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Hospital District still looking for new CEO

LEADERSHIP DAY

Ready for education about changes in health care BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Clarice Nelson, reporting for the Long Range Focus committee at the April 9 North Valley Hospital Board meeting said five Skype interviews of hospital administrator candidates were scheduled for the end of March, but two of the candidates had taken other jobs already. The first Skype interview was done last week, and two candidates were scheduled to be interviewed Tuesday, April 14. One of them was a “no-show” according to Nelson, and the other one is no longer in the running after being interviewed. An interview with a third candidate is intended to be set up for next week. The on-campus interviews have been postponed, and the linked-in ad for the new administrator will be expanded for another 30 days. Meanwhile, Ron O’Halloran

Oroville Elementary School held a Leadership Day as part of their Leader in Me program. The day was an opportunity for parents and others interested in finding out about Leader in Me by watching a video and talking with staff and students, as well as visiting the different classrooms. Each student has a job, whether it is acting as the official greeter or feeding the fish. Above, the student with the Talking Rock gets to speak; right, kids pose with their watercolor paintings of an aquarium; below, students learn about butterflies; below, right, even the school sign was decorated for Leadership Day.

began serving as interim hospital administrator April 1, and is dedicated to holding the helm as long as necessary. “I’ve had fun trying to meet the staff and greet the community as I go around,” O’Halloran said at the board meeting. “I’m pleased with staff and their commitment to the community, which takes us a long way to meet the goals of the strategic plan. While I am here, we will get out into the community. If you have a service organization and want us to come and talk, let us know.” O’Halloran said it is important for people to understand what is going on with changes in healthcare through the Affordable Care Act/Obama Care. “It is changing reimbursement structure through the state. More people are insured, but deductibles are higher,” O’Halloran said. Board Chair Helen Casey reported that “The ICD10 (Insurance Diagnostic Codes manual) is coming and will change lives forever—how we bill, how we treat people. There’s an awful lot to go along with that in

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TSD board talks technology needs for state testing

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The April 13 Tonsket School Board meeting consisted of technology training presented by TSD Technology Surpervisor Jordan Weddle to board members on how to access their new email, with the school switching over from the First Class email system to Gmail May 15. Steve McCullough, who will be the new school superintendent starting in July, was also in attendance. The Consent Agenda portion of the meeting consisted of items related to Personnel, Certified Substitutes, Field Trip Requests and Surplus. All items on the consent agenda were approved

without discussion, other than a referral to the personnel issue relating to two resignations; one which would be effective immediately. Board packets are distributed to board members ahead of time on their I-Pads. Therefore, no discussion of consent agenda items is necessary in the public setting of the board meetings. Board packets are not available to the public at the meetings, just the agenda listing the order of topics to be discussed. Middle School 7th grade History/Language Arts teacher Brett Franklin will be resigning, and Middle School Math Teacher Michelle Silverthorn will be taking a one-year leave of absence.

SEE TECH | PG A2

Tonasket City Council halts parking problem County Transportation Authority to begin service in July BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonsket City Council moved to draft a no-parking ordinance along the road going into and out of Chief Tonasket Park when Mayor Patrick Plumb described a situation during soccer games last week that would have made it impossible to bring in an ambulance, had there been the need for one. The one-way road in the park has been temporarily eliminat- Mayor Plumb ed due to construction of the Water Ranch. The road now serves as both ingress and egress, and cannot serve as a

parking lot, according to the city. Chief complete, Black said the Water Ranch Tonasket Park has three designated park- ended up costing $300,000 instead of the ing lots. originally estimated $100,000 because “We could not have “through the whole gotten an ambulance process we have done through there. It’s not nothing but go high “We could have not good,” said Plumb. end.” The initial invest“We need to do somegotten an ambulance ment in high-quality thing before someone will pay off through there. It’s not equipment gets hurt.” in the long run with a Tonasket Police lack of maintenance or good. We need to Officer Darren Curtis need for replacement. do something before assured council mem“This company has bers the ordinance someone gets hurt” installed 25 parks, would be enforced. and I talked to seven Patrick Plumb, Mayor “As soon as you put of them,” Black said. Tonasket up the signs, we will “The company has give them a week of never had to replace warnings, and then any of the pieces.” that’s it,” Curtis said. The Splash Park includes a concrete Linda Black reported the Splash Park slab with 15 different farm animals that Water Ranch is nearing completion, with can be pulled or stepped on to squirt a “soft opening” planned for the end of water. In addition, a picnic shelter is May, and an official grand opening to being put in along with a horseshoe pit. coincide with a soccer tournament pos“I want the park to attract not just the sibly taking place June 6. young, but the community as a whole,” A project that took her four years to said Black.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 17

Black has taken everything she’s learned over the past four years and written a document called the Tonasket Water Ranch Work Plan she will share with the Tonasket Pool Committee. “Linda, you have done something that’s really a centerpiece to build a park around,” said Councilman Scott Olson. “This will not be something that’s just a flash in the pan, or a hassle for Hugh. Everything I’ve seen you do is the opposite. We get more and have to do less, versus other projects where we end up getting less and having to do more. I am really impressed with everything you have done.” City consultant Kurt Danison agreed, stating, “Linda has amassed significant experience in fundraising and developing a project that the pool committee can learn from. Their project is much larger and complex but Linda has valuable advice for them.” Councilmember Claire Jeffko reported the Park and Recreation Feasibility Study Group had a positive meeting with Okanogan County Commissioners.

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“Perry Houston (Director of Okanogan County Office of Planning and Development) was there, and he came up with many good, solid ideas for us,” Jeffko said. The mayor signed a resolution supporting the formation of a Parks and Recreation District. Danison completed a draft of revisions to the planning code and submitted it Thursday, April 16, to the Planning Commission to look over before presenting it to the Tonasket City Council. Danison said current development standards were formatted into a table, but for the most part remain the same. Danison also reported on the Okanogan Council of Governments (OCOG), stating a new spending cycle for Regional Transportation Planning Organization (RTPO) funds begins July 1, 2015. Availability of funds from the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) depends on there being a Unified Planning Work

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015

SIGN OF SPRING

PARK | FROM A1

Robert Keylard/submitted photo

Robert Keylard found this “flying jewel” Monday at his single feeder at his Yarnell Road home, about seven miles from Tonasket on the way to Loomis. “I noticed the hummingbirds because he had expected them to arrive earlier, some time around the 15th of this month. With the warm weather we have been having, I actually hoped they would arrive earlier. So far only the Calliope has made its appearance,” he said.

Program (UPWP) in place detailing what tasks are to be accomplished and how the RTPO funds will be expended. Danison said due to the nascent nature of the OCOG, not all of last year’s RTPO funds were allocated, and any unspent funds are absorbed back into the state’s budget June 30, 2015. “We have to understand we will not get all of the money that was coming to us this year, but we certainly will next year,” Danison said. Danison said a meeting with the Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) April 16, “went great,” with the UTC supporting a new crossing, providing the railroad grants permission. The planned crossing is for a new access to Chief Tonasket Park. “We are now going to focus on upgrading the temporary access constructed 25 years ago, which will reduce the overall cost of the new access,” he said, “but the signalized crossing will be around $300,000 with the road upgrades possibly a similar amount or even more. Providing we get all the approvals we need, securing the funding to construct the project could take a few years and require several funding partners.” The council approved use of the RV Park building (the old visitor center) by the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center Art Committee as a stained glass/ fused glass art gallery. The gallery will be called ‘Wild Women Glass’ (WWG) and be open Thursdays

through Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., May through December. During operating hours, WWG volunteers will assist in collection fees at the RV Park. The gallery already in place at the Tonasket Visitor Center will continue to exhibit other art, with both galleries giving a 15% commission of sales to the city. Plumb announced the Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) has purchased three buses and will begin service soon, probably in the Omak and Okanogan areas first, with the addition of the Methow line. Manager Kelly Scarf said OCTA is currently contracting service with Okanogan County Transportation and Nutrition (OCTN), and will start running their own service July 1, 2015. “We are taking over and expanding the Omak Okanogan Shuttle service, and conducting a survey to determine where we go next in the county,” Scarf said. OCTA is funded by local taxes, but OCTN is funded almost entirely by state grant funds, with the new funding biennium beginning July 1. “Yesterday we got notice from the state about projects funded, so now we can plan out the next two years and beyond,” Scalf said, adding they would be meeting next week with OCTN. “We want to make sure we are filling gaps and building service that meets an unmet need, rather than duplicating services.” Scalf said OCTA was looking

at doing van pools for people throughout the county, something only a transit authority can do. “We are also looking at setting up a shared dispatch system, so a person could call a single number no matter what kind of transportation they needed,” said Scalf. “We are looking at commutes from Mazama into Omak, Omak to Brewster and Oroville to Omak.” Scalf said the plan is written to have the central location in Omak. “But that would mean a lot of dead head miles for vehicles, which is an expensive way to operate. It would make more sense to have another facility in Twisp or Winthrop,” said Scalf. “Also, that would give us a way to do a last-minute repair on vehicles to remain consistent in our services.” Scalf previously worked for Rural Resources’ Community Action, operating public transportation in Ferry, Stevens and Pend Oreille County. “It was a similar size, about 6,000 square miles, with a similar population facing the same challenges of rural living,” said Scalf. The public is urged to complete the transportation survey on the OCTA website, or by calling 509557-6177. The council elected to have the city accept the Armada Electronic Payment System (Epay) as the city payment system. Customers will still be able to pay their bills as they always have, with the additional option of paying online.

where the $53,000 would come from, expressing concern that it not come out of the reserve fund. “Our reserve fund is in trouble now, it is down to almost nothing,” Caton said. “We have to do what’s best for kids,” said Stangland. “It’s not best for kids if they can’t come to school because we couldn’t pay the bills and had to shut the doors,” Caton responded. “At some point we are going to need that reserve fund for something more important, and it’s not going to be there. We are already not going to finish out the year with as much in the reserve as we had planned. What portion of the $53,000 is coming out of the general fund?” Weddle said that would be addressed at the upcoming bud-

get session. According to Weddle, a large amount of computer equipment purchased in 2007 needs to be surplused, including 32 staff Macs at $40,864 and 117 student Macs at $149,409 for a total of $190,273. Weddle said switching to Chromebooks would save money, with 32 staff Chromebooks costing $12,480 and 117 student Chromebooks would cost $38,610 for a total of $51,090. “We are getting close to having just two kids per Chromebook,” Weddle said. The school district volunteered to take part in a technology audit through the Educational Service District, and Weddle said ESD made the following recommendations: establish a technology refresh cycle, standardize on

equipment, have an off-site backup plan, migrate TSD to google’s email system, upgrade wireless and firewall, reduce the number of servers down to three or four and streamline technology purchasing ad approval. Weddle said the technology audit was about ten pages, and the information would be used when creating the technology plan to be presented April 27. Stangland pointed out that the school’s new phone system that has been being used for less than a year will be phased out. She also said there were still complaints being expressed about the school’s website, and it was suggested a job description be written to hire someone to maintain the website. The board meets next on Monday, April 27 at 7:30 p.m.

TECH | FROM A1 Field trips approved include the high school students going to the State Capital in Olympia April 20-21, the middle school taking students to the Math Olympiad May 1-2, the Mecha Club going to Seattle May 1-3, Gear-Up students going to Stehekin May 5-7, and Alternative Students going to Silverwood Theme Park June 8-9. Two school buses have been surplused. Unfinished Business included a discussion of the facilities bond. Board member Stangland said she meet with three bond volunteers who suggested waiting until February to run the bond again. “The volunteers are all in agreement trying to run two issues in the same year at different times is not a good idea,” said Stangland. “They had a lot of contact with

the voters, and we didn’t lose by a lot. If we run them together, we need to do a better job of differentiating them, and make everything really clear.” Board member Lloyd Caton said the feedback he received from people was that they didn’t completely understand the numbers and the way they totaled up. “We are in the middle of it, so of course we understand it,” said Caton. “We bear the brunt of some of that; the information not being presented clearly. It is clear to us, because we are knee deep in it.” Board member Jerry Asmussen said the board needed to keep working on it, as four more students enrolled in the elementary school that same day. “The numbers aren’t getting

smaller and the space isn’t getting bigger,” said Stangland. Levy monies were again discussed during the technology update. According to Weddle, increased demands by the state for student testing puts the school district in need of spending $83,000 on technology. “We need more technology available during testing. The burden with this new testing is greater,” said Weddle, adding that computers still needed to be available for senior projects at the end of the year when the majority of testing is done. The current levy budgets for $30,000 to be spent annually to “refresh computer labs.” This leaves the district cost for technology updates at $53,000. Board member Caton repeatedly asked

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APRIL 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Annie across America Veteran’s Widow spreads message of faith in the flag and the country’s foundations BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Local girl Annie Wilkison is off for a second interstate sojourn this summer to “spread patriotism one flag at a time.” Wilkison, who formed a nonprofit under the name Annie Amerika to help fund her journey, is the widow of a disabled Vietnam War Veteran who dreamed of replacing worn and tattered American flags flown in private homes with new, American-made flags at no cost to the flag flyer. The two intended to travel across the country the summer of 2011 visiting family and hanging flags, but Annie’s husband John E. Wilkison was killed in a car accident in the fall of 2010. Annie grieved for a year before realizing that she could still carry out his dream on her own. “I was given the nickname ‘Annie,’ and I decided that instead of taking the trip with my real name, Gale Wilkison, I was going to do it under ‘Annie Amerika,’ because this isn’t about me, it is about John and his patriotism and his wish to do this,” Wilkison said. She wanted to use the correct spelling of ‘America,’ but that name was already taken, so she improvised. She didn’t yet have nonprofit status, but she received monetary donations from civic organizations to purchase new flags. A teacher at Bridgeport Elementary at the time, Wilkison headed out for 60 days during the summer of 2012, traveling over 10,000 miles, crossing 32 states and giving away 81 flags. Choosing to avoid interstate highways, Wilkison took back roads and two-lane highways to get to the heart of rural America. She would cruise the towns in the mid-afternoon, looking for possible unsuspecting recipients. Some days she didn’t find a home for a new red, white and blue, and other days she gave away two. As each new flag was raised, Wilkison would cite the Pledge of Allegiance; usually joined by the homeowner. The worn out flags were donated to local boy scout troops across the country, who learned the process of properly retiring the flags. “I like to educate kids about the flag,” Wilkison said. “When I am with young kids, I talk about what the colors mean. And when I am with older kids, I talk about what the constitution means.” Taking a spontaneous approach

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Annie Wilkison stands in front of her husband’s flag, holding the book she wrote about their shared dream, fulfilled alone. on most days of the trip which was her husband’s style, the planner in Wilkison made sure to arrive at the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial in Washington D.C. on the Fourth of July. There, she placed a photo of her husband and the childhood friend he enlisted with in 1966, the year after they graduated high school. “Those two finally made it to the wall,” Wilkison said. She kept track of every town visited and every flag given away, and when she returned home, Wilkison chronicled her adventures in a book called ‘I Pledge Allegiance: A Veteran’s Dream.’ “Patriotism has nothing to do with politics,” she said. “Patriotism has to do with what our country is founded on. And when I crossed the country in 2012, I discovered that patriotism is alive and well in this country.” The journey served not only to promote patriotism across America, but to help infuse healing within her heart. “Healing is a slow process,” Wilkison said. She now lives in Tonasket and works as a paraprofessional at the Alternative School. Her journey this summer will begin July 17, and bring her back to town right before school starts up again. She plans to head south, going through Yosemite State Park in California before heading east to Bryce Canyon National Forest. From there, she’ll head to northern Illinois to visit her father, then

straight to northern Wisconsin and head back to Washington on a northern route. “Every time I see an American flag, I think of someone making the ultimate sacrifice to give, and protect, my freedom,” said Wilkison. Wilkison is hoping to raise enough money to purchase more flags, at a cost of $2,000 for 100. Although she buys the flags with donated funds, she foots the bill for the trip itself. Her last journey included lots of nights spent in Wal-Mart parking lots for free, cooking dried beans she’d been soaking all day. Her van experienced mechanical problems all across the country, but never left her stranded; breaking down near mechanics with good hearts and the desire to see her succeed on her journey. A fundraiser for the purchase of new American flags is planned for Saturday, May 2, at the Tonasket Eagles, where Wilkison will give a brief presentation of patriotism, dedication and love. Dinner from 5:30 to 7 p.m. will feature Indian Tacos for $8. A dessert/pie auction begins at 7 p.m., followed by Joker Poker Karaoke starting at 8:30 p.m. Members and guests are welcome. Annie Amerika is a federally recognized 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization, with all donations tax-deductible. Her book, ‘I Pledge Allegiance: A Veteran’s Dream’ will be available for purchase.

Tonasket Junior Rodeo wishes to give

“A GREAT BIG THANK YOU TO...” Country Crazy Cowgirl Bling Russell and Nancy Burbank Spring Clean Beanblossom’s Backhoe Service Hanks Harvest Foods, Inc Lee Frank Mercantile Naylor’s Air Conditioning & Heating Nulton Irrigation Okanogan Properties OKValleySports.com All Valley Insulation Apple Valley Machine Shop Beltrami Plumbing Bob and Nancy Barnes Coleman Oil Coulee Dam Federal Credit Union

Don Kruse Electric, Inc. Edward Jones, Sandra Rasmussen Frontier Foods George and Karen Zittel Hickman’s Body Shop Hilltop Realty Holan Enterprises Kiwanis Club of Tonasket Confluence Health-Tonasket North Valley Hospital Smith & Nelson Inc. Steve Richey Horseshoeing Superior Auto Parts T&T Real Estate, LLC Terry and Gayle Hueth Tonasket Feed Store

Tonasket Veterinary Service Valley Home Repair Whitley Fuel Wilbur Ellis Co. Cowboy Construction Company Overland Fence & Construction, LLC Colbert Orchards Omak Stampede Rawson’s Cornerstone Custom Granite Gavin’s Petroleum Grant’s Market Inc. Knob Hill Forge Midway Building Supply Steve and Pat Richey

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PAGE A3

NVH | FROM A1 prep work. Doctors would like to be doctors and not have to deal with that.” According to O’Halloran, the ICD regulates how doctors and nurses chart what they learn from the patient, how they envision care for the patient and how they carry that out. “It’s all dictated and documented,” he said, “acuity of care codes for service a patient receives. Each digit on the hand has a code and how it relates to the wrist, elbow and shoulder; it all has a code and that is how you get reimbursed.” O’Halloran said there were thousands of codes, all related to the healthcare plan the physician has ordered, how it’s carried out, and how the patient responds. He said the ICD9 had been “out there for years, and they’ve added tens of thousands of more codes.” “It’s shocking what has to be done to get reimbursed. If they don’t get every detail of care down, they don’t get a payment. If you use the wrong codes, there are penalties for that.” O’Halloran said the coding was very difficult, particularly for older doctors who found it overwhelming. “They are saying, ‘Just let me be a doctor.’ The younger ones do much better. Because of smart devices, if you follow the algorithms, codes come up automatically in place. Newer doctors are getting this as part of their training, whereas other ones have to pick it up,” said O’Halloran. “It’s all evolving.” Casey asked staff to review the 2013/14 Strategic Plan to recognize goals met and others that still needed to be addressed. “Some goals we can cross off and say ‘good job,’ others we still need to focus on,” Casey said, adding, “We haven’t done the education we need; we’ve been more reactive than proactive.” According to O’Halloran, Casey was referring to staff time and energy being funneled into financial concerns. “I think because of budget constraints they have been fighting through, they have forgone themselves the opportunity to go to classes sponsored by the hospital association, vendors and state agencies to keep themselves informed of the opportunity to affect positive change. It is important for board and staff to take advantage of continuing education,” said O’Halloran. “We need

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Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction, ASIR, which allows lower dose scanning. The ASIR software corrects it to still have a high-quality image, according to Pyper. “Our goal is to use up to 40 percent ASIR dose reduction,” he said. The scanner is calibrated daily, and monitored yearly by a physicist. “If the numbers started to stray, we would call in a service technician, and if they couldn’t fix it we would call in a physicist,” said Pyper. Pyper said one year of natural radiation is about three millisieverts of radiation, and a chest Xray equaled about seven millisieverts. A CT scan is equal to about 200 chest Xrays, according to Pyper. For Board Member Committee reports, Herb Wandler said his favorite item to comment on “is finance, as it keeps improving. When I look back at the Strategic Plan of 2013/14, we were not in good shape. We have made great progress,” said Wandler, adding that regarding Caribou Trail Orthopedics, Mid Valley Hospital was still struggling to pay their warrants. NVH had $1,518,422 cash on hand as of April 9. “It would be good to have 90 days cash on hand,” said Casey. “We’re not quite there, but we’ve done well.” According to O’Halloran, the hospital is about a quarter of the way to having 90 days cash on hand. Theresa Hughes said the Nursing Home Success Team put on a couple of good pubic forums, and would be looking at what to do next. “They want to do another one of the forums here in Tonasket,” said O’Halloran. “We had a great turnout in Oroville and would like to see that happen here as well.” Casey reported the hospital’s Wellness Programs have been well-received by the people participating in them. The next course will be Thursday, April 16 from 6 to 7 p.m. OT R/L John D. Ehlers will present a course on Occupational Therapy focusing on what a person can do to improve and extend functional safety and independence within their personal residence. The cost is free, but people are asked to register ahead of time.

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to put enough money into the budget so they can seek other certifications to improve their ability to come back and serve the community.” As an example, he said the hospital has a dietician who is not certified in diabetic education. “We like to think we could help her achieve that,” he said “Sometimes extra help can set someone up to achieve that extra level of ability to serve the community.” NVH holds a Diabetes Support Group meeting the first Tuesday of every month in the hospital board room. The cost-free meeting, facilitated by R.N. Phil Gleason, runs from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Pre-registration is not necessary. Quality reports from employees at each board meeting continued with Radiology Manager Shane Pyper reporting on imaging. Pyper reported the new Optima 660 CT scanner was “doing great and the patients love it. We’ve done almost 500 scans this year so far, and this week we’ve already done 40 scans. It’s been a busy week.” Pyper attributes steady business of the scanner to healthcare using “more diagnostic scans nowadays.” He said approximately 80 million scans were done in the United States in 2014, 1683 of those done at NVH. With the increase in CT scans, several states have passed legislation requiring tracking of radiation doses per patient. Washington is not yet one of those states. “We are now asking patients if they’ve had one done recently, and we pull up their records and track their dose,” Pyper said, adding that repeated CT scans happen for cancer or oncology patients, or patients who “don’t get the answer they want, so they go somewhere else and rescan.” Pyper said another example might be someone with ongoing migraine headaches who comes in, and if they see a new doctor he might not know the patient just had a head scan done a couple weeks ago. “A lot of patients don’t realize it (radiation) adds up over time,” Pyper said, adding that if Washington state passed legislation requiring radiation doses to be monitored, “Our scanner is set up and ready to go. It would just be a matter of implementing the tracking.” The Optima 660 has

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2016

HISTORY The Legend of the monster of Palmer Lake

USGS

1896 USGS Survey Map of Township 39 and 40, Range 25 East. Editor’s Note: This is the third and final installment of Karen Beaudette’s research into the Charley Long killing near Loomis in 1894. G.A.D. BY KAREN BEAUDETTE LOCAL HISTORIAN

Okanogan tribal legend cautions that if a person should see the monster that lives in the northeast corner of Palmer Lake, they will die. The ancient stories told just how some reckless acts of infidelity or greed could lead to a watery doom. Events of 1893 at Palmer Lake involved at least nine reckless men who found themselves at that perilous shore. One of them died. Charley Long met the Monster. Readers may recall that George H. Smith confessed to the jury that he was fearfully afraid of Long, causing him to defend himself with a gun and an axe. The State of Washington deemed Smith’s action as “justifiable homicide.” And the Loomiston Journal speculated that legal trouble between Smith and Long was the underlying motive. What we don’t know is whether Smith may have explained his fear of Long: Was it because of Charley’s reputation or because of some immediate circumstance? We don’t know what story Judge Firfield [sic] heard from the Sheriff that lead to his verdict to acquit Smith on justifiable grounds. But we do know about the legal troubles and we do know they were not between Smith and Long. If you, Dear Reader, have been asking yourself why Charley Long was so far from his Oregon stomping grounds, the East Oregon Herald explains: “As Charley Long, once a resident of Heppner, had written about jumping a ranch [in Loomis, Wash.], stating that he expected trouble over the matter, Heppner people concluded...that he has had the trouble anticipated and once too often.” Additionally, the official records of Okanogan County have turned up the evidence of the legal trouble--most definitely about a ranch, which the bystanders of Loomis may have had only the vaguest gossip to go by. A Quit Claim Deed was recorded by Okanogan County on October 10, 1892 (one of those dreaded historical dates) from William Case to George H. Smith that transferred a “piece and parcel of...the Case ranch... at the north end of Palmer Lake and bounded on the north by ranch of M. Kelley, on the east by the Palmer ranch, on the south of Palmer Lake, and on the west by Mount Chopacca, being 160 acres and...[much legalese here] one cabin.” This land was roughly adjacent to the ranch purchased by George H.’s father, George F. Smith, in 1889. Charley Long certainly had a claim to “that certain ranche [sic] known as the John A. Palmer ranche situated at the foot of Palmer Lake between the Hamilton Ranche and the Ranche formerly occupied by Wm. Claussey and adjoining the James

Palmer Ranche...” as conveyed from James Kinslow [Kinchelo] to Charles Long by a Quit Claim Deed dated January 5, 1893 and duly noted by Okanogan County, attesting to payment as represented by the sum of One Dollar lawful U.S. money. This deed doesn’t mention the total acreage as does the Case-Smith document. Both deeds transferring “ownership” of these ranchlands rely solely on community cooperation as to the actual land boundaries. Without an eyewitness in 1893, and without an official land survey with distinct coordinates, ownership was at best a questionable concept made even more problematical by the

Townships 39 and 40, Range 25 East in 1893. What is more, the 1896 surveys [as partially depicted in our map shown above] were not certified—made “legal” as required by the Homestead Act provision cited above until 1898. Thus, a legal document by Bill of Sale or Deed did not constitute ownership. If a claimer was still on the land when the surveys made filing a preemption claim possible, after a period of five years of continuous occupancy the ownership was secure. It is easy to see the gigantic loophole available to those looking at what may have been their last possible opportunity for land in what has

wrongfully, by force. Smith also alleged that Kenslow tore down and destroyed his cabin, “reasonably worth two hundred dollars” and dwelling house. On October 16, 1893 Judge Wallace Mount declared for the defendant and upheld same on December 20, 1893. Smith appealed the verdict to the State Supreme Court where the case was dismissed. Michael Kelly complaint attested that the property formerly occupied by the plaintiff, now occupied by the defendant, [consisted of] land “beginning about one-half mile north of Palmer Lake, thence north one-half mile and one-half mile wide, all in Okanogan County...” valued at Seven Hundred and Fifty Dollars and included “One Hundred Fifty Tons of wild hay grown, cut, and harvested”; Kelly further claimed that Long unlawfully entered into possession on January 12, 1893 and, adding personal property theft charges, “wrongfully [took] the hay which was then and there growing and being...” In Kelly’s case file, we have the verdict of Judge Mount of October 12, 1893 in Michael Kelly’s favor, restoring the land to his possession and so ordering the Sheriff to so carry out. This decision was also upheld on December 20, 1893. It is worth noting that Michael Kelly was a Civil War veteran, a status that often gained preference in land disputes (providing, of course, they weren’t Confederate veterans ineligible for homesteads). Impeccable patriotic service undoubtedly worked against Charley Long’s reputation as a trouble-maker at best, a lawless hot-head in general. George H. Smith and Kelly seem to have been friends, judging from their simultaneous lawsuits with the same attorney. It is clear, nonetheless, that whatever legal troubles Smith had, they were not with Long. It is also clear that James Kenslow, known as Jimmy Kinchelo, had a big problem with both Smith and with Long. Charley Long paid Kinchelo an unknown amount of money (the One Dollar of the deed was and

Long may well have figured he bought, paid for, and was entitled to. It is hard to imagine that Charley Long just shrugged and with an “Oh, Well”, walked away

area would bring such a frivolous lawsuit to court and rid themselves of their principal buyers. Jasper Cox vanishes from the Okanogan; Michael Kelly died

A rare photo of Jimmy Kinchelo on right, c. 1915

from the whole affair. Smith was obviously still residing on the property he lost to Kinchelo—the site of the killing—but challenging Smith wasn’t going to help Charley’s case or to gain possession. If Kinchelo and Long invaded the Smith & Kelly premises on the same day in January 1893 as contended in both court complaints, there remains some suspicion about any agreements they made between themselves as to the next course of action. It may not have been Charley’s reputation that so frightened The Okanogan Kid; Smith may not have been the intended victim, but we know he was armed and prepared for a gunfight, not for a shouting match of intimidation. Nine men were involved in the struggle for the former Palmer and Case ranchland or had money in the game: The Smith Brothers’ George F. and Jefferson, George H. Smith, and Horace Smith. Jasper Cox of Walla Walla counts as a fifth investor, having bought land from Horace Smith; Michael Kelly (who may have purchased his land claim— no legal documents were filed.); Jimmy Kinchelo and Jack Long, mentioned in the coroner’s hearing testimony; Charley Long is, of course, Investor Number Nine. Two years later, George F. Smith was convicted of cattle rustling of one (1) cow on the “his” ranch, purchased from Phillips. Smith, Sr. was sentenced to prisHerbert Gregg photoon for 18 months, served three Scene of the Crime: A mountain goat’s view of north Palmer Lake, c.1900 by Herbert Gregg months before being pardoned by the Washington Governor. It is unknown whether The Okanogan Kid skedaddled, leaving his nickfact that there was no legal own- been termed “The Late Frontier”, is a common legal minimum) for name behind with the land and ership of United States govern- holding onto, well—for dear life, a ranch. On December 21, 1893, returning to Seattle; his father ment property yet available. whatever seemingly empty acres Kinchelo has a more-or-less maintained that Junior managed Miners leaving the British they could find. In the late legal, court-decreed possession the Smith’s nine meat markets Columbia goldfields were drift- 1880’s, Fifteen-Mile Strip might of any ranch land he deems is on the coast. A person might ing into the westernmost section just as well have been known as his, some part of which Charley wonder why the cattlemen of the of Stevens County during the “Last Chance Gulch”—with an 1870’s and early 1880’s in ever- abundance of grass, water, space, increasing numbers. They soon grazing potential, and empty of complained loudly about their much competition. So far. inability to secure their investWhere do these indisputable ments—labor and a pick-axe-- conditions leave George H. with ownership of the land set Smith and Charles E. Long? In aside for the Moses-Columbia court. During the summer of Reservation. In response to this 1893, Smith filed a complaint loud chorus of disapproval, a against James Kenslow and, fifteen-mile strip—roughly from on the same day, August 14th, the International Border to the with the same attorney, Michael mining camp at Loomis -- was Kelley filed a complaint against removed from the reservation in Charles Long. Both com1883, permitting a certain apri- plaints cite “claim jumping” by ori claim to property that would the defendants. The attorney’s later be eligible for legal owner- handwritten court records do not ship under the Homestead Act of furnish much information; fron1862. The key provisions of that tier justice with a circuit-riding Act for purposes of land owner- judge, apparently did not have ship at Palmer Lake at the time much use for faithful transcripts are clearly stated: [I’m not mak- of testimony in cases unlikely ing this up] “a person is eligible to ever be appealed to a higher for a homestead]... who has filed court. Without citing any legal a preemption claim...in confor- claim, Smith accuses Kenslow mity to the legal subdivisions [aka James Kinchelo] of takof the public lands, and after the ing possession on January 12, same shall have been surveyed.” 1893 of the premises, described Ah, there’s the rub. exactly as noted in the original The U.S. surveys had not Deed, during Smith’s temporary lapse to the entire country: reached the Palmer Lake absence and thereafter holding it,

before the surveys were certified. Together, Kinchelo and Jack Lng end up with the disputed ranchland before the surveys were If you look very closely at the northwest corner of Palmer Lake in the map reproduced above, you will see Jimmy Kinchelo’s name as being in possession of the property in 1896. Kinchelo was awarded a homestead patent in 1900 for the same land, forever described as Lots 1-6 (which included the water rights of Palmer Creek outlet, by the way) and the SESW of Sec. 35, T40N, R25E, approximately the land Charley Long bought. The goal for these nine men was clearly to establish a Possession is 99% of the Law claim on legal sub-divisions of prime cattle-raising territory in order to be in a position to file for homestead status. The Okanogan country was one of the few remaining pockets of available land in the West. As an economic opportunity the Okanogan was not so much overlooked as by-passed in favor of better farm land and transportation to the south. Despite a description of the Sinlahekin watershed made by early-day entrepreneurs as the only prime cattle country north of the Kittitas Valley in eastern Washington (think about it in 1870’s), two cow-killing winters of 1879-80 and 1889-90 in central Washington had nearly wiped out even the prospects of profits on cows, let alone the dry-land farming practices of the Palouse country. Competition for the Palmer Lake corner of the territory began, as we’ve seen, in the mining claims of the 1880’s. The financial depression of 1893 brought economic col-

SEE MONSTER | PG B8


APRIL23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Do polls really matter?

As I discussed last week, we have a new poll about what you think Princes Heritage Park should be. It’s a pretty simple one, with just a couple of questions. Should we have a soccer field there, taking up half the field, and use the other half for things like picnic tables, playground equipment, etc., or should we make it all a multi-use park? There’s also a “something else” option. You have to keep in mind, whatever goes there can’t be too expensive, nor can it be too permanent. The Prince family made a generous offer, but it is for a five year lease, with an option to renew a second five years. No combination pool/recreation centers are in the works. What makes this particularly a tough poll to make is – there really haven’t been that many Out of ideas thrown out there, so the few that have been around FaceBook, etc. made the poll. My Mind bouncing It might have been better just to solicit Letters Gary A. DeVon to the Editor, especially in light of the few, or should I say, none, we got this week. A better question might be is “Do polls matter anyway?” What’s your opinion, maybe we should run a poll. As you can see we got 53 responses to the one on the dam. That might be partly because of a website glitch, but it was up for several weeks. On a positive note, we had 53 responses to our new park poll within a few short days of it being put up. Maybe the answer is to keep the questions simple and to a minimum. We’ll see.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

The Petri Dish

Marijuana probably heading back to voters BY JERRY CORNFIELD EVERETT HERALD

There’s a good chance marijuana will be in front of voters again this fall. This time, though, the decision will be whether to keep the industry out, not whether to let it in. A bill passed by the state House on April 10 would erase bans on marijuana businesses that have been locally enacted by elected officials in Marysville, Snohomish, Mill Creek and 56 other cities, plus a handful of counties. But the bill would allow voters a chance to impose a prohibition on marijuana growers, processors or retailers through passage of a local ballot measure — even in a city or county where the budding weed industry is blossoming. House Bill 2136, a 54-page rewrite of the rules and taxation of recreational marijuana commerce, passed on a strong bipartisan vote of 67-28. It is now in the Senate for consideration. The sliver of the bill dealing with preemption and public votes tries to cope with a sizable rebellion of communities after approval of Initiative 502 in 2012. Fifty-nine of the state’s 281

cities bar entrepreneurs from setting up shop, according to the Municipal Research and Services Center of Washington, a nonprofit that tracks policies and practices of local governments. Four counties — Pierce, Yakima, Walla Walla and Clark — also ban marijuana businesses in unincorporated areas. And another 50-plus cities and counties, including Snohomish County, have moratoriums limiting the industry in some fashion. State lawmakers began the 2015 legislative session determined to address the rejection of marijuana businesses. Many lawmakers did not support Initiative 502 but now want to ensure that those getting into the business are not prevented from doing so. Plus, this is a potential moneymaker for the state. Because of that, there’s general agreement in the House and Senate that the state should share a small piece of marijuana tax revenue with cities and counties — but only if they allow approved marijuana businesses in their jurisdictions. They hope such a financial incentive will encourage communities to drop their bans. But House members didn’t feel that’s

enough to change behavior, so in HB 2136 they wipe out the bans and moratoriums and offer two paths to re-impose them via the ballot. Under one scenario, a voter can submit a petition signed by at least 30 percent of the registered voters of a community to the elected leaders of that city or county. The other is for members of a city council or county council to put it on the ballot. A simple majority is required to pass it. And a voter-approved ban cannot be altered or repealed for two years under the House bill. These elements of preemption and voting face an uncertain future in the Senate. Senators left them out of a similar bill they considered earlier in the session. Should they emerge, it could create some interesting ballot dynamics. One might expect leaders of cities with bans, such as Marysville, Snohomish and Mill Creek, to try to preserve them. That could force this year’s candidates for city and county offices, including county executive, to choose sides, knowing their decision could enrage enough voters to hurt them in an election.

On Monday, the Legislature added another twist. A bill passed by the Senate and heading to the governor brings the medical marijuana industry under the regulatory structure of the recreational market. Soon, hundreds of dispensaries will have to abide the rules of the province where they operate. If it’s a city whose leaders and voters want to impose a ban via the ballot, those dispensing marijuana might need to respond with a campaign or be prepared to relocate. Then there are situations where residents frustrated by the presence of dispensaries in their neighborhood, as in the Clearview area of Snohomish County, might try their hand at limiting or outlawing dispensaries via a ballot measure. So there’s great potential for not one big battle over marijuana in Washington this fall but many small ones in communities throughout the state. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623;jcornfield@heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos.

For the media, traditional values still matter OPINION BY LEE H. HAMILTON

FORMER U.S. CONGRESSMAN

I have been involved in politics and policymaking for over 50 years, and as you can imagine I hold strong feelings about reporters and the media. They’re not what you might think, however. Far from considering journalists to be irritating pains in the neck — though I’ve known a few who qualified — I believe them to be indispensable to our democracy. Our system rests on citizens’ ability to make discriminating judgments about policies and politicians. Without the news, information, and analysis that the media provides, this would be impossible. We depend on journalists and the outlets they work for to be our surrogates in holding government accountable; they can serve as a formidable institutional check on the government’s abuse of power. So I am uneasy about some of the directions I see journalism taking these days. I admire the role that the press has played throughout our history, and fervently hope that it can right itself to play such a role again. Let me note at the outset that I can find exceptions to everything I’m about to say. There are journalists doing reporting that is clear-eyed, fearless, and grounded in an honest evaluation of the facts — I’m thinking, for instance, of some of the work in recent years on the NSA — and this work has moved the national debate forward. But far too often, journalism falls short. Reporters often seem to take what politicians

and their handlers say at face value, writing what they hear without ensuring that the facts bear it out. They look for winners and losers at the expense of nuance. They strive to give the appearance of even-handedness by creating a false balance between two sides that do not deserve equal weight. They elevate politics, polls and personality over substance and measured analysis. Too often, on Fox or MSNBC or any of a plethora of broadcast, print and online outlets, they slant the news. They engage in pack journalism, reminding me of blackbirds on a telephone line — one comes and others follow. And they delight in spotlighting the screw-up, the mistake, or the gaffe, which might be entertaining to readers but sheds no light on the underlying issues that could make government better if addressed. I also worry about the increasingly sophisticated efforts by the government and powerful interests to tell us only what they want us to know. Reporters want to be part of the media elite, and the White House in particular — under presidents of both parties — has become quite skillful at manipulating them. Reporters have to keep policy makers at arms length, and not be intimidated by them. I believe that much contemporary journalism has come untethered from a set of traditional values that served the country well over many years: • Journalism needs to be in the service of justice, asking questions, telling stories, and inspiring those in power and those who vote for them to do the right thing. • It should be a check on power, ferreting

out the stories that those who hold public office don’t want revealed, and reporting the truths that we, as Americans, have the right to hear. • It must hold tight to accuracy, intellectual honesty, rigorous reporting, and fairness — values that ought never to go out of style. • And journalists have a profound responsibility to serve as lie detectors. A couple of years ago, the notable investigative reporter Seymour Hersh gave a speech in London in which he said of the U.S. government in particular, “The Republic’s in trouble. We lie about everything. Lying has become the staple.” You don’t have to go to that extreme to agree that journalists have to be curious and skeptical, and not buy into the conventional wisdom of the establishment. A robust, inquisitive congressional oversight process should be capable of revealing what is too often hidden, but it’s not. We need journalists to do it. In the end, my concern is that skeptical reporting and deeply informed investigative journalism are fading. We need more of them, not less. I want to see journalists digging deep into the activities of government, politics, business, finance, education, welfare, culture, and sports. Our Republic depends on it. Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University; Distinguished Scholar, IU School of Global and International Studies; and Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

April could have been worse Here we are on the downside of April, thus far it hasn’t been a very good month for me, but I will add that it could have been worse. First, we had the auto accident. Bad enough, but most of the “small stuff ’ has healed. The bigger stuff, like the total of the car is being settled, in a timely fashion, I think. Just let me tell you this, if you are considering getting a new or different car, this is not the way to do it. Then I got a severe case of the gout in my knee. And then the effects of the prescribed medication was almost (but not quite) as bad as the ailment. O.K. enough about me. Well, just one more thing, as soon as I recover from the eye surgery, today, I’ll be on my way, again... I hope and I will be looking forward to our small grandchildren that always come, from Snohomish for the May Day

Some thoughts from someone who knows

parade. They love chasing the candy in the parade. They don’t really care about the candy, they just like the chase, but they do love the good apples that are passed out. And then there was the guy that really had car trouble. The engine wouldn’t start and the payments wouldn’t stop. Habitat for Humanity had a very successful yard/garage sale and much thanks go to the people who organize, gather the items and then the final selling, to increase the coffers to help keep the organization making life easier for folks to get into their own homes, along with other good deeds they do. Looking down toward the highway and over the shopping center, it appears that new flags, both American and Canadian, have been installed. They are so beautiful as they flutter in the breeze, which there

NURSING HOME NEWS

SUBMITTED BY THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

We would like to present to you some thoughts from Allen Hole. His wife is a resident of our Nursing Home. We see him every day as he visits her. This has been and can be sent to our legislators along with your own thoughts.

IF THEY ONLY KNEW If they only knew the thoughts that come to me as I stroke my wife’s hair, as I have done for almost four years…… She has dementia. She sleeps a lot. If they only knew as I watch aids caring for residents, with lov-

Are you ready for the Tonasket Farmer’s Market? SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

Ready...Set...Spring! Nothing marks the arrival of Spring like a farmers’ market. Are you ready? Tonasket Farmers’ Market Association is. TFMA held a premarket membership meeting last Thursday to prepare vendors for the season, which begins on May 21. Hours are set for 2015, every Thursday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

MOVIES

ing care. There are only a few. If they only knew that these residents are the mothers and fathers of service men. Perhaps they served the country themselves, paid taxes, all unselfishly. If they only knew as I watched residents who could not feed themselves being fed by loving hands of aids and staff. If they only knew the clouds of uncertainty brought by thoughts of closing the loving home they share with friends. The loving home the community has and desperately needs. If they only knew that because of diseases caused by aging that cannot be cured.

TONASKET MARKET REPORT at Triangle Park in Tonasket. Twenty-five members attended the meeting, which was called to order by Wayne Verbeck, president of TFMA board. Other board members in attendance were treasurer Val Welles, secretary Tanya Palomares, vice president Mark Overton, and members Albert Roberts and Linda Fowler. Tom Cloud is the new Market Manager for this year, however he is not new to the job. Cloud served as acting manager many times last year. Association policies, member application cost and vendor fees remain unchanged from 2014. A new rule has been

has been a lot of recently. They take a quet of fresh flowers. real beating and I’m thinking those super I got a response from someone who large ones are quite expensive. knows what the new enterprise will be in It has been reported to me the old “Blossom and Briar” that Forrey Boyer is having building and it will not be a some difficult days, healthflower shop. I am not going wise. Forrey is a long time to “steal their thunder” and resident of Oroville, having say what it is, but it sounded worked at the PUD, then interesting and when they are Princes, as well as making ready they should be the ones some exceptional pieces to announce it. Good luck to in his woodshop, therethe new owners. fore, making a multitude of Money can’t buy happiness, friends, all who are sorry that but it can make you more he can’t enjoy his retirement, comfortable being unhappy! but cancer is no respecter of THIS & THAT If you see a tall, slender persons, and strikes all too Joyce Emry lady, with a roll of raffle tickoften. Also, Joyce, his wife ets in one hand and cute little has had her struggles, after lime green motor scooter, she had a stroke, some months ago. nearby, that will be Marylou Gutschmidt, Mrs. Raleigh Chin, “Mimi,” suffered a selling tickets on the little scooter, maklight heart attack, while walking her dog, ing funds for the Oroville Senior Center. recently, and was escorted to Wenatchee I’m hoping to see someone ride it in the hospital, for diagnosis, and is now home. upcoming May Day Parade. I don’t believe “Mimi” would need to be The past week had some nice sunshiny told to get more exercise as she is an avid days, with a few sprinkles of rain, last walker on Deep Bay road, as she does her week, and one night when we had rain, daily walks. it once again put down a ground cover George Thornton, by way of his sister of snow in the highlands. So, should I Deloris Hogue, dropped off another big plant the geraniums or keep them in the batch of daffodils at the Senior Center, cartons? making more ladies happy to have a bouAnyone who tells you that he enjoys a

I watched a resident starting to cry because they could not find their room. Loving hands quickly came to comfort, care, and guide. If they only knew that the tear in my eye is a realization that my wife of thirty two years will never know life as we knew it again. You probably know by now that I am talking about a nursing home in Tonasket, Wash. The possibility of closing this place of love and caring over dollars is not a solution, it is a travesty. The residents and the caregivers deserve better than this. I guess I could never have gotten into politics, if I could not help them stay in the only home they know. I trust as my representative, you can do your best to do the only right thing. A lot depends on you. Respectfully submitted, Allan Hole

What are your ideas for classes at NV Community Schools?

Thank you to Allen Hole from the Nursing Home Success Team.

Looking for Korean War veterans for Legion float

added allowing a vendor who has sold out of wares to leave at 6 p.m. Also new this year, TFMA will be selling vintage canvas shopping bags, encouraging market customers to reuse and re-shop. Near the meeting’s close, a drawing was held from among all present. Mike Orcutt won the prize, a free week at Tonasket Farmers’ Market. May markets are a great place to get vegetable and flower plants to give your home garden a jump start. Crafters have been busy all winter producing new hand made items, and bakers will tempt you with goodies. Farmer Fred Fowler predicts he will begin bringing tomatoes by the first of June. If you would like to get involved in the market or want more information, visit the website www. tonasketfarmersmarket.com or call Market Manager Tom Cloud at 509-486-2333. Are you ready for the market? See you May 21!

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I Curtis Kelly wish to extend my deep appreciation to those who came to offer support and condolences at the service for Thelma Harris at the Chesaw Cemetery on the 13th of this month. I especially want to offer the following acknowledgment to Tonasket American Legion Post #82 for the most fitting military service I have ever seen...and I have been involved for over 25 years. I salute you my Brothers! She would have been very proud. Thank you again!!! Thank you David Ray for officiating the service and for friendship and support during these difficult times. Thank you to Home Hospice and the people at Bergh’s Funeral Service. If I forgot anyone, sorry. ~ Curtis A Kelly

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MAll COP 2 94min Matinee $6.50

SUBMITTED BY WALT HART III AMERICAN LEGION, HODGES POST #84

Calling all Korean War veterans. May Day is fast approaching and the Post is putting together a float for the festivities. This year we are featuring our Korean War Veterans and we are looking for Korean War era vets to ride on our float. You do not have

Senior Royalty to host May Festival Royalty at Center SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our Senior King and Queen, Darlene and Hank Allen, are hosting the May Festival Royalty this Thursday for lunch. It will be a “white tablecloth” affair. Our Computer classes will resume in May, with the next level class. Our new floor covering for the dining room is in process of installation, as this is in print.

President resigns for health reasons SUBMITTED BY ESTHER CATON

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Coming up this week NVCS would like to offer the following classes: Beginning Family Tree Monday, April 27 at 6 p.m. My family tree grows nothing but nuts, and I’m pretty sure this one is cracked. How about yours? If you would like to learn how to start your family tree research this is the class for you! This class

AROUND THE LEGION POST to be a Legion member to be on the float, just a Korean War Vet. If you would like to participate please call Post Commander Louie Wilson at 509-476-3438. During our last meeting, Commander Wilson called for the first nomination of officers for the coming year. Only one member each was nominated for Commander, 1st

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Come and see our “new” dining room. We are planning a “school days picture contest,” so dig up a picture of yourself while you were in the grades so we can post it and try to guess who it is. Give your picture to Betty Steg. We are raffling off a mini motorcycle. Tickets are $1 or six for $5. Drawing will be the Tuesday after the May Festival Parade.

TONASKET SENIOR NEWS

TONASKET SENIOR CENTER

April seems to be rushing by in a great hurry. I hope it takes that cold wind with it when it goes. We are all ready for some warmer days. Our newly elected president has resigned for health reasons. Thank you Skip for time served

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and we wish you good health. The S.A.I.L. program, (Stay Active and Independent for Life), is popular here at the center. This is a non-strenuous exercise program developed for persons 60 and over. The hours are from 9:30 A.M. to 11:00 A.M. every Monday, Wednesday and

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Sometimes people ask what type of school North Valley Community School is. It’s exactly what it sounds like, a school for the whole community! NVCS aims to provide interesting learning opportunities for kids, adults, and those of us who are supposed to be adults but haven’t realized it yet. Do you have ideas for more class subjects? We want to know about them!

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cold shower every morning will lie about other things, too. It’s good to have friends just stop in to see how things are going, so we enjoy having Larry Eder do that, any time. We try and have an extra cup of coffee at the ready!! Well, I promised to remind folks of the Class of 65 class reunion, so remember to save some time Saturday during the annual May Day festivities, to meet and greet your buddies. And you locals, that so often don’t come, get your “rears in gear” and meet up with the group at Vicki’s Back Door, and do some “remember when’s.” It always seems strange, to me, that some can (and do) come from as far away as New York and Alaska, while others can’t get away from the TV, or whatever it is they do, and not go a few blocks. Be glad you’re still alive and able to attend. If you think about it, there have quite a few from this class that are probably have liked the chance to have lived long enough to attend. There have been several taken by death and I think a memorial page is being devoted to them. Growing old is a question of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter! ‘Til Next Week

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required hospitalization or a loved one died while taking Xarelto between 2011 and the present Political News Request a free information kit today: LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE BILL One Call • One Payment time, you may be entitled to compensation. 509-476-3602 Buy a Region or the Entire State!

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509-476-3602

Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

will teach you the basics of finding and recording your family information. Mayo is Healthier Made from Scratch - Wednesday, April 29 at 6:30 p.m. Learn how to make this popular condiment more healthful than commercial mayonnaise! Using quality, healthful ingredients leads to a better-tasting and more healthful meal. Coming up on June 1 we have one of our most popular classes Processing of Gold Ores with Gold Pour. This class includes a tour of the Kettle River Mill which requires attendees to pass a background check so please sign up by May 19. To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or visit our website at northvalleycommunityschools. com.

Vice Commander, 2nd Vice Commander, Chaplain and Service Officer. The nominations will be open again in the May meeting and we hope to get nominations for Adjutant, Finance Officer, Historian and Sergeantat-Arms. The slate of officers has to be voted on and submitted to The Department of Washington prior to the July Department Convention. A good turnout at our next meeting to nominated officers would be appreciated. If you are a veteran and would like to become a Legionnaire, join us at a meeting the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. The Post is located at 314 14th Avenue in Oroville. Mimi Chinn has been in the hospital, and is now back home. Marylyn, not 100 percent yet, was at Seniors Friday, preparing and getting signatures for a get well card for Mimi. Now, that’s dedication. Pinochle report: Door Prize, Danny W; Pinochle, Bev Storm; High Man, Dave Russell; High Woman, Judy Ripley. 22 were in attendance. “Love makes no sense, but life without it makes no sense, either. It lifts, allows us to defy gravity. Its storehouse grows the more it is given. It is boundless, fragrant, colorful. Love, the best eternity that we can experience in this present life.” James

Thursday, and is led by Senior Center staff or a volunteer. Come join in, all are welcome. The new paint job has certainly brightened up our center. The colors are a soft beige with brown trim. It looks real spiffy around here! Thank you Anita and helpers for your hard work. The Kiwanis Club rents our facility weekly as a meeting place. They have offered to install a defibrillator here and train people to use it. The membership voted unanimously to accept the offer. Thank you Kiwanis! I hope we never need it, but if we do, you have provided a great service. We also voted to have an exhaust fan installed in the ladies rest room. Bob will pick out a fan of his choosing and install it free of charge. Thank you Bob. You get a free meal for your birthday here if you are a regular attendee. Our good cooks, Lola and Sherri, prepare great meals every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. By the way, M. A., the tag goes on the inside of your shirt! See you at the Center.


APRIL 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR NASHVILLE COUNTRY STAR FUNDRAISER AT LEGION POST OROVILLE - Washington Nashville Country Star will have a fundraiser show at the Oroville American Legion on Friday, April 24, starting at 6 p.m. See some of the top finalists from the 2015 season and their favorite guest performers. The American Legion is located at 314 14th Ave., Oroville. Pacific Northwest Trail Club

SOAP to Perform Melville Boys

OROVILLE - The monthly meeting of the Pacific Northwest Trail Club will be Wednesday, April 22 at the Oroville Grange, 622 Fir St., Oroville, Washington. The regular fourth Wednesday meeting of the club will begin with a potluck dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the business meeting at 7 p.m. We are planning a National Trail Day Event for Saturday, June 6 and a Summer Trail Festival in Oroville on the weekend of Aug. 8 and 9. New members, interested locals and families are all welcome to attend. Come and meet new people you can get out and hike with. For Information contact: 509-4764072.

OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 p.m. For ticket information, please check out http://www.soplayers.ca/melvilleboys.html

Students at Grange Pot Luck

MOLSON - The Grange Potluck in Molson will be Thursday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m. Come and listen to Oroville High School students tell about their projects around the neighborhood. North Country Car Club

TONASKET - There will be a North Country Car Club meeting on Thursday, April 23 with a no host dinner at 6:30 p.m. at Whistlers Restaurant. Meeting begins at 7 p.m. Contact Patti Hill 509-429-2983 for further information Arena Truck Races

OMAK - Outlaw Motorsports presents Omak Stampede Arena Truck Races on Saturday, April 25 at noon. There will be a dance on Saturday Night 8 p.m. with Dance with DJ Dan. Camping available Contact Kevin Fletcher 509-322-7017 or Eric Brown 509322-2052. Conconully Trout Derby

The Conconully Trout Derby will be Saturday and Sunday, April 25 and 26 the opening weekend of fishing at Conconully Reservoir and Conconully Lake Registration at Conconully General Store, Prizes awarded at General Store Weigh-in hours: Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more Calendar of Events, check out our website at www.conconully.com Orchards in Bloom Race

OMAK - The Fit 4 Life Coalition hosts the second annual Omak Orchards in Bloom Half Marathon and 10K Race on April 25 beginning at 8 a.m., as a fundraiser to support all of the free community wellness activities the group offers throughout the year. Registration for this event is available at www.active.com until Friday, April 24. Also on April 24 the Coalition will host 10 time Ironman Champ, Dr. France Cokan, M.D. at the Best Western Hotel in Omak at 6 p.m. as its keynote speaker for the pre-race festivities. Free event.

May 1 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Great selection of books at great prices in a warm and friendly atmosphere. Hardbacks, paperbacks, movies and books on tape, gift sets available. Located at The Oroville Community Library, 1276 Main Street Oroville, Wash. For more info call 509-476-2662 Spring Barter Faire

TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire announces, “Spring Barter Faire.” The event is May 1, 2, and 3 at the Faire Grounds located at 72 W. Cayuse Mountain Road (off Hwy. 20), Tonasket. Information available at: okanoganfamilyfaire.net; offaire2015@ gmail.com; or 509-486-2173. Oroville Farmers’ Market

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, April 29 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library Board presents the Oroville Farmers’ Market, Saturday mornings from 9 a.m.. to 1 p.m., May 2 through Oct 31. The 2015 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 4, Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more information call 509-476-2096.

Community Action Board

Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, April 29 at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. If you have questions or need additional information contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041.

OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org

Story Time at Library

Stroke Support Group

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group will next meet on Wednesday, April 29 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir St. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments. Fire Ecology and History

TONASKET - Jason Llewellyn and Dale Swedberg will co-present about fire ecology and fire history, and share our region’s story of fire management on Friday, May 1 at 6:30 p.m. Swedberg will provide an intro to fire history and fire ecology. Llewellyn will discuss what goes into a prescribed fire, from the decision to use fire as a tool, through the planning phase, to carrying out the plan and keeping fire where it is intended. Come enjoy this exciting and informative presentation about Living with Fire. As Swedberg says, “Wildfire is a war, prescribed fire is a tool, no fire is not an option!” There will be a dinner benefiting the Community Cultural Center at 5:15 pm, followed by the presentation with tea, coffee and desserts.) Cost: Presentation is free; dinner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. More info: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw Oroville Library Book Sale

OROVILLE - The Oroville Library Board’s Semi Annual Book Sale will take place Friday,

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192. Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386. Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information contact. You may place an event on the online by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. List your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for it to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Can You Free Yourself from Some Investment Taxes FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

April 24 has been designated Tax Freedom Day for 2015. Tax Freedom Day, calculated by the Tax Foundation, is the day when the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay off its total tax bill for the year. So it may be a good time to review your own situation to determine if you can “free” yourself from some investment-related taxes in the future. Of course, Tax Freedom Day is something of a fiction, in practical terms, because most people pay their taxes throughout the year via payroll deductions. Also, you may not mind paying your share of taxes because your tax dollars are used in a variety of ways — such as law enforcement, food safety, road maintenance, public education and so on — that, taken together, have a big impact on the quality of life in this country. Nonetheless, you may well want to look for ways to reduce those taxes associated with your investments, leaving you

more money available to meet your important much higher contribution limits than an IRA; in 2015, you can put in up to $18,000 to a 401(k) goals, such as a comfortable retirement. or similar plan, or $24,000 if you are 50 or older. Fortunately, it isn’t really that difficult to be a tax-conscious investor, as some of the best Beyond contributing as much as you can afford retirement-savings vehicles have built-in tax to tax-advantaged retirement plans, how else advantages. For starters, depending on your can you take greater control of your investmentincome level, your contributions to a traditional related taxes? One move is to avoid frequent IRA may be tax-deductible, so the more you buying and selling of investments held outside put in (up to the maximum of $5,500, or $6,500 your IRA and 401(k). If you sell investments that if you’re 50 or older), the lower your annual you’ve held for less than one year, your profit will taxable income. Plus, your earnings grow on a be taxed as ordinary income, with a rate as high as 39.6%. But if you hold investments at least tax-deferred basis. one year before selling them, you’ll just pay the If you meet certain income guidelines, you may long-term capital gains rate, which is 15% for be eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA. The most taxpayers (20% for high earners). So, from contribution limits for a Roth IRA are the same as a tax standpoint, it pays to be a “buy-and-hold” those for a traditional IRA, but the tax treatment investor. of your earnings is different. In fact, your Roth IRA earnings can grow tax free, provided you Taking full advantage of your IRA and 401(k) don’t take withdrawals before 59½ and you’ve and holding your investments for the long term had your account at least five years. (Roth IRA aren’t the only tax-smart moves you can make contributions are not tax-deductible, however.) — but they can give you a good start on making investing less of a “taxing” experience. Even if you have an IRA, you can probably also participate in your employer-sponsored Edward Jones, its employees and financial retirement plan, such as a 401(k), a 403(b) advisors cannot provide tax or legal advice. or a 457(b). You typically contribute “pretax” You should consult your attorney or qualified tax dollars to these types of retirement plans, so advisor regarding your situation your contributions will lower your annual taxable income. Plus, you’ll benefit from tax-deferred This article was written by Edward Jones for use earnings. And employer-sponsored plans have by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

50 Year Reunion for OHS Class of ‘65 from that class may join the celebration. There will be a “Meet and Greet” on Friday, May 8, and a dinner Saturday, May 9. Former teachers and parents of graduates

SUBMITTED BY VICKI HANEY 50TH REUNION ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School graduating class of 1965 will be celebrating their 50th year reunion during May Day Weekend in Oroville. The organizing committee has been sending information out concerning this event to classmates via emails. If you have not received this information we apologize and would like you to contact us through this email ohs. waclassof65@gmail.com and we will send you an update . All classmates and graduates are invited to attend. Others who are interested in seeing friends

PAGE A7

are welcomed and encouraged to attend either or both events. For more information and the time and place of these events please send your request to ohs. waclassof65@gmail.com.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Bears and Tigers and...Frogs? JUST IN!

Figurines in many styles!

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville 10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Healing Service: 1st Sunday Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Warden • 476-2022 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Katlyn Diane Hammons, 27, Riverside, pleaded guilty Sept. 9, 2013 to two counts of second-degree theft and two counts of unlawful issuance of a bank check. The court dismissed a first-degree theft charge. Hammons was sentenced April 16 to 16 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the September 2011 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Amanda Arlene Sanabia-Hammons, 33, Riverside, with POCS (heroin) and making a false or misleading statement. The crimes allegedly occurred April 4. The court found probable cause to charge Richard Wayne Verbeck, 53, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine) and fourth-degree assault (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred April 3. The court found probable cause to charge Raymundo Arciniega Ortega, 20, Oroville, with residential burglary and thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred April 11. The court found probable cause to charge Lukas Timothy Mieirs, 19, Oroville, with residential burglary, third-degree malicious mischief and MIP/C. The crimes allegedly occurred April 11. The court found probable cause to charge Riley Dean Buzzard, 22, Tonasket, with residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred April 11. The court found probable cause to charge David Sanchez Hernandez, 22, Oroville, with residential burglary and thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred April 11. The court found probable cause to charge Crispin Emanuel Ramirez, 24, Tonasket, with residential burglary and thirddegree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred April 11. The court issued an arrest warrant for Manuel Cabrera Jr., no middle name listed, 26, Omak, with theft of mail. The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 13. Civil The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensa-

tion taxes, penalties and fees: Cardenas Bros. Auto & Truck Repair, LLC, Omak, $6,103.46; and Okanogan Valley Transportation, Oroville, $3,800.96.

DISTRICT COURT Lisa M. Long, 34, Tonasket, had two fourth-degree assault charges dismissed. Joe Ballesteros Lopez, 20, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams) and use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Lopez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined a total of $944. David Leslie Louis, 34, Omak, guilty on two counts of fourth-degree assault and one count each of thirddegree theft and first-degree criminal trespassing. Louis was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,674. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 31, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and third-degree theft. McCraigie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,666. Nukona Charley McCraigie Sr., 41, Omak, guilty of firstdegree DWLS, operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and DUI. McCraigie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,936. Jeremy James Monnin, 35, Omak, had three charges dismissed: two counts of fourthdegree assault and one count of obstruction. Joshua David Moore, 27, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of violation of a no-contact order. Moore was sentenced 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined a total of $776. Stephen Dale Moses, 54, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Moses was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $658. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 21, Okanogan, guilty (other deferral revoked) of thirddegree theft. Munsey received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $768. Monte Louis Nicholson, 47, Omak, had a charge dismissed: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Rusty Jochua Nimmo, 25, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and carrying a concealed pistol without a permit. NImmo

was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 79 days suspended, and fined a total of $958.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, April 13, 2015 DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Illegal burning on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Assault on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Theft on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Welcome mats reported missing. Threats on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Darcy Kim Edwards, 42, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for firstdegree criminal trespassing. John Robert Weddle, 64, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. James Edward Kiesecker Jr., 38, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and first-degree DWLS. Jill Marie Nanamkin, 30, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Christopher Thomas Kalal, 33, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Lazaro Sanchez Ruiz, 61, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Conchita Delphine Perez Velasquez, 34, booked a probable cause warrant for 10 counts of forgery and 10 counts of third-degree theft. Jason Daniel Perez, 41, booked on a probable cause warrant for 10 counts of forgery and 10 counts of third-degree theft. Tuesday, April 14, 2015 Trespassing on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on Ruby Two Moons Rd. near Tonasket. License plates reported missing. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Jory Lewis Valley, 25, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for third-degree assault. Sonsaray Ellen Raen Wynne, 21, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia and second-degree DWLS. Krystal Ann St. Peter, 40, booked on two OCSO probable cause warrants: forgery (six counts) and third-degree theft (six counts) and a DOC detainer. Bruce Leroy Wisner Jr., 51,

Oroville May Festival Parade Celebrating 81 Years!

Thursday, April 16, 2015 Assault on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Assault on W. High Country Dr. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Elmway in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hanford St. in

Friday, April 17, 2015 Theft on Rehmke Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Illegal burning on Vista View Dr. in Omak. Fire on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Oak St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Locust St. in Omak. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Omak. Theft on S. Granite St. in Omak. Harassment on E. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Locust Way in Tonasket. Trevis Mayfred Munson, 40, DOC detainer. Robert James Long, 29, booked for first-degree criminal trespassing. Douglas Lowell Atchison, 34, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Jamie Ray Williams, 28, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Richard Joseph Cobos, 22, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and thirddegree theft. John Michael Leaf, 59, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Tommy Eugene Moore, 48, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree theft, third-degree possession of stolen property and seconddegree DWLS. Saturday, April 18, 2015 Burglary on Quassia St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. DWLS on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Anderson Rd. near Riverside. Found property on S. Ash St. in Omak. Wallet recovered.

Theft on Columbia St. in Omak. Chainsaw reported missing. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Assault on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Antonio Rafael Fuentes, 40, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Yasmin Torres Vasquez, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft.

Sunday, April 19, 2015 Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Road rage on Soren Peterson Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Gum Drop Lane near Omak. Disorderly conduct on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ferry St. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Michael Alan Keil, 27, booked on three FTA warrants, all for third-degree DWLS. Manuel Arevalo Hernandez, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for non-emergency use of the 911 system. George Scott Smith, 43, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: third-degree DWLS and DUI. Matthew Lucas Evans, 22, booked for reckless driving. Cergio Santiago Britt, 28, DOC detainer. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, DOC detainer. KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

3 on 3 CLASSIC

“Red Carpet Magic” Judging starts at 8:30am

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 Assault on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Compressor reported missing. Burglary on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Talkire Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Birch St. in Omak. Theft on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Cell phone and marijuana reported missing. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Pine St. in Omak. Harassment on Hanford St. in Omak. Harassment on Omache Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Assault on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Computer crime on Main St. in Oroville. John Andrew Hilderbrand, 21, booked on harassment and interfering with reporting (DV). Kallie Louann Thomas, 26, DOC detainer. Manuel Cabrera Jr., 26, booked on two counts of seconddegree theft, one count of third-degree theft, an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree theft and a probable cause warrant for theft of mail.

Omak. Drugs on W. Jonathan Ave. in Omak. Theft on Ironwood St. in Omak. Teresa Lynn Cruz, 47, booked for second-degree assault. David Eddie Perez, 27, booked on two FTA warrants: fourthdegree assault (DV) and firstdegree theft. David Michael Wood, 40, DOC detainer. Sandra Louise Cheer, 56, court commitment for DUI. Christopher David Duarte, 27, booked for disorderly conduct.

Oroville’s May Day

Saturday, May 9th, 2015

Lineup starts at 8:00am

booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Erik Castillo Gonzalez, 24, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTC warrant for DUI. Hannah Lyn Galloway, 27, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for obstruction.

Parade begins at 10:00am

Name of entry:_________________________________________________________________ Contact name:_________________________________________________________________ Mailing address:_______________________________________________________________ Contact phone day:____________________evening:__________________________________ E-mail:__________________________________Fax: _________________________________ Brief description of entry and number of participants: _________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Media announcement for use by Parade Master of Ceremonies: __________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Note: Mounted novice, 12 years of age of younger must have a handler for each mount. All horse units MUST have their own cleanup crew. In consideration of the acceptance of this application, the applicant agrees to save and hold harmless all officers, employees, and agents of the Oroville May Festival Committee from any loss or damage whatsoever to persons or property arising out of participation in the parade, and further agrees to defend said personnel and committee from any claims for damage related thereto.

Applicant’s Signature: __________________________________________________________ Print Name: __________________________________________________________________ Please return by May 5th to: Oroville May Festival Association, POBox 985, Oroville, WA 98844 Or fax to (509)476-2088 For questions, please contact:

Shelley DeWitte (509) 476- 3603, Linda Schwilke (509) 476-2241, Sharon Richardson (509) 476-0718

http://orovillemayfestival.com

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest sports, business, entertainment, local news and more.

The net proceeds from this event will go back into the community to support youth activities via the Oroville Booster Club.


PAGE B1

APRIL 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET JUNIOR RODEO

Chantz Popelier of Omak shoots the lasso right out of the gate while team roping with Cash James

Dylan Beck of Moses Lake wrestles a steer during Sunday’s Chute Dogging event

Photos by Katie Teachout

Claire Ives of Okanogan races through the pole bending Saturday

Jaycie Richie of Tonasket prepares to lasso a calf in Sunday’s Junior Girls Breakaway

Tonasket Founder’s Day Rodeo Queen Sarah Quinlan of Chesaw circles the arena during opening ceremonies Saturday

Congratulations to 2015 Tonasket Jr. Rodeo All-Around Winners:

Brier Selvidge of Mallott took first in Junior Boys Barrel Racing

Little People: Bodee Blu Gudmundson PeeWee Girls: Rocksie Timentwa PeeWee Boys: Brody Deal Junior Girls: Quincy Downey and Hannah Beeman-Chlarson Junior Boys: Traver Johnson Intermediate Girls: Joy Abramson Intermediate Boys: Clay Buchert Senior Girls: Kaelyn Marchand Senior Boys: Jared Floe

Jared Floe took first place in Senior Boys Bareback and second place in Chute Dogging

Trey Salazar of Oroville smiles playfully after completing the Little People California Stake Race


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Tigers take two from Manson Tonasket’s softball team is slowly getting tighter in the diamond BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tigers won not just their first league game in eight years Saturday, April 18, but their second one also; beating Manson in a double-header 17-0 in the first game and 14-3 in the second. “They are a pretty good team, so it feels good to have a league win under our belts for the first time in eight years,” said Tiger pitcher Vanessa Pershing. Manson coach Janice Stewart,

who has been coaching the team March 17, losing that game 1-24. This time around, the Tigers the past six years, attributed their playing a better second game to kept the Pioneers from scoring any runs in the first inning. being warmed up. “We started out with a good “Who knows for sure, but it’s a two-hour bus ride up here,” first inning, and had some good hits most of Stewart said. game,” The Tigers “From the first time we the said Rimstead. hosted Omak played Omak to this “All the girls Thursday, April 16, improvlast game, it was better put forth what could at ing their game all the way around.” they the game, we against the Tonasket Head Coach just came up Pioneers, despite Emily Rimstead short in one coming out with inning and a 0-18 loss. sometimes “From the first that is all it time we played Omak to this last game, it was takes. The team is still learning to better all the way around,” said play together, and trusting themTonasket Head Coach Emily selves to make the plays.” Tonasket hosts Pateros Friday, Rimstead. In their very first game of the season, the Tigers traveled April 24, with games set to begin to Omak to face the Pioneers at 4:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket’s Sam Keller slides safely into home plate as Manson player Jasmine Pascasio rushes to retrieve the ball. The Tigers won both games of the double-header, 17-0 and 14-3.

Tigers take 16 first-place finishes BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket hosted Omak, Lake Roosevelt and Waterville Tuesday, March 31, with the Tigers taking a total of sixteen first-place finishes between the oys’ and girls’ teams. For the girls’ team, Freshman Alycia Tibbs took first in the 100 Meters with a time of 16.93. Alina Vlahovich and Katie Henneman, both freshmen, took first and second place in the 200 Meters with times of 29.42 and 29.97. In the 400 Meters, Shyane Lewis, a junior, took first at 1:17.32. Lewis also took first in the 800 Meters at 3:03.34, followed by teammate and senior Mary Naylor in third place at 3:20.06. Tonasket also took first place in the 1600 Meters, with junior Jenna Valentine finishing in 6:25:69. The Tigers left little room for competitors in the 100 M Hurdles,

grabbing first through fifth place finishes. Rose Walts, a junior, came in way ahead of the others at 17.28 for first place. Freshmen Camille Wilson, Madyson Clark, and Logan Thompson took second through fourth with times of 20.57, 20.97 and 22.25; followed by senior Alissa Young for fifth place at 23.57. A team made up of Henneman, Vlahovich, Walts and Jaden Vugteveen took first in the 4x100 Relay, finishing in 55.22. Vugteveen also teamed up with Clark, Wilson and Morgan Tyus to take first place in the 4x200 Relay, finishing in 2:10.00. Taking first-place again in the relay competitions was Vugteveen with teammates Valentine, Naylor and Lewis, finishing the 4x400 in 5:06.52. Taking first and second place finishes in the 600g Javelin were Valentine (87-00) and Young (8303).

Young took second in the 1kg Discus, at 76-07; and junior Kasey Nelson took fifth at 55-06. Senior Allison Glanzer took fourth place in the shot put with a throw of 25-09.00, followed by Nelson in fifth place at 25-08.50. First through third-place finishes were taken by Tonasket in the Long Jump, with Vlahovich going 14-04.00, Thompson at 13-03.50 and Wilson at 13-02.00. Freshman Morgan Tyus took fifth place with a jump of 12-03.50. Tyus also took fourth in the high jump with 4-00.00. In the Triple Jump, the Tigers took second through fifth place finishes. Vlahovich came in second at 30-02.00, followed by Vugteveen (30-00.00), Wilson (27-00.00) and Henneman (2602.00). BOYS TEAM ALSO SCORES HIGH The boys’ team took first through fourth place finishes

in the 1600 Meters. Sophomore Hunter Swanson came in first at 5:18.90, followed by senior Abe Podkranic at 5:47.37, sophomore Vance Frazier at 5:47.43 and freshman Riley Morris at 6:00.29. Swanson also took first in the 800 Meters, finishing in 2:24.71; followed by Podkranic at 2:29.17 for a second place finish. In the 200 Meters, senior and Team Captain Smith Condon took second place at 25.37. Freshman Justin McDonald came in fourth at 27.29. Condon took third in the 100 Meters at 12.96, with McDonald coming in fifth at 13.62. Matus Sitar, a junior, took second place in the 3200 Meters with a time of 13:09.40. Freshman Zach Clark took third in the 400 Meters at 1:09.83. Senior David Curtis took first in the 300m Hurdles with a time of 55.45. Taking second place in the

4x400 Relay at 4:21.57 were teammates Podkranic, McDonald, Clark and sophomore Vance Frazier. A 4x100 Relay team of Curtis and seniors Colt Hatch, Chad Edwards and Dallas Tyus took third place with a time of 54.07. Curtis also took third in the 800g Javelin, with a throw of 92-10; and Edwards took fourth place in the 12lb Shot Put with a throw of 39-09.00. Taking first and second place in the High Jump were Tyus at 5-06.00 and senior Ethan Bensing at 5-04.00. Sophomore Lloyd Temby finished fourth at 5-02.00, and freshman Riley Morris took fifth at 4-00.00. In the Long Jump, Swanson took second at 17-02.00, Temby took third at 17-00.00, Bensing took fourth at 16-11.50 and Tyus placed fifth at 16-04.00. Bensing took first place in the Triple Jump at 36-11.00.

Tonasket next competes at the Brewster Co-Ed Relays held April 14 at Bridgeport High School.

OROVILLE TRAVELS TO DEER PARK The Oroville Track team competed in the Deer Park Invitational held at Deer Park High School Friday, April 3rd. “This was a huge meet with tremendous competition,” said Coach Harold Jensen. “Oroville athletes were outstanding competing against older athletes from large schools.” Katie Egerton placed eighth in the high jump and fourth in the pole vault; and Tylynne Watkins placed sixth in the pole vault. For the boys, Brandon Baugher placed eighth in the open 400. The team will not compete again until after spring break, when they travel to Quincy for the Clifton Larson Allen Meet Saturday, April 18.

Tigers defeat Manson in DH Oroville Killer Bee Wrestling BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket hosted Manson Saturday, April 18, beating them 22-1 in the first game and 21-11 in the second. Jimmy Coleman pitched a complete first game, giving up just two hits and striking out seven players. At bat, Coleman went 2-4 with a double, a walk and two runs scored. Adrian McCarthy also went 2-4 with a double, a walk and two runs scored. Quincy Vassar went 3-5 with a double and three runs scored.

In the second game, McCarthy pitched two innings, Jesse Manring pitched one, Cade Hockett pitched one and Zion Butler pitched one. Manring went 2-4 with a walk and three runs scored; Hockett went 2-4 with a double, a walk and two runs scored; and Vassar went 3-4 with a walk and two runs scored. “We walked through the first game,” said Manring, “but we committed a lot of errors in the second game, so they came back.” “Hey Coach, I want to thank you for not running your players,” Manson coach Bill Thompson

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Cade Hockett hit a double in last Thursday’s game against Omak, making it safely to second with an overthrow by the Pioneers. Hockett was hit home twice by Quincy Vassar, but the Tigers lost the non-league game 4-5. told Tonasket Coach Dan Vassar. “You’d be surprised how many coaches in this league don’t get that.” “I’m teaching them etiquette; telling them not to steal the bases. There’s no point in crushing them when they’re down,” Vassar said In a close game against Omak at home Thursday, April 16, Tonasket lost 4-5. “Omak is not a league game, so I didn’t pitch many of my varsity pitchers because I needed them to pitch on Saturday (April 18) for the league games,” said Vassar. Eighth grader Benny Williams threw three innings, giving up only two hits and two runs. Neither run was earned. “Benny’s form is really good,” Vassar said. “He has worked really hard with the coaching staff the

last couple of years.” The Tigers traveled to Liberty Bell April 14, losing 5-8. McCarthy pitched three innings, giving up six runs, with only one of those runs earned. Butler pitched four innings, giving up two unearned runs. “That was eight runs with only one of them earned,” said Vassar. “Ouch!” Hitting for the Tigers, Coleman went 1-2 with a double, a walk, a run scored and three runs batted in. Hockett went 1-2 with a double, a walk, a run scored and one run batted in. The JV traveled to Chelan for a double header, losing the first game 5-15 before coming back to win the second game 11-10. The Tigers host Pateros Friday, April 24 at 4:30 p.m.

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OROVILLE - Two hundred seventy-six pre-K through sixth grade wrestlers made their way north in March 7 to the first Valley Wrestling tournament of the season. Chelan, Cashmere, Brewster, Pateros, Omak, Liberty Bell, Okanogan and Oroville started grappling at 10 a.m and finished up about 3 p.m. The Killer Bees placed as follows: Pre School-Kindergarten: Leah Martin-Champ; Kampala Hirst, 2nd and Mason Hirst, 3rd. Also wrestling-Steven Martin, Madison Hirst and Brodie Booker. First/Second Grade - Kane Booker, Mason Wall, 2nd; Abby Martin, 3rd; Ivan Bulgarin, 4th. Also wrestling Cash DeVon, Caleb Clark, Casey Mieirs, Trevor Lindsay, Isaih Ocampo and Arthur Martinez. Third/Fourth Grade - Lance Fox and Alex DelrosarioChamps, Wyatt Sheer. Elijah Godinez, 3rd and Kodak Hirst, 4th. Also wrestling- Hailey Helm, Isaih Godinez, Rebekka Martin and Tyson Rounds. Fifth/Sixth Grade - Kolo Moser, Taylor McCoy, Victor Ocampo, Oscar Cervantes and Sergio Ocampo, Migel QuesDa,

2nd; Ethan Godinez, Daegon Harris and Jett McCoy, 3rd and Cody Field – 4th. Also wrestling, Kael Harris. “Thanks to high school staff members, parents and high school and junior high wrestlers and students the tournament went smoothly,” said organizers. The second tournament of the season the following Saturday, proved to be tougher with a lot more kids. The Killer Bees had about a dozen less kids than they had at the tournament in Oroville. Here is how the Killer Bees faired: Pre-K: Leah and Steven Martin, 4th. Also wrestling, Truit Salazar 1st/2nd Grade: Frisco Sanchez, 4th. Also wrestling, Isaiah Ocampo, Ivan Bulgarin, Abigail Martin, Cash DeVon, Ryken Harris and Arthur Martinez 3rd/4th Grade: Wyatt Sherrer, 2nd, Koda Hirst, 4th. Also wrestling, Hailey Helm, Lance Fox, Elijah Godinez, Tyson Rounds, Trevor Miller, Rebecca Martin and Isaiah Godinez 5th/6th Grade: Oscar Cervantes and Victor Ocampo, Champions; Jett McCoy and Sergio Ocampo, 2nd; Kolo moser and Cody Field, 3rd. Also wrestling, Daegon Harris, Miguel Quesada, Kael Harris, Ethan Godines.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015

PAGE PAGEB3B3

Spring

HAS SPRUNG

Time to start building, spruce up your yard, garden

&

How to clean dirty windows

Make your garden unappealing to deer

Dirty windows are unsightly, and they can prevent beneficial sunlight from entering a home. Cleaning windows need not be done every week, but it shouldn’t be overlooked completely, either. While it certainly may be a chore to clean windows, there are ways to make the task much more tolerable. Curb appeal can be very important when selling a home. Even ahome with a perfectly manicured lawn and the newest roofing and siding can seem unappealing if the windows are dirty. Keeping windows clean requires a good deal of work. For the acrophobics, cleaning second-story windows can test the nerves. Having the right tools on hand and a strategy in place will make the job easier to manage.

Creating a beautiful and bountiful garden is a popular pastime for people all across the country. It is important to keep in mind

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SPRING

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There are safe and humane methods to repelling deer, or at least blocking access to the plants worth protecting. Here are the main ways

a deer decides that something will not present a threat, the deer can adapt to its presence. Motionactivated devices may not work, nor the presence of pets. Predator urine is typically an effective way of keeping deer at bay. Bottled coyote urine can be quite effective, although human urine may work as well. Reapplying the product weeklyaround the plants is a good idea.

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There are many organic or chemical based products on the market that deer may find offensive to the taste or smell. Hot pepper, sulfur and eggs or even the use of soapy water have been successful in certain instances. The use of blood meal or even human hair around the garden may repel the deer and keep them on a different foraging path. However, remember that any deer that is very hungry may ignore unpleasant tastes or smells for a quick bite.

Cleaning windows

Cleaning windows won’t necessarily be easy, but the following nine-step process can make the task less difficult and time-consuming. 1. Choose a day when it is overcast so you will not be blinded by the sun while cleaning. This also helps prevent streaking. Begin by gathering what you’ll need to get the task done. Having everything at the ready will enable you to move from one window to the next. Here are the basic supplies you will need: * cleaning solution * cloth, newspaper or squeegee * towel * spray bottle * extension pole to reach high windows * vacuum * ladder or step stool * garden hose 2. Take down and clean drapery or blinds when cleaning the windows. Remove the curtains so you will have an unobstructed surface with which to work. 3. Start with the interior side of the windows, as they are easier to access. Place a towel on the sill to catch any drops so the sill or the floor will stay dry. 4. Spray a lint-free cloth or the window directly with the cleaning solution. The edges and corners of the window tend to accumulate the most grime, so begin by cleaning those areas first. Once they are clean and you will not exchange dirt to the center of the window, work on the middle. Wipe the windows in a horizontal direction to help alleviate dripping. 5. To create a streak-free surface, some people prefer to use a squeegee to drag out any pockets of moisture for more even drying. Be sure to wipe the rubber strip of the squeegee after each pass on the window. You may choose to buff out any other streaks with newspaper. 6. Vacuum the window sill and frame afterward to catch any dust and debris. 7. Repeat the process for all interior windows. 8. Move outdoors and start off by spraying the window with a garden hose to loosen any of the accumulated grime. Use your cleaning solution to dissolve the rest of the dirt. You may want to let it sit on the window if there is stubborn grime. Repeat the cleaning process used indoors for each window. 9. If exterior second-floor windows are hard to reach, consider using a ladder and extension pole to extend your reach. Upper windows will not be scrutinized as closely as lower windows, so you may have a greater margin for error. If the windows are simply too high up, rely on a professional window cleaner to get the job done rather than risk falls or other injuries. Mix your own cleaning solution It may take trial and error to find a solution that works. Here is one recipe you may want to start with. 1 cup white vinegar 1 1/2 cups rubbing alcohol 2 drops of dish soap Pour into a clean and empty spray bottle. Remember: Never mix bleach and ammonia together to create a cleaning solution, as toxic fumes will result.

Welcome to

that aesthetically appealing plants may be appetizing to area wildlife, including deer. Those who do not want their gardens to turn into all you-can-eat buffets for deer, rabbits and other wild animals can take a more proactive approach to gardening. Deer are opportunists who will no doubt see your garden as a salad bar ripe with all of their favourite foods. As housing developments continue to encroach on the natural habitats of deer and other animals, these animals are becoming more visible. Deer may not be able to forage for food effectively in their smaller, natural surroundings, or they may become accustomed to the “easy pickings” they find in neighborhood yards. Either way, you may encounter a deer in or around your area. Keeping deer at bay involves some work and maintenance on the part of a homeowner.

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to deer-proof a garden.

Fence It

Fences are one way to deter deer from entering a yard and dining on your garden. Keep in mind that deer can jump fences that are quite tall, but they have to be especially motivated to jump an eightfoot-tall fence. Still, they tend to be wary about scaling a fence when they cannot see what is on the other side. Therefore, if you are fencing out deer, choose a fence that camouflages the garden well and completely encloses the area to be protected. If you do not want the fence to be solid, consider putting stakes or thorny plants within the garden so that the deer will hesitate to jump into the garden.

Scare Them

Deer are naturally skittish around people, but over time they can become quite complacent around human beings. Once

If other food sources are available, there are some species of plants and trees that deer will avoid. Filling your garden with these plants can help you maintain a beautiful, albeit untasty, environment for deer. When planting annuals, select among: Alyssum, Begonias, Calendula, Celosia, Dianthus, Foxglove, Geraniums, Parsley, Poppy or Snapdragons. In terms of perennials, plant these items once, and deer may stay away: Ageratum Anemone, Astibe, Bearded iris, Catmint, Honeysuckle, Lantana, Monkshood, Rock rose, Rosemary, Soapwort or Wisteria. Plant these herbs alongside flowers for even more protection: Chives, Eucalyptus, Garlic, Mint, Thyme or Wintergreen. Gardeners who use a combinationof methods to keep deer out of their yards and gardens may have a higher success rate at deterring these animals.

Curb Water Waste

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Checklist

Spring Maintenance 1) HVAC: Operate air conditioning. Confirm that cold air is coming out of vents. Remove any obstruction from vents, such as furniture or drapes. Turn off the humidifier, clean unit and replace media. Confirm that the outside unit is sitting level and is clear of any debris, such as leaves or toys. Replace filters. 2) Clean out the fireplace if you used it during the winter. Confirm the damper is closed. Check flashing around chimney, repairing any leaks as needed. Move any unused wood away from house. 3) Open outside crawlspace vents. 4) Clean gutters. Confirm downspouts are draining water away from foundation. Repair as needed. (Early May or late April) 5) Check caulking around windows and doors, touch up as needed. 6) Fill in any areas where backfill soil has settled. 7) Lubricate garage door springs and chain. Tighten any loose

bolts. 8) Attic: Check attic for any roof leaks. Repair any leaks immediately. Confirm any attic ventilation is working properly. 9) Check basement or crawlspace for any leaks, mildew or mold. Ensure vapor barrier in crawl space is intact, repair or replace as needed. 10) Check bathroom exhaust fans: Confirm they are working properly so they will pull excessive moisture out of bathroom. Look for any mold in bathrooms. Repair any caulking around tub, shower and sink. 11) Trim any bushes or shrubbery that is blocking windows. 12) Check French Drains around house to make sure they are draining properly. 13) Replace window screens in windows to help cut down on unwanted solar heat through windows. 14) Check that stairwell hand rails are sturdy and steps are solid.


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015

SCHOOLS Submitted photo

Leo Chen, a student in Mr. Ragdale’s fifth grade classroom, traveled to East Wenatchee, on March 19th, to compete in the Scripps Regional Spelling Bee. He earned his participation in that event by placing first in a bee at the Oroville Elementary School. While at Eastmont, he vied with fourth through eighth grade students, and placed second overall!. “Oroville Elementary is proud to be represented by such an accomplished student,” said school officials.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

David Curtis, left, Jesse Manring, center, and Brock Henneman show off the1956 Ford 600 tractor they restored with classmates under the mentorship of George Hill.

Out of the weeds, into parades BY KATIE BRINKERHOFF KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket FFA students were given the opportunity to restore a 1956 ford 600 tractor, courtesy of the USDA. When USDA employee Kevin Hansen came to his 40th class reunion at Tonasket High School, he began talking to classmate Patti Hill and heard of her husband George’s work helping high school students restore old tractors. Hansen mentioned knowing of a surplus government tractor. “He found the tractor in the weeds at the USDA research center in Wenatchee,” said Tonasket Agriculture instructor Matt Deebach. “Kevin contacted me to see if we were interested in restoring it, and George went down and

picked it up.” The tractor was delivered to the THS agriculture shop last spring, and students went right to work on it. Brock Henneman and Jesse Manring put a lot of work into it last year; and David Curtis, Devon Catone and Frank Holfeltz picked up on it this year, with Jonathan Tillus putting the finishing touches on by hand-painting the raised lettering on the tractor that reads ‘Ford’. According to Curtis, Manring and Henneman, the students repaired the radiator, soldered a hole, repaired a blown head gasket, patched a front tire, fixed a rear end oil leak, replaced the gauges and ignition switch on the starter, put in a new gas tank and cleaned out the fuel filter; letting George Hill take on rebuilding the carburetor. “George has helped us restore tractors for several years. He’s been a great asset,” said Deebach. “I had to weld a new exhaust pipe on it and that was hard, because I had to add it right on to

the 1956 pipe,” said Curtis. “We pressure washed the tractor for days when we first got it. It was covered in grease and oil,” said Manring. “What took the longest was getting in the right parts,” said Henneman. “It’s got a really clean engine now, and runs way better,” said Manring. “We cleaned the valves out with George telling us how.” Curtis said he personally put in about ten hours on the tractor, and thought around 100 hours were put into the project by the students combined. “The students have been driving it around,” said Deebach. “It’s not really a farm tractor anymore but it is definitely a parade tractor.” Deebach said the students used to restore up to three tractors per year, but “with the bond not passing, we’re running out of room. This shop was designed to have one class per semester, and now we have three shop classes. So if you bring in a project, it gets pretty crowded.”

FFA Trap Shooters take first and second places The Tonasket FFA team traveled to the Wenatchee Gun Club Friday and Saturday, April 17-18, where they participated as a team in the state competition, with two individuals excelling. Brendan Asmussen took first place—State Champ—in a game called ‘Missing Out.’ “It’s kind of like playing ‘Horse,’ where you shoot from a spot and everyone else has to shoot from there,” said FFA advisor Matt Deebach. Not only did Asmussen take first, but he was followed by a teammate in second place—Jenna Valentine. “It’s pretty neat we took first and second place in that event,” Deebach pointed out. Asmussen also did well in an event called Annie Oakley, placing fourth. “If someone shoots and misses,

then you shoot and break it (clay target), the person is out,” said Deebach. As a team, they didn’t do as well as they might have anticipated. “Friday night the kids shot really well,” said Deebach. “So we woke up Saturday morning with high expectations, but we just didn’t shoot our best.” The event was the longest one of the season; a 100-Bird Shoot. Deebach said the silver lining was that Valentine still took Fifth Place High Female. “I know the team is disappointed, but at least there was a little brightness on Saturday. Jenna didn’t quite shoot up to her potential; she usually shoots better,” Deebach said, adding that with just one senior—Morgan O’Brien graduating this year, the young team can be expected to go far again next year. Valentine is a junior and Asmussen a sophomore. The sev-

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

en-member team competing at state also included one freshman and three other sophomores. “We could have done better, but we could have done a lot worse,” said Deebach. “I’m happy with how they finished the season.” Trap shooting season begins at the end of September, and runs most of the year. The number of students involved—as high as 15 this year—varies, depending on sports and other activities. Deebach called it the craziest season he’s seen, with cancelled shoots resulting in the team competing in just six matches (including state), although they were originally scheduled for ten. Deebach began taking students to the trap shoots when he was student-teaching in Tonasket, and has continued coaching throughout his 19 years at THS. He, too, competed at the state competition, taking fourth place in the adult shoot.

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Omak Stampede Arena Truck Races Saturday, April 25 • Noon Tickets: Adults $12 each 7-12 years $6 each 6 and under FREE

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509-476-3602 Ext 3050


PAGE B5

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015 5

April 23, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale OROVILLE 1048 SF 3 BR 1 AC HOME. Lease program, $115K. Located on A-Highway 97. Call for details 855-5472240.

For Rent

Help Wanted

Health General

Critical Nurse Staffing, Inc. is seeking a CNA/NAR to join our team and provide in home care to our patients in Okanogan. The role of the CNA/NAR in this position will be to work closely with patients and to provide basic care services. The applicant should have an outgoing perCENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR sonality, the ability to communicate effectively, multi- task, remain calm in stressful LOOKING FOR A NEW situations, and be able to ADVENTURE? give patients essential social JOIN US AND MAKE A and emotional support, along DIFFERENCE! with providing excellent quality care. Qualified appli- We are dedicated to our emcants must have a current ployees job satisfaction and and valid WA state license. take pride in providing a place to work that encouragPlease apply online at es growth, teamwork, comwww.cnscares.com munication and positive or send a resume to employee/supervisor relationhumanresources@cnscares.com ships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of Lee Frank Mercantile ability to pay. EVERYONE is Tonasket, WA welcome. We are accepting We have the following applications for a opportunities available: FULL-TIME SALES/ OKANOGAN: CASHIER POSITION. Dentist Customer service experience 2 Full time preferred. Dental Operations Manager 324 S. Whitcomb Ave Okanogan and Oroville Tonasket, WA 98855 Brewster Dental: 509-486-2105 Dental Operations Manager Brewster, Bridgeport and Twisp

$550; 2 BR, 2 BA with walk-in Senior Distribution closet. Quiet area. Nice view Engineer of green lawn from covered Okanogan County PUD back patio. Great location. 2nd floor apartment in 4 plex. is looking for a Senior Distri$400 dep. Oroville 509-223- bution Engineer to prepare work orders, maintenance or3064 509-560-9043. ders, service orders, service requests, easements and Similkameen Park Apts agreements associated with Oroville, WA. distribution overhead or un1 BR Starting at $365/mo + derground line extensions security deposit. and system improvements; 3 BR Starting at $450/mo + application of policies, stansecurity deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, gar- dards, state and national bage; washer & dryer; air electrical codes; and other conditioning; play area; stor- duties as required. age space. A high school diploma, or For more info contact Abby at equivalent, is required, plus a Similkameen Park Office two-year degree in engineer301 Golden St. #16 ing and two years engineerOroville, WA. 98844 ing experience, or six years 509-476-9721/509-476-3059 of progressively responsible utility engineering experience. A valid Washington State Driver’s License is required.

SUN LAKES REALTY 3 BR to 4 BR House $795-$895. Furnished Cabin $625. Lakefront Apt $795. Beautiful downtown Apt $495-$600. Call 509-476-2121

TONASKET 2 bedroom apartment with yard. Close to town. $525.00 month. Call 509-322-0347 or 509-476-2234.

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

www.gazette-tribune.com

Commercial Rentals TONASKET 270 SF OFFICE SPACE Community Cultural Cntr. Light, spacious, corner unit upstairs. Air conditioning. $250 per month. Contact Valerie at 509486-0365 info@communityculturalcenter.org

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Applications and resumes will be accepted through Friday, May 8, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, PO Box 912, Okanogan, WA 98840-0912, by email to donc@okpud.org or by fax (509)422-8418. Applications and job descriptions are available at PUD offices and at www.okanoganpud.org. Okanogan County PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time Twisp Dental: Dental Assistant Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Announcements

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com MISC. DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $32.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 855.571.8115 SERVICES ADDICTION HELPLINE. Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call the Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 844.707.0038 FINANCE WALL TAX. Problems with the IRS or State Taxes? Wall & Associates can settle for a fraction of what you owe! Results may vary. Not a solicitation for legal services. 844.274.9336

Public Notices

WANTED TO BUY: Paying Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Service Annual Ad Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. SkylineBasic Telecom is a quality telecomSpence: 509-429-4722. munications services provider that

WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF APRIL 20, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. HELP WANTED Drivers-No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! No matter what stage in your career, it’s time, call Central Refrigerated Home.

provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: -Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50; Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge - Single Line, $6.50: Access Recovery Charge-Single Line $1.50 -Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone service is provided as a part of local service rate. -Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. -Low-income individuals may be eligible for Federal and State Lifeline telephone assistance programs that include discounts from the above basic and local service charges. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 7824680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, 2015. #OVG627998

Civil Service Exam The City of Tonasket Civil Service Commission will be testing for an entry level patrolman eligibility list on Friday, June 5, 2015. Lateral Officers may apply but will go through the same process and testing as the entry level. Call 509-486-2132 for an application packet or write to City of Tonasket, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 pm May 22nd, 2015. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Civil Service Secretary Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, 30 and

Crosswords

ROAD CLOSURE The Oroville May Festival would like to remind everyone that the parade route along Main Street and Hwy 97 will be closed to through traffic during the parade, Saturday, May 9. The parade will begin at 10:00 a.m., and there will be detours set up for traffic wanting to pass through town until the end of the parade. Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

Tonasket Rodeo Grounds - Tonasket, WA.

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2015 - 10:00 a.m. *******************************

PARTIAL LISTING: Way Too Much to List - Will Run 2 Auctioneers * Tractors * Trucks * Front End Loaders * Hay Balers * Swather * Harrowbed * Pickups *Pickup wDewEze Feeder * Large Manure Spreader *5 Collectible Tractors * 4-whlrs * Nice Horse Buggy & Cutter * Collectible Furniture Pieces * Household * Big Selection of Very Good Shop & Tool Items * LOOK FOR HANDBILLS

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

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LEGAL SERVICES

Wanted

Statewides

ANSWERS

Public Notices

Statewides

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Across

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF WHATCOM In Re the Estate of EDGAR FUSCH, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00134-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 JUDGE: IRA UHRIG The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: April 16, 2015 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: JOAQUIN MONDRAGON ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: PO BOX 736 Bouse, AZ 85325 Attorney for Personal Representative: Olivia Burkland, WSBA #41771 Barron Smith Daugert, PLLC 300 North Commercial St. Bellingham, WA 98225 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Whatcom County Superior Court, Cause No. 15-4-00134-9 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 23, 30, 2015. #OVG626712 Document Title: Notice of Trustee’s Sale Reference Number of Documents Affected: 3083243 (Deed of Trust); 3090643, 3090644, 3125586, 3125587, 3130987/3194187, 3143102, 3146404 (Assignments of Deed of Trust); 3195280 (Substitution of Trustee) Grantor: Robert Humphries and Kim Humphries, husband and wife Present Beneficiary: American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 200 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company Substitute Trustee: Peg R. Callaway Abbreviated Legal Description: SE NW 40-29-27 Assessor’s Tax Parcel Number: 4029274007 THIS COVER SHEET AND THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION HEREON IS FOR RECORDING PURPOSES ONLY AND IT SHALL NOT MODIFY OR CHANGE IN ANY WAY THE CORRECT LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF THE SUBJECT PREMISES OR ANY OTHER FACT AS SET FORTH

Legals Continued On Next Page

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26. Opera star

6. Egg cells

27. “___ moment�

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8. Serious narrative works for TV

30. P.I., e.g.

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33. Penetrating

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35. Decorated, as a cake

13. Animate

36. Famous on-screen pig

14. Show, as a historic battle

37. Magazine feature

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40. Unaffected by time

24. Andiron

44. “___ we having fun yet?�

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45. Intent

28. Coffee order

47. Ceiling

29. Clothed in fine attire

48. Clothe

32. 20-20, e.g.

50. Avarice

34. Come together

51. New Year’s Day game

36. Unfounded

52. Key material

37. Rescuers

54. “Is that ___?�

38. Advance showing

55. Prefix with linear

39. Clear up

56. Greasiest

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58. Shoreline problem

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60. Appraise anew

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62. More wonderful

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63. Some stanzas

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PAGE A2 B6 6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MONTH 2012 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRILDATE, 23,, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 23, 2015

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Legals Continued From Previous Page

and in which the Beneficiary substituted Peg R. Callaway as Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded with the Okanogan County Auditor on October 27, 2014 under Auditor’s File No. 3195280. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: A) Failure to pay monthly payments due on or before the 15th day of each month in the amount of $283.78 each pursuant to the Promissory Note, plus reserves in the amount of $84.83 each, for each of the months of September 2013 through January 2015, for a total of $6,266.37. B) Failure to pay 5% late charge for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date of $297.99. C) Failure to pay default interest of 7% on the unpaid principal balance of $30,989.84, after failure to make monthly payments when due, from October 22, 2013 through January 21, 2015, of $2,716.07, plus per diem of $10.1884 from January 22, 2015 through February 13, 2015 of $234.33, for a total default interest of $2,950.40. TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS, RESERVES, LATE CHARGES AND DEFAULT INTEREST: $9,514.76 Plus all attorney’s fees and costs and foreclosure fees and costs incurred. Default other than failure to make monthly payments: Other Defaults: None. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $30,989.84, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured from the 15th day of December, 2004 and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 22nd day of May, 2015. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 11th day of May, 2015, (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 11th day of May, 2015, (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11th day of May, 2015, (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Robert and Kim Humphries 535B Highway 7 Tonasket, WA 98855-9279 Robert and Kim Humphries P.O. Box 93 Tonasket, WA 98855 Robert and Kim Humphries 2017 Chesaw Road Oroville, WA 98844 by both first-class and certified mail on the 19th day of November, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above on the 20th day of November, 2014, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who

hold by, through, or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS, BORROWER, AND/OR GRANTORS OF A COMMERCIAL OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE DEED OF TRUST (IF APPLICABLE): A) THE GUARANTOR MAY BE LIABLE FOR A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT TO THE EXTENT THE SALE PRICE OBTAINED AT THE TRUSTEE’S SALE IS LESS THAN THE DEBT SECURED BY THE DEED OF TRUST. B) THE GUARANTOR HAS THE SAME RIGHTS TO REINSTATE THE DEBT, CURE THE DEFAULT, OR REPAY THE DEBT AS IS GIVEN TO THE GRANTOR IN ORDER TO AVOID THE TRUSTEE’S SALE. C) THE GUARANTOR WILL HAVE NO RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY AFTER THE TRUSTEE’S SALE. D) SUBJECT TO SUCH LONGER PERIODS AS ARE PROVIDED IN THE WASHINGTON DEED OF TRUST ACT, CHAPTER 61.24 RCW, ANY ACTION BROUGHT TO ENFORCE A GUARANTY OR, IF APPLICABLE, SEEK A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT, MUST BE COMMENCED WITHIN ONE YEAR AFTER THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, OR THE LAST TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER ANY DEED OF TRUST GRANTED TO SECURE THE SAME DEBT. E) IN ANY ACTION FOR A DEFICIENCY, THE GUARANTOR WILL HAVE THE RIGHT TO ESTABLISH THE FAIR VALUE OF THE PROPERTY AS OF THE DATE OF THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, LESS PRIOR LIENS AND ENCUMBRANCES, AND TO LIMIT ITS LIABILITY FOR A DEFICIENCY TO THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE DEBT AND THE GREATER OF SUCH FAIR VALUE OR THE SALE PRICE PAID AT THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, PLUS INTEREST AND COSTS. X. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale, the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: February 17, 2015. (SUBSTITUTE) TRUSTEE: CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC By:/s/ Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786 700-A Okoma Drive Omak, WA 98841 (509)826-6316 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, May 14, 2015. #OVG627961

TEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. If you filed bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this communication is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an attempt to collect this debt from you personally. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE (INCLUDING GUARANTOR NOTICE, IF APPLICABLE) TO: GRANTORS/BORROWERS/ GUARANTORS, OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, AND ALL OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: Sherry Johnson, a married person, as her separate estate, and/or her heirs, successors and assigns 53 Spring Meadow Lane Oroville, WA 98844 Unknown heirs and devisees of Scott E. Johnson c/o Sherry Johnson 53 Spring Meadow Lane Oroville, WA 98844 Unknown heirs and devisees of Scott E. Johnson c/o Sherry Johnson c/o Crystal Stringfellow 80 Bolster Road Oroville, WA 98844 Sherry Johnson c/o Crystal Stringfellow 80 Bolster Road Oroville, WA 98844 Occupants, including but not necessarily limited to Crystal Stringfellow 80 Bolster Road Oroville, WA 98844 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Peg R. Callaway, will on the 22nd day of May, 2015, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock a.m. at the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 North 3rd Avenue, in the City of Okanogan, County of Okanogan, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: That portion of the Northeast quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 21, Township 40 North, Range 30 East W.M., Okanogan County, Washington, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of said Section 21; Thence South 71° 16’ 33” East, a distance of 1,998.49 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; Thence North 53° 14’ 27” West, a distance of 60.47 feet to the centerline of Okanogan County Road No. 4883; Thence North 19° 23’ 33” East along the centerline of said road, a distance of 211.03 feet; Thence South 62° 56’ 27” East, a distance of 216.26 feet; Thence South 35° 56’ West, a distance of 237.87 feet; Thence North 53° 14’ 27” West, a distance of 93.18 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; EXCEPT THAT PORTION LYING WITHIN OKANOGAN COUNTY ROAD NO. 4883. SUBJECT TO: any and all conditions, covenants, easements, rights of way, reservations, restrictions, etc. apparent or of record. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington; Assessor’s Tax Parcel Number: 4030210012. The postal address and commonly known as address of which is 80 Bolster Road, Oroville, Okanogan County, Washington. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 10, 2012, recorded March 15, 2012, under Auditor’s File No. 3171146, records of Okanogan County, Washington, from Sherry Johnson, a married person, as her separate estate, and/or her heirs, successors and assigns, as Grantor, to Inland Professional Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Randall Gaylor and Judy M. Gaylor, husband and wife, and/or their heirs, successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, and in which the Beneficiary substituted Peg R. Callaway as Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded with the Okanogan County Auditor on November 17, 2014, under Auditor’s File No. 3195772. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: A) Failure to pay the 23 consecutive monthly payments due of $300.00 each, with the first payment being due March 27, 2012 and the last consecutive monthly payment being due January 27, 2014, at which time the principal balance and accrued interest were due in full; leaving the original principal balance due of $6,573.95. B) Failure to pay interest on the unpaid principal balance of $6,573.95 at the rate of 2% per annum from the date of execution of the Promissory Note, March 10, 2012, through January 29, 2015 of $390.28, plus a per diem of $.37 from January 30, 2015 through February 5, 2015 of $2.59, for a total of $392.87. C) Failure to pay 5% late charge for each monthly payment not made within 10 days of its due date for each dollar so overdue, for each of the monthly payments due for March 27, 2012 through December 27, 2014 (34 payments x $15) for a total of late charges through February 5, 2015 of $510.00, plus an additional $15 late charge for each monthly payment after February 5, 2015 not made within 10 days of its due date. TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS, INTEREST AND LATE FEES: $7,476.82 Default other than failure to make monthly payments: D) Failure to pay and keep current the real property taxes for the subject real property - Okanogan County Assessor Tax Parcel #4030210012, as follows (which amounts include interest, penalty, and statutory foreclosure costs, as applicable, through December 2014): 2014 $ 451.47 2013 $ 592.35 2012 $ 621.94 2011 $1,317.93 (includes Okanogan County tax foreclosure costs of $600.00)

for a total of $2,983.69. TOTAL REAL PROPERTY TAXES: $2,983.69. Plus all attorney’s fees and costs, and foreclosure fees and costs incurred. Other Defaults: None. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $6,573.95, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured from March 10, 2012, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 22nd day of May, 2015. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 11th day of May, 2015, (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 11th day of May, 2015, (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11th day of May, 2015, (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: TO: Sherry Johnson 53 Spring Meadow Lane Oroville, WA 98844 Sherry Johnson % Crystal Stringfellow 80 Bolster Road Oroville, WA 98844 by both first-class and certified mail on the 4th day of December, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above on the 10th day of December, 2014, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through, or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS, BORROWER, AND/OR GRANTORS OF A COMMERCIAL OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE DEED OF TRUST (IF APPLICABLE): A) THE GUARANTOR MAY BE LIABLE FOR A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT TO THE EXTENT THE SALE PRICE OBTAINED AT THE TRUSTEE’S SALE IS LESS THAN THE DEBT SECURED BY THE DEED OF TRUST. B) THE GUARANTOR HAS THE SAME RIGHTS TO REINSTATE THE DEBT, CURE THE DEFAULT, OR REPAY THE DEBT AS IS GIVEN TO THE GRANTOR IN ORDER TO AVOID THE TRUSTEE’S SALE. C) THE GUARANTOR WILL HAVE NO RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY AFTER THE TRUSTEE’S SALE. D) SUBJECT TO SUCH LONGER PERIODS AS ARE PROVIDED IN THE WASHINGTON DEED OF TRUST ACT, CHAPTER 61.24 RCW, ANY ACTION BROUGHT TO ENFORCE A GUARANTY OR, IF APPLICABLE, SEEK A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT, MUST BE COMMENCED WITHIN ONE YEAR AFTER THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, OR THE LAST TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER ANY DEED OF TRUST GRANTED TO SECURE THE SAME DEBT. E) IN ANY ACTION FOR A DEFICIENCY, THE GUARANTOR WILL HAVE THE RIGHT TO ESTABLISH THE FAIR VALUE OF THE PROPERTY AS OF THE DATE OF THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, LESS PRIOR LIENS AND ENCUMBRANCES, AND TO LIMIT ITS LIABILITY FOR A DEFICIENCY TO THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE DEBT AND THE GREATER OF SUCH FAIR VALUE OR THE SALE PRICE PAID AT THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, PLUS INTEREST AND COSTS. X. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale, the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: February 5, 2015. (SUBSTITUTE) TRUSTEE: CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC By:/s/ Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786 700-A Okoma Drive Omak, WA 98841 (509)826-6316 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, May 14, 2015. #OVG627975

Skyline Telecom is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin or handicap shall be excluded from participation in, or admission or access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any of this organization’s programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts is Delinda Kluser, General Manager. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800)795-3272 (voice) or (202)720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity employer. Complaints must be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.” Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, 2015. #OVG627992

ON THE ATTACHED DOCUMENT OF CONVEYANCE. TRUSTEE NAME AND CONTACT INFORMATION: Peg R. Callaway, Callaway & DeTro PLLC 700-A Okoma Drive Omak, WA 98841 Tele (509)826-6316 Fax (509)826-4704 Email pcallaway@ncidata.com WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. If you filed bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this communication is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an attempt to collect this debt from you personally. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE (INCLUDING GUARANTOR NOTICE, IF APPLICABLE) TO: GRANTORS/BORROWERS/ GUARANTORS, OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, AND ALL OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: Robert and Kim Humphries 535B Highway 7 Tonasket, WA 98855-9279 Robert and Kim Humphries P.O. Box 93 Tonasket, WA 98855 Kim I. Humphries 1579 2nd Avenue North Okanogan, WA 98840 Robert and Kim Humphries 2017 Chesaw Road Oroville, WA 98844 Occupants 44 Wakefield Lane Oroville, WA 98844 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Peg R. Callaway, will on the 22nd day of May, 2015, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock a.m. at the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 North 3rd Avenue, in the City of Okanogan, County of Okanogan, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: The Southeast quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 27, Township 40 North, Range 29 E.W.M; Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington; Assessor’s Tax Parcel Number: 4029274007; which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 15, 2004 and recorded December 15, 2004, Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3083243, records of Okanogan County, Washington, from Robert Humphries and Kim Humphries, husband and wife, as Grantors, to Baines Title Co., Inc., as original Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Randy S. Wilson, a single person, the original Beneficiary, and in which Deed of Trust the beneficial interest was assigned as follows -From Randy S. Wilson, a single person, to American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3090643; -From American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, to Columbia Credit Union, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3090644; -From Columbia Credit Union to American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3125586; -From American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, to American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 300 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3125587; -From American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 300 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, to American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 200 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3130987 and re-recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3194187; -From American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 200 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, to American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 300 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3143102; -From American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 300 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, to American Eagle Mortgage Mexico 200 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, recorded as Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3146404.

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 17 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.51 3 1

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Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

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Puzzle 23 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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Puzzle 19 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

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Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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ANSWERS

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Puzzle 17 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Notice of Application and Threshold SEPA Determination CUP 2015-4 “Williams Pit” An application has been submitted by Chris Williams for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) to operate a gravel pit. This project will involve removal of rock from the slope and placing it in trucks to be removed. Activities will take place Monday thru Saturday 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. as needed. The project site is located north of Wannacut Lake; approximately 6.5 miles south and west of Oroville off Blue Lake Road on tax parcel number 3926022005. According to Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) regulations, the office of Okanogan County Planning and Development issued an environmental determination of non-significance (DNS) for this proposal. The public is invited to comment on this project. Said comments must be submitted in writing, or attend the public hearing. The public hearing for this project is not yet scheduled. Project comments and SEPA comments will be reviewed separately. SEPA comments must be submitted in writing no later than 5:00 p.m., May 6, 2015. Failure to comment by this date denies a party standing to appeal the final determination. Direct questions and comments to: Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, Anna Randall, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7117. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23, 2015. #OVG628106

Document Title: Notice of Trustee’s Sale Reference Number of Documents Affected: 3171146 (Deed of Trust); 3195772 (Substitution of Trustee) Grantor: Sherry Johnson, a married person, as her separate estate, and/or her heirs, successors and assigns Present Beneficiary: Randall Gaylor and Judy M. Gaylor, husband and wife, and/or their heirs, successors and assigns Substitute Trustee: Peg R. Callaway Abbreviated Legal Description: TAX 12 PT NE NW E/CO RD L/RD 40-30-21 Assessor’s Tax Parcel Number: 4030210012 THIS COVER SHEET AND THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION HEREON IS FOR RECORDING PURPOSES ONLY AND IT SHALL NOT MODIFY OR CHANGE IN ANY WAY THE CORRECT LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF THE SUBJECT PREMISES OR ANY OTHER FACT AS SET FORTH ON THE ATTACHED DOCUMENT OF CONVEYANCE. TRUSTEE NAME AND CONTACT INFORMATION: Peg R. Callaway, Callaway & DeTro PLLC 700-A Okoma Drive Omak, WA 98841 Tele (509)826-6316 Fax (509)826-4704 Email pcallaway@ncidata.com THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN AT-

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 1/15/2015 10:51:51 AM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-14-633898-SW APN No.: 3730062007 Title Order No.: 140168246-WA-MSO Deed of Trust Grantor(s): DALE L MITTGE, ANNA M. PETERSON PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF DALE L MITTGE, JOSHUA D. MITTGE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF DALE L MITTGE Deed of Trust Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3166258 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/22/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 Third North in the City of Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 30 EWM, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN BY DEED RECORDED IN VOLUME 135, PAGE 615. More commonly known as: 97 BONAPARTE LAKE ROAD, TONASKET, WA 98855 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/11/2011, recorded 8/17/2011, under 3166258 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from DALE L MITTGE, A SINGLE PERSON , as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $20,066.99 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $138,652.91 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 1/1/2014 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/22/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/11/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME DALE L MITTGE, A SINGLE PERSON ADDRESS 97 BONAPARTE LAKE ROAD, TONASKET, WA 98855 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 12/5/2014 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to

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APRIL 23, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 23, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g ov / o f f i c e s / h s g / sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate= WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 1/15/2015 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-14-633898-SW A notary public or other officer completing this certificate verifies only the identity of the individual who signed the document to which this certificate is attached, and not the truthfulness, accuracy, or validity of that document. State of: California ) County of: San Diego ) On before me, a notary public, personally appeared I certify under PENALTY OF PERJURY under the laws of the State of California that

the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal. (Seal) Signature IDSPub #0076148 4/23/2015 5/14/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23 and May 14, 2015. #OVG613651

signs, recorded December 28, 2006 as Instrument No. 3113032 and the beneficial interest was assigned to Green Tree Servicing LLC and recorded April 21, 2014 as Instrument Number 3191032 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Okanogan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by Green Tree Servicing LLC, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: Green Tree Servicing LLC Contact Phone No: 800-643-0202 Address: 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, MAIL STOP T111, TEMPE, AZ 85283 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From February 1, 2014 To January 13, 2015 Number of Payments 5 Monthly Payment $581.18 4 $626.18 1 $646.18 1 $665.18 1 $681.18 Total $7,403.16 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION From February 1, 2014 To January 13, 2015 Total $84.00 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: June 7, 2006 Note Amount: $65,600.00 Interest Paid To: January 1, 2014 Next Due Date: February 1, 2014 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $58,816.37, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on May 22, 2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by May 11, 2015, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before May 11, 2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier’s or certified checks from a State

or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the May 11, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, Green Tree Servicing LLC or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS CRISTINA CASTILLO 83 SAWTELLS ROAD, OROVILLE, WA 98844 CRISTINA CASTILLO 6086 BAGLEY AVE APT 2, TWENTYNINE PALMS, CA 92277-2270 DAVID CASTILLO 83 SAWTELLS ROAD, OROVILLE, WA 98844 DAVID CASTILLO 6086 BAGLEY AVE APT 2, TWENTYNINE PALMS, CA 92277-2270 by both first class and certified mail on November 20, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible

and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: (877) 894-4663 or (800) 606-4819 Website: www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; DATED: 01.14.15 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By: Athena Vaughn, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps 1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Phone: (800) 409-7530 TDD: 800-833-6388 For Reinstatement/Pay Off Quotes, contact MTC Financial Inc. DBA Trustee Corps TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.priorityposting.com P1127686 4/23, 05/14/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 23 and May 14, 2015. #OVG627052

anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase _counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-

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TS No WA05000766-14-1 APN 6800040001 / 40-27-27 TO No 8474307 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 5/22/2015, 10:00 AM, At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashiers’ check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: THAT PORTION OF LOT D, POPLAR HILL TRACTS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF, AND RUN ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT, A DISTANCE OF 83.0 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 89°54 1/2’ EAST, A DISTANCE OF 92.0 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 0°2 1/2’ EAST, A DISTANCE OF 83.0; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89°54 1/2’ WEST, TO THE POINT OF COMMENCEMENT BEING IN THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT D. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 6800040001 / 40-27-27 More commonly known as 83 SAWTELLS ROAD, OROVILLE, WA 98844 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 7, 2006, executed by DAVID CASTILLO AND CRISTINA CASTILLO, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Trustor(s), to secure obligations in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (“MERS”), as designated nominee for EVERHOME MORTGAGE COMPANY, Beneficiary of the security instrument, its successors and as-

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PAGE B8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 23, 2015

OBITUARIES

Jeff ‘Mersh’ Mershon,

JEFF ‘MERSH’ MERSHON Jeff ‘Mersh’ Mershon, 48, lost his courageous battle to Metastatic Melanoma Cancer on April 7th, 2015, at home with his family at his side. He was diagnosed on January 14 and after 38 days in the hospital, radiation, and cancer (chemo drugs) he went home and continued to “fight the fight,” believing he could beat it. He would say “tiny bites,” but the bites got too big to chew! He had a strong faith in God and knew when Jesus came calling he would be dancing in Heaven, free of pain, surrounded by his loved ones who had gone on before him. He once had a bumper sticker on his truck “Real Men Love Jesus!” He was born January 15th, 1967

to his parents, Steve Mershon and Janet Kershner in Sedro-Woolley. He lived and attended school in Mount Vernon, moving to Concrete and later to Tonasket on a ranch in the Aeneas Valley. At the age of 14, until his early 30’s, he never missed a season fishing salmon in Bristol Bay, Alaska or fishing King Crab in the Bering Sea. He also worked in the logging industry, fish hatchery, landscaping, fencing, haying and raising Black Angus to name a few. He married Sheryl Lindahl, April 25, 1998. Together they had a son Alex (17) and a daughter Ally (16). Jeff followed his dreams, his love of the outdoors involved skiing, hiking, camping, gardening, fishing and bow and rifle hunting... often with his friend Rusty. He loved music and the rhythm usually found him singing or dancing, with or without a partner! He was a member of both the Tonasket Eagles and American Legion s.a.1. Jeff was known for his infectious smile. He was loved by many and his friends  were countless! Jeff shaped his character early in his youth in Skagit Valley. The friends he made, have remained his loyal friends for life. A good friend, Quinn Thompson, sent his message “Mersh taught me how to seize the day and live life to the fullest! He always looked after me, he was my brother. Everyone loved Mersh, he was a leader and oh the adventures he took us on!” He often paid it forward and helped young and old in any way he could. He enjoyed teaching his skills to others, especially his

kids. Love sitting around a bonfire, telling stories, lighting up the coals and barbecuing just about anything to perfection! He was preceded in death by his father Steve Mershon in 2011, and his grandparents he loved dearly. He is survived by his wife Sheryl and their 2 children, his mother Jan and step-father John Olson, sister Jenny (Mike) Nelson, nephew Thomas and niece Jillian, step-mother Judy Mershon, mother-in-law Ann Cramer, brother-in-law Mark Lindahl, and a huge loving family of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Our lives will never be the same without him but his spirit will be in the trees, wind and clouds, surrounding us forever. Heaven received a beautiful gift! A celebration of Jeff ’s life will be held at the Tonasket Eagles, Saturday, May 16 at 2 p.m. and also in Skagit County, to be decided at a later date. Donations in Jeff ’s memory may be made to benefit his wife and children at www.gofundme. com/JeffMershonFund. We can’t thank those enough who have already donated. We were able to use a portion of the funds to help Jeff with medical needs. When we read him the comments and donations from friends and family, he couldn’t believe the outpouring of love, it brought tears to his eyes and warmth to his heart. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of Arrangements.

James R. Rehmke

JAMES R. REHMKE James R Rehmke, 79, passed away in Okanogan on April 6, 2015 with his loving wife Luella by his side. He was born in Mason City, Wash. on March 22, 1936 to Harry O. and Marie E. Rehmke where he joined a sister Rosemary. Jim was raised in and around Siwash Creek area near Tonasket, Wash. He spent many hours working with his parents on the Rehmke Family Ranch. Jim grew up working hard and independently learning good morals and work ethics from his parents. Jim attended school in Tonasket and graduated in 1954. In the year 1956, Jim’s mother, a Tonasket FOE Auxiliary #3002

excellence. Jim married his loving wife Luella on May 12, 1990. They spent the following 25 years being happily together in Okanogan watching their children and grandchildren grow. Many fond memories of holidays, hunting Easter eggs, opening presents and barbequing on that old charcoal grill Jim loved, were made. Survivors include his loving wife Luella, son Michael (Sue) Rehmke of Okanogan, Wash.; daughter Shirley Creech of Columbia Falls, Mont.; daughter Nicolette Miller of Enumclaw, Wash. and son John (Kris) Bader, Sr. of Omak Wash. Jim was blessed with 11 grandchildren, five great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Jim was a true gentleman. Honest, reliable and always there for his family. He was loved deeply by all and will be greatly missed. Jim was preceded in death by his parents Harry and Marie, his sister Rosemary and grandson Quinton. Services with be held Saturday: 11 a.m. at Jim’s family home: 10 Penley Rd., Okanogan, Wash. Please bring a potluck dish for dinner following the service. The Neptune Society was in charge of the cremation arrangements. Donations can be made To the Memory of Jim Rehmke to the Malott Fire Department, P.O. Box 43, Malott, WA 98829 or a charity of your choice.

member, sponsored Jim to become a member of the Eagles where he remained a member for 59 years. After graduation Jim attended the College of Marin in California earning a diploma in Business. In 1958 he enlisted in the U.S. Army where he served as a Single Engine Aircraft M e c h a n i c and was SP4. He earned a Certificate in Aircraft Engine Repair. During Jim’s stint in the U.S. Army his service was extended by nine months due to the construction of the Berlin Wall. In 1964 Jim was Honorably Discharged. He returned home to Tonasket after his stint in the military. In 1965 Jim met and married Rita Dagnon. From that union, a son Michael was born. Jim worked for Hamilton Farm Equipment for approximately 17 years. In 1985 he opened his own business under the name of Rehmke’s Repair. Jim shared shop space with Elmer Rappe and Wayne McCorkle; it was known as The Machinery Clinic. Later years his son Mike joined him in the shop as a business owner. Hours were spent repairing farm and orchard equipment. If Jim couldn’t find a new part, he would remake the old one. (A very talented man). Jim enjoyed building things out of wood, metal, etc., you name it; he would accomplish with the end result of

MONSTER | FROM A4 The stock market collapsed, banks folded, stores went under; the United States repealed the Silver Act, no longer purchasing silver, eliminating the capital investments in mining; the railroads shut down. No credit, no transportation to market, no profit in digging up silver ore. The effects were soon felt in Loomis, Washington. The future was not secure for the new residents and the land status made it worse. The struggle over the land had become violent and deadly. Charley Long is only one

of the deaths in the area that George H. Noyes, U.S. Land Commissioner, reported to the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper in September, 1897, the consequences of what he flat-out called a land war: “Complaint has again been made to the general land office that no inspectors have been sent to look over the surveys of Townships 39 and 40 North Range 25 East. A recent letter from Mr. Noyes of Loomis, Wash. announces that ‘another settler has fallen victim in the dilatory workings of the land

office, making the seventh. Peter Coutts was fatally shot on the Similkameen River August 23, 1897’ ”. It may be interesting to readers to note that in 1905, George H. Noyes, U.S. Land Commissioner, was convicted of embezzlement of funds entrusted to him and belonging to his employers. Noyes was sentenced to three years in the state prison but paroled two months before his term was up. Perhaps the feds objected to the “dilatory” part of

his public accusations. Obviously, Noyes hoped that the Seattle press might have more clout in moving the bureaucracy. Five other murders around Loomis in those years, mysterious as well as confessed, were mentioned in the Loomis newspapers (through clippings and existing issues of the Palmer Mountain Prospector); these are stories for another time. Desperate hardened men with nothing to lose on the edge of either prosperity or failure.

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Desperados—the common word for outlaws” comes from the Spanish “desperate”—recklessly grabbing a piece of that pie. The Monster of Palmer Lake waiting. Not even remote, struggling Loomis pioneers with their parties, dances, weddings, funerals, and civic boosterism were without the show-downs over land that makes up so much of the mythology of the Old West. But those fine folks did prevail, as they always do.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 23, 2015  

April 23, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 23, 2015  

April 23, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune