville girl into his car on two separate occasions, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. Arrested was Douglas A. Lowrie, 53. The arrest came after he allegedly contacted the girl on April 18 when she was walking home on Golden Road, southeast of Oroville, from a friend’s house and again on April 22 when she was walk- Douglas A. Lowrie ing alone. According to reports, Lowrie contacted the young girl and gave her a bag of potato chips. Lowrie told her if she got into his car he would take her anywhere she wanted to go. “He talked with me two times and tried to get me to get in the car,” said the girl last Friday. “He told my daughter that he had my telephone number, she ran home and told me,” added her mother. “On April 22, Lowrie attempted to pick

Above, Tonasket Tree Board members and volunteers met at Little Learners Park Friday, April 24, to celebrate Arbor Day planting five trees, including a Flamingo Box Elder Maple donated in memory of Cola Burton. Other trees planted were Red Maples, a Coral Fire Mountain Ash, a Northern Red Oak and a Purple Leaf Plum. The Tonasket Garden Club donated one of the trees, and the others were purchased by the city through a grant. This is the ninth year the city has planted trees on Arbor Day; “to increase the amount of city trees, with emphasis on our parks and to let community members enjoy watching them grow,” announced Mayor Patrick Plumb. The majority of trees planted in past years has been at Chief Tonasket Park. Pictured, left to right, are Jim Rice, Andy Townsend, Council Member and Tree Board Director Dennis Brown, Mayor Plumb and City Maintenance Supervisor Hugh Jensen. In the front are Council Member Claire Jeffko and Hunter Plumb. Right, two-year-old Hunter Plumb digs into the Arbor Day planting activities at Little Learners Park, before focusing his attention on harvesting earth worms.

up the same girl again and she reported it to her mother. Lowrie then drove to the victims’ residence and started to talk to the mother, who instructed her kids to call 911,” said Sheriff Rogers. As Lowrie drove away from the residence, the mother wrote down the license of Lowrie’s vehicle and reported the incident to the sheriff ’s office. The vehicle Lowrie was driving is a 2011 Hyundai Elantra 4 door, registered to him. On April 22, Deputy Isaiah Holloway was detailed to Golden Road in reference to a child luring complaint. At the location the deputy made contact with a mother and her daughter. The mother reported that a male subject had attempted to lure her daughter into his vehicle on two different occasions. Deputy Holloway started looking for Lowrie and located him driving north on County Highway 7 and Thayer Road. “Lowrie was questioned about the incident and his only comment was that he thought she was 13-years-old and then he stopped talking,” said Rogers. Lowrie was placed under arrest and transported to Okanogan County Jail and booked for two counts of attempting to lure a minor into a motor vehicle. Prior to the arrest, the victim’s mother posted photos of a similar car on Facebook in an effort to warn people about this man. “Then when he was arrested we were told he had several weapons, including knives, in the car with him,” she said. “I hope he doesn’t get out of jail any time soon.”

Tonasket Librarian retires after 18 years Tonasket Library loses Meg but welcomes Sara BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket City Librarian Meg Lange is retiring from an enjoyable career serving readers young, old and in-between.

Katie Teachout/ staff photos

A Retirement Party/Open House/ Reception is scheduled for today, Thursday, April 30, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; to say good-bye to Lange and welcome new librarian Sara McVay. Lange began working for the library in 1994, after coming to Tonasket to visit her sister Cathy Lange, and liking the area enough to stay. The sisters are originally from Tuscon, Arizona. At the time, the library was only open

SEE LIBRARIAN | PG A2

Forresters are May Fest Grand Marshals BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Dane and Joyce Forrester are this year’s May Day Grand Marshals and their choice by the May Festival Committee is somewhat of a departure, but well deserved. While the couple are widely known for keeping the Community Fireworks show going, they also have strong ties to the community at large and the schools. “Just guessing by my kids ages, I would say that we have been involved for 15 years total with the fireworks,” said Joyce. Dane says it all began with Joy Ehlers and then was picked up as a cause by the Sons of the American Legion. After a few years, the group grew smaller

and smaller until the Forresters seemed to be the only ones left to approach the community. “In the beginning we were short of having enough money, then Jim Prince donated to help us out. We’ve had others, especially Greg James, chip in each year, but it is often a struggle to find the funds,” said Dane, who adds that many in the community have been generous. He points to the help the event has gotten from Brian and Rebecca Sawyer the past six years as making his job easier. Brian Sawyer is the licensed pyrotechnician that is responsible for making the show a spectacular each year. The couple, especially Dane, say they are glad to be out of the fund raising part of the event now that the Oroville Chamber of

Commerce has taken over. “Now we can just go down to Deep Bay Park and help to set off the fireworks. We don’t even have to worry about getting the park ready any more,” said Dane. In addition to the fireworks, Dane has coached junior high basketball for three years and high school softball for 10 years for Oroville. He can also often be seen running the time clock at sporting events. “We put in two years helping with the Can Am boat races in 1988 and 1989 and we put on the Oroville May Day 3 on 3 Basketball tournament for three years under the Oroville Booster Club,” said Joyce. For 22 years Dane worked for the family business at Dicks Furniture, as well as helping out with their orchards. The furniture

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Volume 111 No. 17

Dane and Joyce Forrester are this year’s May Festival Grand Marshals. Both have strong family ties to the community, the schools and the May Festival celebration. They are the third generation to participate in the parade and the second to serve as Grand Marshals. Gary DeVon/staff photo

store was started by his grandfather.When the store closed he concentrated on his floor covering business Forrstar Flooring and Home Supply, but now is running the apple and cherry

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

orchards full time. The orchards were also started by his grandfather. His parents, Richard and the late Barbara Forrester, were May Festival Grand Marshals in 2005.

Like the younger Forresters, they were chosen for their contributions to the community. Dick and Barbara were amazing role models to Dane and I

SEE GRAND | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION News A2 Schools A3, A8 Cops & Courts A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Sports B1-2

Classifieds Real Estate Obituaries

B3-5 B5 B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015

LIBRARIAN | FROM A1

GRAND MARSHALS | FROM A1

24 hours per week. “When I first started, my goal was to work up to 25 items a day getting checked out, because there was just no traffic. It was our goal to meet the needs of the community, but if I didn’t get the traffic, I didn’t know what yhe people in the community wanted,” recalled Lange. “I can remember when we hit a thousand items a month being checked out. That was a huge goal, and now the average is 4,500 items checked out per month. We hope we met the needs of the community; that’s what it’s about.” Lange said they worked their way up to keeping the library open full-time about 13 years ago. Check-out slips were handwritten before the library became automated, with computers for patron use brought in about six years ago. Movies and audio books were added later. “We used to have patrons with audio books who would bring them in and trade out with other patrons through a basket on the counter,” said Lange. According to Lange the library computers are secure, with information wiped clean once a patron logs off, and password access changing daily. People who aren’t library members can get a day pass, even using their laptops outside when traveling, as the wi-fi is on 24/7. Other changes Lange witnessed over the years is a burgeoning summer reading program. “It’s good-sized now, with a lot of kids in it. Last summer they read a total of 2,532 minutes, and they try to beat that every year,” said Lange. Books can be read at the library, at home or anywhere else. Minutes of parents reading to preschoolers also count. “If they read 10 hours, they get a free new Scholastic book of their choosing that the Friends of the Library purchases with proceeds from book sales,” Lange said. Tonasket Library is one of 29 branches of the North Central Regional Library (NCRL) system and is funded by Okanogan County property taxes. Book sale proceeds are used within the branch for additional needs such as programming, artwork displays and other library needs. The book sales are held twice a year; on the Thursday and Friday prior to Founders Day Weekend and the Christmas Tree Lighting weekend. NCRL leases the space at city

for their involvement in Oroville that one, it will make the town community events. They inspired super pretty during Christmas.” us to work hard at keeping comJoyce’s parents are Dorothy munity traditions going for the and the late Bud Henneman. He next generation to enjoy. We worked as a well digger and her hope that the mom, who now next generation lives in Yakima, will be inspired worked several “There is no where to step forjobs, includward to keep ing running else I would have events like May the telephone rather been raised or s w i t c h b o a r d Festival, Rally at the Border the raised my family then from Blues Festival, Peerless Hotel. Tu m b l e w e e d “She also in Oroville. We love it Film Festival, worked in the here.” C h e s a w apple sheds and Joyce Forrester, Grand Marshal Fourth of July, then worked at Oroville May Festival Community Princes’ in the Fireworks, fabric departChristmas Tree ment for many Lighting, etc. in place for the next years,” said Joyce. generation to enjoy,” said Joyce. In addition, Joyce has been “Barbara and Dane hung the deeply involved in the MS Society Christmas decorations for the and she and her family were town one year. I’m not sure why recently among the several thouthat happened, but I think it had sand participants in the Walk MS to do with the city storing them in in Seattle. the furniture store after it closed,” “The participants in the MS said Joyce. Walk walked 4.6 miles through Carrying on the tradition, the University of Washington Joyce has committed to helping down to Gasworks Park. It was change the lights on the decora- the twenty-fifth anniversary of tions from all white poinsettias to the walk this year,” she said. colored bulbs. They have two grown daugh“That project is being spear- ters, Shelby and Lacey – both headed by Daralynn Hollenbeck,” Oroville High School graduates she adds. “I’m pretty excited about and both have served as class or

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Librarian Meg Lange (left) is retiring after 21 years. Local girl Sara McVay will be taking her place. hall, with the city of Tonasket providing upkeep, maintenance and janitorial services, as well as paying for utilities. “The people in the front office (at city hall) have all been wonderful. We use the council room for our programs, so it has been a really wonderful partnership,” said Lange. Programs include the summer reading program, puppet shows, crafts events and appearances by the ‘Reptile Man.’ The library gets deliveries twice a week of books that have been ordered or are new to the system. Three book clubs currently operating out of the Tonasket branch get copies of books ordered through a department out of regional works. NCRL is headquartered in Chelan. Lange said a favorite memory is working with the kids after school that didn’t have somewhere to go. “You watch them grow up over the years, letting them do things for the library to learn job skills; and then they come back and get hired,” she said. “Brittany Fitzthum came in when she was young, then she became a page, then she became a sub. I remember telling her when she was young, ‘One day, maybe we will be able to pay you.’” Lange said pages are high school students learning important customer service skills. “We couldn’t operate without all the volunteers helping,”

said Lange, adding she had lots of wonderful memories of staff members. “You become friends when you work together,” she said. The library currently has four volunteers on staff; Liz Williams, Hannah Calhoon, Sheila Barnes and Rachel Miketa-Lacey. “It’s been wonderful working here, with the people and the books and the kids,” said Lange. “It’s such a wonderful facility, with these custom-made oak shelves made by a gentleman here in town.” Retirement plans for Lange include gardening, visiting family and playing with her grandson. “Maybe I’ll do some traveling; that would be nice,” she said. The new librarian, who some will remember as Sara Jordan, is a 2008 Tonasket graduate. She has been working in the Omak library the last two years, and plans to move from Omak to Tonasket with her young, growing family as soon as possible. McVay’s husband, Patrick Dunn, was born and raised in Twisp, and is currently employed by the Winthrop Forest Service. Their daughter Amelia is four and a half. “Patrick is really liking the small town feel of Tonasket,” said McVay. “Omak is still small, but the people aren’t as connected as they are in a town the size of Tonasket.”

club royalty during May Festival, as has their mother. Shelby was recently married and is a hair stylist on the coast. Lacey is currently at home attending Bellevue College online, but transferring to Wenatchee Valley College in the fall. The Forrester family has been involved in the May Festival for three generations. Barbara served as majorette for the high school band. Dane served as crown bearer for his babysitter Lynn Dwyer in 1965 and Joyce did the usual club and class royalty. Completing the three generations are Shelby and Lacey who served as various royalty and both were Maypole Dancers. “The year Shelby was May Princess, the Wolleys, Kellys, Carpers and Dane and I put in over 100 hours in mechanically rebuilding and refurbishing the May Day float and trailer,” she said. “We are fortunate to live in the beautiful area we do. We are lucky to be surrounded by beautiful lakes and mountains and we really love living here,” said Joyce. “There is no where else I would have rather been raised or raised my family then in Oroville. We love it here.”

Firefighters continue to keep eye on fire straddling border at Mt. Chopaka OROVILLE — Firefighters from the Tonasket Ranger District are continuing to monitor US portion of the small fire at the United States-Canadian Border north of Chopaka Mountain. The fire is under unified command between United States and Canadian Governments. It is on lands managed by the United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management. The fire was active yesterday with isolated torching on the US side. It was pushed by 30-35 mile per hour winds blowing from the north/northwest. As a result, there was some additional spread onto BLM lands and the fire is estimated to be about four acres on the US side. On the Canadian side, the fire is estimated to be about 260 acres. The fire is burning in steep, rocky, inaccessible terrain between 2000 and 3000 feet elevation. Today’s helicopter flight to observe the fire from the air was cancelled due to cloud cover. Firefighters are actively monitoring the fire and taking suppression action where they can safely do so. Information about the incident, including an interactive map, is online at www.bcwildfire.ca. To report a fire, please call 911. For more information, please contact the Tonasket Ranger District at 509-486-2186.


APRIL 30, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

SCHOOLS

Tori Kindred elected State FBLA President Oroville Students travel to Future Business Leaders of America State Competition in Spokane THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SPOKANE - Washington State FBLA state competition included over 2000 students this year and the competition was incredible. An exciting element again this year included the campaigning

and preparation by Tori Kindred for state president as well as Ellamae Burnell for regional vice president representing the North Central Region. Kindred campaigned and was elected to serve the over 5000 members state wide as the

Submitted photo

Newly Elected President Tori Kindred Speaks to the audience of two thousand members and advisers at the Washington State FBLA Business Leadership Conference held at the Performing Arts Center, INB in Spokane.

next Washington State Future Business Leaders of America State President. Burnell campaigned against a candidate from Bridgeport and was elected to serve, filling the role of Vice President Representing the North Central Region, a role previously held by Kindred. All attending members worked together at the conference to assist Kindred and Burnell in their campaign for state office. After preparing for over a month, and days of caucusing, speeches and a voting process at the state competition, the race for State President was clinched by Tori Kindred. To add to the excitement, Burnell was selected as the next State Vice President representing the North Central Region FBLA for the 2015/16 school year and will serve under Kindred on the state Executive Board. Kindred will lead her Executive Team at Washington State conferences held in the fall and winter and work with the Washington State Board on their program of work attending multiple events throughout this next year. Kindred will also hold a seat on the Washington State FBLA Board. Burnell will lead the region in leadership, presiding over the region officers training, fall leadership and winter competition as well as state competition in April of 2016. Kindred and Burnell will be traveling to Nationals in Chicago, IL in June to represent the North Central Region and Washington State along with the state leadership team. ‘A sincere thank you goes to Tori Kindred for her hard work introducing the region officers training in Leavenworth Washington as well as her efforts

80th tonasket Founders day

Submitted photo

Members of the Oroville Future Business Leaders who travelled to Spokane for the State Conference prior to opening session at the INB waterfront in Spokane (front row, l-r) Yessica Nemecio and Courtnee Kallstrom, (middle) Kali Peters, Jeniffer Cisneros, Bailey Griffin, Ellamae Burnell, Lena Fuchs, Pie Todd, (back) Mikaela McCoy, Dakota Haney. Not pictured setting up for conference, Tori Kindred. to provide enhanced conferences for the entire region,” said her father and FBLA advisor, Tony Kindred. Kindred, who will be handing over the gavel to Burnell as she takes over for the region, will take up a bigger gavel leading Washington State at the State Business Meeting in Chicago. Oroville Future Business Leaders of America students traveled to Spokane to compete in FBLA competitive events on April 15-17. The conference was held at The INB, Double Tree and Red Lion Inn at the Park. Members who competed at state include, Kindred, Burnell, Courtnee Kallstrom, Kali Peters, Bailey Griffin, Dakota Haney, Lena Fuchs, Pie Todd, Mikaela McCoy, Yessica Nemecio and Junior High President Jennifer Cisneros. The trip to state this year was an amazing experience, according to the students. “Watching these students

excel at both the region and state level as well as be elected to State Office has proven a great experience and I am very proud of these students,” said Tony Kindred. “This group of students represented Oroville with professionalism, timeliness, courtesy, respect, competitiveness, excitement and good old-fashioned fun. “What an amazing group of students.” Along with Motivational speaker presentations, multiple workshops and sessions as well as competition and campaigning, the students had the privilege to attend a college and career fair, a live concert with Cami Bradley a competitor from America’s Got Talent. Included in the conference this year, students were excited to hear from Howard Behar former President of Starbucks, Robbie Bach creator of XBOX, Shasheen Shah International Business Coach and several other high profile speakers.

Students placing at state included Public Service Announcement Team, Kindred, McCoy and Burnell. These students created a public service announcement video “Green Teens,” and were responsible to present as a team together before a panel of judges. The team placed sixth. Kindred also placed sixth in FBLA Principles and Procedures and will compete at Nationals in Chicago. Also placing sixth was Yessica Nemecio who presented the FBLA creed competition. Oroville FBLA and Kindred would like to her sponsors of her Presidential Campaign: John and Becky Desjardins of Hometown Pizza and Bakery, John and Linda Zosel, Howard Zosel of Z’s Engineering and Jack and Mary Hughes of Hughes Department Store/Ace hardware. Oroville FBLA and Burnell would like to thank her sponsors: Oroville Reman & Reload, Kathy Noel, Devyn Grillo, Designs by Devyn and Great Northern Garlic

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015

COPS & COURTS

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Christopher David Brockmiller, 34, Okanogan, pleaded guilty April 8 to first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, firstdegree burglary (DV), two counts of harassment (threats to kill), two counts of harassment (threats to kill) (DV), and one count of fourth-degree assault (DV). Brockmiller was sentenced April 24 to 116 months (9.66 years) in prison and fined $600. The crimes occurred in June, August and September of 2014. Juliana Yvonne Terry, 30, Electric City, pleaded guilty April 21 to residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. Terry was sentenced to 22 months in prison and fined $600. The crimes occurred Feb. 1 in the Sinlahekin. Clarence Marcel Desautel Jr., 51, Omak, pleaded guilty April 21 to intimidating a public servant. Desautel was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $600 for the July 8, 2014 crime. Dana Ray Wilson, 62, Oroville, pleaded guilty April 21 to fourth-degree assault (lesser included of first-degree child molestation). The court dismissed an additional charge of first-degree child molestation. Wilson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and credit for time served; and fined $760.50 for the 2013 crime. Christian Kane Lundsten, 35, Tonasket, pleaded guilty April 21 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The court dismissed a second-degree assault (DV) charge. Lundsten was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended with credit for 20 days served; and fined $600 for the Aug. 20, 2014 crime. Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 27, Omak, pleaded guilty April 22 to POCS (methamphetamine). The court dismissed a charge of POCS (heroin). In a separate case, the court dismissed an additional charge of POCS (methamphetamine). Squetimkin was sentenced to 12+ months in prison and fined $2,110.50. Jesse James Ytarte, 33, Omak, pleaded guilty April 23 to two counts of harassment (lesser included of threats to kill) and one count of second-degree criminal trespassing. Ytarte was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 295 days suspended with credit for 69 days served; and fined $1010.50 for the Feb. 12 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Teresa Lynn Cruz, 47, Tonasket, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV) and fourthdegree assault (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred April 16. The court found probable cause to charge Chantelle Rose Mendivil, 19, Oroville, with attempted first-degree murder, first-degree robbery and firstdegree burglary. The crimes allegedly occurred July 31, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Larry Gene Visger, 67, with addresses in Omak and Oroville, with two counts of unauthorized issuance of a bank check. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 4. The court found probable cause to charge Manuel Cabrera Jr., 26, Omak, with two counts of second-degree theft and one count of first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred March 25. JUVENILE A 13-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty April 22 to third-degree malicious mischief and second-degree malicious mischief. The boy was sentenced to seven days in detention with credit for one day served, and fined $100 for the Nov. 9, 2014 crimes. In a separate case, the boy pleaded guilty April 22 to first-degree criminal trespassing, third-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. He was sentenced to a total of 15 days in detention with credit for 15 days served, and fined $100 for the April 6 crimes. A restitution hearing for both cases was scheduled for June 24. DISTRICT COURT John David Price, 54, Omak, guilty of DUI. Price was sen-

tenced to 364 days in jail with 348 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Stacy Lea Rodriguez, 49, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of third-degree theft. Rodriguez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,326. Tristan Devlyn Rodriguez, 18, Okanogan, guilty of unlawful display of a weapon. Rodriguez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $933. William Lloyd Sasse, 53, Tonasket, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Sasse was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 360 days suspended, and fined $933. Stephanie Melissa Starkweather, 28, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Starkweather was sentenced to 20 days in jail with five days suspended, and fined a total of $1,386. Brandy Marie Summers, 38, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree defrauding of a public utility. Summers was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 170 days suspended, and fined $808. Beau Brandon True, 30, Omak, guilty of disorderly conduct, DUI and reckless driving. True was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,656. Constancio Vazquez Guzman, 50, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Vazquez Guzman was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Terrence Lee George Williams, 33, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Tamara Kathleen Wilson, 53, Tonasket, guilty of seconddegree DWLS. Wilson received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $768. Jeffery Allen Young, 44, Tonasket, had a second-degree criminal trespassing charge dismissed.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, APRIL 20, 2015 Fire on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Found property on Edmonds St. in Omak. Bicycle recovered. Warrant arrest on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Harassment on N. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Hanford St. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, DOC detainer and a Lincoln County FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. William George Myles, 64, booked for DUI. Larry Gene Visger, 67, booked on two counts each of forgery and third-degree theft. Christopher P. Campos, 43, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Smith Alexander Condon, 49, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. John Carl Jakoski, 72, booked for second-degree assault.

Shaylin Jerran Smith, 22, booked on a bench warrant for seconddegree burglary.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2015 Drugs on N. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Threats on Timber Wolf Rd. near Tonasket. Rape on E. Dry Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Cherry Lane near Okanogan. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Drill vice reported missing. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Drills reported missing. Sex offense on Golden Rd. near Oroville. Found property on Bluebell Lane near Tonasket. Outboard motor recovered. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Chainsaw reported missing. Sex offense on Ironwood St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Assault on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Central Ave. in Oroville. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Rock reportedly thrown through window. Drugs on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Chace Kenneth Taber, 25, booked for second-degree vehicle prowl, second-degree criminal trespassing, VUCSA (heroin), VUCSA (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Heather Watson, no middle name listed, 42, booked for firstdegree trafficking in stolen property, second-degree theft and second-degree possession of stolen property. Jose A. Escamilla Villasano, 35, booked for third-degree rape. Monte Louis Nicholson, 47, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for first-degree DWLS. Kallie Louann Thomas, 26, DOC detainer.

Jesse Jane, no middle name listed, 38, DOC detainer. Michael Allen Menley, 37, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Douglas Arthur Lowrie, 53, booked on two counts of luring.

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2015 Violation of a no-contact order on Limebelt Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Public intoxication on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Ash St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Ferry St. in Omak. Windshield reported smashed. Warrant arrest on Hanford St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Jackson St. in Omak. Windshield reported smashed. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Recovered vehicle on 12th Ave. in Oroville. Pamela Mae Jones, 50, booked for fourth-degree assault and resisting arrest. Nichole Briane Martin Porras, 24, booked for hit-and-run (attended). Janet Lyn Charley, 48, booked on three OCSO warrants: DUI, third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device; and a Douglas County warrant for DUI. Anthony Jason Bigwolf, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Dona Castillo Reed, 50, booked for third-degree assault.

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2015 Littering on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Columbia St. in Omak. Found property on Apple Way

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2015 Two-vehicle crash on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Theft at Spectacle Lake near Tonasket. Harassment on Bentham Rd. in Omak. Custodial interference on Burton Ave. in Okanogan. Recovered vehicle on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Ridge Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Loitering on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Vehicle prowl on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Assault on S. Joseph St. in Tonasket. Ronald Ellsworth Albert, 49, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Julia Maria Johns, 37, booked for contempt of court. Robert Francis Boyce, 57, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS, a Grant County FTA warrant for making a false or misleading statement, and a King County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Last Friday afternoon the Oroville Police Department, along with units from the U.S. Border Patrol, Okanogan County Sheriffs and the Washington State Patrol responded to a report of a domestic dispute where a man was alleged to have been dragging his wife by the hair. When they arrived the woman, Donna Reed is alleged to have assaulted Oroville Police Chief Todd Hill and was arrested for obstructing and assaulting a police officer. The police tried to arrest the husband, Richard Reed, but he had barricaded himself in the house, according to Chief Hill. The couple’s two daughters attempted to talk their father into giving himself up, but there was no sign the suspect was coming out. After some concern that Reed may be armed, Hill made the decision to get a warrant and armed law enforcement stood by and warned bystanders to get back. Chief Hill later decided to ask all law enforcement to leave in the hopes that Reed would come out on his own, which he did later in the evening, turning himself in at the Oroville Police Station. “We opted not to conduct the search warrant and enter the residence. It was a case of a possible possession of a firearm, versus an alleged crime. It is not worth the risk to the officers safety or to potential bystanders,” said Chief Hill. “He did later come and turn himself in and was released. The case goes to the prosecutor to decide. If he gets a summons to appear in court and doesn’t then an arrest warrant will be issued.”

Ave. in Okanogan. Fourwheeler recovered. Fraud on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on Queen St. in Okanogan. Laptop reported missing. Fraud on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on Boone Ave. in Conconully. Automobile theft on Gold Hill Rd. near Loomis. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Threats on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Harassment on N. Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Golden St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Orovile. Malicious mischief on Golden St. in Oroville. Derrick James Charley, 21, booked for third-degree malicious mischief. Dennis Lee Glover, 47, booked on three Superior Court FTA warrants: POCS, DUI and use or possession of drug paraphernalia. Sherrie Lovette, no middle name listed, 59, booked for residential burglary and seconddegree theft. Laura Lee Munson, 47, booked for residential burglary and second-degree theft. Lester Vincent Priest, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Michael Aaron Cornella, 25, booked on a drug court violation. Josephine Valdez, no middle name listed, 22, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS.

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2015 Assault on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Threats on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Edmonds St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Omache Dr. in Omak.

Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Lost property on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. iPod reported missing. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Cameron Roth Ripper, 18, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Isaac Koostahtah Bessette, 23, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Ernesto Alvarado Rojas, 36, booked for no valid operator’s license without ID, negligent driving and a USBP hold. Stacy Lavon Adrian, 46, DOC detainer. Darwin J. McDonald, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft.

SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 2015 Threats on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Elm St. in Omak. Constancio Vazquez Guzman, 50, booked for DUI. Kim James Northcott, 56, booked for physical control.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement


APRIL 30, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER How do we keep our communities vital?

I just caught the tail end of the Pathways to Prosperity workshop held at the Pastime Bar & Grill recently. From what I saw it was interesting and seemed to focus, at least in the second half, on how Oroville can attract entrepreneurs to live here – especially that group of young people known as Millennials. You know, the ones that came after the Baby Boomers and Generation X. If we’re to put a label on it. The twenty to thirty somethings. It seems most of those in attendance were of Baby Boomer or Gen-Xer vintage – while they do own most of the businesses here, the idea was that we need to have more of the next generation to keep the town fresh and vital. The workshop was put on by Washington State University and was attended, via video, by many different communities in rural Eastern Washington. “The focus was on revitalizing our communities through entrepreneurship. They stressed that small business makes up a huge part of Out of this country’s economy and is especially imporMy Mind tant in rural communities,” said Chris Branch, Gary A. DeVon Oroville’s director of community development. “Boomers are active people engaged in planning to work to revitalize our community... but we notice that the younger people are not there and they are potentially the entrepreneurs who will start new businesses,” said Branch, who helped facilitate the conference. Branch adds that it comes down to making downtown Oroville an attractive place to start a business. “There were questions like ‘why come here?’ How do we show the community in a positive light – it’s a big challenge. There were suggestions like having the Chamber start a fund for new business and education,” he said. Among those “big challenges” was the fact that in Oroville the economy can be very seasonal. Another is that there are several empty buildings, but few are ready be moved into right away. After watching the video, the group was asked to identify the community’s entrepreneurs and ask existing people why they located their businesses here. There was also talk about can the community take advantage of things like NAFTA, Foreign Trade Zones and Port Districts. Branch said new state legislation has passed that allows Port Districts to be smaller and not have to take in the whole county. Something that held north county back in the past. Several business people also answered questions regarding why they have a business here. Some grew up here and have family here. While others like the rural area and country life Oroville affords them. Kell Peterson, an economist from Osoyoos and Vicki Eberhart, who is starting a wool mill in Oroville, suggested those gathered need to start looking at North America as their market, rather than just Main Street. We need more meetings like these – but we also need to see more than just a few of the same faces, mixed with a few new ones. Keeping our community vital is important to all who live here and finding that next generation of entrepreneurs who will take Oroville into the next decades is vital to our community’s survival.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Puzzle of Autoimmunity

Dear Editor, Puzzles seem to beg for solving, no more so than the puzzle of autoimmunity. Autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Lupus, Crohn’s Disease, type 1 diabetes and many more are unfortunately common in the Pacific Northwest. In fact no state has a higher percentage count of autoimmunity patients than Washington. With this puzzle, pieces include the influence of genes, triggers, family history and the state of one’s immune system. How can siblings receive the same genetic load with completely different outcomes; the sister with MS, the brother with Crohn’s and another brother with no apparent autoimmune issues at all? How have we come to the 21st century with so little understanding of the origin of over 80 autoimmune conditions? Slowly increasing numbers of therapies are emerging but there remain no cures. Women and children get the brunt of this health dilemma. No part of the body or age group is immune. Research is underway in many parts of the world but definitive paths to eliminate developing autoimmune diseases are yet to be found.

North Central Washington has a high incidence of autoimmunity and better understanding of this complicated puzzle can lead to earlier and correct diagnosis; key to slowing and reducing tissue damage from the family of autoimmune diseases. May 16 in Wenatchee at the Performing Arts Center, the first annual Living with Autoimmunity event will be presented for patients, family and support persons. This program is a joint effort of the Autoimmune Advocacy Alliance and the National MS Society; Greater NW Chapter. An overview of autoimmunity and insight from medical specialists will be included. A patient panel will offer their own stories and how they are coping. Admission is free but registration is requested. To register visit www.a3autoimmunity/blog.org or call the MS Society at 1-800-344-4867 For questions of further information please call Judi Rising at 509-630-5344 Judy Rising Wenatchee

Column was inaccurate Dear Gary, In your column you made mention that the

School District does not allow outside groups such as youth baseball, softball and adult softball to use our field. I believe this is an inaccurate statement. In the 15 plus years I have been here we have never to my knowledge turned sports groups away from using our fields. Presently we have youth softball using Terry Taylor Field for practice and games, and I am told that adult softball still uses it from time to time for practice. In regards to a soccer field at the new Prince’s Heritage Park, no one has approached the School District in regards to our teams playing there or our contributing to it’s development. Personally, the last thing I want to see this new park space used for is another soccer field. Any group that is pursing the development of a soccer field and using the School District as an advocate is doing so without the School Districts knowledge. As Athletic Director I did have one of our High School Soccer coaches ask me if I would write something in support of a soccer field and I told him I would not. Respectfully, Tam Hutchinson OHS Athletic Director

SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Reporter/Production Katie Teachout katheriner@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago: Friday, April 19- 26, 1940: At a meeting of the school board of Oroville District #116 held on Monday of this week, Lloyd H. Priebe was chosen from among a number of applicants and given a one year contract as Superintendent of the Oroville School for the 1940-41 school year. He replaces John Crabb, who has been the superintendent for the past five years. Vivian Birch, Dorothea Simpson, Joyce Petry and Kathryn Nigg now have the invitations ready to be mailed for the Junior Prom. Those who will receive invitations to act as patrons and patronesses are: Mr. and Mrs. Dale Rice, Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Brunner, Mr. Mrs. N. E. Petry, Mr. and Mrs. Jess Sexson, Mr. Mrs. James Sherwood, Mr. Mrs. Frank Bartell, Mr. Mrs. Arthur Noble, Mr. Mrs. John A .Jensen and Mr. Mrs. N. L. Thrasher. The seniors will also receive their invitations this week. A free dance celebrating their third anniversary at the Liberty Ball Room in Oroville is being advertised for Saturday night, April 20, with the compliments of the Serenaders Modern Dance Band: Kelly, Piano, Tink, Violin, Tex, guitar, Larry, clarinet, Monte, Hawaiian guitar, Joy vocals. The Oroville Business Club, at their regular meeting at the Peerless Hotel, with a good attendance present. After the reading of the minutes, a brief from the Washington Motor Coach Co. in regards to the application of Hugh Lawrence for an extension of his bus line from Wilbur to Spokane, making it from Oroville to Spokane. Since the club had already been on record as favoring, no action was taken. There are included in these issues, headlined articles from outlying communities for activities in their districts and they include: Ellisforde, Loomis News, Cordell, Chopaka, Knob Hill, Molson Items, Meyers Creek and the Molson Broadcaster, Molson Union High School. Substantial reductions in the residential and commercial of the Washington Power Company are announced by C. Rae Moore, Manager of the Okanogan Division. This rate reduction will amount a saving of $300,000 annually by the customers of the company. Grocery Prices: Carnation Milk, 3 cans $.21; Shredded Wheat, per pkg. $.09; Tang Dressing, 1 qt. $.29; Willapa Oysters, $.14 per can; Hills Bros. coffee, 4 lb. can, $1.00.

ITEMS FROM THE PAST The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: April 15 - 29, 1965: Oroville Grade School has chosen their May Day Royalty. They are: Pamela Kiser, Caroline Milicia, Laura Meese, Cynthia Best, Connie Thorndike, Teresa Stucker, Charlotte Meese, Karen Kiser, Karen Manchester, Bonnie Howe, Bonnie Fleischman, Beverly Verbeck, Queen, Vickie Reese, Theresa Harden and Leanne Loose. A picture on the front page of a 26-inch Rainbow Trout, caught by Ken Barton in Palmer Lake, weighed in at 7 3/4 lbs. The Oroville High School Scholastic Team has been chosen for 1965. Seniors of the list are: Kathleen Kernan, Edna Ballard, Cindy Ramey, Bruce Scott, Pat Siegrist and Howard Chamberlin; Juniors; Karen Haskell, Carolyn Day, Tom Littlefield, Barbara Trevithick and Sophomore, Gay Kammers. The time of year for parades is nearing. The May Day Committee is sending out applications forms to other communities in the valley to take part in the big annual parade. Locally, all entries should be sent to Leonard Fish, parade chairman, not later than May 3. At the request of the Dominican Sisters, who operate the St. Martin’s Hospital in Tonasket, to form a Hospital Advisory Committee and that has been formed. Hans Bergh, Oroville and Bob Codding, Tonasket, are co-chairman and Mrs. W. G. Scofield, Oroville, as Secretary. Other members of the board are; Wilbur G. Hallauer, Oroville, Mrs. J. H. Colbert, Tonasket, Glee Sullivan, Loomis and Marion Turner, Molson. Water in the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation canal had been turned on only a few hours when during Thursday night, a section of the canal broke through about 1 1/2 miles west of Oroville. This necessitated the building of an open canal about 500 feet in length. By Tuesday morning, shaping of the canal began and concrete is being poured today (Thursday). Guy Fisher, Chief Engineer, stated that they hope to have water back on by next Monday. Last Friday, the Oroville High School students elected the Student Body Officers for 1965-66. They are: Dan Schultz, President; Van Landreth, Vice President; Gay Kammers, Secretary; Nancy Harnasch, Treasurer. Grocery Prices: Boiling

beef, $.29 per lb.; Beef liver, $.29 per lb.; 21 oz. Nalley’s syrup, $.29; Head lettuce, $.17 per lb. Freestone peaches, #2 1/2 can, 3 for $.85; New potatoes, 5 lb. $.49. WeatherWise, by Marge Frazier, Official observer: April 21, 67 degrees maximum and 37 degrees minimum; April 22, 69 and 39; 23, 70 and 32; April 24, 71 and 48; April 25, 76 and 41; April 26, 77 and 35 and April 27, 76 and 44. No precipitation for the period.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: April 19 - 26, 1990: The Fourth Annual Oroville Chamber of Commerce sponsored “Clean-up of the Century” has been set for Saturday, April 28. Congratulations to Grand Marshall couple, Wesley and Fanny Rogers. Summer runoff for the area -- small streams is expected to be below normal. Forecasts for the Okanogan River is 76 percent of Normal, the Similkameen, 80 percent and the Methow River, 90 percent. April 1 snow cover was 70 percent of average in the Okanogan-Methow. Last week was down and up and then back down again situation for the Hornet’s Baseball Squad as they fell before Lake Roosevelt, came back to slide past Tonasket, then was sent to the slaughter house by Chelan. League Softball got underway for the Hornet girls last Thursday ass they hosted Lake Roosevelt Raiders in a double header when the Hornets took the Raiders in the opener then defeated them again in the nightcap, 6-3. Oroville would be the community to benefit most should a gold mine go into production on Buckhorn Mountain east of Chesaw according to the Executive VicePresident for Crown Resources. According to Crown Resources, the Buckhorn discovery was ‚Äúone of the largest new gold deposits found in North American during 1989.‚Äù Two moose were spotted last week on the second Molson grade by Sandy Mann, who said that they have been reported to be in the area quite frequently. Moose are usually a rare sight in the area. Tonasket High School students have thrown their hats in the ring for Student Body Officers for 1990-91: They are: Tina Bolz, ASB president; Stacie Ayers. Secretary-Treasurer; Justin Attwood and Jenny Orth, VP of publicity; Mark Super, Ben White, Pablo Bensing, VPs of programs. Real Estate for sale: 100’ lot with all services, ready for your home and enjoyment on shimmering Lake Osoyoos, $45,000 trees, close to National Forest, with drilled well. 97 near the border, Excellent family home, $115,000; Log Cabin, located on 6.23 acres surrounded by trees, close to National Forest, with a drilled well. $15,000.00 down, $137.00 monthly at 10%.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Glad to see the end of April The last day of the month, and I’ve mentioned it wasn’t a favorite, for me. Hopefully all of the glitches are behind me and May will be filled with good things. Already I can think of some positive happenings. To finish law school is an accomplishment and one of our grandson’s has done

that, with honors. (he is really a granddaughter’s husband, but I just hate that word “in-law” ..... he is part of the family. I know he will do well because he can talk “up a storm” to old and young alike. And then, of course, baby Robin joined our family, making our youngest daughter a grandma. We were able to see

and hold her, in Wenatchee, and she is music. It is a most interesting college and there should be more of its kind, or so it indeed a keeper. Then, we can jump across the states to seems to me. Then, we got a decent settlement Missouri and another special from our “fender bender” family member, graduated and got a car replacement. from “Hard Work University” And I had my eye procedure, and in case you’ve never and it didn’t kill me, as I had heard of that school, it is for envisioned it might, when I real, and the official name is couldn’t sleep at night “College of the Ozarks” and And now, before Shirley is located in the back door of thinks I have forgotten, please Branson, where all the fun remember the Red Cross and music is. The college blood draw, to be held, at the started in 1906 and if you United Methodist Church, qualify (and work hard) you can make it when finances THIS & THAT May 6th, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. So far the record for are in short supply. Through Joyce Emry “turn-out” holds up, so please no fault of his own, our Gavin remember this date and help needed assistance, and he now has a degree in elementary education and fill the quota, once again.

Do you have a cultural skill you’d like to pass down? SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Many skills once nearly universal have been lost to time and modern conveniences. Even if they are no longer necessary for everyday living, these skills still have value to our culture. Do you have one of these skills? Are you willing to share your knowledge? North Valley Community School would like to facilitate the passing down of cultural skills and knowledge. Give us a call if you are willing to teach! Coming up this week NVCS is offering the following classes: Gold Panning and Placer Mining - Saturday, May 2 at 9 a.m. Panning is one of the sim-

Joannie and David Raymond, were in Molson tying up “loose ends” at Vivian Emry’s house, as Vivian now makes her home with them on Vashon Island. They attended the pancake feed at the Grange Hall where they were able to see many friends. They expect to return in June for the Mid-Summer Festival and another pancake breakfast. I recently reported the illness of Forrey Boyer and today it was announced that he passed away on Sunday. And another death was reported and that is of Judy Marts, longtime resident of Oroville. Tom and Dorothy (Roberts) Wagner of Kenai, Alaska were in the Oroville area visiting family and friends. ‘Til Next Week

THE LEARNING TREE plest ways to find gold. It is cheap, easy and makes a great weekend activity for the family! This class will teach you what to look for and how to find it! Flute for All Ages- Tuesday May 5 at 6 p.m. Learn to play the flute! All ages welcome! Meditation for a Peaceful Mind – Tuesday, May 5 at 6 p.m. Work, kids, spouse, housework, in-laws, politics, unexpected events...all of these and more can leave us with overwhelming stress. Join this class to learn

meditation, relax and get your piece of peace! Switching From PC to Mac with Ease - Tuesday, May 5 at 6 p.m. Have you decided to make the switch from using a PC to a Mac? Do you need a little help transitioning? Sign up for this class and make sure your switch is silky smooth. Is Your Dog Training You? - Thursday, May 7 at 5:30 p.m. Many people consider their dogs to be family. But even family shouldn’t jump on people, drag you down the street, poop on the neighbors lawn or bite chunks out of the legs of passersby. Though I must admit I sometimes suspect my own family members of several of these. Join this class to learn straight forward techniques for keeping your dog well behaved. To sign up for these classes and more call Ellen at 476-2011 or visit the NVCS website at northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Submitted photo

Local members of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association met members of the Okanogan County Backcountry Horsemen on the north end of Blue Lake in the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area early Saturday morning to do trail maintenance. At 9 a.m. they started hiking to the Blue Lake Trailhead and worked on the trail traveling south on the west side of Blue Lake. For the first two miles they trimmed trees with loppers and handsaws. They also performed some light trail reconstruction removing rocks and debris along the trail. At 11:30 a.m. they stopped for a picnic lunch along the trail and at noon continued hiking south and encountered a section of the forest where some logging activity had occurred. For the next mile they raked and removed limbs and debris by hand. At 1:30 p.m. they finished our assigned section of the trail and began to hike out. The group reached our original starting point at 3 p.m. and enjoyed a potluck celebration hosted by members of the Backcountry Horsemen. “Thank you to all members of the PNTA and Backcountry Horsemen for your work on this trail. This is a wonderful area and we hope more people take advantage of opportunities to use the trail,” said Dave Tobey, with the PNTA.

Trail maintenance and upcoming events discussed SUBMITTED BY DAVE TOBEY OROVILLE CHAPTER OF THE PNTA

At the April 22 meting of the Oroville Chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association, there were project reports on the recent trail maintenance event in the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area on Saturday, April 18. Six local PNTA members worked from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. clearing the trail on the west side of Blue Lake. This was a combined project with the Backcountry Horsemen. Justin Haug, DFW facility manager, sent us a note of thanks for your participation. This was a fun event and we hope to do similar projects soon. Samantha Hale, Marketing Director for the PNTA, discussed possible promotion ideas for the PNT and activities in our area. Suggestions included the rotation of monthly meetings to include Oroville, Tonasket and

PNW TRAIL NEWS Omak. She also suggested the inclusion of area businesses as trail partners, the use of social media, and coordinating events with PNTA HQ so they can promote our events on their website. Samantha has many great ideas and we appreciate her willingness to help the local communities along the PNT. Upcoming events: A. National Trails Day, June 6 Planning for this event is on track and we are making progress. Trygve Culp will host the trail maintenance event starting at Whistler Canyon Trailhead at 9:00 a.m. Dave Tobey will host the Similkameen Trail bike ride at 4:00 p.m. The evening event will be at 6:00 p.m. and a motion was made to have it at Centennial Park in Downtown Oroville. Dave will check on the availability of this site. It was also suggested that we have a cookout and grill hamburgers and hotdogs. B. Trail Day, August 8 and 9 Joseph Enzensparger would

like input from the members on the following questions. 1. Do we want vendors like artists and crafts? 2. Do we want local food? 3. Should we contact outdoor suppliers to showcase tents and gear? 4. What activities, hikes or runs or bike rides as scheduled events? 5. What about a fish tank for kids? Please email your suggestions to Joseph at jgenz4@gmail.com C. Oroville May Day, May 9 Joseph and Dave will set up a PNTA information table at the May Day event. Samantha is planning to attend and supply us with promotional items. Attending the meeting were James Moore, Steve Shimmel, Dave Tobey and special guest from PNTA headquarters in Sedro Woolley, Jon Knechtel and Samantha Hale. Thank you to our Special Guest Jon and Samantha for attending and providing support and direction for our local chapter. Jon reported they dodged over 40 mule deer on the trip home. Yikes!

AT THE LEGION POST Oroville girls wow them at Nashville Country Starts

We will do our best to make the seats accessible so please join us.

Call Commander Louie Wilson at 509-476-3438.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

SUBMITTED BY VICKI HART AMERICAN LEGION POST #84

Thank you to all those who attended the Nashville Stars show at the Legion Friday. We had a great crowd. All the funds raised go to support the program so the young singers can showcase their talent. We had two local ladies, Pie Todd and Aya Cruspero, sing for us, too. Wow! They all did a beautiful job. We are so proud of them. Legion Post 84 will have a float or two in the May Festival parade. We are featuring Korean War vets but are asking all veterans who would like to ride and/ or to help with the float please do so. Please call and let us know who will be there so we know how many places we need. If for some reason you don’t call, show up anyway. We will make room.

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

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Last week, we enjoyed a royal gala that included hosting the May Festival Royalty by our own Senior Citizen Royalty. We hosted Ellamae (yes, named after the mountain), the May Festival Queen and Princesses Faith and Mikayla. They shared a table with white table cloth, fine china, royal purple lilacs, and assorted flowers as a centerpiece. And, they drank sparkling cider in crystal glasses, all organized by Roberta Cole, our out going Senior Citizen Queen. Roberta and Howard passed the crowns to the new Senior Royalty. Hank and Darlene were also presented with a certificate of election. Hank wore his best suit, and Darlene was in purple to match

Over 100 served breakfast

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS the table décor. The May Festival Queen, and the Princesses spoke to our attendees. All was wonderful. We have secured a convertible from Becky, of Hometown fame, for our Senior Royalty to ride in the parade. Maybe we can win the blue ribbon again. Ruth LaFrance honored Harry Stockwell’s 91st birthday with a candle and a wish. We all sang him happy birthday with many more. Our mini motorcycle raffle fund raiser is going well. We have met many generous raffle ticket purchasers. Those of you who haven’t had a chance to purchase a ticket, will have an opportunity as the drawing is not until after

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May Festival. Our main project, of late, has been the new floor in the dining room. Brent Daniels did a professional job of installation and we want to thank all who gave input and helped. I think its beautiful. We’re looking for someone to pull weeds and mow, and attend to landscaping. Would someone please volunteer? Betty Steg is accepting pictures for a “school days” picture contest. Dig up a picture of yourself while you were in school for her to display. At the County Association we are revising the By Laws in order to give the members and local centers more control. All the members are invited to vote to ratify these amendments at their local Centers. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Dave Russel; Pinochle, Betty Hall; High Woman, Danny Weitrich and High Man, Leonard Paulsen. out to the Hilstad families with the death of Teddie this past weekend.

BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

There are still a few tables available. Call Penny at 509-485-2343. There were 116 breakfasts served at the Pancake Feed in Judy will have her wonderful cinMolson at the Grange Hall. This namon rolls. If you want one you is the best deal around. You can’t need to get there early. The Bingo Fridays for May are go wrong For $8. the 1st and 15th. Come and join The next breakfast will be in the middle of June at the Mid the fun. I was able to have a short visit Summer Fest. Mark your calenwith “Uncle Bim” at the Rodeo dars. The winners of the gift bas- Club Dinner. If you remember kets were: Ken Ripley, Susan Eder, back about a year or so ago when Sharon Cox, Becky Cross and we met he was living up in Alaska with Tina, his care giver. He is Mark the cook, Alden. The next big event on our still the character he was then. He Hilltop will be the Molson/ has now moved to Brewster, so Chesaw Yard Sale to be held on we can visit more often. “Uncle Bim” likes to help Bill Saturday, May 23 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch will be served starting and Sandy at the Mercantile when at 11 a.m. until they sell out. Taco he is here. He is still interested Salad is on the menu. Also avail- in writing and telling stories and enjoys talking to people. able will be soft Why notdrinks, start awater new and holiday tradition? Make thisprayers the go Our thoughts and baked goods.

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APRIL 30, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Looking for new membership, officer nominations

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM

of your Eagles Aerie. Election Day is Sunday, May 19 from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. and our installation of new officers will be Sunday, May 31. The routine for the Ladies Auxiliary is the same. Only the dates change nominations on the 12th and elections on the 26th. Upcoming plans for May Day. We will be open to the public that weekend and will have entertainment. The Star Connection Karaoke Show with Jeannie

OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

It’s that time of year again. We are asking for our membership to become involved in your Eagle Fraternity. Tuesday, May 5 is our day to nominate officers for the coming year. You must be present to accept a nomination or have a letter of acceptance available at 7 p.m. that night. Now is the time for you to step up and come to the aid

PAGE A7 Riggan will be with us on Friday, from 8 p.m. Saturday night at 9 p.m. North Half will be performing for your dancing and listening pleasure. Sunday morning is our traditional Mother’s Day Breakfast and all moms eat free. We start at 8 a.m. and serve until 11 a.m. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

Benefit for Annie Amerika, May 2 SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Well we had some rain, if you know where it is it’s time to go get some asparagus. On Saturday, May 2 we are having a benefit dinner/dessert auction for Annie Amerika Protection of Patriotism for the Veteran’s dream. Come support this worthy cause. Dinner will be Indian tacos by Jean Jones for $8.00 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Auction and Karaoke to follow and don’t forget Joker Poker at

Story Time at Library

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, April 29 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children. Community Action Board Meeting

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, April 29 at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. If you have questions or need additional information contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041. Stroke Support Group

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group will next meet on Wednesday, April 29 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir St. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments. Fire Ecology and History

TONASKET-Jason Llewellyn and Dale Swedberg will co-present about fire ecology and fire history, and share our region’s story of fire management on Friday, May 1 at 6:30 p.m. Swedberg will provide an intro to fire history and fire ecology. Llewellyn will discuss what goes into a prescribed fire, from the decision to use fire as a tool, through the planning phase, to carrying out the plan and keeping fire where it is intended. Come enjoy this exciting and informative presentation about Living with Fire. As Swedberg says, “Wildfire is a war, prescribed fire is a tool, no fire is not an option!” There will be a dinner benefiting the Community Cultural Center at 5:15 pm, followed by the presentation with tea, coffee and desserts.) Cost: Presentation is free; dinner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. More info: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw Oroville Library Book Sale

OROVILLE - The Oroville Library Board’s Semi Annual Book Sale will take place Friday, May 1 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come enjoy the great selection of books at great prices in a warm and friendly atmosphere. Hardbacks, paperbacks, movies and books on tape, gift sets available. Located at The Oroville Community Library, 1276 Main Street Oroville, Wash. For more info call 509-476-2662 Spring Barter Faire

TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire announces, “Spring Barter Faire.” The event is May 1, 2, and 3 at the Family Faire Grounds located at 72 West Cayuse Mountain Road (off Hwy. 20), Tonasket. Information available at: okanoganfamilyfaire.net; offaire2015@gmail.com; or 509486-2173. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville

Public Library Board presents the Oroville Farmers’ Market, Saturday mornings from 9 a.m.. to 1 p.m., May 2 through Oct 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more information call 509-476-2096. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, May 9 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library Board is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096. Thirty-second Annual Mother’s Day Walk for Peace

OROVILLE - The Mother’s Day Walk for Peace is Sunday, May 10. This will mark the 32nd annual Mother’s Day Walk for Peace in Oroville. Participants will join with Canadian Peacemakers at the International Border for a two hour program of speeches, poetry and music. The walkers leave Oroville at noon for the 4.5 mile walk to the grassy area adjacent to the U.S. and Canadian Customs Building. The program at the border is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Participants can also drive to the border, parking at the south side of the Super Duper Market or the U.S. Customs guest parking, if space is available. Bring water, snacks and weather appropriate clothing and head gear. Banners, streamers, placards are always appreciated and add to the fun. Seating and a public address system will be provided. As our nation continues in its 13th year of perpetual War let your opposition be heard. Come and join the gathering, make some new friends, share a poem, a song and your message of Peace. For additional information Call Dorinda and Joseph Enzensperger at 476-4072 or email jgenz4@gmail.com. Teacher-Alumni Reunion

OROVILLE - There will be a Teacher – Alumni Reunion on Saturday, May 12 after the Oroville May Festival Grand Parade and Queen’s Court. The reunion will be in the OHS Commons from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Light refreshments and guided tour of the school are sponsored by the Oroville Scholarship Foundation. The highlight for many will be the viewing of the graduation classes’ photos, which will stir up many memories of friends, students and good times. Rally at the Border Blues Fest

OROVILLE - Join bikers and blues fans that roar into town on Saturday and Sunday, May 16-17. On Saturday, head out to Deep Bay Park on the shores of Lake Osoyoos for a day of blues music. Sunday all riders are welcome to participate in the Poker Run. Blues Fest, Noon-10 p.m. Admission $20 online or $25 at event. Poker Run, 9 a.m. to noon $15. Contact us www.rallyattheborderbluesfest.com. Like us on Facebook or phone 509485-2272.

OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386. Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Did you know?

Think Green!

TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire announces, “Spring Barter Faire.” The event is May 1, 2, and 3 at the Family Faire Grounds located at 72 West Cayuse Mountain Road (off Hwy. 20), Tonasket. Information available at: okanoganfamilyfaire.net; offaire2015@gmail.com; or 509486-2173.

Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival

We use... l Soy Ink l Recycled Paper l Excess paper

recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

7 p.m. Wednesday, May 6 the Aerie will be having their Election of Officers, this year there is only one office with two candidates running. Come in from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and vote for Ron Wisener or Terry Rampley for president. We are in need of several other officers in positions not filled as yet (inquire). Mother’s Day is just around the corner, we are having a Buffet Breakfast that day from 9:am – 11:am Treat you mom’s to a great

CHURCH GUIDE Okanogan International Chorus Members are from Oroville, Osoyoos, Oliver & Midway Invites you to our

Annual Spring Concert under the direction of Lloyd

Fairweather

Sat., May. 9th at 2 p.m. Oroville Free Methodist Church

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Tonasket Bible Church 10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022 Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Loomis Community Church

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Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

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meal, It will be the last breakfast until fall. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place to Ken Cook and Jo Porter, second place to Wanda Sutherland and Bill Maple, Low Score went to Julie Hovland and Lee Bennett and last pinochle to Wanda Sutherland and Bill Maple. The Aerie would like to thank all that have donated time and dishes for the last few month for all the Memorials . Without you it would not have been possible. (Thank You). We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Okanogan Valley

COMMUNITY CALENDAR SPRING BARTER FAIRE

TONASKET EAGLES

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015

SCHOOLS School garden reaps rewards for Arbor Day Students plan several trees in Tonasket School garden BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Garden became permanently greener when students planted Chestnut, Hazelnut, and Oak trees along with Saskatoon (service berry) and Caragona (Siberian Pea) shrubs along it’s borders. A total of 145 trees were ordered through a grant from the Okanogan Family Faire, arriving in time for planting on Friday, April 24, in celebration of Arbor Day.The trees were planted to protect the garden from the wind, produce fruit and nuts and create a beautiful border. “Do you know why we celebrate Arbor Day?” Alex Appel asked students gathered at the garden. “Because if every one on earth planted just one tree every year, it would make up for all the

deforestation. That’s the point of today.” Appel, recently transplanted from South Africa, is a Gear Up employee and Vice Chair on the School Garden Board. He also serves as a resource for the garden’s outdoor classroom until a permanent staff member can be hired. Speaking to fifth graders and students from the Outreach Program, Appel asked for good reasons people should be planting trees. “They make a place more beautiful.” “They provide oxygen.” “They give us food.” “They provide habitat.” “They make the earth more green,” students responded. Appel agreed, telling the students “It might not seem like a lot of work, but we are going to find out today how much work it is.” Asking for volunteers to carry shovels, water, compost and mulch, Appel headed for the first pre-dug hole. He demonstrated how a mound of dirt was left in the center, surrounded by a circular crevice. The roots, following the water, would go around the hole rather than remaining in a ball which could lead to the tree

tipping over in the first strong wind. The first tree to be planted was a Siberian Pea Shrub, chosen for its ability to form a hedge and protect the garden from the North wind. “Normally we would add a little compost to the hole to feed the tree, but since this one has nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots, that won’t be necessary,” Appel said. “Add a sprinkling of high-nutrition potting soil, and cover up the soil, as it is alive. Do you notice how nature works it so the ground is usually covered? We will defer to nature, as it has been doing it for four and a half billion years.” That said, Appel put on a top layer of grass clippings provided by the school maintenance staff. Students then broke into teams and headed out to get the trees in the ground. Other volunteers on board for planting trees throughout the day included the Ag. Science landscaping class, middle school engineering and service learning classes, school garden board members, AmeriCorps volunteers, Gear Up members, the elementary school Green Team and other students. The Green Team is made up of

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Fifth-grade students and Outreach students work with Alex Appel planting trees on Arbor Day about 20 students in third, fourth and fifth grades. “They go into the classes as representatives and help rally the students,” said School Garden

Education Liaison Rose Corso, who organizes the Green Team along with VISTA volunteer Sabrina Norrell. Corso said after students viewed a U-tube video

on the importance of trees and the Green Team made a presentation, nine of the eleven third through fifth grade classes signed up to plant trees on Arbor Day.

Tonasket FFA rocks district competition it because they think he has a chance to become a Star Finalist at the National level,” said Deebach.

Additional upcoming events include a Spokane Junior Livestock Show May 6 which will include State livestock judging

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

and a Meats Evaluation Contest; and the Pateros Greenhand Competition, a CDE for first year students held in Pateros May 7.

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

Several moving on to State BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Students from Tonasket’s FFA competed at the District VII Leadership Career Development Event in Chelan Wednesday, April 22, with several members qualifying to go on to State Competitions, and two individuals possibly moving on to Nationals. Rade Pilkinton took first place in Extemporaneous Public Speaking. This event requires members to draw three topics from a hat and choose one to prepare a four to six minute speech within a thirty minute preparation period. Pilkinton’s topic was ‘How will the public opinion of GMOs affect producers?’ “The basic gist of my speech was that the public opinion is not going to matter in the long run, because the producers are going to have to feed an ever growing population, and to do that they need to use GMOs,” Pilkinton said. Asked how he prepares for a contest where he doesn’t know what issue he will be speaking on, Pilkinton said he reads current news articles; particularly from the Capital Press, a newspaper focusing on current agriculture issues. The Prepared Public Speaking event involves participants preparing a six to eight minute speech on an agriculture related topic. Qualifying for State in this event are Corinna Karrer, Jenna Valentine and Deisy Alcauter. “We choose a controversial agriculture topic to speak on,” said Valentine. Karrer took second place with a speech on the current need for more agriculture on tribal lands. Valentine placed third speaking on in vitro meats, where animal cells are grown in a petri dish. A speech on immigration laws and how they affect the agriculture industry earned Alcauter a fourth place finish. Competing in the Creed Career Development Event (CDE) were

Nicole Juarez and Morgan Tyus. This event requires first year members to recite the five paragraphs of the FFA Creed and answer a series of three questions. “The creed was written in 1928 and is a statement of beliefs, reasons, history and words of encouragement for FFA members,” said FFA instructor Matt Deebach. “They did a great job; it is a very, very hard competition. It’s a memorized speech, and if you miss two or three words, it can mean the difference between first and fourth place.” This was the only event this year where Tonasket students did not qualify for State. Teamwork was required for two different Parliamentary Procedure events. The Novice Parliamentary CDE requires a team of first year members to perform the opening and closing ceremonies of an FFA meeting, and complete a short Parliamentary Procedure Demonstration. The Parliamentary Procedure CDE requires teams of six members to solve a problem using a specific set of parliamentary motions. “First there is a 50-question test on parliamentary knowledge and fundamentals, and after the run is completed they have to answer questions from the judge,” said FFA President Dallas Tyus. Taking first place in the Novice Parliamentary Procedure event was a team made up of Nicole Juarez, Katie Henneman, Madison Clark, Sam Whitney, Morgyne Hjaltson and Camille Wilson. Placing second was a team consisting of Morgan Tyus, Taylon Pilkinton, Rycki Cruz, Alycia Tibbs, Mikah Haney and Hayley Larson. Tonasket also took first place in the Senior Parliamentary Procedures CDE, with a team made up of Jordan Hughes, Rachel Silverthorn, Janelle Catone, Dallas Tyus, Rade Pilkinton and Jenna Valentine. “There are six people on the team, and one is chairman and the others are officers,” said Catone. “You are given a main motion, and each member is to make two motions and debate four times.” It’s no surprise this team took

Submitted photo

first place; two years ago team members Catone, Valentine, Hughes and Pilkinton were on a National Novice Parliamentary team that placed second in the nation, along with teammates Samantha Earley and Madison Bayless. A second team made up of Deisy Alcauter, Seth Smith, Johnna Terris, Lexie Wahl, Bonnie Siegfried and LeighAnne Barnes tied for second place. A coin toss to determine placement put them in third place. Both teams will go on to State, held at Washington State University in Pullman May 14-16. “I am looking forward to the State convention. We have some kids that have worked really hard,” said Deebach. “It hasn’t been without its disappointments, but I think the kids that compete will make the community really proud. I think we had the most kids advancing on to State from our district than any other district.” Deebach said additional opportunities available only at the State level the students would be participating in include a Farm Business Management Team, a Meats Evaluation Team and and a First Year Career Development Event for Freshman. A special event held at the State Convention for a select few is an awards banquet BBQ sponsored by the Washington State FFA Foundation honoring students for their accomplishments. WSU’s Dean of students for the College of Agriculture will be present, along with other business leaders in agriculture. “Out of 1500 kids there, only 20 are invited to this banquet,” Deebach said. “Charlie Sanchez, the big winner, has been invited to attend. Also, there will be a slideshow honoring him at the State Covention as a State Star finalist; and his application has been forward to Nationals.” Sanchez, a senior, qualified in Fruit Production Placement. Tonasket 2014 graduate John Symons also had his application forwarded to Nationals in Equine Production. “John graduated last spring, but the State pulled his application and asked him to submit

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APRIL 30, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

submitted photo

Contestants of all ages competed for prizes at the Sixth Annual T-Town Bowl Bomb, held Sunday, April 19, at the Skate Park in Chief Tonasket Park.

submitted photo

Dylan Douke of Tonasket, winner in his age group of late teens to early 20s, is seen here doing a trey flip at the T-Town Bowl Bomb.

T-Town Bowl Bomb serves up food, fun and prizes BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Dylan Douke of Tonasket took first place overall at the sixth annual T-Town Bowl Bomb April 19 at the skate park in Chief Tonasket Park. Coming in second place was Kaleb Steinshouer, followed by Douke’s brother Emmett Douke in third. Dustin Menard and Sean Waters tied for the high-

est Ollie, which was five boards. An ‘Ollie’ is jumping the board up and landing successfully. Waters also took Best Trick, and Menard was awarded Most Style. Receiving Honorable Mentions were Kyle Cochran and Dawson Click. In the Youth division, Tyler Jobes took first place and Everett Click took second. Ethan Laurent got first place for Early Teens, followed by Axzel Morland in second and Addison Epps in third.

LILY HILDERBRAND SIGNS LETTER OF INTENT Lily Hilderbrand, a senior at Oroville High School, has signed a letter of intent and accepted an athletic scholarship to play basketball for Everett Community College. “Lily had an outstanding four year basketball career at OHS, finishing her senior season with a girl’s basketball record total of 1224 career points scored,” said Bill Contrell, an assistant coach with the Oroville program.

BY GARY A. DEVON

LAKE ROOSEVELT - Hornets softball played two close matches against Lake Roosevelt, coming home victors in the double header played at Lake Roosevelt on Tuesday, April 21. In the first game of the double header Oroville won by a point – 9 to 8. Pie Todd led in hitting with a home run and three RBIs. Michelle Nutt hit a single and stole eight bases to lead the team in stolen bases against the Raiders. “She’s a real stealer, she’s fast,” said Coach Dane Forrester. Faith martin had a single and four stolen bases, Courtney

ALL-AROUND WINNERS:

Little People: Bodee Blu Gudmundson Peewee Girls: Rocksie Timentwa Peewee Boys: Brody Deal Junior Girls: Quincy Downey and Hannah Beeman-Charlson Junior Boys: Traver Johnson Intermediate Girls: Joy Abrahamson Intermediate Boys: Clay Buchert Senior Girls: Kaelyn Marchand Senior Boys: Jared Floe

Mutton busting: 1. Truett Salazar, 2. John Rainey, 3. Ayvah Marchand. Goat tail tying: 1. Bodee Blue Gudmundson, 2. Riley Stucker, 3. Cass Rothrock. California stake race: 1. Bodee Blu Gudmundson, 2. Riley Stucker, 3. Cass Rothrock. Barrel racing: 1. Bodee Blu Gudmundson, 2. Riley Stucker, 3. Jake Sullivan. Pole bending: 1. Bodee Blu Gudmundson, 2. Riley Stucker, 3. Jerah Jane Andrews. Dummy roping: 1. Bodee Blu Gudmundson, 2. tie: Monte McKee and Riley Stucker, 3. Truett Salazar. Points: 1. Bodee Blu Gudmundson, 27; 2. Riley Stucker, 20; 3. Truett Salazar, 10.

PEEWEE GIRLS

Kallstrom hit a single and stole three bases; Hannah Hilderbrand had a double and three stolen bases, Madison Whiteaker had two singles and three stolen bases and Windy Ortega had a single and a stolen base. Lake Roosevelt’s C. Williams had a single against the Hornets and stole a base, while R. Ensminger, had to singles and three stolen bases and S. Marin had a single and stole two bases. In game two Oroville won by just two points, 18 to 16. “We had to come back from a nine run deficit in the first inning,” said Coach Forrester. Nutt started that rally with a single and six stolen bases. Martin also had a single, three stolen

bases and an RBI. Kallstrom chipped in with two singles and three stolen bases. Todd had her second home run of the day knocking in two and stealing four bases. Hilderbrand had a single and two stolen bases, while Ortega had two singles, an RBI and three stolen bases. Egerton stole three bases. “It was the first inning that Lake Roosevelt did the damage, Hanawayhad three singles, five stolen bases and an RBI. Pitching for the Hornets was Kallstrom in the first game and Hilderbrand in the second game. The Hornets are now ranked fourth in the NC2B league, according to Forrester.

Omak,” said Michelle Laurent. “Without our sponsors, this event would not have been such an overwhelming success.” Oberand Longboards provided 10 mini cruisers and NHS Fun Factory gave 10 skate DVDs. Providing food and grocery funds were the Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, Grants Market and Beyers IGA, with Mountain Top Bakery providing snacks and baked goods as well as catering the event. Brian and McTavish Jones provided sound equipment and DJ’d the event.

Tonasket Junior Rodeo results

LITTLE PEOPLE

Oroville softball takes double header from LR EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Thirteen contestants ages seven to late 20s competed; the majority of them were locals with a few from Omak and one from Okanogan. Waters is from Grand Coulee/Nespelem. Event coordinators were Michelle Laurent, Daniel Harn and Painted Sky Warrior. Dustin Menard and Matthew Richter served as judges. “We had a fantastic turn out this year, and we raised over $90 in donations for the Stampede Skatepark Foundation to build a new skate park in

Goat flanking: 1. Kassidy Bremner, 2. Cheyannae Hughes, 3. Isabela Timentwa. Barrel racing: 1. Rocksie Timentwa, 2. Kassidy Bremner, 3. Macey Jane Freemantle. Pole bending: 1. Rocksie Timentwa, 2. Cheyannae Hughes, 3. Talliyah Timentwa. California stake race: 1. Isabela Timentwa, 2. Macey Jane Freemantle, 3. Kassidy Bremner. Dummy roping: 1. Cheyannae Hughes, 2. Rocksie Timentwa, 3. Charlee Buchert. Points: 1. Rocksie Timentwa, 12; 2. tie: Kassidy Bremner and Cheyannae Hughes.

Pakootas. Pole bending: 1. Elizabeth Bolich, 2. Joy Abrahamson, 3. Shantana Pakootas. Breakaway roping: 1. Krista Marchand. Steer daubing: 1. Tiegan Johnson, 2. Tessa Johnson, 3. Joy Abrahamson. Points: 1. Joy Abrahamson, 8; 2. Krista Marchand, 7; 3. tie: Elizabeth Bolich, Cora Diehl, Claire Ives, Tiegan Johnson, Abbigail Popelier, 4.

SENIOR GIRLS

Cow riding: 1. tie: Laatya James and Kaelyn Marchand. Goat tying: 1. Kaelyn Marchand, 2. Savanna Bolich, 3. Autumn Frye. Barrel racing: 1. Kaelyn Marchand, 2. Savanna Bolich, 3. Autumn Frye. Pole bending: 1. Kaelyn Marchand, 2. Camille Wilson, 3. Savanna Bolich. Steer daubing: 1. Stevie Slack, 2. Michaela Allen, 3. Taylor Smith. Points: 1. Kaelyn Marchand, 16; 2. Savanna Bolich, 8; 3. Makenly Davis, 6.

PEEWEE BOYS

Calf riding: 1. Brody Deal. Goat flanking: 1. Braeden SignorMcLaughlin, 2. Quintin Ogg, 3. Brody Deal. Barrel racing: 1. Quintin Ogg, 2. Braeden Signor-McLaughlin, 3. Cooper Ives. Pole bending: 1. Brody Deal, 2. Braeden Signor-McLaughlin, 3. Cannon Deal. California stake race: 1. Brody Deal, 2. Diesel Downey, 3. Cooper Ives. Dummy roping: 1. Braeden Signor-

McLaughlin, 2. Body Deal, 3. Darrel Nanpuya. Points: 1. Brody Deal, 17; 2. Braeden Signor-McLaughlin, 14; 3. Quinin Ogg 8.

JUNIOR BOYS

Goat tying: 1. Traver Johnson, 2. Tyler Popelier, 3. Tucker Hughes. Barrel racing: 1. Brier Selvidge, 2. Traver Johnson, 3. Hunter Nussbaumer. Pole bending: 1. Traver Johnson, 2. Brier Selvidge, 3. Cash James. Breakaway roping: 1. Traver Johnson. Steer daubing: 1. Traver Johnson, 2. Tyler Popelier, 3. Brier Selvidge. Points: 1. Traver Johnson, 19; 2. Brier Selvidge, 9; 3 Tyler Popelier, 7.

INTERMEDIATE BOYS

Calf stake tying: 1. Clay Buchert, 2. Chantz Popelier, 3. CJ Saxon. Chute Dogging: 1. Mathew Pakootas. Breakaway roping: Clay Buchert. Steer daubing: 1. Cameron Plaisted, 2. Chantz Popelier, 3. Bradoen Hennings. Points: 1. Clay Buchert, 9.2; Chantz Popelier, 6; 3. Cameron Plaisted, 5. Senior Boys Bull riding: 1. Taylor Flesher, 71. Bareback; 1. Jared Floe, 58. Chute dogging: 1. Justin Crossland, 2. Jared Floe. Calf roping: 1. Wade Bruemmer. Points; 1. Jared Floe, 8.

JUNIOR GIRLS

Steer riding: 1. Jadya Taylor. Goat tying: 1. Brooke Richey, 2. Madi Baumberger, 3. Quincy Downey. Barrel racing: 1. Hannah BeemanChlarson, 2. Sage Olmstead, 3. Paige Thomson. Pole bending: 1. Jaycie Richey, 2. Quincy Downey, 3. Abby Hinen. Breakaway roping: 1. Paige Thomson, 2. Cassidy Bolich. Steer daubing: 1. Hannah Beeman-Chlarson, 2. Quincy Downey, 3. Hattie Buchert. Points: 1. tie: Hannah BeemanChlarson and Quincy Downey, 8; 2. tie: Brooke Richey and Paige Thomson, 6.

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS

Cow riding: 1. Cora Diehl, 2. Erin Quinlan, 3. Keianna James. Goat tying: 1. Aubree Skone, 2. Krista Marchand, 3. Claire Ives. Barrel racing: 1. Abbigail Popelier, 2. Joy Abrahamson, 3. Shantana

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The handgrip that wouldn’t give up Ayvah Marchand held on for a long, full ride during Sunday’s (April 19) mutton busting event at the 2015 Tonasket Junior Rodeo. Marchand took third place among Little People with a score of 54. Truett Salazar placed first at 66, followed by John Rainey with 58. Tying for fourth place with scores of 51 were Seth Austin and Bodee Blu Gudmundson.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015

SPORTS

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Morgyne Hjaltson makes it safely to first base in the second inning of last Friday’s (April 24) home game, despite the best efforts of Pateros player Lauren Gelstin. The Tigers held the Nannygoats from scoring at the beginning of the game, coming out on top 1-0 at the end of the second inning. Pateros soon forged ahead to win the game 7-3. The Nannies currently stand fourth in the North Central Washington B League among nine teams. Tonasket is in seventh place, with two conference wins and eight losses; four wins and ten losses overall.

Third baseman Sam Keller is firmly planted for the out as Kat Wilson of Pateros attempts to steal third during the fifth inning of last Friday’s (April 24) home game. The Nannygoats’ ability to steal bases was, indeed, part of their successful strategy in winning the game, 7-3. Tonasket plays Oroville on the Hornets’ field Saturday, May 2, with games at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Tigers jump the competition at Rieke Invite BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket’s Track and Field team traveled to Cascade’s Rieke Invitational Friday, April 24, garnering five first-place awards from the competition involving 15 schools. Among teams, the Tonasket girls took third place with a score of 73. Cashmere came in first at 107.5, followed by Cascade with 82. Rose Walts took first place in the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 15.87. She also took first in the long jump at 15-08.50, and first place in the triple jump at 34-01.50. Walts is in her junior year. Alina Vlahovich, a freshman, took second place in the triple jump at 39-09.50. The boys team came in fourth place with a score of 61. Chelan scored highest at 126, followed by Cashmere with 111.25 and Bridgeport with 78.75. Ethan Bensing took first place in the long jump at 19-11.75, and first place in the triple jump at 40-10.50. Bensing is a senior. Ryan Rylie, a junior, took second place in the 400 meters with a time of 54.85, and sophomore Hunter Swanson took second in

the 3200 meters at 10:28.57. “Rose Walts ran a great race in the hurdles, and Hunter Swanson ran a good, smart 3200,” said Coach Bob Thornton. “Alina Vlahovich had a big pr (personal record) in triple jump. All the jumpers had a good meet.” Other jumpers include freshman Morgan Tyus in a six-way tie for sixth place in the high jump at 4-02.00. Tyus also placed 14th in the long jump at 11-01.50. In the Pole Vault, juniors Jaden Vugteveen and Walts took seventh and eighth places, respectively, with jumps of 6-06.00 and 6-00.00. For the boys, sophomore Lloyd Temby took fourth in the long jump at 18-01.50, and senior Dallas Tyus took ninth in the high jump at 5-04.00. Competing close to home Tonasket participated in a five-team event at Okanogan High School Tuesday, April 21, along with Soap Lake, Mansfield and Waterville and the hosting Bulldogs. Individual first-place finishes among the boys include Swanson in the 1600 meter with a time of 5:05.82; senior Chad Edwards in the shot put at 39-7; Bensing in both the high jump at 5-11 and the triple jump at 40. The4x100

relay team came in first at 51.98. Second-place finishes for the boys include Rylie in the 400 meter at 1:03.07, Bensing in the long jump at 19, and the 4x400 relay team coming in at 4:21.96. Senior Smith Condon placed third in the 200 meter with a time of 26.18. Also taking third place finishes were Rylie in the 100 meter at 12.48, Edwards in the discus at 82-7, and Tyus in both the high jump at 5-6 and the triple jump at 36. For the girls, first place finishes were grabbed in the 100 meter by freshman Katie Henneman at 14.13, and Vlahovich in the 200 meter at 29.15. Walts grabbed first place in the 100 meter hurdles at 17.24, the long jump at 15-5.5, and the triple jump at 34-9.5. Vlahovich took second in the triple jump at 31-11. Second place finishes were also grabbed by three of the girls’ relay teams. The 4x100 relay team came in at 58.67. The 4x200 relay team came in at 2:13.0, and the 4x400 relay team came in at 5:11.48. Individual girls placing third were sophomore Chelsea Vasquez in the shot put at 24-11, senior Alissa Young in the discus at 72-10, and Walts in the high jump at 4-10.

Other school sports Tonasket’s soccer team beat the Omak Pioneers 6-2 Saturday, April 25, in Omak. On Thursday, April 23, they lost at Manson 1-0. A match at Liberty Bell Tuesday, April 21, was lost 3-2. As this article goes to press, the Tigers stand fourth in the Central Washington B League among nine teams, with five league wins and four league losses; eight overall wins and five overall losses. The Tigers are scheduled to travel to Brewster Thursday, April 30; and to host Bridgeport Tuesday, May 5 at 4:30 p.m. In tennis, the Tonasket girls’ team stands third in the league with two conference wins and

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zero losses, and two overall wins and seven losses overall. Okanogan is in first place, followed by White Swan. The boys’ tennis team is in fifth place behind Okanogan, White Swan, Entiat and Liberty Bell. The boys’ team has one conference loss and one conference win, with two wins and seven losses overall. The girls’ team beat Liberty Bell 4-1 Tuesday, April 23; while the boys’ team lost 5-0. Scores for Tuesday’s (April 21) at Wilson Creek are not yet posted. Tonasket hosts White Swan Saturday, May 2, with matches beginning at 1 p.m.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Jimmy Coleman tags first base to end last Friday’s (April 24) home game against Pateros, while centerfielder Dallin Good stands ready to back him up. The Tigers won 12-1. Coleman pitched the complete game, giving up one run, two hits and two walks, with six strikeouts. On offense, Kahlil Butler went 3-3 and scored a run, Zion Butler went 2-4 and scored two runs, and Andrian McCarthy and Jesse Manring both went 1-2 and scored two runs each with both of them having a walk. In the Tuesday, April 21 game against Pateros on their field, the Tigers won 13-3. McCarthy piched the complete game, with seven strikeouts in the five inning game. McCarthy went 4-4 with a homerun, four RBIs and two runs scored. Butler went 2-4 with tow doubles and two runs scored, and Wyatt Pershing went 2-4 with a double and one run scored. As of April 28 when this article went to press, Tonasket stands sixth in the North Central Washington B League among nine teams, with four conference wins and six losses; five wins and nine losses overall. Tonasket plays Oroville on the Hornets’ diamond Saturday, May 2, with games at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

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April 30, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale OROVILLE 1048 SF 3 BR 1 AC HOME. Lease program, $115K. Located on A-Highway 97. Call for details 855-5472240. TONASKET 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH + UPSTAIRS BALCONY AREA. Full basement is unfinished. This house has charm, situated in Old Orchard Estates. $149,500. Shown by appointment only. Call for details 509-322-3471 or please leave message.

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Announcements A special than you to all the friends, for all the cards & flowers & hugs. From the family of Bill R. Gideon ROAD CLOSURE The Oroville May Festival would like to remind everyone that the parade route along Main Street and Hwy 97 will be closed to through traffic during the parade, Saturday, May 9. The parade will begin at 10:00 a.m., and there will be detours set up for traffic wanting to pass through town until the end of the parade. Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Help Wanted

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Dental Operations Manager Okanogan and Oroville Brewster Dental: Dental Operations Manager Brewster, Bridgeport and Twisp Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time. Bilingual English/Spanish required due to business need. Twisp Dental: Dental Assistant Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

This position is responsible for the daily operations of all transit services, ensuring high quality public transportation availability to the residents of Okanogan County. CORE FUNCTIONS include oversight of dispatch, fixed route, demand response and vanpool programs, supervision and training of staff, participating in strategic planning, policy development and transit related reporting. Must live no more than 60 minutes from Okanogan County. For a complete job description, please visit our website at okanogantransit.com OCTA is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Senior Distribution Engineer Okanogan County PUD is looking for a Senior Distribution Engineer to prepare work orders, maintenance orders, service orders, service requests, easements and agreements associated with distribution overhead or underground line extensions and system improvements; application of policies, standards, state and national electrical codes; and other duties as required. A high school diploma, or equivalent, is required, plus a two-year degree in engineering and two years engineering experience, or six years of progressively responsible utility engineering experience. A valid Washington State Driver’s License is required.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

BUS DRIVER

Lee Frank Mercantile Tonasket, WA

Okanogan County Transit Authority

We are accepting applications for a seeks full and part time DrivFULL-TIME SALES/ ers to provide safe, reliable CASHIER POSITION. and courteous transportation services to the public, including populations with special Customer service experience preferred. transportation needs. Positions report to the Omak of324 S. Whitcomb Ave fice. Positions from 24-40 Tonasket, WA 98855 hours/week. $16.90-$17.93 509-486-2105 per hour and benefit eligible. Class B CDL with Passenger endorsement required. See www.okanogantransit.com for instructions on submitting applications. Okanogan WANTED TO BUY: Paying County Transit Authority is an Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. Equal Opportunity Employer. Spence: 509-429-4722. Critical Nurse Staffing, Inc. is seeking a CNA/NAR to join our team and provide in home care to our patients in Okanogan. The role of the COOKS 21st ANNUAL CNA/NAR in this position will Garage Sale/Flea Market be to work closely with paFriday and Saturday, tients and to provide basic May 1st & 2nd, 9am - 5pm. care services. The applicant should have an outgoing personality, the ability to commu- 950 Hwy 7 N. Tonasket. 18 nicate effectively, multi- task, vendors including a food venremain calm in stressful dor! Antiques, household, situations, and be able to tools, vehicle parts, fishing..... give patients essential social Trailer loads of stuff! SEE YOU THERE! and emotional support, along with providing excellent quality care. Qualified applicants must have a current and valid WA state license. Oroville ESTATE & YARD SALE. InPlease apply online at side and out. May 1, 2, 3, www.cnscares.com 8am - 2pm. 311 Ironwood. or send a resume to New: 2 refrigerators, 1 stove, humanresources@cnscares.com 1 upright freezer, 1 sofa, 2 recliners, 1 coffee table lift top, Subscribe to the... 2 end tables, 2 lamps, washer & dryer. Old furniture: dressers, beds, sewing machine, entertainment center. Too, too much to list!

Wanted

Garage & Yard Sale

Estate Sales

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

School Bus Driver Training Class

Applications and resumes will be accepted through Friday, May 8, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, PO Box 912, Okanogan, WA 98840-0912, by email to donc@okpud.org or by fax (509)422-8418. Applications and job descriptions are available at PUD offices and at www.okanoganpud.org.

The Tonasket School District is providing a School Bus Driver Training Class in late June. Upon completing the class, employment as a substitute bus driver in the district is available with the pay of $14.39 per hour. Persons interested in becoming school bus drivers, should contact Jeff Yeckel at 486-2665 or 486-2126, for additional information.

Okanogan County PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer

An Equal Opportunity Employer

Crosswords

Help Wanted Gold Digger Apples Truck and Bus Drivers needed

Phone: 509-476-3602 Toll Free: 866-773-7818

www.gazette-tribune.com

FT Seasonal work Please apply at Cherry Facility 104 14th Ave

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF APRIL 27, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in

Legals Continued On Next Page

23. Marienbad, for one

7. Entangles

24. “___ Maria�

8. Little rascal

25. “For ___ a jolly ...� (contraction)

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26. 007, for one

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33. Diacritic mark over German vowels

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36. Enthralling novel or play

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40. Big test

17. Parenthesis, essentially

41. Convene

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44. Casual eatery

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55. Leader born in Georgia, Russia

34. “Dilbert� cartoonist Scott Adams has one: Abbr.

57. Improbable story (2 wds) 60. Medieval surcoat 61. Iron/nickel/carbon alloy used in watches 62. Anesthetized 65. Industrious 66. Complain

ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

Tonasket Rodeo Grounds - Tonasket, WA.

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2015 - 10:00 a.m. *******************************

PARTIAL LISTING: Way Too Much to List - Will Run 2 Auctioneers * Tractors * Trucks * Front End Loaders * Hay Balers * Swather * Harrowbed * Pickups *Pickup wDewEze Feeder * Large Manure Spreader *5 Collectible Tractors * 4-whlrs * Nice Horse Buggy & Cutter * Collectible Furniture Pieces * Household * Big Selection of Very Good Shop & Tool Items * LOOK FOR HANDBILLS

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

67. Armageddon

ANSWERS

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16. Public place in ancient Greece for athletes 18. Small coins of ancient Greece 19. Centers 20. Highest heaven 22. Slow-witted person (British)

3. Musicians who perform individually

35. Easter flower 37. “To ___ is human ...� 38. Drug to treat Parkinson’s disease (hyphenated) 39. Understands clearly 42. Lacking vigor 43. Big ___ Conference 44. Happen to 45. Comparatively cockamamie 46. Individuals 48. Bony 49. 180’s (hyphenated) 53. Mournful poem 54. Back in 56. “Gimme ___!� (start of an Iowa State cheer) (2 wds) 58. Put on board, as cargo 59. “Don’t give up!�

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64. “Silent Spring� subject (abbrev.)

6. “A jealous mistress�: Emerson


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 30, 2015

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

sonal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: April 21, 2015. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: April 30, 2015. /s/Katherine H. Dahlin KATHERINE H. DAHLIN Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Topping Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30, May 7, 14, 2015. #OVG629564

Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: April 16, 2015 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: JOAQUIN MONDRAGON ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: PO BOX 736 Bouse, AZ 85325 Attorney for Personal Representative: Olivia Burkland, WSBA #41771 Barron Smith Daugert, PLLC 300 North Commercial St. Bellingham, WA 98225 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Whatcom County Superior Court, Cause No. 15-4-00134-9 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 23, 30, 2015. #OVG626712

W.M. 10-077579-GRAZING-N1/2SW1/4, SW1/4SW1/4, SE1/4, Section 8, NE1/4NE1/4, Section 17, S1/2SE1/4, Section 20, W1/2NW1/4, Section 21, all within Township 39 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-C55216-GRAZING-Gov Lot 1 (N1/2NW1/4), N1/2NE1/4, Section 20, Township 37 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-B60851-GRAZING- Gov Lot 4, Section 1, Gov Lot 1, SW1/4NE1/4, S1/2NW1/4,SW1/4SW1/4, Section 2, SE1/4SE1/4, Section 3, Gov Lots 1,2,3,4, SW1/4NE1/4, NW1/4, SW1/4SE1/4,Section 12, all within Township 38 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-B63152-GRAZING-Gov Lots 1 & 2, Portion of Gov Lot 3, NW1/4SW1/4, S1/2S1/2, Section 36, Township 37 North, Range 26 East, W.M. 10-077582-GRAZING-NE1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NW1/4, NE1/4SW1/4, S1/2SW1/4, SE1/4, Section 1, NE1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NW1/4, NE1/4SW1/4, S1/2SW1/4, SE1/4, Section 12, all within Township 39 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-B56853-GRAZING-NW1/4, Section 27, Township 39 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-B61384-GRAZING-Gov Lot 2 (SE1/NE1/), Gov Lot 3 (NE1/4SE1/4), Gov Lot 4 (SE1/4SE1/4), W1/2SE1/4, Section 36, Township 40 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-C61304-GRAZING-W1/2NE1/4, SW1/4NW1/4, SW1/4, W1/2SE1/4, Section 15, N1/2, N1/2S1/2, Section 16, SW1/4, W1/2SE1/4, SE1/4SE1/4, Section 21, Gov Lots 1, 2, & 3, W1/2NE1/4, W1/2, Section 22, all within Township 39, North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-C63227-GRAZING-NE4SW4, NW4SE4, Section 22, Township 37 North, Range 29 East, W.M. Written request to lease must be received by May 31, 2015, at Department of Natural Resources, 225 S Silke Rd, Colville, Washington 99114-9369. Each request to lease must include the lease number, the name, address and phone number of applicant, and must contain a certified check or money order payable to the Department of Natural Resources for the amount of any bonus bid plus a $100.00 deposit. The envelope must be marked “Sealed Bid” and give lease number, expiration date of lease applied for and give applicant’s name. The applicant must be prepared to purchase improvements that belong to the current lessee. Persons wishing to bid to lease any of these properties can obtain more details, bid packet, and qualification requirements by contacting the Colville office or calling (509) 684-7474. Published: April 30, 2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30, 2015 (OVG628732)

$148.68, for 2013 in the amount of $153.12, for 2014 in the amount of $131.84 and for 2015 in the amount of $168.78, plus interest and penalties, and any taxes which become due and payable before either reinstatement or forfeiture of the contract occurs; 2. Other defaults: Failure to keep insurance on the property (e) Failure to cure the default on or before filed date, will result in the forfeiture of the Contract. (f) The forfeiture of the Contract will result in the following: 1. the buyer’s right, title, and interest in the property will be terminated; 2. the right, title, and interest in the property of others whose interests are subordinate to the buyer will be terminated; 3. the buyer’s rights under the Contract will be canceled; 4. all sums previously paid under the Contract will be kept by and belong to the seller or other person entitled to them; 5. all improvements made to, and unharvested crops and timber located on, the property will belong to the seller; and 6. the buyer and all other persons occupying the property will be required to surrender possession of the property, improvements to the property, and unharvested crops and timber located on the property to the seller on August 10, 2015, if their interests have been forfeited. (g) The following is a statement of payments of money in default (or, where indicated, an estimate thereof) and, for any defaults not involving the failure to pay money, the action(s) required to cure the default: 1. Monetary delinquencies: Item/Amount Contract balance/$10,336.04 Accrued interest/$ 8,465.60 Late Payments/$ 1,500.00 2012-2015 Okanogan County Real Estate Taxes/$ 602.42 plus interest and penalties TOTAL: $20,904.06 2. Action(s) required to cure any nonmonetary default: Acquire insurance on property as required by the contract (h) The following is a statement of other payments, charges, fees, and costs (or, where indicated, an estimate thereof) to cure the default: Item/Amount 1. Cost of title report $210.00 2. Service/posting of Notice of Intent to Forfeit (estimated)/$100.00 3. Copying/postage/$50.00 4. Attorney’s fees/$2,500.00 5. Recording fees/$150.00 TOTAL:/$3,010.00 The total amount necessary to cure the default is the sum of the amounts in (g)(1) and (h), which is $23,914.06, plus the amount of any payments and late charges which fall due after the date of this Notice of Intent to Forfeit and on or prior to the date the default is cured. You must cure the default prior to August 1, 2015. Monies required to cure the default may be tendered to David Ebenger, Attorney at Law at the following address: PO Box 217, Winthrop, Washington 98862 If default includes a default other than payments of money when due, then you must cure such other defaults as specified in paragraph (g)(2) by August 1, 2015. (i) You have a right to contest the forfeiture or seek an extension of time to cure the default, or both. If you wish to exercise this right, you must file a summons and complaint on the seller or seller’s agent or attorney before a declaration of forfeiture is recorded. NO EXTENSION OF THE TIME FOR CURE CAN BE GRANTED FOR DEFAULTS THAT ARE A FAILURE TO PAY MONEY. However, you may not be in default if you have a claim against the seller that would release, discharge, or excuse the default. (j) You have a right to request a court to determine whether a public sale of the property should be ordered. A public sale may be ordered if the court finds that the fair market value of the property substantially exceeds the sum of the debt owed under the contract and all liens on the property that have priority over the seller’s interest. The excess, if any, of the highest bid at the sale over the amount owed on your contract will be applied to the liens eliminated by the sale and the balance, if any, paid to you. If you wish to request that a court make this determination, you must do so by filing and serving a summons and complaint before a declaration of forfeiture is recorded. If you make such a request, the court will require you to deposit the anticipated sales costs with the clerk of the court. (k) The contract requires that notices shall be either personally served or shall be sent certified mail, return receipt requested, and by regular first class mail to Buyer at PO Box 556, Oroville, Washington 98844 and to the Seller at 53 Hwy 7 S., Tonasket WA 98855 or such other addresses as either party may specify in writing to the other party. Notices shall be deemed given when served or mailed. Notice to Seller shall also be sent to any institution receiving payments on the Contract. Seller’s interest in the contract is now held by Richard Bynum and Tracey Bynum whose address is 74 Ross Road, Twisp, Washington 98856. /s/Tracey Bynum TRACEY BYNUM) STATE OF WASHINGTON) ) ss. County of Okanogan) On this day personally appeared before me Tracey Bynum to me known to be the individual described in and who executed the within and foregoing instrument, and acknowledged that she signed the same as her free and voluntary act and deed, for the used and purposes therein mentioned. Given under my hand and official seal this 16th day of April, 2015. /s/David Ebenger Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, Residing at Winthrop My appointment expires 2-17-18 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30 and May 7, 2015. (OVG629004)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET. SEQ. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. TO: Lucky and Cindy Wilson; to any occupants of the property; and to all other persons or entities claiming an interest in the subject property. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: oThe statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission: Tollfree: 1-877-894-HOME ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) http://www.dfi.wa.gov/ consumers/homeownership/post_ purchase_counselors_foreclosure. htm OR http://www.wshfc.org/ buyers/counseling.htm United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819 http://nwjustice.org/what-clear I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on May 29, 2015, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock, a.m., at the OKANOGAN COUNTY SUPERIOR COURTHOUSE 149 3RD N., in the City of OKANOGAN, OKANOGAN COUNTY, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: The Southwesterly 77.0 feet of Lot 11, as measured along the Northwesterly boundary thereof of Kahlow’s Second Addition to North Alma, as per plat thereof recorded in the Office of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. (commonly known as 951 First Ave. S, Okanogan WA 98840) TAX ACCOUNT NUMBER: 1200110002. Which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated the 16th day of July, 2004, recorded the 14th day of July, 2004, in the mortgage records of Okanogan County, under Auditor’s File No. 3077291, records of Okanogan County, Washington, from : Lucky D. Wilson and Cindy M. Wilson, husband and wife, as Grantors, to The United States of America acting through the State Director, USDA, Rural Development for the State of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of United States of America acting through the Rural Housing service or successor agency, United States Department of Agriculture, as Beneficiary. Jerome A. Froland, P.S. DBA Alder Lynn Law office was appointed Successor Trustee Okanogan County Auditors File No. 3195363. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:- Failure to make monthly payments of principal and interest beginning with the payment due 8/16/2013 -3 Payments of $285.72 /month $857.16 -15 Payments of $474.91 /month $7,123.65 - Failure to make monthly escrow payments beginning with the payment due 8/16/2013 -18 Payments of $200.78/month $3,614.04 Fees and Late charges $ 72.74 Total Amount in default, excluding Real Property Taxes: $11,667.59 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $73,136.52, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from July 14, 2004 and other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on May 29, 2015. The Default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by May 18, 2015 (11 Days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after May 18, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale by Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded Junior Lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: CINDY M. WILSON AKA CYNTHIA WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 CINDY M. WILSON AKA CYNTHIA WILSON AND JOHN DOE WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 LUCKY WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 LUCKY WILSON AND JANE DOE WILSON 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA

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Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 19 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

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Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 17 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

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Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

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Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

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Sudoku

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: MARIAN ETHEL DAHLIN, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00038-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as per-

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF WHATCOM In Re the Estate of EDGAR FUSCH, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00134-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 JUDGE: IRA UHRIG The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate.

LEGAL NOTICE NEGOTIATION OF STATE LEASES WITH EXISTING LESSEES BETWEEN JUNE AND AUGUST 2015 EXPIRES: OCTOBER 2015 10-080193-GRAZING-SE1/4SW1/4, SE1/4, Section 11, SE1/4NW1/4, N1/2SW1/4, SE1/4SW1/4, Section 13, N1/2NE1/4, NE1/4NW1/4, Section 14, W1/2NE1/4, E1/2SW1/4, W1/2SE1/4, Section 23, E1/2NW1/4, Section 24, W1/2NW1/4, Section 25, E1/2NE1/4, NW1/4NW1/4, NE1/4SE1/4, Section 26, all within Township 40 North, Range 36 East, W.M. 10-C59735-GRAZING-Gov Lot 4 (NE1/4SE1/4), Gov Lot 5 (SE1/4SE1/4), Section 11, Gov Lot 1 (E1/2NW1/4NE1/4), Gov Lot 4 (E1/2SW1/4NE1/4), Gov Lot 5(NW1/4SE1/4), Gov Lot 8 (SW1/4SE1/4), E1/2E1/2, Section 14, Gov Lot 1 (NE1/4NW1/4), Gov Lot 3 (SE1/4NW1/4), Gov Lot 4 (NW1/4SW1/4), NE1/4, Section 23, all within Township 39 North, Range 31, East, W.M. 10-B56140-GRAZING-SE1/4, Section 19, Gov Lot 6, NW1/4NE1/4, Section 20, NW1/4SW1/4, SW1/4NW1/4, Section 29, E1/2, Section 30, all within Township 38 North, Range 30 East, W.M. 10-B55218-GRAZING-NE1/4NW1/4, Section 13, Township 38 North, Range 30 East, W.M. 10-078616-GRAZING-SE1/4SW1/4, Section 8,SW1/4SW1/4, Section 9, W1/2, Section 17, SE1/4NE1/4, N1/2SE1/4, SE1/4SE1/4, Section 18, NE1/4NE1/4, Section 19, NE1/4NE1/4, Section 20, SE1/4NW1/4 Section 28, NW1/4SW1/4 Section 30, E1/2NW1/4 Section 35, all within Township 38 North, Range 28 East, W.M. 10-B56821-GRAZING-All of Section 36, Township 37 North, Range 29 East, W.M. 10-B60295-GRAZING-NE1/4NE1/4, Section 35, Gov Lots 3 & 4, N1/2NW1/4, SE1/4NW1/4, NE1/4SW1/4, N1/2NW1/4, SE1/4NW1/4, NE1/4SW4/, Section 36, all within Township 37 North, Range 30 East, W.M. 10-B62169-GRAZINGE1/2SE1/4, Section 7, SE1/4NW1/4, SW1/4, Section 8, W1/2, Section 17, NE1/4NE1/4, Section 18, E1/2NW1/4, NW1/4NW1/4, Section 20, all within Township 36 North, Range 30 East, W.M. 10-C63153-GRAZING-Portions of Gov Lot 3, Section 36, Township 37 North, Range 26 East, W.M. 10-B56969-GRAZING-W1/2, W1/2E1/2, SE1/4NE1/4, Section 16, Township 38 North, Range 31 East, W.M. 10-077222-GRAZINGGRAZINGE1/2, E1/2NW1/4, SW1/4NW1/4, SW1/4, Section 16, NW1/4, E1/2SE1/4, Section 21, all within Township 38 North, Range 30 East, 9

Civil Service Exam The City of Tonasket Civil Service Commission will be testing for an entry level patrolman eligibility list on Friday, June 5, 2015. Lateral Officers may apply but will go through the same process and testing as the entry level. Call 509-486-2132 for an application packet or write to City of Tonasket, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 pm May 22nd, 2015. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Civil Service Secretary Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, 30 and May 7, 2015. #OVG627054

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Public Notices

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of AUDENE FARMER, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00035-6 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Wanda Lou Beacon as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: April 30, 2015 /s/ Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Wanda Lou Beacon, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30, May 7, 14, 2015. #OVG629508

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: JUDITH L. COFFELT, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00032-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: April 21, 2015. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: April 30, 2015. /s/Andrea M. Coffelt Keutzing ANDREA M. COFFELT KEUTZING Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Topping Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30, May 7, 14, 2015. #OVG629566

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Legals Continued From Previous Page

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Statewides

NOTICE OF INTENT TO FORFEIT PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.30. Grantor: Bynum, Richard and Tracey Grantee: Moomaw, Truman Legal Description (abbr): LOT 1145 OKANOGAN RIVER RANCHES #7 Additional legal(s): Page 2 Assessor’s Tax Parcel ID: 6 431145000 Reference Nos. of Related Documents: 3197723 TO: The Estate of Truman Moomaw, Deceased, and the Known and Unknown Heirs of Truman Moomaw, deceased, PO Box 556, Oroville WA 98844 TO: Gloria Mortrud, PO Box 556, Oroville WA 98844 TO: David M Starkovich, PO Box 667, Roslyn WA 98941 David M Starkovich, c/o Castelda & Castelda, Inc., PO Box 1307, Tonasket WA 98855 TO: State of Washington Department of Social and Health Services, Office of Financial Recovery, PO Box 9501, Olympia WA 98507-9501 TO: All Persons Claiming Any Interest in the Subject Property Described Herein You are hereby notified that the Real Estate Contract described below is in default, and you are provided the following information with respect thereto: (a) The name, address, and telephone number of the seller and, if any, the seller’s agent or attorney giving the notice: Seller’s Name Richard Bynum and Tracey Bynum, husband and wife 74 Ross Rd., Twisp WA 98856 (509) 997-0650 Agent’s or Attorney’s Name David Ebenger Attorney at law PO Box 217, Winthrop WA 98862 (509) 996-2206 (b) Description of the Contract: Real Estate Contract dated March 13, 2006, executed by Silverthome LLC, as seller, and Truman Moomaw, a single person, as buyer, which Contract or a memorandum thereof was recorded under Auditor’s File No. 3101583 on April 5, 2006, records of Okanogan County Auditor, Washington. Seller’s interest in the real estate contract is now held by Richard Bynum and Tracey Bynum, husband and wife, by instrument recorded on February 9, 2015 under Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3197723. (c) Legal description of the property: Tract 1145, Okanogan River Ranches Division 7 as per plat thereof recorded in Volume H of Plats, Section 1, pages 14 and 15, under Auditor’s File No. 514396, Records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington, situate in County of Okanogan, State of Washington. (d) Description of each default under the Contract on which the notice is based: 1. Failure to pay the following past due items, the amounts and an itemization for which are given in (g) and (h) below: a. Contract payments in the amount of $150.00, plus interest at 10% per annum, due monthly on the first day of August, 2007 and due monthly in the same amount for 97 months thereafter until paid in full; b.Late charges in the amount of $15.00 for each contract payment in arrears; c.Okanogan County Real Estate Taxes for 2012 in the amount of

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PAGE B5 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 30,

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 30, 2015 5

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with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: January 15, 2015 /S/Jerome A. Froland, Jerome A. Froland, WSBA 14916, as Trustee 8 - 164th St. SW, Bothell WA 98012 P.O. Box 13125, Mill Creek WA 98082 Telephone : 425-778-5297 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 30 and May 21, 2015. #OVG628487

of January 22, 2011, executed by ERNEST D DAHLGREN, UNMARRIED MAN as Trustor(s), to secure obligations in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (“MERS”), as designated nominee for MORTGAGE INVESTORS CORPORATION, Beneficiary of the security instrument, its successors and assigns, recorded February 17, 2011 as Instrument No. 3161845 and the beneficial interest was assigned to Planet Home Lending, LLC and recorded October 1, 2014 as Instrument Number 3194718 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Okanogan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by Planet Home Lending, LLC, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantors’ default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: Planet Home Lending, LLC Contact Phone No: (866) 882-8187 Address: 321 Research Parkway, Ste. 303, Meriden, CT 06450 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From April 1, 2014 To December 30, 2014 Number of Payments 1 Monthly Payment $418.63 1 $397.71 7 $357.47 Total $3,318.63 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION April 1, 2014 December 30, 2014 $66.08 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: January 22, 2011 Note Amount: $47,927.00 Interest Paid To: March 1, 2014 Next Due Date: April 1, 2014 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $44,515.91, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured, and such oth-

er costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on May 8, 2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by April 27, 2015, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before April 27, 2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustees’ fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the April 27, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, Planet Home Lending, LLC or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERNEST D DAHLGREN 308 SOUTH TONASKET AVE, TONASKET, WA 98855 ERNEST D DAHLGREN 308 SOUTH TONASKET AVE, TONASKET, WA 98855 by both first class and certified mail on November 12, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted

in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees’ Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you might eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (877) 894-4663 or (800) 606-4819 Website: www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and

Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; Dated: December 30, 2014 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By: Jean Greagor, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps 1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Phone: (800) 409-7530 For Reinstatement/Pay Off Quotes, contact MTC Financial Inc. DBA Trustee Corps TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.insourcelogic.com. Order No. WA14-000455-2, Pub Dates 04/09/2015, 04/30/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 9, 30, 2015. #OVG625107

98840-1392 CURRENT OCCUPANT 951 FIRST AVE. S. OKANOGAN WA 98840-1392 By both first class and either registered or certified mail on November 3, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on November 4, 2014, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the Owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant

TS No WA06000164-14-1 APN 2420112000 TO No 8476431 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on May 8, 2015, 10:00 AM, at the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd North, Okanogan, WA 98840, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, the undersigned Trustee, will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 1 AND THE NORTHWESTERLY 15 FEET OF LOT 20, BLOCK 11, MAP OF TONASKET, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK “B” OF PLATS, PAGE 37, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 2420112000 More commonly known as 308 SOUTH TONASKET AVE, TONASKET, WA 98855 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated as

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL30, 2014

OBITUARIES

Forrest Dean Boyer

FORREST DEAN BOYER Forrest Dean Boyer, “Forry,” went to be with our Lord on April 25, 2015. Forry was born January 7, 1938 in Sprague, Washington. Forry was raised in Oroville, Washington and graduated from Oroville High School in 1956. Forry married Joyce V. Millard

Linsey J. Manuel

July 3, 1959. Prior to Forry’s 31-year career with the Okanogan County PUD, he was the owner/ operator of the Oroville Shell Service Station. Forry retired from Okanogan County PUD in approximately 1993 and continued to work with Jim Prince at Prince’s Department Store and thereafter Jack Hughes of Hughes Department Store. A dedicated and devoted husband and father, Forry was known for his rowdy sense of humor and restless enthusiasm for living. Beneath that salty exterior was a golden heart. He was a good friend to his community and truly adored his beloved Oroville. Forry was a member of the Oroville Episcopal Church and served as a board member, Oroville Masonic Lodge, member of the Oroville Fire Department, served on the Oroville City Council, numerous May Festival Committees throughout the years. Forry loved boat racing and coordinated and donated many hours of time to promoting hydroplane races on Lake Osoyoos through the years. Forry had a passion for hobbies to include woodworking,

restoration, ownership and showing of vintage automobiles and many others. Forry was preceded in death by his parents, Howard and Gladys Boyer and grandson Collin Timothy Cross. Forry was blessed with a wonderful family – son Michael and daughter-inlaw Brenda Buckmiller; daughter, Tammy and son-in-law Larry Eneix; son Tim and daughter-inlaw Cindy Sneve Boyer. Forry has seven grandchildren, Stephanie Hornback, Colby Boyer, Kyle Cross, Kyle Buckmiller, Whitney Boyer and Kadi Buckmiller. And, four beautiful great grandchildren, Sophia Mae, Ava Madeline, Shaylin Alexandra and Blake Patrick. Forry is also survived by his sister Donna Shaver of Deer Park, Wash., nieces and nephews and countless friends. Forry will be missed by his family, his friends and his beloved Oroville. Services in memory for Forry will be held Saturday, May 2, 2015 at the Oroville Episcopal Church at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers any donations may be made to the Oroville Episcopal Church Youth Group.

LINSEY J. MANUEL

ers and sisters; Alvin of Omak, George of Mount Vernon, Randy of Ark., Kirk of Bradley, Violet of Omak, Randy of Lynnwood, Adelene of Oroville and Kim of Wenatchee. He was preceded in death by his mother, Irene; father, Angus; brother Stan and sisters Mildred and Agnes. Services will be held on Saturday, May 2, 2015 at 10 a.m. at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Oroville with Father Jose Maldonado, officiating. A dinner will follow the service at the Oroville Eagles. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements

Linsey J. Manuel, age 58, passed away April 21, 2015 at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee with family at his side. He was born November 30, 1956 in Tonasket to parents Angus and Irene Manuel. He attended Oroville Schools and graduated in 1974. He moved to the coast and worked at Jafco then moved back to Oroville to work at the Casino as a security guard. He later took care of his mother. He was a member of the Colville Confederated Tribe. Linsey is survived by his broth-

Judy Ellen Marts

JUDY ELLEN MARTS Judith Ellen Marts left this world on April 19, 2015 at the age of 75 to join her dear departed loved ones. She passed peacefully at home surrounded by her loving family. Judy was born to Robert and Betty Hesseltine, the only daughter of four children on December 13, 1939 in Mason City, Wash. where her father was working on construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The family later moved to Snohomish, Wash. where Judy was raised and attended school.

In 1958, Judy married Don Smith and together they had two children, Roger and Elaina. This union was fated not to last… and some years later they divorced. While working at the Hour Café in Snohomish, Judy met John Marts and a year later, in June of 1968, they were happily married. Together they had two children, Alan and Ann. Judy continued to work as a waitress at different restaurants in the Snohomish area until they took their family and relocated to Toroda Creek in Eastern Washington in 1972. In 1974, they moved to Oroville where they would call home. Judy enjoyed being at home raising her children for the next several years. In the early 1990’s Judy attended Gonzaga University and became a Paralegal. Judy returned home and got a job at the Okanogan County Courthouse as a court facilitator from 1994 to 1997. Judy left that position to work closer to home and worked as an Insurance Agent at Farmers Insurance until retirement. Judy enjoyed going to family campouts, years of fishing with friends and especially at Conners Lake with her son, Roger. She also enjoyed watching her grandsons play high school football. It didn’t matter how cold or how far away, you could always count on seeing her at a Friday night game, usu-

ally in Republic or Wenatchee. Judy was a wonderful person and although she was often in pain, she had a smile on her face and was always happy to visit with friends while up town doing errands. She was a loving mother, grandmother, wife and friend and she will be missed dearly by everyone who knew her. Judy is survived by her husband of 47 years, John Marts; son John (Shelly) Marts and grandkids, Ashley and Aaron; son Roger (Trish) Smith and grandchildren Robert, John and Sky; daughter Elaina (Dave) Koepke and grandchildren Justin, Chance and Dallas; daughter Ann Marts and grandson Brandon (Holly) Wells along with several great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, Robert and Betty Hesseltine and her son Alan Marts. At Judy’s request there will be no services. Memorials may be made to the Oroville Ambulance in her memory. Also, the family would like to thank the Oroville Ambulance Crew and the Oroville Pharmacy for their service and special care. Rest in Peace Mamma! We Love You! Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory is in care of arrangements

JUANITA M. LIVINGSTON

Spencer, Concrete, Wash; Mary Nelson, Hawthorn, Calif.; 13 grandchildren, 13 great grandchildren and her mother, Berdina Rhynard of Arlington Heights, Arlington, Wash. She was preceeded in death by her father, Russel Rhynard. Juanita was the past president of the American Legion Auxiliary Post 82, Tonasket and was a current member of the Tonasket Eagles #3002 and a life member of the AmVets, Post 69, Chesaw. At her request no services will be held. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Go with God my darling.

Juanita M. Livingston passed away on April 4, 2015 in the early morning hours at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She leaves her husband at home in Oroville, two sons, Eugene Johns of Mills, Wyo and Wane Johns of Wilber, Wash. and seven step children – Ginger Stein of Everett, Wash.; Mary (Lou) Shultz of Marysville, Wash.; Katherine Jane McPhearson, Arlington, Wash.; Bernice Grettel of Arlington, Wash; Danny Graves, Marysville, Wash.; Dorea

Juanita M. Livingston

Oroville May Festival Parade Celebrating 81 Years!

Saturday, May 9th, 2015

“Red Carpet Magic” Lineup starts at 8:00am

Judging starts at 8:30am

Parade begins at 10:00am

Name of entry:_________________________________________________________________ Contact name:_________________________________________________________________ Mailing address:_______________________________________________________________ Contact phone day:____________________evening:__________________________________ E-mail:__________________________________Fax: _________________________________ Brief description of entry and number of participants: _________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Media announcement for use by Parade Master of Ceremonies: __________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Note: Mounted novice, 12 years of age of younger must have a handler for each mount. All horse units MUST have their own cleanup crew. In consideration of the acceptance of this application, the applicant agrees to save and hold harmless all officers, employees, and agents of the Oroville May Festival Committee from any loss or damage whatsoever to persons or property arising out of participation in the parade, and further agrees to defend said personnel and committee from any claims for damage related thereto.

Applicant’s Signature: __________________________________________________________ Print Name: __________________________________________________________________ Please return by May 5th to: Oroville May Festival Association, POBox 985, Oroville, WA 98844 Or fax to (509)476-2088 For questions, please contact:

Shelley DeWitte (509) 476- 3603, Linda Schwilke (509) 476-2241, Sharon Richardson (509) 476-0718

http://orovillemayfestival.com

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 30, 2015  

April 30, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 30, 2015  

April 30, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune